The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00229

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJewisti FloridIan
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
19 Number 16
Hollywood, Florida Friday, August 10,1979
Fnd Shoeh,i price 35 Cents
tkin Is President's \ 120 Sign Up for Community Mission
Mission Chairman
|an Atkin, M.D. has been
President's Mission
n for the Jewish
of South Broward,
to Joyce Newman,
will be leading the
}t's Mission participants
With Broward, leaving
jderdale Airport Sunday,
He and 20 specially
leaders from South
will meet with Yitzhak
Parcel's president.
a cardiovascular
[in Hollywood, is on the
the Council of Jewish
Mis and the Jewish
in of South Broward. He
president of the Jewish
n of South Broward.
('
^
*^ -. 4Nh
J
>
r--.<
y
Dr. Atkin
ilom Reception Aug. 25
year the Jewish
>n of South Broward
Division holds a
.Reception in honor of
ers to the South Broward
[The purpose of the
is to inform new
of the Jewish com-
Ind its many facets.
rst Shalom Reception for
will be held Saturday,
at the home of Brenda
and Andrew Greenman. The wel-
coming event will feature wine,
cheese and music.
If you are new to the area or
know of any newcomers, please
contact Leslie Altman at the
Federation.
Louise Diamond is chairman of
the event. Nancy Ehrlich and
Barbara Rosenberg are co-
chairmen.
Israel Shows Latest
Combat Technology
!L AVIV (JTA) Israel celebrated Air Force
Hth a demonstration of the latest combat technology
le presentation of wings to a new crop of pilots at
jnies attended by Defense Minister Ezer Weizman
Force Commander Gen. David Ivri at a base in
ith of the country.
>ME OF that equipment was put through its paces.
>bra helicopter demonstrated its maneuverability as
ti-tank weapon. The American-built Hawkeye early
lg and spotter plane which has already seen action
[skies over Lebanon, detected "enemy" aircraft at a
of 260 miles and flashed the information to in-
^tor planes.
Formations of French-made Fouga Magestere
lg planes, American F-15 fighters and the Israel-
kfir interceptors flew in formations forming a giant
)f David.
ISRAEL'S NAVY also had something to celebrate,
newest missile boat was launched at the Israel
rards on Haifa Bay.
The craft, which will carry a crew of 46 officers and
and the latest improved Gabriel surface-to-surface
Kiles, has a cruising range of 3000 nautical miles.
$1.2 Billion in Arms Pushed
One hundred twenty people
have signed up for the Jewish
Federation of South Broward's
1979 Community Mission to
Israel, scheduled for Nov. 1-11,
according to Mary and Ed
Gottlieb. "It appears this year's
Mission will be sold out by mid-
August," the Gottliebs com-
mented.
A Mission is defined as "going
out among your people in Israel
to witness their achievements, to
share their hopes and struggles,
to discover your heritage and to
renew your own commitment to
them," the Gottliebs explained.
Mission participants will stay
in the Jerusalem Hilton, the
Tiberias Plaza and the Tel Aviv
Hilton.
THEY WILL tour various
places, including Mount Scopus,
Mount of Olives, Ammunition
Hill, Mount Zion and Mea
Shearim, the ultra-orthodox
quarter of Jerusalem.
Other stops include Mount
Herzl Military Cemetery and Yad
Vashem, a memorial to the
Holocaust. Here participants will
listen to lectures by Holocaust
experts and see a tour of exhibits.
The tour is concluded with a
Yizkor Service to the martyrs
and heroes of the Holocaust.
Stops in Jordan include the
Allenby Bridge, connecting
Jordan to Israel. A feature of the
Golan Heights is the Good Fence
at Metulla. connecting Lebanon
and Israel.
A closing banquet will be held
the evening of Nov. 10, and some
members of the group will depart
for their homes in Hollywood.
BEFORE returning to South
Broward, other members will
[ASHINGTON (JTA) -
State Department has
that it has "recom-
ied" that President Carter
Congressional approval for
[U. S. sale of $1.2 billion in
sns to Saudi Arabia to equip
more battalions of its
Sonal guard.
The disclosure on July 12
le a week after Saudi Arabia
minced it was increasing its
py oil production for an un-
ified period to help offset
Drtages in the U. S. and other
industrialized countries. Ever
since first reports of Saudi ac-
tivities in oil production and
pricing within OPEC
(Organization of Petroleum
Exporting Countries) discussions
indicated less gouging than by
such countries as Libya and Iraq,
reports of deals indicated linking
Saudi actions and statements
with an understanding from
Washington that the U. S. would
pressure Israel on withdrawal
from the West Bank and deal
with the Palestinians.
Mary and Ed Gottlieb
extend their trip to include
additional days in Israel or
stopovers in England, Greece or
other European countries.
For complete information and
reservations, contact the Mission
Desk at the Jewish Federation of
South Broward.
Mission Parlor Meetings
Three additional Community
Mission Parlor Meetings have
been scheduled in South
Broward, according to Mission
chairmen Mary and Ed Gottlieb.
These Parlor Meetings are held to
enlighten prospective par-
ticipants on the Jewish
Federation of South Broward s
Community Mission to Israel.
Wednesday, Aug. 15, 7:30p.m.
at the home of Svde and Dave
Ho use n.
Thursday, Aug. 16, 7:30 p.m.
at the home of Nancy and Herb
Brizel.
Tuesday. Aug. 21, 7:30 p.m. at
the home of Irene and Sydney
Molt /.man.
Anyone interested in attending
these Parlor Meetings should
contact the Mission Desk at the
Jewish Federation.
UN Soldier Arrested
For Running Guns
4UIV T0..W.I nl^nn TEL AVIV Israel closed its
border last week to all personnel
of the United Nations Interim
Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL).
following the arrest of a high-
ranking Nigerian Army officer
who, according to police, was
smuggling a small arsenal of
weapons and explosives to a
Palestine Liberation
Organization agent in Jerusalem.
The officer, Lt. Col. Alfred
Gom, who serves as manpower
and information officer at UNI-
FIL headquarters, was
remanded in custody for 15 days
by a Jerusalem magistrate. He
has refused any comment and
asked for legal counsel by the
UNIFIL legal officer.
A SPOKESMAN for UNIFIL
said that the matter is entirely in
the hands of Israeli authorities.
He observed that among the
12.000 soldiers attached to UNI-
FIL there are some "rotten
apples," but this should not
cause friction between UNIFIL
soldiers and Israelis.
Gom was the second UNIFIL
From Lebanon
officer arrested this year for
alleged arms smuggling to
terrorists. Last February, a
Senegalese captain was arrested
for delivering an arms cache
concealed in the spare tire of his
car to a PLO agent near Acre.
Senegalese personnel have
been barred from Israel since
then.
Gom was detected as a result
of a highway accident at Bab el
Wad midway between the coastal
plain and Jerusalem. His car hit a
private car driven by a woman
who was injured and
hospitalized.
Police immediately inspected
Gom's car to ascertain if it was in
good running order, a routine
required in any highway accident
that causes injuries.
ACCORDING TO police, two
valises in the trunk compartment
were crammed with weapons and
Lt. CoL Alfnd Gom
explosives wrapped in red cloth.
Police said the cache consisted
of 30 demolition bricks of a
combined weight of 15
Continued on Page 9


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 10,1979
Young Leadership Sets
Programs for Year
Newman Urges:
Convert Good Intentions into Cash' J
The Young Leadership
Committee of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward will
embark on an ambitious program
this fall, according to chairman
Larry Weiner.
Committee members will meet
monthly for such programs as
Soviet Jewry: "Let My People
Go But Where?". "What Is A
Mission To Israel?," "Campaign:
What Is It?," and "Allocations
Who Makes The Decisions?"
Other programs will focus on
Soviet Jewry, World Jewry and
Jewish Education.
The committee will end the
year with a Shabbaton retreat.
According to Weiner, the first
Young Leadership Committee
meeting is scheduled for
Saturday, Sept. 9, and will focus
on Priority Planning.
More than 16 couples have
been selected to participate in the
leadership group. Those in-
terested in becoming a member of
"The people of Israel cannot
spend a pledge," Joyce Newman.
Jewish Federation of South
Broward president said. "In the
days ahead, we are confident that
the 30.000 member Jewish
community of South Broward
will once again respond
generously to the Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund by converting
the good intentions of their
pledges into cash payments in
order to enable our Federation
and its agencies to fulfill their
obligations to Jews in need
throughout the world and in our
community.
Luncheon to Benefit
Service to the Blind
Larry Weiner
the group should contact the
Federation.
Sumner G. Kaye is the
professional working with the
young leaders.
Service to the Blind Program
of Temple Beth El Sisterhood will
benefit by a Sisterhood Lun-
cheon-Card Party to be held in
the Tobin Auditorium of the
temple, 1351 S. 14th Ave..
Hollywood, on Tuesday, Aug. 28
at noon. The public is invited to
attend.
Sisterhood's Braille Services
provide study and test materials
for students at Nova Elementary
and Middle Schools, as well as for
students throughout the state of
Career Women Set Meeting Sept. 5
The Career Women's Council
of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward has finalized its
calendar for the upcoming year.
The first program on Wednesday.
Sept. 5, will feature Dawn
Schuman. She will speak at a
Learn-In on Jewish Women
Throughout History.
Ms. Schuman graduated
magna cum laude from Nor-
thwestern University in the field
of education. She has been active
in many aspects of community
life and has developed a curricula
of adult Jewish study, primarily
in the field of Jewish history.
Students study Jewish history
from ancient through medieval
and modern. These courses
recently won the Solomon
Schechter Award for the out-
standing Jewish adult education
program in the nation.
Other programs are scheduled
for the '79-'80 year. The dates to
keep in mind are Nov. 29, March
11 and May 22. All interested
working women may attend.
"The Career Women's Council
provides the opportunity for
sharing common interests,
educational stimulation and
strengthening of ties with the
Jewish community," Elaine
Fleisher, co-chairwoman of the
Council said.
Florida. Blind adults benefit by
the transcription of career and
technical manuals. This group
also provides library books to the
Jewish Braille Institute of
America.
The Braille Bindery group
works under the chairmanship of
Mrs. Milton Forman, with Mrs.
Abraham Halpern in charge of
the tape recording books for the
Nova Schools.
Mrs. Caryl Feldman of
Hollywood, is founder of
Sisterhood's "Service to the
Blind" and now coordinator and
braille chairman of volunteers for
the project.
For tickets and reservations
call Mrs. Richard Tober. 938-
2844. Mrs. Jeanette Rauch. 458-
7927. or the temple office. 920-
8225 944-7773.
"Could you or your private
businesses possibly survive if
most of your cash came in at the
end of the year?" Mrs. Newman
asked. "Of course not, and
neither can our fellow Jews who
depend upon the humanitarian
programs supported at home and
abroad by our Federation.
"Should we ask the Russian
Jews seeking new Uves of
freedom either in Israel or in our
own community to defer their
language and job retraining until
we can pay our pledges?
"How can we, in good con-
science, ask the 60,000 Jews of
Rumania, to postpone important
programs until we get around to
paying our pledges?
"It is imperative that im-1
mediate cash payments be made I
on all outstanding pledges to the
Combined Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund campaign."
Stack to Speak
Freshman Congressman
Edward J. Stack will be the guest
speaker at the Jewish Federation
of South Broward's Community
Relations Committee meeting,
Tuesday, Aug. 21. The meeting
will begin at noon.
Levin Named Family Mission Chairman
Philip A. Levin, M.D. has been
named National Family Mission
chairman, according to Joel
Breslow, National Missions
chairman.
A pediatrician in Hollywood.
Dr. Levin is the Campaign
Chairman of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward's
1980 Combined Jewish Appeal -
Israel Emergency Fund. He is
also a member of the Federation's
board of directors and board of
trustees.
In addition to his new
leadership position, Levin
previously served as the 1979
Missions chairman, Shomrai
chairman and Professional
Division co-chairman.
Levin's responsibility as
National Family Mission
chairman includes the coor-
dination of the
Family Mission.
1979 National
RELGO.INC
Religious I Gift Articles
Israeli Arts A Crafts
Hebrew Books Judaic*
Paper Backs Records A Tapes
Open Sunday
1507 Washington Av MB S3J-SIU
Judaica High School to Begin
A National LeadershiD
Conference on American-Israeli
Relations will be held under the
sponsorship of the Zionist
Organization of America in
Miami Beach. Oct. 24-28.
Announcement of the conclave
was made by Gerald Schwartz,
president of the Presidents
Council of the ZOA for Florida.
Ivan J. Novick, national
president of the ZOA, said the
conference "will be an op-
portunity to draw together
concerned, responsible leaders of
the academic. lay and
professional communities to
review and assess issues that
affect American-Israeli relations
and relations between Israel and
its Arab Neighbors."
The fall conclave. Schwartz
said, will be held in conjunction
with a Pan American Zionist'
Conference, to be held in Miami
Beach under ZOA auspices and
bring together Jewish leaders
from throughout the United
States, Canada, Central America,
the Caribbean and South
America.
I have tuned pianos (or most ol the
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Provide for Jewish
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trust to HADASSAH
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For more information write
Hedassah Will** Bequests
50 West 58th Street
New York. NY 10019
Telephone: (212) 355-7900
At Riverside, our reputation is based
upon our assurance of service that fulfills
the high standards evoked by Jewish
tradition.
Today, each of Riverside's chapels
serving Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
counties is staffed only by Riverside
people who understand Jewish tradition
and honor it.
And in that tradition we serve every
family, regardless of financial
circumstance.
Miami Beach, Miami/North Miami Beach: 531-1151
Hollywood: 920-1010
Ft.Lauderdale(Sunrise): 584-6060
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan Area.
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For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
Kenneth M Kay / Arthur Grossberg/ Joseph Rubin
h n n

I.H1. ,t,IM I II <^V


Friday, August 10, 1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Women's Campaign Events
The Jewish Federation of South Broward Women's
Division has finalized dates for their 1980 Campaign events,
according to Delia Rosenberg, campaign vice president.
Following is a list of events, dates and chairmen:
SHOMRAI Thursday, Jan. 24,1980
Chairmen Annette Deakter, Marge Saltzman, Dina Sedley
SHOSHANA Thursday, Feb. 7,1980
Chairman Evelyn Stieber
MEIRAH Thursday, Feb. 21,1980
Chairmen Ruth Rodensky, Florence Roth
YONAH:Wednesday, March 12,1980
Chairmen Corinne Kolodin, Noreen Schapiro
; -.
Delia Rosenberg
Holiday Cards Available
Holiday greeting cards and Russian cards, a project of the Soviet
Jewry Committee of the Jewish Federation of South Broward's
Community Relations Committee, are available through the
Federation office. The greeting cards come 25 per package, and the
Russian cards include four cards and addresses to send out to Russian
families. Anyone interested should call the Jewish Federation of South
Broward.

Now as never before,
I'm far from my
people...and I'm
facing long; and
bard years of
detention. But I
say, addressing:
my people,
rtftw mu mh
Avital
Scharansky
Area Hadassah Leaders
Attend National Conclave
Some 60 leaders of the Florida 1 deputy prime minister of Israel.
Mid-Coast Region of Hadassah
from all of Broward County and
South Palm Beach have
registered for the 65th annual
convention of Hadassah, to be
held at the Palmer House,
Chicago, Aug. 19-22.
Esther Cannon, president of
the region, will depart Aug. 15, to
attend the pre-convention region
presidents' meeting and the
national board meetings
scheduled Aug. 15 to 19. A
Shabbot dinner for the national
board will be held on Friday
evening, Aug. 17, at the Palmer
House.
Also participating in the
national board meeting from the
Florida Mid-Coast Region are its
honorary members: Sara Dana of
Boca Raton. Elaine Ellish of
Tamarac and Sara Munter of
Hollywood.
The convention's opening day,
Sunday, Aug. 19, will highlight
an address by Prof. Yigael Yadin,
Among the other speakers
during the convention will be Dr.
Kalman J. Mann, director
general of the Hadassah Medical
Organization, who will discuss
the latest medical developments
as well as the urgent medical
needs in Israel.
The Tuesday banquet will be
part of an evening at which the
annual Henrietta Szold award
will be presented to a surprise
international personality.
Every phase of Hadassah s
projects will be reported in depth
in workshops during the four day
convention, and a film theater
will be open continuously for
presentation of Hadassah "s latest
productions. Another highlight
of the convention will be the
newest Israeli Fashion Show.
All 32 chapters and 26 groups
of the region have scheduled
detailed reports of the convention
at September or October
meetings.
Marion Salter
Wriaihdvi
Post Haste Shopping Cemer
4525 Sheridan St Hollywood. Fla
- Phone 961-6998
Personal Service Book Store
Menotcih QjapdS.
In three locations,
ready to serve.
A funeral requires every convenience and consideration available
to those making the arrangements.
Knowing that Menorah Chapels are close by, in three prime
locations in Broward County, gives you that all-important extra
measure of confidence and service when you most need it. Il 'l
another way we show you thai Menorah makes a difference.
IN SUNRISE. INDEERFIELD. IN MARGATE.
Executive Offices:
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Attention College Students
During the course of the school year, the Jewish Federation
of South Broward would Bee to keep you informed about
hometown events.
Please fill in the form below and mail to:
Jewish Federation of South Broward
Women's DMston
2T19 Hotywood BouhMd
Hotywood, Florida 33020
, riWrlt.
;ADDRESS
_PlKJfvc._.
SCHOOL NAME.



Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, Auguat 10,1979
The Gas Crunch 'Explained'
A piece of hate literature distributed from
Louisiana and making its way through Florida is
particularly odiousand dangerous.
There is nothing more than double-digit in-
flation that infuriates Americans these daysexcept
one thing: the availability of gasoline. Notice that we
do not say the price of gasoline. The rage one feels
about that falls into the category of the fury over
inflation.
No, it's the availability that is at issue. Given
that gas will go to $1.50 a gallon, or even higher, the
sad fact is that Americans will still be using their
cars so long as the tank can be filled.
How does all this bear on the hate literature now
showing up in Florida? Simply that it blames the gas
crunch on Jews. Of course, Israel gets into the act,
too. But primary emphasis is placed on Jews,
American Jews.
According to the pamphlet, it is American
Jewish "control" of the Congress and "Jewish"
control of the media that are to blame for the whole
thing. The reasoning behind the hate monger who
wrote the pamphlet is too tortured and hardly
deserves being repeated here. We have seen this kind
of alleged reasoning before.
But now that it is related to the gas crunch, this
sort of anti-Semitism, as we say, is not only odious.
It is truly dangerous. With tempers running high
about gas, anti-Semitism can begin running just as
high. And just as hot.
Support for Wallenberg
The newly-formed Free Raoul Wallenberg
Committee, composed of four distinguished
legislators headed by Sen. Frank Church, deserves
the support of all American Jews. The Jewish people
owe Wallenberg a debt for his efforts in saving more
than 10,000 Hungarian Jews during World War II.
As Americans, our debt is compounded since
Wallenberg went to Bucharest in 1944 at the request
of President Roosevelt who asked Sweden, a neutral
in the war, to send someone to Hungary to help the
Hungarian Jews facing extermination by the Nazis.
Wallenberg, who will be 66 if he is still alive, is
believed to be in a Soviet prison. He was arrested
when the Soviet army captured Bucharest in 1945.
The Soviets at first refused to admit that he was
their prisoner but since 1947 the Kremlin has
maintained he died of a heart attack.
His family believes he is alive and has kept up
efforts to have him freed. They have received reports
from released Soviet prisoners that Wallenberg is in
the USSR. The latest was in December when a
Moscow Jew, Jan Kaplan, was rearrested after he
telephoned his sister in Tel Aviv and said he met in
the Butyrka Prison in 1975, a Swedish prisoner who
has been held since 1945.
Mrs. Nina Lagergren, Wallenberg's half-sister
has been conducting an international campaign in
behalf of her brother since early this year. She has
been to Israel, where Prime Mmister Menachem
Begin has given his support, and to Britain where an
all-parties parliamentary group was formed.
As the U.S. committee noted, the Soviets won't
admit that they are holding Wallenberg because they
do "not want to be forced to explain why they im-
prisoned someone whose only crime was saving
lives." We in the West must not add to this crime by
allowing the memory of this brave man to fade.
^Jewish Floridian
fi SHOFAR OF OR EATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood Office S Federal Hwy.. Suite JOB.Danla. Fla SJ004
Telephone WO-aoiS
TR^wSSE? "* "*" ,M NE ^ Sl Mlam'' F" "SSSSSe EHOW.T
Editor and H**-^ ^^ K^X^ *""
Ol The Merchandise Advert.sed In If* Columns
Published Bl Weekly
Second Class Postage Paid at Danla. Fla. a500
Federation office: President. Joyce Newman: Vice President! Allen Gordon,
Moaei Hornsteln; Secretary. Joel Schneider, M.D ; Treasurer. Jo Ann Kate;
Executive Director, Sumner G. Kaye. Submit material for publication to Marcy
Schackne, Public Relatlona Director; or Leslie Horn, Assistant Public Relations
Director.
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed fhe Jewish Unity and the Jewish Wefftiy
Member of the Jewish Teteoreph.c Aoency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. Wonu
wide News Service. National Editorial Association. American Association o)
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (local area) One YearS7.S0. Out of Town Upon Request
17 AB 5739
Number 16
A Part Doesn't Make the Whole
IN GENEVA the other week,
Britain's Chief Rabbi Immanuel
Jakobovits made a brilliant
point His assumption was that
we are becoming victims of a
"Holocaust mentality"
In essence, said Rabbi Jako-
bovits, we have begun to brood
upon our survival as individual
Jews rather than upon the sur-
vival of Judaism.
The logical inference here is
that we have become obsessed
with the demise of six million
Jews, but we appear to be less
distraught by the decimation and
virtual disappearance of the great
and irreplacable German Jewish
community, or of the other
vibrant Jewish communities of
Eastern Europe that fell victim
to the H itlerian horde.
AND SO, according to Rabbi
renew our commitment
%
Jakobovits, our despair is mis-
placed. The Holocaust should not
be the focal point of an eternal
Jewish shiva; rather, it must
confirm our allegiance to the
testament of a Jewish continuum
that no Holocaust can destroy.
The shiva must terminate in a
purgation of thoughts of death
-me AUSTRi m tweRHM^EK

1
and
life.
A Holocaust may interrupt the
Jewish continuum, but it can
never put a halt to it. This must
be our visceral intellectual and
emotional condition, and to brood
upon the individual losses,
though they be reckoned in the
millions, rather than pledge our-
selves to the etemality of the
principle which the individuals
constitute, is not only wasteful.
It is also self-destructive.
In Geneva, Rabbi Jakobovits
also had some startling things to
say about Israel and Zionism. To
mix the metaphor of two great
civilizations, Israel rose like the
ancient phoenix out of the ashes
of the Holocaust
IN THIS sense, we regard
Israel as a State dedicated to the
survival of Jews as individuals in
the hopeful belief that a
Holocaust of the type (if not
necessarily the dimension)
unleashed by the Nazis on
European Jewry is impossible in
Israel today by definition.
And so, modern political Zion-
ism, as the root from which
Israel has sprung, is in these
terms limited in its vision. For
once again, it is not individual
Jews who are the issue, but
Judaism.
Reasons Rabbi Jakobovits:
Israel must transcend this
brooding existential egotism.
Israel must become the core of
the noblest Jewish virtues in the
prophetic tradition. Only in this
way can Israel rise above the
view of itself as a perennial
refugee camp and achieve the
status of keeper of the key to the
Eternal Jew.
THERE IS no doubt that this^
makes eminently good sense y
except that in Rabbi Jakobovits
view of Israel as the instrument
of Jewish prophetic virtue, he
errs.
For it was the Prophet Nathan
who first warned the Jews
against nationhood, pointing out
Continued on Page 9
sl Bs9Ji
Our Obligation to Affirmative Action
Friday. August 10. 1979
Volume 9
Way back in 1971, Marco
DeFunis, a member of a
Sephardic Jewish family and a
Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the
University of Washington, was
turned down when he applied for
admission to that Seattle in-
stitution's law school. He was
admitted to four other law
schools, but his alma mater was
his top choice; and his fight to
get in eventually reached the
Supreme Court.
Many folks sensed anti-Jewish
leanings in the DeFunis case;
others said, oh, no, the
University of Washington was
just trying to make it easier for
blacks to become lawyers. In any
event. Justice William O.
Douglas pushed the legal button
that gave a victory of sorts to
young DeFunis.
THIS ALL LEFT a cloud of
ambiguity hanging over the issue
of justice in college admissions.
And matters drifted along until a
year ago when the Supreme
Court handed down a sharply
divided ruling in the famous
Allan Bakke case. That time
around, the Court upheld con-
sideration of race in school entry
programs while at the same time
ordering Bakke, who is white,
admitted to the University of
California Medical School at
Davis where he is currently
trudging along towards his
degree-
Just as the DeFunis case left
shadows of uncertainty, so did
Bakke. The Jewish community
by and large hailed the Bakke
decision as a blow at college
quotas while continuing to
subscribe to the important
principle of affirmative action.
Robert
Segal
The Black community was
understandably upset by the
Bakke decision. Dr. Alvin
Poussaint, Harvard professor of
psychiatry and a prominent
member of the Black community,
complained: "Legally, I think it
(the Bakke ruling I is going to
open a Pandora's box; it invites a
testing of affirmative action
programs all over the place."
BUT NOW with the decisive 5-
to-2 ruling by the Supreme Court
in the case of Brian Webber vs.
the Kaiser Aluminum and
Chemical Company, we have
moved away from the important
but somewhat circumscribed area
of discrimination in education to
the much broader issue of
discrimination in employment.
The DeFunis and Bakke cases
impinged upon the destinies of
several hundred thousand; the
Webber case packs a message to
millions of workers and many,
many employers.
At issue in the Webber case
was Webber's complaint that the
Kaiser Company, in selecting
candidates to train employes for
upgrading, ignored Webber's
seniority by using a racial quota.
That the case originated in
Louisiana, where equality was
long consigned to the dungeon,
complicated the issue.
Moreover, it appeared rather
*

/f.
certain that the Kaiser Louisiana
plant, taking on the hue of the
immediate environment, had
indulged in bias against Blacks.
CONFRONTED by such
factors, steeped in doubt, the
American Jewish Congress and
the American Jewish Committee
decided to sit out the Webber
case. (Both agencies had filed
briefs in the Bakke case.) The
Anti-Defamation League, which
had also been active in the Bakke ,}
case, filed in support of Webber;
and, judging by early reports of
reactions to the 5-to-2 ruling, the
ADL is unhappy about the
outcome.
Not so the Black community,
certain sectors of organized labor,
and a number of governmental
units. The dismay of the ADL
folks is understandable: they fear
a rebirth of a drive for quotas.
Actually, many who have
fought for equality of op-
portunity for years are not too
upset, indeed rather encouraged
by the Court's Webber ruling.
They feel confident that neither
Chief Justice Burger's nor
Justice Rehnquist's negative
branding of their judicial
brothers as "escape artists such
as Houdini" will endure the test
of time.
RATHER THEY take heart
from the fact that Justice Black-
manno fiery liberalwas with
the majority. Even more to
delight is the decision of the
majority to sound a clear call for
"employers and unions to self-
examine and to self-evaluate thei.
employment practices and to,
endeavor to eliminate, so far as.
Continued on Page 9
wear-eww i i .1n


Friday, August 10,1979
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 5

*
Olympics Concern
Israeli Sports Leaders
HI AS President Gives Scholarships
Edwin Shapiro, president of
HI AS, funded in part by the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's combined Jewish
Appeal Israel emergency
campaign, recently presented
scholarships to four Tel Aviv
University students. The grants
are from the Richard Alan
Shapiro HIAS Memorial Fund
established by Shapiro and his
wife Claire in memory of their son
who was fatally injured in an
automobile accident in 1974 at
the age of 23.
The recipients, selected by the
university, are participants in a
"big brother" program which
reaches out to children in poverty
neighborhoods. As part of their
course of study, the students
spend several hours a week with
these children, who are often
from broken homes, generally
failures in school, and often drop-
outs. They frequently harbor a
sense of neglect and have a low
regard for themselves. Some 600
Tel Aviv University students
look part in this program in the
past academic vear.
At the presentation ceremony
on the university's campus,
Shapiro stated: "Taking the
disadvantaged out of huts and
putting them into buildings will
not solve the problem. This
ORT Sponsors
School in Israel
The American High School
Program, sponsored by Women's
American ORT, World Zionist
Organization and ORT Israel,
offers teenagers entering tenth or
eleventh grade an opportunity to
study in Israel.
Curriculum includes academic
subjects, Judaica, kibbutz work,
technical track and touring.
Call Chaya Remba, 212-752-
0600, Ext. 384. or Rita Krell, 212-
594-8500, Ext. 217 for additional
information.
CTUDI0
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Cuisine
FRED JOSSI
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you back to
his renowned
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for a unique
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Match your table to your
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Wine Cellar studio. Place
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project is real Project Renewal -
Human Project Renewal."
Aviezer Chelouche, vice president
of the university, said, "The
student who cares will ultimately
be a better citizen.''
ALSO ATTENDING the
ceremony were Shapiro's son,
Shaul, who is an oleh residing
with his wife and sabra child in
Ramat Gan, and Gaynor I.
Jacobson, executive vice
president of HIAS.
Photo taken at the presen-
tation ceremony: (left to right)
Aviezer Chelouche, vice
president, Tel Aviv University;
1 iosmili Nakash, student; Michal
Binyamini, coordinator of the
tutorial program; Zvi
Klementynovski, member of Tel
Aviv University Executive
Council, former deputy mayor of
Tel Aviv, member of the board of
directors and secretary of the
board of HIAS Israel; Edwin
Shapiro, president of HIAS; his
son, Shaul Shapiro; Rachel Asch,
student; Gaynor I. Jacobson,
executive vice president of
HIAS; Yossie Carmel, vice
chairman, Tel Aviv University
board of governors; Ayelet
Sultani, student; Uri Zedaka,
student. The four students were
recipients of the scholarship from
the Richard Alan Shapiro HIAS
Memorial Fund.
Hias is a beneficiary of every
organized Jewish community in
the United States, the United
Jewish Appeal and the UJA-
Federation Joint Campaign of
Greater New York.
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Concern has grown in Israeli
sports circles that the Soviet
Union may resort to the denial of
entry visas or other ad-
ministrative measures to prevent
Israel from participating in the
Olympic Games in Moscow next
summer despite its promise that
every nation will be welcome to
compete.
The possibility of such action
by the Soviet authorities seemed
likely after Alex Giladi, a senior
Israeli television official, received
word that his application for a
visa to enter the USSR was
rejected.
Giladi, who had covered the
Olympic Games in Munich and
Montreal for Israeli television, is
slated to head the Israeli TV crew
at the 1980 Games in the Soviet
capital. He was scheduled to go
to Moscow along with 39 senior
officials of the European
Broadcasting Union (EBU) to
cover the "Spartakiada," a
general rehearsal for the Olympic
Games. Of all the applicants, he
apparently was the only one
denied a visa.
DOUBTS ABOUT Soviet
intentions toward the Israeli
Olympic team were increased by
the discriminatory treatment
given 40 Israeli political scien-
tists who had asked to attend the
International Congress of
Political Science which opens in
Moscow on Aug. 12.
Prof. Asher Arian of Tel Aviv
University, head of the Israeli
chapter of the Political Science
Association, reported that only
30 of the 40 applicants have been
notified that they will receive
visas. The others have received
no notification. Moreover, none
of the applicants has yet been
notified about accommodations
and it appears that no reser-
vations have been made for them.
Unless the full delegation
receives visas and ac-
commodations, Israel may have
to cancel its participation in the
forum. According to Arian, the
American and French political
science associations have
promised that if all 40 Israelis are
not allowed to attend, they would
cancel their participation.
It was pointed out, however,
that a decision by Israel to
boycott the congress would be
collective. The academicians with
visas could go to Moscow on an
individual basis if they chose to
but would not be part of an
Israeli delegation.
e 1979 R. J. Reynold* Tobacco Co
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Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 10,1979
A Retrospective
Jack Levine's Works in Traveling Exhibit
I
By ALFRED WERNER
Currently, a large retrospective
show of Jack Levine's work,
organized by New York's Jewish
Museum, is traveling through
this country. Now thousands of
Americans, who had heard of
America's foremost painter of
social protest," and of the
strongest of those Realists who
have been inspired by the
"Jewish motif," will be able to
see some of the original works
rather than just reproductions in
college textbooks.
What a joy it will be for art
lovers in West Palm Beach.
Memphis. Montgomery, Por-
tland (Oregon) and St. Paul to,
walk in a leisurely fashion among
his masterpieces.
SO MUCH has been written in
praise of Levine who. ad-
mittedly, has had adversaries as
well that it might be difficult
to try to find new words of praise.
But there are few who know his
story, for this Bostonian in-
trovert, quite unlike Dali.
Picasso, or Chagall, has rarely
and almost reluctantly given
interviews or publicly interpreted
his pictures.
Levine, who recently turned
64, wants his paintings and
prints to speak to the art lovers
directly, to feel the impact of his
works, his politics, philosophy,
love. But on the many occasions
that I have asked him questions,
he has answered them patiently
and. at times, through a single
remark, opened an entirely new
world to me.
The son of immigrants from
Czarist Russian. Levine was
lucky enough to have been born
in Boston, one of America's
oldest artistic centers. He spent
his first eight years in the South
End, a slum section inhabited by
Jewish. Italian and Irish
newcomers.
THE NEXT stop was the
somewhat more affluent Rox-
bury. which had a Jewish Center.
There, by an accident of fate, an
exceptionally bright and
progressive young man was in
charge of the drawing class.
Harold Zimmerman was only
nine years older than Jack: he
was trying to eke out a living as a
teacher while studying at the art
school of the Boston Museum.
Another name must be
mentioned, too the "Brahmin"
Dr. Denman Waldo Ross, who, in
his youth, had been a personal
friend of several of the
Impressionist painters in France,
and had founded Harvard's Art
Department Old Dr. Ross took
three young Jews under his wing.
He enabled Zimmerman to set
up his own teaching studio, and
he took a paternal interest in the
two adolescents, Levine and his
friend, Hyman Bloom (who was
also to become a leading artist).
Levine still feels indebted to
Zimmerman who died
prematurely in 1940. Zimmerman
was a perfectionist who drilled
the young man in draftsmanship
rigorously, "as a violinist would
he drilled by Leopold Auer."
AS FOB Dr. Ross, he not only
Sve Levine private instruction
t also supplied him. Cor a
period of three years, with
weekly allowance of $12, a nice
sum in those pre-Depression
days. Ross' greatest contribution
to Jack's education was.
probably, in urging him to study
the Old Masters in the rich
collections in Boston and nearby
Cambridge As Levine once
recalled:
"He put me in touch with the
European tradition and the great
painting of the past at an early
age, when I knew nothing about
it. He gave me roots a long way
back I owe to Ross what I'm
interested in, continuity."
There was nobody to give roots
to Levine's contemporary,
Jackson Pollock from Wyoming,
and Ross would never have
considered Pollock's techniques
of dripping and splashing paint
on canvas as part of the practice
of art
BUT HAD he lived to see the
grim, satirical oils produced by
Levine after the mid-thirties,
Ross, with his puritan-patrician
background, would, in all
likelihood, not have cared for his
ex-student's new style and
subject matter either. Yet he
loved young Levine's "Classical"
drawings. He exhibited them at
Harvard's Fogg Art Museum.
Levine was not yet 20 in 1934
when the late Edith Halpert, the
discoverer of many an artist,
gave him his first one-man show
at her Dowtown Gallery in
Manhattan. He was among the
youngest of the thousands of
artists who, in the era of the
Great Depression, were saved by
the Federal Arts Project,
sponsored by the Work Projects
Administration (WPA). created
under President Roosevelt to
salvage many creative people.
Levine was one of the most
productive and versatile of these
young men and women. In 1936.
his Feast of Pure Reason was
included in the Museum of
Modern Art Exhibition. "New
Horizons in American Art." (It
created a controversy among the
wealthy trustees, for in his
picture Levine had portrayed
John Pierpont Morgan in an
unpleasant underworld setting
with unsavory political and police
chacters, as if to say, "See, they
are all pals in skullduggery," but
the majority on the Board was
liberal and permissiive, and the
picture remained on the wall. (
String Quartette, in the
Metropolitan Museum of Art,
became the most widely known of
the more than 50,000 easel
paintings produced in the WPA
era; through Life magazine and
through New York subway
posters it reached a vast public
JUST BEFORE the outbreak
of World War II, Levine was
represented in Paris at the Three
Centuries of American Art at the
Jeu de Paume (which is ad-
ministered by the Louvre).
While there were individuals
who deplored the money
"wasted" on the WPA Art
Project which provided artists
with such necessities as a roof
over their head, food, clothes, and
materials for work, it was enough
just to point at Levine to
demonstrate that the funds ware
quite necessary.
The WPA Project petered out
in the year 1943. By that time,
private citizen Levine had
become Technical Sergeant
Levine in the Engineer Corps,
stationed or. Ascension Island,
an isolated army base in the
South Atlantic
%
Welcome Home, 1946.
In those 20 dreary months of
service he had little time to
devote to his art Yet he
managed, nonetheless, to paint a
crucifixion for the CathoUc
chapel: "The boys needed
something to look at on that pile
of slab," he explained.
AFTER THE WAR, he settled
in New York, where he married
the painter, Ruth Gikow, who
bore him a daughter. Some years
ago, the Levines bought a
charming small house with red
walls on Morton Street, in
Greenwich Village. The upper
floor contains Miss Gikow's
studio, while her husband has his
own atelier in another old house,
only a few hundred yards away.
Except for traveling repeatedly
in Europe where they seem to
know thoroughly nearly every
important museum the
Levines have, on the whole, lived
quiet lives what the ordinary
man might call "uneventful"
lives, not realizing that the
creation of every work of art is an
event
I do not know how many
pictures Levine has painted, but
there must be hundreds of them,
the monograph about him, with
text by Frank Getlein, issued by
Harry N. Abrams, in the mid-
sixties, contained 169
illustrations: most of the pictures
shown were oils, the inspiration
of El Greco, Rubens, Rembrandt,
Daumier can be felt, as well as an
affinity to Rouault Kokoschka,
and Sou tine
MANY OF these pictures have
been appreciated mainly on
account of their satirical subject
matter. But many art-conscious
people also love his portraits, his
works inspired by literature and
religion. Several of his small
paintings deal with heroes of the
Old Testament and with
historical Jewish figures.
On these little canvases, the
artist lavishly bestowed his
painter's riches, as delightful as
those of medieval miniatures.
The New York Graphic Society
once issued six of them in an
album of excellent color
reproductions. In his prefatory
note, Prof. Sachs, the gres' old
man of Harvard's Art Depart-
ment pointed out to those who
needed some enlightenment that
Levine was more than a bitter
social satirist and that the
pictures in which he castigates
his contemporaries with irony,
with cynicism compounded with
a touch of wry humor, and
usually with vitriolic gusto," tell
only part of the story:
"To evaluate this complex,
spectacularly talented artist
properly, we need not only to
know his satirical side, as

-. -w ~
Shammai, 1976.
triumphantly revealed in his
masterpiece. Gangster's Funeral,
but also the group of paintings
and drawings in which we are
touched by a deep, gentle, tender
side of the artist's nature as
presented in the excellent
reproductions in this portfolio,
made from the series of
beautifully painted Old
Testament figures, small in scale.
In them Jack Levine seems
actually identified with his
subjects. Knowing these figures
we are satisfied that unlike most
of his contemporaries, he is heir
to that ancient compound of
religion and poetry, mythology
and fable, which in the great
epochs of the past supplied ar-
tists with subject matter."
At 64, Levine can look back
upon several decades of incessant
and, on the whole, most suc-
cessful endeavor, but, judging by
my talks with him, he is not the
man to believe that he has
reached his peak and can now
"relax." Indeed, compared to
Oskar Kokoschka, who is 93, and
Marc Chagall, who is 92, Levine
is still a youngster.
HE HAS grown as a painter,
and is constantly growing. If, at
one tune, his approach to life and
art may have appeared somewhat
heavy-handed, the mature Levine
commands a brush that is both
buoyant and spontaneous.
Pioneer Woman
9
:>- 4
NEVK *** i^ouy
A LANft FLOWING WITH
i mIuk *m HOHCY.
MOW ABOUT A LAM*
I FIOWIKC WITH OIL ana
I mom ey i!"_____________
London Jewish Chronicie
"


Friday, August 10,1979
The Jewish Floridian and S hofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
Jewish Leaders Laud Carter's Energy Program
YORK MTAl that. Am American nL, -.ill OV -*
NEW YORK, (JTA| -
President Carter's energy
program calling for an immediate
fcarp reduction of oil imports
find the eventual elimination of
American dependence on foreign
oil was lauded by American
Jewish organizations. They
pledged their cooperation.
In a telegram to the President,
applauding his nationwide
television address on energy
policies and other issues,
Theodore Mann, chairman of the
National Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council
(NJCRAC).said:
"We join with you in the faith
that the American people will
respond to the need for equitable
sacrifice by all segments in the
common effort to achieve the
national goal of reducing our
dependence on foreign oil.
THE JEWISH community
relations field, as represented by
the NJCRAC, is committed to a
policy, and has embarked on
programs, making energy one of
our major priorities. We can
assure you of the support to these
ends of the 11 national
organizations and 107 local
community agencies which have
always worked for a free, just and
strong America."
Activities at Temple in the Pines

Registration is now taking
place for the Sunday School and
Hebrew School departments at
Temple in the Pines, Hollywood,
for the school year beginning
Sept. 4.
Plans are being made for an
extended Early Childhood
Program, under the direction of
Ellen Heilig. There are several
openings for children ages 2'/ to
5.
Inquiries regarding mem-
bership in the congregation,
Men's Club, Sisterhood,
Religious School and Early
Childhood Program are invited.
Special membership fees for
young married couples and senior
citizens have been arranged.
All members are entitled to
tickets for the High Holy Days.
Tickets are now available for
membership and the general
public through the temple office,
which is open Monday through
Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. and on Sunday from 9:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Temple Israel
Temple Israel of Miramar,
6920 SW 35th St., Miramar,
invites members of the com-
munity to a complimentary open
house and breakfast on Sunday,
Aug. 19, at 9:30 a.m.
Guests will meet the rabbi,
Paul Plotkin and tour facilities.
On hand for this event will be the
cantor, members of the School
Board and staff, preschool
director, youth director and
representatives of all arms of the
temple.
For further information, call
961-1700.
THE FAMILY JACOBS'
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A similar statement was issued
by Harris L. Kempner Jr.,
chairman of the American Jewish
Committee's Energy Committee,
who noted that the President's
proposals were consistent with
recommendations made by the
A JCommittee and 11 other major
national Jewish organizations.
These include: mandatory
conservative measures; in-
stitution of oil import quotas;
incentives for speedy develop-
ment of synthetic fuels and solar
power; and the removal of red
tape that has hampered domestic
energy development.
"For the sake not only of our
economic health but also our
political integrity, we must free
ourselves from dependence upon
foreign sources of energy,"
Kempner said.
"THE PRESIDENT'S
speeches have made it clear
beyond doubt that this is his goal
... On behalf of the American
Jewish Committee we pledge our
fullest cooperation."
Ivan J. Novick, president of
the Zionist Organization of
America, said, "President Carter
has correctly singled out the
energy problem as the 'im-
mediate test' so that our nation
can 'seize control again of our
common destiny.' I believe the
American people will now un-
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derstand fully that our great
nation has been victimized by the
oil producing Arab countries
dominating OPEC, including
some who claim to be America's
friends We welcome his
(Carter) call for a free America
and we agree that our nation
must regain its traditional
precepts of morality and con-
fidence in its ability to meet all
challenges."
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.rtru*-
Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 10,1979
Scholarships to Disadvantage*! Students
Distribution Committee.
The awards came from the
Mrs. Walter N. Rothschild
Scholarship Fund which helps
needy and deserving students to
continue their education up to the
university or professional level.
During the last four years the
fund has awarded 848 scholar-
ships, Goldman said. The
program is administered by the
Joint Distribution Committee.
JERUSALEM Three
hundred high school and
vocational school students from
disadvantaged families in
Jerusalem have been granted
scholarships ranging from IL 500
to IL 3,800 to enable them to
| purchase books, clothing,
equipment, and meet school
expenses, it was reported this
week by Ralph I. Goldman,
executive vice president ot the
American Jewish Joint
Rabbi Silver Heads
Defray Congregation
Rabbi Samuel Silver has been
selected as spiritual leader of the
one-year-old Reform Hebrew
Congregation of Delray Beach.
Dr. Silver, an orator and
author will be the rabbi of the
congregation as of Sept. 1.
Rabbi Silver helped organize
the liberal congregation when
needed one to fill the void be-
tween Boca Raton and West
Palm Beach.
Rabbi and Mrs. Silver, a
concert pianist and organist,
conducted the group's first
worship service last July. Since
then Rabbi Emmet Frank has
served as Sabbath Eve leader for
the congregation which now has a
membership of over 100 families.
Rabbi Silver, currently the
spiritual leader of the Jewish
Community Center of Lee
County in Cape Coral, is known
to many Florida residents
because of frequent appearances
on television and radio and
because he was once on the staff
of the National Reform Jewish
Body, the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations.
Dr. Silver is a native of
Wilmington, Del. After or-
dination at the Cincinnati, Ohio,
branch of the Hebrew Union
College, he became director of the
Hillel Foundation of the
University of Maryland. He
served during World War II as
an Army chaplain with the in-
fantry, ending his tour in the
Philippines.
After demobilization, Rabbi
Silver served at the Euclid
Avenue Temple, Cleveland, and
then became director of public
information for the National
Reform Group.
Elected rabbi of Temple Sinai,
Stamford, Conn., in 1954, he
remained in that pulpit until
retirement last year.
His credo seems to be finding
good and delight in life and in
writing. One of his six books is
entitled How To Enjoy This
Moment. He and his wife,
Elaine, a graduate of the JuiUiard
School of Music, have appeared
before audiences the world over
in musical programs. They are
the parents of five boys.
In addition to serving various
Tour of Israel
Dr. Morton Malavsky,
spiritual leader of Temple Beth
Shalom, Hollywood, announces
his tour to Israel scheduled for
Dec. 4.
Rabbi Malavsky has prepared
a tour with a choice of either 13 or
15 days in Israel.
other congregations in the course
of his career. Rabbi Silver has
been president of the National
Association of Jewish Chaplains
of the Armed Forces, a trustee of
the Military Chaplains
Association and president of the
Clergy Association of Stamford.
He is a trustee of the Fellowship
in Prayer Organization and is on
the board of the Temple of
Understanding, a global
ecumenical organization. While
residing in Connecticut, he was a
member of the executive com-
mittee of the Greater New York
Board of Rabbis.
23
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Fourteen of the students
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leadership activities in their
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presented with an IL 3000
meritorious award by Donald M.
Robinson, JDC president, at a
reception given by the Lown
Jewish Center in Kiryat HaYovel
to representatives of the JDC and
members of the Council of Jewish
Federations.
Almost all of the scholarship
winners come from large, low-
income families where conditions
at home make continued
schooling difficult, if not im-
possible.
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ON THE OCEAN AT 15th ST. MIAMI BEACH. FLA. 33139
Owner Mgmt
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the less-than-$K),000
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Minimum Deposit $100
Rate during the month of July 7.85% per year
ANNUAL YIELD 8.17%
Federal regulations require a 6 month interest penalty for early withdrawal.
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CONVENIENT OFFICES SERVING YOU IN FLORIDA
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JACK D. GORDON. President. ARTHUR H COURSHON. Chairman of the Board
COuai oeoi!ufry ixhoyii -


r, August 10,1979
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
13
V
I PLO Chief Shot, Killed;
Was Considered No. 2 Man
ly EDWIN EYTAN
IIS (JTA) Zuhair
head of the pro-Syrian
[ organization and believed
lie number two man in the
Itine Liberation
ition, was shot and killed
gunmen shot him in the
Bfcs he was about to enter his
Dent in Cannes in the south
of Ponce
43, who returned to
from the Organization of
in Unity summit in
ria, Liberia, was shot at 1
he rang the bell of his
hfloor apartment. His wife,
\ found him lying in a pool
He had apparently been
felled by one shot.
THE PLO bureau in Paris
issued a communique blaming
Israel "or its agents" for the
attack. French police believe,
however, the gunmen might
belong to a rival Palestinian
organization who shot Mohsen in
reprisal for the recent attack
against the Egyptian Embassy in
Ankara, Turkey. The attack was
carried out by "The Eagles of the
Revolution," an organization
which is part of Saiqa.
The attack occurred while
Mohsen's colleague in the PLO,
Faruk Kaddoumi, was in Paris
reportedly negotiating for an
official invitation to PLO Chief
Yasir Arafat to visit France.
Charge Israel With Being
Puggish on Energy Conservation
Industry Minister
IUSALEM (JTA) -
the President of the United
stakes his political future
energy savings plan, Israel
rith the energy crisis as if
all the time in the world,
linister of Energy and
tructure, Yitzhak Modai,
ed before the Knesset
rity and Foreign Affairs
mittee. Modai said, that as
His gasoline is concerned, time
Krning out fust.
|e spoke in reference to the
net's failure to agree to new
fa in the price of oil and its
re to adopt an energy saving
He said the Ministerial
fcrgy Committee is discussing
[energy savings plan which
lid be adopted immediately,
erwise Israel will have to
>pt even more extreme
asures to conserve energy.
PROPOSAL to close down
soline stations on Saturdays
holidays was rejected by the
imittee because of objections
Finance Minister Simcha
ro Irish at the
[arbour House
[Diners can go Irish with a
krned beef and cabbage entree
tiursday nights at the restau-
knt at Harbour House (White
JypressRoom).
The Harbour House South is at
3275 Collins Ave., Bal Harbour.
Segal: Obligation
fo Affirmative Action
Continued from Page 4
Dssible, the last vestiges of an
Unfortunate and ignominious
age in this country's history."
We must refuse to allow the
entry of quotas; but we also
ive an obligation to give the
jasic philosophy of affirmative
action an uncluttered chance to
advance the ideal of equality in
chooling, in jobs, in housing,
and in public accommodations.
Ehrlich and
Gideon Patt
The committee similarly
turned down a proposal to require
each motorist not to use his car
one day a week. A proposal which
would allow residents of con-
dominiums to detach themselves
from the central heating system
in order to purchase solar heating
units was dropped
UN Soldier
Arrested
For Gun-
Running
Continued from Page 1
kilograms; 70 gelegnite
"fingers," weighing seven
kilograms; 60 denotators; two
Italian-made Baretta sub-
machineguns; 10 American-made
hand grenades; one Kalashnikoff
assault rifle and many magazines
of ammunition.
Police said Gom at first denied
any knowledge of the arsenal but
later confessed that he had
received the two valises from
PLO agent in Lebanon for
delivery to a PLO contact-man in
Jerusalem.
The police imposed a news
blackout on the investigation but
it is assumed that several more
arrests will be made
AN ARMY spokesman said
the fact that a UNIFIL officer
served as a delivery man for the
PLO was a very serious violation
of the confidence Israel has
placed in UNIFIL officers.
Jewish Western Bulletin
JCC Teens to Produce
Tinian9s Rainbow9
The Hollywood Jewish
Community Center will stage
"Finian's Rainbow" on Tuesday.
Nov. 6, at Young Circle Band-
shell. The newly established JCC
Teen Musical Workshop will
perform this Broadway hit. The
show is to be directed and
choreographed by actress, dancer
and choreographer Lydia
Franklin.
Mrs. Franklin has appeared in
such shows as "Brigadoon" and
"The Boy Friend" on Broadway
and has toured with road com-
panies in "Oklahoma," "Funny
Girl," "Rinian's," "Peter Pan,"
"Show Boat," "Guys and Dolls,"
"East Side Story" among others.
Mrs. Franklin has recently
appeared in the touring com-
panies of "Second Time
Around," and in Florida at the
Theater of the Performing Arts in
"Naughty Marietta" and as
Sadie Thompson in "Rain," at
the South Pacific Dinner Theater.
She is dance instructor at the
Michael-Ann Russell JCC's
Arena Program.
Audition dates will be an-
nounced shortly with tryouts to
be held at the JCC for teens
between 12 and 17. The JCC is
also looking for people interested
in working on scenery, lighting
and costuming. Contact Bob
Schwartz at the Hollywood JCC
for more information.
Tht* hv in old tylng. Achm.d nacattfty l th matt** of Invention
' Daily Dispatch
INCJ
RBI
I)! MM It I It lf7!)
i.xmtmmwvm u mm i wwmaaar.-iw^wCTapinwrt 11
COMMUNITY DAY IS COMING!!!
:i | 4 | 5 < 7 8
MARK YOUR CALENDARS NOW!!!
i)
io
11
12
Thursday, December 13
Hi
2.1
;7i
IN
l!>
'20
14
21
9:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m.
21
ar
2H
Diplomat Convention Center
15
22
21
Leo Mindlin
A Part Doesn't
Make the Whole
Continued from Page 4
that a secular king is redundant
to the transcendent heavenly
Jewish king. It was Nathan who
warned that nationhood does not
secure a people's ideals; it
corrupts them.
Nationhood is a political beast
unrelated to the people who
compose it Nationhood lies,
steals, murders, wars and other-
wise oppresses the people it
presumes to represent whose
lives it presumes to secure. But
nationhood is really a thing unto
itself dedicated to the survival of
nationhood at whatever human
and ethical cost
FOR ALL these reasons,
Nathan warned the Jews against
nationhood and urged them to re-
dedicate themselves to the
principles of their divinity in-
stead not to emulate their
neighbors in vain allegiance to
secular institutions.
In Israel's struggle to survive
today, we sadly see the eroding of
Jewish ideals which fall victim to
expedient nationhood precisely
as Nathan prophesied- From the
dynasty of King Saul to the
victory arches in Rome and
Jerusalem celebrating the final
collapse of ancient Judea, we are
made intensely uncomfortable by
his foresight
It is not Israel, it is not in-
dividual Jews as tragic sacrifices
of the Holocaust we must focus
upon. It is the glory of our past
history, wherever we are, which
| must impel us toward our future.
ISRAEL ARGUES, with con-
siderable justification, that this
can best be done in Israel. That
may well be so Still, the struggle
we face to loosen ourselves from
our holocaustic obsession is
common to Jews in Israel as well
I as out
Our special status, if we have
one, lies not in growing ac-
customed to the wheelchair of our
most recent misery, but in our
stars. And these shine in celestial
splendor everywhere.
If this is not so, then all our
efforts, in behalf of Israel and
ourselves, are an absurdity. We
dedicate ourselves to the success-
ful urvival of Israel as a haven of
Jewish security; we say Masada
shai not fall again, at the same
time that we assimilate ourselves
out 01" Jewish existence by rising
rates of intermarriage or, what is
worse, sheer indifference. In
which case, of what use is our
drive for security except as a
contradiction in terms a self
cancelling of our destiny?
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. .


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Friday, August 10,1979
Mideast Cruise to Feature Jewish History
"The Religious and Cultural
Life of the Jewish People in the
Middle East" is to be the theme
of Rabbi David Shapiro's Fall
tour as he leads a group on a
cruise through the Mediterranean
in the Middle East.
Religious
Directory
"The Jewish people, in the
course of the centuries, migrated
to many parts of the world, in-
cluding the Middle East. There
they established communities,
built synagogues, centers of
H C ANDLEUGH Y iNG|
10 TIME
H 7:41
%& 17 AB-5739
From left are Mayor David Keating, Prime Minister Menachem Begin
and Rabbi Morton Malavsky.
NORTHBROWARD
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100W. Oak
land Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Ptillllp A. Labowin. Cantor Maurice
A.Neu. -^

Mayor Keating:
'Everyone Should
Go to Israel'
ByAMYWILPON
"The Israelis have the pioneer spirit the
Americans seem to have lost,' said Mayor David
R. Keating upon returning to Hollywood after a
three-week trip to Israel. "The Israelis were very
nice, and it was one of the greatest experiences of
my life."
Mayor and Mrs. Keating went on the tour con-
ducted by Or. Morton Malavsky of Temple Beth
Shalom. When they arrived in Israel, a welcoming
cocktail party and banquet was held in their
honor. Yigal Barzilai. the vice mayor of Herzlia,
and Mayor Keating exchanged honorary citizen-
s and keys I" the city, making Hollywood and
-.'Mm Bister cities.
One of the highlights of the Keatings' trip was
visit with Menachem Begin. The Keatings
the Malavskys were welcomed into the Prime
Minister's home and they spent more than an
hour together.
A private tour of the Knesset was conducted
for the group. A meeting was held with Rabbi
Menachem Porush, who also graciously received
the mayor. The city of Tiberias extended an
official welcome to the mayor at a dinner with the
mayor of Tiberias attending.
"There was such a contrast between the United
States and Israel. In the Holy Land you live
history everywhere you go Jerusalem, Beth-
lehem, Jericho there is so much to see and do. I
think everyone should, at some time in their lives,
go to Israel," Mayor Keating said.
Soviet Jewry Update
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive Reform (44)
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. *106
57tt St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. (44-A)
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 4920 SW 35th St.f
Conservative. Rabbi Paul PlotkinJ
Cantor Yehudah Heilbraun. (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE BETH EMET. 200 NW f
Douglas Rd. Liberal Reform. David |
Goldstein, ed.dir.
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. V730 Sterling
Rd., Hollywood. Conservative. Rabbi
Bernard I, Shoter.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd Rabbi
SheON J.Harr. (64)
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA
GOGUE 7473 NW 4th St (69)
HALLANOALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr
Carl Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob Dan
ziger. (12)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kongsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes (37)
HOLLYWOOD
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max Land
man (47B)
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. Assis
tant Rabbi Jonathan Won (45)
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601 Arthur
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
TEMPLE SINAI 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi Seymour Frietf
man, Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro.
Cantor Naftaly A. Linkpysky. (65)
TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.
Hollywood, Fla. 33021. Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Robert P. Frazin
Cantor Phyllis Cole. (47C)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE. 3291 Stirling
Road. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe
. Bomzer. (52)
In a court ruling reminiscent of
the worst excesses of the Stalin
era, four Jews were sentenced to
be shot. The four men, Gabriel
Sepiashvili, Rafael Adziashvili,
Elia Milchalashvili and Abassor,
were convicted last August of
economic crimes (swindle in-
volving surplus cloth).
Approximately 50 others also
were convicted but were given
prison sentences. These four were
sentenced to death. On June 18
the Ukrainian Supreme Court in
Kiev rejected their appeal.
The last chance of reprieve
rests with the president of the
USSR, Leonid Brezhnev.
Write a letter of protest today
to:
Leonid Brezhnev
President, Secretary General
The Kremlin
Moscow, RSFSR, USSR
ESTHER SNYDERMAN,
M.D.
IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE HER ASSOCIATION WITH
PAUL ELLIOT PERLMAN,
M.D.
For the Practice of Internal
Medicine & Family Practice
2500 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Suite 207 Hallandale, Fla. 33009
Hours: 9-5 Daily by Appt. 456-7700
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Jewish learning, and made
important contributions to
Judaism and to mankind," said I
Rabbi Shapiro. /'
He will give a briefing to the
group on the Jewish historic
aspect of each country before
they arrive at the port of call.
The cruise on the Norwegian
ship, the Royal Viking Star, will
include Alexandria, Egypt,
Haifa, Israel, Antalya, Turkey,
the Greek Islands of Kos,
Mykonos, Samos, Thessaloniki;
Malaga, Spain, and Funchal,
Portugal.
The ship will return to the
United State9 and dock at Fort
Lauderdale.

HOWARD N. ROBINSON, M.D.
ANNOUNCES
The Opening of His New
Office For the Practice of
Plastic and
Reconstructive
Surgery
SUITE 500
3700 Washington St.
Hollywood
961-7570- HOURS BY APPT.
HALLANDALE REHABILITATION CENTER
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Top notch smiling professionals, gourmet meals, a complete physical therapy depaitment.
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When you need a Nursing Home for a fortnight, a month or an indefinite stay See Us
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I
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HALLANDALE REHABILITATION CENTER
2400 East Hallandale Beach Blvd. Hallandale. Florida
Phones (305) 457 9717 or 944 6340
DR. ALAN M. JAC0BS0N,
PODIATRIST
ANNOUNCES
The location of his new office for
the practice of Podiactric
Medicine & Surgery
r*
1045 S. FEDERAL HWY., HOLLYWOOD, FL. 33020
Hours by appointment 9251515
BRAMSONw
A technical college within
a Jewish environment
Certificate and Associate
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Accounting
Computer Programming
Computer Technology
Electronic Technology
Executive Secretary
Legal Secretary
Management
Word Proceeding
Classes begin May 14,1979
You ere invited to attend an Open-Door
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BRAMSONORT
44 E. 23rd St., Now York, N.Y. 10010
212-677-7420
Bramaon doe* not discriminate on me
____________"*of. "' peg Pf 'flam*. ...


f, August 10,1979
The Jewish Floridian andShofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
'he Man Behind the Silver Bracelet
y DAVID DUITCH
TANYA, ISRAEL-Every
r seven years, a man in
fork wore a bracelet on his
hoping that one day he
[no longer need to wear it.
|ve words were inscribed on
ris Penson, June 15, 1970.
Bmple silver bracelet linked
jgether.
April 29, 1979, Boris
Prisoner of Zion in
became Boris Penson,
tan in Israel. The moment
reached Israel, Irving
|tein, executive vice
tan of the United Jewish
I, took off the bracelet that
line an integral part of
B. Five weeks later, in Israel
Jubilee Assembly of the
Agency, he shared the joy
iom with the man behind
ren-year vigil,
ting on July 2 for the first
r, the two men spontaneously
yarmly embraced in the
fce to the Netanya apar-
where Penson is living
fis mother. With his wife,
smiling broadly as she
Bs, Bernstein keeps
his head and saying, "I
in't believe I am finally
you, Boris, and in Israel."
LKING IN Russian, the
old Penson says,
ig Bernstein is a very
experience for me. Thanks
ble like him in America and
(free world, all the efforts
3n my behalf were worth-
[i am no longer in prison, I
i now.
On June 15, 1970, in
Leningrad, when he and nine
other Soviet Jews set out to
commandeer a Russian plane and
fly it to Israel via Sweden,
Penson did not expect to spend a
day in prison. He would either be
living free in Israel, he felt, or be
shot dead by the Soviets.
Retelling the story, Penson
emphasized that the group did
not plan to hijack the plane. "We
had purchased all 17 seats on the
plane," he says. "One of our
group, Mark Dymshitz, was a
pilot and would fly it. The airline
pilot would be taken off and
given a sleeping bag and blankets
to keep him warm. No one was
going to have his life placed in
jeopardy except for the 10 of us."
Penson was 23 when im-
prisoned with the other nine.
Their plight helped galvanize
worldwide support for Soviet
Jewish Prisoners of Zion. When
silver bracelets were made with
the names of the prisoners and
the dates of their arrest, Bern-
stein decided to wear Penson's
because he identified most closely
with him. Penson was young at
the time of his imprisonment and
Berstein had two young sons. In
addition, Penson was a painter in
Riga before going to prison; Judy
Berstein is a sculptor.
THE BRACELET caught the
eyes of people all over the world,
wherever the widely-traveled
UJA executive went. Many, after
hearing Boris Penson's story,
would ask him for one. "People
all around the world," Bernstein
says, "became concerned about
Ask Abe
Boris and the other prisoners
because of the bracelets. '
Penson's bracelet was special
to Bernstein and his family. He
wore it every day for seven years.
"It was like a constant prayer,"
he recalls. "Wearing Boris'
bracelet as well as owning two of
his paintings (bought from Boris'
mother) made me feel very close
to him."
When the day of release came,
Bernstein joyfully arranged to
have the bracelet brought to the
artist. While in prison, Penson
had received letters from Bern-
stein and other people all over the
world who were wearing his
bracelet. The letters played an
important role in his survival.
"Knowing that so many people
cared about me helped very
much," he says. "I felt the
support of world Jewry, and
especially the support of the
State of Israel."
APRIL 22, 1979. Everything
that happened on the day of his
release remains vivid in Penson's
mind. "I was called into the
prison office and saw all the big
bosses standing there. I knew
something must be up because it
was a Sunday. They told me I
was being sent to another prison
in Riga. They never told me why
or what for. They never do.
Everything of mine was taken
from me, including my diaries.
"At Riga, they thrust a piece
of paper at me with Brezhnev's
signature on it. I was to be
released and had 10 days to leave
the country. At first I could not
fully comprehend those words."
By Abe Hal pern
stion:
there anything in halachic Judaism that
Jd make it impossible for a Jew who follows
Halacha to support the Equal Rights
end men t?
Linda Myers
Hollywood
ver:
cannot answer your question specifically
lusc it requires a rabbinic interpretation of
icha as it applies to your question in our time
M United States. I would therefore suggest
I you ask your rabbi.
fowever, I wish to share several comments
it the status of women in Judaism culled from
[tradition.
"This is the book of the generations of
In the day that God created man, in the
aess of God made He him; male and female
tted he them, and blessed them, and called
name Adam, in the day when they were
pOed." Genesis 5:1,2)
According to many commentaries on this
tage, because the Hebrew word Adam also
is man, the passage in the Original Hebrew
is that Adam and Eve are both equally
^ted in the image of God, and together they are
1 man and form one unit.
"One of the early rabbis, Ben Azzai, tran-
these words, 'this is the book of the
erations of Man,' and declared them to be 'a
It, fundamental teaching of the Torah.' As all
ian beings are traced back to one parent, he
jht, they must neccessarily be brothers. These
is, therefore, proclaim the vital truth of the
|ty of the Human Race, and the consequent
trine of the Brotherhood of Man. "This is the
of the generations of Man'-not black, not
Ite, not great, not small, but Man. In these
Iptural words we have a concept quite
pown in the ancient world humanity. And
the belief in the one God could lead to such a
affirmation of the unity of mankind."
imentary in the Soncino Publication of the
ktateuch and Haftoras, p. 17.)
"Like other ancient Semitic and non-Semitic
Lurals, biblical and post-biblical Judaism was
rkedly patriarchal in character, though in
ny ways greater provision was made for the
its of women ... in many spheres rabbinic law
Dgnized equality of men and women; they are
|ject to the same laws, religious prohibitions,
penalities (Tractate Kiddushin 35a), and
ien, like man, may offer sacrifices in the
iple ... Theoretically-though rarely in
practice-women are admitted as ritual
slaughterers and circumcisers. They are also
legally entitled to recite, and be called up to, the
Reading of the Law, but a rabbinical enactment
forbade this in order to preserve decorum at
public services (meg. 23a)." (The Encyclopedia of
the Jewish Religion, pp. 404, 405)
For approximately 150 years following the
death of Joshua, the ancient Israelites, the
Twelve Tribes, after settling in the Land, were
ruled by Judges. One of these judges was
Deborah (Hebrew Devorah meaning bee).
"Now Deborah, a prophetess, the wife of
Lappidoth, she judged Israel at that time. And
she sat under the palm-tree of Deborah between
Ramah and Beth-El in the hill country of
Ephraim; and the children of Israel came up to
her for judgement." Judges 4:4,5)
According to the commentaries she not only
arbitrated disputes but also directed the people in
the right way of life. Her title in the Hebrew,
Neviah, liu.ally means a woman prophetess and
signifies that her activities were divinely inspired.
This description is not used for any other judge of
the period.
In addition to being a prophetess and a judge,
she was also the inspiring heroine of the war of
defense against king Yavin of Hatzor and his
commander Sisera. The narrative in Judges
states that when she called on Barak to lead the
troops in order to free the Israelites from op-
pression by the Canaanites, Barak said, "If thou
wilt go with me, then I will go; but if thou wilt not
go with me I will not go." (ibid 4:8).
Deborah and Barak led the troops to victory.
Following this victory, Deborah and Barak sang a
song of praise thanking God for the deliverance of
Israel from the powerful armies of Sisera and
reviewed the history of the Israelites since the
time of Abraham. This song, attributed to
Deborah, is considered one of the outstanding
poems in the Hebrew Bible.
In addition to Deborah there were many women
throughout the history of the Jewish people who
had positions of importance. The list includes the
late Golda Meir, prime minister of Israel.
If any readers of this column have additional
information on this subject please communicate
with me and I will share it with the readers in a
future column.
Please send all questions to:
ASK ABE
c/oJtwiih Federatioaa of South Broward
2719 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020____________
^SsT to ^ ^
M ^1 ^S0M
\^ mr------ _j*mm' <^p
;;. f ^ 1

Silver Prisoner-of-Zion bracelets worn by UJA executive vice
chairman Irving Bernstein are shown above. Bracelet bearing
the name of Boris Penson, one of 10 Soviet Jews imprisoned for
1970 attempt at flight to freedom, was exchanged after Pen-
son's recent release for bracelet inscribed with name of Josif
Mendelvich, last of the 10 remaining in Soviet prison.
Penson feels that a decisive
factor in his release was the
pressure the American govern-
ment put on the Russians
during various negotiations.
"And behind that pressure, were
the voices of Jews in America and
around the world," he says.
Seven days later Penson was in
Israel, at home with his mother.
"It was like a dream come true. I
was going to live in Israel. I kept
waking up and asking myself,
Am I really free?"
BERSTEIN WAS deeply
moved by Penson's release:
"Boris had become a part of our
family. When I heard the news, I
cried tears of joy. His dream had
come true. His release had special
meaning to me often wearing his
bracelet for all those years. It was
all worthwhile."
At age 33, Boris Penson is
beginning to paint again. For-
bidden to practice this art for
I nine years, he is working on
illustrations for a book on prison
life being written by Eduard
Kuzenetsov, a fellow Prisoner of
Zion.
One of Penson's main priorities
now is to help get other Jews out
Of Russia, especially Ida Nudel
who is in a Siberian labor camp.
He recently donated one of his
paintings for a fund-raising
auction in her behalf, raising
almost $1,300.
When asked about the future
of Russia Jewry, Penson says,
"They don't have a future. They
should come to Israel if they
want to remain Jews. There is no
alternative for them."
Dr. Margulies Heads
United Way Group
Dr. Stanley I. Margulies, chief
of radiology at Memorial
Hospital in Hollywood, has
recently been appointed to serve
as south area chairman of the
Professional Division for the
1979-80 United Way Campaign.
Active in the community for
many years. Dr. Margulies
served as vice president of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward from 1976 to 1978. He
was also campaign chairman of
that organization during the
same years.
Currently, Dr. Margulies is a
member of the United Jewish
Appeal National Campaign
Cabinet.
Among his professional
memberships are the Florida
Medical Association and the
American Medical Association.
He is also a member of the
American College of Radiology,
Radiology Society of North
America and the American
College of Radiology.
A Hollywood resident. Dr.
Margulies received the Young
Leadership Award in 1975 from
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
Levitt It
memorial chapel
1921 Pembroke Rd.
Hollywood. R.
921-7200
Sonny Levitt. F.D.
13385SW Dixie Hwy
North Miami, Fia
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NAME.- _________________
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.
Page 12
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