The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00227

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJewisti Florid law
I and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
[Volume 9 Number 14
Hollywood, Florida Friday. July 13,1979
Price 35 Cents
Parlor Meetings Sign 68
For Mission to Israel
Community Mission parlor meetings are held
iroughout South Broward to enlighten prospective par-
Bcipants on the Jewish Federation of South Broward's
Community Mission to Israel.
eated from left are Abraham Slifka, Betty Karp, Harry and Helen
Slavitt. Standing from left are Bernard and Ann Anton, Al and
larilyn Ponn, and Frank and Sunny Soifer. Hosts for the parlor
aeeting were Delia and Jerry Rosenberg.
From left are David and Shirley Schloesman, Sherri and Jay Kerzner,
hosts; and Eileen and Melvin Ross.
From left are Barbara and Bruce Schwartz, Sherri and Jay Kerzner,
Valerie and Paul Sussman, and Marlene and Al Finch.
At rear, from left are Alvin and Jackie Wheeler and Dr. Bill Rkhman.
Seated from left are Earl and Carol Morgenetein, Judie Richman, and
Holly and Steve FraJdatern. Hoata for the parlor meeting were BUI and
Judie Rkhman.
Gottliebs Look Forward
To Another Mission
By LESLIE HORN
Mary and Ed Gottlieb went on
their first trip to Israel in 1978 as
participants of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward's
Community Mission.
This year they will lead more
than 125 people to their Jewish
homeland as chairmen of the 1980
Community Mission.
"We were so exhilarated by our
trip to Israel last year that we felt
a strong commitment to make
people aware of what giving to
the Jewish Federation means and
where their dollars go," said the
Gottliebs.
"A Mission experience gives
you many things discovery,
revelation and a sense of self. It is
an opportunity to see for yourself
what has been accomplished by
the Jewish people when their
energy and resources are used
fully and creatively," the Got-
tleibs added.
"We were delighted to be
asked to serve as chairmen. The
entire Mission experience was
fantastic. All of the participants
developed such an unbelievable
rapport that we wanted to help
plan this year's event," the
Gottliebs said.
When asked what they are
looking forward to most on this
year's Mission, the Gottliebs
replied, "every minute." They
feel the group creates a family
atmosphere. "The whole Mission
was as if a family were
congregating on an annual basis.
It makes you feel strong about
being Jewish," they explained.
Besides chairing the Com-
munity Mission, Mary is a donor
vice president, past Board
member and past executive vice
president of Temple Solel
Sisterhood. Her Federation
Ed Gottlieb Mary Gottlieb
involvements include chairman of
a Women's Luncheon in 1971,
arrangements co-chairman for
the 1979 Pacesetters Dinner, and
serving on the Jewish family
service allocations committee.
She is a charter member of B'nai
B'rith A viva chapter.
Ed is co-owner of Merchandise
Liquidators Company, Inc.
The Gottliebs have three
children, David, 13; Michael, 11'
and Danny, 3.
Levin Heads Campaign
Dr. Philip A. Levin has been
named Campaign Chairman of
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward's 1980 Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency
Fund campaign, according to
Joyce Newman, president.
"There is no doubt that human
needs in Israel, elsewhere
overseas and in our own com-
munity represent a vast
challenge and opportunity as we
begin a decisive year." Mrs.
Newman said.
"In accepting this most vital
and demanding position, Levin
will be calling on the leadership
and members of our Jewish
community to accept their fullest
responsibilities," Mrs. Newman
added.
Levin pointed out that the
1980 campaign "calls for com-
prehensive actions to provide a
coordinated network of housing.
community facilities and social
support services for deprived
people in Israel and throughout
the world. We must increase our
campaign support of UJ A-funded
programs overseas as well as our
own local services. We accept this
challenge," he said, because we
are one people.
, "But this goal can only be
reached with complete
cooperation of the South
Broward communities of
Hollywood, Hallandale, Dania,
Davie, Pembroke Pines, Miramar
and Cooper City," Levin ex-
plained.
He said Jews traditionally help
each other, "and in this year of
great need, we must do more than
ever before."
In addition to his new
leadership position, Levin
previously served as the 1979 chairman and Professional
Mission chairman, Shomrai Division co-chairman.
CJF Approves Report
A three-year study charting
the future of Jewish federations
and Welfare Funds and their
umbrella agency, the Council of
Jewish Federations, for the 1980s
was adopted at a special CJF
General Assembly by an over-
s helming majority of the 300
delegates representing most of
the 190 member Federations in
the United States and Canada,
according to Joyce Newman,
president of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
The community represen-
tatives adopted the final review
report which emerged from three
years of analyses and con-
sultations involving more than
1,500 community leaders in the
United States and Canada.
Mrs. Newman said the review
report examines every major
aspect of the CJF philosophy,
operation and objectives and how
the CJF can best meet the needs
of its member Federations.
South Broward community
members who attended the CJF
Assembly included Dr. and Mrs.
Howard Barron, Herbert Katz,
Joyce Newman, Stunner Kaye,
Reva Wexler and Susan Holtz-
Sign Up Now for
Community Mission
include a tour of Jerusalem,
including the Old City, Mount of
Olives and Mount Zion.
The Gottliebs said they expect
this mission "to be the best one
the Federation has ever had."
For complete information and
reservations, contact the Mission
Desk at the Jewish Federation of
South Broward.
Sixty-eight of the 120 available
seats for the Jewish Federation of
South Broward's Community
Mission are sold, according to Ed
and Mary Gottlieb, chairmen.
Anyone interested in par-
ticipating on this journey into
Jewish history from Nov. 1-11,
should make his reservations
quickly.
Highlights of the Mission


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, July 13,1979
I Interfaith Hunger Appeal Helps 'Boat People' I
NEW YORK The Intrfaith
Hunger Appeal, a coalition of
Protestant, Catholic and Jewish
agencies representing the three
major faiths in the United States,
announced that it has allocated
S30.000 to assist the "boat
people" in Southeast Asia.
Simultaneously, it announced
that the Interfaith Hunger
Appeal is receiving donations
from the American public in
support of future relief operations
for the refugees. The three
agencies which sponsor these
actions are Church World Service
(Protestant and Orthodox),
Catholic Relief Services, and the
American Jewish Joint Dis-
tribution Committee, which is
funded in part by the Jewish
Federation of South Broward's
Combined Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund.
THE FUNDS will be used to
provide food, blankets, bedding,
medicines and clothing for dis-
tribution to the "boat" people in
the Philippines, Macau, Hong
Kong and Malaysia. Catholic
Relief Services and Church World
Service are already on the scene
and are assisting the refugees in
Manila. Macau, Thailand and
Malaysia. The Jewish Joint Dis-
tribution Committee will provide
welfare assistance-
Bishop Edwin B. Broderick,
executive director of Catholic
Relief Services and president of
the Interfaith Hunger Appeal,
said, "This is the first use of
funds collected from the Amer-
ican public last year as a result of
the campaign. We feel the many
donors would wish to know how
their donations last fall are being
used on behalf of those who
hunger and thirst in many parts
of the world"
Program Promotes American Aliya
The World Zionist
Organization is developing a new
aliya program for the 1960s to
attract American and Canadian
Jews.
Rabbi Charles Weinberg,
advisor to Rafael Kotlowitz, bead
of the WZO's Immigration and
Absorption Department, is in
New York to promote the new
program, which is scheduled to
be launched late this fall. The
WZO is also seeking the active
partnership and cooperation of
the American Jewish leadership
in the aliya movement
Weinberg feels the "historical
destiny of the Jewish people will
be determined in Israel" He
hopes that WZO's "outreach
program" will instill the same
Long Debate Ends
Statute of Limitations
On War Crimes Abolished
BONN (JTA) The West German Bundestag
decided Tuesday to abolish the Statute of Limitations
Law and continue with the prosecution of former Nazi war
criminals without, any time limit. The vote at the second
reading was 253 238, making it almost certain that the
bill would be adopted at the third reading later in the
evening.
The bill's first reading was in March, when the gap
between supporters and opponents was much narrower.
Only 21 votes were cast here in favor of a counterpro-
posal, which would have maintained a Statute of
Limitations for murderers not convicted of genocide and
racial killings.
MOST OF the Social Democratic deputies voted in
favor of continued prosecution. They were joined by a
relatively large number of Christian Democrats. There
was an exceptional interest in the Bundestag debate
throughout West Germany.
Radio and television stations interrupted their
normal programs to beam the news. Hundreds of people
crowded the important visitors and press galleries during
the debate, including many former concentration camp
inmates. Some interviewed over West German Radio said,
"We have come to be vindicated and to see that justice
triumphs."
CHANCELLOR HELMUT SCHMIDT said over the
radio that he was "highly pleased" with the vote. "It was
necessary for justice and good order.
Greene Receives J.D. Degree
feeling in Jews throughout North
America in the battle against
rising assimilation.
WEINBERG EXPLAINED,
in an interview with the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, that his
group has the full support of the
Israeli government which is
cooperating with the WZO's
development of a computer
system, the computer will aid
WZOs efforts to identify the
needs in Israel.
Weinberg was questioned
about the housing shortage
facing new immigrants in Israel.
"By the time the program gets
going, the housing problems
should be resolved." he said.
He added that programs are
being readied to provide rental
housing for the new settlers by
the mid-1980s.
Weinberg also responded to
questions about Israel's growing
inflation rate, the language
barrier, socialization problems
facing emigres and the overall
hardships of living in Israel
He said that the average
American Jew comes to Israel
with the knmowledge that there
are some serious problems and is
willing to confront this situation.
"ISRAEL HAS a problem of
uncontrollable inflation.
American has a problem of
uncontrollable assimilation.
Inflation will be overcome in
Israel but the assimilation
problem may not be overcome in
the U.S.." Weinberg said.
He also expressed concern that
Soviet and Iranian Jews coming
to the U.S. are rapidly
assimilated into the American
culture.
"Encouraged to come to the
United States, these Jews would
ont only add to the statistics of
assimilation," he said. "While
the elementary rights of
democracy demand they be given
this choice, many leaders have
Michael Steven Greene of
Hollywood received a Juris
Doctor degree from North-
western University in com-
mencement exercise June 16.
Approximately 3.500 degrees,
diplomas and certificates were
conferred by Northwestern
president Robert H. Strotz at the
121st annual commencement.
Greene is the son of Newton
and Helen Greene. He holds a BA
in American studies from
Brandeis University. A the
Northwestern Law School he was
president of the Student Bar
Association, editor-in-the chief of
The Pleader and a member of the
Journal of International Law &
Business.
Greene will join the Miami law
firm of Shutts & Bowen.
Are You a Jewish Working Woman?
The Jewish Federation of South Broward is sponsoring the
WORKING WOMAN'S COUNCIL so you can meet your peers.
This politically-oriented group will meet four times a year and is
open to women of all ages and all professions.
Detach and mall to:
Women's Division
Jewish Federation of South Broward
2719 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
YES I am interested in Working Woman's Council.
N,
Address
PLAN
TODAY
FOR
TOMORROW
Provide for Jewish
continuity and support
life giving programs
in Israel through
a bequest or deferred
trust to HADASSAH
deo in *
For more inlormaiion write
Hadassah Wills & Bequests
50 West 58th Street
New York. NY. 10019
Telephone: (212) 355-7900
second thoughts and have ex-
pressed the hope that Jews from
these countries be brought to
Israel first, and be given the
choice to remain, afterwards.
"Skeptics remain," Weinberg
concluded, "but I believe that
enough brave and principled
young Jews and those who seek
to identify with Jewishness may
turn with pioneering zeal to help
firm the Jewish State of Israel."
WEINBERG was a rabbi in
the Boston area for 25 years
before moving to Israel 3'/i years
ago. He is a former president of
the Orthodox rabbinic
organization.
He added, "It is also
significant that the Interfaith
Hunger Appeal is now receiving
contributions for refugee aid."
Contributions may be sent to the
Interfaith Hunger Appeal, Box
5055, FDR Station. New York
N.Y. 10022.
The three sponsoring agencies
of the Interfaith Hunger Appeal
have more than a century of
cumulative experiences in
planning and effecting relief and
development in many areas
throughout the world. They are
among the largest and oldest
voluntary aid organizations.
Recognizing that hunger is a
human problem that transcends
creed or national origin, the three
organizations founded this
ecumenical nonprofit organiza-
tion in 1978 to mobilize resources
and expertise against this type
human disaster.
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Our staff of Riverside people consists of
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They are people who understand Jewish
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Since 1935, these policies have been
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Friday, July 13,1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
g^ TT ,-. 'Cash Is Needed
Court Wont Reverse Nowmisraei-
Rechtmann Conviction
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Supreme Court refused to
reverse the conviction of Likud
MK Shmuel Rechtmann, who
was sentenced by a lower court
last December to three-and-one-
half years in jail for accepting
bribes from a contractor while
serving as Mayor of Rehovoth.
In rejecting Rechtmann's
appeal, the high court said it was
convinced that the evidence
given by the contractor and other
State witnesses was valid. It also
refused to shorten Rechtmann's
sentence.
He went to jail in February, to
become the first Knesset member
to be incarcerated while still
holding his seat. Rechtmann
refused to resign pending the
outcome of his appeal. Likud
Whip Abraham Sharir urged
him to resign because "I believe
that the legal procedure
completely exhausted."
is
But Rechtmann still refuses to
quit. He said that he wanted his
lawyers to examine the Supreme
Court's ruling and consider a
request for a second hearing.
Sharir, for his part, said if
Rechtmann does not resign the
Knesset would have to pass
legislation that would force him
to do so.
"It is unacceptable that a
member convicted on two counts
should continue to serve in the
Knesset," he said.
"Cash is desperately needed to
meet the ever rising needs in
Israel," Joyce Newman, Jewish
Federation of South Broward
president announced this week.
"We must pay our pledges
promptly in order that the cash
flow not slow down," she con-
tinued.
"Immigration to Israel is
increasing," Mrs. Newman
reported. 'This is something we
have worked and prayed for.
However, because of this rising
trend, vital programs need to be
implemented and this cannot be
facilitated if the cash is not
present At a time when the
Jewish Agency should be getting
millions more, it has been
receiving millions less."
"It is essential that we in
South Broward respond to this
plea," Mrs. Newman continued.
"Won't you pay your pledge
today so that Israel's vital
programs can be continued
without interruption and her
survival assured?"
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Members of the Public Relations Committee of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward met recently to discuss plans for the 1960 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund campaign. Seated from left are
Abe Halpern, Dr. Sam Meline. chairman; and Rochelle Koenig, co-
chairman. Standing from left are Sylvia Abram, Norman Freedman,
Marcy Schackne, public relations director; and Leslie Horn, assistant
public relations director. Committee members not pictured are Jack
Berman, Dr. Bob Heller, Elaine Pit tell and Larry Weiner.
Women Establish President's Council
The President's Council of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward Women's Division was
established to create a better
understanding among the Jewish
women's organizations in South
Broward. Each group offers
different methods and programs
as they strive to achieve the same
goal: the survival and growth of
the Jewish community.
Twenty-five local women's
groups were represented by their
presidents at a meeting recently,
where they agreed to cooperate
fully with each other's
programming. The Women's
Division will make up and
distribute a comprehensive
calendar for all the organizations.
Those who attended learned
about each other through short
presentations on the various
groups represented. "The
President's Council offers a
forum for open communication
among organizations and can
help us all properly set up a
calendar, attempting to avoid
conflict," according to Esther
Gordon, Women s Division
president
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday, July 13,
Strauss in Israel
Robert Strauss, President Carter's special envoy
to the autonomy talks, is now in Israel. Much has
been made of his skills as a negotiator. Nevertheless,
from the start, we were not thrilled by the ap-
pointment.
Strauss may be a latter day Lyndon Johnson
arm-twister and a negotiator without peer, but his
being Jewish is simply too much to ignore in the
negotiating process that lies ahead.
It would be absurd to say, as both Strauss
himself and President Carter have already done, that
his Jewishness is not a Machiavellian masterstroke
maneuvered by Carter to achieve the adminis-
tration's preconceived notions about the West Bank
and Gaza.
That Strauss has elected to accept the appoint-
ment and be used in this way should not be sur-
prising in light of the visit in Israel this week of yet
another American Jew of some considerable renown
Dr. Henry Kissinger.
But Dr. Kissinger's statements in Israel today
are a far cry from his commandments as Secretary of
State for Richard Nixon: one is the purr of a pussy-
cat; the other was the menacing swish of the taloned
American bald eagle.
All of which is by way of saying that, in light of
past experience relevant to such matters, Mr.
Strauss may be expected to serve as an ad-
ministration hatchetman in Jewish drag.
Strike Two Called
The autonomy talks should be taking a more
difficult turn now what with two of Israel's favorite
negotiators in Egyptian eyes knocked out of the box.
Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan's surgery for
intestinal cancer at least temporarily puts him on the
sidelines, and Defense Minister Ezer Weizman has
resigned his seat on the negotiating team. Both men
were deemed, especially by President Sadat, as more
amenable to flexibility than Prime Minister
Menachem Begin.
With three sessions of the autonomy talks
already over and little to show for them, even their
presence was hardly as salutary in Egyptian eyes as
they may have anticipated.
What lies ahead is difficult to say. In the end,
not only are the face-to-face negotiations delicate at
best, but Weizman's permanent departure and the
sidelining of Dayan for an indeterminate time will
make them even more difficult.
And once Carter's pitchman, Robert Strauss,
gets going, the progress between Jerusalem and
Cairo may be bogged down even more.
Helping the 'Boat People'
The plight of thousands of refugees in Southeast
Asia, the "boat people," is becoming a world
calamity. Many compare it to the flight of Jews from
Nazi Germany in the 1930s. There are some striking
parallels especially in the racist drive by Vietnam to
force out the more than one million ethnic Chinese
living there.
President Carter, during the economic summit
in Tokyo, announced that the U.S. will double its
quota of Southeast Asians refugee immigrants from
7,000 to 14,000 a month. But the President must
increase the American share
He must especially see to it that the up-
coming world meeting on the subject in Geneva does
not become another session where a problem is talked
about endlessly, but nothing concrete happens. Jews,
too, well remember the 1938 conference in Evian,
France, where Western nations failed to agree to
provide refuge for Jews from Germany.
"cJewish Floridian
andSHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood Office .M S. Federal Hwy.. Suite Ml. DanJa. Fia 13004
Telephone OTO-9018
MAIN OFFICE and PLANT l NE 6th St.. Miami. FU. Ultt Phone 371-4M6
FREDSHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor
The J e with PtorMian Does Not Cue rentee The Keihruth
Of TIM Merchandise Advertised In in Columns
Published Bi Weekly
Second Claaa Postage Paid at Danla. Fla. M4SO0
fnOShochtl
The Jewish PMrMiM has absorbed the Jewish Unity and Mm Jewish We.kiy
Me mar af the Jewish TeMeraphlc Aeency, Sevan Arts Feature Syndicate, Warn,
wMe News Service, National Editorial Association. American AssaciatMa al
Knflish-Jewish. Newspapers,anal the Florida Press AssaciatMa).
SU BSCR IPT ION RATES: (Meal area) One Year- -i7.se Out efTewn Upon Request
Qaddafi Strong Amin Supporter
IT IS three years since Idi
Amin. Uganda's imitation Hitler
with the wide girth and limited
mentality, helped make captivity
hell for the 103 hostages held by
terrorists at Entebbe Airport, the
wild man of Kampala has been
caged, crushed and humiliated.
Most of the world will rejoice.
But not Col. Muammar el-
Qaddafi, Libya's strong man,
who was one of the few friends
Amin had left when his empire
fell. Responding to Amin's
whimpers for help as an aroused
Tanzania rained blows of
destruction on the Uganda dic-
tator's army, Qaddafi dispatched
1.000 or so troops and a Tupolev
(Soviet) bomber to the fray in a
desperate and losing gamble to
save a cornered buddy.
QADDAFI OWED Amin that
bit of a lift. For it was at the
Libyan leader's request that Idi
Amin had ordered out of his
domain those Israelis who had
come a few years ago to bolster
his economy. True to his charac-
ter, the mad ruler of Uganda, who
had trained in Israel to be a para-
chuter, had paid back his Israel'' .
benefactors in typical coin of the* T\
Amin realm. r'
In October, 1975, as President
of the Organization of African
Unity (OAU), he arose in the UN
General Assembly demanding
Israel's expulsion from all UN
organizations and the extermina-
tion of the State of Israel. In that
season, Sen. Daniel Patrick
Moynihan, then U.S.
Ambassador to the UN, branded
Amin a "racist murderer'' in a
speech in San Francisco.
This served to inflame Amin's
hatred for Israel. Urged on by the
PLO, which kept a large cadre in
Kampala, and poisoned by that
part of his meager education
derived from reading the Pro-
tocols of the Elders of Zion, Amin
offered the Arabs the assistance
of his 12,000 troops "to wipe out
the Jews."
THE DEGREE of his
refinement was reflected further
in his dispatch of a letter to
Golda Meir (then Israel's Prime
Minister) extolling Hitler's
savagery, specifically the
Fuhrer's slaughter of six million
Jews. Had not friends in Moscow
dissuaded him, Amin would un-
doubtedly have gone ahead with
his announced plan of erecting a
statue to Hitler. (His pet pigeons
would have loved that.)
When 20 of his soldiers were
killed as the Israeli rescue squad
dropped from the skies over
Entebbe, his first reaction was to
cry revenge against Jerusalem;
his next characteristic act was to
ask Israeli Lt. Col. Baruch Bar-
Lev, who had helped with his
military training, to send in spare
parts for his crippled tanks.
Dictators with hands dripping y
blood are one of the world's,
oldest and most grievous stories.
Amin comes close to registering
as top prize winner in that realm
Continued on Page 9
New Book Reveals
Nuremberg Trials Questioned
Friday, July 13.1979
Volume 9
18TAMUZ5739
Number 14
ByERICMOONMAN
WERE THE Allies right to
Provide a public trial for the Nazi
/ar Criminals at Nuremberg?
This disturbing question is again
brought to the surface by Airey
Neave's astonishing new book,
Nuremberg
Sir Winston Churchill, An-
thony Eden and other members
of his war cabinet were inclined
towards a summary execution of
the 21 top Nazis. I am glad they
were overruled by the American
and Russian leaders. As Rebecca
West says in the foreword: "The
Nuremberg trial was conceived in
hatred of war, and it was nur-
tured by those of peace."
The trial was not a perfect
instrument. How could it be? It
had to deal with new crimes for
which there was no provision in
national law or international law.
The judges were themselves not
of the same legal background and
found it hard to agree end the
hearings were often incompre-
hensible.
AIREY NEAVE then wo
given a remarkable opportunity.
He spoke German, he had been
captured by the Nazis, he knew of
their interrogation methods, he
had been brought to Colditz. His
incredible escape from that
fortress, just prior to his
despatch to an extermination
center, has already been written
about but at the age of 29 he
was able to serve the Allies in the
preparation of the indictments
against the top Nazis awaiting
trial at Nuremberg jail.
This is not a bitter, violent
book in the manner of Lord
Russell's Scourge of the
British Labor MP Eric Moonman is chairman of the
British Zionist Federation and of British Poale Zion. At
50, Moonman manages to combine intensive Par-
liamentary activity with one of the most important
positions in Anglo-Jewish life.
Swastika. It is educative and
revealing. Thus through the trial
and Neave's visits to the prison,
we pursue the relationship be-
tween the 21 men and Hitler.
Take Hans Frank. From 1939
to 1945, he ruled as Governor
General of Poland. He had a
menacing record. Although
Hitler abused him he adored his
master:
"He demanded 'only one
jurisdiction the Fuhrer s. The
truth is that after his accession to
power, Hitler had no use for
Frank or indeed any other
lawyer. Despite his adulation,
Frank was never again invited to
discuss legal matters with him.
As the years went by, Hitler's
attitude to lawyers became in-
creasingly violent and hysterical.
Lawyers were 'traitors to the
nation,' 'idiots' and 'utter fools.'
On April 26, 1942, he said to the
Reichstag that he 'would not rest
until every German sees it is a
disgrace to be a lawyer.' Frank
had something of the bumptious-
ness and grandiloquence of a
Nazi buzfuz but he must have
winced when Hitler roared,
'There is no one to whom the
lawyer is closer than to the
criminal.' "
FRANK LIVED in a dream
world, pretending that those
principles of law were actually in
force in Nazi Germany which, he
knew, had been abandoned in
1933.
And what of Julius Streicher,
soon to become known as the
Beast of Nuremberg? His sexual.
habits in prison were openly dis-
cussed by the press and in court
"He liked to expose himself like
an animal in a cage at the zoo."
The Nazi war machine was**-
dependent on the factory owners
as well as the fear created by the
SS. A fascinating chapter deals
with the attempts by Neave and
his team to prepare evidence
against the Krupp family. The
Krupp's empire produced guns,
tanks, and U-boats and brought
victory to Hitler in the West. But
that was not the basis of the
indictment.
KRUPP had used slave labor
They had on the premises women
and children brutally transported
from Rumania and Hungary
where they were penned in
night by SS guards and barbed
wire. They were marched to the
factory in that last winter of tie
war, their legs blue with cold end
scarred by frostbite. They lived
on a slice of breed and a bcwl ot
watery soup. At the trial ot
Alfred Krupp it was proved that
they were none-whipped.
And what was the Krupp trieJJ
It lasted from August 16, W<
until July 31, 1948. The
CoatinaedonPasl9


Friday, July 13,1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
r-ageo
1# ^
EEC Strategy
Diplomatic Offensive Launched Against Israel
By ALFRED SCHROEDER
BONN (JTA) The
Bonn government is
launching a large-scale dip-
lomatic offensive in the
Middle East, involving
practically all Arab nations
except Egypt. Israel, too, is
excluded. Foreign Minister
Hans-Dietrich Genscher
intends to clarify German
Middle East policy which
favors a far-reaching com-
prehensive peace settle-
ment in the region.
The overture to the Arabs
began with the three-day visit of
Morocco's Foreign Minister
Mohamed Boucetta. It was fol-
lowed by the visit of Qatar's
Foreign Minister Sheikh Suhaim
Bin Hamad Al-Thani. In the
course of a few weeks, Genscher
has visited Iraq, Syria, Saudi
Arabia, Jordan, Libya and
Algeria.
ASKED WHY he did not stop
over in Cairo and Jerusalem, and
if that was a snub at the Israeli-
Egyptian peace efforts, Dr.
Juergen Sudhoff, a spokesman
for the Foreign Ministry, rejected
such speculations emphatically.
"We first had top-level talks with
Egypt," he said, "and as far as
Camp David is concerned, we are
in close contact with the
Americans and Israel knows our
position quite well. What we
intend to do now, is to talk to
those Arab nations which are so
far rejecting a peace solution. We
v want peace and that is why we
attempt to influence others in
that direction."
The German Foreign Minister
intends to focus his talks with his
Arab colleagues on two major
aspects of Bonn's Middle East
policy: the German government
is interested in seeing unity in the
Arab camp because this is
considered a prerequisite for
peace. Bonn is in favor of a
comprehensive Middle East
solution, which will consider the
interests of all states and peoples.
SOME POLITICAL observers
here believe that this position is
the expression of a policy of
moving away from Israel. The
Foreign Ministry spokesman
rejected the accusation. Bonn, he
said, is trying to stay close to
Israel and Egypt, but also to the
other Arab countries. It is im-
portant that Cairo and Jerusalem
don't stop their peace efforts but
continue.
In that context, the German
y Foreign Minister regretted the
continuation of the Israeli settle-
ment policy on the West Bank as
it was not useful for a peace
solution.
The visit of Morocco's Foreign
Minister is welcomed in Bonn, as
German-Moroccan relations have
always been close and of a
friendly nature.
GENSCHER intended to
assure his colleague from Rabat
that the European Economic
Community's Middle East policy
will be continued. The three-day
talks also included trade ques-
tions and development assistance
as Morocco is among the favored
recipients of German aid. It has
so far received almost one billion
Marks in capital and technical
aid, and there are sizeable Ger-
man private investments in the
country.
The visit by Qatar's Foreign
Minister was a "first" because
there has never before been a
visit by an official delegation
from that Persian Gulf state. By
protocol, the visit was labeled
private, but the number of talks
between the Foreign Minister
and leading German politicans
certainly gave it a political note.
Qatar's Ambassador to Bonn has
voiced the conviction that his
country's head of state, Emu-
Khalifa Bin Hamad A-Thani, will
come on an official state visit to
Bonn before the end of the year.
German-Israeli relations are
rather cool at the moment. For
that reason, Chancellor Helmut
Schmidt does not plan to make
his long planned visit to Israel in
the near future.
THE GOVERNMENT has
gained the impression that
Jerusalem is not willing to
continue further far-reaching
peace efforts and pursue a course
toward a comprehensive peace
solution in the Middle East,
Bonn sources said. That filled the
government here with concern.
Originally. Schmidt's visit was
scheduled for 1977, and the post-
ponement has been criticized in
Israel. There was also anger over
Bonn's critical views on the peace
process. The German govern-
ment regrets that Jerusalem ob-
viously does not consider suf-
ficiently the importance of a com-
prehensive Middle East solution
for the international stability.
The Germans have always
viewed the Egyptian-Israeli
peace treaty as a valuable first
step, which must be followed by
more, as quickly as possible. The
Germans fear that Israel is
content with the first step, and
they see proof for that in the con-
tinuation of the settlement
policies.
CHANCELLOR SCHMIDT is
obviously not prepared to risk his
international reputation for the
attempt to bring Israel and the
other Arab nations closer
together an attempt, which he
believes is doomed to failure at
least at the moment.
The Germans and their Euro-
pean partners believe that an
agreement with the OPEC
countries on moderate oil prices
is impossible as long as the Arab
oil oroducers continue to use
petroleum as a weapon in the
Middle East conflict. This is also
the reason for Bonn's criticism of
Washington that it does not
continue its peace efforts with the
Foreign Minister Genscher
same persistence it has used for
the Israeli-Egyptian treaty.
The Germans fend off criticism
from Jerusalem by referring to
Chancellor Schmidt
Bonn's policies of maintaining
good contacts with the Arab
world a policy, it is argued
here, which has been kept up also
in the interest of Israel.
JCC Events for Seniors
The Jewish Community Center
of Hollywood announces the
following July events for seniors.
Movies are held every Wed-
nesday at 1 p.m., and the
community is invited. "Case of
the Bermuda Triangle" will be
shown on July 18 and
"Hollywood, the Dream Fac-
tory" on July 25.
A lecture series is held every
Thursday at 10:30 a.m. On July
19, a representative from the
local Social Security office will
speak on law changes. Only July
2b Shelley Soloman of Jewish
Family Services will speak on
"The Russian Resettlement
Program What Our Com-
munity Is Doing."
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NORTH MIAMI REACH
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LENDER


American Jewry Plays Major Role in Assembly
Max M. Fisher of Detroit,
chairman of the Board of
Governors of the Jewish Agency
for Israel and honorary chairman
of the United Israel Appeal,
announced that American Jewry
played a prominent role in the
eighth Assembly of the Jewish
Agency in Jerusalem from June
24 toJune28.
"This Assembly," says Fisher,
"was particularly significant as it
commemorated the 50th an-
niversary of the Jewish Agency
which was established in Zurich
in 1929." The Assembly is the
basic governing body of the
Jewish Agency.
"The eighth Assembly was the
largest Assembly ever," says
Jerold C. Hoffberger of
Baltimore, chairman of the
United Israel Appeal. "The
Assembly," Hoffberger con-
tinued, "was the first gathering
of world Jewish leadership in
Jerusalem since the signing of
the peace pact between Israel and
Egypt. United Israel Appeal
leaders, representing the United
Jewish Appeal and the
Federation communities, had
major responsibilities throughout
the Assembly as Chairmen of
Plenaries and workshops."
FULFILLING the American
commitment to assist in the
resettlement and absorption of
refugees in Israel, UIA super-
vises the flow and expenditure of
funds raised for these purposes
by UJA. The Jewish Agency is
UIA's sole operating agent.
Max Fisher presided at the
opening of the Assembly on June
24. Speaking on "The Challenges
of Peace," President Yitzhak
Navon and Aryeh Leon Dulzin
chairman of the World Zionist
Organization and the Jewish
Agency, gave the opening ad-
dress.
An orientation session, in-
cluding a briefing for workshop
chairmen and first-time members
to the Assembly, was held on
June 24. This session was chaired
jointly by Stanley Sloane of New
York, national vice chairman of
UJA, and Bert Rabinowitz of
Wellesley, Mass. president of the
Israel Education Fund of UJA.
This years Assembly focused
on the future tasks of this unique
body which has served for the
last 50 years as the largest
organized expression of Diaspora
Jewry on behalf of the people and
the land of Israel. Three main
issues were discussed a three-
year budget projection, im-
migration and absorption, and
Project Renewal. Among the
leaders representing the
American Section of the WZO
was Charlotte Jacobson of New
York, vice chairman of UIA, who
chaired an important session.
MONDAY, JUNE 25, was set
aside for the Three-Year Budget
Plenary, and led by Melvin
Dubinsky of St Louis, honorary
chairman of UIA and chairman of
the Budget and Finance Com-
mittee of the Jewish Agency
Board of Governors. During the
morning session, Simcha Ehrlich.
Minister of Finance, spoke on
Israel's needs in the
years, and Akiva
next three
Lewinsky,
treasurer of the Jewish Agency,
spoke on the Jewish Agency's
three-year budget projection. The
speaker was Morton L. Mandel of
Cleveland, president of the
Council of Jewish Federations
and a member of the Board of
Directors of UIA.
The June 25 afternoon session
focused on budget needs for
settlement and youth aliyah.
Paul Zuckerman of Detroit,
chairman of the Jewish Agency
Board of Governors Rural
Settlement Committee and co-
treasurer of UIA, chaired the
session entitled "Settlement
Projection and Needs." Speaking
at this session was Prof. Ra'anan
Weitz, head of the Land Set-
tlement Department of the
Jewish Agency.
Following the settlement
session was a session entitled
"Youth Aliyah Projection and
Needs," chaired by Raymond
Epstein of Chicago. Yosef
Shapira, an initiator and founder
of the World Bnei Akiva
Movement, was the speaker.
During the budget workshops
which followed, members
established budget priorities.
These workshops were chaired by
Marilyn Brown of South Bend.
Ind., vice chairman of Project
Renewal; Amos Comay of Pitta-
burgh; Martin E. Citrin of
Southfield. Mich., and Herbert
Katz of Hollywood. Fla..
members of the Board of
Directors of UIA; and Sidney
Leiwant of South Orange. N.J.,
president of American ORT
Federation.
The Immigration and
Absorption Plenary was held on
June 26. In a year of greatly
enlarged Jewish migration, the
issues to be discussed involved
not only Israel but numerous
communities in the free world,
both as sources of aliyah and as
havens for Jewish refugees from
areas in Eastern Europe and the
Moslem world.
RAPHAEL KOTLOWITZ,
director general of Immigration
and Absorption for the Jewish
Agency, presented his annual
report. Specific topics relating to
aliyah and absorption were
then discussed during the
workshops. Jane Sherman of
Birmingham, Mich., chairman of
Young Women's Leadership of
UJA. and Bernice Waldman of
West Hartford, Conn., Campaign
Chairman of National Women's
Division of UJA. chaired
workshops entitled "Community
Responsibility for Aliyah;" Dr.
Sylvia Friedman of New York,
president of New York
Association for New Americans
(NYANA). and Annette Dobbs of
San Francisco chaired workshops
dealing with the topic of noahrim
(emigrants who decide not to
settle in Israel); and Alan
Shulman of Palm Beach
chaired a housing workshop. The
reorganization of absorption
services was discussed in a
workshop.
June 26 was reserved for the
Open Session Plenarv. chaired by
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Max Fisher. This "Plenary in-
cluded a discussion of questions
and proposals submitted in
advance by delegates as well as a
briefing by Moahe Dayan,
Minister for Foreign Affairs.
Dayan was introduced by Frank
R. Lautenberg of metropolitan
New Jersey, president of UJA
and vice chairman of UIA.
The 50th anniversary
celebration was held on June 26.
Irwin Field of Los Angeles,
national chairman of UJA and a
member of the Board of Directors
of UIA, gave the major address.
The third focus of the
Assembly was Project Renewal a
comprehensive social
rehabilitation program aimed at
bringing 54,000 immigrant
famines living in 160 distressed
neighborhoods into the main-
stream of Israel's society. The
Project Renewal Plenary, chaired
by Jerold C. Hoffberger.
chairman of the Project Renewal
committee of the Jewish Agency
Board of Governors, took place
on June 27. Developments in this
program which began one year
ago were discussed and evaluated
from the vantage points of Israel
and the Diaspora Eliezer Rafaeli,
director general of Project
Renewal, spoke from the Israeli
perspective; Philip Granovsky of
Toronto spoke on the view from
abroad.
YIGAEL YADIN, member of
the Knesset, Deputy Prime
Minister, and head of the
Inter ministerial Committee on
Project Renewal, also spoke at
this session. He was introduced
by Sylvia Hassenfeld of
Providence, member of the
Executive Committee of the
National Women's Division of
UJA and the Board of Directors
of UIA. The afternoon was set
aside for visits to Project
Renewal neighborhoods.
The Budget and Assembly
Plenary took place on. June 28.
During this Plenary, reports on
the Three-Year Budget
workshops were presented, as
well as draft resolutions on the
three areas of discussion the
budget, immigration, and Project
Renewal. Robert Russell of
Miami, national chairman of
Project Renewal and member of
the Board of Directors of UIA,
gave the reports and resolutions
on Project Renewal.
Aryeh Leon Dulzin presided at
the closing of the Assembly on
June 28, when addresses were
given by Prime Minister Begin
and Max Fisher. The assembly
clarified key issues confronting
Technion Party
The South Broward Chapter of
the American Society for Tech-
nion will hold a dessert and card
party Wednesday, July 18, at
noon at Galahad West, 3000
South Ocean Drive. Members
and guests are invited.
Proceeds wul go toward Tech-
nion's Scholarship Fund.
At a recent closing meeting,
the following were installed:
Ruth Teich, president; Dorothy
Hodes, program chairman; Rose
Goldstein, membership chair-
man; Ruth Gross, medical and
engineering project chairman;
Ann Blau, treasurer; Elizabeth
Feinerman, recording secretary;
Rose Tulin, tribute chairman;
Miriam Isaacs, educational
chairman; Rose Goodman,
corresponding secretary: Rose
Lewis, Entebbe chairman; Lillian
Kaplan, ways and means chair-
man; Reba Hochman, financial
secretary; Florence Scheinbeim,
telephone squad chairman; Edith
Harrison, chairman of wills and
bequests; Ann Garbelnick,
parliamentarian; hostesses. Sara
Hafter, Reba Hochman, Bea
Kaplan and Blanche Brownstein.
Honorary Board members are
Shirley Fishman. Sylvia Moss.
Ida I.avin. Sally Smallberg and
Rose Lublin.
Israel and the Jewish Agency,
and the resolutions resulting
from the Assembly are expected
to have a greater influence on
Jewish Agency programs and
priorities than ever before.
Soviet Jewry
Update
Ida Nudel Remembered
The outgoing chairman and
chairman-elect of the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry
(NCSJl urged Soviet President
Leonid Brezhnev to release Ida
Nudel from exile and allow her to
emigrate to Israel.
Eugene Gold, who will end his
three-year chairmanship on Aug.
15. and Los Angeles attorney
Burton Levinson, declared, "In
the spirit of good will and
cooperation of the SALT II
accords, we urge the Soviet
Union to release Ida Nudel and
allow her to join her sister in
Israel"
Known as the "Guardian
Angel" of other Jewish
"Prisoners of Conscience" in the
Soviet Union, Nudel first applied
to emigrate to Israel in 1971.
Repeatedly detained and in-
terrogated by the secret police,
she placed on her apartment
balcony a sign that read, "KGB,
give me my visa." That difiant
act precipitated her four-year
exile to the Siberian Village of
Krivo Sheyno for "malicious
hooliganism."
Meanwhile, the Long Island
Committee for Soviet Jewry
commemorated the first an-
niversary of Nudel's exile by
dedicating two benches on the
grounds of the Nassau Countv
Coin, Stamp Show
The Juvenile Diabetes Foun-
dation announces the sponsor-
ship of a professional Coin and
Stamp Show to be held at Holly-
wood Fashion Center on Sunday.
July 15. between noon and 5 p.m.
with exhibitions throughout the
mall. The show helps support
diabetes research.
in
Supreme Court building
Mineola in her name.
In a related event, a special
vigil was held outside the Soviet
Consulate in San Francisco. The
Bay Area Council on Soviet
Jewry, which sponsored the
event, declared the week of June
14-21 as Ida Nudel Week, as part
of the international campaign to
gain her release In Israel, a
group of women demonstrated in
front of the Finish Embassy,
which handles Soviet affairs,
urging Nudel's release
Brandeis Group
Gets Louis Award
The Hollywood-HaUandale
Chapter of Brandeis Women
recently received the Louis
Award and an honor roll for out-
standing service and contribution
to Brandeis for the past year.
Sylvia Simons was president of
the group. The new president,
Katherine Packer, attended the
annual installation when the
group was honored.
The Brandeis University
National Women's Committee
presented $1,010,000 to the
Brandeis Library.
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Treatment of Chinese Southeast Rabbinical Assembly Elects
Compared to Hitler
National Jewish Com-
n^nitj Relations Advisory
Council today called Vietnam's
treatment of its ethnic Chinese
citizens "the Asian version of
Hitler's Nuremberg laws con-
cerning Jews."
In a letter to President Carter
(dated June 29), Theodore R.
Mann, chairman of the co-
ordinating body for 11 national
and 107 local Jewish community
relations agencies, said Jews
cannot help but make that com-
parison when they read about
"Vietnamese citizens with even
one Chinese grandparent, or
married to a Chinese, being
expelled from their jobs, then-
businesses closed, and given a
choice of moving to so-called New
Economic Zones which often lack
water, food and shelter or buying
,ir right to flee by sea in boats
ich are all but guaranteed to
k." He urged the President
"to instruct the U.S. Ambas-
sador to the United Nations to
seek that body's condemnation of
Vietnam's treatment of its ethnic
Chinese" and to continue to use
his leadership to stimulate world-
wide action.
Mann, writing at the direction
of the NJCRAC's Executive
Committee, commended
President Carter for his human-
itarian efforts in behalf of the
ww
Ink
Indochinese refugees, par-
ticularly noting that the U.S.
which has already accepted more
of these refugees than any other
country has now doubled its
monthly quota from 7,000 to
14,000. He added, however, that
"ever mindful of the callous
indifference which confronted
Jewish refugees from Nazism in
the 1930s, we trust that if the
situation continues to sorsen, as
we fear it will, even this number
will have to be substantially
revised upward."
Mann went on to say that the
NJCRAC constituent agencies
endorse the President's proposal
for bringing greater justice to the
admission and resettlement of
refugees through a "Refugee Act
of 1979."
"We want you to know," the
letter concluded, "that the
Jewish community, and par-
ticularly the national and local
agencies we represent, are
prepared to cooperate in any way
we can to help this nation remain,
as she has been traditionally, a
haven for the homeless and
oppressed."
NJCRAC is funded in part by
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Combined Jewish
Appeal Israel Emergency Fund
campaign.
At the recent convention of the
Southeast Region Rabbinical
Assembly the following officers
were elected for 1979-80:
president, Rabbi David Gaffney,
Jacksonville; honorary president,
Rabbi Irving Lehrman, Miami
Beach; vice presidents, Rabbi
David Auerbach, Atlanta, Ga.,
Rabbi Victor Hoffman, New
Orleans, La., and Rabbi Steven
Glazer, Birmingham, Ala.;
secretary, Rabbi Bernard Shoter,
Pembroke Pines; treasurer,
Rabbi Theodore Feldman,
Columbus, Ga.; directors, Rabbi
Alan Cohen, Charleston, S.C.,
Rabbi Edwin Farber, Miami, and
Rabbi Jacob Luski, St. Peter-
sburg; Moras ha coordinator,
Rabbi Philip Labowitz, Fort
Rabbi Ben A. Romer has been
elected assistant rabbi at Temple
Beth El in Hollywood beginning
July I.
Ordained in June at the
Hebrew Union College, Jewish
Institute of Religion in Cin-
cftnati, Rabbi Romer graduated
t h honors from the University
of Michigan.
He will live in Hollywood with
his wife Karen and daughter
Tamar. His major responsibility
will be in the conduct and
supervision of the religious
school and youth group
programs. In addition, Rabbi
Romer will conduct family
services and participate in other
rabbinic duties under the
direction of Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffee,
senior rabbi.
At Shabbat services on Friday
at 8:15 p.m., Rabbi Jonathan S.
Woll will speak on "Everything
You Wanted to Know about the
Single Rabbi but Were Afraid to
Ask." This will be his concluding
sermon at Temple Beth El.
Temple Still Has
Camp Openings
Some openings remain for the
second camp session which
begins July 16 at Temple in the
Pines, Hollywood. For further
information and applications,
contact the temple office.
Temple president Sidney F.
Schreidell invites inquiries
regarding membership in the
congregation, Men's Club, early
childhood program and religious
school. Special membership rates
are available for singles, young
marrieds and senior citizens.
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Lauderdale; Av Beth Din, Rabbi
Solomon Waldenberg, Miami;
vice president Av Beth Din,
Rabbi Max Lipschitz, North
Miami Beach; and executive vice
president, Rabbi Seymour
Friedman, Hollywood.
The Rabbinical Assembly is
the organization of Conservative
Rabbis numbering 1,100
throughout the United States,
Canada, South America and
Israel. It is the rabbinic arm of
the Conservative movement, and
ita members serve United
Synagogue congregations
throughout the world.
The Southeast Region Rab-
binical Assembly consists of 75
rabbia serving synagogues
throughout the states of Florida,
Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee,
Louisiana, South Carolina, North
Carolina and Puerto Rico.
On Law Review
Sandy Sutta, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Bernard Sutta of Holly-
wood, formerly of Coral Gables,
has been named to the Law
Review staff at American
University in Washington, D.C.
She is an honor student and is
working as a law clerk. Sandy is a
recent Phi Beta Kappa graduate
of Emory University in Atlanta.
Temple Beth El Names Rabbi Romer
Air France Cleared in Entebbe Incident
A French Court of Appeals
cleared Air France of any direct
or indirect responsibility for the
Entebbe hijacking of June-July
1976 and decided that the French
air carrier is not liable to pay
damages to the passenger vic-
tims.
The court's ruling came in
reply to a request by an Israeli
couple, Joseph and Lisette
Haddad, for compensation. The
two Israelis were on the plane
when it was hijacked to Uganda
by terrorists.
The three-man court said, "Air
France has no police respon-
sibility and no right to check
passengers at a foreign airport.
The company cannot exclude
passengers from boarding the
plane on the basis of then-
physical appearance. It is thus
unable to take all necessary
measures to prevent such an
incident from occuring."
Legal experts noted that, had
the court found in favor of the
plaintiffs, it would have created a
serious precedent which might
have influenced the in-
terpretation of the "Warsaw
Convention," which prescribes
the responsibilities of air carriers.
After
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The Jewish Floridian and Skofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, July 13,1979
Fedorenko Reversal Widely Applauded

By ROCHELLE WOLK
ALBANY, N.Y. -
(JTA) Walter J. Rockier,
head of the newly-organized
federal special unit respon-
sible for Nazi war criminal
investigations, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that a New Orleans federal
appeals court ruling
against Feodor Fedorenko
would "tend to strengthen
the position of the office of
special investigation."
Rockier made the state-
ment in a telephone inter-
view from Washington. The
special investigation unit is
in the criminal division of
the U.S. Justice Depart-
ment.
The Fifth Circuit Court of
Appeals in New Orleans recently
reversed the decision by U.S.
District Judge Norman C. Roett-
New Inquiries Ahead?
ger, Jr. in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.,
that had held that Fedorenko, a
one-time guard at the Treblinka
death camp, could retain his U.S.
citizenship.
IN A 3-0 ruling, the appeals
court instructed Judge Roettger
to revoke the citizenship of
Fedorenko because he had lied
about serving as a Treblinka
guard when he entered the
United States in 1949. Fedorenko
told immigration authorities then
that he had been a farmer and a
factory worker during World War
II. Judge Roettger had ruled that
Fedorenko's lie had not been
serious enough to justify
revoking his citizenship.
The appeals court held that by
concealing his Nazi past, Fedo-
renko prevented the government
from conducting an investigation
at the time of his entry. Such an
investigation might have pro-
duced evidence that would have
warranted denial of his entry or
granting of citizenship.
The appeals court instructed
Judge Roettger to "cancel the
certificate of naturalization
issued to the defendant" in 1970.
The denaturalization order,
which can be appealed to the
Supreme Court, will presumably
be followed by deportation pro-
ceedings to return Fedorenko to
his native Ukraine.
"IMMIGRATION law does
not allow a defense in a natural-
ization case, that a material mis-
representation was motivated by
fear of what might have resulted
if the applicant told the truth,"
the appeals court ruled.
Rep. Elizabeth Holtzman (D.,
N.Y.), chairman of the House
Judiciary subcommittee respon-
sible for Nazi war criminal cases,
issued a statement in Washing-
ton that she was "extremely
gratified" by the appeals court
ruling.
She alao said "thia is a
tremendously important victory
which will help facilitate the
prosecution of all suspected war
criminals who have found sanc-
tuary in the United States. I
heartily congratulate the Justice
Department and the Solicitor
General's office which argued the
appeal for their fine efforts."
IN NEW YORK, Howard M.
Squadron, president of the
American Jewish Congress, said
he was "deeply gratified" by the
court ruling. He recalled that the
AJ Congress had led a delegation
to the Justice Department in
Washington, which successfully
urged Attorney General Griffen
Bell to appeal the lower court
decision which held that
Fedorenko co'Ud remain in the
U.S. as a citizen. v
The A J Congress also wrote &
friend of the court brief, sub-
mitted to the appeals court,
which argued as the court
eventually ruled that
Fedorenko's false statements on
entering the country were
grounds for revoking his
citizenship.
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Friday. July 13,1979
Day an Leaves Hospital;
Back on Job Shortly
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
[Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan,
[who had a malignant tumor
[removed from his intestines
[recently, was discharged from Tel
lashomer Hospital and can
eturn to work after a short
eriod of rest, his doctors said.
They described his recovery as
['surprisingly rapid."
Dayan was informed that the
jmor was cancerous but had not
jread. His physician, Dr.
joleslaw Goldmann. made his
Dndition public in a television
iterview and indicated that
rospects for a full recovery were
ery good.
[IN A BEDSIDE interview
liblished in Yediot Achronot,
ayan said that had the prog-
sis been otherwise he would
ve resigned from the govern-
ent immediately.
"A public servant in my
ksition must be in full physical
ndition. If he is incapable in
way he must resign. That's
tiai I told Prime Minister
gin." he said, adding "and so I
11 do," had he felt could not
on.
Dayan said, "I demanded that
the doctors tell the whole truth
about my physical condition" not
only because the public had the
right to know but because the
reputation of the hospital would
have been compromised
otherwise.
Junior Tennis
Tourney
Slated at JCC
A Florida Tennis Association
sanctioned, unranked junior
tournament will be held at the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center, North Miami
Beach, through Friday, July 13.
The divisions are boys and
girls singles 16 and under, 14 and
under, 12 and under and 10 and
under. There will be a consolation
round for all first round losers.
Chuck Gately. former tennis
pro at Golden Isles, is now the
tennis director at the Michael-
Ann JCC and the director of this
tournament.
Qaddafi Still Strong For
Old Friend Uganda's Amin
Continued from Page 4
activity. In recent weeks, Am-
bsty International has
Itimated murders committed or
Btigated by Amin at 300,000.
it the people around Yusufu K.
ie, the scholar fetched from
tile to serve as Uganda's new
ad of state, place the figure at
),000.
IS THERE an Amin coat of
b? All manner of sadistic
ltures should be com-
pmorated thereon: the tyrant's
julsion of some 50,000 Asians
had tried to bolster his
fging fortunes; bis penchant
clubbing fellow Ugandans to
th with his own hands; his
as dictator, in the 1975
ition of the Chief Justice of
nda; his reference to Tan
^ia President Julius Nyerere as
award and a prostitute; his
sion for playing off against
i other tribes of his own land;
role in the murder of the
rlican Archbishop of Uganda;
[sinister part be played in the
"disappearance" and eventual
demise of Mrs. Dora Bloch. who
was 75 when hospitalized as one
of the Jews forced to endure the
hell of Entebbe.
If the OAU is meant to
symbolize anything, that
obligation is for each member
state to adhere to the vow not to
attack another member state.
When Amin's forces attacked
Tanzania in the fall of 1978, the
madman of Uganda shattered
that vow. Tanzania, to defend its
soil, had to violate the pledge by
striking back.
HENCE, Amin, the arrogant
President of the OAU, became
the architect of African unity's
disunity. And may world opinion
not forget that Libya's Qaddafi,
in attempting to help Amin by
way of paying him back for the
Ugandan's shameless treatment
of an old benefactor Israel
has had his fingers properly
singed.
Nuremberg Trials Scrutinized
In New War Crimes Book
Continued from Page 4
tecution provided 200 wit-
es, but Alfred Krup argued
he did not know of the
they revealed although
[secretary admitted she could
' from her desk the screams of
[Slave workers, and further-
he said he was expected to
lit the slave workers. This is
itrue: industrialists in Ger-
lv were given the choice of not
ploying foreign workers. Even
er, says Neave, was surprised
a company like Krupp's
Id insist on doing so.
If red Krupp was sentenced to
kears imprisonment of which
[only served five. The
pern Allies then restored him
inheritance. Within a year,
[operations were put together
and he achieved L 83
an worth of business. In
his turnover was L 300
an. The firm has now sur-
the Kaiser, the French
apation of the 1920'a, Hitler,
[ RAF and the triad at Nurem-
; of the head of the family.
SRE ARE major questions
this book throws up which,
tly, have not been faced since
Have we all been so pre-
upied?
[Should there have been a
emberg Trial? Was it, M
> say, merely 'victor's
a"? One distinguished leader
said, 'I accept that the circum-
stances of 1946 made a trial
politically necessary: that there
are certain rules of war: hut these
war criminals of a defeated state
should not be tried in future.'
"If there are to be no trials in
future, how are 'war criminals of
a defeated state' to be treated?
How are the 'rules of war' to be
enforced if there is neither a code
of international law nor a
tribunal? Those who criticize
Nuremberg with moral fervor
should answer these questions. It
is true that the presence of the
Russians on the bench, sitting in
judgment on the SS, after per-
petrating the horrible massacre
of Katvn, adds a certain strong
prejudice against the trial. But is
' it relevant?
THIS IS a powerful book The
question still persists however:
What difference has the public
nature of the trial made to public
tbjnlring and attitudes 30 years
later?
The National Front still
marches in London's Brick Lane-
Terrorism is a flourishing in-
dustry across the world, from
Vietnam to Germany and
Northern Ireland. Planes are
hijacked with a callous disregard
for the arbitrary victims, and so
on. Have we forgotten so easily,
or did we ever take in the
message at all?
Gerald Green (right), author of the teleplay and book "Holocaust: The Story of the Family
Weiss," receives the National Mass Media Gold Medal from Dr. David Hyatt, president of
the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Green was cited by the NCCJ for his "out-
standing contributions to human relations and the cause of brotherhood." Dr. Hyatt also
presented him with a special citation "for his tremendous understanding to the necessity to
awaken the conscience of humanity to the dangers of anti-Semitism and indeed all forms of
religious and racial prejudice."
Headlines
Kissinger Gets University Degree
Dr. Henry Kissinger received an honorary
degree of Doctor of Philosophy honoris causa
from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem on
Monday.
Dr. Kissinger arrived in Israel on Sunday and
spoke at the traditional tribute dinner for the
recipients of honorary degrees and special
awards. The commencement exercises took place
on Monday on Mount Scopus in the presence of
Prime Minister Menachem Begin.
Writing from Cairo, the well-known Israeli
journalist, Amos lion, reports that many
Egyptians desire peace but dislike Menachem
Begin. He quotes a popular Egyptian author as
having told him that Begin is "a difficult man and
a fanatic." The same view is echoed by certain
prominent intellectuals, who have welcomed the
Israeli-Egyptian peace agreement. lion quotes a
leading Egyptian author, who expressed
profound skepticism of possible economic
cooperation between his country and Israel.
Egypt and Israel, according to that source, are
two pauers who survive, thanks to handouts from
foreign countries. Two pauper states, he said,
cannot create meaningful commerce. One
Egyptian intellectual told him that the peace
treaty will transform Egypt into a second Israel
an isolated pariah state in the Arab world.
The intellectuals in Egypt warned the Israeli
writer that he should put little stock in the
Egyptians, who shout peace, peace, peace. The
very same Egyptians, they said, who are cheering
peace today can shout tomorrow with the very
same enthusiasm war, war, war.
The National Conference on Soviet Jewry
(NCSJ) closed its annual policy conference last
week with a statement of principles that indicated
it was "in accord' with the Carter
Administration's approach to negotiating with
the USSR to improve the plight of Soviet Jews.
The conferees at the three-day affair elected
Los Angeles attorney Burton Levinson to succeed
Brooklyn (N.Y.) District Attorney Eugene Gold
as chairman of the NCSJ. Levinson officially
takes over the post from the three-term chairman
on Aug. 16.
Honored for their support for Soviet Jewry
were Senators Henry Jackson (D., Wash.) and
Edward Kennedy (D., Mass.) and Congressman
Charles Vanik (D.. Ohio).
"Hubert Humphrey once again defends a man
persecuted for his struggle for freedom."
So stated Jacobo Timerman, the distinguished
newspaperman who has been called "the Dreyfus
of Latin America" because of his imprisonment
for undisclosed crimes by Argentine authorities,
when he was informed that he had been awarded
the 1979 Hubert H. Humohrev Freedom Prize of
the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith.
Relating this response. Hector Timerman, now
a resident of Israel, accepted the prize in behalf of
his father, who remains under house arrest in
Argentina.
The presentation was made by Benjamin R.
Epstein, executive vice president of the ADL
Foundation, at the 66th annual sjtfansj com-
mission meeting of the League at the Plaza Hotel.
The Health Committee of the New York State
Assembly was commended by Agudath Israel of
America for rejecting two bills which would have
defined death as the cessation of brainwaves. The
Commission on Legislation and Civic Action of
Agudath Israel, chaired by Dr. Bernard Frysh-
man, has been fighting efforts in Albany to
legislate the definition of the time of death, on the
grounds that "issues which are so deeply in-
terfaced with religious and ethical implications
cannot be dictated by government."
The Senate is debating a proposal for direct
popular election of the President, a proposal that
would do away with the Electoral College system
altogether. Many traditional liberal groups and
liberal Senators favor the proposal, which is being
introduced by Sen. Birch Bayh (D., Ind.). The
opposition includes conservative Senators from
rural states and also the traditionally liberal
Black and Jewish communities. These opponents
traditionally believe that the Bayh Resolution
will jeapordize the American government
structure of checks and balances; and that it will
reduce the influence of Blacks, Jew* and other
ethnic minorities that exercise political power
mainly in urban areas.
Israel's Minister of Agriculture, Ariel (Arik)
Sharon, has called on the Palestinian Arabs to
rise up against King Hussein and establish a
Palestinian state in what is now the Kingdom of
Jordan. Sharon stressed the fact that, even today,
30 percent of the Jordanian regime is composed of
Palestinians, while the majority of Jordanian
residents are of Palestinian orgin. Sharon recalled
the fact that the first attempt to transform
, Jordan into a Palestinian state was made in the
year 1970, when Hussein brutally repressed the
attempt because he understood what its purpose
was..


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, July 13,1979
Polite Talk
Strauss in 'Getting
to Know' Meetings
Hadossah Plans National
Convention in Chicago
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The U.S. special envoy to the
autonomy talks, Robert Strauss,
met Monday with Prime Minister
Menachem Begin and the chair-
man of the Israeli team, Dr.
Yosef Burg, in what he described
as "getting to know" meetings-
There were no dramatic and
sensational announcements, and
the feeling in Jerusalem was that
the parties refrained so far from
getting down to the real issues at
stake.
HE MET with Begin for more
than an hour, and as he came out
of the meeting, he said, "I guess
it was a rather philosophical talk
than a talk with great specificity.
I find it very useful and helpful,
and I trust he (Begin) finds the
same." Strauss said the meetings
were but setting the stage for
more specific discussions as time
went on.
Strauss handed Begin a letter
from President Jimmy Carter.
The contents of the letter were
not revealed, although it was
described as a "friendly" letter,
and Begin was reportedly pleased
with it.
At noon Strauss met the head
of the Israeli negotiations team.
Dr. Burg. Burg, too, described
the meeting as a chance "to get
better acquainted "
TALKS ON the delicate issues
ahead were expected to begin
later Monday evening, when
Strauss would once again meet
with the Israeli negotiating team.
Tuesday morning Strauss was
scheduled to meet once again
with Begin, before holding a '
press conference.
Later Tuesday, Strauss was
scheduled to be flown in an Air
Force helicopter over the West
Bank to get a bird's eye view of
the territories involved in the
negotiations.
IN HIS capacity as Carter's
special advisor on the economic
aspects of peace, Strauss met
Monday with Industry Minister
Gideon Patt and Bank of Israel
Governor Arnon Gafni.
In the meetings, Strauss
stressed the importance of
economic development to the
routine of the peace process.
"I am certainly aware of the
fact that as political negotiations
go on, there is also an economic
side to this ... we should hold
talks of the mutual problems we
face today, such as our problem
of inflation and your problem of
inflation." Strauss said he
wanted to check the sort of con-
tribution the U.S. could make in
the area beyond the contribution
of "military hardware."
Gov. Gafni said he was op-
timistic about economic invest-
ments in the region in the peace
era. "With the correct policy we
ran see prospering economies
with a high rate of development,
industrialization ... it will take
years, but it is important to begin
this process as soon as possible."
Campus Anti-Semitic
Incidents on Rise
NEW YORK (JTA) More
than a third of the 90 universities
polled throughout the United
States during the past two
academic years reported on-
campus incidents, the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith considers anti-Semitic.
Nathan Perlmutter, ADL
director, said the ADL logged 50
incidents at 31 campuses, Anti-
Jewish graffiti or vandalism
made up one-fourth of the total.
HE TOLD the ADL national
commission that "theoretically,
bigotry on our college campuses
should be non-existent" in light
of research "that anti-Semitism
decreases as one's level of
education increases."
The survey, prepared by
Theodore Freedman, ADL
program director, was done in
cooperation with B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundations. Also polled
were deans of students, heads of
student government and campus
newspaper editors, Perlmutter
MM
He said the graffiti or van-
dalism, accounting for 24 percent
of the incidents, involved "facile
use of swastikas or other Nazi
symbols and epithets," adding
that a rash of such incidents
seemed to have been "triggered"
by the TV "Holocaust" program
which he noted was "meant to
dramatize the dangers of
bigotry." He listed the cases of
arson, destruction of property of
Jewish fraternities and swastika
smears.
THE ADL labeled one-fifth of
the incidents "political," ac-
tivities directed against Jews
under the guise of anti-Zionism
but considered basically anti-
Semitic. A typical example was a
physical assault on pro-Israel
students at an Eastern university
by pro-Arab supporters, some
shouting anti- Jewish epithets.
The survey found that
evangelical activities mostly
by off-campus groups were the
source of 16 percent of the in-
cidents. Perlmutter said the out-
siders, often gaining access
"through misrepresentation or
by invitation from Christian
student groups," reportedly use
"offensive methods and
literature" aimed at converting
Jewish students.
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Name................................
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9204204 9204114
IMAGE CENTER
PEMBROKE ROAD AT DIXIE HWY
1649 S. 21 AVE., HOLLYWOOD
NEW YORK Hadaasah will
hold its 65th annual national
convention at the Palmer House
in Chicago Aug. 19-22, Bernice S.
Tannenbaum, national president
announced.
"At our last convention in
Chicago in 1968, plans were
announced for the reopening of
the Hadassah University
Hospital on Mount Scopus in the
recently reunited Jerusalem,"
Mrs. Tannenbaum recalled. ^
"Our medical facilities at the
Hadassah-Hebrew University
Medical Center in Ein Karem,
western Jerusalem, were
stretched to capacity with
soldiers who had been injured in
the Six Day War with Arab
patients from east Jerusalem and
the West Bank, many of whom
came to Hadassah to resume
treatment suspended 19 years
earlier when access to Hadassah
had been cut off as a result of the
1948 War of Independence."
SHE CONTINUED, "Arthur
Goldberg, former U.S.
representative to the United
Nations was the opening speaker
and the recipient of our Henrietta
Szold Award, Hadassah's
highest honor. Baroness Alix de
Rothschild, European chairman of
Youth Aliyah, reported on the
famed child rescue and
rehabilitation movement."
Over 2,500 delegates and
guests representing over 360,000
members in 1,6000 chapters and
groups from every state and
Puerto Rico will attend the four-
day convention.
Founded by Henrietta Szold in
1912, Hadassah is the largest
women's volunteer organization
and the largest Jewish
organization in the United
States. It is, also, the largest
Zionist organization in the world
today. Hadassah spends millions
annually for its health, education,
vocational, social welfare and
land-redemption programs in
Israel, and its education and
youth programs in the United
States.
In addition to hearing reports,
projecting plans, adopting
budgets and participating in
seminars and workshops, the
delegates will honor
distinguished guests and hear
addresses by government leaders
and international authorities in
the fields of Hadassah's ac-
tivities health, education,
Arab League Threat
Should be Ignored
OTTAWA (JTA) -
Finance Minister John Crosby
said that "Canadians should not
lose sleep over the statement put
out by the Arab League
Monetary Fund in Abu Dahbi
threatening to suspend any
financial transactions and
boycott Canadian banking and
financial institutions."
He was referring to a report
from Bahrain that the Arab
Monetary Fund, an Arab League
agency based in Abu Dahbi, has
suspended all financial dealings
with Canada to protest the
Canadian government's plans to
move its embassy in Israel from
Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.
CROSBY SAID that he has
asked the Arab countries for
clarification and that he would
abstain from any further com-
ments at the moment. He an-
nounced, however, that the Inner
Cabinet will discuss the matter at
its meeting.
Meanwhile, Roland Frazee,
president of the Royal Bank of
Canada, Canada's largest bank,
told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that "I have never heard
of the Arab Monetary Fund."
youth, and American and foreign
affairs.
Frieda S. Lewis of Great Neck,
N.Y. is national convention
chairman, and Edith Zamost of
Highland Park, N.J. is co-
chairman.
HADASSAH MAINTAINS a
network of medical institutions in
Israel providing healing,
teaching and research radiating
from the two campuses of the
Hadassah-Hebrew University
Medical Center in Ein Karem and
on Mount Scopus in Jerusalem.
Many United States agencies,
such as the National Institutes of
Health, the Departments of
Labor, of Health, EducatjAft and
Welfare, and of Agriculturdjfcave
shown great interests" *n
Hadassah's medical, youth
rehabilitation work, vocational
training, and programs for the
educationally deprived as they
are carried out through Youth
Aliyah and by Hadassah Israel
Education Services.
In the United States,
Hadassah conducts an American
Affairs program which informs
members on vital community,
state, national and international
developments and through which
its members contribute
thousands of volunteer hours to
school programs and services to
the aged. The Zionist Affairs
Department educates and
participates in activities on
behalf of Israel and of Jews living
here and abroad.
Hadassah fosters creative
Jewish living through Jewish
education; and sponsors a Zionist
co-educational youth movement
(Hashachar The Dawn), which
provides a variety of programs
for youth from 9 to 25 years,'''
including seven Young Judea
camps located throughout the
country, and work-study and
summer-in-Israel courses for
American high school and college
students.
CHARLES B. KAHN, M.D. ux#.
DIPLOMATS. AMERICAN BOARD OF INTERNAL MEDICINE
DIPLOMATE. AMERICAN BOARD OF RHEUMATOLOGY
PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION
TAKES PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING
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'Ei't'i'e'i'i'i'i1


y, July 13,1979
The Jewish Ftoridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
Begin, Labor Leadersln Blazing Fight
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
lazing row has broken out be-
veen Prime Minister Begin and
He Labor Party leadership over
iho founded the State of Israel.
|listering exchanges of insulting
itements are flowing in both
tions.
| The episode began when Begin
as asked, in a joint Passover
srview with Maariv, Yediot
haronot and the Jerusalem
jst, about the view held by
any that Ben-Gurion founded
State and he, Begin, brought
; peace.
IBEGIN'S REPLY was that
pn-Gurion did not set up the
ate. Th> Jewish people set it
," for without the struggle by
zel und Lehi the nation would
It have freed itself from the
sign ruler, and the State of
rael would not have been
a ted, and because without the
Hagana and the Palmach Israel's
independence would not have
been preserved after it was
proclaimed."
Begin continued: "BG's
historic role, which I recognized
even during the days of our
greatest enmity, was in his
decision to proclaim the indepen-
dence of Israel, even against the
views of members of his party,
and in his proclamation of in-
dependence on Iyar fourth,
5708."
The Labor Party's "reactions
team" published the following
statement:
"(Mr. Begin's) statement that
BG only proclaimed the State is
typical of the head of Betar and
head of Herut but it is
shocking when it comes from the
mouth of the Prime Minister of
Israel.
"INDEED the State was not
[JA Automotive Division Mission
I NEW YORK A 10-day
lited Jewish Appeal Mission to
b1, especially organized for
lers of the automotive in-
ns try, was announced by Edgar
adden of Skokie, 111., and Victor
I'll) of Moreland Hills, Ohio, co-
lt a irnu-n of the UJ A Automotive
B vision. The mission will leave
ew York on Sept. 9 and return
i Sept. 19.
[ Among the highlights will be
automotive mini-trade show,
etings with Israeli manu-
acturers, briefings by Israeli
nlitary and diplomatic leaders,
>urs through the West Bank and
fiinai and a walking tour of Old
Jerusalem.
"This mission is the first
created for the particular needs of
our industry," Cadden and Gelb
stated. "We welcome the oppor-
tunity of exchanging ideas and
information with people in
similar or related businesses and
expect to achieve special insights
into the enormous problems
facing Israel's people and indus-
trial community in these
demanding times. We further
welcome the opportunity to
travel throughout Israel, seeing
the realities behind the events
and places that fill our head-
lines."
created by a mere proclamation.
Its creation rested on acts of
settlement, defense, aliya and
statesmanship. The verbal proc-
lamation was the result of an
historic decision and of these
acts. David Ben-Gurion and the
Labor movement were respon-
sible for the policy which led to
this.
"It is perhaps worth asking the
head of Herut what did you
(plural) do in these fields? It is
right to demand of him an
apology for his irresponsible
words."
Within hours Begin fired back
a rejoinder. He cited his com-
ments in the interview, and went
on: "The Labor Party claims that
I am rewriting history and
demands an apology. Not only
will I not apologize for what I
said, but I shall repeat what I
said at every opportunity in
writing and in speech. The reason
is simple: what I said was the
truth.
"It is the leaders of the Labor
Party (formerly Mapai) who
ought to ask forgiveness from
thousands of Etzel and Lehi
fighters, from hundreds of
bereaved families, and from the
entire nation, for having re-
written history for 30 years and
for falsifying the truth in our
generation.
THEY DENIED from Etzel
and Lehi their role in founding
our State and called them by the
contemptuous assignation, 'ter-
rorists.' They did so not only in
speeches and articles, but even in
textbooks from which Israel's
children were taught.
%&
$fr*
By Abe Halpern
ADDENDA, regarding the question by
Herman Yorks of Hollywood about the Twelve
Tribes of Israel. (Jewish Floridian and
Shofar,FridayJune29,1979, p. 11)
In researching the answer to another question,
I came across some additional information about
the Twelve Tribes of Israel and the number 12.
As the readers of this column know, I have
written answers to questions about the
significance in our Scriptures of numbers 3,7 and
10. I therefore wish to share the additional in-
formation about the Twelve Tribes and the
number 12 as it appears in our Scriptures.
Following Jacob's blessing of all 12 of his
children, enumerated in great detail in Geneisis,
Chapter 49, the To rah narrative states: "All these
were the Tribes of Israel, twelve in number ..."
(Genesis 49:28). The Soncino Publication of the
Pentateuch and Haftorahs has the following
comment on this passage. "Jacob in blessing his
sons was at the same time blessing the future
Tribes." (p. 187).
t There is another passage in the Torah
narrative regarding Ishmael. "And God said to
Abraham. 'As for your wife Sarai, you shall not
call her Sarai, but her name shall be Sarah. I will
bless her; indeed, I will give you a son by her. I
will bless her so that she shall give rise to nations;
rulers of peoples shall issue from her.' Abraham
threw himself on his face and laughed, as he said
to himself, 'Can a child be born to a man a
hundred years old, or can Sarah bear a child at
ninety?'
"And Abraham said to God, 'Oh that Ishmael
might live by Your Favor!' God said, 'Never-
theless, Sarah your wife shall bear you a son, and
you shall name him Issac; and I will maintain My
covenant with him as an everlasting covenant for
his offspring to come. As for Ishmael, I have
heeded you. I hereby bless him. I will make him
fertile and exceedingly numerous. He shall be the
father of the twelve chieftains, and I will make of
him a great nation.' (Genesis 17:15-20). The
Twelve Chieftains are enumerated in detail in
Genesi8 25:13.
t The Land of Israel was designated as the
inheritance of the twelve sons of Jacob and his
descendants, the Twelve Tribes of Israel. This
Abraham, repeated to Issac and Jacob. It was
provisionally granted to twelve nations residing
in the area. It was the duty of these nations to
take care of the land until the rightful owners
should come. The twelve nations are enumerated
in detail in the Legends of the Jews by Louis
Ginzberg. (vol. 1, p. 173).
According to some commentators there is a
concept that there are Twelve Archangels con-
nected with the 12 signs of the Zodiac.
"ZODIAC: An imaginary broad celestial belt
within which ancient astronomers visualized the
sun, moon, and planets as passing. It was divided
into 12 equal parts, each of which was given a
sign representing a constellation of the zodiac.
The signs are listed in the Hebrew calendar as
corresponding to the 12 months of the year
beginning with Nisatu The first Jewish source to
mention the 12 signs in their present form is the
Book of Yetzirah where they also correspond to 12
organs of the human body. The relationship of the
Twelve Tribes to the signs of the zodiac also has
been noted (Yalkut Shimoni Num. 418). the origin
of the signs is unknown; rabbis interpreted them
symbolically, thus Moznayim{'Scales ) is the sign
of Tishri, the month of judgment. The theme of
the Zodiac formed a favorite theme of Jewish art
and was prominent in ancient synagogal
decoration." (The Encyclopedia of Jewish
Religioa p. 414).
Yalkut Shimoni is the title of a collection in
Hebrew of commentaries compiled by Rabbi
Simeon (Shimon) of Frankfort on Main. The
collection culled from the Midrash, Talmud,
Legends and many other sources some no longer
extant are commentaries on the Hebrew Bible,
the Tanach (the Hebrew acronym of the three
divisions of the Bible: Torah, Prophets and
Hagiographa). the commentaries are arranged to
follow the order of the Books in the Hebrew
Bibla It is a handbook of considerable im-
portance;
The Encyclopedia of Jewish Religion refers to a
passage in the Yalkut Shimoni in which the
Hebrew name of each of the Twelve Signs of the
Zodiac is enumerated in relation with one of the
Twelve Tribes.
Please send all questions to:
ASK ABE
c / o Jewieh Federation of South Broward
2719 Hollywood Blvd.
"Since the Labor Party was
consigned to the opposition, my
colleagues and myself have been
doing our best to put right the
terrible injustice which was done
against the memory of the
fighters and heroes and to
their sacrifice for the freedom of
the nation. And we shall continue
doing so."
In response to this, Labor put
out a second statement saying
that Ben-Gurion's role in Jewish
history never needed the recog-
nition or vindication of Mena-
chem Begin, and does not need it
today either even though he is
serving as Prime Minister.
"HISTORY has already ap-
portioned the appropriate merit
to the Hagana, Etzel and Lehi for
their respective roles and Mr.
Begin's well-known complaints
that he was discriminated
against cannot change the sig-
nificance of the historic picture.
"Mr. Begin is mistaken if he
thinks that his status today as
Prime Minister enables him to
crown himself ex -post factor with
wreaths which the reality of the
struggle for independence denied
him at the time."
Fishing Fleet
Is Barred
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
Israeli fishing fleet of 20 trawlers
is a casualty of the Israeli-
Egyptian peace treaty that
returned to Egyptian
sovereignty.
The Navy has informed the
fishermen that they can no longer
operate within 100 kilometers of
El Arish, including the rich
fishing grounds of the Bardawil
Lagoon, which Egypt has
claimed as territorial waters.
THE TRAWLERS are not
equipped for deep-water fishing
and the fleet will have to be dis-
banded. The Ministry of
Agriculture is expected to sub-
sidize imported fish to replace the
Sinai catch.
The settlers of Neot Sinai, just
south of El Arish, also got some
bad news over the weekend.
Prime Minister Menachem Begin
told reporters that he was unable
to persuade President Anwar
Sadat to allow the settlers to
continue cultivating their
vegetable fields which are in the
area returned to Egypt.
"President Sadat said this i
would be difficult, and we must'
accept this announcement, to my
regret," Begin said.
IICANDLELIGHTINGtl
TIME
7:56
18TAMUZ-5739
Religious
Directory
NORTHBROWARD
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100 W. Oak
land Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Phillip A. Labowltz. Cantor Maurice
A.Neo.

TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive. Reform (44)
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 910*
57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. (44-A)
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 8920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Paul Plotkin.
Cantor Yehudah Heilbreun. (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE BETH EMET. 200 NW
Douglas Rd. Liberal Reform. David
Goldstein, ed.dir.
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9730 Sterling
Rd., Hollywood. Conservative. Rabbi
Bernard I. Shoter.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi
SheONJ.Harr. (44)
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA-
GOG U E. 7473 NW 4ttl St. (49)
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 4U
. NE 8th Ave. Conservative Rabbi Dr
Carl Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob Dan
ilger.(12)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SI NAI TEMPLE OP N OR TH DADE.
IM01 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kongsley. Cantor Irving
Shu Ikes. (37)
HOLLYWOOD
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max Land-
man. (47B)
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. Assls
tant Rabbi Jonathan Woll. (45)
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601 Arthur
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
TEMPLE SINAI 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi Seymour Fried
man, Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro.
Cantor Naftaly A. Llnkovsky. (65)
TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.
Hollywood, Fla. 33021. Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Robert P. Frazin.
Cantor Phyllis Cole. (47C)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE. 3291 Stirling
Road. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe
. Bomzer. (52)
Levitt l:
memorial chapel
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SCHLITZ
Seven-
PANTIT PIMM IIC.U1AI OI PINK ItOZIN
Lemonade___
PANTIT PIIM ItOZIN COfMI
31*01. si
CANS I
Light ener 3conV, $1
PANTIT PIKM IIOZIN CHOPPII OI
Leaf Spinach 4 '..' $1
III OIMIN F.OIIN ASSOtTIO VAHfTHS
Cook-in-Pouchespfoz 39*
6 $189
^L^ 12-OZ.
^R-tT CANS
NEWTON ACRES FROZEN
Broccoli Spears3 $1
PANTIT PIIOI KINO SIII
White Bread 3
MITII S SOU! DOUGH OI __
English Muffins 3 W*l
PANTIT PIIM (11^1 )
Lemon Crumb Pie I
rWty & Zkti TktiqkA
UOHT N LIVHT MAIN ^_
Cottage CheeseJ 59*
LIGHT N' IIWHT IIAVOIIO .
Cottage Cheese 'Sp 65*
95*"
Yogurt eSS 49*
PANTIT PIMM w
Muenster Slices -.^ 79*
PjMMffj
Leaner Wieners "p.0.1 89*
Turkey Breast- iSl *1,f
PIACH PMMAPPII OAIMN SAIAD
IUISCHMANN S COIN OH
Margarine...'.".".?.........nw
STAT N SNAP!
The Big One Jk $1
7
SKVII ILOSS
Sauerkraut. ... 59*
HIIIIW NAIIONAl SALAMI OI
Bologna
tOI. %*
CHOI
Tropicana J
ORANGE JUICE
HP*
IAN6E
PANTRY PRIDE MEAT OR
Beef Bologna
I-IB
PKO.
#140
OR TVPOGIAPHHTAl ERRORS


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