The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00234

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
^Uemsti IFIIaridliai m
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
/olume9 Number 22
Hollywood, Florida Friday, November 2,1979
' Fna Shoch" Price 35 Cents
Speakers Announced For Community Day
lltochelle Koenig, Community
iy chairman, has announced
at guest speakers for Com-
jnity Day" will be Bella Abzug
Id Dr. Ruth Gruber. Com-
jnity Day is Thursday, Dec.
at the Diplomat Hotel, and is
msored by the Jewish
jeration of South Broward
jmen's Division.
ormer Congresswoman
Izug presently serves as co-
\]v to the new National Ad-
Dry Committee for Women,
lated to implement the
lional Plan of Action adopted
ler her leadership in Houston.
Abzug remains a forceful,
Irageous and outspoken
Bella Abzug
Ruth Gruber
fighter for a national urban
policy, world peace, aid to the
cities, low-cost public transit,
jobs for all, economic develop-
ment initiatives, health and
education, equal rights and pro-
grams for senior citizens.
She is also in favor of housing
rehabilitation and construction,
rent control, the federalization of
welfare and MedicakJ, a safe
environment, protection against
crime, openness in government
and aid to the State of Israel.
Dr. Ruth Gruber. author,
foreign correspondent and
authority on the Middle East,
visited Cairo and Israel last year
where she covered the Sadat-
Begin Conference for 150 news-
papers serviced by the North
American Newspaper Alliance.
Her latest book, Raquela: A
Woman of Israel, has been hailed
as "a major and masterful work
. passionately told deeply
moving this authentic life
story of a woman of Israel is a
striking example of how in-
timately a life in our times is
interwoven with the turbulent
current of our history. Raquela is
that eternal wonder, a real
woman."
For Community Day reser-
vations and information, contact
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward Women's Division.
[EW Secretary Patricia Harris Moses Hornstein, 72
To Speak at CJF Assembly Passes In Israel
FW YORK, N.Y. Patricia
fcrts Harris. U.S. Secretary of
|ih. Education and Welfare,
be the featured guest speaker
aturday evening, Nov. 17, at
Council of Jewish Fed-
pns General Assembly in
(real, Que.
five-day General
Assembly, Nov. 14-18, will bring
together 3,000 of the foremost
leaders of Federations in the
United States and Canada to
participate in over 150 sessions.
Secretary Harris joins a roster of
distinguished speakers that
includes Leon Dulzin, Dr. Irwin
Cotler and Dr. Ruth Wisse of
McGill University. Irwin Field.
Leonard Fein, Rabbi Irving
Greenberg, Allen Pollack,
Bernard Reisman, and other
leading academic, spiritual and
community figures.
Secretary Harris, who will
speak on "Meeting Human
Needs in a Period of Inflation and
Continued on Page 6
Emerald Hills Residents Hear Peleg
|re than 50 concerned resi-
Emerald Hills gathered
kly at the home of David
phirley Schlossman to meet
[Prof, (iideon Peleg at the
oektail party sponsored by
Jewish Federation of South
lard
Peleg spoke to an
liuv comprised of residents
neraid Hills apartments.
lownhouses. patio homes
>mes. I le commented on the
Israeli Peace Treaty and
Mideast relation-
audience paid careful
Bon to the speaker aa thej
Ited Ins remarks in relation
position of the Jews in the
I States and Israel.
Jewish Federation of
I Broward seeks sponsors of
lional events to bring the
lof the Combined Jewish
II Israel Emergency Fund
V residents of South
Ird.
The officers and board of
directors of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward
express a profound sense of
loss on the passing of Moses
Hornstein. a longtime friend
and supporter of Jewish
causes.
Moses Hornstein, 72, Holly-
wood, a resident for nine years,
died of a heart attack in Tel Aviv.
Israel, on Oct. 28. while engaged
by the government of Israel to re-
deploy air force bases in the Sinai
Desert.
Mr. Hornstein. who moved
here from Nassau County. N.Y..
was founder and chairman of the
board emeritus for Horn Con-
struction Co.; owner and
president of Cooper City
Utilities. Inc.; owner and
president of Cooper City Con-
struction Corp.; vice president
and treasurer of Laurence Lukin
. *"
as
Moses Hornstein
Associates and a partner in
L.A.H. Associates.
ACTIVE in Jewish communal
________ Continued on Page 3
Women's Seminar
Set at Hillcrest Playdium
Seated from left are Shirley Greene, Leah Kurtz, Ida Bloome. Stan-
ding from left are Abbott Greene, Sol Kurtz, Charles Bloome.
More photos, page 6.

Linda Levin to Bring
Federation Message
Hillcrest Women's Division of
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward will participate in a
Women's Awareness Seminar.
Monday, Nov. 12, 9:45 a.m. to
noon at the Hillcrest Playdium,
according to Gloria Hess and
JEWISH
TtJEKAilON
Ja Levin will be the guest
W at the Harry Truman
B'rith Lodge meeting.
lay, Dec. 18. at 8:15 p.m.
I deliver the "Road Show''
tills the story of the
ii Federation of South
lard and what happens to
raised through the
"inns annual Combined
M> Appeal-Israel Emergency
i campaign
Irs Levin has been involved
I the Federation's Young
fership Committee and is on
board of directors of the
fish Family Service of
" Linda Levin
Lee Franklin, (second from left) was recently installed as La Mer's
1980 building chairman for the Combined Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund of the Jewish Federation of South Broward. Others
pictured from left are Ben Schwab, committee member; Estelle
Glattman, building co-chairman for Women's Division; Otto Stieber
Hallandate Beach chairman; Ambassador Shaul Ramati, former
Israeli Ambassador to Japan and guest speaker; and Leon Glattman
committee member.
Nellie Shanler. Awareness Day
chairwomen.
"The purpose of this event is to
raise the consciousness of the
women in Hillcrest with regard to
the growing anti-Semitism in the
United States and to the facts
behind the headlines." Mrs. Hess
and Mrs. Shanler explained.
Guest speaker is Brenda
Shapiro, executive director of the
Southeast Region of the Amer
ican Jewish Committee.
The Awareness Day committee
includes Sylvia Amsterdam
Esther Arnold. Alice Berezin.
Dorothy Bernstein. Doroth\
Chernuchin. Gertrude Entin.
Yvonne Feuer, Trudy Ginsberg
Libby Klinghoffer, Shirl<
Kravitz. Eleanor Lerner. lion
l.ewit.
Also Dorothy Lipson. I'lai
Manchyk. Suzanne Mock. M,
Mogilowitz, Sara Ottensteit
Eleanor Rabins, Vicki Ray mom.
Sally Rittenberg, Daisy Rubil
Ruth Serwitz, Ann Weit/
Martha Werbach.
Hannah Adel is the Hillcrest
Women's Division chairwoman.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
I Ineehee V iu;u
Friday, November 2, l$7g
Classes Set in Jewish Special Education
The Super Sol committee from left are Delia Rosenberg (Olga), Joan
Raticoff (Sara), Brenda Greenman (Yardena), Jean Kruger (Lyta).
From left
chairman,
(Miral.Sh
are Bobbie Levin, vice president, in-aervice and Super Sol
Gloria Hess (Miriam), Arlene Ray (Aviva), Florence Roth
ane Wolf, Super Sol cashier.
Federation Women
Assume Roles of
Israeli Housewives
WOmcn's Division board mem-
bers and Leadership Develop-
ment group of the Jewish Fed-
eration of South Broward
recently participated in a full day
of role playing in the Super Sol
program at the Federation,
according to Bobbie Levin, vice
president, in-service.
The Super Sol program gave
the participants a chance to
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experience "A day in the life of an
Israeli woman." Each participant
assumed the role of one of seven
Israeli women. They worked out
weekly food budgets based on
annual income, taxes, life
situations and circumstances
provided to them in a character
profile. Their task was to plan
and shop for their "family" for
one week, Mrs. Levin explained.
The discussion after the event
further emphasized the lack of
day-to-day funds for Israeli
families. The Super Sol program
kicked off the Women's Division
campaign for leadership for 1980.
The Central Agency for Jewish
Education, funded in part by the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward, in cooperation with
various synagogues, is offering
classes in Jewish culture, history
and the Hebrew language for
children with learning
disabilities. The classes are being
conducted in synagogue schools
and community programs in
Dade and South Broward
counties.
If your synagogue does not
have a class that can ap-
propriately meet the needs of
your child with learning
problems, speak to your rabbi
and / or educational director
Shabbes Shul at
Temple Israel
Get in on the ground floor
be the first on your block to
attend Shabbes Shul! It's only a
matter of time before everyone
will be doing it. Now is the time
for the pioneers, the adventurers,
those that like to be ahead of the
crowd, not following in the rear.
Saturday morning fever is for
the whole family (if fathers can-
not attend due to other unmen-
tionable activities, then mothers
come with the kids).
Services begin at 9 a.m. for
veterans, 9:30 for the initiated,
and 10 for those with limited
Sinfleish. Highlights include
more English, more par-
ticipation, and shorter services.
Complimentary lunch begins at
11:30 followed by cantor and a
singalong of Sabbath Semirot.
The Shabbes Shul will be
Saturday, Nov. 3, 9:30-11:30 at
Temple Israel of Miramar.
Temple Solel
Art Auction
Unique and unusual art will be
seen and sold at an Art Auction,
sponsored liy Temple Solel
Sisterhood, Saturday. Nov. 17, at
the temple, 5100 Sheridan St.,
Hollywood.
A selection of sculpture will be
offered, along with original oils
by Fitreman. There's signed and
numbered work by the late
Norman Rockwell, work by
Alexander Calder and Leroy
Nieman; also water colors by
Karen Shaeffer.
A 7 p.m. wine and cheese
preview will be followed by the
auction at 8 o'clock.
TAX FREE BONDS*
TN?t
I
I
i
AAA RATED STANDARD AND POORS
?FREE OF FEDERAL INCOME TAX
?REPRESENTS COUPONS PRICED AT PAR
OFFERING SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE
AND/OR CHANGE IN PRICE
J. B. HANAUER AND COMPANY
2960 Aventura Boulevard 211 Royal Poinclana Way
No. Miami Beach, Fla. 33180 Palm Beach, Florida 33480
Please send your brochure on tax-lree municipal bonds.
Name -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
about implementing special
education classes in religious and
Hebrew school.
If you do not belong to a
synagogue, community programs
have been created to provide a
Jewish education for youngsters
with special education needs. The
Central Agency for Jewish
Education is the cooperating
working with the
Address
Stale
Zip
City.
tel *.
Member N A S D Inc
See us dally
at 4 45 PM
onChonn4)l_51
^M Member SIPC
MUNICIPAL BOND
SP6CIALISTS SlNCf 1931
I
Miami (305) 932-6300
Ft. Lauderdale/Pompano Beach (306) 785-2900
Other Cities In Fla. Toll Free (800) 432-2290
Outiede of Fla. Call Toll Free (800) 327-6740
Hollywood (305) 921 -8000
Palm Beech (305) 737-2800
JFH11/2 '
agency
synagogues and providing
guidance, financial support and
academic assistance.
If you are interested in
enrolling your child in a class,
contact your synagogue or Dr.
Deborah Lerer, director of special
education, at the Central Agency
for Jewish Education office
between 9 a.m.-l p.m. any during
the week.
mmmmmmmmmmm

Family Skating Party Attracts 70
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward Women's
Division held its first Family
Skating Party recently at the
Pines Roller Rink, according to
Brenda Greenman, vice presi-
dent, community education.
Greenman said the Family
Skating Party gave 70 South
Broward residents the oppor-
tunity to meet their neighbors,
learn some community facts and
enjoy rink rollerskating.
"The Art Of Appointment Making" was the topic of discussion at a
recent meeting of the Jewish Federation of South Broward board of
directors, Campaign Cabinet and Hi-Rise Leadership. From left are
Gerald Flanzbaum, National I J A Campaign Cabinet member and Dr. >
Philip A. Levin, Campaign chairman. V
The assurance
of service. In the
Jewishtradition.
At Riverside, we take full responsibility
for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
communityand the high standards
demanded by Jewish Law and Custom.
Our staff of Riverside people consists of
the largest number of Jewish professionals
employed by any funeral director in the State.
They are people who understand Jewish
tradition and honor it.
Since 1935, these policies have been
our assurance to a family of service that
respects their needs and the dignity of Jewish
funeral ritual.
It's a trust we've never taken lightly.
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach: 531-1151
Hollywood: 920-1010
' Ft. Lauderdale(Sunrise): 584-6060
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan Area.
ED Riverside
Memorial Chapel.inc /Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
Kenneth M. Kay / ArthurGrossberg/ Joseph Rubin
HIt-2-79
H112 79
M11179


Friday, November 2,1979
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
.::.: v.' v.v
Program Involves Grandparents
Hornstein Passes In Israel
\
Continued from Page 1
affairs for more than 40 years, he
served as vice president of the
.Jewish Federation of South
Hroward for six years, chairman
of the Pacesetters, Big Gifts and
Kducation Committees.
He was the director of
American Friends of the Hebrew
University, Jewish Theological
Seminary of America, Hillel
Community Day School,
American Friends of Boys Town,
Jerusalem, Inc.; American-Israel
Cultural Foundation, Inc.; a
board member of the United
Israel Appeal, the Joint
Distribution Committee,
American Friends of Tel Aviv
University, High School in Israel
and Executive Committee
member of the United Jewish
Appeal, on the national council of
the American Israel Public
Affairs Committee and a sponsor
of American Technion Society-
Israel Institute of Technology.
He was president emeritus of
Hebrew Academy of Nassau
County, vice president of the
Synagogue Council of America
and chairman of the board of
Touro College.
He was director of National
Bank of North America, past
president of General Contractors
Association for the city of New
Shabbos
Fn Eve Sat All
Bat-Bar
Mitzvahs
*"! laslraaeats
Performed *h feprty and
mlMpmg -m | Sabbat,
Supervrsad actMkn lor ma
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A Day lo Remainder
THE NEW
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MIKE FIELDS
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We also furnish music for]
Your Evening Affairs
York and trustee emeritus of
Hofstra University, where he
received an honorary degree of
doctor of science.
HE WAS a member of the
Merrick Jewish Centre, the
Merrick-Belmore Synagogue,
Temple Sinai in Hollywood and
Temple Emanu-El on Miami
Beach.
He is survived by his wife,
Gertrude; a son S. Lawrence
Hornstein; daughter Judith
Goldman; a brother, Abraham
Horn; sisters, Ms. Joan Horn
and Mrs. Dorothy Moskowitz;
and five grandchildren, Meryl
and David Hornstein and
Pamela, Laurie and Michael
Goldman.
Services officiated by Rabbi
Bernard Mandelbaum were held
Wednesday, Oct. 31, at 2:15 p.m.
at Schwartz Brothers, 11403
Queens Blvd., Forest Hills, N.Y.
Interment was at Mt. Ararat
Cemetery, Farmingdale, N.Y.
The Hroward County Medical
Association Auxiliary makes its
presence known throughout the
county. Among the various
activities, which include running
the remedial reading centers with
the Broward County School
System, they train the mothers
to teach in the remedial reading
classes, according to Diane
Bergheime, a member of the
auxiliary.
The BCMAA has begun a pilot
project in conjunction with the
Broward Community Colllege
Community Services. The project
is called "Effective Grand-
parenting."
"The program has 25-30
participating grandparents and
the children from Temple Beth
Shalom's preschool program,"
explained Selma Hopen,
chairman. "Its purpose is to form
a bridge of caring, concern and
enhancing self-image of both the
elderly and the child. The elderly
have been encouraged to share
their creativeness with the
chUdren."
TO PREPARE the grand-
parents for their confrontation
with the children, they par-
ticipated in a sensitivity session
with Ann Rohde, president of the
Florida Association for the
Gifted.
"During the second week of the
program, the grandparents were
taken to the Day School for a day
with the children. The tables were
turned for this situation," Mrs.
Hopen declared. "The children
had been exposed to the nursing
home atmosphere, but the
grandparents had not been in the
pre-school atmosphere before.
The day proved to be quite an
experience.
"We had two groups of
grandparents. One group baa
participated in the sensitivity
session, and one group had not.
The group that had participated
in the sensitivity session warmed
up to the children immediately.
They communicated well and
became fast friends. The group
who did not have the sensitivity
training were cold and stand-
offish. They were not eager to
talk to the children, and the
children sensed this and were not
eager to talk to them.
"By the end of the school day,
everyone was singing together,
they had painted together and
shared refreshments together.
"The grandparents brought
crafts to leave with the children
and the children in turn, made
plants for the grandparents to
take home with them.
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"By the end of a very short day
together, we feel that the par-
ticipating grandparents took
home with them a week's worth
of memories," said Mrs. Hopen.
Marion Salter
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4525 Sher.don Si Hollywood, Flo.
Phone 961 -6998
Perionol Service Book Stora
Jewish ownership
makes the difference
There are several funeral chapels in South Florida who present
themselves as serving members of the Jewish faith. But they lack
one very important feature: I hey are not Jewish owned.
At Menorah Chapels, we firmly believe that Jewish ownership is
a prime consideration. Those who practice the Jewish faith can
best observe its religious traditions and precepts at a time as
significant as the death of a loved one.
Menorah Chapels are Broward County's oldest, established
funeral chapels. And that makes the difference.
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
MVHi
Friday, November 2,1979
Dayan's Departure
Our first reaction to Foreign Minister Moshe
Dayan's resignation is that we wish it weren't so. To
begin with, it is! ill-timed: it gives his country's
enemies, and they include Egypt with which Israel
has signed a peace agreement, the kind of support
they hardly need in their own ultimate dismember-
ment plans for the Jewish State.
More important, there seems to be a conflict in
Dayan's own explanations for his decision to resign.
On the one hand, he accuses the Likud f having
tied his hands so that he could not speak out.
"In brief, in what I wanted to deal," he said, "I
do not deal. With what I deal, I do not want to deal
cocktails and ceremonials."
But on the other hand, Dayan's duel with
Egypt's Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Butros
Ghali before the Council of Europe in Strasbourg
does not suggest that Dayan's hands were tied.
There, Day an said frankly to the Egyptians that
"an agreement is an agreement. If you did not like it,
you should not have signed it." And: "Nowhere in
the (Camp David) agreements are the words self-
determination written. Had Egypt wanted
something else than what we signed, it should have
held out for more and refused to sign the final
treaty."
This is hardly the stuff of which cocktail party
chatter is made. Nor, in our view, does it square with
Dayan's sharp differences (by his own account) with
Likud over the autonomy question.
These are issues that must be resolved before
the real reasoning behind his resignation can become
clear.
Recalling Sister Teresa
In a letter here to Archbishop Edward
McCarthy of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami the
Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami has ex-
pressed its profound pleasure at the awarding of the
Nobel Peace Prize to Mother Teresa.
The Jewish community joins in affirming the
Rabbinical Association's sentiments. Some of our
community leaders here recall their meetinp with
Sister Teresa and hearing her at Gesu Churcn as a
guest of the late Archbishop Coleman Carroll back in
1974.
It is more than that, as the Association has told
Archbishop McCarthy. "It was an extremely moving
experience to be in the presence of a genuinely saintly
person."
In retrospect, we come to realize that the pro-
foundly devoted work of persons such as Sister
Teresa with the needs of the poor, the hungry and the
deprived is ennobling to humanity in its highest
sense and elevates the Nobel Peace Prize beyond
its highest purposes.
"Jewish Floridian
ml SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood Office .38 S Federal Hwy Suit* 208. Danla. Fla 13004
Telephone 020-9018
MAIN OFFICE and PLANT 120 NE 8th St Miami. Fla. 33132 Phone 373 4606
FREDSHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor
Tilt Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Katkruth
Ol The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published Bl Weekly
Second Class Postage Paid at Danla. Fla 884500
t Fred SfiochU
Federation officers: President. Joyce Newman; Vice Presidents: Allen Gordon
Moses Hornsteln. Secretary. Joel Schneider, M.D.; Treasurer Jo Ann Katt'
Executive Director, Sumner G. Kaye Submit material for publication to Marcy
Schackne, Public Relations Director; or Leslie Horn, Assistant Public Relations
Director.
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed Hit Jewish Unity and me Jewish We.'fciy
Member of the Jewish Tetearaphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate, Wane
wide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association e'
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (local area) One YearS7.S0. Out of Town Upon Request.'
The Politics &f Art Expression
THOSE WHO justify their
worshipping at the soily feet of
the State Department's cultural
exchange program with the
Soviet Union by arguing that art
has nothing to do with politics
simply don't know a blessed
thing about history.
When the great Caesar decided
to prove to the world that Roman
civilization was as accomplished
as the Greek, he commissioned
Publius Virgilius Maro to write a
work of literature that would
rival the best that the Greeks had
ever achieved.
Virgil, as he is known to us
today, tried; decades later, he
came up with the Aeneid essen-
Mindlin
m
tially an extension of Homer's
grand epics Iliad and Odyssey.
I say "tried" because Virgil
didn't think he had succeeded
and was probably right in his
artistic judgment, and in his
political and cultural judgment,
too.
IN FACT, so depressed was he
over the vast enterprise imposed
upon him by Caesar, so certain
was he that he could not change a
nation's public relations image on
order, even Caesar's order, let
alone its intellectual fabric, that
Virgil in succession attempted to
destroy the manuscript of the
Aeneid and even to commit
suicide.
This is one of the genuinely
historic examples of the principle
that art indeed does have a
primary role to play in politics if
only such a role is invoked.
Virgil's agony occurred some
2,000 years ago he died in 19
BCE unconvinced either of the
worth of his epic or of his success
as an author, let alone as an equal
of Homer.
The recent death of the
political philosopher, Herbert
Marcuse, proves the principle
again, and in our own time.
Marcuse argued that art that
does not illustrate the struggle of
the proletarian masses is not art
at all. In Marcuse's terms,
political graffiti is the only
worthwhile contemporary art. It
alone can inspire the working
class revolution against multi-
national corporate oppression.
THIS MAY be a far cry from,
say, the Hallmark greeting card
notion of just what art is, which
popularly construes art as a New
England snow scene. Or a fat
Venus-type by Watteau.
But Marcuse, though his
malevolent Marxism may offend
us, is not far removed from the
Irish poet W. B. Yeats' principle
that art which is not symbolic is
mere story-telling, a notion that
removes him from the splendor of
Hallmark legerdemain no less
than it does the Marcusian. Both
Continued on Page 13
m/ts/nm
Victor Bienstock
Mr. Frost, Dr. Kissinger and Lebanon
Friday, November 2,1979
Volume 9
12 HESHVAN 6740
Number 22
Former Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger has shot out the
moral underpinnings of any claim
the Carter Administration may
have to tell Israel how to handle
security problems involving
Palestine Liberation
Organization bases in Lebanon.
He did this in his angry NBC-
TV interview with British
journalist David Frost by his
justification of the Nixon-
Kissinger policy of bombing
Communist sanctuaries in
neutral Cambodia during the
Vietnam war. The Cambodia-
Lebanon comparison was not
explicitly stated in the debate but
the deadly parallel was there for
all to see.
VIETCONG and North
Vietnamese forces had invaded
Cambodia and occupied strategic
areas there which they used for
the massing of forces, stockpiling
of supplies and staging grounds
for attacks against American and
South Vietnamese forces in the
belief that the Americans would
not violate the frontier to strike
back at them in their sanctuaries.
Frost repeatedly charged that
the United States had violated
Cambodian neutrality by
bombing Cambodian territory
and invading the country to
eradicate the sanctuaries. An
angry Kissinger snapped back
that Cambodian neutrality "had
already been violated by the
presence of foreign troops."
By the same exercise of logic,
the Israeli incursions into
Lebanon are not a violation of
Lebanese neutrality because
enemy forces the PLO had
already breached the country's
neutrality and were using the
Lebanese "sanctuary" to mount
attacks on Israel.
INNOCENT Cambodians had
been killed in the American
bombings, Kissinger agreed, but
only because the U.S. command
had been assured that civilians
had evacuated the target areas.
They were not the target.
Lebanese have been killed in the
Israeli bombings and shellings,
not because the Israelis con-
sidered them targets, but because
the PLO deliberately uses
Lebanese villages by placing its
bases in their midst or in refugee
camps so that they cannot be
attacked without the helpless
village or camp suffering.
Cambodia itself did not have
the strength to oust the Viet-
namese invaders, nor can the
Lebanese expel the PLO. It was
the PLO, in concert with leftist
Moslems, which overthrew the
legitimate ruler of Cambodia,
in 1975. Prince Sihanouk, the
legitimate ruler of Cambodia,
according to Kissinger, secretly
welcomed the American attacks
on the Vietnamese sanctuaries in
his country.
But there is only a puppet
government in Beirut, its strings
pulled by President Assad of
Syria, and no one to speak for the
Lebanese. The puppet govern-
ment protests the Israeli in-
cursions and bombing, but, like
Sihanouk, it is helpless to
establish order in its own
territory and curb the PLO.
IT IS ironic that the British
government which, in Security
Council debates, has adopted
such a superior, moral tone in
criticizing the Israeli policy on
Lebanon, wants to use the same
tactics to crush the Provisional
Irish Republican Army and its
terrorism in Northern Ireland
and has been pressing the
government of the Irish Republic
to give the British Army and the
Royal Ulster Constabulary the
right of hot pursuit of terrorists
fleeing to safety in the republic.
The British Government and
the press have subjected Premier
Jack Lynch and his government
to unsparing criticism and
denunciation, because the
terrorists do have a certain
degree of sanctuary in the
republic. Hundreds of suspected
terrorists are in Dublin's prisons
and British police and army
helicopters have actually received
permission to overfly the border
between Ireland and Ulster on
the lookout for infiltrators.
The British have someone to
talk with and negotiate with in
Dublin; the Israelis have no one
in Beirut.
THE DUBLIN authorities
have promised strong measures
to control the activities of the
Provos, but there is no one in
I-ebanon to enforce order: neither
the puppet government in Beirut,
the Syrian Army which occupies
most of Lebanon on the pretext
of maintaining order, nor the
United Nations peace-keeping
force in southern Lebanon which
concedes that it cannot prevent
hundreds of terrorists from
operating in the zone it purports
to control.
In 1958, when Syria instigated
a coup to overthrow the
legitimate Lebanese Govern-
ment, President Eisenhower,
without ado, dispatched a force of
U.S. Marines to maintain order.
do* P.* 12


Friday, November 2.1979
The Jewish Flondian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Pag.5
*.
ThreerSciefitMs Win Ml$l Prize
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Two physicists, one the son and
the other the grandson of Jewish
immigrants, became the third
generation of Jewish professors
at Harvard University to win the
Nobel Prize for achievements in
their specialized field. Sheldon
G las how and Steven Weinberg,
who were classmates in their high
school and college days and now
teach at Harvard, will share the
$193,000 award with a Moslem
scientist from Pakistan, Abdus
Salam. The three scientists have
been friends for years.
The Royal Academy in Stock-
holm announced the awards for
their work in the electromagnetic
interaction between elementary
particles. In announcing the
awards, the Academy said the
contributions of Glashow, Wein-
berg and Salam were of great
importance to the development of
particle physics during the 1970s.
Glashow and Weinberg, both
46, were born in New York City.
Glashow is the son of Lewiab
Glashow and the former Bella
Rubin who immigrated to the
U.S. from Bobruisk in White
Russia in 1906. Weinberg's
father, Frederick Weinberg, was
born in New York and his
mother, the former Eva Israel,
was born in Germany. His grand-
parents came from Rumania.
Salam is the director of the Inter-
national Center for Theoretical
Physics in Trieste, Italy and a
professor of theoretical physics at
the Imperial College of Science
and Technology in London. The
three will have a reunion when
the Nobel awards are presented
in Stockholm.
I. I. Rabi, the noted nuclear
physicist, was the first of three
generations of Jewish professors
of Harvard to win the Nobel
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Prize. His protege, Prof. Julian
Schwinger, who won his Nobel
Prize in 1966, was the second.
Weinberg succeeded Schwinger
at Harvard when the latter
retired in 1973. Rabi sent mes-
sages of congratulations to
Glashow and Weinberg.
Glashow presently teaches
physics at the Lyman Laboratory
at Harvard and Weinberg is a
Higgins Professor of Physics at
Harvard. Glashow is a member of
Temple Israel in Boston where
three of his four children attend
the Hebrew school. Both
scientists spoke at the Einstein
Centennial Symposium in
Jerusalem last spring.
Attend Boston Event
Local Leaders on UJA
President's Mission
NEW YORK More than 300
Jewish communal leaders from
across the United States, in-
cluding Jewish Federation of
South Broward representatives
Norman Atkin, M.D., JFSB
President's mission chairman,
Shatzi Kahn, Mort Kalin,
Herbert D. Katz, national vice
chairman, Ted Newman, Saul
Singer, M.D. and Revs Wexler.
JFSB campaign director, will
meet with the four top dignitaries
of the Israel government during
the second annual United Jewish
Appeal President Mission to
Israel, scheduled for Oct. 28-Nov.
2. The announcement was made
by Joel Breslau of Washington,
D.C., mission chairman.
The mission host, President
Itzhak Navon, will greet par-
ticipants at an opening dinner in
Jerusalem, and Prime Minister
Menachem Begin will receive
mission members at a dinner in
the Knesset on the final evening.
Defense Minister Ezer Weizman
will address other major mission
sessions.
Scheduled briefings on a wide
range of Jewish communal
concerns will be given by Jewish
Agency Chairman Leon Dulzin.
Prof. Eliezer Jaffe of the Hebrew
University and Harry Rosen,
secretary general of the Jewish
Agency.
Other mission highlights will
include visits to a youth aliyah
village, new settlements in the
Galilee and UJA-funded in-
stitutions, as well aa meetings
with mayors of Project Renewal
neighborhoods and Israelis from
all segments of Israeli society.
Several local women attended
the recent national convention of
Women's American ORT in
Boston.
Attending were: Carol Sue
Press, president, South Broward
Region; Rosalind Klein, chair-
man, Executive Committee; Lois
Unger, re-enrollment vice
president; Mamie Gates,
membership vice president;
Sarah Fellner, community affairs
vice president and Fran Wold-
man, financial secretary.
The following chapter
representatives also attended
Sam Sagenkahn, Emerald Hills
Chapter; Marion Steinlauf,
Golden Isles Chapter; Jennie
Melnick, Hallandale Chapter;
Ceil Flax and Claire Copen.
Hallmark Chapter; Ceil Sch-
wartz, Holly brook Chapter:
Anne Kern, Hollywood Chapter;
Minna Fleekop and Fay Rosa,
Hollywood Beach Chapter; Cberi
Rothschild. Hollywood Hills
Chapter; Ada Friedkin. La Mar
Chapter; Ann Katx,
Meadow brook Towers Chapter;
Lillian Geschwind, Oceanview
Park Chapter; Eva Moses, South
Ocean Chapter; Esta Zavaloff.
Stirling Chapter; Mimi Kar-
donick. The Estates Chapter, and
Harriet Wein, III Islands
Chapter.
These women joined 1,500 of
their colleagues from over 1,100
chapters of Women's American
ORT throughout the United
States in deliberations
in Boston, Oct. 21-25.
ORT, the vocational and
technical training program of the
Jewish people, is the world's
largest non-governmental
vocational training network and
maintains nearly 800 in-
stallations in 22 countries of
Europe, North Africa, the Middle
East, Latin America and
elsewhere.
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Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, November 2,1979
Malavsky Believes in Tradition
By AMY WILPON
Born into a rabbinical family,
Morton Malavsky not only
studied for the rabbinate, but
grew up with it.
As spiritual leader of Temple
Beth Shalom, Rabbi Malavsky
believes in keeping the service
and sermon traditional.
"It is my belief that what a
person hears from the pulpit is
very convincing; therefore, it is
unfair for me to speak on political
matters and the like," Malavsky
said. "As a rabbi, I am obligated
to teach Judaism, ethics,
morality and Judaic ob-
servances."
The Beth Shalom Community
Day School, of which Malavsky
is dean, is built on closeness of
the student to student and
student to teacher relationships.
There is a feeling of love and
understanding for everyone,
Malavsky said.
THE SCHOOL serves the
South Broward community and
is for children from kindergarten
through eighth grade. It has its
own board of directors and
personnel. One-third of the
child's day is spent learning
Hebrew and religion, and the
remaining two-thirds focuses on
secular education.
Besides his affiliation with the
temple. Malavsky leads tours to
Israel.
He first went to Israel 10years
Rabbi Malavsky
ago, and has been leading tours
ever since. Many people tour with
Malavsky including Hollywood
Mayor David Keating, who
recently returned from Israel.
"It is a mitzvah introducing
people to the State of Israel and
watching their faces when they
see things for the first time.
Many people have never been
there before and are totally
dependent on me. It is a very
spiritual experience." Malavsky
said. "I count every traveler and
to me every traveler counts."
There is a mixture of all ages
on the trip, and it is a very well-
rounded experience.
Every person's wants and needs
are taken care of, the rabbi ad-
ded.
On his most recent tour,
Malavsky and Keating met with
Israel's Prime Minister
Menachem Begin.
Temple Beth Shalom is a
member of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education. Many
classes are taught at Beth
Shalom at night as part of the
adult education program. Classes
include Hebrew, parent ef-
fectiveness and adult Bar / Bat
Mitzvah.
The religious school has more
than 400 students enrolled who
participate in afternoon and
Sunday classes. There is also an
early childhood development
program for children ages 2' to
5. The youth department has
more than 300 active, vibrant
members who participate in
Jewish living weekends, socials
and service projects, Malavsky
said.
Temple Beth Shalom was
founded 30 years ago and has
grown considerably within the
last few years. It follows
traditional conservatism as it has
for the past three decades.
Malavsky is not in favor of
membership drives. More time
and effort should be spent on
ideologies and beliefs, he said.
"If there is a spark of interest
in people and I can ignite it. I will
try to do so, whether the person
involved is a member of this
synagogue or not," Malavsky
said.
Patricia Harris To Speak
at CJF Assembly
Continued from Page 1
Recession," served as Secretary
of Housing and Urban Develop-
ment before assuming her current
Cabinet position in July 1979. A
former Ambassador to Luxem-
bourg, she also was an alternate
delegate to the United Nations!
General Assembly and a member
of th (-Commission on Causes and
Prevention of Violence and the
Advisory Committee on Reform
of Federal Criminal Law.
DISCUSSING A New Era In
Israel-Diaspora Relations" at the
Plenary session on Thursday.
Nov. 15. at 8:45 p.m.. will be
Leon Dul/.in, chairman of the
Jewish Agency for Israel. Born in
Minsk, Dulzin began his career as
a Zionist leader when he became
secretary-general of the Zionist
Federation of Mexico at the age
of 18. Later he served as
president of the Federation and
of the Mexican Keren Hayesod.
Dulzin was the first Latin-
American to be elected to the
Jewish Agency Executive.
Currently he serves on the board
of Keren Hayesod, as vice presi-
dent of the World Confederation
of General Zionists, and as a
member of the World Jewish
Congress Executive and chair-
man of the Central Committee of
the Israeli Liberal Party.
Dr. Irwin Cotter, 1979 GA
Scholar in-Residence, is a leading
figure in both academic and
Jewish communal affairs. An
associate professor on the McGill
University Faculty of Law, he is
a graduate of McGill and Yale
Law School, where he served as a
Graduate Fellow. He was also a
Woodrow Wilson National
Fellow. The author of over 50
published academic papers, he
has served as a special advisor to
the Federal Minister of Justice in
Canada.
Shabbat activities at the GA
will include a 9 p.m. Oneg
Shabbai address on Friday by Dr.
Jewish Studies at McGill
University. Co-editor with Irving
Howe of the recently-published
The Best of Sholem Aleichem,
Dr. Wisse is also the author of
The Schlemiel as Hero in Yiddish
and American Literature.
On Saturday, Nov. 17, "The
"70s Revisited The "80s Pro-
jected" will be the topic explored
by three past GA Scholars-in-
Residence: Leonard Fein, Irving
Greenberg and Allen Pollack. Dr.
Fein is editor-in-chief of Moment
magazine. Rabbi Greenberg,
director of the National Jewish
Conference Center, also directs
the President's Commission on
the Holocaust. Dr. Pollack is
chairman of the Labor Zionist
Alliance of America.
IRWIN FIELD, national
chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal, will lead a special session
on Friday exploring "New Needs
and New Opportunities Con-
fronting the Jewish Agency After
or ice wk welcome to
SOWS" lOeVet rt* SWA
\j
From left are Ted and Lil Fein berg, Jack and Gloria Niedorff, Claire
and Joe Levine. _____
4
From left are Eleanor Niederman, Sam and Sabina Sabin, Reva
Wexler; campaign director Jack Malamud, Lou and Debra Rappaport,
David Schfoesman. _____
From left are Shirley and David Schlossman, Gideon Peleg. Jean
Kruger, Joyce Newman, president, Arnold and Vivien Goldstein.
The Air Conditioned
the Israel-Egypt Peace Treaty."
Principal speaker will be Akiva
Levinsky. Jewish Agency treas-
urer.
Other GA speakers include Dr.
Bernard Reisman. Brandeis
University; Esther Peterson,
former executive vice chairman of
the President's Committee on
Consumer Affairs; Dr. Jonathan
Woodier. Brandeis University;
Donald Robinson, president,
JDC; Dr. Steven J. Roth,
London Institute of Jewish
Affairs; Mordechai Abir, Hebrew
University; Aaron S. Klieman,
Tel Aviv University; Boris
Penson, former Prisoner of
Conscience, and others.
The delegation representing
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward includes: Dr. and Mrs.
Robert Heller, Dr. and Mrs.
Meron Levitats, Rabbi Carl "^
Klein, Florence Roth, Marcy r
Schackne and Dr. Ira Scheier.
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Friday, November 2,1979
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
Battered Wives
* T

Finally, They Are Beiny Taken Seriously
By ROBERT NOBEL
JERUSALEM The tragic
murder in the Herzliya Shelter
for Battered Wives of Carmela
Nekesh has brought a great
amount of publicity to the
problem of wife-beating in Israel.
Some observers hope it may have
an influence on lessening its
incidence in the future.
On the warm summer evening
when the killing took place,
however, all thoughts were on the
tragedy. Carmel's husband
slipped into the Herzliya Shelter
for Battered Wives on the heels
of a woman returning through
the entrance gate after shopping
in town. He hugged Carmela and
then repeatedly stabbed her with
^v a pocketknife in front of more
than a dozen other horrified
women and children at the
shelter.
ACQUAINTANCES described
Carmela as a beautiful young
woman with an exceptionally
pleasant personality. She had a
knack for cheering up depressed
residents of the shelter a rare
and important trait among the
women in a place where most are
inevitably so involved with their
own problems that they cannot
reach out to help anyone else.
The incident drew a great deal
of attention to wife-battering, a
social problem that had long
demanded recognition in Israel.
It was partly achieved in May,
1978 when Ruth Reznic, head of
the feminist group called
lighting Violence Against
Women, lounded the shelter in
Herzliya.
It serves as a sort of first-aid
station for women who must
escape from physical violence at
home and have no other place to
turn to.
ESSIE LEV, an immigrant to
Israel from California and
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RABBI JOS. KAUFMAN
s
volunteer at the shelter, ex-
pressed the surprise felt by many
to learn of battered wives in
Israel.
"I grew up in a home, and a
neighborhood where both Jews
and Christians had the idea that
Jewish men make the best
husbands. I was originally
shocked to learn that Jewish men
beat their wives. I shouldn't have
been. And I'm sure it goes on
among Jewish couples in
California, just like it does here in
Israel."
The institution, whose
operations are funded by
municipal and national funds, is
housed in a small, residential
bungalow with two bedrooms, a
living room, a kitchen-dining
area, and bathroom. Despite its
small size, it has served as a
temporary refuge for up to 32
women and children at one time.
"WOMEN DON'T come here
because it is nice." Reznic notes.
"They come because they are in
serious trouble and have nowhere
else to go."
Most of the women who reach
the shelter are from impoverished
backgrounds, and of Eastern
origin. Similar problems also
exist among other socio-economic
levels, Reznic points out, but
more established women can
afford other ways of leaving the
house such as a trip inside
Israel or even abroad, putting up
in a hotel, or staying with friends.
Those who come to the shelter
generally married young and lack
professional training. They often
face strong pressure from their
families to remain with their
husbands, regardless of the
domestic situation. With no
experience of managing on their
own, and unable to return to their
parents, they seek refuge at the
institution.
EOR SOME of the women, just
the fact that they have a place to
seek help solves their problems.
"Often men receive the shock of
their lives when their wives come
here," Reznic says.
"They suddenly realize that
their wife may leave them, and
they are willing to change their
ways so that she will stay. And
simply the knowledge that the
shelter is here and that there is
somewhere to come, gives many
women the confidence to go
home.
"Before the women return
home, we try to have their
husbands sign an agreement that
they will no longer use physical
violence. There are some types,
though, with whom we have little
chance. Men who are drug-users,
drunkards or card-players will
not easily change.
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THE INSTITUTION supplies
marriage counseling for those
who want it, legal aid for those
women who seek a divorce, or
who want to bring charges
against their husbands, and
psychological counseling for the
women and or their men.
The women also discuss their
situation among themselves and
provide each other with a great
deal of moral support. "We have
a lot of group sessions where
women talk about their
problems," Reznic says. "They
see that they are not alone. And
for some of them, it puts their
situation into a new perspective
they realize that they are not
as alone in their problems as they
thought."
In addition to Ruth Reznic,
whose many functions include
director, public relations officer
and someone for the women to
confide in and cry to, the center's
staff is made up of a social
worker, paid by the Ministry of
Social Services, a house mother,
and an accountant, all of whom
serve on a part-time basis. The
paid staff is supplemented by 20
volunteers, two of whom are men.
REZNIC CONCEDES that
much remains to be done for
example, new shelters must be
built in Jerusalem and Beer-
sheba, new laws must be enacted
but she is optimistic about the
shelter's progress to date.
"To cure a problem, a social
one just like a medicinal one, you
must first be aware of it. I see our
primary job as exposing the
problem. And I think we are
doing that.
"There is still a long way to
go," Reznic says, "but as a
Zionist. I know Israel was started
with a handful of Jews whose
only real asset was a just idea.
We will also go from a few people
Women and children at Shelter for Battered Wives in Herzliya
with a cause to a change in the Ultimately, we hope to be able to
Israeli society of the 1980s of (.Xpose, tackle and overcome the
mores, concepts and behavior, problem."
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar ofOreater Hollywood
Friday, November 2,1979
Conference on Children Of Holocaust Survivors
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Reaching out to the thousands of
children of Holocaust survivors,
as well as to organizations and
individuals who are interested in
learning about teaching and com-
memorating the Holocaust, ZA-
CHOR: the Holocaust Resource
Center, is sponsoring the "First
International Conference on
Children of Holocaust Survivors"
on Nov. 4 and 5 in New York
City.
ZACHOR, which is a project of
the National Jewish Conference
Center, announced that there are
about 200,000 young adults now
in their twenties or thirties who
are children of survivors.
According to Rabbi Irving
Greenberg, director of the Con-
ference Center, "The children of
survivors see themselves as an
identifiable group who wish to
remember the Holocaust, who see
themselves as having a special
role in its commemoration, and
who want to speak out for them-
selves and about themselves."
The two-day conference is
being held in cooperation with
the Hebrew Union College-Jew-
ish Institute of Religion and will
take place at the HUCJIR's new
campus at 1 West 4th Street.
Attending will be panelists and
participants from the U.S.,
Canada, Europe, South America
and Israel who are concerned
with how the Holocaust has
shaped the lives of children of
survivors.
The conference "affords
children of survivors an oppor-
tunity to meet on a national
basis, possibly to form a more
cohesive group as well as to
deepen their awareness of the
catastrophe that took the lives of
six million Jews," notes Green-
berg, who is director of the Presi-
dent's Commission on
Holocaust.
Community Calendar
Nov. Ill
JEWISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD, 1980 Community
Mission to Israel.
Nov. 4
CJA-IEF HOLLYBROOK WORKERS BREAKFAST 9 a.m. Hollybrook
Clubhouse TEMPLE BETH EL, Sunday Morning Seminar, Judg
Miette Burnstein to speak on "Women in the Law," 10 a.m., Tobin
Auditorium, $1.00 Public is invited MIRAMAR CHAPTER-PIONEER|
WOMEN, Luncheon and Card Party, noon, Miramar Recreation
Center, 6700 Miramar Parkway. Call 989-4240 or 989-7870.
Nov. 5
HOLLYWOOD CHAPTER-HILLCREST HADASSAH, Regular Meeting,
Leona Brauser will speak on "Youth Aliyoh," noon, Hillcrest Play-I
diu. Call 963-0566 HOLLYWOOD SECTION NATIONAL COUNCIL OF
JEWISH WOMEN, Living biography of Katharine Hepburn, noon,
Temple Sinai, 1201 Johnson St. Public is invited call 923-4286.
Nov. 8
MIRAMAR CHAPTER-PIONEER WOMEN, Regular Meeting, noon,
Miramar Recreation Center, 6700 Miramar Parkway. Call 989-4240|
or 989-7870.
Nov. 10
HOLLYWOOD HILLS CHAPTER-ORT, Art Auction/Nassau Gallery ofj
New York 8-9 p.m. viewing, 9 p.m. auction Rock Creek Bath and
Tennis Club, 11600 Stonebridge Parkway, Cooper City, $3.00 per
person, door prize, refreshments. Call 961 -7800 or 963-7774.
Nov. 12
HILLCREST WOMEN'S DIVISION, Women's Awareness Seminar 9:45
a.m. Guest speaker Brenda Shapiro, Hillcrest Playdium. Call 921-
8810 HOLLYWOOD CHAPTER-HADASSAH, Youth Aliyah Luncheon,
Gloria Friedman, guest speaker, entertainment by Gillian Grey,
accomponied by Harry Lef court noon Hillcrest Country Club, 4600
Hillcrest Drive. 966-7795.
Nov.14
WOMEN'S DIVISION, Educotional Parlor Meeting, Lila Zedeck,
hostess-9:30 a.m. Call 921-8810.
Nov. 14-18
COUNCIL OF JEWISH FEDERATIONS GENERAL ASSEMBLY, Montreal
Canada.
Nov. 15
JEWISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD, Education Committee
Meeting 7:30 p.m. 2719 Hollywood Boulevard. Call 921-8810
BRANDEIS GREATER HOLLYWOOD WOMEN'S COMMITTEE. Luncheon
and Make-up demonstration by Neiman Marcus, drawing for Mario
Romano knit dress 11:4 5 a.m. Holiday Inn, 3000 South Ocean
Drive. Hallandale. Call 458-1 395 or 932-4238.
Nov. 20
JEWISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD, Community relations
meeting noon 2719 Hollywood Boulevard. Call 921-8810
HALLANDALE GROUP HADASSAH, Plaza Towers Group, regular
meeting and book review by Hester Kapelow noon Social Ha
1849 South Ocean Drive. Call 456-5898.
Nov. 22
THANKSGIVING Federation Office Closed.
Nov. 24
JEWISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD, Young Leadership
Committee meeting -8 p.m. -Call 921-8810.
Nov. 25
ISRAEL BONDS BREAKFAST: Honoree, Mayor Art Canon, guest
speaker, Rabbi Carl Klein 9a.m. Hallandale Jewish Center.
Nov. 26
HOLLYDALE CHAPTER AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS Mini-
Lunch and Card Party, Subscription $2.50, proceeds go to Israeli
youth noon 3801 South Ocean Drive, Galahad South. Call 456-
1454 or 456-2074.
Nov. 27
JEWISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD, Board of Directors 7:30
p.m. 2719 Hollywood Boulevard. Call 921-8810.
Nov.28
AQUARIUS ISRAEL BONDS NIGHT, honoring Bernard and Olga Gold-
berger Larry Dorn, guest entertainer 8 p.m. Cascade Room.
the
Another vital reason for
holding the conference, according
to ZACHOR assistant directors,
Mary Glynn and David Szonyi, is
that it "will represent a unique
opportunity to bring together
and to learn more about members
of this second generation. With
their immediate link to those who
so personally experienced the
Holocaust, children of survivors
will have an increasingly im-
portant role in deepening under-
standing of the Holocaust and its
place in our lives during the years
ahead."
Szonyi said the first day of the
conference will be devoted to
psychological issues and the
second to the world views and
creative responses of children of
survivors.
IHCIIIHlii !'*<
COMMUNITY DAY IS COMING!!!
I'tViJ
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MARK YOUR CALENDARS NOW!!!
<>
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11
12
Thursday, December 13
i;
2:1
:tii
17
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20
14
21
P
2-1 |25
:30 a.m. 2*30 p.m.
20
27
28
Diplomat Convention Center
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22
21
i 1 HBmh
"
After theatre
there's nothing like a delicious
cup of coffee. Maxwell House
Coffee always makes it great.
*< }
1
Pleasant company after the theatre is bered cup after cup. year after year,
never the same without a cup of piping Maxwell Housea tradition in Jewish
hot Maxwell House Coffee. Its rich, lifestyle for over half a century,
satisfying taste is brewed to be remem-
Good
to the
Lat Drop"

K
Certified
Kosher
A living tradition in Jewish homes for more than half a century.


Friday, November 2,1979
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
Hailey's 'Overload' Projects Power Shortages
I Overload by Arthur Hailey,
published by Doubleday & CO.,
Inc., S10.95, has been in print for
almost a year. If you have not
read it, I hope this review will
prompt you to do so.
The following quote from
Fortune Magazine appears on the
foreword page of the novel:
"Since 1974, the rate at
which new electrical gen-
erating capacity has been
built in California has fallen
to less than half of the 1970-
74 level. As a result, the
threat of an economically
ruinous power crunch by the
1990s is very real; and there
is already apprehension over
the danger of brownouts and
blackouts in the 1980's ..."
Arthur Hailey selects themes
of topical interest to write about
and by his selection of the quote
from Fortune it is evident what
has triggered him into writing
Overload.
IN THIS book, Hailey's bad
guys are the officers of an en-
vironmental association he
names "Sequoia." The closeness
of this name to the prestigious
Sierra Club does not seem ac-
cidental, especially since both
have their headquarters in the
west.
He tells you that the officers of
the Sequoia Association basically
are against the way we live and
want us to return to a life con-
dition of 300 years past. This is
what motivates them to fund
agitators who denounce new
power plant construction.
And this is what motivates
them to use their present favor-
enable public image at hearings
* before commissions to delay the
processing of licenses and per-
mits which are prerequisites to
build new power plants.
The members of these com-
missions are Hailey's second set
of bad guys. It takes them eight
to 10 years to approve a public
utility'8 application to build a
new power plant. Most states
have overlapping commissions
and their members jealously
guard their authority and
political power while they con-
duct endless hearings.
ANOTHER set of bad guys are
thieves who rig by-passes to
avoid paying for gas and elec-
tricity they consume. This
amounts to two percent of all
power generated annually, and
this loss is packed into our bills.
The rate of theft is on a steady
uprise.
His last set of bad guys are the
Arabs, who control oil produced
in their countries.
Hailey predicts that our
government will be forced to
issue a new currency, backed by
gold, and will demand its citizens
exchange their dollars for the new
gold dollars at an exchange rate
of 10 for 1, because dollars
backed by gold are the only
currency the Arabs will take for
their oil amidst the upcoming
power shortage crises.
His good guys are the
executives of our public utilities,
who see what lies ahead and are
struggling to beat the crises.
HAILEY BUILDS his plot
around set-backs a California
utility encounters in its efforts to
obtain approval to build a plant
which will use geo-thermal steam,
the cleanest and cheapest form of
energy, to power its generators to
make electricity. Geo-thermal
potential also exists in Oregon,
Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah,
Colorado, Arizona and New
Mexico.
As a master storyteller should,
Hailey heightens reader interest
by writing about intrigue,
sabotage, theft and the erotic,
esoteric love affairs in which he
involves his hero.
Hailey prophesies that if new
power plants (designed to use
fuels other than oil) are not built
scon, power shortages will occur
in the mid '80's. As a part of his
predictions, food production will
drop 50 percent because farmers
will not have power to operate the
pumps to irrigate their fields and
food prices will soar. Factory
production will fall and unem-
ployment will rise; institutions,
offices and stores will not be able
to function.
Chaos will follow.
If Hailey's Overload becomes a
fiction that precedes the fact, one
wonders: "Will Americans
choose the Jewish community as
a scapegoat?
One also wonders whether that
fear was in Hailey's mind when
he set out to write Overload
Could it be the reason why he
named his hero Nimrod Goldman
and developed his character with
a Macho image?
ALVIN HESS,
HUcrest
Seminar Highlights Hadassah Procedures
As Hadassah faces the new
decade of the 1980's, the Florida
Mid-Coast Region will pause to
review procedures for expansion,
organization and membership at
an all-day seminar on Thursday
Nov. 8, at the Lauderdale Lakes
City Hall auditorium.
Guest advisor will be Rose
Dorfman of New York, National
Hadassah vice president and
national organization chairman.
Moderator of the panel of
experts participating will be
Esther Cannon, president of the
Florida Mid-Coast Region. The
panelists will include Adele
Lewis, membership chairman;
Priscilla Lippa, expansion
chairman; Lillian Baker, life
membership chairman, Rosalie
Slass, trackdown-transfer
chairman; Helen Hecht, winter
residents chairman; and Jean
Itosen, Hadassah associates
chairman.
The Florida Mid-Coast Region
of Hadassah, one of the largest in
America with over 14,500
members, and considered one of
the fastest growing regions,
covers all of Broward County and
South Palm Beach with 32
chapters and 26 groups. It has a
potential this year of four new
chapters in the rapidly
developing areas of west Broward
and west Boca.
Mrs. Dorfman will offer a
projection of Hadassah
organization for the 1980's. She
also will discuss the complex
system of membership and
chapter records at Hadassah
headquarters in New York in-
corporating over 370,000
members, one-third of whom are
life members, and the 1,700
chapters and groups throughout
all 50 states and Puerto Rico.
To climax the day, awards will
be made by Adele Lewis, region
membership chairman, to
chapters achieving the summer
goals for re-enrollments, new
members and new life members.
The program will begin at 10
a.m. breaking for a brown-bag
lunch at noon. Coffee and dessert
will be served. Registration cards
are available from each chapter
president.
Miami Beach's 6LATT KOSHER
MOTH, ft 1EACH CLUB
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THANKSGIVING WEEK-END SPECIAL
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name can be obtained >,',-.ding a separate ped seH
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i
Page 10
The Jewish Fbridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Friday, November 2,1979
Modern Hebrew Classes Begin Nov. 5 JCC Announces Programs
Shalom, the Hebrew word for
peace, has become known
throughout the world. But
Shalom is only the beginning.
Now every adult in the com-
munity has the opportunity to
learn to speak Hebrew by the
innovative method developed in
Israel for teaching new im-
migrants.
Modern Hebrew Community
Ulpan classes will begin
throughout Miami and
Hollywood the week of Nov. 5,
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation has an-
nounced. (The Hollywood Ulpan
is conducted in conjunction with
the South Broward Federation.)
The six-week fall term held
twice a week at two hour
sessions, is being offered at
locations in Miami Beach, North
Dade, and Hollywood.
Classes are taught through the
Ulpan, the unique method of
learning the Hebrew language.
Ulpan is the only course of its
kind available in the Miami-
Hollywood area. Based on
linguistics and scientifically
planned, its methods have been
used worldwide for teaching
other languages. Ulpan in-
structors are specially trained in
Hollywood Mayor David Keating, right, presents a proclamation to
Israel Zalmonson, as Soviet Jewry chairman. Dr. Stan Spatz, looks
on.
*
ii
the technique, which combines
speaking and reading with such
cultural elements as dance, song
and holiday celebration. Classes
will be offered on beginners,
intermediate and advanced
levels. Classes at Temple Beth
Sholom on Miami Beach will be
held on Monday and Wednesday
mornings from 9:30-11:30 for
beginners intermediates and
advanced: and Monday and
Wednesday evenings, from 7:30-
9:30 for beginners /in-
termediates and advanced.
In North Dade, classes are
scheduled at the Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community
Center on Monday and Wed-
nesday mornings from 9:30-11:30
for advanced: and Monday and
Wednesday evenings, from 7:30-
9:30 for beginners and in-
termediates.
Classes in Hollywood will be
held on Tuesday and Thursday
mornings from 10-noon at
Temple Sinai for beginners,
intermediates and advanced: and
at Temple Beth Shalom on
Tuesday and Thursday evenings
from 7:30-9:30 for beginners,
intermediates and advanced.
Registration will take place at
the first class session.
Ulpan classes are sponsored by
the Central Agency for Jewish
Kducation of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, the South
Broward Jewish Federation, the
American Zionist Federation, the
Israel Aliyah Center and the
Department of Kducation and
Culture of the World Zionist
Organization.
A city-wide Chanukah party at
the term's end, the week of Dec.
18. will highlight the fall
semester.
Ulpan classes are accredited
for Early Childhood and Sunday
School teaching licenses.
The Ulpan program is directed
by Abraham J. Gittelson,
associate director of the CAJE
and is coordinated by Miles P.
Bunder, director of the Institute
for Jewish Studies.
Present at a recent Jewish Federation of South Broward Soviet Jewry
Committee program with Israel Zalmonson, former Soviet prisoner of
Conscience (second from left) are Dr. Stan Spatz, chairman, Soviet
Jewry Committee of the Community Relations Committee, Holly-
wood Mayor David Keating, Gail Cohen, Elaine Pittell. past chairman
of the Soviet Jewry Committee, Joyce Newman, JFSB president and
Dr. Ira Sheier, director. Community Relations Committee.
Hadassah Youth Aliyah Luncheon
The Hollywood Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its annual
Youth Aliyah Luncheon on
Monday. Nov. 12, at noon at the
Hillcrest Country Club, 4600
Hillcrest Drive, Hollywood.
Guest speaker will be Gloria
Friedman, former president of
Miami Region. Gillian Grey will
provide the entertainment, ac-
companied by Harry Lefcourt.
Reservations are required.
Hollywood Chapter president
is Leona Brauser, and chair-
person of the day is Evelyn
Wilpon. Program chairperson is
Ann Hurwitz and publicity chair-
person, Esther Sklar.
CTUDI0

Temple
Beth Emet
Art Auction
An Art Auction, sponsored by
Temple Beth Emet of Pembroke
Pines, at Rock Creek Bath and
Tennis Club, 11700 Stone Bridge
Parkway, Cooper City, is planned
Saturday eveing, Nov. 17.
A champagne preview is set for
7 30 and auction at 8:30. Works
include: Chagall, Dali. Calder,
Peter Max, Matisse, Neiman,
Silva, Hibel.
pi'"iill
p<
Continental
Cuisine
FRED JOSSI
welcomes
you bacK to
his renowned
STUDIO
RESTAURANT
for a unique
dining epenence
Matcn your table to your
mood in one o* 5 ind'vidual
rooms The Tent
Wine Cellar Studio Place
Pigaiie Swiss Chalet
David Maddern
at the Piano
OPENS AT 5 P.M. j
(private Luncheon* arranged)
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THE GROTTO"
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
HONORED
2340 SW 32 Ave.
445-5371
elated Mondavi
The Michael-Ann Russell
branch of the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida an-
nounces that a timely lecture,
"The History of Black/Jewish
Relations." will be presented to
the community on Sunday,
Nov. 4, at 8 p.m.
Brenda Shapiro. director,
Florida area of the American
Jewish Committee, will speak on
this subject, drawing on the
expertise of the 73-year history of
the American Jewish Committee
in inter-group relations. In
tracing the history of the inter-
relationship of Jews and Blacks
in America, Ms. Shapiro will em-
phasize their influence and con-
tinuing impact on society.
Open discussion will follow this
lecture. There is no entrance fee.
The Michael-Ann Russell
Branch of the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida an-
nounces a new course on Taxes
and Wealth to begin at the
Center. North Miami Beach,
Wednesday, Nov. 7, 7:30 to 9
p.m. This four-week mini-course
will deal with methods of income
tax planning and financial
management.
The instructor, Robert
Chalnick, CPA with a master"s
degree in taxation, adjunct pro-
fessor of taxation, FIU, lecturer
and author on taxes, will en-
courage open discussion and
exchange of ideas on techniques
of handling personal taxes and
finances.
In-person registration is taking g
place now at the MAR Jewish
Community Center.
The Michael-Ann Russell
Branch of the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida offers a
one-day workshop to help women
enter or re-enter the job market.
Designed to give women tools for
self-assessment and information
on training opportunities, this
workshop will be held at the
Center.
Scheduled from 9:30 a.m. 1
p.m., the panelists will explain
these areas: "A New Career for
You?": Re-Entry" a dis-
cussion of transitions, successes,
support and family con-
siderations: "Strategies for Re-
Entry What Color Is Your
Parachute?"; "Preparation
Through Education" with rep-
resentatives from Miami-Dade
Community College. The
audience will be encouraged to
discuss personal employment
objectives with the panelists.
This workshop, planned in co-
operation with the Center for
Continuing Education for
Women, Miami-Dade Com-
munity College, is the second in a
scries of programs designed to
focus on women's concerns.
In-person registration is
scheduled at the JCC. For ad-
ditional information, call Myrna
l.i.man. director of adult
education.
*S*.
FORT LAUDERDALE 776-6272
TAPES BUSINESS FORMS
CARTONS TAGS -LABELS
HANGERS BAGS BOXES
WIPES POLYETHYLENE
ROWARD
APER
ACKAGING
1201 NE4SthST
FORT tAUDEROALE
FL0RI0A 33334
Your tzimmis just wouldn't be the same without
Sun-Maid Raisins. And your compote wouldn't be
complete without Blue Ribbon or Old Orchard Figs. R>r
over half a century our wholesome kosher fruits have
been a Jewish cooking tradition.
We dry them the traditional way, too. Naturally,
in the sun. So the natural sweetness you enjoyed as a child
still tastes the same today. And isn't that what
tradition is all about?
Certified by Rabbi Dr J H Ralbag
OSun Mild GrowmerfCalifumia. 1979
-


friday, November 2,1979
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Doll Creator to Appear
in South Broward
Madame Alexander, creator
[id designer of more than 5,000
Oils, will give a benefit ap-
parance for the Beth Shalom
ladame Alexander
hool complex, Thursday, Nov.
at 7 p.m., according to
lairman, Morris Engelberg.
[She will speak, autograph
Mis and autograph special
cordings for contributors,''
K-lared Engelberg. "Proceeds
ill go toward furnishings and
bmpletion of the Jill Ann Coplin
lemorial Wing of the school
pmplex.
"Madame Alexander's theory
Religious
Directory
NORTHBROWARD
lEMPLE BETH ISRAEL 7100 W. Oak
1 land Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Phillip A Labowitz. Cantor Maurice
A Neu
lEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
| Drive. Reform t44)
AMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
|57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
| Zimmerman, u A)
MIRAMAR
lEMPLE ISRAEL 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Paul Plotkin.
I (..intor Joseph Wichelewski. <4B)
PEMBROKE PINES
: MPLE BETH EMET. Pines Middle
I School. 200 NW Douglas Rd.. Liberal
| Relorm. Rabbi Bennet Grecnspon
EMPLE IN THE PINES. 9730 Sterling
|Rd., Hollywood. Conservative. Rabbi
I Bernard P. Shoter.
PLANTATION
LANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA-
TION 400S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi Sheon
I Harr. ,64)
lECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA
|GOGUE.7473NW4thSt. (69)
HALLANDALE
\LLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
INE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
ICarl Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob Dan
|iger. ,12)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
|NAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
IRalph P Kongsley. Cantor Irving
|Shulkes. ,37)
HOLLYWOOD
EMPLE BETH AHM 310 SW 62nd
*ve. Conservative. Rabbi Max
Landman. (47B)
tMPLE BETH EL. 1351 S. 14th Ave.
^sistant Rabbi Ben Romer. (45)
EMPLE BETH SHALOM. 4601 Arthur
& Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Aalavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
IMPLE SINAI 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi Seymour Frled-
nan. Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro.
Cantor Naf taly A. Linkovsky. (65)
IMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.
Hollywood. Fia. 33021. Liberal
Retorm. Rabbi Robert P. Fraiin.
Cantor Michael Kyrr. (47C)
ki!t!i 'SRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
TORT LAUDERDALE. 3291 Stirling
Road Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe
fomzer ,52)
SWEDEN'S
nd Restaurant
** *'**%, 2477 L Sunnte Bfcd
Pta"a*W, m (he new Broward Mai
i Hoik wood Bk-d at 48th Ave
*. 9000 n Federal Mwy
1902 South Federal Mwy
_S~* is that when you place a toy in
the hands of a child, you are
affording the child an oportunity
to realistically appreciate
his/her dreams," Engelberg
explained.
"For 53 years, Madame
Alexander has created dolls
which today have become
collectable items. They are one of
the highest priced lines of
collector dolls in the world.
Madame Alexander takes pride
in her dolls being manufactured
and produced by Americans.
"Her warmth and love of
children has inspired her work. It
is an honor to have her be a part
of the growth of Jewish education
in South Broward.
"The respect that we have for
Madame Alexander is reflected
by Hollywood Mayor David
Keating proclaiming Nov. 15 as
Madame Alexander Day in
Hollywood."
Committee members working
with Engelberg include: Mrs. and
Mrs. Kenneth Schwartz, Mrs.
Morris Engelberg, Mrs. and Mrs.
Richard Cotler, Mrs. and Mrs.
Alan Coplin and Mr. and Mrs.
Herbert Kate.
The children of the school
complex will pay tribute to
Madame Alexander through a
musical presentation.
The public is invited to attend.
Shalom Hadassah
The Shalom group of
Hollywood Hadassah will have a
regular meeting on Nov. 6 at
noon at the Washington Federal
Building. 450 N. Park Road. The
program will be a movie relating
to Youth Aliyah, and the
chairman is Ida Klein.
Anne Ackertnan
I
Minerva Kaplan
Emil Cohen
Histadrut Program Set Nov.29
Anne Ackerman, book
reviewer, communal and civic
leader, will dramatize the novel,
Leah's Journey, by Golda Gold-
reich on Thursday, Nov. 29 at
9:30 a.m., at Inverrary Country
Club in Lauderhill under the
sponsorship of the Israel
Histadrut Foundation.
Minerva Kaplan, program
chairwoman, announced that this
year's program also will include
the nationally known, American-
Jewish humorist, Emil Cohen.
She stated, "He will entertain us
with anecdotes, folklore, humor
and song."
Since establishing himself as a
humorist, raconteur and vocalist,
Cohen has appeared on tele-
vision, radio and made personal
appearances before Jewish
audiences throughout the United
States. He presents a program
whose origins are in American
and Yiddish culture.
Dr. Morton Malavsky,
Broward chairman and national
board member of the IHF, will
speak on "Facing The Realities of
Peace Today."
The Israel Histadrut Founda-
tion supports a vast network of
health, educational and welfare
institutions in Israel. It is
currently directing its major
efforts to providing vitally
needed mortgages for housing for
Israeli war veterans and their
families through the Histadrut
bequest and annuity programs.
A mini-breakfast will be
served. Tickets can be obtained
by contacting the Israel Hista-
drut Foundation office in Hallan-
dale.
MEYER
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are delicious." But there is never any
argument about DELICIOUS. Because
they are. Mott's captures all the
natural and sparkling taste
of the sun-ripened fruit. And
many Jewish housewives know
it. And that's why they serve
Mott's to the family.
Whether it's one of the
apple sauce varieties or
the prune products, you
just know it's the finest
because Mott's uses only
the finest quality apples
and sun-ripened prunes.
So whether it should
be Mott's 'IS', or
Mott's'ARE'...
Mott's "are/is"
m-m-m-m-m-m.
marvelous!
CERTIFIED
KOSHER


Pan. 4
Pagel?
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, November 2,1979
Soviet Jewry Update
Anatoly Sharansky, hero of the
Soviet Jewry movement, remains
in prison, and continues to suffer
from headaches and faulty vision.
A casual examination by a
visiting physician was unreveal-
ing and because he was cleared
for work, he is denied even the
opportunity to rest during the
day. Efforts to secure assistance
from western physicians and the
Red Cross are ongoing.
Please voice your concern to:
Ambasador Anatoly Dobrynin
Soviet Embassy
1126-16 Street N.W.
Washington, DC. 20006
and express your support
Anatoly "s parents:
Boris and Ida Milgrom
Cooperativinaya 8, Apt. 4
Istra, Moscow Oblast,
RSFSR, USSR
and to Anatoly "s wife:
Avital Sharansky
70/30 Ben Zaleai Street
Gonen, Jerusalem, Israel.
to
Refusenik Faces Spinal Surgery
The following information
came to us via our London
contact, Michael Sherbourne:
To: Secretary General of the
Communist Party of the Soviet
Union and president of the
Supreme Soviet of the USSR,
L. I. Brezhnev:
We appeal to you in connection
with the desperately tragic
situation of the Tufeld family,
who for two long years, have been
trying to obtain permission to
emigrate to Israel to join their
only son.
i Vladimir Tufeld has become an
invalid with a serious spinal
illness and is confined to bed. He
has been advised to undergo a
complicated operation which
could threaten his life and on
which he cannot decide.
Tufeld has been in this catas-
trophic situation since May of
this year, but all their appeals to
various authorities and telegrams
to you have remained un-
answered. In this connection, we
urgently appeal to you to show
humanity in regard to this family
in their pitiful situation and give
instructions for them to be
allowed to leave the country to be
reunited with their son.
Signed by 27 refuseniks
Jury 21,1979
You can write to the Tufeld
family at the following address:
Vladimir Tufeld
Chkalova41-2
Apt. 272
Moscow, USSR
A certificate attesting to
Vladimir's
enclosed.
infirmity was also
B'nai B'rith Youth Dance Marathon
Einstein AZA and Tikvah
BBG, B'nai B'rith Youth, will
disco down to raise money for
their International Service Fund.
The event is a 12-hour Dance
Marathon from 8:30 p.m. Satur-
day, Nov. 3, to 8:30 Sunday
morning, Nov. 4. The teens will
New Yorkers
Plan Reunion
Former members of the Rock
ville Centre, N.Y., community
now in Florida are invited to
express their interest in a
reunion. A luncheon is planned in
the Holiday Inn in Hollywood.
Contact Vicki Silver, 600 Three
Islands Blvd.. Hallandale, Apt.
33009. Apt. 210 or Dorothy
Teiman, 3800 S. Ocean Drive.
Hollywood. 33019, Apt. 921.
dance at Temple Israel, 6920 SW
35th St.. Miramar.
Per-hour pledges will be ac-
cepted at the temple from 7:30
p.m. until starting time.
Beth El Brotherhood SaJtomVdtdstelit
Brotherhood of Temple Beth
El is sponsoring a good
fellowship night, Sunday, Nov.
11, in the temple's Tobin
Auditorium, Hollywood, at 6:30
p.m. The affair will consist of a
full-course catered dinner and
entertainment and dancing by
Bill Flannigan.
The highlight of the evening
will be the honoring of Louis
Goldstein as Temple Beth El's
Brotherhood "Man of the Year."
Mr. Goldstein is a member of the
temple board and is serving as
chairman of the Temple Beth El
Cemetery Committee. Program
chairman is Hymen Saber; co-
chairmen, executive vice
president Dr. Irving Grebin and
Hyman Wyman. As space is
limited and a large attendance is
anticipated, make your reser-
vations by Nov. 2.
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
El is sponsoring a barbecue and
square dance with a professional
caller and instructor, on Satur-
day, Nov. 3, on the Temple Beth
El grounds, Hollywood
There will be card-playing and
a variety of activities. Set-ups
will be provided. Tickets are
available by tailing Sylvia Conn,
Raya Finn, or the temple office.
Family service for the children
of the religious school will be con-
ducted at 7:30 p.m. Friday in the
chapel of Temple Beth El, 1351 S.
14th Ave., Hollywood. Rabbi Ben
Romer will officiate with children
participating.
Congregation worship will be
held at 8:15 p.m. Friday in the
sanctuary. Rabbi Samuel Z.
Jaffe, D.D., will speak on "Our
Role In History Are We Ful-
filling It?"
Pulpit honors will be accorded
temple president, Milton H.
Jacobs, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard
Schinder, parents; Harry
Schinder and Meyer Kirsner,
grandparents, in honor of Barry
Schinder's Bar Mitzvah. Mrs.
Bernard Schinder, Mrs. Harry
Schinder, Mrs. Meyer Kirsner,
will bless the Sabbath tapers.
The oneg shabbat and flowers
will be sponsored by the grand-
parents.
J
Turn
your
eyes
to .
YDIZ
V
OPTICAL
CENTERS
Where The Extras Are On The House"
95
LARGE SELECTION OF
FASHION
EYE GLASSES
AS
LOW
AS
24
(MOST
MttSCMfTIOHS)
I OB..) SVOCALS f MTIU. TWT. HOTO 0*4*. MO MTITMIC
Sl
SHOTS Of KENDALL
12516 N. KENDALL DR.
271-2535
PARK SHERIDAN PLAZA
3313 SHERIDAN ST
963-4370
Barry attends Nova Middle
School where he is a student in
the eighth grade. He enjoys
hiking, camping and racquet ball.
His favorite subjects are
language, arts and physicial
education. On Saturday at 11
a.m., Barry will conduct the
worship service and read from the
Tor ah.
Victor Bienstock
Continued from Page 4-
They didn't have to fight; their
presence was enough to abort the
coup, and they were home in
short order.
In 1975, after the Lebanese
Government had been forced to
give the PLO its own legal and
military status on Lebanese
territory, a PLO-leftist Moslem
combination, with Syrian sup-
port and Soviet arms, easily
ousted the government and
launched a merciless war on the
Lebanese Christians.
IN THE state of anarchy that
followed, two American
diplomats were kidnapped and
slain by the terrorists. President
Ford sent no marines to help the
stricken nation. Secretary of
Slate Kissinger, always ready to
work out compromises, stayed
away from the mess and breathed
a deep sigh of relief when a
Syrian Army marched in in the
guise of an Arab peace-keeping
force.
No Lebanese voice dared be
raised in international forums
against the rape of the tiny
nation except that of former
Foreign Minister Charles Malik
who warned a Senate committee
that there could be no oeace in
the Middle East "while there are
non-Lebanese armed forces on
Lebanese soil."
There has been no change from
that situation although the State
Department, even without
Kissinger, still professes to see
the Syrians as a stabilizing force
and the only threat to peace, the
Israelis. Secretary of State Vance
has not been able to distinguish
between defensive and offensive
actions and would be satisfied if
the Israelis Would just remain
south of the border.
HOWEVER, the Carter
Administration, which has come
up with some really fantastic
schemes, including revision of
Resolution 242, is apparently
working on another project to
bring together all the "interested
parties" in the Lebanon situation
and Vance announced he was
discussing this with other
governments. Meanwhile, the
State Department moves closer
towards accusing Israel of
illegally using American
equipment in offensive actions in
Lebanon a charge which, if
substantiated, could bar Israel as
recipient of further military aid
from this country.
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OIIVU, II


y, November 2, 1979
\lews in Brief
The JewiahFtoridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
~ ..-.. ~. ... _,
Page 13
i iii
w
*rx
r m
esset Session Subdued By Dayan's Resignation
ByJTA Win Service*
I AVIV Defense Min-
Ezer Weizmnn interrupted
five-day visit to Cairo Tues-
[ to fly back to Jerusalem to
icipate in a Knesset vote of
Idence in the government of
ie Minister Menachem
He returned to Cairo
Yards to continue his talks
Egyptian officials on the
aspects of Israel's with-
yaffrom Sinai.
the Knesset opened its winter
lion Monday under the
shadow of Foreign Minister
Moshe Dayan's resignation and
the Supreme Court's decision
declaring the Gush Emunim
settlement of Elon Moreh illegal.
Both surprise developments
occurred after Weizman had
arrived in the Egyptian capital.
After a long telephone con-
versation with Begin, he decided
to return to Jerusalem after a
scheduled meeting with
President Anwar Sadat Tuesday
morning. He was expected to
raise the issue of Sinai oil for
Israel.
PARIS Hundreds of French
Jews attended the trial of three
former Nazis, including Kurt
Lishka, the former Paris area
Gestapo chief, when it opened
Tuesday in Cologne.
Lishka and his two accom-
plices. Herbert Hagen and Ernst
Heinrichson, are charged with
the forced deportation of more
than 50,000 Jews from France,
most of whom never returned.
Lishka, who has been living
quietly in Cologne since the end
to JUindliw
ie Politics of Art Expression
Continued on Page 4-
so vastly different in
Letic sensibility and cultural
tprise, shared the same con
jrary conclusion.
bis view of art is, indeed, only
[step, although admittedly a
, step, removed from the aes-
|ic principles that characterize
atrocious Soviet sculpture
painting typical of the
linist era; it is clearly allied to
fascist style of the Hitler-
Bsolini axis, whose object was
iake simple statements about
ultimate triumph of the
Bses through the triumphs of
fir- state.
IUSIC ENTERS into all of
with its own role to play. It
be a bit harder to conceive
music can serve up a
laical message in the same way
It the literary and plastic arts
fut even in a generalized way,
has only to recall the agonies
lited upon composers like pro-
|iev and Shostakovich by the
. n't strategists in the Kremlin
Isee how this art form, too, can
be an effective political propa-
ganda weapon when it is deemed
necessary to manipulate music
toward that end.
One would think that the per-
former of music is immune to all
of this. Unlike the composer, he
is, in the end, no more than an
interpreter of a known com-
position, and what he brings to
his interpretations can hardly be
political if the compositions
themselves are not.
IT IS, I suppose, on this basis
especially that starry-eyed slaves
of the latest Muscovite keyboard
genius or gymnast or ballet
dancer base their argument that
art is apolitical as they race off to
see them wherever they may
appear in public performance.
But even here they are wrong, for
the inference one is meant to
draw from these artists is clear:
they are exceptional because the
Soviet Union, Soviet society,
Soviet culture are exceptional.
There is no doubt that the
message is subliminal, but its
intent is obvious, in fact far more
so than were it explicitly stated.
Rap
Council Women
!onnally's Mideast Policy
/ASHINGTON (JTA)
Iddle East issues were
pminent at the 10th Biennial
it Program Institute of the
tional Council of Jewish
)men attended by 500
[legates from 36 states at the
jreham Americana Hotel here.
The opening dinner was ad-
bssed by Israel's Ambassador
I the United Nations, Yehuda
urn, who castigated the anti-
el speech of Cuban President
lei Castro to the UN General
sembly.
THE NCJW also issued a
Jtement deploring former
las Governor John Connelly's
Idle East plan that would
le Israel's withdrawal from all
fcupied Arab territories for an
lured supply of Arab oil at
|ble prices.
Hum condemned Castro's
iparison of Israel's actions
kard the Palestinians with the
ntment of Jews by the Nazis
Jag World War II. He called
| juxtaposition "an outrageous
desecration against the victims of
the Holocaust" and observed
that the absence of a public
outcry against it showed to what
degree attitudes toward Israel
have eroded under the impact of
Arab propaganda.
Blum also explained why Israel
will never deal with the Palestine
Liberation Organization. He
called it an invention by which
the Arabs hope to achieve the
destruction of Israel.'
IN A REACTION to Con
nally's speech at the Washington
Press Club, the NCJW said: "He
called for Israeli territorial with-
drawal before calling for an end
to terrorism. And, most
significantly, he mistakenly
linked U.S. oil shortages with
American support of Israel, a
view not shared by this gover-
nment or by responsible
authorities in the field. If there
were no Israel, the OPEC
(Organization of Petroleum
Exporting Countries) nations
would still control the flow of oil
to the West on their own terms."
It is for this reason that
organizations like the Jewish De-
fense League take such
vociferous objection to ap-
pearances of Soviet artists in the
United States.
As the JDL sees it. these
artists are neon signs advertising
the greater glory of the Soviet
system, when one really ought to
see them for what they are:
blinders to isolate our vision
against the grim realities of the
oppressive Soviet political
system from which they come to
beguile us.
ARE SOVIET performers in
music, gymnastics and the ballet
outstanding? By definition they
are; it is necessary that those
who visit here be outstanding.
But this is so to the exclusion of
too many personal freedoms and
ought to be seen in the same light
as the Soviets' excellence, say, in
missiles: it, too, is an achieve-
ment paid for at a price that is
devastating to the human spirit.
In the end, those in America
who indulge their artistic sen-
sibilities by jamming the
auditoriums wherever Soviet
performers may appear are
making the most revolting of
bourgeois statements: they are
saying that they are willing for
others to pay this devastating
price in order that their own
'higher" order of aesthetic
appreciation may be indulged
and pleased.
Is the Jewish Defense League
therefore right in engaging in the
sort of exotic tactics unique to
their brand of "persuasion" as a
preventive against Soviet per-
formances here? In a sense, it
seems to me that these tactics are
as self-indulgent as are the well-
fed aesthetes who clamber to
attend them. For more on that,
another time .
John E. Vlnsant, Jr., M.D.P.A.
IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE RELOCATION
OF HIS OFFICE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY
AND FRACTURES
TO
HOME FEDERAL SA VINGS BLDG.
WC Homeon St Suite 8D Hollywood. FL 33020
Wee- Hour. By Appt phone. 02SAOOI Dade: 944-8452
of the war, has become a symbol
for many French Jews of un-
punished and unrepentant former
Nazis. Lishka had been sentenced
to life imprisonment by a French
court in abesentia but had
escaped trial in Germany till now
due to a technicality.
NEW YORK Yasir Arafat,
chairman of the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization, has
returned to Jerusalem three
times since Israelis captured the
city, and on one occasion, he
himself narrowly escaped cap-
ture.
The close call is revealed in a
portrait of Arafat in the Novem-
ber issue of Life Magazine,
written by David Tinnin. In an
interview with Tinnin, Arafat
explained that he returned to
Jerusalem, his birthplace, by
wearing a disguise and using
" falre papers.
Asked what he would do if he
could return, he said he would
"continue my prayers" because
on his last visit they were inter-
rupted. "The Israelis caught a
colleague of mine who was
carrying my picture. After they
started searching, I had to run,"
Arafat said.
Gary a. Yanowltz, D.D.S.
General Dentistry
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Mon-i:ispfn-8pm Frl 8 50am
wed 8 SO am S pm Sat 8 50 am
Tnurs:i:ispm-8pm
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*


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Friday, November 2, 1979
American Savings Announces
New Managers
Morris N. Broad, president of
American Savings and Loan
Association of Florida, has
announced the following
managerial appointments:
Mary Ann Bacon has been
appointed branch manager of tht
Pembroke Lakes office in
Pembroke Pines. Prior to joining
American Savings, Bacon was a
branch manager of a Dade
County financial institution.
Bacon holds a degree from Fisk
University in Tennessee.
Peter L. Chinnici has been
appointed branch manager of the
North Miami Beach office.
Chinnici has been with American
Savings since July 1978, and was
formerly a branch manager with
Hempstead Bank in New York
City. Chinnici holds a degree
from A del phi University in New
York.
Jonathan D. Frieze has been
appointed branch manager of the
Triton Tower office in Miami
Beach. Frieze has been with
American Savings since April
1978, and was formerly an at-
torney in Manchester, England.
Steven J. Gersack has been
appointed branch manager of the
Young Circle office in Hollywood.
Gersack has been with American
Savings since April 1977, holds a
degree from Indiana University.
Frederick A. Sawtell has been
appointed branch manager of the
Gait Ocean Mile office in Fort
Lauderdale. Sawtell holds a
degree in business from Salem
State College in Massachusetts
and has been with American
Savings since January 1976.
Douglas L. Sexton has been
appointed branch manager of the
North Miami office. Sexton holds
a degree in business from Florida
Atlantic University and has been
with American Savings since
May 1976.
Joan Van Wyck has been
appointed branch manager of the
West Hollywood office. Van
Wyck has been with American
Savings since February 1975,
holds a degree from Calvin
Coolege, Michigan.
Lynn R. Veil has been ap-
pointed branch manager of the
Pompano Beach office. Veil has
been with American Savings
since April 1979, and was for-
merly a branch manager with a
Broward County commercial
bank. Veil holds a degree from
Michigan State University.
Karen T. Zwick has been
appointed branch manager of the
Emerald Hills office in
Hollywood. Zwick holds a degree
in business from Barry College in
Miami and has been with
American Savings since August
1976.
American Savings, with 26
offices in Florida, has assets
exceeding $1.6 billion and is the
fourth largest savings and loan
association in the state of
Florida.
Red Cross Rapped
New View Puts Dutch
Of Nazi Era Down
By HENRIETTE BOAS
AMSTERDAM (JTA) -
The failure of both the Dutch
government-in-exile and the
Dutch Red Cross to offer any
support or succor to the more
than 100,000 Dutch Jews
deported by the Nazis during the
German occupation of Holland in
World War II was documented in
the ninth volume of a 12-volume
history of the war years by Prof.
Louis de Jong, former director of
The Netherlands State Institute
for World War II Documen-
tation.
Volume Nine, just published
here, devotes most of its nearly
1,600 pages to the activities of
the Netherlands Government-in-
Exile in London and the Dutch
Red Cross and its activities in
unoccupied parts of Europe and
other free countries. About 100
pages are concerned with the
Jews in occupied Holland and
those who managed to escape.
ACCORDING TO de Jong, the
Dutch authorities in London
seemed hardly aware of the mass
deportation of Jews and did
virtually nothing in its broad-
casts from London to urge the
non-Jewish population to help
them.
The Netherlands Red Cross, in
contrast, to the Red Cross
societies of other occupied
countries, provided very little
assistance to Jews. Dutch
representatives in France,
Belgium, Switzerland, Spain and
Portugal were likewise unhelpful,
de Jong stated.
De Jong, who retired upon
reaching the age of 65 last May,
is of Jewish origin. His report of
the indifference of Dutch
authorities to the suffering of
Jews in Holland during the war
differs sharply with the
widespread belief to the contrary
held in many countries, especially
the United States.
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iday, November 2,1979
The Jewish Floridian and Sho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 15
POCs Urge Americans Not To Relax
JEW YORK (JTA) -
Iree former Soviet Jewish
fisoners of Conscience urged the
nerican public not to relax its
ipaign on behalf of Soviet
vs. They said they feared the
tent increases in Soviet Jewish
Migration would lull Americans
;<> a false sense of victory, while
reality, more Jews than ever
fore are denied exit visas.
The three, Eduard Kuznetsov,
jatoly Altman and Wulf Zal-
inson, spoke at a press con-
rence sponsored by the
aiional Conference on Soviet
Iwry (NCSJ) at the Carnegie
Tidowment Center here.
|The three are currently touring
U.S. on a mission designed to
lly American public support to
cure the release of Iosif
endelevich, Yuri Federov and
leksei Murzhenko, who have
en in Soviet labor camps for
are than 10 years. They are
imprisoned for their part in the
June 1970 attempt to hijack a
Soviet airplane and fly to Israel.
Altman, Zalmanson and three
other Jews were pardoned in
April by Soviet President Leonid
Brezhnev, while Kuznetsove was
among a group of five prisoners
exchanged by the U.S. for two
Soviet citizens convicted of
spying in New Jersey. Kuznet-
sov, Altman and Zalmanson met
in Washington with National
Security Advisor Zbigniew
Brzezinski, Congressmen and
other U.S. officials. They said
Brzezinski promised the U.S. will
increase its efforts on behalf of
Soviet Jews.
In the press conference, Zal-
manson said that Mendelevich,
who is an Orthodox Jew, suffers
more and is subject to harsher
treatment because he refuses to
abandon his religious practices.
Although he was originally sen-
tenced to a labor camp, he has
been transferred to Chistopol
Prison, which is known for its
strict rules, Zalmanson said.
Kuznetsov pleaded on behalf of
Federov and Murzhenko, who are
not Jewish, noting, in response to
a question, that if released they
will orobbably immigrate to
Israel. Kuznetsov also charged
that at least 16,000 Jews apply
each month for permission to
emigrate but only 4,700 are
usually granted exit visas.
Altman urged that continued
efforts be taken to help Ida
Nudel, who is in exile in Siberia,
to regain her freedom, noting
that she is now the only woman
on the list of POCs. Brooklyn
District Attorney Eugene Gold,
chairman of the NCSJ, said the
methods by which the three
former POCs were released
pardons or exchanges could be
applied to all Jewish activists
now imprisoned in the Soviet
Union and that such a release
would be very feasible at this
stage of U.S.-USSR relations.
Raymond Named Israel Bonds Chairman
Hillcrest resident, Joseph
Raymond, was named Israel
Bonds chairman for South
Broward County, according to
William I .it (man. chairman of the
board of governors, Israel Bonds
Broward County. Raymond will
oversee all phases of the Israel
Bonds Campaign within
organizations, synagogues and
***
*3o*
By Abe Hal pern
Question:
Continuing my answer to the question
.ihmitted by Eve Brier of Miami Beach regar-
ding the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls and
[heir significance to Biblical studies, Judaism and
Christianity. (Jewish Floridian and Shofar, Oct.
f, 1979, p. 15)
Part III
(Third of a series)
The Dead Sea Scrolls written in Hebrew,
kramaic and Greek, were discovered at various
times from 1947 on, along the northwest shore of
|he I toad Sea, a few miles south of Jericho.
The first scrolls, seven in number, were not
liscovered by archeologists but by two Arab
buys, Bedouins, who followed one of their goats
|nto a cave where they stumbled upon some jars
and what they described as some stinking
bundles of leather.
Three of these scrolls were acquired in 1947
by I! L. Sukenik (1889-1953), the first professor
t>f archeology at the Hebrew University. The
bther four were acquired later in the United
ptates by Yigael Yadin, son of Professor Sukenik.
These seven scrolls and others discovered
later are now located in the Museum of the Dead
pea Scrolls, the Shrine of the Book.
THE AUTHORS of these scrolls are at-
tributed by Yigael Yadin to the Essenes. In a
mimentary on tape provided for visitors to the
Shrine of the Book, dated 1974, he says:
"We believe that the Dead Sea Scrolls
elonged to the Essenes, one of the three major
Jewish sects of this time, the Second Temple
eriod and the time of Jesus. According to
'osephus Plavius (38-100), the Jewish historian of
the time, the Essenes were in fact celibates who
lived in a monastic group. They did not marry,
they had no private property, everything
elonged to the community."
Following is a brief description of three of
these seven scrolls.
"One of the most important of the scrolls is
the complete scroll of Isaiah. .The scroll we
liscovered has all the chapters of Isaiah from
papier 1 to 66.
"IT IS the oldest complete biblical
[manuscript existing in the world today. Not more
than about five or six hundred years elapsed
PM'tween when the actual words of Isaiah were
l*aid and this scroll was copied in the second
pntury BCE.
"It is amazing that although the original
Scroll in the museum is more than 2,000-years-old,
how dose it is to the Bible we read today either in
Hebrew or in translations which were made from
the original Hebrew. .
The scroll was written on parchment and
'ch piece was sewn to another. You can see the
earns quite clearly between each sheet.
"Before writing anything, the scribes would
r--ake parallel lines with a sharp instrument and
|hen hang the letters of the words downwards
from the line.
TO CORRECT their mistakes they would
ert missing words between the lines. Perhaps
1 is the origin of the expression that one is able
> read vetween the lines.
"The greatest value of course, the real im
portarice of the discovery of the 2,000-years-olc
Isaiah document is that it allows us to study i
text hundreds of years older than any one we hac_
previously seen, and which turns out to confirm ir
large part the accuracy of the translation that w
read today. ." (ibid)
I "The Second Scroll of Isaiah in Israel, oneo
the three acquired by Professor Sukenik, i
known as MS 2. In contrast to MS 1, it is in i
rather poor state of preservation. .( These arel
the identifications made by scholars for these two
Isaiah Scrolls.)
"Despite the incompleteness of thi;
manuscript, its existence in parallel to MS 1
enables us to note significant comparisons. There
are some differences. MS 2 is nearer to the
Masoretic text known to us, especially in matters
of spelling. It does not have the full' vowelled
spelling that is common in MS 1. In addition, it
contains variations on the Masoretic text, not all
of which appear also in MS 1. This is a further
warning that we must be careful in our
examination of and conclusion about
the'correctness" of these ancient scrolls, since
they date back to the period before the final
standardization which gave us the text as we
know it today." (The Message of the Scrolls by
Yigael Yadin, pp. 87, 88)
"THE HABAKKUK Commentary____was
at the time of its discovery the only work of its
kind. Since then later excavations have revealed
other similar commentaries on different Biblical
books, although they have survived only in
fragments. The Habakkuk Commentary is
significant mainly in that it deals with the in-
terpretation of the words of the prophet and
attempts to apply them to contemporary events.
The word repeatedly used by the writer of the
Commentary is pesher, which is difficult to
translate into English. It means a combination of
interpretation, application and commentary. The
writer, in other words, seeks to convey an un-
derstanding and interpretation of some concealed
meaning in the prophecies, the true significance
and application of which are known only to a
chosen few. The Commentary of Habakkuk sets
out to explain how the prophecies will materialize
and how they should be applied to certain events
of the day. .
"The author of the Habakkuk Commentary
makes matters simple. His system is to quote
verse by berse from the Biblical book of
Habakkuk and immediately after it add his
explanation, saying, 'Its hidden interpretation is
such and such.'
"The significance of the scroll is therefore
two-fold. On the one hand it gives us the text of
the book of Habakkuk, which, as mentioned
before, is a thousand years older than any Hebrew
text so far known. On the other, it enables us to
learn of the background and problems of the
members of the sect who wrote the scroll." (ibid,
pp. 90, 91)
A description of the other four scrolls will
appear in the next column.
(TO BE CONTINUED)
Editor's note:
Please send all questions to:
ASK ABE
2719 Hollywood Brvd
Hollywood, Florida 53020
hi-rises.
Long active in Jewish com-
munal affairs in New Jersey and
South Florida, Raymond served
as an Israel Bonds chairman in
Teaneck and was also on the
United Jewish Appeal Cabinet.
He has been a prime mover in the
Hillcrest UJA campaign, is a
member of the B'nai B'rith
Presidents Club, the ZOA, and
the Jewish War Veterans. He is
also active with the Jewish
Federation of South Broward and
is vice president of Men's ORT.
Raymond is a member of the
Israel Bonds Prime Ministers
Club and has been honored by the
ZOA, and Brandeis University.
Joseph Raymond
Stanfield Gets Free Rein
To Meet PLO Spokesmen
MONTREAL (JTA) -
Robert Stanfield. Prime Minister
Joe Clark's ambassador-at-large
to the Middle East, is free to
make contact with the Palestine
Liberation Organization if he so
chooses. External Affairs
Minister Flora MacDonald said
in Ottawa.
She said the Cabinet gave
Stanfield no instructions on
consulting the PLO while he is in
the Middle East, and it is up to
him to do so or not. MacDonald
added, however, that "There is
no question of official recognition
of the PLO at this time" by
Canada. Before Stanfield left he
said he would not talk to PLO
officials.
CLARK SAID in a radio in-
terview earlier this week that he
would consider recognizing the
PLO as the official representative
of the Palestinian people if it
renounced terrorism and
recognized Israel's right to exist.
Stanfield. a former leader of
Clark's Progressive Conservative
Party, was sent on a fact-finding
mission to the Middle East last
month.
His assignment is to elicit the
views of Israel and the Arab
states on Clark's election
campaign promise to move
Canada's Embassy in Israel from
Tel Aviv to Jerusalem and to
assess the Middle East situation
in general. He will submit his
recommendations some time next
year. Clark said on the radio
interview that he still believed
Jerusalem should be recognized
as the capital of Israel but would
have to consider Stanfield's
recommendations before acting.
_
L
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memorial chapels
1921 Pembroke Rd.
Hollywood. Fia
921-7200
5411 w. Okeecrtobee Blvd
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for information call: 920-8225 or wrife:
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PHONE:


Page 14
Page lb
l nejewisn
tiondtan and She/far of Greater Hollywood
TfipeeCfieePS
tov fS,
mm
cPtIde
\
Bob Johnston
Miami
f
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