The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00228

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
^Jewisti Flcridli&in
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 9 Number 15
Hollywood, Florida Friday, July 27,1979
Price 35 Cents
Pay Pledges Now
Newman Appeals for Cash
The economic situation in
Israel is more critical now than
ever. It is imperative that all
members of the South Broward
Jewish Community convert their
pledges to the Combined Jewish
'Appeal Israel Emergency Fund
campaign into cash.
"While many of the pledges to
our campaign have been indeed
generous, neither Israel nor our
local agencies can spend them
until they are converted to
currency," Joyce Newman,
Federation president, remarked.
"There will be an immediate
increase in prices at the super-
markets and gasoline pumps for
these people who are already
overburdened with inflationary
costs. In addition, the cost of
Joyce Newman
transportation, electricity am
water also will be rising on an
average of 25 percent. These price
increases and the increased cost
of living must be borne by the
citizens of Israel themselves, who
are already the most heavily
taxed people in the world."
Here in South Broward, the
local services, agencies and
programs must have the cash
flow needed. to sustain their
programs, she said.
Nothing short of full payment
of all outstanding pledges will
assure that both Israel and our
local agencies will have the cash
flow so essential to their survival
and continued growth and
development "A pledge com-
mits; your cash delivers."
Arab Takeover
How America
Is Losing
The Quiet War
Parlor Meetings Sign 78 for Mission
Community Mission parlor
* meetings, held throughout South
fi Broward, have helped sign 78
people for the Jewish Federation
of South Broward's Community
Mission to Israel, Nov. 11,
according to Mary and Ed
Gottlieb, mission chairmen.
Reservations for this mission
are going faster than any other
mission in the history of the
Federation, remarked the
Gottliebs.
Highlights of the Mission
include a tour of Jerusalem,
including the Old City, Mount of
Olives and Mount Zion.
For complete information and
reservations, contact the Mission
Desk at the Jewish Federation of
South Broward.
By HOAG LEVINS
This is a story about a loud
peace and a quiet war.
It is the lengthy, complex tale
of a six-year effort by more than a
dozen Arab nations to fashion a
new ultimate weapon. The story
of a continuing battle for annihil-
ation of a Jewish State in the
Middle East. The account of a
soundless offensive that jeopar-
dizes the safety and well-being of
200 million Americans.
That ultimate Arab weapon
has now been perfected. And
even as the world has been
celebrating the Israeli-Egyptian
peace engineered by Jimmy
Carter, its full force has been
positioned and detonated.
THAT WEAPON is money:
unlimited petrobillions now being
used in a secret, organized cam-
paign that has already over-
turned the world's monetary
system; revolutionized
traditional concepts of inter-
national battle and accomplished
the most drastic realignment of
world power since World War II.
That campaign employing a
potent, seven-pronged oper-
ational strategy inside the United
States has directly involved
every American as an unwitting
pawn on a global Arab battle
board where every move has one
initial goal: the breakdown of the
American support that has
enabled Israel to withstand three
Continued on Page 12
From left are Florida State Rep. Lawrence J. Smith, Grant and Shelia
Smith, Jake and Bea Mogilowitz, Nellie and Irving Shanfer. Hosts for
the parlor meeting were the Mogilowitzes.
k iMlLlTH
I
Elise Garris (right) recently presented Jewish Federation
Broward president Joyce Newman with a check for $2,700 on behalf of
the University of Florida's annual humanitarian campaign for world
Jewry. Ms. Garris, campaign chairman, reported that the check which
she presented to the Federation was one-half of the total dollars raised
by fellow students on the Gainesville campus.
Working Women Organize
Standing from left are Dr. Robert Pitt ell, Gert Leinwand, Florence and Leon Roth, WOrna Rosenfeld.
Seated from left are Henrietta and Fred Sultan, Annette Deakter, Lillian Popover. Hosts for the parlor
meeting were Gert and Alan Leinwand. (Additional photos, Page 3)
As more and more women
enter the work force, women's
organizations are being greatly
affected. The Jewish Federation
of South Broward's Working
Women's Council is geared
toward those women who are in
professions, who work for a living
and also those who are confined
to their homes caring for young
children. Although they can't
spend time at meeting, these
women do want to be involved in
Jewish affairs and in the com-
munity.
"This is the chance for Jewish
working women in the com-
munity to have contact with
other Jewish working women
who share many of the same
goals and experience many of the
same frustrations," Nancy
Atkin, chairwoman of the
Working Women's Council,
explained.
Last year's Council focused on
political programming. This year
there will be a special program
featuring Dawn Schuman, who
will speak on different aspects of
Jewish history. Solar energy will
be the main economic issue.
"Raising a Jewish family is
still very important, as is our
heritage, even though we might
not be around the house all day
promoting it," Elaine Fleischer,
co-chairwoman, commented.


P*e2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofitr ofGreater Hollywood
Fn44y. July/ft, 1978
Next Year in Jerusalem
With these words Anatoly
Sharansky left the Soviet
courtroom and began his im-
prisonment
It is now "next year," and
Anatoly Sharansky is not in
Jerusalem. He is still in prison.
He may never get to Jerusalem.
One year ago Sharansky's
name was constantly in the news.
His arrest (16 months earlier) had
drawn protest from around the
world. His trial in Moscow made
headlines in the U.S. President
Carter defended him. Indeed,
Soviet-American relations
seemed entwined with the fate of
this one man.
ANATOLY SHARANSKY
has personified more than the
plight of Russian Jews. He has
become a martyr in the struggle
for personal dignity and freedom.
He has been the very symbol of
human rights.
The Soviet court spared his
life, but the sentence 13 years in
a labor camp was outrageously
harsh With his imprisonment,
civilization slipped backward.
History has known many
heroes men and women who
risked their lives for their
families, for their nations, for
their beliefs. Since 1973, when he
was denied permission to
emigrate, Anatoly Sharansky
sacrificed his own freedom to help
others reach freedom; he watched
his own wife emigrate to Israel
while he worked to see other
families reunited in the Holy
Land; he risked his own life so
that others could live.
At the conclusion of his trial he
said, "I am happy that I have
lived honestly, in peace with my
conscience, and have never
betrayed my soul, even when I
was threatened with death. I am
happy that I have helped people
... I am happy that I can be a
witness to the redemption of the
Jews in the USSR"
IT IS a year since Sharansky
uttered these words. It has been a
year of poor and deteriorating,
health, a year of hard labor and
inhuman conditions, a year of
DO NOT FORGET
These prisoners are suffering so that other Russian Jews
can emigrate to freedom. Support them with a letter today.
Anatoly Sharansky Chistopol
UCHR 5110/1
Moscow RSFSR, USSR
Vladimir Slepak
Ida Nudel
Pochta Do Vostrebovania
Selo Tsokto Khangil 674466
Aginsky Rayon
Chitinskaya Oblast, RSFSR. USSR
Muzhskli Obshchezhitie
selo Krivosheino
Krisvsheyino Rayon
Romskays Oblast 636300.
RSFSR, Russia, USSR
Project Searches for
Yad Vashem Martyrs
isolation from his wife and his
people. Anatoly Sharansky is a
young man of 31, but he already
has felt the weight of a lifetime of
struggle, a lifetime of suffering.
He is a man who, perhaps more
than any other man, has earned
the right to live his own life -
where he chooses, how he
chooses. He is still in prison.
Other "Prisoners of Con-
science" have been freed by the
Soviet Union. It is time to free
Sharansky. He cannot wait
another 12 years. He cannot wait.
We cannot acknowledge the
anniversary of his trial without a
rededication to the human rights
which he made his cause and
which we in the free world value
so highly.
American influence, American
pressure, American deter-
mination can free Anatoly
Sharansky. Let the hope of the
Holy Land sustain him today and
welcome him home tomorrow.
Let his year be his year in
Jerusalem.
French Force for Oil Fields
PARIS (JTA) The French army is setting up a
special strike force which will be ready to intervene abroad
and especially in order to protect the oil fields supplying
France and other West European countries.
The strike force is being set up by the French
Ministry of Defense, but, according to reliable reports, no
basic political decision has been taken at the Presidential
level on where, when and how it will be used.
THE FORCE, which will consist of volunteers, will
be ready to be used only on major occasions and on the
President's orders.
-
France intervened in Zaire and in Chad last year with
forces supplied by its airborne divisions and special
paratroop units.
The Yad Vashem Martyrs and
Heroes Remembrance Authority
in Israel has been conducting a
program to document all the
individuals of the Jewish faith
who laid down their lives, fought
and rebelled in order to per-
petuate their memories and that
of their communities destroyed
during the Holocaust years. The
project consists of completing a
one page form known as a "Page
of Testimony" "Das Ayd" -
with the vital statistics including
a photograph and the known
circumstances of the death of the
individual.
Carl Rosenkopf and Sam
Shniter, leaders in the David
Ben-Gurion Culture Club have
announced that in conjunction
with the Community Relations
Committee of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward,
these "Pages of Testimony" will
be complied from survivors in the
South Broward area.
"The David Ben-Gurion
Cultural Club has over 300
members and 99 percent of them
are survivors," said Rosenkopf.
"I would guess we will have well
over 1,000 pages when you
consider each member of the
David Ben-Gurion Culture Club
lost members of their families
such as mothers, fathers, sisters,
aunts, uncles, etc."
Working with the David Ben-
Gurion Culture Club will be Dr.
Ira Sheier, the director of the
Community Relations Com-
mittee. "With the questioning
and besmirching of the validity of
the six million figure by so called
'scholars' and fringe neo-Nazis in
recent years, the Pages of
Testimony take on even greater
significance Almost three million
names have already been
deposited in the 'Hall of Names'
of the Yad Vashem Memorial in
Jerusalem where visitors and
scholars do research and pay
homage to the martyrs," noted
Dr. Sheier.
Also participating in the
project are David Ben-Gurion
Culture Club board members,
Murray Weintraub, Hyman
Konter, Fela Fryschman, Morris
Kopka, David Steinweis, Harry
Grundman, Jerry Winchel and
Rose Rotmench.
Rosenkopf reported that this
project will take a good number
of months for their membership
to complete. "Hopefully, the
resources of both the David Ben-
Gurion Culture Club and the
Community Relations Committee
of Jewish Federation of South
Broward will add to the growing
importance of Yad Vashem as not
only a memorial to the Holocaust
victims, but as a source of
scholarship to insure that a
Holocaust will never happen
again," concluded Rosenkopf.
If C AN DLELIGHfiNGi
1$ TIME
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My
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t ""
Women's Division Leadership Development
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward Women's
Division has originated a
leadership development group to
educate future community
leaders, according to Florence
Roth, vice president, leadership
development.
The group consists of ap-
proximately 30 women who have
been somewhat involved in
Federation work. They have
shown some interest and have
participated on various com-
mittees, explained Mrs. Roth
"The program was developed
to teach these women more about
themselves as Jews, the com-
munity they live in and its neeas
and their Israeli brethren.
"This is a whole new concept
for Women's Division. As the
community gets larger, there is a
need for special training for our
future leaders,'' explained
Mrs. Roth
Judee Barron is co-chairman of
the group.
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for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
community and the high standards
demanded by Jewish Law and Custom.
Our staff of Riverside people consists of
the largest number of Jewish professionals
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They are people who understand Jewish
tradition and honor it.
Since 1935, these policies have been
our assurance to a family of service that
respects their needs and the dignity of Jewish
funeral ritual.
It's a trust we've never taken lightly.
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach: 531-1151
Hollywood: 920-1010
Ft.Lauderdale(Sunrise): 584-6060
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Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan Area.
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For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
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Friday,,July ,27,1979
t|3
gM Jawi$h FhrWan a/ut Shofar of OnaUr Hollywood
Page 3
Pioneer Women Form Southeast Region Temple Beth El Activities
Establishment of a new
Southeast region of pioneer
Women, to serve the growing
number of clubs and chapters of
the world's largest Jewish
women's organization in Florida,
was announced this week by
Frieda Leemon, national
president of Pioneer Women.
Three members of the national
board of the organization and two
former national board members
were named to the executive
committee of the new region.
They will work with Grace
Herskowitz of Delray Beach,
South Florida field represen-
tative of Pionner Women.
Executive committee members
include Harriet Green, national
board member of the Pioneer
Women and national vice
president of the American Zionist
Federation; Gert Aaron of
Hallandale, past national board
member and former Midwest
membership chairman; Bebee
Pullman of Fort Lauderdale,
national board member and
national chairman of Friends of
Pioneer Women; Lillian Hoffman
of North Dade, past national
board member; and Mildred
Weiss of Deerfield Beach,
national board member.
Chartering of new chapters in
Delray Beach and Lake Worth
was announced by Mrs. Leemon.
She said additional chapters are
in various stages of organization
in Broward and Palm Beach
counties, including units in the
Palm Springs area of Palm Beach
County, Boca Raton and
Tamarac
Mrs. Hoffman was appointed
chairman of a regional speaker's
bureau. Mrs. Green will serve as
general advisor to the region,
with Pioneer Women
headquarters established in
enlarged offices in Miami Beach.
Standing from left are Ronald and Arlynne Alexander, Howard Lift, Arlene and Gerald Ray, Iris
Wasserman, Charles and Claire Jacobs, Haviva and Stewart Schull. Seated from left are Amy and Jack
Tobin, Mary I.iff. Isadora and Mary Don. Hosts for the parlor meeting were Mary and Ed Gottlieb.
Standing from left are Steve and Joanna Schoenbaum, Bob Wolf, Baa Goldin, Shane Wolf, Jerome
Goldin, Charles and Jean Moses, Joel and Sheila Adler, Hedla and Jerry Cantor. Seated from left are
, Bernie and Kathy Lane and Anna Levy. Hosts lor the parlor meeting were Bob and Shane Wolf.
IH 4 I MIMIC lf7!
H'lil-fJ
COMMUNITY DAY IS COMING!!!
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MARK YOUR CALENDARS NOWIII
i>
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22
211
>
Temple Beth El, a Reform
congregation, affiliated with the
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, has the largest
family membership of any
synagogue in Broward County.
In addition to worship ser-
vices, the temple offers a variety
of cultural and educational
programs of interest to all ages.
Temple's Sisterhood and
Brotherhood provide programs
during the entire year. The
Sisterhood is sponsoring a
"Service.To The Blind" luncheon
card party on Tuesday, Aug. 28,
at noon in the Tobin Auditorium
of the temple. This event is open
to the public. For tickets, call the
temple office.
Religious and Hebrew classes
are offered from kindergarten
through the tenth grade.
Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffe. senior
Rabbi of the congregation, last
year celebrated his 20th an-
niversary at Temple Beth El and
his 30th year in the rabbinate.
Membership inquiries should
be referred to Sydney D. Kmnish.
Religious School Registration Set
Religious School registration
will be held Sunday, Aug. 26,
from 9 a.m. to noon, in the Tobin
Auditorium of Temple Beth El,
Hollywood. Those unable to
register their children then can do
so on Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday, Aug. 28, 29 and 30,
from 3 to 5 p.m.
For the first time, Temple Beth
El is planning a bus service for
the students of the Hebrew
classes who attend Nova schools
starting, this fall term. A bus
service also will be provided for
Hebrew students living in the
Hollywood Hills-Emerald Hills
area. For information, call
Sydney D. Kronish.
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The Jewish t'loridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, July 27, 1979"
The Quiet War We're Losing
The article we are publishing today by Hoag
Levins on the quiet war America is losing as the
Arabs take over and subvert American banking and
other corporate enterprises may raise feelings of deep
anxiety.
Levins is an outstanding investigative reporter,
and his series is excellent. But we are moved to
observe that the general thrust of our series, if not all
of its juicy facts, have appeared in our pages in the
past. They continue to do so in other forms, as well,
even as the series is being published.
Perhaps it is Levins' concentrated study that is
making the difference that is causing readers to
ring our phones off their hooks and to ask whether
this Arab war is commonly understood.
We think so. President Carter long ago dubbed
the energy crisis precipitated by OPEC and our need
to respond to it as a "moral equivalent of war." It is
clear that the President has understood the Arab
strategy almost from the beginning.
With due apologies to Clausewitz and Veblen
and their own moral equivalents, we may take issue
with the President on the "moral equivalency" of any
kind of war under any circumstances, and whether
his adapted terminology is apt in this case. But, from
the beginning, Mr. Carter has shown his under-
standing of the Arab strategy. So, of course, have
many others.
It is in this sense, and only in this sense, that
we wonder about the startled and even anxious
reaction to the series. It was our purpose to add to
our readers' knowledge, not to frighten with the
unknown.
But in either case, we believe it is performing an
invaluable service. It is about time that Americans
understood the absolutely Machiavellian purpose of
Araby beyond Jews, Zionism and the existence of
Israel.
A Forgotten Promise
There can be no more clear example of the
jaundiced expediency upon which political battles are
based than Joe Clark and his victory over Prime
Minister Trudeau in Canada.
It would be absurd to believe that Clark won
because of the Jewish community's support of him.
Trudeau had survived in office a long time. His was a
turbulent tenure and, as is so often said in American
presidential battles, it was time for a change.
But Clark did make a vow to his Jewish con-
stituents that if elected, he would move Canada's
embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.
We don't have to review the significance of such
a promise. Suffice it to say that while Israel desig-
nates Jerusalem as its capital city, the rest of the
world acknowledges it as Tel Aviv, not the least of
this faction being the United States.
Now that Clark is in office, his promise has
already been delayed for "further study" for a year.
There is no need to take bets on what will happen
after that.
It is about time that Jewish voters, wherever
they may live, stop permitting themselves to be lied
to in'such ugly sectarian terms. One way would be to
discourage candidates from thinking of them as
"Jewish^ voters.
Aren't Canadian Jews who took Prime Minister
Clark at his word feeling foolish these days?
We might add, something like American Jews
who recall all those things Jimmy Carter said about
Israel when he asked for our "Jewish" votes.
DC-10*s and the American Spirit
I DON'T understand all the
excitement about the decision to
restore the DC-10 to the air. Days
before the FAA lifted its ban, I
flew a Lufthansa DC-10 from
Frankfurt to Nassau.
There was no fear among any
of the passengers I could detect -
Neither was there any applause
when it took off and landed as
occurred on the first DC-10 flight
on a United jet from Chicago to
Baltimore when the FAA lifted
its ban as capriciously as it was
laid down in mid-June. Or when
National sent its first DC-10 from
Miami to Los Angeles over the
weekend.
MAYBE NO ONE applauded
on my DC-10 flight because,
being denied air access to the
U.S. at the time, we were forced
to land in Nassau, and that is not
a happy prospect to look forward
to under any circumstances. To
be blunt about it, what is there to
applaud in so catastrophic an
occurrence? Next to Las Vegas,
Nassau is the last place on earth
I'd ever want to visit, and I
suspect most everyone else on the
plane shared that same feeling,
going to Mexico City as mostly
they were.
Knowing how unattractive
they are, Nassau forces you to go
through immigration even if
you're just waiting for a con-
necting flight elsewhere just so
the Bahamians can then scalp
you for a $4 head tax.
Jewish Floridian
and SHOFA* OF CHEATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood Office .MS FederalHwy Suite JOS. Daiua. Fla U004
Telephone MNW
MAIN OFFICE and PLANT 130 NE th St Miami. r*la. S31J2Phone 3T3-M06
FREDSHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publlaher Executive Editor
The Jewish Floridian DNI Not Guarantee The Ksihruth
Of Tha Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published BIWeekly
Second Claaa Postage Paid at Dan la, Fla 86*500
f. Frtd Shoch0i
Federation officers: President, Joyce Newman; Vice Presidents Allen Cordon I
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Executive Director. 8umner G. Kaye Submit material for publication to Marcv
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Member of the Jewish Teieraah4Mcy, Sevan Arts Feature SyMicste. *n i .
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JC*m\
tell KW10 y9
JCl-OB| hj ^7^1^^
bbbbbbbbI Jr J
=*?_
presumably to cover the use of
their antiquated airport facilities
at the conclusion of your "joyous
stay" on their scruffy little
island, which is about as boring
an experience for civilized man as
can possibly be imagined.
Anyway, my DC-10 flight from
Frankfurt was smooth, com-
fortable and lovely. I spent my
time sorting out notes for an
extensive report I am in the
midst of preparing on my stay in
Germany. I was sitting at the
window overlooking the long
expanse of the left wing, and I
must confess that, once or twice,
I stared more with curiosity than
anxiety at the motor quivering on
its pylon just beneath it the
very same motor that went for a
ride of its own at O'Hare late in
May and I took to figuring the
statistical possibilities of a repeat
performance.
My sole solace was a note I'd
written to a friend before I took
off in Frankfurt: no German
plane, even of foreign manufac-
ture, would dare crash without
first asking for permission.
BUT A youngster seated next
to me kept interrupting my
thoughts with questions about
America and whether the Grand
Canyon is as ungeheuer und
kunstlerlich ("mighty and ar-
tistic") as it is said. I assured her
it was and complimented her on
her choice of adjectives for one of
my country's most exquisite
natural wonders. She didn't seem
to be giving one single darn
about that wing or that quivering
engine on its questionable pylon.
Neither did anyone else. I saw
a lot of books, newspapers, back-
gammon boards and earphone-
listening to a recording of
Madame Butterfly, which I
myself heard though inter-
mittently three times before
landing.
All of this massive indifference
to bureaucratic czars like Lang-
home Bond and the DC-10 flap
got me to thinking about us as a
nation. Certainly, there were eco-
nomic considerations involved in
the decision of the European
nations to get their DC-10's back
into the air regardless of FAA
prohibitions against them. But
Continued oa Pag* 10
IT TOOK OVER 5000 YEARS TO PRODUCE
THESE MONUMENTAL TWO HOURS OF TELEVISION.
American Savings is proud to provide the funding for Struggle for Israel
A vivid and unique documentary tracing the evenrs leading ro the creation of the Stare of Israel
AMERICAN SAVsNGSr*
AMp>AN ASSOCIATION Of FLORIDA9

Friday. July 27. 1979
Volume 9
3 AB 5739
Number 15


Friday, July 27, 1979
The Jewish Floridian and Sfrofar of Greater Hollywood
PageS

Israel's Stormy Reaction
Kreisky Says Arafat's a Pussy Cat About Israel
it
A*
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The mainstream political
community in Israel, em-
bracing the government
and the Labor Party op-
position, reacted with uni-
form indignation and dis-
may over the meeting that
Chancellor Brun Kreisky of
Austria and Willy Brandt,
chairman of West Ger-
many's ruling Social
Democratic Party, had with
Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization Chief Yasir Ara-
fat in Vienna
ARAFAT WA8 invited by
'Kreisky in the Chancellor's
capacity as vice president of the
socialist International Brandt,
former Chancellor of West
Germany, is president of the
Socialist International. Arafat's
visit was not announced in ad-
vance and was a surprise to
reporters in Vienna. It was his
first official visit to the West
since he addressed the United
Nations General Assembly in
1974.
The Cabinet "empowered the
Foreign Ministry" to summon
home Israel's Ambassador to
Austria "for consultations" as a
mark of protest. Yosef
Ciechanover, the director general
of the Foreign Ministry, called in
the Austrian charge d affaires to
deliver an expression of Israel's
strong protest at Kreisky's
action.
Shimon Peres, chairman of the
He told a meeting of the Labor
Party Bureau that the party
would raise the matter at the
next meeting of the Socialist
International.
MEANWHILE, Kreisky and
Brandt stated that the Socialist
International will have more
talks with the PLO irrespective
of previous decisions to the
contrary.
Only the leftist two-man Sheli
faction, consisting of Meir Payil
and Uri Avneri, welcomed the
Vienna meeting as a possible
breakthrough in the com-
prehensive peace process.
Another Sheli leader, Gen. (res.)
Mattityahu Peled, who has
himself met with PLO leaders at
various times in Europe, said
that what transpired in Vienna
was beyond proper proportions.
But Peled said on a radio
interview that he assumed the
Kreisky-Brandt meeting with
Arafat had been arranged on the
basis of new pledges by Arafat to
make public statements either
recognizing Israel or accepting
UN Security Council Resolution
242. For that reason, Peled said
he welcomed the meeting as a
hopeful sign.
Mooriv published an interview
with Kreisky from its Vienna
correspondent, Menahem
Oberbaum, in which the Austrian
Chancellor asserted that the
analogy between Israel's policies
and those of South Africa was at
the focus of the tripartite meeting
in Vienna.
one speaks of the bombing of
Lebanese villages and its con-
sequences. One speaks of the
extraordinary arrogance with
which Israel behaves.
"Obviously and this should
be clear to you the central idea
of these talks tends towards the
comparison between Israel and
South Africa. There is a position
(which maintains) that Israel
intends to set up a Bantustan on
the West Bank i.e., an area of
Arab population which would in
effect be bereft of rights, with
Israeli control over all the area's
resources."
In Gotham
Kreisky said that he personally
was convinced that the PLO
leadership did not (still) hold the
view that Israel had no right to
exist "I am sure the PLO does
not believe in the destruction of
Israel," he said.
HE SAID the meeting had
evolved out of a prolonged
correspondence between himself
and Arafat, a correspondence
during which he had written his
own unequivocally negative
opinion regarding some of the
PLO positions.
Arafat was welcomed by
Kreisky and Minister of Interior
Erwin Lane on his arrival from
Sofia in a special plane of the
Bulgarian Airline. In a short
statement Arafat rejected the
idea of negotiations with Israel
and said the Palestinian problem
can only be solved within the
United Nations.
Political commentators in
Jerusalem believe that Brandt
and Kreisky will launch a new
initiative to spur the current
round of negotiations on
Palestinian autonomy between
Israel, Egypt and the United
States.
Crown Prince Hassan of
Jordan met Kreisky on Friday
during a stop in Vienna. Jordan
and the Palestinians have
declined to take part in the
autonomy talks on grounds that
the Camp David agreements do
not meet their demand for total
Israeli withdrawal.
Punishment Urged for Bigoted Toughs
"AT A MEETING like this,
, one discusses a broad spectrum
-> opposition Labor Party, joined { .. K d k ^d ,.Qne
with Pnme Mmater Menachem kjj Jd ^^ of
Begin in drafting a statement J\ Mme ^^
condemning the meeting. Peres
noted that negation of the PLO is
the national consensus in Israel.
Sirota to Speak at
, Temple Beth Hillel
1 Hy Sirota will speak on
"United, We Are One" at Friday
night services, July 27 at 8 p.m.
at Temple Beth Hillel, Margate.
Sirota is director of public
relations for Menorah Chapels, a
chain of west Broward funeral
homes.
He is associated with many
humanitarian causes and is now
chairman of the 1967 Rein-
vestment Bonds for Israel He is
a past president of Sunrise Lakes
Phase One Condominium
Association, Inc., and is active
with UJA and Israel Bonds. He
* has received many awards from
the Jewish Federation and Bonds
for Israel
} Neo-Nazis
Bombed Car
PARIS mysterious neo-Nazi organiza-
tion, "Odessa," has assumed
responsibility for the bomb ex-
plosion which last week
destroyed the car of Nazi-hunter
Serge Klarsfeld. "Odessa'' is the
secret organization which used to
smuggle wanted Nazi criminals
out of Europe in the post-war
years.
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The Queens District Attor-
ney has been urged to im-
pose maximum penalties on
youths charged with van-
dalism against religious in-
stitutions and to remove
racist or anti-religious graf-
fiti from public areas. These
were among the recommen-
dations the Queens Jewish
Community Council called
for in its meeting several
days ago with officers of
the police department
The meeting followed the
attack late last month by a
number of baseball bat-wielding
youths on the Rabbinical
Seminary of America. During the
rampage, the teen-agers attacked
Rabbi Abraham Ginzberg,
executive director of the
Seminary, and students, and
ripped religious books and
smashed windows. One student
was hospitalized with a broken
nose and eight others suffered
lesser injuries.
QUEENS POLICE Comman-
der William Fitzpatrick said that
he will call upon the District
Attorney's office to "apply the
full measure of the law in the
event of future similar acts of
vandalism.
At the suggestion of Benjamin
Vinar, executive vice president of
the Council, he called upon the
local precinct to draw up a list of
the teen-agers involved in the
Seminary attack and to impress
upon their parents the gravity of
their children's actions and to
warn them that any future at-
tacks will be dealt with severely.
Max Schoenbrot, executive
director of the Council, called for
a citywide program for the
removal of any anti-religious or
anti-racial graffiti displayed in
public areas. Anti-Semitic graffiti
such as was found in the local
school yard near the Seminary at
the time of the rampage, tends to
incite or buttress such acts of
hatred and vandalism, he
charged. The group agreed to call
upon the Board of Education and
the Mayor's office to implement
this suggestion.

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Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. Jury 27,1979
Ask Abe
By Abe Halpera
Inflation Hits
Orthodox With
Special Blows
Question:
Dew Abe.
Sometime ago I read in Ripley's Believe It Or
Not, an article of interest. "Methuselah is known
as the oldest human being. How come he died
before his father?"
Knowing that your colum asks for questions of
interest, can you please enlighten me about this
question and give me an answer.
Thank you.
Milton H. GUck
Hallandale.
Answer:
According to the Biblical narrative,
Methuselah, one of the patriarchs of mankind
lived longer than any of the pre-Abrahamic
fathers of the human race. The narrative states
that "All the days of Methuselah came to 969
years; then he died." (Genesis 5:271
Methuselah is the son of Enoch.
The following account of the life of Enoch
appears in the Biblical narrative. "When Enoch
had lived 65 years, he begot Methuselah. After
the birth of Methuselah. Enoch walked with God
300 years: and he begot sons and daughters. All
the days of Enoch came to 365 years. Enoch
walked with God; then he was no more, for God
took him." (Genesis5:21-24)
It is obvious from the above Biblical passages
that Methuselah lived 669 years longer than his
father. The Bible clearly states that "All the days
of Enoch came to 365 years." (emphasis mine
A.B.H.) According to the Bible, when Enoch was
no more Methuselah was 300 years old.
All the Jewish commentators accept the
Biblical phrase "for God took him" to mean that
Enoch died. The commentary in the Soncino
Publication of the Pentateuch and Haftorahs
explains this phrase as follows.
"Whereas the other men enumerated existed
and preserved the race physically, Enoch led a life
of intimate companionship with God in that
morally deteriorating age. The Hebrew idiom 'U>
walk with God' is employed to express a
righteous course of life, as though the man who is
thus described walked with and was accompanied
by his maker. A similar phrase is used concerning
Noah. (Genesis 6:9)
'These words may mean either that, as a
reward for his piety. Enoch did not meet with the
ordinary fate of mortals, but like Elijah, was
taken to heaven without the agony of death: or
that Enoch died prematurely. Rashi explains that
although Enoch was pious, he was weak and
liable to go astray. To avert such a calamity he
was removed from earth.
"This description of death is profoundly
significant. We come from God. and to him do we
return. To die is to be taken by God in whose
presence there is life eternal. Rabbinical legend
was very busy with the story of Enoch He was
the repository of the mysteries of the universe;
and even higher honours were later accorded to
him in the circle of the Jewish mystics." (P.18)
Chapter 5 in Genesis lists the 10 generations
from Adam to Noah. Enoch is the seventh in line.
Methuselah the eighth. Lamech ninth, and Noah
tenth.
With reference to all men enumerated, with the
exception of Enoch, the Biblical narrative uses
the Hebrew word Vayomot (and he died).
The early Christians interpreted the phrase
"For God took him" to mean that Enoch did not
die. but ascended alive to heaven. They used this
interpretation of the Hebrew phrasewhich is
different from the other ninefor their own
purposes.
Evidently. Ripley's statement which you quote
depends upon this interpretation.
The authoritative Encyclopedia Judaica refers
to many legends in existence about the life of
Enoch, then concludes:
"Notwithstanding these legends, third century
Palestinian rabbis deny the miraculous tran-
slation of Enoch, and state that he vacillated all
his life between righteousness and sinfulness,
whereupon God removed him from the world
before he relapsed again into sin. (Genesis 25:1)
(VoL 6, p. 794)
Please send all questions to:
askabe
2719 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida33020
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Orthodox Jews completing the
Kolel (postgraduate yeshiva
studyl are among those hardest
hit by rising inflation in the New
York area In a recently com-
pleted study by Project COPE,
the career guidance and job
training agency of Agudath
Israel of America, Orthodox Jews
were found to be unable to take
advantage of new jobs opening in
management and related fields
not meet subsistence level living
requirements.
In an interview with the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
Rabbi Menachem Lubmsky,
director of Project COPE, said
that a tvpical entry level salary of
$13,000 for a family of four is "far
below" that needed to maintain
basic living expenses. Lubinsky
added that his agency has opened
a special desk to deal with the
hardship cases.
THE SPECIAL desk is run by
Rabbi Moshe Bornstein. who will
work with the estimated 100
unemployed Orthodox Jews
throughout the metropolitan area
who have registered so far.
Bornsteia who faced similar
problems in his own career
direction, will attempt to place
these unemployed in suitable
jobs and retrain others to meet
the demands of changing job
markets.
Project COPE also assists the
wives of the Kolel students in
finding better paying careers in
order to support their husbands
and families. In this way, many
graduate students who would be
forced to abandon their studies in
order to obtain more lucrative
employment, are able to continue
their careers in Jewish education
and communal affairs. .
Project COPE also aims to
retrain and place Orthodox Jews,
often supporting large families,
who are employed in low paying
jobs often within the Jewish
educational system.
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Friday, July 27,1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7

: ,^-_.. ur<
Impact of Peace on Israel's Economy
By H. BRAIDMAN
And J RUSSELL KRAUS
The state of war in which Israel
found itself for the past 30 years
greatly bolstered many of the
weaker aspects of the economy.
Paradoxically, the economy now
faces greater challenges than ever
before in the wake of the peace
treaty signing with Egypt.
As Israelis begin to gear
themselves for peace, they
already realize that their natural
desire for improving their
standard of living and quality of
life will suffer a serious setback.
Implementation of the peace
treaty will inevitably cause social
and economic strain, the extent
of which may not yet fully be
appreciated.
Many economists in Israel are
estimating the direct and indirect
effect the pullout from Sinai and
the massive inflow of $3 billion in
armanents and funds for
relocating Israeli forces in the
Negev will have on the economy.
AT LEAST half of the
American aid will be spent in the
United States. The rest of the
money will flow into the local
economy. Among other things,
the money will pay for the
operators of heavy mechanical
equipment, contractors,
prefabricated building firms and
trucks. Thousands of workers
employed on these operations will
receive high wages because of the
difficult working conditions. The
Ministry of Finance is con-
sidering the feasibility of im-
porting foreign labor and
equipment to keep the costs
down. Also being weighed is the
increasing of tax deductions at
source from contractors and
employees alike, to raise income
and to restrain inflationary
pressures.
Inflation, which reached 50
percent in 1978, is expected to
reach 70 100 percent in 1979, as
Israeli exports to Egypt of
agricultural machinery, irrigation
equipment, refrigerators, air
conditioners, television sets,
cooking ovens, computers,
electronic instruments, medicines
and medical equipment, fer-
tilizers, pesticides, hothouses,
fresh and processed foods,
inexpensive textiles, fashion
goods, plastics and petrochemical
products. At present, the
majority of Israel's exports of
textiles, sophisticated electronic
equipment and citrus fruits are
destined for European and
American markets.
WITHIN A YEAR, about
50,000 Egyptian visitors are
expected to visit Israel and many
Israelis travel to Egypt. Because
of a shortage of hotel rooms and
accommodation in Egypt,
camping sites might be erected
for Israeli visitors arriving in
buses or cars. El Al is already
the enormous construction
contracts go into effect. The
demand for labor for the building
in the south, combined with the
increased call-up of many tens of
thousands of reservists to help in
the redeployment will tax Israel's
manpower resources to the limit.
OPENING JUNE 28 SPECIAL
Even fewer workers will be
available for industry and ser-
vices, encouraging pressure for
wage increases.
Similarly, the existing acute
housing shortage can also be
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expected to worsen with the
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By the end of the first nine-
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Although it will be able to buy oil
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- -
/ ne j ewisn b londian ana Shofar of Ureate'r Hollywood
JEWISHFEDERA TM
1979-80 Officers
JoAnnKitz
Treasurer
'
Norman Atkin
Herbert D. Katx
Robert PftteO
Allen Gordon
Vic* President
Melvin H. B
Howard Barron
Paul Koenig
Nathan Pritcber
Lewis E. Cohn
Rabbi Morton Malavaky
BenSalUr


riday, July 27, 1979
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
OF SOUTH BROWAKD
Board of Directors
f~

if
} *.^- .'jf/M

'** B^
I ~^^^k
Joyce Newman
President
k/>
MH
7
Mosee Horn stein
Vice President
Joel A. Schneider
Secretary
RJoelW.


P&,
re 10
Th* Jewish Floridian and Shofar of OrtaUr Hollywood
Friday, July 27,1979
Leo Mimllin
DC-10's and the American Spirit
Continued from Page 4
the Europeans don't want air
disasters any more than we do.
IS IT that we are more
humane, more considerate of life
and less money-conscious than
they? Is that why we delayed our
resumption of flights to discover
no more about the O'Hare crash
than we know now? I don't know
whether the answer to that
question should cause me to
laugh first or to cry first.
But the fact is that, somehow
in the last quarter-century, we
have lost our pizzazz as a people.
Only a decade ago. we were
celebrating our flights to the
moon. The other day. we were
offering apologies to the Aus-
tralians for the crash of Skylab
on their territory.
We don't go up anymore
except perhaps in the cost of
living. We have become a nation
accustomed to falling down. We
are daily encouraged to become
more and more individually self-
centered and self-indulgent, to
celebrate our individual rights
without regard to the awesome
erosions this causes our national
consciousness. our national
integrity, our national culture,
our national history, our national
"lift."
THE EUROPEANS are as-
tonished by our creeping col-
lective psychiatric depression.
These days, we are the leaders of
the free world nominally only.
Time and again. I heard in Ger-
many that we have lost the wings
of our imagination the very
spirit that has been changing the
character of their own national
consciousness and that now
apparently leaves them betrayed
in their desire to emulate our free
spirit and our free institutions,
abandoned midstream because,
quite suddenly, the leader has
turned leaden with incalculable
despair.
Even President Carter in his
energy address Sunday night
failed to give a lift to the nation.
He spoke of the energy war, but
he didn't define the nature of the
war, or of the enemy. Why should
the nation respond to that? He
spoke of the need for windfall
profits tax, but he didn't say who
is making the windfall profits and
why.
It was contrary to the success-
ful greed of those enterprises
truly in control of the nation, it
was contrary to their own best
interests that he not do so, and
for this reason he merely skirted
the issue of what he has come to
call the "moral equivalent of
war." but without sounding a
rallying cry by pointing out our
adversaries as the enemy.
IN CALLING on us to stop
being self-centered, to rise to
higher ethical and moral prin-
ciples, the President failed by
example to demonstrate how to
do that. He was no less hypo-
critical than any of the rest of us
who seek the safety of the
ground, not the excitement of
soaring on the wings of our
nation's eagle. He cried war. war.
but as Churchill once said, all he
did was jaw-jaw, and in a
deliberately obfuscatory way.
In this regard. I note the other
day South Florida's successful
circumvention of the Federal
guideline on cutting back bi-
lingual instruction in the
elementary school system. Is it
conceivable to the American
spirit people who want to live
in America but not be
Americans? And to insist on their
self-centered "right" that other
Americans pay the cost of their
insular choice?
I suppose it is safe to be on the
ground, to gather in the coastal
clusters of ethnocentricity and
pretend that one is part of the
vaster society beyond. In this
self-delusion, one feels free to
impose his ethnocentricity upon
others as the national norm.
ALL OF this is central to the
DC-10. We permit this freedom in
others as a juridical respon-
sibility. We soar no more. The
self-serving ethnocentrics who
are noisy in their espousal of the
right to celebrate their "roots
are not the only cultural cowards
with which a once great
American past must now reckon.
Too many of us seem to be
groveling with them in the inter-
stices of our quiet greed building
a burrow back to the primordial
womb.
To send the DC-10 back into
the air is an anachronism. These
days, we are more comfortable
with visions of DaVinci's glider
providing the FAA first
guarantees that it's okay.
Otherwise, sue.
Rumania Said to Allow
Emigration for Family Reunion
NEW YORK (JTA) -
President Nicolae Ceausescu of
Rumania assured Donald M.
Robinson. president of the
American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee, that
any Jew wishing to leave
Rumania for family reunion in
Israel or any other country would
be able to do so, it was reported
here.
The Rumanian leader made the
statement during an audience
with Robinson, Ralph I. Gold-
man, JDC executive vice
president, and Chief Rabbi Moses
Rosen, president of the
Federation of Jewish Com-
munities of Rumania. Stefan
Andrei, Rumanian Foreign
Minister, was also present.
THE JDC leaders were in
Bucharest for the dedication of
the new Olteniei Home for the
Aged, a 220-bed facility, and also
nursing cases. The home was
named the Amalia and Rabbi
Moses Rosen Home in honor of
the Chief Rabbi's 40 years of
service and leadership to the
community. Amalia is the rabbi's
wife
Calling the meeting "historic,"
Robinson said "It was the first
time a President of an East
European country met with the
president of the Joint
Distribution Committee for a
face-to-face talk on the condition
of the Jewish Community and the
work of the JDC in that coun-
try."
The JDC, Robinson said,
"spends close to S3.5 million for a
variety of social assistance
programs aiding over 10,000 of
the 40,000 Jews estimated to
reside in Rumania.
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Phyllis Robin Matthews, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Ira Matthews of Miramar, became the bride
of Gary Marvin Levy, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Samuel Levy of Lakeland, on Sunday afternoon,
July 22, in a double-ring ceremony at the
Diplomat Hotel in Hollywood Beach.
Rabbi Samuel Jaffe of Temple Beth El of-
ficiated ai the wedding, which was held in the
Embassy Room of the hotel and was followed by a
reception in the Scheherazade Room.
The bride chose her sister, Mrs. Marjorie
Kelling. as matron of honor. The groom was
attended by his father as best man.
The bride's gown was made of white organza
with a double bertha collar of Schiffli embroidery
and had an empire waistline marked with Venice
lace. It had short sleeves and a long full skirt
trimmed with appliques of Venice lace and edged
with a wide flounce of Schiffli embroidery. The
bride carried a bouquet of white roses and baby's
breath and wore a full three-tier fingertip veil
attached to a Juliet cap covered with Schiffli
embroidery.
The bride is a recent graduate of the University
of South Florida in Tampa, where she earned a
BA degree in mass communications. She plans a
career in personnel management. The groom is a
resident unit administrator at Eastern Michigan
University.
Following a wedding trip through the state of
Florida, the couple will reside in Ypsilanti, Mich.
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I July 37,1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
TTT
Pag. 11
U.S. Firm Denies Arab Connection
HLLIAM SAPHIRE
YORK (JTA) -
J. Patterson, vice
lent for corporate
ha of the Perini
told the Jewish Tele-
ic Agency that his
s "never violated"
egislation against the
>oycott of Israel.
was responding to
published in Israel
the Framingham,
company, a primary
ictor for the construc-
lof two U'S--financed
^ses in the Negev, was
tive participant in the
^boycott.
kT ALLEGATION was
led in what was termed an
il memo of the Anti-Defa-
Leatruo of R'nai B'rith
which the Jerusalem Post pub-
lished. The memo said the com-
pany was known to do business
with Arab countries, including
Saudi Arabia and Kuwait, and
signed agreements with those
countries that contained clauses
enforcing the anti-Israel boycott.
Asked by the JTA for
clarification, Patterson read the
following statement: "The only
project the Perini Corp. has ever
had in the Arab world was the
construction of a hospital in
Kuwait. In connection with that
project and in any other activities
in which the corporation has been
involved, we have never violated
any U.S. anti-boycott laws or any
regulations promulgated by the
U.S. Department of Commerce in
connection with such laws."
A spokesman for the ADL in
New York confirmed to the JTA
that the internal memo, dated
June 11, 1979, existed and that
the Perini Corp. has been under
"study" by the ADL.
HE EXPLAINED, however,
that the contents of the memo
were based on news items and
magazine articles published in
the U.S. between 1976-1978.
including a story in the June 22,
1976 JTA Daily News Bulletin.
That story, which originated in
Boston, said that a bill to outlaw
the Arab boycott in
Massachusetts remained stalled
in the State Senate because of the
vigorous opposition of the Ray-
theon Corp. and the Perini Con-
struction Co.
According to the story, "Their
representatives said at a meeting
last week at the office of Senate
President Kevin Harrington that
while the firms do not favor the
Arab boycott, they felt the bill,
as written, could be injurious to
their business and was an uncon-
stitutional state usurpation of
federal power that could be
harmful to U.S. trade abroad."
ill INT NO MOK
Definition Changes
Israel Hails Bonn's Move
To Strike Down Statute
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israelis have hailed the
West German Bundestag's vote abolishing the statute of
limitations for prosecuting Nazi war criminals and have
sent cables of appreciation to German officials and
Germany's Ambassador to Israel, Klaus Schuetz.
Premier Menachem Begin personally expressed his
satisfaction today to visiting West Berlin Mayor Dietrich
Stobbe.
Justice Minister Shmuel Tamir expressed his
satisfaction with the vote. Tamir, who interrupted the
Knesset session to announce the vote, said he hoped that
now Nazi criminals still free would be brought to trial.
LABOR PARTY chairman Shimon Peres sent a
cable of congratulations to his opposite number in Ger-
many, Willy Brandt, chairman of the Social Democratic
Party, expressing his appreciation for the decision.
BEGIN URGED West Germany to pursue the
prosecution of war criminals. At the same time, the
Premier protested to Stobbe over the recent statement by
the foreign ministers of the European Economic Com-
munity criticizing Israel's settlement policy.
LONDON (JTA) The latest edition of Collins
English Dictionary has dropped a definition of a Jew as a
"skinflint, miser or cheat." Collins, the publisher, said the
change had been made because the usages were no longer
appropriate. It denied that it has anything to do with
Manchester businessman Marcus Shloimowitz who has
pressed dictionary publishers for the past 10 years to
remove "vulgar" and "offensive" definitions of the word
Jew. However, Shloimowitz said he was delighted by the
>VlCt JcwrV change.
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS LABELS
BAGS BOXES
WIPES
776-6272
HOWARD
Iapkr 4.
ACKAOING
1201 N E 45 STREET
FORT LAUDERDALE
pdate
fter graduating from a
lucal college. Victor Gliner
[drafted into the Air Force.
|r application to emigrate has
denied three times because
service. Letters to Victor's
^er commander regarding the
th of time he is barred from
Migration have gone unan-
kd
tie Gliners' applied for their
the same year that their
rhter Julia was born. Since
time Victor has been unable
et a job in his field and often
)le to get any work at all.
|fter being harassed about
unemployed, Victor finally
nd temporary work as a night
I'limim. He was required to
t>n his aew status to the local
ce who in turn called his new
^loyer which resulted in his
; fired.
[ictor ^s now caught in the
sic case of Catch 22. As
isenik, he is barred from
ting work in his field, it is also
|inst the law in the USSR to
someone who is over-
rated for a job, and it is illegal
pemain unemployed. His only
i now is to escape from Soviet
lecution.
I lease write to the Gliners:
WHUfWA 33o
KHtPRU$5R
en the first few letters
en to a refusenik go un-
kered, to discourage future
Irs. Please don't give up
re the censors do.
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H4
Page 12
lhmJauMMk Klnmtlimm.
J V'J..(.-------to.
Tha Jewish Fbridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood_______^^
v.
.. I -----------j'- -.' m^
a*
>lra6 Takeover
How America is Losing the Quiet War
Continued from Page 1
decades of Arab ground and air
attacks.
A good place to start the story
is amid the gaudily-colored col-
lection of circus tents which were
stretched across the lawns of the
White House on Mar. 26. There,
thousands of revelers and cele-
brants pranced before the TV
cameras to declare peace and sit
down to a feast of steak and
champagne.
BUT THOSE TV cameras did
not show the entire story of the
day to their audiences around the
world. They did not show how
two of the private firms Chase
Manhattan and the Bank of
America which donated funds
for that peace banquet have been
serving as willing and creative
partners in the revolutionary
form of secret warfare first un-
leashed back in 1973.
They did not show how the
brother, best friend and various
other political and business col-
leagues of President Carter have
taken a direct and aggressive
part in that secret war.
They did not show how, on the
same day the peace treaty was
signed, Arab leaders of this new,
unorthodox secret effort met in
Geneva to map out a new battle
strategy.
Their initial move was masked
as yet another oil price hike an
increase that brought the cost per
barrel to an unprecedented
$14 55. In effect, that increase
opened a harsh offensive in the
quiet war whose prime targets
are now Egypt, Israel and the
United States.
WHAT FOLLOWS is the
story of the complete evolution of
that six-year war: a global
conflict that now involves dozens
of combatant countries, wildly
innovative war-making tech-
niques, Arab operatives,
prominent American col-
laborators. And a new battle tool
whose awesome potential for
international havoc exceeds that
of any weapon ever used by one
nation against another. Except
possibly the atomic bomb.
Strangely, what follows has
never been told before in its
entirety, although much of this
information has been readily
available to anyone curious
enough and sufficiently con-
cerned about the future of
Israel. And America.
Despite the denials of govern-
ment officials and the silence of
the media. Expo has discovered
that tens of billions of petro-
dollars collected from U.S. con-
sumers have been recycled since
1973 to finance a nationwide
campaign through which Arab
officials, operators and entre-
preneurs have bought their way
into America's highest social
financial, military and political
circles.
RECORDS at the Depart-
ments of State, Commerce and
Defense; at the Securities and
Exchange Commission; in federal
and local courts, Congressional
testimony and published
financial reports and records
indicate that Arab nationals have
been involved in hundreds of
billions of dollars worth of
financial activity in America
during the past six years.
Cross-referencing the patterns
of these transactions, Expo has
been able to reconstruct a seven-
pronged petrodollar penetration
strategy through which Arab
Holding the deadly
sniper's rifle to his
shoulder and peer-
ing through its tele-
scopic sight, the
now-deceased King
(Faisal) swung the
barrel in a westerly
direction toward
distant America...
countries have gained entry into
and rapidly expanding influence
on the mainstream institutions of
American life.
Those seven areas of activity
are:
DIRECT PHYSICAL ac-
quisition, through takeover, buy-
in or merger, of hundreds of
Eroperties including billion-dollar
inks; office buildings; hotels
and other real estate; brokerage
houses; manufacturing plants;
construction companies; cattle
ranches, farms and grain futures.
FINANCIAL "paper" ac-
quisitions involving various
stocks, bonds and similar com-
mercial paper investments.
Treasury Department records
indicate that Arab investment in
U.S. Treasury bonds, bills and
notes rocketed from $2.2 billion
in 1973 to $10.7 billion in 1975.
Treasury Bulletins and Inter-
national Capital Movement
Reports indicate that between
1973 and 1977, Arab investment
in non-Treasury stocks went from
$365 million to $1.4 billion;
holdings in other bonds zoomed
from $685 million to $1.7 billion.
However, this includes only
directly traceable investments
made openly in the international
market. Much of the recent Arab
investment in all fields has been
made through third-party
countries or international cor-
porations set up to hide the
investors' true identities. At the
same time, a 1978 survey by
Business Week magazine found
that Saudi Arabia is now the
largest holder of the paper of the
Federal National Mortgage
Association. The association,
which has $40 billion in assets
and is the sixth largest cor-
poration in America, is the major
supplier of home mortgage loan
money in this country.
SHORT-TERM bank
deposits for use as immediate
political leverage. Late in 1975,
the Senate Foreign Relations
Subcommittee on Multinational
Corporations tried to determine
exactly how much control foreign
investors had in American banks,
and sought to subpoena
American bank records as part of
that investigation. Kuwait and
Saudi Arabia openly challenged
the Subcommittee and said they
held about $11 billion in
American banks including
$7.3 billion in short-term
deposits; and that they would
transfer the money to European
institutions if the Subcommittee
did not stop trying to subpoena
the American bank records that
showed the extent of Arab
holdings.
The Subcommittee backed
down and stopped that portion of
its investigations; Subcommittee
members explained that they had
"no other choice." It was the
second time since the 1974 Rabat
Summit that the Arab bloc
threatened to collapse the
Federal Reserve System if thev
Continued on Following Page
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y. July 27, 1979
The.Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
How the Plot Began
ab Battle Plan Against U.S. Institutions
itinued from Preceding Page
not get their way. They
y succeeded both times;
ss never did pass legis-
to control or even require
ration of Arab investments
erica.
[PETRODOLLAR court-
aimed at buying contacts
"advisors" in the highest
bs of government. Among
currently known to be
f involved in representing,
ling or in the direct employ
fab financial operatives are a
candidate for the United
9 Presidency in 1980; the
U.S. Director of the
and close friend of
t Carter; the brother of
Bnt Carter; a former poll-
and personal friend of
ent Carter; a former U.S.
President; a former CIA
>r; two former CIA station
two former Senators,
ling the former head of the
Foreign Relations Com-
a former U.S. Attorney
; four former Assistant
ies of State; a former
at Secretary of the U.S.
y; a former Secretary of
and former Secretary of
Force.
'LINKAGE" programs
aed to draw segments of top
industry close to Arab
iments. This is reflected in
its of Arab-American
ires Inc. of San Francisco,
indicate that U.S. exports
ab countries just prior to
1973 Mideast war were less
$1 billion annually. By late
year, that figure had in-
to more than S15 billion,
(extent of this new wave of
tage" is also seen in the
litment efforts of the Arab-
irican Association for Com-
fce and Industry, head-
ered in New York and open
"any private corporation,
lership or membership which
nterested in the aims and
ases of the Association."
Je Association, which rep-
iits the member nations of
[Arab League, is financed by
paid by the 167 member
lies. Those dues, ac-
to the Association's
is, support Arab research,
im meetings, business
lings, informal luncheons,
erences, industry workshops
trade missions across the
1 States. Records show that
dues-paying member corn-
lies include 18 of Americas
100 defense contractors,
them Western Electric,
itinghouse and General
:tric; 21 of Fortune
wine's top 100 U.S. cor-
Itions with combined yearly
totaling $400 billion such
sanies as the Ford Motor
rpany, IBM, ITT, Union Car-
and U.S. Steel; and ten of
erica's top 20 banks with
lined assets of about $280
on, including the Bank of
Brica, Chase Manhattan and
leers Trust Company.
Pne of the most recent new
ruitments is Hill and
awlton. Inc. Headquartered in
v YcAp, *b company is the
I'sVtagBst public relations
HOI and Knowlton signed
nth the Arab Association last
ember.
DIRECT political action
ough a greatly expanded and
|hly sophisticated lobbying
art in Washington and
ough direct financial involve-
nts in the home districts of
Kslatora whose actions have
(pleased the Arabs. The Arab
V>y. acknowledged as
the capital, is
ng the pivotal
s controversial
to on the F-16
-.
[deal.
chilling example of local
itical action can be seen in the
Jation of Idaho's Sen. Frank
Church. Church has investigated
Arab financial dealings, helped
block military equipment ship
ments to Arab countries and
opposed such proposals as the F-
15 agreement. In an effort to
neutralize Church, the Arabs
have now landed in Idaho and
begun buying support for a pro-
Arab candidate who is gearing up
to run against Church in 1980.
EDUCATIONAL grants
and endowments through which
Arab nations, according to the
State Department, have in-
creased their "linkage" with
American colleges more than ten
times over since 1973. At least 75
universities and colleges have
accepted gifts from various Arab
states for the establishment of
Arab Studies programs. Typical
is a $1 million gift from Saudi
Arabia received by the Univer-
sity of Southern California to
fund a professorship in Arab
Studies. To get the money, the
University agreed to allow the
Saudi government to approve the
instructors chosen to direct the
program.
Even when university officials
stand fast against Arab attempts
to dictate hiring policy and
violate federal anti-dis-
crimination regulations, alternate
routes are found to accomplish
the same goal. One device in-
volved an Arab-endowed $1.5
million working grant to MIT for
engineering studies of various
problems in desert societies.
When the grant stipulated that
no Jews be allowed to participate
in the program, the school balked
at signing such an agreement. So
the Arabs hired away all the non-
Jewish MIT experts they needed
to set up the identical program
as a "private business" with no
official ties to MIT's resources.
THERE ARE no indications
that the Arabs have softened on
their stated intention of using all
business dealings and "linkages"
in America as a direct political
tool:
Middle East magazine is the
official business organ of the
Arab world and journal used by
American firms seeking trade
there. The opening pages of
Middle East's October 1978.issue
pull no punches. In an editorial
directed toward readers, adver-
tisers and prospective clients, the
magazine states bluntly, "The
day when you can expect to do
business with the Arab world and
not take note of what they believe
in and fight for is long gone The
Arab world is sufficiently strong
today not only to fight for what it
believes in, but to expect that its
friends and allies will stand up
and be counted.
"Today, politics and economics
not only mix, but are totally
interdependent. There is e con-
sensus among the Arabs that to
do business with the Arab world
means taking a political stand
not incompatible with Arab
interests and legitimate rights."
HOW IT BEGAN
The real beginning of this story
lies half a dozen years in the
pastat a time when fUnerica
paid scant attention to the
Middle East The priflluaf oil
hovered at a constfjfc<|ad
comfortable $2.42 per' barrel
Then on a sunny, shocking
October day, headlines suddenly
began to chronicle the flaming
progress of another, familiar,
kind of war.
It is late October, 1973. and the
air along the Golan Heights is
thick with the smell of spent
explosives and scorched steel.
Overhead, the sky is webbed
with the exhaust trails of rM
Pbatom jets shrieking aorthaaal
cat into Syria. BoaalMbwSt?
rumbles through the |
Thick oily plumes of anssbebaril
up from a dozen points along the
horizon.
BELOW, the sands are littered
with ragged clusters of still-
smoldering tanks whose sides are
fire-blackened and gutted out-
ward, like burst metal melons.
Strewn haphazardly among these
machines are the grotesquely
stiff shapes of former crewmen,
their bodies already beginning to
bloat and crack pink in the desert
heat
This was the turning point, the
place at which the Syrian in-
vation to the south was broken.
Syrian armies are now scattering
north, in disorganized retreat.
The American-made M-60 tanks
which roar past are marked with
Stars of David and hastily-
scrawled slogans: "On to
Damascus."!
To the west in the Sinai, the
banks of the Suez Canal are
rimmed with fire and carpeted
with twisted remnants of the
Russian ZIL trucks, rocket
launchers and artillery pieces
which the Egyptian Third Army
used to front its assault across
the waterway on Yom Kippur.
Now, two weeks into that war,
the Egyptian Third has been
badly mauled and out-
maneuvered. Surrounded by
Israeli forces, its 20,000 sur-
viving members and 400-odd
tanks sit immobile in the
relentless sun, facing the choice
of total surrender or certain
annihilation
OUT ACROSS the Atlantic
Ocean, the skies are hung with a
hovering archipelago of U.S.
military tanker planes,
positioned for continuous mid-air
refueling of the fleet of El Al
74 7's ferrying supplies from
Peace Air Force Base in New
Hampshire to Israel.
Meanwhile, in Delaware,
caravans of U.S. C-54 cargo
planes lumber off the runways of
Dover Air Force Base, round the
clock, headed for Tel Aviv. The
largest airlift in history is un-
derway.
In the Arab capitals of the
Middle East eyes which have
spent months gazing downward
in confident perusal of desert war
maps abruptly lift skyward,
bringing that airlift into hostile
focus. That American airlift.
That military jugular that has
enabled Israel to score its fourth
triumph over Arab invaders since
1948.
ONE PAIR of those eyes
broods in the Riyadh throne room
of Saudi Arabia's King Faisal.
An angry Faisal dispatches a
message to U.S. President
Richard Nixon. The king's
messenger is Adnan
Khashoggi a man whose name
will become increasingly familiar
in the quiet war that is just
beginning. A member of the
Saudi royal court Khashoggi is
frequently used by Faisal as an
emissary and operative
is
In this case, Khashoggi
particularly useful. Six years
before, the Saudi courtier had
taken it upon himself to back
Nixon's campaign; during the
intervening years, Khashoggi has
made a conscious effort to retain
Nixon's friendship and easy
access to the President
KHASHOGGI MEETS with
Nixon in Washingtonrepor-
tedly at the Watergate Apart-
ment House suite of Presidential
secretary Rosemary Woods. He
delivers the message in which
Faisal suggests that if the White
House really wants to end the
war, it can do so by merely
halting the resupply efforts that
now permit Israel to continue the
Faisal's suggestion is ignored.
The resupply continues. The
Israelis move to within 50 miles
of both Damascus and Cairo.
And even as the troops are still
engaged and flaming planes still
fall from the skies, Arab leaders
meet again in Kuwait
They charge that they have
once again been cheated of
victory. They announce the
formation of a united Arab front
and the opening of yet another
campaign against Israel. This
time, they vow publicly, they will
"unsheath the sword of oil"
They also vow to punish the
Western nations whose support
and supplies have enabled the
Israelis to repulse Arab attacks.
NEXT IS8UE: How much do the
Arabs really control?
After
shopping.
relax with a
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coffee.
Maxwell
House
Coffee says
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home.
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is brewed tobbremember -d cupefter cup,
year after year. Smart Jewish homemakers
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A living tradition in Jewish homes for more than half a century.


___
Page H
Tht Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Gnotor Hollywood
Friday, July 27,1979
Electoral College Decision
Capitol Hill Report
Influenced by Minorities Surprise Mideast Influence in Haiti
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
San. Birch Bayh (D.. Ind.) Mid
Religious
Directory
NORTH BROWARD
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. Conservative Rabbi
Phillip A. Labowltz. Cantor Maurice
A.Neu. -_
TEMPLE BETH ORR. J1SI Riverside
, Drive. Reform (44)
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
57tn St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. (44 A)
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Paul Piotkin.
Cantor Yeriudah Heilbraun. (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE BETH EMET. 200 NW
Douglas Rd. Liberal Reform. David
Goldstein, ed. dlr.
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9730 Sterling
Rd Hollywood. Conservative. Rabbi
Bernard I. Shoter.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi
SheON J. Harr. (4>
RECONSTRUCTIONS SYNA
GOGUE 7473 NW 4th St (69)
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
. NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Or
Carl Klein. Ph.O. Cantor Jacob Dan
ziger. p?)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph p. Kongsley. Cantor Irving
Shu Ikes (37)
HOLLYWOOD
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative Rabbi Max Land
man. (47B)
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1J51 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. Assis-
tant Rabbi Jonathan Woll (45)
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601 Arthur
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
TEMPLE SINAI \ 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi Seymour Fried
man. Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro
Cantor Naftaly A. Linkovsky. (65)
TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St
Hollywood, Fla. 33021. Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Robert P. Frazin
Cantor Phyllis Cole. (47C)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE. 3291 Stirling
Road Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe
. Bomzer (52) .
that the Senate's rejection of hia
constitutional amendment to|
abolish the Electoral Collage and
elect Presidents and Vice
Presidents by popular vote
means the issue will not be
renewed at least in this session of
Congress.
Commenting following the
decisive defeat of bis proposal
which he first introduced in 1966,
Bayh said the Senate vote was
heavily influenced by pressure
from the Urban League and the
American Jewish Congress.
HE SPECIFICALLY men
tioned Vernon Jordan, the
League's executive director, and
Howard Squadron, president of
the A J Congress. They had
testified against the measure in
hearings a month ago held by
Bayh's Senate subcommittee.
"They put a great deal of
pressure on some Senators," a
spokesman for Bayh reported the
Senator as saying. Bayh, who
has been fighting for the measure
for 13 years, mustered 51 votes
while 48 opposed it.
A constitutional amendment
requires approval by two-thirds
of the Senate to be adopted. It
thus lost by 16 votes. This was
the first time the Senate had
voted on the proposed amend-
ment. It previously was blocked
by filibusters.
Opposing were Rudy Bosch-
witz (R., Minn.) and Richard
Stone (D., Fla.)
In the last hours of the debate
preceding the vote that lasted
two days, Levin declared, "This
country desperately needs a
sense of unity." Metzenbaum and
Javits previously spoke for it.
In his post mortem discussion
of the results, Bayh com-
plimented Javits and Ribicoff for
"hanging tough under a great
deal of pressure" from groups
which he said "mistakenly
believe they have an advantage
under the Electoral College."
THE DEBATE was marked
by numerous quotations from
Blacks and Jews on both sides of
the issue, but particularly in
opposition to the amendment.
Among the presentations were
those of the late Alexander M.
Bickel of Yale Law School and
the late Martin Diamond of
Georgetown University.
V.
WE ARE PLEASED
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UROLOGY
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By REP. BILL LEHMAN
U.S. Congres$man
13th District of Florida
Too often foreign assistance to
Israel is considered to be a one-
way street The truth is that
Israel's own foreign aid programs
exist in many of the world's
developing nations. When I was
in Haiti recently investigating
the problem of Haitian refugees
coming to South Florida, I
visited an Israeli irrigation
project and was again shown that
with Israel, foreign aid flows in
both directions
Israel has a history of ex-
tending a helping hand to those
in need. Because the Israelis have
had so much successful ex-
perience in water conservation
and irrigation, Israel has made a
valuable contribution to coun-
tries, such as Haiti, needing
water irrigation programs.
GOLDA MEIR had a vision
back in 1958 when she made her
first trip to Africa as Israel's
Foreign Minister. Upon her
return from Africa Mrs. Meir set
up the Department for Inter-
national Cooperation under
Israel's Ministry of Foreign
Affairs. Under the new depart-
ment, shoestring aid programs
were initiated during the early
1960's to share with the world the
knowledge gained by Israelis in
transforming a predominantly
arid, unproductive land into a
land of milk and honey.
The governments of Haiti and
Israel agreed in 1966 to start a
small pilot program aimed at
increasing the agricultural
productivity of Haitian farmers
in the Cul-de-Sac Valley. A group
of 117 peasant families in-
dividually harvested a few crops
(maize, red beans, millet, and
sugar cane) in one season each
year producing an average an-
nual income of about $80 per
family.
Because the area has little
water, it was necessary to dig
wells for irrigation, the one
Israeli agricultural expert
assigned to the project suggested
farming the cluster of separate
holdings as a cooperative, while
leaving the ownership of the plots
untouched Local farmers would
share the use of the irrigation
pump and thus promote
cooperation. The wells eventually
became a type of community
center for the children to
congregate and play in the water.
PROGRESS WAS slow at
first, but with the introduction of
fertilizer, irrigation, and other
modern farming techniques,
tomatoes, tobacco, and sweet
potatoes were being grown, and
the Haitian government took
over responsibility for extending
credit to the project
By 1973, the village of Baa
Boen was organized into
bonafide credit and marketing
cooperative One measure of
success was the growing scarcity
of children in the fields. The
farmers could now afford to keep
their children in school rather
than at work in the fields.
The qualitative and quan-
titative success of this project is
staggering. The overall income of
a peasant family from one
cultivated hectare was $1,140 in
1977, quite an improvement from
$80 before the project began
some ten years earlier.
INTERNATIONAL granting
institutions became interested in
extending the project and
recommended its expansion to
include 3,000 families in the
entire valley region. The ex-
pansion is now in progress with
some assistance from West
Germany and Holland, as well.
Israel's aid programs con-
centrate primarlv on agricultural
development. The host country is
required to find funding for the
project with Israel providing the
technical expertise. The Haitian
government pays for all the local
expenses while Israel and the
Organization of American States
(OAS) share all other expenses
equally.
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lay, July 27, 1979
The Jewish Floridian and Sho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 15
With
Negev to Become
srael's New Frontier
By ELI EYAL
\Chairman, Department of
Information
lorld Zionist Organization
1935, David Ben-Gurion
to Justice Louis Brandeis
"The great importance of
4egev lies in its being a large
jay stretch of uninhabited
. Here we can dig water-
and create a densely-
ilated settlers' region, an
ctive that is not feasible in
other part of western Eretz
jeL" Since these words were
itten, the Negev has beckoned
| settlers, scientists and far-
rs. Although a tentative push
ithward did take place in the
lies, all in all only a limited
[have responded to this great
Ilenge.
takes a peace treaty to make
"call to the Negev."
\\\ odds point to the Negev
transformed into a region
in physical, social, urban and
I conception.
tie repercussions of the peace
>ty will have their material
act first and foremost in the
ev. But we will have to face
lin risks.
The new airfields will have to
I built mainly by imported
^ign labor. And this may
pg in its wake undesirable
pal phenomena.
miS QUESTION and many
ers were put recently to
non Ravid, chief executive
cer of the World Zionist
[anization's Settlement
lartment. The following
ort by Charley J. Levine, is
gely drawn from his ensuing
Iversation with Ravid, and
i related research.
Jnce again, writes Levine,
ke Negev is a frontier." I hope
|t the Negev dream will
)me our "New Frontier" of
[Eighties.
The next three years will play a
rmatically decisive role in
ermining how the Negev will
[ shaped for decades to come.
arly, the most urgent and
peping element involved in this
nplex development scenario is
el's strategic and military
llback from the Sinai
ninsula which it controlled
Ice the 1967 Six-Day War.
|n the course of 12 years in
ai, an Israeli system of
fense was established that will
be easily dismantled and
treated elsewhere. Yet this is
ecisely the task facing
Jvernment planners in
rusalem today: how to regroup
fectively the men, material and
(frastructure required to
lintain the optimum defensive
sition.
Vhatever decisions are ren-
ted on the military level will
timately be reflected in a
assive plan for civilian
|velopment. Thus the Set-
lent Department of the World
anist Organization (the only
rional development planning
iy of its kind in Israel) and
|her related agencies will be
tively involved with army
anners to achieve mutually
Ineficial priorities and plans.
I ONE OBJECTIVE of the
ttlement specialists is to make
re that bases do not waste
potentially arable land by
reclosing the option of
[ltivating these areas through
estricted" or "off limits" zones.
JA second goal is to encourage
|utually supportive sites for
Mh military and civilian
^velopment. Ideally, a base and
new town can together build the
Mic necessities for any new
^velopment area (utilities,
ads, etc) and can then continue
support each other. The base
can provide needed employment
and settlement incentives, the
towns supplying manpower,
services and recreation.
Top Israeli professionals in
defense, settlement and industry
are already meeting to chart their
common perceptions.
THE FIRST 20 new set-
tlements to be established as part
of a much broader program will
be in direct response to another
Israeli pullback from Sinai that
of several Jewish civilian set-
tlements. In virtually all cases,
those settlers who choose to
remain intact as groups or
communities will do so in the
Negev.
These earliest centers will be
clustered in one compact area of
the Negev. Although the urgent
priority exists to provide housing
and full services for the former
residents of Sinai, an equal
priority exists to map out set-
tlement possibilities throughout
the whole Negev, even where no
construction is contemplated for
as much as a decade.
Officials stress that it is only a
lack of funding, not of manpower
or modern technology that
prevents the development plan
proceeding at a much quicker
rate Even so, of the 100 or so
new agricultural settlements
slated for eventual completion,
fully 30 should be founded within
the coming three years.
The immediate plan entails
significant expansion of the
area's existing urban centers but
no totally new cities for the time
being. The emphasis will con-
sistently remain the slow but
fulfilling process of reclaiming
the barren Negev for agricultural
purposes.
The necessity to reclaim and
populate the Negev extends
beyond the military or the
mundane. It is an historic
challenge that demands bold
thinking and creative action not
only from the citizens of Israel
but from the Jewish people
everywhere.
FOR THE first time in the
state's young history, the Negev
will constitute Israel's civil
rather than military border with
Egypt Citizens, not soldiers will
live side by side. The previous
Zionist imperative of survival
and defense will gradually be
supplanted by the new challenge
found wherever civilization
confronts the desert each
trying to conquer the other. The
Zionist challenge has become a
global concern, that of beating
back often encroaching desert-
lands to redeem them for pro-
ductive utilization. The border
will no longer be an imaginary
line of barbed wire and mines, but
a living, thriving human
boundary of cultural and
economic exchange.
From 1967 until the peace
treaty was signed in Washington,
D. C. in 1979. Israel by necessity
had to use the Negev to look
forward, i.e., toward the frontier
with Egypt in Sinai. Although
the Arava did indeed bloom
precisely during this period, most
other development plans for the
Negev were naturally viewed as a
rear guard type of matter. With
the advent of peace with Egypt,
this perception changec.
Now the luxury of looking
inside is not only possible but a
sine qua noa Once again the
Negev is a frontier. For the
twelve years when it was not,
planners had little alternative but
to accord settlement primacy to
those areas that were indeed (and
in fact still are) frontiers with
Arab states that have not as yet
taken the plunge for peace.
NEW FOUND water source*
will help nurture the plans for the
Negev. Beyond the early phase of
20 clustered settlements, water
today exists for another 15 sites
in the heart of the area, and plans
call for two or three of these to be
built each year. Even as this
process gets underway, the in-
tensive search for other new
water continues.
Will plans for the Negev upset
settlement operations in other
areas? Settlements will un-
doubtedly proceed on all fronts,
but the rapid expansion of plans
in the south cannot help but hold
implications for the Galil, Judea,
Samaria and Golan. As such
problems arise, hopefully new
solutions will simultaneously be
found.
One such solution recently
unveiled in the Galil was creation
of 29 "pre-settlements," built for
kernel groups of fewer than 15
families who will live in
prefabricated residences, guard
sites designated as future
developments, and initiate an
economic program of agriculture
and light industry. These set-
tlements will "hold space" until
such time as budget and material
permits full-scale contruction. In
the meantime, they exist as dots
on the map, waiting.
Settlement specialists hope
that the situation is not perceived
as Negev priorities versus set-
tlement priorities in other areas
of the country, but rather as the
overall priority of settlements
everywhere in Israel compared or
contrasted with other sometimes
competing national prorities.
THE NEAR future of the
Negev remains something of an
enigma, but one saturated with
promise and excitement. One
intriguing question mark remains
the dimensions of Israel-
Egyptian cooperation which will
naturally gravitate to this
particular region. Clearly, the
frequent shuttling of top
Egyptian leaders to the Negev
center of Beersheya
point of potential cooperation
continuously under speculation.
Egyptian tourism to Israel,
when it opens up and expands,
can be anticipated to have a
significant impact on the Negev.
Perhaps even more crucially for
future, longer term prospects are
the possibilities of joint
desalinization works, canal
projects, nuclear energy
programs and efforts to tap the
Nile River's vast fresh water
resources to help irrigate and
cultivate the Negev. Obviously,
these ideas have not as yet en-
tered the serious talking stage
and major topographical
problems will complicate any
such plans yet the point
remains that many stages of
potential Israel-Egyptian
cooperation continue to find their
base in the Negev.
If peace takes true root and
hopefully extends to other neigh-
boring states, Israel's rail
national resources can at last be
utilitized to develop the Negev as
it should be developed. Without
full peace, even optimistic
analysts might concede that
prospects are grim; the Negev
would likely remain one large
army camp, awaiting the promise
of full civilization.
BUT WITH peace, 100 new
settlements can be established by
the year 2000. Scientific ad-
vancements will definitely come
already the research institute
at Sde Boker is exploring new
ways of conquering the desert on
any number of academic and
practical fronts and the
lessons there drawn will not be
lost on other nations around the
globe which face the problems of
extracting the desert's natural
wealth.
IEVITT
memorial chapel
1921 Pembroke Rd
Hollywood, Fia
9217200
Sonny Levitt. F.D.
13385 S W Dixie Hwy
North Miami. Fla.
949^315
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NAME: ________________________________________
FHONE:


Pgel6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. July 27,1971-

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$1 19
^^ 1 DCACT ijTHS W BACKS w*W" raivn -> < in
EYE ROUND ROAST u $2.49 3 uc QT1S. W/BACKS. 3 GIBLET PKGS. Shldr.SfeakiOP.niss_a. 2
BOTTOM ROUND STEAK u $2.29
U.S.D.A. CHOICE KEF FRESH VALLEY
ETIEEFSIACH BOtlOITI ROIHIQ
U.S.D.A. CHOICE-FRESH VALLEY BEEF BLADE e+g*
Chuck Roast ,*139
U.i.W vnvivi mun vii' ti' Biur WIIVIII IIVHIIIl A tfftOO
'Chuck Steak Steak *2f?
Ill COCONUT CMOCOIAT1 CMP.
CCtMMOi
Rich 'n Chips
"UK SOPTIMI
Downy--------
1
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mm. $109>
.....m.
MtW WANT CHAM JTTU Ot MMM .
Kernel Corn SS 39*
IIYNOL05 ._ .
Economy Wl op-, ffi
IACU IKTtA TMKI t XIITT
tVAIM -MIA' 'AUlMAOOM # -rt
n-o. $ 1 49
Spaghetti Sauce'^."1
AiSOt TID VAIMTKS ,
Ragu Classic_____3St %\m
r2
PIOGIISSO
Wine Vinega
AliOtTID VAIMTMS
Royal Gelatin 5
HTTT CIOCKII
Potato Buds
11 oi 1
n>.
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PICS
1A-OI.
....ox
$
1
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t-oi
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Orange Juice.....2
NOtTON ItOZIN
Fried Chicken 2
GtllN GIANT IIOZlN
Corn Cob n>lhs.....*%a.


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IHIA lAtC.1 4B VI
Nectarines 2 ml 1
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CtUNCHT. T1ISH OMIN
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Limes
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10 o. 59<
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Escarole m*0 39*
SUIT 110 (WHOll om r
Watermelon a.cn$219
HIAUMTUl 1 GOOD
Yellow Squash i*33*
a ii a. a ,-( ii a AUTTItMUT Ot
BURSTING WnH
XIICE1 FLAVOR
Southern
Peaches
3*1
PKK YOUR OWN
'PxeJi "&dud $ coconut Ol CINNAMON ^.
Pecan Twirls 2 ^6i 89*
PANTIT PIIM It-OZ. PKOS. IIINCH ^T^.A
Farm Bread ......2/89*
MITII J AISIN HAN Gi INCH A Ol
Acorn Squash _* 25*
u
1
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ASSOtTIO VAIHTM
Dressing
.iAO
AKlTOtM SAUkO
69*
Refreshing
SCHLITZ BEER
Variety Muffins oV. 59*
ASSORTED FLAVORS
LIGHT n LIVELY 0% #% j#ft j/>
Yogurt 3cu0psO9q
Cream Cheese Vt 69*
PANTIT PIIM NAIUtAl SIICID __,
Swiss Cheese -J 99*
*" -*i-cup -. ,
up. AQ<
M COLOIID -
American Singles ; I
..IAITGIATID *,^A
Parmesan CheeseiSt 69*
Margarine.
99
PANTIT IIIW FIII...I. HICII
Assorted Meats S
PANTIT PIIM MAI Ot AO
Beef Bologna____!. M4'
KM i SI KID
Turkey Breast
JONUSUCW
Liverwurst____
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..p.
$199
$|19
29
ITEMS ALSO AVAILABLE WITHOUT TAPES
AT SPECIAL LOW PRICES
TWIN SMftT 'MO
OOUMC SHUT '125
QUtfNSMECT ...'4BS
KING SHtn 'SM
RiG. PIUOtYCASIS hm I tti
KING PWIOWCAMS it* Of 1 -J7S
THIIMAl MANKIT IS*
PIUS SAIIS TAX
KM UK l Of TARS VISIT YOUR NEARBY PANTRY PRKM TOO AT
TO UAHT OUANnTHS MONt SOtO TO DUUHB NOT
HfHIW NATTONAL MICID SAIAM Ol
Bologna________SSt
aVaI
$1
19
Light n' Lively
COTTAGE CHEESE
. -y :-"L.-..!.i'
BAIL PARK-MEAT OR BEEF A ^| AttQ
Franks Knocks &\
FOB TYPOGRAPNKA1

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