The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00233

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJewisti Floridian
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 9 Number 21
Hollywood, Florida Friday, October 19,1979
' "' *'* SKochtt price 35 Cents
Montreal to be Site for CJF General Assembly
NEW YORK Historic
events and circumstances
converging on the Jewish
communities of North America
during the coming decade will be
a major focus of the 48th annual
General Assembly of the Council
of Jewish Federations, Nov. 14-
18 in Montreal, Que.
Priority items on this year's
agenda, according to Lawrence
II. Williams of Cleveland,
chairman of the GA Program
Committee, include the Middle
Kast peace process; expanding
and allocating Federation
financial resources in a time of
inflation; demographic changes
in the Jewish community, and
World Jewry in the 198(r8.
Set in the continental at-
mosphere of Quebec, the 1979 GA
will bring together leadership
from 190 Federations in the
United States and Canada. The
GA, which includes over 150
sessions covering every major
aspect of contemporary Jewish
life, has become the central
convocation of the organized
Jewish community in North
America.
CJF president Morton L.
Mandel of Cleveland will be
keynote speaker at the opening
plenary session on Wednesday
evening, Nov. 14. Leon Dulzin,
chairman of the Jewish Agency,
will address the Assembly
Thursday, Nov. 15, on "A New
YLC Meets with Russians
More than 40 members of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward's Young Leadership committee attended a
meeting at the home of Valerie and Paul Sussman. The
topic of the evening was the Russian Resettlement
program of the Jewish Family Service, a recipient of funds
from the Federations's Combined Jewish Appeal'Israel
Emergency Fund.

i
a
From left are Larry Weiner, chairman; Valerie and Paul Sussman,
hosts. See Related Photos on page 3.
Kra in Israel Diaspora
Relations," while the Plenary on
Saturday evening, Nov. 17, will
be devoted to the challenge of
meeting human needs in a period
of inflation and recession.
Scholar-in Residence for the
1979 G A is Dr. Irwin C. Cotler of
McGill University Law School,
who will participate in a variety
of formal and informal sessions.
At the concluding Plenary
Session on Sunday, Nov. 18, Dr.
Cotler will explore "The
Federation as an instrument of
Qualitative Jewish Survival."
Four Forums are scheduled to
provide in-depth examinations of
selected issues. They include
"Planning Challenges for the
Family
Skating
Party Set
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward Women's
Division will hold its first Family
Skating Party, Sunday, Oct. 21,
at 10 a.m. at the Pines Roller
Rink, 7685 Hollywood
Boulevard, Pembroke Pines,
according to Brenda Greenman,
vice president, community
education.
Greenman said the Family
Skating Party will give South
Broward residents the op-
portunity to meet and greet their
neighbors, learn some com-
munity facts and enjoy rink roller
skating.
She encourages all family
members to attend. Babysitters
will be provided.
For additional information,
contact Nancy Mull ins at the
Federation.
Famed Bible Scholar to Speak
Col. Itzhak Itzhaki, inter-
nationally acclaimed Bible
scholar, and a sixth generation
Israeli, will present a community
lecture Oct. 30 at 8 p.m. at
Temple Beth Shalom, 1400 N.
46th Ave., Hollywood, on Oct. 30
at 8 p.m.
The event is co-sponsored by
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward and the Central Agency
for Jewish Education.
After completing 21 years of
service with the Israel Defense
Forces, where he served as the
head of the educational branch in
Col. Itzhaki
the general headquarters in
charge of the Yediat Ha'aretz
(Knowledge of the Land
Program), Col. Itzhaki became
director of the Pedagogic Center
in the Israel Ministry of
Education. He supervised
development of curriculum in the
public schools and devised
training aids for his teachers.
He combines knowledge of the
Bible, the geography of the land
of Israel and archeology with the
ability to transmit to his
audience a love of and knowledge
of the Bible, according to pro-
gram organizers.
Tanks to Jordan
Raises Eyebrows
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) -
Israeli diplomatic circles
here have expressed grave
concern at Britain's
decision to sell Jordan 200
advanced Chieftain tanks,
some of which were
originally built for the
Shah's regime in Iran.
The tanks, worth about 200
million Pounds Sterling, are the
latest model of a fighting
machine which Britain had
originally hoped to sell to Israel.
She dropped the idea about 10
years ago as part of a ban on
arms sales to front line states in
the Arab-Israel conflict. Britain's
only restraint now is her declared
intention of not upsetting the
Middle East balance of power.
THE NEWS of the sale to
Jordan came as no surprise to
Continued on Page 12
1980s The Impact of
Population Shifts"; "The
Continuing Quest for Peace in the
Middle East"- "The Impact of
Increased Soviet-Jewish
Immigration on the Advocacy
Movement/' and "Inside the
Arab World."
Sabbath observance will in-
clude a Friday Oneg Shabbat
with Dr. Ruth Wisse, director of
Jewish Studies at McGill
University, who will discuss the
Yiddish renaissance. An in-
novative program of "Judaica
Teach-ins" is being developed for
Saturday, with three concurrent
sessions concentrating on the
application of traditional Jewish
values in contemporary corn-
Continued on Page 14-
Beach Kickoff Luncheon
More than 50 residents of Hollywood and Hallandale recently at-
tended a luncheon at the Jewish Federation of South Broward. The
purpose of the meeting was to begin organization of the attendees'
respective buildings for the 1960 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund. Seated from left are Milton Seitles, Hallmark chair-
man; Dr. Robert Pollack and Jack Scharf, Hallmark co-chairmen.
Standing from left are Sam Levenson, Riviera; Linda Levin, guest
speaker; Sumner Kaye, executive director of the Federation; and Dr.
Harry Silver, Gulf Stream Gardens.
Plans for Legacies and Endowments

The Legacy and Endowment Committee of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward met recently to discuss the future coarse of the
Committee. Chairman Joe Schwartz (seated second from right) is
looking forward to the Federation benefiting greatly from the
proceeds of his committee's efforts. Anyone interested in bequesting
monies to the Federation is requested to call the Federation. Seated
from left are Stephen Rose, Joyce Newman, Joe Schwartz and Nancy
Greenberg. Standing from left are Larry Weiner, Paul Sussman.
Sumner Kaye, Ted Newman, R. Joel Weiss and Irving Fox.
'Newsweek'Apologizes to ADL
For Anti-Semitic Stereotype
NEW YORK Newsweek
magazine has apologized to the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith for its "highly regrettable
lapse" in reflecting "an anti-
Semitic stereotype" in a Sept. 3
article entitled "Israel's Spies in
the U.S."
In a letter dated Sept. 20 to
Abraham H. Foxman, ADL's
associate national director,
Newsweek Editor Lester Bern-
stein said: "Since I was absent
at the time the Sept. 3 issue was
prepared, I have conducted a
thorough post-mortem and
satisfied myself that this lapse
resulted from insensitivity and
inadvertence, not from malice.
"I CAN assure you that w<
have engaged in some con-
sciousness-raising on this subject
and I do not expect a recurrence
In our next issue we plan to
publish a critical letter and ar.
acknowledgment that we wen
wrong."
Foxman, who had written t>
David Auchincloss, Newsweek'*
publisher, protesting the article
as "untrue and unfair," accepted
the Bernstein apology "with
restored faith in Newsweek' i
I objectivity and fair-mindedness '
%


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Page 2
77u> #MfaA Floridian and Shofar of Ortatar Hollywood
South Broward Shalom
Held In Meline's Sukkah

South Broward Shalom is a committee of the
Women's Division of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward. The committee attempts to reach all newcomers
to the South Broward areas and inform them of the
Jewish community and its many facets. The second
Shalom event this year was held at the home of Sam and
Audrey Meline, in the family's Sukkah. Louise Diamond
is chairman of the Shalom Committee.
Seated from left are Judy and Walter Frank, Bonnie Benefeld and
Toby Greenberg. Standing from left are Ron and Nancy Ehrlich,
Bruce Benefeld, Jacquelynne and Simon Reichbaum.
Seated from left are Shaya Vaizburd, Julia Vaizburd and Svetlana
Vaizburd. Standing from left are Yakov Belogorodaky, Roza
Belogorodsky, Isabella Belogorodksy and Mike Belogorodaky. All are Seated from left are Nate and Marion Heller. Suzanne and Gerald
Russian emigrants recently resettled in South Broward. Gunzberger. Standing from left are Irving and Roselyn Michaels.
Zelda and Michael Ehrlich.
Friday, October 19,1979
;!.).>...1............wimm..........i.ij, '>.
Former POC
Speaks At
Federation
Israel Zalmonson, former
Prisoner-of-Conscience, ad-
dressed members of the South
Broward community recently at
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward. according to Dr. Stan
Spatz. chairman of the Soviet
Jewry Committee.
Zalmonson discussed his arrest
in 1970, when he was charged
with "treason and anti-Soviet
Agitation and Propaganda" and
his prison sentence.
At the age of 21, Zalmonson.
was part of the escape plan that
led to the now infamous
"Leningrad" show trials. Prior to
his being sentenced, Zalmonson
was quoted as saying. "The only
thing that drove me to this was
the desire to live and work in
Israel, my spiritual homeland."
After the Leningrad trials,
Zalmonson and eight other
defendants signed a "Last Will"
letter to the Jews of the world.
which in part read. "Jews of the
world, it is your holy duty to
struggle for the freedom of your
brothers in the USSR. Know that
to a great extent the fate of the
Jews of Russia...to be or not to
be...depends on you. We ex-
perience a keen envy of freedom,
of its blessings which have
become commonplace for you.
We appeal to you to use them to
the hilt in defense of our rights."
Zalmonson is currently touring
the United States, hoping to
inspire those he addresses to
further action on behalf of
Anatoly Sharansky and all
I'risoners-of-Conscience still
serving sentences in the USSR.
Holiday Crafts
Fair Slated
Application blanks are
available now for the annual
Holiday Crafts Fair set for Dec. 1
and 2 in Young Circle Park, U.S.
1 and Hollywood Blvd.
This event offers an oppor-
tunity for individuals and clubs
to make money for their favorite
projects by selling ceramics,
stitchery, plants, leatherwork.
james, jellies, decoupage. yarn
dolls, decorations, art work,
batik, copper and all sorts of
handcrafted novelties.
Seated from left are MariAnn Soanik, Ariene Kushner and Nellie Net profits from the entry fees
Attia. Standing from left are Martin Soanik, Steven and Wendy will benefit the Greater Holly-
Benjamin, Charlotte and Harvey Abraham. wood Philharmonic Orchestra.
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Friday, October 19,1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3

Russians Meet With
Federation Young Leaders
i
Front from left are Karen and Rabbi Ben Romer. Center from left are
Dr. Harvey and Barbara Feldman, and Lea Plotkin. Rear from left are
Marlene and Dr. Bob Heller, and Rabbi Paul Plotkin.
*%
Front from left are Barbara and Ben Tobias, Dr. Barbara Rothstein
and Edward Webb. Rear from left are Lynn Fisher, Peggy and Robert
Brin, and Gary Fisher.
Jr
Front from left are Abby Weiner, Noreen and Fred Friedman. Rear
from left are Yakov and Roza Belogorodaky; Julia, Svetlana and
Shays Vaizburd.
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A New Spirit at Temple Israel
ByAMYWILPON
"Temple Israel is more than
the only synagogue in the
Miramar area, it is the onlv
back to the traditional Triennial
Cycle of reading the Torah. One
third.of the scrolls are read each
year in order to afford more
discussion time on each subject
due to the smaller amount of
material covered. A Shabbos
Schul has been started whereby
once a month there is a service
oriented for the entire family.
They are kept brief, and families
are encouraged to attend
together and participate in a free
luncheon with singing and
discussion.
Temple Israel features a USY
and Kadima group, as well as a
full school calendar for children
from 2 '/ -years-old through
confirmation. College students
are kept up to date through
bulletins and Hillel-sponsored
dinners.
"In today'8 world, the
synagogue is the fortress of
Jewish Life. It is the center of our
Jewish experience and our second
home," said Rabbi Plotkin.
"With the difficulty in main-
taining Jewish identity,
tradition, and heritage today, the
question is not 'Can I afford to
join?' but 'As a Jew, can I
afford not to?' "
Rabbi Plotkin
Jewish presence. There is a new
spirit here, a spirit that people
enjoy getting involved with,"
said Rabbi Paul Plotkin of
Temple Israel.
He is beginning his second
year as the religious leader after
being the assistant rabbi at the
largest congregation in Van-
couver. "Our members perceive
Temple Israel as their home away
from home. We are a very warm
congregation of 250 families that
enjoy working together."
Temple Israel began as the
Miramar Hebrew Community
Association 25 years ago. The
building is being renovated, and
the social halls will be used for
wedding and Bar Mitzvah
receptions.
"A good service is one in which
the congregants are inspired,
learn, enjoy themselves and be
themselves. Friday night a
formal sermon is delivered, along
with a current events spot about
different points of interest in
world Jewry. The reason for this
is that sermons are becoming too
political and tend to leave out
Jewish knowledge. Saturday
morning services feature a Torah
discussion that is exciting, in-
teresting and gets the
congregants involved. They are
informal but dignity is never
sacrificed," commented Plotkin.
Changes have been made at
Temple Israel since Rabbi
Plotkin arrived. They have gone
Members of the Jewish Federation of South Broward Career Women's
Council Steering Committee seated from left are Sylvia Abram, Elaine
Flewher and Shane Wolf. Standing from left are Marion Wolf son.
Nancy Atkin and Rita I lowit.
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Menorah Chapels, to preserve the
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, October 19,1979
The Word from Clearwater \
From Clearwater, Fla. way comes the news that
Judaism has finally been elevated to the same rank of
esteem previously held exclusively by Christianity.
It is the Ku Klux Klan that has done the elevating.
They've taken to burning Stars of David in the same
way that they once reserved exclusively for the
Christian Cross.
- Neither Jew nor Christian ought to be flattered
by this, or offended, whatever road our religious
sensibilities may direct us toward.
Indeed, this latest selection for special KKK
honors accorded the Star of David ought to be
sufficient reason for Jews and Christians to join
hands more firmly than ever in their repudiation of
such gross and ignorant action.
If we seem to have difficulties in doing that
under the best of circumstances, the two great
Western religions ought at least have no such dif-
ficulties under the worst.
The Papal Message
There is no doubt of the impact that Pope John
Paul's visit to the United States has had on all
Americans, no matter what their faith. People are
reaching out for some sort of leadership they feel
they can trust.
Certainly, there is no such trust they any longer
believe they can have in their governmental leaders.
Nor, indeed, in the leaders of the nation's commerce
and industry that once made them the richest and
most powerful country on earth.
Right or wrong, the orchestration of Pope John
Paul's visit here showed him to be a man of benign,
beneficent power, and it is this that seems so at-
tractive to the masses of Americans
So far as the Jewish community is concerned,
there" is little doubt that it also felt the warmth of his
feeling. Not even in the three-ring circus called the
United Nations did he shy away from reminiscing
about Auschwitz as a lesson in human morality in
that arena where things Jewish these days are reviled
and held in contempt.
Perhaps it is that the Pope understands that
history is consistent in this single lesson: Jews are
the harbinger of the future, and thus, such
humiliation as is currently being visited upon them
at the United Nations must be regarded as
humiliation-to-come in the not distant future for all
mankind by the forces of immorality that have seized
that body of world opinion and cynically twisted its
high ideals into a mockery of their original intent.
Auschwitz was the Pope's warning to the world,
and we are not a little frightened that, applaud him
roundly though they did, the nations of the world
still do not pay heed.
On Making Friends
Since people are inclined to seize upon the ac-
tions of individual Jews as characteristic of all Jews,
it would seem we must be especially careful in the
choice of actions that we make.
This is especially true in our prospensity for
adopting the high and the mighty as spokesmen for
our various causes. Beginning with the distinguished
journalist, Dorothy Thompson, our contemporary
history is rich in the experience of stellar per-
sonalities who took our money, spoke our sen-
timents, and then stuck a knife in our backs.
It is therefore with some degree of concern that
we note our most recent adoption: this time of movie
actress Jane Fonda and her husband, Tom Hayden,
as spokesmen in the cause of Israel.
J
~'Jewish Floridian
and SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood Office-. 28 S Federal Hwy. Suite 206, Danla Fla 33004
Telephone 920-9018
MAIN OFFICE and PLANT 120 NE 8th St Miami. Fla 33132 Phone 173 4606
FRED SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published Bl Weekly
Second Claaa Postage Paid at Danla. Fla 864600
FrMShochil
Federation officers: President. Joyce Newman; Vice Presidents Allen Gordon
Moses Hornstein; Secretary. Joel Schneider, M.D Treaaurer Jc Ann K?T
Executive Director. Sumner G Kaye. Submit'material V^ubiliaUon*to Mton
Director "elation. Director, or Leslie Horn. Assl.&nt Pubite Rel.Son.
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish We.fciy
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. Warn.
wide News Service. National Editorial Association. American Association o(
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (local area) One YearI7.S0. Out of Town upon Request
Friday, October 19, 1979
Volume 9
28 TISHRI 5740
Number 21
That Time for Nobel Thoughts
TIME AND again, I have
written about the Nobel Prize as
a political instrument too often
unrelated to the area of excellence
it recognizes. The criteria by
which we judge a great novelist
or poet, an innovative scientist or
earth-shaking humanist too
easily and too frequently take
second place to the Nobel
Academy "s favorite political
cause of the year.
Consider, say, Jorge Luis
Borges for the Academy's prize
in literature? That might well
depend on whether or not the
Academy's cozying up to Argen-
tina these days. The reasoning
might go something like this:
BORGES IS a breathtaking
novelist and philosopher, all
right. Also, he's blind and
MIMMiraHIHMIIIM
Mindlin
growing older by the minute. He
may not be around next year for
us to enshrine him in the halls of
our immortals. If we do not give
him the prize right now, Borges
may have to join the ranks of the
-+J1A
other unheralded masters whom
the Nobel Academy snubbed and
whom, one would therefore think,
the world has since forgotten:
Joyce, Proust.^Voolf, Lawrence,
Pound, to name but a few.
Still, the Academy might say,
we must gamble, and Borges
must wait. Argentina is fascist,
and the fact that Borges was one
of the most outspoken opponents
and heartrending victims of
Argentine fascism from the
earliest days of Juan Peron is
beside the point. For Ladislaus
Lutoslawski can not wait. His
gallant stand on the palace steps
of the capital city in Central
Transylvania was last year's shot
heard round the world.
Without Lutoslawski's
courage against the 500-man
insurgent force seeking the
destruction of freedom in Centra)
Transylvania, an entire continent
might today be enslaved and the
rise of the free world with it.
BE IT KNOWN, too, that in
his spare time Ladislaus Lutos-
lawski is a poet of no incon-
siderable power. Nighttime Press
of Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn,
whose gallant editor, Yussi
Steinberg. is a 17-year-old
director of the Central Transyl-
vania Security Force in Behalf of
Democracy Abroad the entire
Five Boroughs Chapter has
received a copy of the collected
works of Lutoslawski through
the underground, "38 pages in all.
Yussi Steinberg is now preparing
a definitive Nighttime edition of
these poems on vellum which, he
says, were smuggled out through
the frontline action on the palace
steps.
Steinberg considers that they
rank with the rankest of Chile's
Pablo Neruda. Anyway, Central
Transylvania today. Argentina
tomorrow even if it remains
fascist and, of course, providing
Borges is still alive.
Now. who am I to say that
politics will enter into the Nobel
Continued on Page 13
xamines
When Harlem Was Jewish Community
NKW YORK Jews and
Blacks lived peacefully together
in Harlem during the first two
decades of the twentieth century,
with the Jewish population
leaving largely for reasons of
upward mobility, says Dr.
Jeffrey Gurock, professor of
Jewish history at Yeshiva
University's Bernard Revel
Graduate School in his newly
released book, When Harlem
Wat Jewish 1H70-19W. published
by Columbia University Press.
"The first large incursion pf
Blacks into Harlem, then a
predominently Jewish neigh-
borhood, did not precipitate a
mass exodus of Jews. Although
some opposed Black settlement,
more stayed, and lived har-
moniously with and among
Blacks until new economic op-
portunities and better built
neighborhoods beckoned in the
1920's. Indeed, Jews were among
the last whites to leave what was
to become the renowned Black
ghetto." Dr. Gurock says.
THE BOOK, which "grants
long overdue recognition to a
once important and until now
uncelebrated American Jewish
community." offers many
descriptions of heretofore
unknown or unrecognized events,
issues, and presonalities.
It also seeks to extend the
knowledge of issues such as
urban growth and decay, im-
migrant settlements and
relocations and internal Jewish
communal organization and
conflict. For Dr. Gurock. it is on
this comparative and analytical
level that there is most to be
gained.
Dr. Gurock believes that
previous historians of mid-
nineteenth_ century German-
American Jewish life centered
either on "the changing com-
munal structure of early Atlantic
coast Jewish centers under the
impact of large-scale Central
European migration, or upon the
trials and travels of the im-
migrant peddler the Jewish
component in America's manifest
destiny story who plies his
wares in the Western wilderness
and who ultimately succeeds in
establishing focuses of Jewish
economic and religious life in
most major entrepot cities on the
road."
He explains that "historians
recognize the absence of sub-
stantial communications between
the older Eastern centers and the
new pioneer communities of the
West, and have examined the
valiant attempts at national
unification initiated by several
groups of religious leaders within
a dispersed American Jewry. Yet
no one has analyzed the economic
life and community-building
activities to those other German
Jews who were neither really part
of the seaboard communities nor
of the remote midwestern set-
tlements the .lews of the early.
nineteenth century suburbs,"
which Harlem. New York's
uptown suburb, was one. k
A DETALIED study of tum of
the century East European
migration from the lower East
side to Harlem illuminates the
complex set of forces directing
Ultra-city migration, upsetting
many commonly held views of
contemporary analysis, who see
uptown migration as a "signal
milestone" in the changing
economic and social life of the
new American, and who maintain
that the poor and unacculturated
immigrant at the turn of the
century had no option but to
settle in the densely populated,
run-down sections of the city
already occupied by his co-
ethnics and co-religionists.
Dr. Gurock explains that
Harlem, at least after 1900, was
home to both poor and affluent
Jews, and that, apparently, more
immigrants moved to Harlem in
the hope of financial success than
as a sign that they had already
achieved that success.
"Many of the same forces
which pushed the poor out of the
ghetto may well have con-
tributed, ironically, to the
persistence there of many of their
more affluent fellow im-
migrants," he says.
AS ONE example of his
maverick theory. Dr. Gurock
cites new law tenement and
public park legislation, which, in
improving the physical con-
ditions of life on the Lower East
Side, created more modern, but
also more expensive housing for
the newly affluent manufac-
turers, dealers and shopkeepers,
and. inadvertently forced many
poor Jews either to crowd in with
friends and relatives downtown
Continued on Page 13
I
Hie-i-*


Friday, October 19.1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
P^5
Special Education Fills a Gap for Jewish Child
The Department of Jewish
Special Education, a pilot project
of the Central Agency for Jewish
Education, is now entering its
second year in an attempt to
erase a void which has existed in
Jewish education for many years.
The notion that bright, in-
telligent children can have dif-
ficulty learning, is a phenomenon
gaining tremendous recognition.
In particular, special attention is
being focused on the Jewish child
in the community who has been
unable to function effectively in
the regular program of the
synagogue religious school, and
day school, and who is un-
comfortable participating in
social activities with his / her
peers.
To meet these needs, in
January the Central Agency for
Jewish Education started a
department of Jewish Special
Education, under the direc-
torship of Dr. Deborah Lerer. Dr.
l^erer comes to South Florida
with many years of experience,
and with a doctorate in learning
disabilities from the Teacher's
(Ollege of Columbia University.
DURINti the past year,
special programs and activities
have already been organized in
many day schools and afternoon
religious and Sunday school
programs, for the child who is
experiencing learning difficulties
Traditionally, the Jewish
community places great im-
portance on the education of its
children. It is unfortunate. Dr.
I,erer believes, that the voung
person whose learning styles may
require individual and or special
management, has been neglected,
i.e. skills, preparation for
Bar Bat Mitzvah, involvement
in holidays, traditions, customes
and ceremonies which provide a
real sense of identity for all
children.
These areas have all too often
been unreachable*' for these
youngsters. As Dr. Lerer says.
"Learning Hebrew, Jewish
history, Bible and or customs
and ceremonies frequently are
viewed as insurmountable tasks
for the child who is having
enough difficulty mastering
secular studies. For children who
have been identified in their
secular school as learning
disabled, the idea of enrolling in a
supplementary religious school is
untenable."
As part of the overall project.
Dr. Lerer. in coordination with
the synagogues' schools and day
schools in the area, has begun
implementating a program to
identify those students who may
be learning disabled in a Hebrew
school setting, although not in a
public school setting.
DK. LERER is quick to stress,
that "the very concentration on
Judaism, its values, the Bible,
customs and language offer
children a feeling of belonging to
something special and wor-
thwhile. This feeling transcends
the acquisition of specific skills
and. in fact, creates the only
atmosphere propitious for
learning. The program then
contributes significantly to the
emotional and spiritual growth of
the children. They become ac-
cepted by the school and
synagogue. They develop a
positive identity as a Jew."
The initial nine months of the
pilot special education program
have been tremendously
gratifying, according to Dr.
Lerer. She is proud of the fact
that 80 children received special
education assistance during the
first six months of the project.
The success at Temple Beth
Shalom Day School in
Hollywood, four synagogue
schools and two community
classes have provided the
catalyst for Jewish education
expansion. As Dr. Lerer reports,
"The participation of non-
affiliated Jewish families in an
organized program of Judaic
studies for learning disbled
children adds renewed hope for
the future of the Jewish com-
munity."
The Central Agency for Jewish
Education believes that as all
children are special and unique,
so must the individual learning
styles of the children be ac-
comodated. That is what Jewish
education is all about. That is
what makes Jewish education so
special. ___^___
For more information about
this special program, contact Dr.
Lerer. Jewish Special Education
director, Central Agency for
Jewish Education. 4200 Biscayne
Boulevard, Miami, 33137.
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Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, October 19,
Histadrut Council Honors
Rhoda and Jerome Gordon
The North Dade-Broward His
tadrut Council will hoot its
Annual Awards Luncheon, Sun-
day, Oct. 28, at the
Williamson Restaurant in Fort
Lauderdale, according to an
announcement by Dave Silver-
bush, co-chairman of the Council.
The luncheon is in honor of
Rhoda and Jerry Gordon, who
will receive the Histadrut Silver
Menorah Award for their
devotion and concern for World
Jewry, the people of Israel and
the cause of Histadrut. Making
the presentation will be Dr.
Morton Malavsky, spiritual
leader of Temple Beth Shalom.
A room at the Yaaski Bet
Clinic in Beersheba, Israel, is
being dedicated in memory of
Mrs. Gordon's parents, Theresa
and Isidore Wollheim. After
visiting Israel this year and wit-
nessing first-hand the services
provided at the Kupat Holim
clinics, Mrs. Gordon returned
determined to honor her parents
in this manner.
The Gordons are both active in
the North Dade-Broward Hista-
drut Council and last year were
the sponsors of a Histadrut
scholarship which allowed a child
in Israel to complete one year of
education.
The Yaaski Bet Clinic is part of
the Kupat Holim, Histadrut's
comprehensive health care arm,
which serves the needs of more
than 75 percent of Israel's
population, through 19 major
hospitals and 1,200 clinics. The
North Dade-Broward Histadrut
Council is the sDonsor of the
Rhoda, Jerome Gordon
entire second floor of the Yaaski
Bet Clinic.
Nicholas S. Bonanno, inter-
national vice president of the
International Ladies Garment
Workers Union, will be the
featured guest speaker. A
musical program will be
presented by The Distant Shores.
Mayer "Lennie" Finkel is
chairman of the luncheon, which
is sponsored by the Israel Hista-
drut Campaign.
The Israel Histadrut Cam-
paign supports the Histadrut in
the development of the numerous
institutions which today con-
stitute the essential elements of
Israeli society, including the
Kupat Holim.
Tickets for the luncheon may
be obtained through the
Histadrut office in Miami Beach.
Calendars Available
Several hundred Yahrzeit
calendars already have been
mailed at no cost to members of
the South Florida Jewish com-
munity in a special program
being conducted by Menorah
Chapels.
The calendars translate the
date of death of a loved one from
the standard calendar date to the
Hebrew date. Anniversaries of
the memorial date are then listed
by the standard year, day of the
week and date for the next 20
years.
"In keeping with the holiday
Mason, we are making the
calendars available at our three
facilities, in Sunrise, Deerfield
Beach and Margate." noted
Mark Weissman. funeral director
for the Jewish owned-and-oper-
ated chapels.
"It's a convenience to have a
reminder of when the Yahrzeit is
coming up. since there is quite a
difference in dates on the
standard calendar from year to
year."
To request a Yahrzeit calendar,
write Menorah chapels at 6800
W Oakland Park Boulevard.
Sunrise or call and indicate the
name of the loved one, date and
time of death and cemetery. A
calendar will be mailed at no
charge.
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CJF Controllers Institute
To Be Held in Nebraska
Irving Fox, controller of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward, will participate in the
Council of Jewish Federations
Controllers Institute, Oct. 22-24
in Omaha, Neb.
Designed to enhance
professional skills in this vital
aspect of Federation operations,
the Controllers Institute provides
a forum for the discussion of
fiscal and administrative con-
cerns affecting local Federations
and their agencies.
Workshops on Federation
functional accounting will be held
by city-size on Monday Oct. 22.
Functional accounting also will
be explored in reference to Soviet-
Jewish resettlement programs.
At the luncheon meeting, CJF
associate vice president Carmi
Schwartz will discuss "The
Future of CJF and Federations."
"The Controllership Function
in Federations" and "CJF
Review and the Future" will b
topics for afternoon meetings .
Scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 23 ,
are sessions on insurance am '
pensions, fire loss, monej
management and dat a
processing. The agenda for
Wednesday morning will 'oe
headed by Project Renewal, ci ish
collections and government
funded programs.
Investment broker Dr. Joseph
Soshnik, formerly president of
the University of Nebraska, will
be the keynote speaker at the
dinner on Monday evening.
The Council of Jewish
Federations is the association of
more than 190 Federations,
Welfare Funds and Community
Councils which serve nearly 800
communities and embrace over
95 percent of the Jewish
population of the United States
and Canada. Established in 1932,
the Council serves as a national
instrument to strengthen the
work and the impact of Jewish
Federations through leadership
in developing programs to meet
changing needs in the Jewish
community; through the ex-
change of successful experiences
to assure the most effective
community services; through
establishing guidelines for fund
raising and operation; and
through joint national planning
and action on common purposes
dealing with local, regional,
national and international needr.
Irving Fox
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never the same without a cup of piping
hot Maxwell House* Coffee. Its rich,
satisfying taste is brewed to be remem-
bered cup after cup. year after year.
Maxwell Housea tradition in Jewish
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*
Hia.ia.?t


Friday, October 19.1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar o[ Greater Hollywood
Page 7

Haiel Fouhdatohs DirectorIfrowafd TechnUm to Hear Alpert
To Address B'nai B'rith
Kabbi Frank A. Fischer, newly
appointed director of the seven-
unit Florida area Hillel Foun-
dations, will be the guest speaker
at the Oct. 22 dinner meeting of
Past Presidents Club of B'nai
B'rith at 6 p.m. at the Beau
Kivage Hotel, Miami Beach.
Rabbi Fischer comes to Florida
after a career as director of Hillel
Foundations at University of
Georgia. Brooklyn College,
Hofstra University and as staff
coordinator of the New York area
Hillel Foundations.
A BA graduate of Brooklyn
College, Rabbi Fischer was or-
dained at the Hebrew Union
College and took graduate
courses in sociology at Adelphi
University and University of
Georgia.
His community activities in-
clude the vice presidency of the
Ministerial Association of
Athens, Ga.; member of the
board of education of the
Brandeis School; the Rabbinical
Assembly of America and the
Central Conference of American
Rabbis.
Rabbi Fischer now resides with
his family in Coral Gables.
Judge Milton A. Friedman,
circuit judge of the Eleventh
Judicial Circuit of Florida and
president of the club, will preside.
Past B'nai B'rith Council presi-
dents will be honored by the
presentation of service cer-
tificates. Lou Shor, comedian,
will entertain.
Dinner reservations can be
made by calling general secretary
Hank Meyer.
Miller Named Regional
Director of Young Judaea
Charlotte Wolpe, youth ac-
tivities chairperson of the Florida
Hadassah Youth Commission,
announces the appointment of
Jordan Miller as regional director
of 'Hashachar -Young Judaea,
and Yehuda Einan, Shaliach from
Israel.
Miller is in charge of over-
seeing the growth and
development of some 70 Young
Judaea clubs in Florida and
Puerto Rico.
He comes to Miami from
Canton, Mass. He received a
bachelor's degree in social work
from Temple University,
Philadelphia, Pa. He also studied
at Tel Aviv University in 1976-
1977. Miller is a member of Garin
Smadar, a group of people who
plan to settle on Kibbutz Sde
Boker in the Negev.
Kinan. who arrived with his
family last month, was born in
Tel Aviv and was an active
memver of the Tsofim (Israeli
Scouts). A former member of
Kibbutz Hatzerim, Kinan comes
to Young Judaea with years of
experience in working with young
people. He has organized scout
activities in Bat Yam, a suburb of
Tel Aviv, and has worked with
youth groups in Yeruham, a
development town in the Negev.
Kinan is the former director of all
youth clubs in the city of Beer
Sheva.
The new Shaliach's primary
responsibility is working with the
programming for Young Judaea
clubs.
What a lunch!
TETLEYTEA
IN THE GLASS
CORNED BEEF
ON THE RYE
Your thirst will tell you-
iced Tetley Tea is iced tea
at its best. Because Tetley
stands up to ice. Its flavor
just won't melt! Tetley is
made with tiny tea leaves
for big flavor. Deep rich
color, too. Since Tetley
starts out stronger it lasts
longer. No wonder the fa-
vorite in Jewish homes has
been Tetley since 1875-now
beginning a second century!
K on the purkune means certified Kosher
TETLEY
'&
A CENTURY OLD TRADITION
Carl Alpert, executive vice
chairman of the international
board of governors of Technion-
Israel Institute of Technology,
will speak at an open meeting of
the new South Broward Chapter
of the American Technion
Society Tuesday, Oct. 23, at 8
p.m. in the offices of chapter
president Charles D. Landau.
The office of Loeb, Rhoades,
Hornblower and Co., of which
Landau is vice president, at 2500
E. Hallandale Beach Boulevard
in Hallandale, will be the site of
the special session welcoming
Alpert.
Other officers of the South
Broward Chapter, which serves
one of the nation's most rapidly
expanding Jewish communities,
include Sy Geier, vice president;
and Steven B. Dolchin, secretary-
treasurer.
Members of the board of
directors, in addition to the
officers, include Harry Carson,
Jerome Gevirman, David Harris,
Samuel Kallman, Betty Kallman,
Meyer Kaplan, David Posnack,
Julius Shragerand Km Stillman.
Alpert, one of the best known
Americans living in Israel, is
considered one of the foremost
authorities on the Middle East
and on Israel technology. He is
known throughout the world as a
leading journalist whose syn-
dicated column appears weekly in
scores of newspapers in more
than a dozen nations.
For more than 25 years, Carl
as he is called by thousands of
American community leaders
AJC Entebbe Board Meets
On Monday, Sept. 24, a
meeting of the board of the
Entebbe Chapter of American
Jewish Congress was held at the
home of Sylvia Hagler.
Plans for the coming season
were discussed. First on the
agenda were the plans for the
Wiesel at Moscow
Synagogue
llya Essas, Pavel Abramovich,
Vladimir Prestin and Alexander
Lerner were recently visited
privately by Elie Wiesel, who
visited the Soviet Union in
connection with President
Carter's special Commission on
the Holocaust.
While in Moscow, Wiesel
addressed a Moscow synagogue
and. reported a Moscow activist,
"Although Wiesel spoke in
Yiddish and very few of us un-
derstand the language, it was one
of the most moving occasions of
my life. People were literally rapt
and one felt an enormous sense of
solidarity."
opening meeting on Oct. 17,
which featured a book review of
Sophie's Choice.
Then on Nov. 18, the group is
having an evening with the
Habimah Players at Temple Beth
Shalom in Hollywood. All are
welcome.
has worked to develop and build
the new Mount Carmel campus of
the Technion. The Miami
Education Center will be one of
the last buildings to be completed
at what is today known as
Technion City. with the
university expanding other
campuses as its new colleges,
such as the medical school, grow.
Alpert's life has been that of a
Zionist, journalist and educator
from his young days in Boston,
where he became national
president of the Young Judea
movement. Later he was
managing editor of the Boston
Jewish Advocate and then editor
of the New Palestine, official
publication of the Zionist
Organization of America, which
reached a peak circulation of
250,000 copies. He was head of
the National Education
Department of the ZOA, and in
1952 emigrated to Israel.
Beginning as public relations
director of the university, he
quickly assumed leadership in
spearheading the Institute's vast
expansion to meet Israel's needs.
Even in Israel, he found time for
communal service, and was for
two years national president of
the Association of Americans and
Canadians in Israel.
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
. t. 1 u/u
Friday. October 19,1979 Friday. October 19.1979
THE ARAB
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
SENAL-1978
/
*-~/,V
%'li
39!
RATIO OF FORCES
A\teftanean $ea
CYPRUSr
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V.
2,6<
70 ^S
I
RATIO OF FORCES
ISRAEL :
planes Qi: 2.6
tanks Qi: 2.4
troops []i: 17.9
LEBAN0N<^>^^>
1m& 2^
*
ARAB LEAGUE NATO
PLANES 2,059 3,300
TANKS 9,737 11,000
TROOPS 1,263,510 1,190,000
SV
1
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ISR
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And They Want the West Bank Too!
This map was distributed to the participants of the Prime Minister's Mission to Israel. The South Broward delegation included Lester Grossman, Sumner G. Kaye, Herbert D. Katz, Philip A. Levin, M.D., and Nat Sedley.
need for the entire South Broward Jewish community to share this part of the Prime Minister's Mission with them. They hope that th;i map will open some eyes to the situation in the Middle East.
The South Broward delegation felt the

?
-
HHMMMJ


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. October 19,1979
Soviet Jewry Update
Letters of Support Needed
Hallandale Center
Expands Program
Igor Guberman: Igor is a
43-year-old author of popular
science books, who lives in
Moscow. He has received two
refusals since he applied for a
visa in December 1978. The
International Herald Tribune
reported that he had been
charged under Article 208 with
"trading in icons stolen from a
rural church near Moscow."
Viktor Brailovsky, one of the
editors of "Jews in the USSR,"
said that the police have been
investigating this journal for four
years, and the arrest of
Guberman is a new twist in the
Soviet authorities' efforts to
suppress it. Brailovsky and other
activists believe that Guberman
has been "set up" on a criminal
charge to obscure the political
nature of his arrest.
He is known in Moscow as a
collector of icons and an
authority on ancient religious
art; realizing that his connection
with the Jewish samizdat could
lead to trouble, he stopped
purchasing icons three years ago.
The editors of "Jews in the
USSR" have been harassed since
its inception in 1973.
Please send letters of protest to
USSR RSFSR. MOSCOW, 15-A
Pushkinskaya Street, General
Prosecutor. Roman RUDENKO.
Viktor and Margaret Pelakh:
The parents of Margaret live in
Pardes Hana. Israel. They have
appealed for help for their
daughter and son-in-law to join
them. Viktor and Margaret live
in Kishinov; they were refused
permission because Viktor's
brother Pavol, who was afraid of
losing his high position in Omsk
if his brother emigrated to Israel,
wrote a letter to officials in which
he supplied false information
concerning Viktor's previous
access to work which was con-
nected to State security. Pavol
asked the authorities to refuse a
visa to Viktor.
In reality, neither Viktor nor
Margaret has ever performed any
classified or secret work. Write to
officials stating that visas should
be granted because Viktor and
Margaret have not had access to
classified material:
Send letters of support to:
USSR, MOLDAVIAN SSR,
KISHINEV, OVIR; USSR &
MOLDAVIAN SSR, Kishinev
Th GLATT KOSMEPT"
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iittdDavid
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phone 1-672-0333
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277030, 16 Dimitrov Str. Apt. 15,
PELAKH, Viktor & Margaret.
Marina Temkin: Marina, who
was kidnapped by a police
woman and a KGB agent and
placed in a militarized KGB
young Communist's camp,
Orlenok, on the Black Sea, is now
20. She has been subjected to
forcible re-education: attempts
have been made to change her
personality by misuse of drugs:
she is denied the right to visit her
82-year-old paternal grand-
mother. Nevertheless, she still
wants to join her father. Prof.
Alexander Temkin. in Israel.
Alexander received evidence
from Marin's friend Olga
Zornitzkaya that at her
farewell party before Olga's
emigration, Marina told her she
wanted to establish contact with
her father, that she remembers
him as before and always remains
his daughter. Olga said that
Marina suffers from the im-
possibility of being in touch with
ler father.
Adopters, who used to work for
Marina, do your utmost to
publicize her case during the
Year of the Child and the
run-up to the 1980 Moscow
Olympics. An updated biography
has been produced and is
available on request from this
office.
Please send appeals to: USSR
RSFSR. MOSCOW.ul. Ozer-
/.hinskogo 2. Chairman KGB,
ANDROPOV, Yuri: USSR
RSFSR. MOSCOW, ul. Ogariova
6. Director of All Union OVIR,
ZOTOV, Konstantin.
Elias Zhaks: His wife and
daughter have now arrived in
Israel from Tashkent. We un-
derstand he has been given a
suspended sentence of two years
and is no longer in prison. Please
write letters of support to:
USSR, UZBEK SSR,
TASHKENT. 2 Malogospitalny
2-A. ZHAKS. Elias.
Igor M. Guberman, a Moscow
writer, was arrested Aug. 13. The
arrest is part of a campaign of
persecution of the unofficial
"Jews in the USSR" magazine,
founded in 1973 and devoted to
cultural, historical and religious
problems in Russia. In 20 issues
to date, no Soviet state policy has
been discussed.
Nevertheless, in 1975 the
magazine was charged with
spreading anti-Soviet in-
formation. Since then, people
associated with the magazine
have been harassed and per-
secuted, especially in the past
year.
Because Igor Guberman was
active in "Jews in the USSR," he
has been interrogated repeatedly.
In December 1978, he applied for
an exit visa and became a
refusenik. On many occasions he
refused to work for the KGB as
an informer. Finally he was
arrested and charged with the
illegal purchase and sale of icons.
Guberman may face im-
prisonment of seven years and an
additional five years of exile.
Dr. Seymon Gluzman
protested the Soviet practice of
confining political prisoners to
psychiatric institutions. In 1972,
he was sentenced/to seven years
in a strict regime labor camp.
Having completed that sentence,
he is now beginning a three year
exile. His health is failing, and he
needs our support.
Please send letters to:
Seymon Gluzman
Do Vostrebovaniya
Posidok Nizhnaya Tavda
Tyumenskaya Oblast 626020
RSFSR. USSR
The Hallandale Jewish Center.
Beth Tefilah Committee on Adult
Jewish Fducation, has come up
with a considerably expanded
program for the 1979-1980
season. The following courses will
I"' available.
MONDAY
10 a.m.. Elementary Hebrew
Conversation. Meyer Hirsch.
instructor. Sabbath Prayers and
Synagogue Procedure (Hebrew
reading knowledge required)
Mrs. Arnold Lasker. instructor.
11 a.m.. Intermediate Hebrew
Conversation (continuation of
last year's elementary Hebrew
conversation) Meyer Hirsch,
instructor.
7 p.m. Talmud Talmud Cass,
Dr. Carl Klein, instructor.
8 p.m., Great Jewish Per-
sonalities and Their Times, Rabbi
Arnold Lasker, instructor.
WEDNESDAY
10 am., Beginners Hebrew,
Mrs. Sidney Esterson, instructor.
10:30 a.m.. Advanced Hebrew
Conversation, Dr. Sidney I.
Esterson, instructor.
THURSDAY
7 p.m., Bible Class, Dr. Carl
Klein, instructor.
8 p.m.. lecture Series: Oct. 25.
"Man. By Nature of God or
Evil." Dr. Carl Klein. Nov. 8,
"Jewish Medical Fthics in
Halachic Tradition." Rabbi
Simcha Freedman. Nov. 14,
"American Life of Paradoxes."
Arthur Teitelbaum. Nov. 21,
"The Need for Moral Direction,"
Kabbi Solomon Schiff. Dec. 6,
"Mixed Marriages," Dr. Carl
Klein. Dec. 19, "The Need for
Discipline in Modern Life," Prof.
Oscar Shmerler. Jan. 23,
"Religion and the Concept of
Beauty." Rabbi Norman Shapiro.
Feb 6, "Authority in Jewish
Life." Dr. Carl Klein.
Yiddish speaking Group starts')
Jan. 3 with Cantor Jacob <.
Danziger, leader, some con-
versational ability required.
An adult Bat Mitzvah class for
women who did not have an
opportunity to participate in this
rite in their youth: an adult Bar
Mitzvah class to prepare the men
who never had the opportunity to
become Bar Mitzvah in their
youth. Day and sessions will be
decided when sufficient
registrations are in. For
registration and further details,
call the Hallandale Jewish
Center. The program is open to
the general public. Classes start
on Monday, Oct. 22.
TUTORING
SPECIAL EDUCATION
Experienced special education
teacher with masters, available
tor tutoring grades K-12. Call
Mrs. Burton, 791-8573.
Hebrew
Teachers Needed
For Broward Day School
Certified or Certifiable
Retirees acceptable.
Part time or full time
9816111 949 0501 966-2200
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ly, October 19,1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
Temple Sinai Adult
Education Courses
PLO Reaches Force of 700
man M. Jacobs, chairman
Adult Education Com-
of Temple Sinai of
rwood announces the
jng of the new Adult
ition series taking place at
iple, on Monday evenings
In Thrusday mornings with
monthly book reviews
place at 8 p.m. on
ays, beginning Oct. 22.
Monday evening courses
insist of 10 sessions. One
will be from 7:30 to 8:30,
Affairs Today," with
isis on the Jewish aspect of
abject. Dr. Albert E.
ian will be the lecturer.
|m 8:30 to 9:30, following
lKaufman's class, Rabbi
.our Firedman of Temple
I will lecture on "Judaism
^eaningand Relevance."
Ike Thursday morning courses
:onsist of 14 sessions. From
11 a.m., "The Sound of
i Music" will be taught by
t>r Naftaly A. Linkovsky of
pie Sinai. From 11 a.m. to
Rabbi Seymour Friedman
- the
will lecture on "Ritual
Fabric of Judaism."
The winter term, which begins
on Jan. 14, will have an ad-
ditional course taught by Rabbi
David Shapiro, emeritus of
Temple Sinai. It will begin on
Thursday, Jan. 14, at 11 a.m. to
noon, on the topic, "Current
World Jewish Problems and
Eternal Values of Judaism."
Monday evening book reviews
are as follows:
U'lilMi
Nov. 12, The Guggenheims, a
remarkable American Jewish
family, to be reviewed by Paula
Malamud. Dec. 3 Evergreen
best-seller book, to be reviewed
by Rabbi Seymour Friedman.
Jan. 28: A Living Biography
of Leonard Bernstein, presented
by Mrs. Billie Hyman. Feb. 11:
Raquela A Woman of Israel
reviewed by Elsie damage.
All book reviews are scheduled to
begin at 8 p.m.
There is no charge for the
classes and book reviews.
Everyone is welcome to register.
Call the temple office*
HHIMiHii !*?
mmmm 11 mmmmmmKmammmmammtmmtmmm
COMMUNITY DAY IS COMING'!!
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Israel's chief of military in-
telligence, Gen. Yeshayahu
Saguy, has charged that the
United Nations has understated
the number of Palestinian
terrorists active in the area under
its control in south Lebanon,
claimed that there are now Cuban
military units all over the Middle
Fast, that new Soviet weaponry
has been introduced into the
region, and that Jordan is
converting its ground and air
forces from defensive to offensive
capabilities.
At a meeting with the foreign
press corps here, Saguy said that
according to Israeli estimates
there are between 500-700
terrorists in the territory con-
trolled by the United Nations
Interim Force in Lebanon
(UNIFIL), but UNIFIL admits
only that there are more than
200.
SAGUY OFFERED his
statement to augment a report
released on the recent meeting
between Israel's Chief of Staff
Gen. Raphael Eitan and the
commander of UN forces in the
r\m i-m-i
I
:i
;
8
MARK YOUR CALENDARS NOW!!!
!
Il>
I I
12
Thursday, December 13
i<;
2:1
IN
I!)
20
11
21
9:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m.
:.' I
2f>----- 2U
h
28
Diplomat Convention Center
15
22
21 >
1*1 t I H
Middle East, Gen. Ensio
Siilasvuo.
At that meeting, Eitan said
that Israeli aerial reconnaissance
indicated that the terrorists were
using the ceasefire to redeploy
and reinforce their units, stock-
pile arms and equipment and
construct new fortifications.
Siilasvuo was silent, thereby
confirming the terrorist build-up
in the UNIFIL area, the Israeli
report said.
Replying to questions, Saguy
said the presence of Cuban forces
in the Middle East was no new
phenomenon. He said that there
was a Cuban armored brigade in
Syria during the Yom Kippur
War and that now Cubans are to
be found almost all over the
Middle East in Syria, Iraq and
especially in Libya where, ac-
cording to the intelligence chief,
"they fly planes."
SAGUY SAID the most
important new Soviet weapon in
the Middle East was the T-72
1 tank of which there are about 100
each in Syria, Iraq and Libya.
In addition, he said, Soviet-
made MIG-25s have been
deployed in Libya for about a
year and recently in Syria. The
same applies to the Sukhoy-22
bomber which is new to the
'Syrians though not to the
Libyans, Saguy said.
He offered a breakdownof the
35.000-man Syrian force in
Lebanon which, he said, con-
sisted of one infantry division,,
two armored brigades, 400-500
tanks and 250 artillery pieces of
all calibers. He said he didn't
believe the Syrians intended to
withdraw their forces from
Lebanon.
BUT SAGUY expressed his
greatest concern over what he
contended was the shift in the
balance of power along Israel's
frontier with Jordan.
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*._..... I WaKm K 1
PofTO A
Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. October 19,1979
In UN Address
Dayan Urges Arabs to Join Talks
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
- Prior to his return home,
Israeli Foreign Minister Moshe
Dayan called on Jordan, Syria,
Lebanon and "the represen-
Soutk Qmwand
Spotftgfct n

ught
fulfill-
Welcome home Dr. Herb and Nancy Brizel from a month's
visit to Israel. Nancy toured Hadassah installations in
Jerusalem. Herb, a therapeutic radiologist, worked and ta
at the Hadassah Hospital. It was an experience of great ful:
ment. They made a new "family of frienda."
Jesse and Cynde Martin have returned from a four-week
vacation in Europe. They enjoyed an exciting cruise aboard the
Royal Viking Sky. Bar Mitzvah congratulations to Michael
Linda, son of lovely Saks personal shopper Ina Linda and Bud
Linda. Mazel tov to Jim and Barbara Miller on the Bar Mitzvah
of their son Charles and to Dr. Arthur and Wendy Rubin on the
Bat Mitzvah of their daughter Stephanie.
Nova University was founded in 1964. Since 1970, the
president has been distinguished, innovative Dr. Abraham
Fischler. Last month a group of over 80 charter members formed
the Circle of Gold to support the university through community
involvement.
A champagne brunch was hosted by area chairwomen
Bobbe Schleainger and Toni Paoli. Shirley Fischler. wife of the
president, cordially welcomed each charter member. Shirley is
also an attorney. Among the group extending greetings for the
New Year to friends were Temple Sinai members Iris Crane,
Maralyn Anton, Terry Geronemus, JoAnn Katz and Camille
Sultan, who were all enthusiastic about the High Holiday
Services conducted by new Rabbi Seymour Friedman.
More of the Circle of Gold members who are educationally
concerned community leaders are: Rosemarie Goodman,
Mildred Nitzberg, Marge Saltzman, Lucille Baer, Lilyan
Beckerman, Ilene Weisberg, Mary Garber, Janet Gable, Also
Margie Wohl, Sylvia Graditor, Grace Finkel. Ruth Sands.
Maxine Silverblatt, Ruth Galvin, Myra Cantor.
What a dynamic group!
It was Judy Glazer's birthday and a chance for a few close
friends to get together for lunch at Emerald Hills Country Club.
Enjoying the midday brunch was Judy's mother Gladys
Sussman, Ellen Yanofsky, Estelle Podis, Nancy At kin. Florence
Rosenthal and Barbara Roberts. Nancy had come directly from
the Book Bazaar where she and Marion Salter are busy ordering
current reading material. Nancy told us that the pocketbook
edition of Kaquela will be available in November. This is the
outstanding novel written by Community Day speaker and
author Dr. Ruth Gruber.
A few days later. Judy flew to Vermont with Harold and
Ellen Yanofsky to see the spectacular fall foliage. Bob and
Barbara Roberts went to Washington, DC, to Parents* Week-
end at American University then a few days in New York
City.
I'm lucky if Fang takes me to Hallandale.
Saw Arthur and Rhoda Marcus relaxing at lunch in the
newly remodeled Royal Market Cafeteria. Arthur is associated
with the Hollywood office of Israel Bonds. Rhoda is a busy gal
with her plans and activities as Hadassah president.
Fang and I and our son Jim enjoyed a Shabbat dinner with
Myron and Charlotte Brodie and their son David. Myron is
executive vice president of the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration. Charlotte works at the Michael-Ann Russell JCC in a
program to aid the resettlement of Russian immigrants. Their
daughter Debbie is having a great year at the University of
Florida in Gainesville. Son Steven is a second year law student
at the University of Miami. Last summer Steven worked for a
large law firm in Miami which also organizes athletic teams as
extra-curricular benefits. They compete with teams from
governmental agencies, other law firms, and clients. Since his
days at Nova High School, Steven is an avid athlete and con-
tinues to be "on call" for the softball and tennis events of the
law firm. In case of injury, do they call for legal aid?
If you have been overeating too often or used your vacation
an excuse to overindulge, you can now shed those extra
ounds. Bonnie Kowitt is a Diet Workshop lecturer. Bobbe
>chlesinger and I met Bonnie at Emerald Hills Country Club as
she was finishing one of her classes. After one look at attractive,
vivacious Bonnie and her gorgeous figure, Bobbe ordered black
coffee for lunch, and I had only a small tuna appetizer.
Tennis friends gathered at Hillcrest Country Club to
surprise Marilyn Kalik on her special birthday. Sharing the fun
were Barbara Goldberg, Judy Bluth, Natalie Bluth, Judy Licht-
man. Pauline Sarkin, Sue Badat, Sandy Kellner, Barbara Peretz,
Nancy Greenberg, Natalie Joblove, and Disa Anhalt. Marilyn
really was surprised.
Congratulations to Irwin and Disa Anhalt on daughter
Helaine's marriage to Stuart Yadgaroff at Aventura Country
Club. The newlyweds will be living in Atlanta.
The holidays were highlighted by the celebration of
Sukkoth. Rabbi Harold Richter and wifeDeveraheld a delightful
Sukkah party. Dr. Sam and Audrey Meline also celebrated the
fifth annual gala Sukkah Festival. The scene shone brightly as
friends and family enjoyed swimming in the pool, relaxing in the
hot tub, eating the Israeli style food, and sharing the joy of the
happy holiday.
tatives of the Palestinian Arabs
residing in Judaea, Samaria and
Gaza" to join in the current peace
negotiations between Israel and
Egypt "in order to achieve the
noble goal of a real and durable
comprehensive peace in our
area."
In a speech prepared for
delivery at the 34th session of the
United Nations General
Assembly, Dayan noted that the
Camp David accords provide for
Palestinian Arabs residing on the
West Bank and Gaza Strip to be
included in the peace talks.
BUT HE reiterated Israel's
unequivocal position of no
negotiations with the Palestine
Liberation Organization. Dayan
said that from June. 1967 until
the present, "over 600 people
have been murdered and 3,300
others have been wounded in
Israel by the PLO. It has also
terrorized and intimidated Arabs
prepared to negotiate with Israel,
killing more than 350 Arabs and
injuring about 2.000 others.''
Referring to the autonomy
plan for the West Bank and Gaza
Strip, Dayan noted that "the
option of creating a third state
between Israel and Jordan is not
considered by the Camp David
accords." He said the objective of
the current autonomy
negotiations is the provision of
full autonomy for the
Palestinians in those regions.
The Israeli military govern-
ment and its civilian ad
ministration will be withdrawn as
soon as a self-governing
authority has been freely elected
by the inhabitants." Dayan said.
This framework also specifies
measures that will be taken to
assure the security of Israel and
ilsneighbors."
WITH RESPECT to the
controversial issue of Jerusalem,
described by Dayan as "the
eternal capital of Israel and the
Jewish people," the Foreign
Minister stressed that
"Jerusalem cannot be divided
again by barbed wire, and there
can be no return to the repeated
shooting at our civilians and the
barbaric desecration of the
Jewish quarter of the city, the
Holy Place and cemeteries as
happened before 1967."
Dayan recalled Jordan's ban
on Jews visiting the holy places
in Jerusalem before 1967 and
noted in contrast, Israel's policy
of free access to all holy places for
all religions.
Dayan referred in his speech to
the situation in Lebanon, to the
UN role in implementing the
Israeli-Egyptian peace treaty and
to the fate of Soviet and Syrian
Jewry. In south Lebanon, he
said, Israel was compelled to act
against the PLO "in a clear act of
self-defense.'"
HE CHARGED that PLO
terrorist groups "are still
functioning all over Lebanon and
in quite a large number of cases
inside the (United Nations
Interim Force in Lebanon)
UNI FIL area."
Dayan was critical of the Ult
role in implementing the Israeli-
Egyptian peace treaty.
Although our assumption and
hope that the UN would assist in
the implementation of the peace
treaty were disappointed, we will
proceed on the path of peace," he
said. "The attitude of the UN
will not damge the peace process
but it will, no doubt, lower the
prestige and even the -moral
status of the UN," Dayan said.
Dayan charged that there has
been only "little improvement"'
in the situation of Soviet Jews
seeking to emigrate and that
large number of Jews is still
denied exit visas. He also ex-
pressed concern over the growing
anti-Jewish propaganda cam-
paign in the official Soviet media
Dayan appealed to the Syrian
government to stop violating the
human rights of its Jewish
citizens and permit them to leave
to reunite with their relatives.
Tanks To Jordan
Raises Eyebrows
Continued from Page 1
Israeli circles here since it had
been discussed by British dip-
lomats in Israel and the Israel
Defense Ministry. Even so,
Israeli sources say they are
worried about the deal because it
adds to the firepower of the Arab
stales opposed to the Israeli-
Egyptian peace treaty and
because of Jordan's refusal to
enter the negotiations envisaged
in the Camp David agreements.
The Jordanian tanks are likely
LO include some of 1.350 models
ordered bv the Shah but can-
celled by the new Iranian govern-
ment. Several other countries are
understood to be interested in
purchasing some of them.
Meanwhile, in Washington, the
Stale Department said that "we
will continue to discuss with
Jordan" the delivery of tanks,
although King Hussein of Jordan
said on ABC-TV's Issues and
Ansuvrs program that his ol'
ficials have told the U.S. govern-'
ment "we are not interested" in
acquiring American M-60 tanks.
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October 19, 1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
mat Time for Nobel Thoughts
ntinued from Page 4
again this year? That is,
1 to say for sure?
THING I can say for
that if politics don't enter
he choice, the choice itself
)ie\\ enter politics. The case
nt is President Carter, who
to be so desperate in his
>n bid that he's counting
on his nomination for a
[peace Prize to bolster his
|g fortunes.
Jimmy the Greek would
i lay odds on this one, but it
em that to cite Carter for
in the Israel-Egypt peace
would be to replay just
far later the granting of the
Menachem Begin and
Sadat in 1978;'
fue sporting man would be
inclined to lay odds on
lawski in either the liter-
or peace categories this
ind. say, on the Rev. Jesse
jn in 1980 for his work in
>ing the gene content of the
itine Liberation
/.at ion. Since Jackson's
would be an award in either
physics or biology rather than in
peace or literature, why Borges,
given that he's still around, and
Argentina is still fascist, should
certainly remain in the running at.
that time.
ON THE other hand, it is not
improbable that the Nobel
Academy would make a redun-
dant choice and give the nod to
President Carter, since so many
of its other choices, if not redun-
dant, are certainly irrelevant.
President Carter has as good a
press as, say, Ladislaus Lutos-
lawski of Central Transylvania,
given that his 38 pages of poetic
masterpieces on vellum win out
in the end. Or Halldor Kiljan
Laxness, of Iceland, of whom no
one heard before he won the prize
or after, for that matter.' S
Certainly, he has a better press
than, say, Bertha von Suttner, of
Austria, who turned the Nobel
Academy's head back in 1905. Or
even Millard Fillmore, Carter's
predecessor in the presidency, of
whom absolutely no one has
hen Harlem Was Still
|A Jewish Community
Continued from Page 4
seek lodging outside the
(iurock has also indicated
wntrary to what is generally
ted, resettlement of
m's Jews was not in-
Ive either of their adoption
Ir acceptance of a new
can way of life.
LltLEM'S upwardly mobile
^nts did not necessarily
ion their religious and or
I cultural identity, and the
Pr relocating ghetto Jews
hundreds of landmanshuft
agues serving as testimony
peir desire to retain their
grant identity. Although
<>t Harlem's residents may
been eager to embrace rapid
H< .ini/iition, Dr. (iurock
out. others sought to
llam and even strengthen
|Jewish identification.
e of the greatest values <>t
Harlem Was Jewish in the
^ni day lies in its sketch of
earliest Black-Jewish
lions in an urban setting and
Vhrpretation of the factors
|tmg immigrant migration
Harlem following World
II.
t>r Prof, (iurock, the ex-
ingly rapid Jewish migration
Harlem was not directly
or especially in response to.
the mass arrival uptown of
Blacks, but was instead merely
part of a general immigrant
relocation out of the downtown
ghetto and New York's other
densely populated Jewish neigh-
Ixirhoods in the post-war years.
THE JEWISH migration was
due most basically to the desire
and ability to live in bettjer ac-
comodations, and escape the
neighborhood's physical
deterioration. The Black's
decision to settle in the decaying
neighborhood only hastened the
departure.
Dr. (iurock's key evidence in
support of this argument is that
from the time the Blacks first
arrived uptown, beginning
around 1905, to their con-
solidation in the neighborhood
after World War 1. limited
numbers of Black-- and Jews
almost immediately penetrated
one another's enclaves, with no
apparent issue.
This final aspect of Harlem's
history, which suggests that the
dynamics of physical neigh-
borhood decay, and the upward
mobility of the residents were
more important than the arrival
of Blacks uptown in the earlier
settlers' decision to leave their
own neighborhood or other parts
of the city, holds significant
implications for future resear-
chers. Dr. Gurock says.
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heard these 130 years since his
election.
Unless you pit Fillmore in a
presidential preference primary
against Chester A. Arthur, of
whom no one heard either before
or after his election, and who with
Fillmore also failed to win a
Nobel Prize but not for want of
trying: the,first prizes weren't
offered until after both had died.
But this is a rather quaint
regulation among the Nobel's
rules, that nominees must be
living at the time of their nom-
ination, considering that there
are so many dead winners under
any circumstances.
IN THE END, though, it is to
be hoped that President Carter
' has another ace up his sleeve
than the annual Nobel pro-
duction, which bombs about as
much as it abhorred the bombing
in Vietnam and for the stopping
of which it gave prizes to Henry
Kissinger and Le Due Tho, the
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Page 14
Ths Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Ortattr Hollywood
Friday, October 19,1979
CJF General Assembly
Continued from Page 1
munai affairs. At the Saturday
Oneg Shabbbat, three past GA
Scholars-in-Residence will reflect
on "The 70's Revisited Tht
80's Projected."
"AGING: Challenges and
Opportunities in the 1980's" is
the theme of a planning
reception and tour of the
Montreal Jewish community
complex, an exhibit on the
Holocaust and Yiddish theater
performance will be available.
The Council of Jewish
Federations is the association of
more than 190 Federations,
Vm- Welfare Funds and Community
posium with three concurrent Councils which serve nearly 800
workshops. Other sessions 'communities and embrace over
covering issues that have become 95 f h j jgh
LES3S CHnCern ^tHe Jr,Sh Population of the United States
KSSShSS f e,PaSt ^ "d Canada. Established in 1932,
mclude the impact of step-parent h Counci, ^^^ natjona|
families, the aging, Black-Jewish
relations, and the Quebec in-
dependence movement.
The CJF Women's Division
will sponsor a special program of changing" need's in the Jewish
sessions on leadership and community; through the ex-
campaign skills and con- change of successful experiences
temporary issues. A similar to assure the most effective
variety of topics will be pursued community services; through
in J > sessions led by the CJF establishing guidelines for
serves
instrument to strengthen the
work and the impact of Jewish
Federations through leadership
in developing programs to meet
Leadership Development
Committee, including a sym-
posium on World Jewry led by
Dr. Cotler. For college students
attending the GA, special
"Jewish Civics" sessions will
examine Federation governance
and rtcision-making.
Other sessions at the 84th
General Assembly will be
devoted to Campaign; LCBC:
Multiple Appeals; Soviet-Jewish
Resettlement; Jewish Singles;
Public Relations; Federation-
Synagogue Relations;
Budgeting; United Way;
Government Funding;
Endowment Funds; Canadian
and U.S. Models for Jewish
Community Service; Jewish
Culture; AAJE; Small, Inter-
mediate and Large Cities; and
others.
Several receptions flavored by
the spirit of Quebec will be hosted
by the Montreal Allied Jewish
Community Services. A
'Women's Division "Soiree
Canadienne, "Boit A Chanson"
for college youth, and a general
reception for all GA participants
are among the social activities
being planned by the Montreal
Jewish community. During a
Religious
Directory
NORTH BROWARD
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100 W. Oak
land Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Phillip A. Labowitz. Cantor Maurice
A. Neu
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive. Reform (44)
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman, u A)
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Paul Plotkin
Cantor Joseph Wichelewski. (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE BETH EMET. Pines Middle
School. 200 NW Douglas Rd Liberal
Reform Rabbi Bennet Greenspon
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9730 Sterling
Rd.. Hollywood Conservative. Rabbi
Bernard P. Shoter.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION 400 S Nob Hill Rd Rabbi Sheon
J Harr ,64)
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA
GOGUE 7473 NW 4th St. (69)
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Carl Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob Dan
ziger. 112)
NORTHMIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P Kongsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. ,37)
HOLLYWOOD
TEMPLE BETH AHM. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max
Landman. (47B)
TEMPLE BETH EL 1351 S. 14th Ave
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
Assistant Rabbi Ben Romer. (45)
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM. 4601 Arthur
St Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Maiavsky. Cantor Irving Gold (46)
TEMPLE SINAI 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi Seymour Fried
man. Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro.
Cantor Naf taly A. LinkovsKy. (65)
TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St
Hollywood. Fla. 33021. Liberal
Reform Rabbi Robert P. Frazin
Cantor Michael Kyrr. (47C)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE. 3291 Stirling
Road Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe
Bomzer. (52)
fundraising and operation; and
through joint national planning
and action on common purposes
dealing with local, regional,
national and international needs.
The following people will
represent the Palm Beach County
Jewish community at the General
Assembly in Montreal: Mr. and
Mrs. Floyd Bachrach, Mr. and
Mrs. James Baer, Phyllis Cohen,
Dr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Faivus,
Bette Gilbert, Paula Kass, Mr.
and Mrs. Arnold Lampert, Staci
Lesser. Mr. and Mrs. H. Irwin
Levy, John Moss, Mr. and Mrs.
Myron Nickman, Berenice
Rogers, Norman Schimelman,
Mr. and Mrs. Alan Shulman, Mr.
and Mrs. Nathan Tanen and Mr.
and Mrs. Bruce Warshal.
REGISTRATION information
for the General Assembly is
available from the Jewish Fed-
eration of South Broward.
Nazis Train in Uruguay
BUENOS AIRES (JTA) A Nazi or^nization
in Montevideo, Uruguay, the National Socialist Party,
has a training camp some 12 kilometers from Montevideo,
according to a report here in La Liu which quoted from an
article in Nuevo MundoIsraelite published in Caracas,
Venezuela. The aim of the party, the report stated, is to
"liquidate Jews and Communists and to achieve the
unity of all the Uruguayans." The Nazi Party comprises
three groups: "Black Shirts," "Brown Shirts and
"Gestapo."
Shalom Hadassah Slates Luncheon
n
The Shalom group of
Hollywood Hadassah will hold its
ninth annual Hadassah Medical
Organization Luncheon on
Tuesday, Oct. 23, at William-
son's Restaurant at noon.
Honored guest is Leona
Brauser, president of the
Hollywood Chapter. Eleanor
La Forge, soprano, and musical
director Warren Broome of Opus
III will entertain. All proceeds
are for the benefit of the
Hadassah Hospital.
Broward Professionals for Israel Bonds
Members of the health, legal
and accounting professions will
take part in their third annual
State of Israel Bonds Dinner
Dance on Saturday evening, Oct.
27 at Pier 66, Fort Lauderdale.
The Professional Services of
Broward County will hold the
ball in cooperation with the
Fiduciary and Pension Com-
mittee of the Israel Bonds
Organization, according to Joel
FIU to Co-Sponsor
Course With CAJE
Florida International
University, along with the
Central Agency for Jewish
Kducation, an agency funded by
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, will be co-sponsoring
a course entitled "Judaism:
Jewish Thought and
Philosophy." The course will be
taught by Rabbi David Lehrfield
of Knesseth Israel Congregation,
along with Rabbi Edwin Farber
of Congregation Samu-El.
The course is being offered at
the Federation building
beginning Oct. 22, and running
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every
Monday for 10 weeks.
The course will be a survey of
major Jewish concepts and
trends in Jewish thought and
philosophy through the ages. The
course is being held as part of the
Institute for Jewish Studies of
the CAJE, and is widely par-
ticipated in by the Women's
Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
For more information call the
Statement ot Ownership
Management St emulation (required
by :< ISC 36881 l Title of publication:
The Jewish Klorulian and Shofar of
Greater Hollywood. Publication No
MM-800; -' Date of flllnc, 28 Sept 197;
I Frequency "' Issue, bi-weekly, a- No.
ol issues published annually, 26. B-
Aniiual subscription price $7.50. 4-
Lot itUon of known office of publication.
126 S Federal HiKhway. No. 206. Dania.
Florida MOM; .V location of head-
quarters or general business offices of
the publishers. 120 NK 6 SI Miami. Fla.
88132; B- Publisher, editor, managing
editor Fred K Shoe net, 120 NE 6
Slreet, Miami, Fla 33132 7 Owner.
Fred K. Shochet, 120 NE 6 Street,
Miami, Fla. 33132 8- Known bond-
holders, mortgagees and other security
holders owning or holding 1 percent or
more of total amount of bonds, mort-
gages or other securities. If any. mine H
for completion by non-profit
organizations, not applicable. 10- Extent
and nature of circulation, given In this
order, average no. copies each Issue
during preceding 12 months followed by
.ii in.il no copies single issue published
nearest to filing date. AI total no. copies
printed met press mm: 12,360, 12,400;
Hi paid circulation: l- sales through
dealers and earners, street vendors and
i imulei sales, 7. 1; 2- mall subscrip-
tions: 11.993. 11,999; Ci total paid clr
dilation. 12.000, 12.000, Dj free dis-
tribution by mail carrier or other
means, samples, complimentary and
other free copies, 16. 9; El total dls-
tribuUon. 12,016, 12,009. Fi copies not
distributed: li office use. left over,
unaccounted for. spoiled, after printing,
344. 391. 21 returns from newsagents, x
x. U) Total: 12,360. 12,400. I certify that
statements made by me above are
correct and complete
s Fred K. Shochet, publisher
CAJE in Dade or in Broward.
The following is a list of the
programs which will be beginning
during the month of October,
sponsored by the CAJE.
Week of Oct. 15 beginning
of courses for South Broward
Midrasha Adult Institute for
Jewish Studies.
Oct. 188 p.m. at
Congregation Beth Torah,
opening lecture of North Dade
Midrasha Arthur Kurzweil:
"How to Find your Jewish
Roots." No charge.
Oct. 21 beginning of Akiva
Student Leadership Program
available to high school students
who are currently enrolled in
Judaic programs of four hours
per week.
Week of Oct. 22 beginning
of courses for North Dade
Midrasha Adult Institute for
Jewish Studies.
Oct. 22 beginning of course
in "Jewish Thought and
Philosophy." sponsored jointly
by FIU and the CAJE, to be held
at the Federation building.
Shabbos
Fri. Eve. Sat. Aftn.
Bat-Bar Mitzvahs
without instruments
PERFORMED WITH DIGNITY
AND IN KEEPING WITH THE
SABBATH
Supervised activities for
the children (With prizes)
Adult Audience Participation
Let the Tummlers
Make Your Party
A Day to Remember
The Tummlers
Mike Filed*
1-742-4614
We also furnish orchestras for
AU Occasions
Reinstein, Harris Reibel and
Gary R. Gerson, committee
members. Gerson is also General
Campaign Chairman of the South
Florida Israel Bonds
Organization.
Special guest at the Israel
Bonds Dinner will be Brig. Gen.
Benjamin Ben Eliezer, com-
manding officer of the Israel
Defense Forces in Judea and
Samaria. Gen. Ben Eliezer has
served in a number of leadership
positions in the Israel Defense
Forces. He was a regimental
deputy commander in the Suez
Canal area during the Yom
Kippur War. He also actively
participated in the 1956 Sinai
campaign and the Six Day War.
A graduate of the Israel Com-
mand and Staff School and the
National Defense College, Gen.
Ben Eliezer is one of Israel's
leading military experts.
Dinner co-chairmen are Dr. and
Mrs. Wayne Bizer; Dr. Robert H.
Gillon: Dr. and Mrs. Sylvan
Goldin: Mr. and Mrs. Bruce
Goldman: Dr. and Mrs. Philip
Gould; Dr. and Mrs. Robert
Grenitz. Also Dr. and Mrs. Jon
Jacobs; Dr. and Mrs. Saul
Lipsman; Mr. and Mrs. Harris
Reibel; Mr. and Mrs. Joel
Reinstein and Dr. and Mrs.
Robert Uchin.
For information, call the Israel
Bond office in Fort Lauderdale.
Hen. Eliezer
Coin, Stamp Show
The Juvenile Diabetes
Foundation announces the
sponsorship of a professional
Coin and Stamp Show to be held
at Hollywood Fashion Center,
located at 441 and Hollywood
Boulevard, on Sunday, Oct. 21,
between noon and 5 p.m. with
exhibitions throughout the mall.
The show helps support diabetes
research.
Gary A. vanowltz, d.d.s.
General Dentistry
Announces New Hours:
MOft 1:15 pm-8 pm Frl: 850 am-5 pm
wed 8 30 am-5 pm Sat 8 50 am-2 pm
Ttiurs 1 15 pm -8 pm
EMERALD HILLS MEDICAL SOUARE
4420 Sheridan street Hollywood. Fla. 33021
Phone 966-6352 for appointment
John E. Vlnsant, Jr., M.D.P.A.
IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE RELOCATION
OF HIS OFFICE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY
AND FRACTURES
TO
HOME FEDERAL SAVINGS BLDG.
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Office Hours By Appt phone: 92&4001 Dade: 944-8452
Marion Saltei ^r 1
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Posj Hosie S 4525 Sher.don Phone hopping Center >t Hollywood. Fla Personal Service Book Store' [
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twnnmrirn ..... ,<,,ivr.>.


toy
, October 19,1.979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page IS
Ask Abe
By Abe Hal pern
Ihuob:
Continuing my answer to the question sub-
tted by Eve Brier of Miami Beach regarding
discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls and their
Inificance to Biblical studies, Judaism and
ristianity- {Jewish Floridian and Shofar, Oct.
1979. p. 15) partn
(second of a series)
iswer:
|As I wrote in the introduction to the series
lart I), the Dead Sea Scrolls are ancient scrolls
Id fragments of scrolls, written in Hebrew,
ramie and Greek, discovered at various times
bm 1947 on, along the northwest shore of the
pad Sea.
|The first scholar to recognize their antiquity
\s E. L. Sukenik (1889-1953), professor of
theology at the Hebrew University who
[quired three scrolls. Four other scrolls were
quired by his son Yigael Yadin. All seven of
|jese scrolls and others are now located in the
brine of the Book in Jerusalem.
|An interesting historical fact is that the Dead
la Scrolls were being deciphered by Prof.
Ikenik on Nov. 29, 1947, the night the United
itions voted to create the State of Israel.
Previously, he had seen a portion of a scroll and
>nted to examine all three in greater detail.
Two of the cylindrical jars in which scrolls were
found in caves at Aumran, Israel, on the north
llowing are a few excerpts from an account by west shore of the Dead Sea.
of. Sukenik of his trip to Bethlehem.
"1 had planned to meet my Armenian
friend
tain on Nov. 28 and go with him to the Arab
Itiquities dealer. But my wife had been par-
lularly adamant against my going, in view of
danger. Later in the day, my son, Yigael,
ime in from Tal Aviv and was as excited as I
V when I told him of the scrolls. But he, too,
iicated. though not as vehemently as his
:>i Hit, that perhaps it was not too wise. He was
ll> with me for a short while, as he had to return
I his headquarters in Tel Aviv.
"Later in the evening, I listened to the radio
kd heard that the United Nations, which had
fen expected to vote on that day, had postponed
i decision. Here I thought was my chance. For I
klieved that the Arab attacks would begin
pmediately after the vote, and if I were to go to
ethlehem. it would have to be before. I therefore
solved to make the journey next morning, the
th. and this time I decided not to tell anyone.
I "Next morning I telephoned my Armenian
:'iul and told him I was coming over to see him
?ht away. Armed with my pass, I entered Zone
(once again and went straight to his store. I told
m 1 was ready to go with him to Bethlehem.
I "We took the bus. I was the only Jewish oc-
The rest were Arabs. All of us felt the
lsion in the atmosphere. My friend told me
ter that he had really been scared stiff by the
sponsibility he hed assumed by bringing me on
rat journey. But it passed without incident. .
"I examined the other leathers, while all the
lile I was wondering what to do next. I wanted
i buy them and I wished to take them home with
then and there ... I therefore told the dealer
it I was much interested, would probably wish
buy, but I should like to take them home with
me for further scrutiny. I promised to let him
know my decision, through our mutual Armenian
friend, within two days. He agreed and wrapped
the scrolls in paper. Tucking them under my arm
we parted with friendly salaams .
"While I was examining these precious
documents in my study, the late news on the
radio announced that the United Nations would
be voting on the resolution that night.
"My youngest son, Mati (who later became a
pilot and was killed in action on a mission against
an Egyptian warship during the War of
Independence), was in the next room, twiddling
radio knobs in an effort to get New York. He was
tuned in to the United Nations and was following
the speeches before the vote. From time to time,
he would give me a brief commentary on what had
been said.
"It was past midnight when the voting was
announced. And I was engrossed in a particularly
absorbing passage in one of the scrolls when my
son rushed in with the shout that the vote on the
Jewish State had been carried. This great event in
Jewish history was thus combined in my home in
Jerusalem with another event, no less historic,
the one political, the other cultural"! The
Message of the Scrolls by Yigael Yadin, PP. 21,
22,23,24)
A description of the contents of the seven
scrolls will appear in the next column.
(To be continued)
Editor's note:
Please send all questions to:
ASK ABE
2719 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33O20
Joseph and Miriam Richter
Bar,Bat Mitzvahs
On Saturday, Oct. 20, at 8:45
a.m., Joseph R. I. Richter, son of
Rabbi and Mrs. Harold Richter of
Hollywood, will be Bar Mitzvah
at Temple Ner Tamid, Miami
Beach.
Joseph, a student of the
Hebrew Academy, is a member of
the Miami Choir Boys NCSY. He
enjoys singing as his hobby.
A reception in his honor will be
held Saturday evening at Temple
Ner Tamid.
Out-of-town guests include Mr.
and Mrs. Mosh Goldberg, aunt
and uncle of Pittsburgh; Albert
Richter, uncle of California; Mr.
and Mrs. Sidney Sosin, aunt and
uncle of Chicago; Dr. and Mrs.
Fred Goldberg, friends, of New
York; Mrs. Sarah Ehrlich, an
aunt from Chicago; and Mr. and
Mrs. Jerome Elbin, cousins of
Chicago.
On Friday. Oct. 19, at 8.15
p.m., Miriam Sarina Richter,
daughter of Rabbi and Mrs.
Harold Richter of Hollywood,
will be Bat Mitzvah at Temple
Ner Tamid, Miami Beach.
Miriam, a student at the
Hebrew Academy, is active in the
NCSY and enjoys singing as her
hobby.
An oneg shabbat will follow
the services.
A reception in her honor will be
held Saturday evening at Temple
Ner Tamid.
Lucille Baer la inducted into the Israel Bond* Prime Ministers Club
and received a plaque recognizing her many yean of dedicated service
to the State of Israel and its economic development. Making the
presentation to Mrs. Baer is Milton M. Parson, executive director of
the South Florida Israel Bonds Organization. Husband Melvin H.
Baer is at right and son Alan Baer at left.
EVITT-WWEINSTEIN
memorial chapels
21 Pembroke Rd.
pitywood. Ra.
M-7200
3385 W. Dixie HWV.
North Miami, Fla.
949-6315
5411 w. Okeecnooee Blvd.
W. Palm Beacn, Fla.
689-6700
TAX FREE BONDS*
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
lempCe 3etki
Wemoelat
he all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
unty. Peaceful surroundings, beau-
ully landscaped, perpetual care, rea-
lly priced.
' information call: 9204225 or writti
/$$*$
TEMPLE BETM EL *Y>>*
Mil 5. I4tl AVE. HOLLYWOOO. FLORIDA 3J020
* send mm literature on the ""
HAHCr _________________
AOOftCSSc ____________
PHONE:
A RATED STANDARD AND POORS
FREE OF FEDERAL INCOME TAX
REPRESENTS COUPONS PRICED AT PAR
OFFERING SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE
AND / OR CHANGE IN PRICE
J. B. HANAUER AND COMPANY
2960 Aventura Boulevard
No. Miami Beach, Fla. 33180
211 Royal Poir.ciana Way
Palm Beach, Florida 33480
Please send your brochure on tax-free municipal bonds.
Nome
Addreit
State
Zip
City.
Tel *
Member NASDInc
SooutOOHy
at 4 45 PM
B Member n a s u inc
fjfl Member SIPC
UNICIPAL BOND
PECIALISTS SINCE 1931
Miami (305) 932-6300
r% Lauderdale/Pompano Beach (S06) 785-2900
Other Cities In Fla. Toll Free (800) 432-2290
OutIsde of Fla. Call ToN Fro* (8001327-5740
Hollywood (305) 821-8000
Palm Beach (80S) 737-2800
I
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Po 1 A
Page 16
The Jewish Florida* and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, October 19, i8
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$ 1,000
CASH
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BRENDA CHAMBERS
Miami
EMMA RIVES
Ft. Pierce
EVERY WEEK
YOU TOO COULD
1980 OLDS
Cutlass Supreme
1,000 Cash
or ONE OF 7,497 OTHER WEEKLY GASH PRIZES
NO PURCHASE NECESSARY
ON
tt
"Pride
LOOK WHO WON
$100 CASH I
JOSEPH TAUBER
N. Miami
*AUL OEMETRV
Miomi Beoch
ADCLA NOLLER
Key Biscoyne
ROBERT R. EINSTEIN
No. Bay Village
bessiE UVINT
Miami Beach
5^DRAZKOWSK?
Miami Beach
^oratrDeba
Miami
J. seNHowERTsR:
Lauderdale Lake.
AND MANY QTHfH *
MORE THAN...
'300,000
IN CASH PRi;
A
PWY
Pro-Football
PICK UP A GAME CARD AT PANTRY PRIDE. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY.
HOW TO PLAY OUR
PRO-FOOTBALL GAME
1 Obtain a 'ee PRO FOOTBALL weekly game card each time
you visit a participating PANTRY PRIDE STORE NO PUR
CHASE NECESSARY Then watch PRO FOOTBALL the
following Monday night on NETWORK TELEVISION, or check I
vour local newspaper or result m poster at any participating I
PANTRY PRIDE STORE for the last number erf the final SCORE
of both teams at the completion of the game
2 If the last number of the final score of each team matches the
number for each team printed on the PRO FOOTBALL game
card, you wtn the dollar amount indicated on the card, either
31 000 $100. $10 or $1
3 If you have a winning card, take it to any participating
PANTRY PRIDE STORE by the dose of business Saturday n.ght
following that Monday night's game for verification.
4 Cards that do not correspond with the card number teams
color and TV game date shown on the game result poster will not
be honored Persons under 18 years of age are not eligible
PROGRAM DATA FOR 18 WEEKS
17 1980 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme* to be awarded!
S309 946 m Prize Money 1 34 500 Winning Game CarJ
Winning Possibilities fmt W*k _________
on a FREE
GAME CARD
EVERY TIME YOU
VISIT A
PANTRY PRIDE
1 STORt VISIt
n* wi ik
I m 103
I .n 3 750
I m 15 000
1 m 250 000
I m 750 000
3 STORI VISIt]
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I in 1 250
I in 5 000
I in 83 333 |
I ,n 250 1
TO RUN DURING IB Of IMl 21 WilKS Bt'vVUN AuO it I9WANOJAN ?C
'0 STORES PARTICIPATING (ROM Ft PIIRCF TO {r WF.SI
> .- I.il. w . IvINil YOU MNOl ACASMWINNIt Allll 1HI MM OtPOSIT TOUR CUM CARO IN TW j
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SAVE YOUR
PINK REGISTER
TAPES FOR...
X
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SHEETS
PILLOWCASES
BLANKETS
FIRST QUAi.TYPERCAlE
FIAT OR FITTED
PACKAGE OF TWO
MATCHING REGULAR
DOUBLE SHEET PILLOWCASES
FREE
With J325 in Pink Tapes With s225 in Pink Tapes
OFFER EN(
OCTORER 17. 11
nona'iergenic THERMAL BLANKET
ITEMS ALSO AVAILABLE WITHOUT TAPES AT SPECIAL PRICES.
RAW mi. F| Slf (PfNC HAUniS- SriMh
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