The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00226

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJewistiFloridlam
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 9 Number 13
Hollywood, Florida Friday, June 29,1979
Price 35 Cents
In Jerusalem
Hollywood Men Attend Jewish Agency Assembly
to**
American Jewry is playing a
prominent role in the eighth
Assembly of the Jewish Agency
in Jerusalem this week. Moses
Hornstein and Herbert D. Katz
are representing the Hollywood
community.
Max M. Fisher, chairman of
the Board of Governors of the
Jewish Agency for Israel, an-
nounces that this assembly is
particularly significant as it com-
memorates the 50th anniversary
of the Jewish Agency which was
established in Zurich in 1929. The
assembly is the basic governing
body of the Jewish Agency.
"The eighth assembly is the
largest ever," says Jerold C.
Hoffberger, chairman of United
Israel Appeal. UIA fulfills the
American commitment to assist
in the resettlement and absorp-
tion of refugees in Israel by
supervising the flow and expen-
diture of funds raised for these
purposes by the United Jewish
Appeal. The Jewish Agency is
UI A's sole operating agent. "The
assembly," Hoffberger con-
tinues, "is the first gathering of
world Jewish leadership in
Jerusalem since the signing of
the peace pact between Israel and
Egypt, and will be attended by
150 American delegates rep-
Herbert Katz
resenting 50 federation com-
munities."
BOTH THE President and the
Prime Minister of the State of
Israel were expected to speak on
the challenges of peace. Cabinet
ministers were to brief the
assembly members on the latest
developments in the process of
normalization now unfolding be-
tween Israel and Egypt.
The focus of this year's
assembly was on the future tasks
of this unique body which for
half a century has served as the
largest organized expression of
Diaspora Jewry on behalf of the
people and the land of Israel. The
issues discussed a three-year
budget projection, immigration
and absorption, and Project
Renewal reflect a basic change
in the purpose and function of the
assembly.
For the first time since the
reconsitution of the Jewish
Agency in 1971, the assembly
was to deal with a three-year
budget projection prepared in
great detail by the Finance
Department of the agency.
Members wiD be called upon to
establish priorities in the agency
budgeting, following discussion
and analysis on the criteria which
determine the existing priorities.
Specific topics of discussion will
be budget needs for settlement
and youth aliyah. Workshops will
be chaired by Sidney Leiwant of
South Orange, N.J.; Martin
Citrin of Southfield, Mich.:
Herbert Katz of Hollywood:
Amos Comay of Pittsburgh: and
Marilyn Brown of South Bend.
Ind. The results of workshop dis-
cussions and plenary resolutions
will determine the direction of
Jewish Agency activity in the
years to come.
Special emphasis was to be
placed on problems of aliyah and
absorption in a year of greatly
enlarged Jewish migration. The
issues involve not only Israel but
numerous communities in the
free world, both as sources of
aliyah and as havens for Jewish
refugees from areas in Eastern
Europe and the Moslem world.
THE TOPICS of community
Continued on Page 3
Visa Procedures Okayed | Gottliebs Announce MissionDetails
4*1
JERUSALEM (JTA) A system whereby
Israelis and Egyptians will be able to obtain visas to visit
each other's countries was agreed to during Foreign
Minister Moshe Dayan's talks with Egyptian officials in
Cairo
The Foreign Ministry is expected to announce the
procedure here within the next few days.
A SPECIAL unit was established by the Ministry
here. Under the agreement it will act as a "consulate" for
the Egyptian Foreign Ministry and pass on visa requests
to the authorities in Cairo. They in turn would be expected
to respond within 10 to 14 days.
A similar procedure would apply to Egyptians
seeking visas for Israel.
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward has completed
plans for the 1979 South Broward
Community Mission to Israel,
according to mission chairmen
Mary and Ed Gottlieb.
The mission is scheduled for
Nov. 1 11. Explaining the
difference between a mission and
a tour to Israel, the Gottliebs
declared, "A mission gives you
much more: a total encounter
with our Israeli brethren. It is a
unique opportunity to discover a
people, a land; the State of
Israel."
Stop Trying to Shape Autonomy Talks,
Sen. Church Warns Administration
The mission is open to all
members of the South Broward
community. Fifty of the available
12U seats already are sold, so
reservations should be made
quickly.
The cost of the South Broward
Mission is $750 per person, round
trip from Hollywood-Fort Lau-
derdale Airport, connecting at
JFK Airport for a non-stop El Al
flight to Tel Aviv.
Mission participants will be
asked to make a minimum gift of
$1,700 ($1,200 family gift and
$500 Women's Division gift) to
the 1980 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
campaign of the Jewish Fed-
Mary Gottlieb Ed Gottlieb
eration of South Broward.
For complete information and
reservations, contact the Mission
Desk at the Jewish Federation of
South Broward.
More Parlor Meetings
1 i\
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Sen. Frank Church (D.,
Idaho), chairman of the
Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, called on the
4 United States not to inter-
fere in the current nego-
tiations between Egypt and
Israel over autonomy for
the Palestinians in the
West Bank and Gaza.
"We have a duty to encourage
that process without inter-
Washington's Role
'Clarifications, Have
Happy Outcome
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The "clarifications" between
Israel and the U.S. over Wash-
ington's role in the autonomy
talks appear to have had a happy
outcome. The U.S. reply to
Israel's queries on this issue was
transmitted to Prime Minister
Mcnachem Begin. High Israeli
sources said Jerusalem was
thoroughly satisfied with it.
"The U.S. endorses our
position entirely," one Cabinet
source told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency. A U.S. Em-
bassy spokesman in Tel Aviv
said that if Israel saw the U.S.
reply as endorsing its own
position he was delighted.
American sources appear to
feel that the American reply,
drafted by Secretary of State
Cyrus Vance, should be ac-
ceptable to both Israel and
Egypt. Israel's position has been
that the U.S. role should be that
of "full participation" or "part-
ners" in the negotiations but not
a "party" to the eventual agree-
Continued on Page 10
ference," Church said in a speech
at the annual dinner and convo-
cation of Bar Han University at
the Pierre Hotel here.
HE ADDED: "Admittedly,
the opening positions are far
apart, but compromise is the
meat of negotiations. To try to
force any proposal upon Israel or
Egypt would surely redound to
our detriment as happened
during the one nearly fatal phase
of the post-Camp David talks. It
is imperative that we allow the
negotiations to proceed un-
hindered by any suspicion of par-
tiality. Let us respect," Church
continued, "not denigrate, the
political process in Israel where
major political decisions cannot
be taken by simple fiat."
But Church, noting the
"serious problem" facing Egyp-
tian President Anwar Sadat who
has been a subject of political and
economic pressures by the Arab
world as a result of Egypt's peace
agreement with Israel, said that
it is urgent that the U.S. will
solicit help "on a global scale" for
Egypt.
Three additional Community
Mission Parlor Meetings have
been scheduled to enlighten
prospective participants on the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Community Mission
to Israel, according to mission
chairmen Mary and Ed Gottlieb.
Following is a list of the newly
scheduled parlor meetings. Any
South Broward resident wishing
to attend a parlor meeting should
contact the Jewish Federation s
Mission Desk for additional
information.
Monday, July 16, at 7:30 p.m.
at the home of Bob and Shane
Wolf.
Thursday, July 26, at 7:30
p.m. at the home of Nat and Dina
Sedley.
Wednesday, Aug. 1, at 7:30
p.m. at the home of Lewis and
Ann Cohn.
Family Mission Sold Out
"Excitement is mounting for
the 21 families who will see their
heritage redeemed, alive, growing
toward future greatness; as they
explore Israel from Aug. 9 20 on
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward's first Family Mission,"
according to Saul and Susan
Singer, chairmen.
All seats for the Family
Mission are sold out, and par-
ticipants are busily getting ready
for this vacation to their
homeland.
Besides preparations such as
passport validation and shop-
ping, several mission par-
ticipants have been attending
Susan Singer Saul Singe
weekly Ulpan classes. The classes
are taught by Dr. Diana
Reisman. education consultant to
the Federation from the Central
Agency on Jewish Education.
Ulpan is the technique of learning
Hebrew by speaking and using it.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 29,1979
From left are Boris, Alia and Faina Ekaler.
Russian Family Arrives
When the Ekaler family arrived in Hollywood from Leningrad,
USSR on June 6, the total number of Russians resettled by the Jewish
Family Service of Broward County increased to 99.
Boris, 34, has a diploma in refrigeration unit repair and is a
qualified electrician. Faina, 33, has diplomas in women's hairdressing
and as a dental technician. She made dental prostheses in Russia.
The Ekslers' nine-year-old daughter Alia will be attending
summer camp at Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center and
Hillel Day School in the fall. This is made possible through the efforts
of the South Broward Jewish community.
The Jewish Family Service expects to resettle an additional 72
people in Broward County by the end of the year, according to Fred
Greene, president.
The Jewish Family Service's Russian Resettlement Program is
funded in part by the Jewish Federation of South Broward's Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund campaign.
Forbes Refuses 'Peace Ad'
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Forbes Magazine, a business
weekly which has been soliciting
ads for its fifth annual Arabic
edition, has refused to carry a
"peace ad" that the Anti-Defa-
mation Leagues of B'nai B'rith
sought to place in the pub-
lication, the ADL said.
"We are disappointed that the
ad, in English, Arabic and
Hebrew, which salutes the
peoples of Egypt and Israel for
their courageous, creative com-
mitment to wage peace, is
rejected because Forbes Maga-
zine considers peace to be
'political'," Abraham H. Fox-
man, ADL's associate national
director, declared. He added,
"We even offered to remove the
Hebrew wording from the ad if
that would make it acceptable."
Foxman said he personally
wrote Malcolm Forbes, owner of
the magazine on May 31 and also
tried to reach Forbes by phone,
but the publisher has neither
responded to the phone calls nor
the letter. Forbes is reported to
have left for an extended stay in
France.
620-7449dade
broward 963-2850
Centennial Insurance
Agency
All Your Insurance Needs Handled Under One Roof
5720 Hallandale Beach Blvd. Howard Graham
Hollywood, Florida 33023 President
Marion Salter
Wrf m iiJfi
Post Hoare Shopping Center
4525 Sheridan Si Hollywood, Flo.
Phone 961 -6998
Personal Service Book Store'
Graham Names Goldenberg
Dr. Alexander Goldenberg a
retired Holly-
brook dentist,
has been ap-
pointed to the |
South Broward
Hospital District
board by Gov.
Bob Graham.
Goldenberg re-
places nine year
board veteran
Charles Nelson. Goldenberg
representing western subdistrict
five on the public hospital policy-
making board.
Hopeful applicants for the at-
large seat await word on that ap-
pointment. Vying for that spot
are Hollywood Inc. president
William Horvitz, Hollywood cer-
tified public accountant Morton
Levin, and Yetta Gould, former
member of the city Planning and
Zoning Board and the Broward
County Planning Council.
Though Gov. Graham was
expected to announce all three
appointments simultaneously, a
spokesman said the -at-large ap-
pointment has been delayed
indefinitely. No reason was
given.
The selection makes the first
time doctors will serve on the
South Broward board. The
governor's local screening com-
mittee, responsible for narrowing
the field for each seat to three
applicants, haggled over whether
a doctor might have conflicting
interests in serving. However,
the screeners agreed that retired
medical men might offer a com-
bination of know-how and skills
without such a conflict.
Goldenberg, who served on the
Broward Democrat Health Task
Force and is a former member of
the Broward Task Force for Con-
sumer Affairs, says he'll keep in
mind during his service on the
board that the objective is to
provide the best health care for
the community, including in
digents.
He is active in all aspects of the
community, including the Jewish
Federation of South Broward s
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund campaign.
Rabbi Fischer Heads Florida Hillel
WASHINGTON Rabbi
Frank A. Fischer has been ap-
pointed executive director of the
Get a Second
Opinion on
Surgery
Many people protected by
Medicare medical insurance
whose doctor has recommended
non-emergency surgery may
want to get a second opinion, but
do not know how to obtain one.
To help, the Department of
Health, Education, and Welfare
has set up a toll free telephone
number to find a doctor who will
give a second opinion concerning
the surgery. The telephone
number is 800-325-6400.
The idea behind getting a
second opinion is to assure high
quality care and to reduce un-
necessary surgery, which in turn
should help hold the cost of
Medicare as low as possible.
Medicare will help pay for the
expenses of a second opinion just
as for other medical services
covered under the medical in-
surance part of Medicare.
Anyone who wants more in-
formation about Medicare should
contact his local Social Security
office.
B'nai B'rith Hillel Jewish
Students Centers of Greater
Miami and the Hillel Foun-
dations of Florida, Rabbi Oscar
Groner, international director of
the Jewish student movement,
and Joel Karpay, chairman of the
Hillel board of governors for
Florida, have announced.
He succeeds Rabbi Stanley A.
Ringler, who has been named
national director for community
affairs and development for Hillel
in Washington.
Rabbi Fischer, 48, has been
with Hillel for 16 years, serving
as director at Brooklyn College,
the University of Georgia and
most recently at Hofstra Univer-
sity. While in Georgia, he was
also a pulpit rabbi.
During that period, he was a
member of the faculty of the
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He is president of the Inter-
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utive committee of the B'nai
B'rith Hillel Commission, the
board of directors of Brooklyn
College's Alumni Association
and the board of trustees of the
Brandeis School of Lawrence,
N.Y. He is a member of the
Central Conference of American
Rabbis and the Rabbinical
Assembly of America-
Rabbi Fischer, who is a native
of Germany, received his BA
degree from Brooklyn College
and his MA from Hebrew Union
College, from which he was or-
dained in 1962.
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Friday, June 29, 1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Campaign Leadership Makes Plans for 1980
The Jewish Federation of South Broward's Camnaum Leader-
The Jewish Federation of South Broward's Campaign Leader-
ship, consisting of Hi-Rise leaders from Hollywood Beach, Hallandale
Beach and Hallandale Area A gathered recently with 1980 Cam-
paign Chairman Philip A. Levin to make plans for the upcoming
campaign. r
More than 90 community leaders coordinated their efforts in
different aspects of the campaign, including missions, category levels
worker training, local agency bus tours and calendarization of all
events.
Soviet Jewry
Update
Seated from left are Abe Slifka, Abe Gerstel and Abe Melter. Standing
from left are Solis Cantor, Sam Stept, Jacob Udis and Bert Mock.
a*
Seated from left arc Evelyn Richman, Gns Lipps and Leon Rintzler
Standing from left are laidor Bookbinder, Rom Orszag, Carl Roaen-
kopf, Martha and Nathan Paaik.
Seated from left are Joseph and Irnaa Dentach and Ruth Suss.
Standing from left are Ed Shandell, Dan PoUin, Morse and Ada
Kngelman and Max Ti------
\ f\
Seated from left are Ida and George Schneider and Dorothy Hodea.
Standing from left are Milton Rolf, Kay G. Kaadan. Sidney Hodea and
SamLeveaon.
t i
Seated from left are Ruth Deutsch. Judge Joseph Deutsch and Fannie
Schifnn. Standing from left are Mel Baer and Gert Sciaorek.
Seated from left are Manya Weaaler, Alex Goldenberg and Sylvia
Stem. Standing from left are Joseph Stem, Joe Roae and Lester Weil.
Grigory Vigdarov, a third year
economics student, was forced to
leave his studies so that a univer-
sity degree would not be an
obstacle to his emigration to
Israel.
His family applied together in
1973. His parents were given exit
visas immediately; Grigory was
promised he would be able to
follow soon after if he would leave
his place of work. He was then
employed as an ordinary worker
in a factory producing metal
buttons. Although he left this
job, he was not granted an exit
permit.
The authorities have come up
with two pretexts for detaining
Grigory. One is his past army
service which he completed in
1969. Another pretext is that
Marina's father does not give his
consent. The fact that he aban-
doned the family 16 years ago
does not seem to be taken into
account.
Grigory is forced to change
jobs every few months. He has
worked in factories and as a
woodcutter outside Moscow. He
spent two months in the hospital
after chopping wood as he was
unused to such heavy labor and
sustained back injuries.
Seated fronTleft an Jeanette Susaman. Nancy Brkel and Ben Klein.
Standing from left are Harry Suaaman, Jo Ann Kate, Stephen
Local Men
Attend
Assembly
Continued from Page 1
responsibility for aliyah,
Noshrim (emigrants who decide
not to settle in Israel), housing,
and the reorganization of absorp-
tion services were to be discussed
during the workshops. Chairing
these workshops were Dr. Sylvia
Freidman of New York; Mrs.
Harold Dobbs of San Francisco;
Alan Shulman of Palm Beach;
Mrs. Lawrence Sherman of
Birmingham, Mich., and Mrs.
Bernard Waldman of West Hart-
ford, Conn.
The third focus of the assembly
was to be Project Renewal, a
comprehensive social rehab-
ilitation program aimed at
bringing 45,000 immigrant
families living in 160 distressed
neighborhoods into the main-
stream of Israel'8 society.
Developments in this vital
program which began one year
ago will be discussed and
evaluated from the vantage
points of Israel and the Diaspora.
Robert Russell of Miami will be
presenting all the reports and
resolutions on Project Renewal at
the Budget and Assembly
Business Plenary on June 28.
There was an open sessions
plenary to discuss questions and
proposals submitted in advance
by assembly members. This gave
every participant an opportunity
to discuss any aspect of Jewish
Agency activity in the presence
of colleagues from the world over.
The assembly was planned as
an occasion for the deepening of
everyone's knowledge on the key
issues confronting Israel and the
Jewish Agency, and the reso-
lutions emanating from this
assembly will have a greater
impact on the programs and
priorities of the Jewish Agency
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 29,1979
What Happened to POC's?
The report by Robert Hawke, president of the
A ustralian Council of Trade Unions, that he was told
by Aleksei Shibayev, the Soviet trade union chief,
that the USSR will ease emigration restrictions and
release the Soviet Jewish Prisoners of Conscience
still in prison, has raised hopes in the Jewish com-
munity. Whether they are true or false hopes still
remains to be seen.
Hawke 'revealed the statement to Moscow
Jewish activists who released the news. But since
then, other Jewish activists in the Soviet Union have
said they were told by an Interior Ministry official
that no one had been authorized to make such a
statement.
At the same time, it is hard to believe that a
Soviet trade union leader would make such a
statement to a, foreigner unless he had some official
authority. Observers have also speculated that the
information was given in preparation for Soviet
President Leonid Brezhnev's meeting with President
Carter in Vienna and as part of the Soviet effort to
get United States trade benefits in compliance with
the Jackson-Vanik Amendment which conditions
this on the USSR easing its emigration policies.
Turning the Clock Backward
The point is increasingly being made, and with
growing justification, that the United States effort to
dictate peace terms in the Middle East that are
detrimental to Israel's survival has only just begun.
There were clear indications of this tendency,
not only in the State Department where one would
most likely expect it, but in the Carter ad-
ministration as well, from the earliest days of the
Camp David .meetings between Israel and Egypt.
But as the current talks between the two
countires over the autonomy issue are getting under
way, the tendency now seems to have become a frank
bludgeon of intent.
As retired Admiral Elmo Zumwalt is noting
these days, we are submitting to the crassest
possible petrob lack mail and are clearly willing to
sink Israel and to rely on our capacity to build up the
Arabs militarily as an alternative agent for our need
for an American presence in the Middle East.
This is not only suicidal to Israel by definition;
it is also suicidal to our own best interests by past
experience with Arab capabilities, let alone Arab
reliability in the long term.
Selfish American Motives
The major issue, of course, goes beyond this.
And that is that there is every indication that
Egypt's President Sadat is far more amenable to
settling the Gaza-West Bank autonomy question
along lines favorable to the Israeli position this in
the face of his desire to convince his Arab brethren
that he is pursuing Palestinian demands than is
apparent on the face of it.
But continuing American obsequiousness before
Arab petroblackmail encourages Sadat away from
the more realistic view of the autonomy problem.
In the end, the realpolitik of both Israel and
Egypt has progressed far beyond the selfish
motivation of American foreign policy in the Middle
East. In attempting to impose its own terms on a
settlement, the U.S. is turning the clock back and not
forward.
Why Should Anyone be Shocked?
"(Jewish Floridian
and SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood Office .26S Federal Hwy Suite 208. Danla. Fla. 33004
Telephone 920-9018
MAIN OFFICE and PLANT -130 NE 6th St., Miami. Fla 33132 Phone 373-4600
FREDSHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publlaher Executive Editor
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published Bl-Weekly
Second Claaa Postage Paid at Danla. Fla. 864B00
". fnOShochtt
Tht Jewish Floridian hat absorbed Hie Jewish Unity and Hit Jewish Weveiy.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. Wonu
wide News' Service, National Editorial Association, American Association of
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Pross Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (local red) One Year47.S0. Out of Town Upon Request.
Friday. June 29. 1979 4 TAMUZ 5739
Volume 9 Number 13
"Why is it so bad to be a
Nazi?" Prof. Pierre Maurer of the
Cochinport Royal Medical School
in Paris asked the other day. "I
don't see why anyone should be
shocked."
Herr Maurer, who served with
the Charlemagne Division of the
Adolf Hitler Institute, was
addressing his assembly of
medical students when he laid it
on the line. "I have been a fascist,
and I remain a fascist. I remain
totally for the elite"
HE MAY still be what he
considers for, by, and with the
elite. But as far as the medical
school is concerned, he is out,
removed, fired, sent packing.
And the medical students at the
Cochinport Royal, happy to have
four years of Maurer's teaching
behind them, have issued a
forthright disclaimer: "Fascism
constitutes an appeal to murder.
Racism, condemned by law, must
be fought."
Perhaps we need this kind of
case history occasionally to jog
sagging memories about the
outrage of Nazism.
We had strong reminders in
1977 when an American historian
and a British writer tried to
whitewash the scarlet letter of
Hitlerism. Prof. Arthur R. Butz*
of Northwestern University came
forth with a book called The l
Hoax of the 20th Century in'
which his revisionist pen insisted
that the claim that six million
Jews had been killed by the Nazis
was a falsity, nothing more than
a Zionist plot.
AND OVER in London, David
Irving cooked up a similar pot of
mush in Hitler's War, insisting
that Hitler probably knew about
the concentration camps that
studded his Reich but surely was
unaware that his domain em-
braced extermination camps.
But the Nazi sickness is not
confined to a medical school in
Paris or to the scribblers now
busy sprinkling perfume over
depravity. Extremist German
rightwing organizations ap-
proximate 150 with more than*
20,000 members; ultra-rightist]
publications in the land locked
into Hitler'8 rule 35 years ago are
numbered well over 100.
CBS's hard-hitting 60 Minute*
shot fright into many hearts not
long ago by showing us how well-
entrenched in Paraguay today
are Dr. Josef Mengele, "the
Butcher of Auschwitz," and
Heinrich Mueller, who was near
the top of Gestapo activities
before finding a well-feathered
nest in Paraguay.
And in Paris, Louis Darquier
de Pellepoix, now 76, has hit the
headlines again with his defense
of service he provided the Naxis
as Vichy high commissioner for
"Jewish affairs."
IS THERE no good news than
in this sector of remembrance of
those years of horror? Not long
ago, Israel's ambassador to the
Hague bestowed Yad Vashem
awards on 50 righteous non- Jews ^Ck-,
who helped save Jews at their j#i :
own peril when Hitler's spies and
agents hovered near. And during
the Passover and Easter holiday
season, a program produced by
the Anti-Defamation League paid
Continue on Page 9
if '**Ka!mr.
Palestinians See Cause Weaken
By JOSEPH FINKLESTONE
London Chronicle Syndicate
President Sadat's peace treaty
with Israel has caused anger
among many Arab leaders and
confusion, as well as division,
among pro-Arab supporters in
Britain.
When President Sadat went to
Jerusalem in 1977, the applause
which he received in the free
world was equalled by the denun-
ciations in the Arab world.
British supporters of the Pales-
tinian cause joined in the war-
nings against a unilateral peace
l>etween Israel and Egypt.
THESE WARNINGS were
multiplied during and after the
Camp David meetings in
America. When new problems
arose, and the peace agreement
was delayed (while the Arab
States meeting in Baghdad,
including the "moderate" Saudis,
threatened Egypt with sanctions
and isolation), there was a feeling
of some satisfaction that Egypt
was being prevented from taking
a step regarded by her opponents
as harmful to the interests of the
Arabs in general and of the
Palestinians in particular.
However, President Carter's
dramatic and triumphant visit to
the Middle East, which ended in
an Egyptian-Israeli treaty, has
provoked heart-searching and a
deep reexamination among
leading supporters of the Arab
cause in Britain.
This revaluation had already
begun before the signing of the
treaty. Foremost among those
who questioned the negative
attitude of the Palestinians and
their supporters in the Arab
world and in Britain was Sir
Harold Beeley.
HE WAS one of the most
influential advisers on Palestine
to the late Ernest Bevin, the
British Foreign Secretary, who
followed a pro-Arab policy im-
mediately before and after the
birth of the State of Israel in
1948.
Sir Harold has made clear his
strong pro-Arab sympathies, but
he is a man whose actions are
influenced by practical and
humanitarian, as well as political
considerations.
He noted how often the
Palestinian Arabs had missed
opportunities to gain advantages
from which they could have built
up a strong base, as the Israelis
had so forcefully done.
Time after time, the British
Government and the world com-
munity had made major offers to
the Palestinians. These had been
rejected with contempt and
what the Palestinians rejected,
the Israelis gratefully accepted.
NOW, once again, the dreary,
arid scenario was being repeated,
even though the offer this time
came from an Israeli leader,
backed by the might of an
American President and the
vision of an Egyptian leader.
Sir Harold and those who think
like him have not lessened their
support for the full Palestinian
case, nor have they decreased
their criticism of many aspects of
Israeli policy. On the contrary, it
is precisely because they are so
attached to the Arab cause that
they feel that the PLO leaders,
and Yasir Arafat in particular,
are missing a golden opportunity.
Arafat refused several invi-
tations from President Carter to
change his attitude and to accept
the existence of Israel not by a
dramatic gesture, but by im-
plication, through the acceptance
of UN Resolution 242.
HE REJECTED them all and.
inflamed by the Moslem revo-
lution in Iran, has used flam-
boyant language about cutting
off American hands.
What are the alternatives to an
Egyptian-Israeli treaty? Can the
UN Security Council impose
peace? It has failed to do so for 30
years. Would a Geneva con-
ference, with the Russians taking
a leading part, provide a
solution? Not even the most
naive and optimistic could really
believe that. Does the PLO
assume that a victorious war
against Israel would give the
Palestinians a country? No prac-
tical observer could accept that.
It is this analysis that has led
Sir Harold to the strong belief
that the PLO must abandon its
arid policies. Prime Minister
Begin's autonomy plan for the
West Bank and Gaza is not an
ideal solution, but it gives the
Palestinians major advantages
on which they could build their
hopes.
In his view, the PLO has
totally failed to understand that
President Sadat has followed an p
absolutely consistent policy and
Continued on Page 9
n
*'


Friday, June 29,1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
Brazil Recognizes PLO Hollywood Hills ORT Installs Officers
t
'V
But Delays Office
By DAVID MARKUS
RIO DE JANEIRO (JTA)
The Brazilian government has
officially recognized the Palestine
Liberation Organization as the
"sole legitimate representative of
the Palestinian people" but for
the time being, at least, it has
refused to authorize the PLO to
open an office in Brasilia, the
capital-
Recognition was announced in
a joint communique released at
the end of a five-day visit to
Brazil by the Vice President of
Iraq, Tana Muhyidinne Maarouf.
The communique also stated that
Brazil recognizes "the rights of
the Palestinians to self-deter-
mination, independence and
national sovereignty in their
homeland."
MAAROUF is known to have
urged that a PLO office be per-
mitted in his talks with President
Joao Baptista de Bigeirede and
his aides. During the past four
years, 15 formal requests were
made by several Arab countries
to allow a PLO representative to
function in Brazil.
But according to Foreign
Ministry sources, Brazil will not
permit a PLO office as long as the
PLO continues to engage in
terrorist activites. A PLO rep-
resentative, Farid Sawan, was
expected to present his dip-
lomatic credentials in Brasilia
last week. The government post-
poned that "for the time being,"
apparently because of strong
criticism by the press.
But a diplomatic source close
to Foreign Minister Ramiro
Guerreire, acknowledged that
"Brazil is not in a comfortable
position to deny requests from
the Arabs," apparently a
reference to its need for Arab oil.
Brazil imports 400,000 barrels a
day from Iraq, more than 50
percent of its oil supply.
SAID FARHAT, Minister of
Social Communication who
serves as Information Minister,
and Ricardi Navajas, a Foreign
Ministry spokesman, have in-
sisted that the joint communique
"does not alter anything." They
said, "There is absolutely no
change because Brazil had
already recognized the PLO
through the 1975 United Nations
resolution" which gave the
Palestinian group observer
status at the UN.
Israel's Ambassador to lirazil,
Moshe Erell, said he was con-
vinced that the "PLO will not
open an office in Brazil .
The Hollywood Hills chapter of
Women's American ORT
(Organization for Rehabilitation
through Training) held its instal-
lation of officers on June 6 at the
ftftSH UIMIMU
Emerald Hills Country Club.
Conducting the installation,
which highlighted the World
ORT Union's 100-year "Centen-
nial" celebration, was past
because their offices are caves of
subversion and murderers."
But Brazil's Jewish com-
munity is clearly alarmed. Dr.
Benno Milnitzksy, president of
the Jewish Confederation,
protested the joint communique.
"Thus Brazil started to give
haven to the terror," he said. He
said the recognition of the PLO
and the future opening of a PLO
office "left the Jewish com-
munity anxious and resentful."
HE SAID he feared that "the
infiltration of anti-Semitic
materials into Brazil is almost
certain." One Jewish community
leader observed that PLO agents,
protected by diplomatic im-
munity, would mount an anti-
Semitic campaign.
J\j\j lenillS leaitl ^ Jewi8h Community Centers of South Florida, South Beach
rw\ -pv Activities Center, Miami Beach, recently played host to Trilok Deep,
1 OPS 111 DlVlSlOn who was visiting the U.S. from India at the invitation of the Inter-
national Visitors Program of the U.S. government. As a reporter for a
news weekly, Deep was counting on his U.S. tour to provide him with
information covering such areas as health care, women's rights,
problems of the aging, etc. His visit to the JCC's South Beach
Activities Center gave him insight into the senior adult community in
South Florida. Miriam Zatinsky, director of South Beach Activities
Center, was Deep's hostess and guide for the day.
The Michael-Ann Russell Jew-
ish Community Center's Ladies'
"C" Tennis Team won the North
Division of the South Florida
Women's Doubles League.
Members of the team were:
Ruth Benson (captain), Florence
Alster, Adrienne Anchel, Ina
Eisenberg, Bernice Fine, Shirley
Fuchsberg, Ronni Fromberg,
Sandy Gordon, Sylvia Goren-
berg, Edith Hurwit, Lil Katzin,
Lois Kriett, Dotty Lipton, Irene
Lipot, Joan Myers, Sylvia
Rosenfeld, Bea Rubine, Marilyn
Staffman, Sue Steinberg, Margot
Tabb and Arlene Trachter.
The team was coached by Ray
Mitchell, who also coached the
first JCC Ladies "D" Team.
Their record this season was
eight wins, one loss. They
finished third in the league
standings.
president of the Broward Region,
Jeanne Wormser, representing
ORT District 6.
Cheri Rothschild was installed
as president for a second term.
Other officers for 1979-80 in-
clude: vice presidents, Beth
Ehrlich, Ellen Greenspoon,
Cathy Hoffeld and Carolyn
Kayne; treasurer, Ellen Living-
ston; financial secretary, Donna
Breiner; corresponding secretary,
Gina Saada: and recording sec-
retary, Geri Riskin.
ORT first began its vocational
training in Russia in 1880. Today
Women's American ORT plays a
major role in building and main-
taining vocational and technical
schools throughout the world. In
24 countries, 75.000 students are
preparing in such fields as elec-
tronics, computer science and
dress designing.
Locally, in the South Broward
area, ORT comprises 21 chapters
representing over 3,000 women.
For more information regarding
membership and activities call
the ORT Region offirp
Children Invited
Boys and girls ages six and up
are invited to design a dinner mat
for a favorite pet at the Holly-
wood Branch Library, 26th Ave.
and Hollywood Blvd., on Satur-
day, June 30, from 2 to 3 p.m.
II
Halpert,
Oberst
and
Company
12S01. HalaaM* kadi IM.
EnmM
HMMMMO, rlB.
Hrfliiiili 4M-0U1
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Mtr Mm IfI md
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STATE OF
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WE'RE SPECIALISTS IN
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TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
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Having a
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to invite
the great
taste of
Maxwell
House*
Coffee.
r
Maxwell House* Coffee has that rich,
satisfying taste, brewed to be remem-
bered. Serve it with sable and white-
fish salad or whatever the Cousins'
Club enjoys noshing. Smart Cousins'
Club hostesses have been serving it for
over half a century.
K
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A living tradition in Jewish homes for more than half a century.


Page 6
IheJeirisriflohdiah'dnaanojar'oi irreuivt .Mvuyuw**
PANTRV PRIDE PRESENTS ...
SHEETS
i PILLOW CASES
THEY'RE
r SOMETHING TO
PUT TOUR BUDGET iju HI ill/FTC
TO REST! jffP BLANKETS
\llST FOR SAVING YOUR
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START
SpW i* fi ftf *** 7*tC "JhUfcp Saute*'
ITEMS nNKTAPtS MUMMO
TWIN SHEET hat o* pittio DOUBLE SHEET hat o pitted 250 '325
QUEEN SHEET hat o. prmo '450
KING SHEET fiat o. pittio '550
REGULAR PILLOW CASE W* t KING PILLOW CASE rm.OM. THERMAL BLANKET *W.US SALES TAX 225 275 250
FIRST QUALITY *N0 IRREGULARS
RESALE 0
FLAT or FITTED
SHEETS
WRINKLE RESISTANT MACHINE WASHABLE I
NO IRONING*TUMBLE DRY
MATCHING
pillo* ww
I1AJUH1
REGULAR OR
KING SIZE
65% Polyester 35% Cotton
AVAILABLE IN
3 BEAUTIFUL COLORS:
OPALINE BLUE
SUNBEAM YELLOW
RICE PAPER
SCf DISPLAY IN YOUK NtAMY
f ANTKY PMM STORE
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Non-All organic
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THERMAL BLANKET 5-2T
OFFER 600D JUNE 28
thru OCT. 17, 1979,
At all Pantry Prides from
Ft. Pierce to Key West
)
Jit
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GUAM 'A FIOZIN IOCKINGHAM
* # ? ii.
Roasting Chickens ,. 69<
GlAM IIOIIN n f, |
Cornish Hens ......_. 99*
i...............a:
HA. Ot SHIPPIO PIIMIUM FIISH FITII 'Alls
Pick 'O' the Chick .. >
WUAST WITH KISS THIGHS DRUMSTICKS
U S-U-AJ FtISH VAUIY US.DA CHOKI Sill
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PURCHASE THEM INDIVIDUALLY
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DINNER PLATES.......ach $2.02
CUPS................iach$1.19
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CSRPUTER PIECEJ USB M SUE
OPPIR OOOO TMIU WED JUIT 4.1*71
I'l
FRESH VALLEY U.S.D.A. CHOICE BEEF BLADE
Chuck Roast
Rib Steak .oNct/sT i*. *3 fSS!SPmtmSm'mm $i
f.ishv.u.tuscho.c.m.f.ouno C!lU BOTTOM MUM -- OUKM-N-IAST
Roast or Steak *.. $1" Beef Patties--------_?i$649
^
Perrier Water 4 SSS**!79
29<
Potted Meat
Iced Tea Mix___Sfit %2"
IINOSAT SMAll
Pitted Olives___58; 79*
GUIAT rot SNACKS _
ChiAt-atSX-JBt 75*
UNSWMTSNW ..-. ^ .
Kool Aidj&S2 S& 25*
OPEN PIT ^ .
BBQ Sauce_____SS? 67*
NOITHEIN AllOITID VAIIITIII
Bath Tissue
CONCINTIATID F1HK SOfTENM
Sta-Puf_____________bOTTU
iTiniiMOvii
Ajax Cleanser ISS? 34*
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t. $1 07
cashmim souawai
Bath Soap
* -
4P.G 0O<
(M>M.)V'
SAiAD sin FM IFPI
Tomatoes....6 mTe 55*
IIIIT 110 SWIll IAIING WHOU
Watermelons CH 1
39*
CIIPSY FIISH IITTUCI
Romaine...
GAIMNIIISHCIISP IID,
Radishes. 2r..V25*
HCALTHf UL ANO GOOO YELLOW
Squash-
Southern
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l.35*
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CaUNKNT FRISH GRIIN
-. F-K" YOUR OWN
Peppers-----------.ta
SUMMIITIMI IS UM1TIMI SEEDLESS *^J^*
Flo. Limes 10.o. 69*
ASSCHIIO VAIMIFIS WALBSN SALAD
r I lOW IMlOOI LNHITNUVttT
Dressings...l ,.. 89' Yogurt
IIAUTHUl IUNCH Ol ASSOtTSB COLO* iMm w UVUY
$lw Low Fat Milk oalIoh 95*
._. Assoane MMNM -_
Cheese Curls5S 79* Cheese Dips____^ $105
4 2S99*
ASSOITIO
riAveas
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Of IKKXIS SNACK HAST TO I AI
ieese Curls "i
15AOT TO 1AT ANO GOOO
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LUNCH MEATS ( CHEESE SLICED TO ORDER.
JAC PAC USDA CHOICE
Roast $499
Beef /ar
f.
1
ijbiioitf<~" x.4"* oisn too lauiT riAvoaio -baab^j
^te^^PopCorn Assorted Drinksco% 99*
I AIT ASSOITIO COCKTAH
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lANniVPMM
Drink Mixe--S2?99
pantiy mat coffti .,,-gt
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PANTIT NM ^.1}**
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PANTIT PIMM IIS. O* MM NMM. "
Marshmallows 39
PANTIT MM .UaVCOTR
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pant., p.- "**-.4Mtw4M.-jro
Detergenttomi #?
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PANTIT PIKN MMMMI M
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Mil PAR MIAT OR Mil
Franks Knocks J& $1**
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PANTIT Pilot MAT OR
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tLAMHSN SPtAI M MM
Pickles__________Sk M,f
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m Lemonade
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3 vst *1
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Page 8
The Jewish Fbridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 29,1979
Texas U. Squabbles Over Jewish Prof As Dept. Head
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The American Jewish Com-
mittee said it is closely
watching a dispute at the
University of Texas at
Austin over the proposed
appointment of an Israeli-
born historian to the uni-
versity's Center for Middle
Eastern Studies this faD.
The squabble, which has been
going on for a month, started
when the university's history
department recommended that
the Center appoint Abraham
Marcus, a 31 -year-old Tel Aviv
University graduate now com-
pleting work on a doctorate at
Columbia University. The pro-
posal calls for Marcus, whose
field is modern Arab history, to
be appointed jointly to the
history department and the
Center.
THE CENTER rejected the
proposal saying that Marcus is
not qualified for the position
which includes supervision of
advanced graduate students and
running the Center's freshman
program.
The history faculty, which was
asked by the Center to find a his-
torian, maintains that Marcus is
a qualified scholar of great
promise.
This view is shared by Ira
Silverman, who, as director of the
special programs for the AJCom-
mittee, heads a project urging
American colleges and univer-
sities to establish guidelines in
accepting grants and other funds
from foreign countries. The
University of Texas Center is
partially supported by funds
from Arab governments.
SILVERMAN told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that it would
be "shocking" if Marcus or any
other qualified applicant was
denied an academic position
because of national origin. He
said he believes Marcus "is well
qualified" for the position.
At the university, a com-
promise is being mentioned
which would have Marcus ap-
pointed to the history faculty but
not to the Center. Silverman said
that while this could be ac-
Jackson Demands Soviet Straight Talk
Bv JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Sen. Henry M.
Jackson (D., Wash.), co-
author of the Jackson-
Vanik Amendment, has
demanded "a firm commit-
ment to freer emigration
from the Soviets them-
selves" before the U.S.
eases its present restric-
tions on trade and financial
benefits to the Soviet
Union.
In a speech prepared for
delivery at a dinner
meeting of the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry
at the Shoreham Hotel
here, Jackson declared,
"without the assurances
the law requires, we will
have no way of knowing
what to expect from the
Soviets in the future."
JACKSON spelled out his view
of specific assurances from the
Soviet government just a week
before President Carter and
Soviet President Leonid Brezh-
nev met in Vienna to sign the
SALT II pact. Soviet emigration
practices and the Kremlin's
desire for U.S. trade benefits,
including Most Favored Nation
treatment, were major topics of
discussion.
Jackson noted, "We have seen
how cruel and capricious their
(the Soviet) emigration policies
can be, sometimes separating
parents from children or
husbands from wives, sometimes
permitting the numbers to rise,
sometimes holding them down."
He referred to the Soviet
education tax intended to bring
emigration to a halt and the trials
"designed to intimidate would-be
applicants and imprison those
brave enough to resist."
JACKSON added, "We have
seen enough in short to know
that without a firm commitment
to freer emigration from the
Soviets themselves, any con-
cessions on trade or credits would
be leaping in the dark with con-
sequences for the prisoners and
refuseniks and all who desire to
emigrate that cannot be
foreseen."
In his prepared remarks,
Jackson said, "In the struggle of
the Soviet Jews to obtain their
freedom, we have come a long
way. We have a long way yet to
go. Together we will bring home
the refuseniks and the prisoners
and the thousands who have
applied to leave but have not yet
received their visas and the
thousands more who would apply
if they believed that their families
would be safe from retaliation
and harassment."
Jackson assailed Carter Ad-
ministration officials "who have
recently embraced the notion of
even-handedness" noting that
they think the U.S. should
provide benefits to the Soviets
because they are ready to give
them to China.
JACKSON said the Soviet
Union has "chosen not to con-
form" to the Trade Reform Act of
1974 of which the Jackson
Amendment is a part. "As of now
the Soviets have not given us"
the assurances of "letting people
leave without harassment,
without intimidation, without
punitive action.

\
difference tt *
All Sunshine cookies and crackers are baked with 100% vegetable shortening.
ceptable it would "highlight the
moral bankruptcy" of having
academic decisions made for
political reasons.
He added that if the university
fails to appoint Marcus it would
be "selling out cheap." He noted
that the University of Texas is
one of the richest universities in
the country with a steady in-
fusion of Texas oil money. The
Center reportedly receives about
$100,000 a year from Arab
governments.
Silverman stressed that Mar-
cus has not engaged in the public
controversy over the appoint-
ment and is waiting for it to go
through "channels."
IN PROPOSING guidelines
for schools receiving foreign
money last March, Silverma3>
said that some programs dis-
played an anti-Israel slant, were,,
funded with the provision that
Middle East studies not include
Israel, or that Jews be excluded
as instructors or students.
The AJCommittee guidelines,
which were aimed at preventing
universities and colleges from
agreeing to discriminatory
practices or biased courses when
accepting foreign money, went to
187 schools, including the
University of Texas. Silverman
said the University of Texas had
not approved the guidelines as
yet but has been approached by
AJCommittee chapters in the
area.
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U June 29,1979
The Jewish Flaridian and S ho far ofGreater Hollywood
Page 9
Palestinians See Their
\Cause Being Weakened
Continued from Page 4
I the overwhelming support of
[Egyptian people.
lor can Arafat be satisfied
what happened at the
id Baghdad conference,
he apparently triumphed,
the Saudis and Jordanians
ing in a call to boycott
lident Sadat.
Jose observers of the Arab
ne are convinced that the
estinian issue played a
ondary role in the decisions.
remost in the minds of the
Rb leaders were national con-
erations and rivalries.
J SYRIANS were annoyed
! Sadat had dashed their
i for a Greater Syria as the
raid for intervention in
banon. Iraq was appalled by
j events in Iran and hurriedly
ide peace with the Syrians. The
ludis, equally fearful of the
knian upheaval, saw an ad-
tional danger from an Iraqi
Vian block.
rhe Jordanians, closely tied to
Saudis, accepted their lead.
Saudis joined the Syrians
i reluctance and are unlikely
put off all aid to Earvot.
an Arab world where
es plav such a dominant
e, the Palestinians seem bent
lin on self-destructive
usions. There are signs that,
n among sharp critics of the
yptian-Israeli treaty, there is a
vning realization that the
~stinians will have to revise
r attitude.
)R EXAMPLE, the strongly
j-Arab Robert Stephens has
ked in The Observer: "Would
| the Palestinians, in par-
ular, be wiser to forego revenge
ainst Mr. Sadat and con-
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centrate on making constructive
proposals of their own for a nego-
tiated peace?"
Unfortunately, Arafat and his
henchmen are blind to argument.
Nor is it helpful that so many
leading members of the Council
for the Advancement of Arab-
British Understanding have
retained a basically unfruitful
and carping attitude and that the
voice of Sir Harold Beeley is in a
minority.
Nevertheless, for the first time,
there are hopes that, not only in
Britain but also among the
Palestinians themselves, an
appreciation is dawning that it is
time to move away from the
suicidal policies of Arafat
towards reconciliation and
progress as proposed by Sadat.
Why Should
Anyone
Be Shocked?
Continued from Page 4
merited honor to Christian
clergymen and other heroic non-
Jews who proved fealty to their
faith by rescuing and sheltering
Jews when the Gestapo sought
them out.
Beyond that, there has come
the welcome announcement that
a fight led by Rep. Elizabeth
Holtzman, chairwoman of the
House Subcommittee on
Immigration, Refugees, and
International Law, has convinced
the U.S. Department of Justice
that the full $2 million plus
authorized by Congress for
cracking down on Nazi war
criminals abroad in the United
States will all be put to work.
Until this break came, only
$900,000 of that fund had been
made available to the Special
Litigation Unit of the
Immigration and Naturalization
Service for that important
purpose-
Duplicate Bridge
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Joan Lavin is director.
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139
Will Reds Keep Vow?
Aussies Hope They Will on POCs
BySAMLIPSKI
MELBOURNE, Australia -
(JTA) The Soviet Union, it is
still hoped here, will fulfill its
undertakings made to an Aus-
tralian trade union leader last
month on the release of Jewish
Prisoners of Conscience and the
relaxation of restrictions on the
right of refusniks to emigrate.
This view was expressed by Isi
Leibler, president of the
Executive Council of Australian
Jewry, who was commenting on
reports from Moscow which cast
doubts on the undertakings
which were made to Robert
Hawke, president of the Aus-
tralian Council of Trade Unions,
during meetings held in Moscow
in the week ending May 25.
AFTER HAWKE S meetings
with senior Soviet officials, three
leading Jewish activists issued a
statement saying they had been
told the Soviet leadership had
agreed to release 12 prisoners,
allow all refusniks who had
waited for longer than five years
to emigrate, and to ensure there
would not be a waiting period of
longer than five years in the
future.
Two weeks ago, reports from
Moscow quoted Gen. Vladimir
Borisenkov of the Soviet
Ministry of Internal Affairs as
denying any knowledge of the
promises made to Hawke. Hawke
had met with the chairman of the
Soviet Central Council of Trade
Unions, Alexei Shibayev.
Commenting on these reports,
Leibler said that Hawke, now in
Geneva, had encountered certain
problems since the undertakings
were given. He had been told that
final authorization still required
clarification at a senior level.
Leibler added that he shared
the views of refusnik leaders in
Moscow with whom he had met
last August and again in
December that at this crucial
period in relations between
Washington and Moscow, the
Soviets were unlikely to renege
on their pledges concerning
Jewish emigration.
LEIBLER MET with Hawke
in Rome at the World Presidium
on Soviet Jewry after the Aus-
tralian trade union leader arrived
from Moscow. He described
Hawke's mission as "a pro-
foundly humanitarian initiative
by Australia's most dis-
tinguished non-governmental
international statesman."
The Australian Jewish leader
noted that Hawke's activities on
behalf of Soviet Jewry had
received the full support of Prime
Minister Malcolm Fraser and
Foreign Minister Andrew Pea-
cock. Both Peacock and Fraser
are members of the governing
Liberal Party, while Hawke is a
member of the Labor Party.
Hawke's activities in Moscow
have received front-page
coverage in the Australian media
and have attracted widespread
comment. The trade union leader
has a long record of support for
Israel and of outspoken commit-
ment to a variety of
humanitarian causes.
LEIBLER SAID that if
Hawke was not satisfied that the
promises made to him were being
implemented, he was planning to
return for further discussions in
Moscow early in July.
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Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 29,1979
Spotftglit fit
June is a month for weddings, and three very popular
couples celebrated their 25th anniversaries. Congratulations to
Ted and Joyce Newman. She is president of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward. They are parents of a married son,
Rick, who lives in Boulder, Col. Glenn, a graduate of Syracuse
University, Beth, who completed her freshman year at college in
Colorado, and 11-year-old son, Jeff. On the big day Ted and
Joyce enjoyed a family reunion in Denver.
Happy 25th anniversary to Edward and Marilyn Kaplan
who celebrated at a gala simcha in their home. They are proud
parents of Phil, a student at Tufts Dental School, Evan, who
attends Brandeis University and will study abroad for a year
starting this fall, and Susie, in high school at the Hebrew
Academy/
Dr. Paul and Ruth Rodensky celebrated their silver an-
niversary at a party in their honor hosted by friends and family
at the home of Paul's partner and long-time friends Dr. Saul and
Millie Nit/berg. Others who helped plan the big event were
Paul's mother Martha Rodensky, Hy and Marilyn Kones, Dr.
Stoyan and Tobene Roeenthal, Harry and Hannah Schorr,
Ruthie's sister and brother-in-law Arny and Fran Seamon, Dr.
Mickey Segal, and Jackie Zbar. Dr. Paul Rodensky recently
retired as chief of staff of Memorial Hospital. They are the
parents of Karen, a student at the University of Michigan,
working in summer theater in North Carolina and Debbie, who is
living in San Diego, Cal.
Most women prefer to let their birthdays go by unan-
nounced. Not so with Brenda Greenman and her friends. It is
also not easy to surprise Brenda and husband Andy. On her
"special" birthday, Brenda came all dressed up to her regular
Monday morning West Hollywood Lanes bowling, anticipating
a party at lunchtime. She was flabbergasted when the woman
actually took her. as usual, to Denny's. But the following day
when Brenda expected a quiet lunch alone with Joyce Newman,
35 friends and family warmly greeted her at Emerald Hills
Country Club. Among the celebrants were her patents Bill and
Sarah Reahefsy, mother-in-law Helen Greenman, a sister, Doris
Sana, sisters-in-law Amy Reahefsky and Nan Dorfman.
Andy was interrupted in the midst of a sentimental toast by
a singing telegram from Ted Newman and again by Fang who
burst into the room singing (off key) "Happy Birthday" .At
the party was Perle Siegel who has returned with husband Jerry
from a 26-day safari to remote islands of Galapagos, the Amazon
jungles of northern Ecuador, and exploration of the Inca ruins in
the Andes Mountains of Peru. Buddy and Ruth Calvin joined
the Siegels as they hiked, climbed and canoed their way through
this exciting adventure.
Emerald Hills Country Club was the scene of a surprise
50th birthday party and roast for Fang's partner and friend
Herb Katz. Fang was the emcee. Brother Sherman and wife
JoAnn Katz were among the close friends who invited them-
selves along to share the fun evenings. Herb was really surprised
when daughter Laura arrived from Washington, D.C. to join her
sister Sally and brother Tom for the occasion. Bob Pearlman
came from New York, and with Mike and Charlotte Brodie, Dr.
Norman and Nancy Atkin, Ted and Joyce Newman, Stunner and
Dina Kaye present, it was appropriate that Herb's table seating
card was a UJA pledge form.
Mazel tov to Dr. Barney and Ann Myers on their golden
wedding anniversary. The party began with cocktails followed
by dinner and dancing at Emerald Hills Country Club. Both
sons, one a dentist, the other a Purdue University professor, and
daughters-in-law with seven grandchildren came from Otis,
Mass. and Lafayette, Ind. Their daughter from California also
joined the family celebration as did other relatives from
California and New Jersey Jeanette Suaaman had just
returned from her 50th class reunion in Syracuse, N.Y. Adele
Levine had returned from a two-week vacation to Montreal,
Canada and Lexington, Mass., and grandson Perry CorteU's
graduation. Among the many local guests at the Myer's party
were Alfred and Ada Block, Ben and Ruth Miller, Shep and
Lillian Gefsky, Sig and IaabeDe Alterman. Also among the 100
in attendance were Dave and Eatelle Lippman, Moray and Fritzi
Kim ball, Jack and Lil Bergatein, Ruth Hersh, and Pearl
Shutman.
The Women's Bowling League of Temple Sinai concluded
another successful and fun-filled season with a luncheon at the
MASTECTOMY
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Old Spain Restaurant. The first place team, "The Pits, was led
by Fran Friedman, luncheon co-chairperson, and Lynnora \wt.
who held the highest average. Second place went to "The
B.B.G.s" with Bobbie Sugarman, Florence Roeenthal, Sue
Dweck and Claire Oppenheim. This league even gave recognition
to the "Desperados" who finished last. Better luck next year to
Hannah Schorr, Ruth Rodensky, Carol Morgenatein and Joan
Houaer. Phyllis Koplin and Cathy Klausner selected beautiful
houseplants for prizes. Who needs the dust-collecting trophies!?
Good luck to all of the recent high school graduates and
success in their future plans. Some of the young people are Jeff
Pittell, George Washington University; Tracy Roberta,
American University; June Siegel, Vanderbilt; Glenn Gordon,
University of Pennsylvania; Sherrie Bluth, University of
Pennsylvania School of Dental Hygiene; Kip Goodman, Karen
Novick, Lance Scbindler, Tulane; Hope Mayer, BCC; Scott
Crane. John Kuahner. Julie Fleet. Mark Yealow. Marlene
Nathanaon, Florida State University; Mfady Blumenthal,
Stephanie Lord, Jill Burnatine, Evan Derison, Neil Barry Shoter
(son of Rabbi and Mrs. Bernard Shoter, Temple in the Pines),
University of Florida; Scott Kleiman and BID Cohen, Emory
University; Howard Kline, Brown University; and my son Bill,
who will attend Harvard.
Our family is also very proud of my son Michael, who has
just graduated from Florida State University in
Tallahassee Congratulations to Mike and BUI Kuahner,
twin sons of David and Betty Kuahner. The boys graduated
from FSU and the University of Florida on the same
day Susan Beth Efroa, daughter of Jerry and Audrey Efroa,
graduated from Goucher College with a degree in
education Jarad Anton, son of Paul and Maralyn Anton,
will enter the University of Miami Law School in the fall, having
obtained his undergraduate degree at Washington and Jefferson
College Congratulation also to Leon and Leona Brauser
(president of the Hollywood chapter of Hadassah) on their son
Joel's graduation summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa from
Brandeis University.
Nat Dean was recently honored at a surprise 75th birthday
by his sons Larry and Bob. Thirty guests enjoyed the delicious
dinner and Nat's moving words of gratitude to his friends and
family.
Have a wonderful summer! Enjoy and relax! _______^_
'Clarifications'
Continued from Page 1 C
ment or to its subsequent imple-
mentation.
THE ISSUE came up during
the first working session of the
autonomy talks in Alexandria.
Egypt's Minister of State for
Foreign Affairs, Butros Ghali,
seemed to suggest that the U.S.
would be a party to the nego-
tiations and also involved closely
in the implementation of the
eventual agreement. Ghalil built
his thesis on the phrase "par-
ticipate fully in all stages of the
negotiations" in the "joint
letter" that accompanied the
peace treaty.
But Israeli negotiators Yoeef
Burg, Moshe Dayan and Shmuel
ramir immediately rejected this
reading, pointing out that the
Camp David framework implies a
role of participation but not oi
party, for the U.S. What wouK-
happen, Dayan asked the Egyp-
tians, if Israel and Egypt agreed
over some point and the U.S., as
a "party,' imposed a "veto?"
Dayan demanded that the U.S.
clarify its position before the
talks proceed further.
Officials of the three
delegations are due to meet in
Herzliya to work on the agenda
for the talks. The next plenary
session has been tentatively set
for June 25. also at Herri jv
Malavsky Tour of
Israel Sold Out
Dr. Morton Malavsky,
spiritual leader of Temple Beth
Shalom, announces that the tour
to Israel, departing June 19,
which he will be leading, is a
complete sell-out.
This year's group consists of
99 people. Included will be the
mayor of Hollywood, David
Keating and Mrs. Keating.
Assisting Dr. Malavsky, as
assistant tour host, will be Leon
Weissberg, director of education
at Beth Shalom.
Following the Israel portion of
the tour, Dr. Malavsky and 18
travelers will visit Greece, cruise
the Greek Islands with special
emphasis and visitations in-
cluding Rhodes, the synagogues
in Athens and Jewish Com-
munity Center.
On Law Review
Sandy Sutta, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Bernard Sutta of Holly-
wood, formerly of Coral Gables,
has been named to the Law
Review staff at American
University in Washington, D.C.
She is an honor student and is
working as a law clerk. Sandy is a
recent Phi Beta Kappa graduate
of Emory University in Atlanta.
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r, June 29, 1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
Study Continues
Fedorenko Fate Still Up In ^ir
W YORK Were World
II concentration camp
coerced into serving the
Fifth Circuit Court of
is in New Orleans was
strongly urged to
! a lower court ruling that a
concentration camp guard
about his past may keep
lerican citizenship on the
that he was forced to
| the Nazis.
American Jewish
ess, in a friend of the
brief joined by the Anti-
nation League of B'nai
took issue with a decision
(Federal District Judge
C. Roettger dismissing a
turalization proceeding
Feodor Fedorenko, now a
it of Miami Beach.
L HILBERG, of the Uni-
of Vermont, served as
~\\ adviser in preparing the
Dr. Hilberg, an utter-
ly recognized authority
Holocaust, is the author of
struction of the European
brief was prepared by Phil
associate executive
r of the Congress. Eight
[national agencies and 102
Jewish community relations
ils associated with National
Community Relations
iry Council said they
the concerns expressed in
lief.
jorenko admittedly con-
his past as a guard in the
death camp of Treblinka
he entered the United
States in 1949 and again when he
applied for citizenship in 1970,
asserting that he was forced into
serving the Nazis.
THE BRIEF challenges Judge
Roettger's ruling that Fedorenko
was a "prisoner" as well as a
camp guard. "There is nothing in
the record to support this dec-
laration," the brief says, adding:
"Concentration camp guards
at Treblinka were selected from
among volunteers released from
their status as prisoners of war.
Not only was the defendant
unlikely to have been voluntarily
coerced into such duty, but
because of his ethnic background
he was eligible for early release
and return to his home.
"It is true that Fedorenko
became a prisoner of war and,
while in German captivity during
the winter of 1941-42, doubtless
suffered severe hardships along
with several million other Soviet
prisoners for whom the German
army failed to provide the bare
necessities of life. The defendant,
nevertheless, was in a preferred
and privileged position because
of his Ukrainian background.
"AS SUCH it is not only in-
conceivable that he should have
been coerced into accepting
assignment as a concentration
camp guard but, on the contrary,
because of his ethnic background
he qualified for release and return
to his homeland should he have
so desired.
"Clearly, Fedorenko's presence
in that camp for close to a year
made him a knowing participant,
at close range, in one of the
greatest orgies of barbarism in all
history."
The Jewish organizations'
appeal also challenges the lower
court's statement citing the
defendant's reputation in this
country as "an excellent worker
... a 'real gentleman' with no
apparent prejudices" and a quiet,
well-behaved resident. The brief
comments:
"IT IS HARDLY surprising
that an alien who gained entry by
deliberate misrepresentations
would be scrupulously careful
during his subsequent residency
in the U .S. to shun anything that
might bring him public notice.
Indeed, every individual now in
this country whom there may be
reason to suspect of complicity in
war crimes has comported
himself while in the U.S. with
extreme circumspection.
"It stands to reason that the
greater the enormity and the
more horrendous the war crime,
the more compelling the pressure
to remain anonymous and the
more careful and cautious the
subsequent behavior. This is
surely not the kind of conduct
that deserves to be rewarded by
exemption from the requirements
of law."
Baum's brief also criticizes
Judge Roettger for the "extraor-
dinary procedure of convening a
press conference during which
(he) commented on matters
central and germane to the
proceedings The Court did
not scruple at discussing with
reporters even such material as
the credibility of the witnesses. It
is impossible to reconcile this
behavior with the decorum and
objectivity demanded of a trial
judge."
THE BRIEF cites Judge
Roettger's action as grounds "at
the very least" for vacating the
court's judgment and ordering a
new trial and concludes:
"Humanity cannot come to
terms with the Holocaust until it
not only acknowledges that the
event occurred but confronts the
precise manner in which it oc-
curred.
"The possibility of un-
derstanding and final recon-
ciliation is at the very least
impeded by the recasting of
events implicit in the District
Court's judgment.
"Retribution may not be
an
Bonds Reinvested at Rapid Rate
More than a half a million
dollars worth of Israel Bonds
have been reinvested in new pur-
chases during the last five weeks,
according to Milton M. Parson,
executive director of the South
Florida State of Israel Bonds Or-
ganization.
Ask Abe
By Abe Halpera
stion:
reading Numbers, Chapter 2, verses 1
ough 34,1 find that the-Twelve Tribes of Israel
Bist of Judah, Ichar, Zebulun, Reuben,
peon, Gad, Ephraim, Manasaeh, Benjamin,
Asher and Naphtali. My question is: Why
the Tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh who
the sons of Joseph, considered to be the
of their tribes and not Joseph who
i one of Jacob's sons?
Herman Yorks
Hollywood
Bwer:
According to Biblical tradition, the Twelve
i's of Israel are descended from the sons and
kndsons of Jacob. As enumerated in Genesis,
apt er 49, the sons of Jacob are listed in the
Bsings that Jacob gave to them before he died.
i'\ are: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Zebulun,
char, Dan, Gad, Asher, Naphtali, Joseph and
njamin.
lowever, in their exodus from Egypt and their
in camp during the 40-year wandering in the
ert, they are listed in groups of three.
fHE TRIBES of Judah, Issachar and Zebelun
in'd the first group.
the second group consisted of Reuben, Simeon
I Gad.
the Tribes of Ephraim, Manasseh and Ben-
kin formed the third group.
THE TRIBES of Dan, Asher and Naphtali
rced the last group.
following the Revelation at Mt. Sinai, when-
the Israelites stayed at a certain place, the
Met* of the Covenant were placed in the center
the camp. The four groups surrounded the
bernacle on four sides: north, east, south and
It. Each group had a standard, and each Tribe
its own special spot. In addition, each Tribe
I its own special ensign.
The descendants of Levi were the Kohanim
estsl and Levites. They had specific functions
he Tabernacle in their travels throughout the
rt and in the Temple in Jerusalem. They did
participate in the mundane affairs of the
elites and were therefore not counted as a
HOWEVER, the number 12 for the Tribes was
preserved by dividing of the descendants of
Joseph into two Tribes. They are Manasseh and
Ephraim who were the sons of Joseph. Thus
neither Levi nor Joseph are counted as Tribes.
Many commentators point out that Ephraim
and Manasseh were actually adopted by Jacob
and were therefore legally his sons. In addition to
the fact that Joseph had two Tribes named after
his children, his descendants had a double
inheritance.
"And Jacob said to Joseph, El Shaddai ap-
peared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan, and He
blessed me,' I will make you fertile and numerous,
making of you a community of peoples; and I will
give this land to your offspring to come for an
everlasting possession.' Now, your two sons, who
were born to you in the land of Egypt before I
came to you in Egypt, shall be mine; Ephraim
and Manasseh shall be mine no less than Reuben
and Simeon." (Genesis 48:3^)
BEG PARDON! In the column published on
June 15th, two phrases were inadvertently left
out from a paragraph of the letter written by Ted
Lifset of Hollywood. This distorted the meaning.
Following is the correct wording as it should have
appeared:
"At the ceremony in the synagogue, the
privileges of having a specific letter inscribed, to
complete the Sofer Torah, were auctioned to
members of the congregation. As each purchaser
or honoree went to the altar to the Sofer Torah, a
professional scribe, a Sofer, inscribed the letter.
My father bought the privilege of the letter Tet
for me, my Hebrew name being Todress. I was
awestrcken as I stood there and watched the
Sofer inscribe 'My' letter. Experiencing such
traditional events and customs has forged and
perpetuated the bonds of our religion."
The phrases in italics were omitted. I regret the
error.
Please send all questions to:
ASK ABE
c / o Jewish Federation of South Broward
2719 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
appropriate or congenial ob-
jective of society, but ac-
countability assuredly is. Our
social order is dependent upon
reciprocal and indefensible ac-
countability. It is the concept at
the heart of our law.
Religious
Directory
NORTHBROWARD
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100 W. Oak
land Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Phillip A. Labowltz Cantor Maurice
A.Neu.
TEMPLE BETH ORR.
Drive. Reform (44)
2151 Riverside
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 910*
57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. (44-A)
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Paul Plotkin.
Cantor Yehudah Hellbraun. (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE BETH EMET. 200 NW
Douglas Rd. Liberal Reform. David
Goldstein, ed. dlr.
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9730 Sterling
Rd., Hollywood. Conservative. Rabbi
Bernard I. Shoter.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA-
TION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi
SheON J.Harr. (44)
RECONSTRUCT IONIST
GOGUE. 7473 NW 4th St. (*9)
SYNA
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 4U
NE Ith Ave. Conservative Rabbi Dr
Carl Klein. Ph.D. Cantor Jacob Dan
rlger. (12)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OP NORTH DADE.
lfJMl NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kongsley Cantor Irving
Shulkes (37)
The Israel government per-
mitted the full maturity value of
the bonds to be applied to new
purchases, regardless of when in
1979 the bonds matured. Most of
the bonds were purchased in June
1967 at the time of the Sue Day
War.
Parson said nearly $144 million
in Israel Bonds will be maturing
this month and many bond
owners have forgotten that they
are in possession of the securities.
"The bonds were purchased in an
outpouring of emotion toward
Israel and the Jewish people, and
in 12 years' time, many people
have forgotten that the bonds are
stored in their safety deposit
boxes.
"Israel needs the reinvested
dollars at this time to develop the
Negev area," Parson stressed-
"The terms of the Israel-Egyp-
tian Peace Treaty provided for a
return of the Sinai to Egypt, so
the cities, developed areas and
industry in the Sinai must now be
reconstructed in the Negev. This
process will cost billions of
dollars, some of which will be
supplied by world Jewry through |
their purchase of Israel Bonds
and their participation in the new
billion dollar Negev development
loan issue which was authorized
by the Israel government.
Parson said that all those
wishing to reinvest their matured
Israel Bonds may contact the
Bond office in the Roney Plaza on j
Miami Beach.
HOLLYWOOD
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max Land
man. (47B)
BETH EL TEMPLE. 13S1 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa. Assis-
tant Rabbi Jonathan Woll. (45)
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601 Arthur
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnson St
Conservative. Rabbi Paul M. Katz,
Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro
Cantor Naf taly A. Llnkovsky. (65)
TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St
Hollywood. Fla. 33021. Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Robert P. Frazin
Cantor Phyllis Cole. (47C)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE. 3291 Stirling
Road. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe
, Bomzer. (52)
iiCANDLELIGHTINGij!
m
TIME
7:56
m
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Levitt B
memorial chapel 1921 Pembroke Rd. Hollywood. Fla. 921-7200 Sonny Levitt. F.D. w
13365 SW. Dixie Hwy. North Miami. Fla. 949-6315
-_.
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
7empte 3etk 6
Wlemociat
(JazcUns
The all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beau-
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sonably priced.
For information call: 920-8225 or wrtto:

TEMPLE BETH EL
13S1 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please sand me literature OR the above.
NAME: ______________
ADDRESS: ._________________________
PHONE:


V- -#*
Page 12
The Jewish florutian and i>hoJarot Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 29, lj
Increased Pledges Promised
OCONOMOWOC, Wise. -
Moved by the presence and mes-
sage of freed Soviet Jewish
Prisoner of Conscience Mark
Dymshitz and stirred by a hard-
hitting presentation on the cost
of the peace process to Israel's
people by former Ambassador
Simcha Din it/., 150 members of
the United Jewish Appeal
National Campaign Policy Board
concluded a two-day annual
meeting here recently with
pledges of significantly increased
giving to the 1980 UJA cam-
paign.
"In setting this high standard
for the coming campaign," UJA
national chairman Irwin S. Field
declared, "our leadership is
giving spirited advance notice of
the crucial nature of the Jewish
imperatives involved." To meet
heightened needs at home and
overseas, he reported, the
national leadership group was
projecting a 1980 drive calling for
an additional sum in the regular
campaign currently estimated at
about $80 million, and a
minimum of $40 million for the
crucial social rehabilitation
programs of Project Renewal.
Sources of heightened need
identified by the Policy Board in
an intensive round of workshops
and discussions, according to
Field, are: the high cost in Israel
of human redeployment and
social readjustments flowing
from the peace treaty with
Egypt; greatly increased Soviet
Jewish emigration to Israel and
the U.S., and severe inflationary
pressures in both countries.
AMONG the representatives
from cities throughout the nation
from all eight UJA regions were
seven leaders from the Florida
Region Charles Rutenberg of
Pinellas County, 1978 Regional
Chairman: Frank Beckerman of
Hollywood; Irwin Levy of Palm
Beach; Norman H. Lipoff of
Miami; Robert Russell of Miami;
Kenneth J. Schwartz of Holly-
wood; and Alan L. Shulman of
Palm Beach.
In a dramatic and highly
emotional plenary session led by
UJA national vice chairman
James L. Weinberg of New York,
Mark Dymshitz described his
years of imprisonment and ex-
pressed warm appreciation for
American Jewry's supportive
actions which, he said, helped
! sustain him during his confine-
ment and aided in the process of
gaining his freedom.
"The struggle to liberate
Soviet Jewry is not ended," he
declared. "Many of my friends
are still in jail or in the camps.
Hundreds of Jews in the Soviet
Union are still refused visas to
Israel. When our children refuse
to serve in the Red Army, they
are being sent to jail for several
years. Our fight for freedom goes
on."
Dymshitz, who has begun a
new life in Israel after rejoining
his wife and two daughters,
called for added campaign
support to strengthen Jewish
Agency absorption programs.
Earlier, the director-general of
the agency's Immigration and
Absorption Department, Yehuda
Dominitz, outlined the challenge
of resettling more than 35,000
immigrants expected to arrive in
Israel in the next 12 months,
largely from the Soviet Union
and other areas of Jewish
distress. Akiva Kohane, co-
ordinator of East European Mi-
gration Affairs of the Joint Dis-
tribution Committee, added an
account of growing Soviet Jewish
transmigration needs in Italy.
FORMER Ambassador Dinitz,
while welcoming the opportunity
for peace afforded by the treaty
with Egypt, stressed the chal-
lenges created for Israel's people.
"The months ahead," he
declared, "particularly as we
move into 1980, will be a decisive
era which will shape the resilience
of Israel's society and test our
capacity to withstand the costs
and pressures of peace, to survive
as a nation and to mature as a
people"
An extended plenary session
was devoted to another major
1980 challenge increased
support for Project Renewal, the
comprehensive program to re-
habilitate the lives of 300.000
residents of Israel's distressed
immigrant neighborhoods. The
session was featured by a report
from Robert Russell of Miami,
chairman of the UJA National
Project Renewal Coordinating
Committee, on his recent on-the-
scene review of the program in
Israel. Grass roots social plan-
ning in the neighborhoods, he
indicated, is producing visible
results and raising hopes which
must be fulfilled swiftly and
decisively through community
Project Renewal campaigns.
Russell was supported in his
presentation by Eliezer Rafaeli,
director-general of the Jewish
Agency Project Renewal Depart-
ment; and Dov Sinai, national
coordinator of Project Renewal.
Five workshop sessions de-
veloping plans for the 1980 cam-
paign resulted in projections for
an earlier start, parallel efforts at
all levels of giving, increased
mass campaigning and inten-
sified programs of solicitor
training and education in key
issues and basic Jewish values.
UJA national vice chairman Joel
Breslau of Washington, D.C.
presented the coordinated work-
shop report and led the ensuing
discussion. Workshops were con-
ducted by national vice chairmen
Daniel M. Honigman of Detroit,
Robert E. Loup of Denver, Neil J.
Norry of Rochester, H. Paul
Rosenberg of Kansas City and
Herbert J. Solomon of San Diego.
OTHER highlights of the
annual meeting included a report
by national vice chairman
Herschel W. Blumberg of
Washington, D.C. in behalf of
\
t
V
I
s

Y
Mark Dymshitz (second from left! inspired a meeting of 150 memfa
of the United Jewish Appeal National Campaign Policy Boa
recently. The recently released Soviet Jewish Prisoner of Conscieo
called for a continuation of the struggle to liberate Soviet Jewry. W
Dymshitz are (left to right) Irwin S. Field, UJA national chairmJ
James L. Weinberg of New York, national vice chairman; snd IH
Bernstein, executive vice chairman.
UJA president Frank R. Lauten-
berg, who was away in Europe,
on the activities of the UJA
Board of Directors, featuring
steps taken to strengthen cam-
paign policy and practices, and to
broaden community leadership
participation in the UJA cor-
porate structure; a presentation
on the UJA budget for 1979 by
Alexander Grass of Harrisburg,
Pa-, who is chairman of the
Budget Committee as well as
chairman of the Board of the
Israel Education Fund; a dis-
cussion of "1980 Cam pa
Issues and Community
by Irving Bernstein, Uj
executive vice chairman; a
sentation on "The Challenges]
the Eighties" by Rabbi St
Rabinowitz of Washington, D.I
chairman-elect of the UJA
binic Cabinet; and a symposia]
on "The Jewish Stake
American Energy Independent
by Dr. Elihu Bergman, executj
director, and Clarice Feldr
general counsel of Americans I
Energy Independence, along i
Yuval Elizur, U.S. correspond
for Maariv.
23
OPENING JUNE 28 SPECIAL
Purr son
DMM Occupancy
70 ot 145 Boomi
TO AUGUST 23
5% DISCOUNT FOR M DAY STAY
2 GREAT KOSHER MEALS
A LUNCHEON SNACK DAILY
. CHILDREN S DAY CAMP
MANY ARTS CRAFTS
CALL (305) 866-8831
RESERVE MOW!
Prof. Ephraim Urbach, center, an Israeli scholar, who recently ad-
dressed a large public meeting in Hollywood on the topic of "Zionism
in an Era of Israel-Egyptian Peace," is shown with Rabbi Morton
Malavnky, spiritual leader of Temple Beth Shalom, who served as
moderatoV of the meeting at his synagogue, and Joyce Newman, presi-
dent of the Jewish Federation of South Broward, who responded on Mlal joi MUf MAN
behalf of the local community
0a the Ocean at 67th Street
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
HIGH HOLY DAYS SEPT. 20-OCT. 21
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Full Text
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FILES


Friday, June 29, 1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
m
n
i
Brazil Recognizes PLO Hollywood Hills ORT Installs Officers
But Delays Office
By DAVID MARKUS
RIO DE JANEIRO (JTA)
The Brazilian government has
officially recognized the Palestine
Liberation Organization as the
"sole legitimate representative of
the Palestinian people" but for
the time being, at least, it has
refused to authorize the PLO to
open an office in Brasilia, the
capital.
Recognition was announced in
a joint communique released at
the end of a five-day visit to
Brazil by the Vice President of
Iraq, Tana Muhyidinne Maarouf.
The communique also stated that
Brazil recognizes "the rights of
the Palestinians to self-deter-
mination, independence and
national sovereignty in their
homeland."
MAAROUF is known to have
urged that a PLO office be per-
mitted in his talks with President
Joao Baptists de Bigeirede and
his aides. During the past four
years, 15 formal requests were
made by several Arab countries
to allow a PLO representative to
function in Brazil.
But according to Foreign
Ministry sources, Brazil will not
permit a PLO office as long as the
PLO continues to engage in
terrorist activites. A PLO rep-
resentative, Farid Sawan, was
expected to present his dip-
lomatic credentials in Brasilia
last week. The government post-
poned that "for the time being,"
apparently because of strong
criticism by the press.
But a diplomatic source close
to Foreign Minister Ramiro
Guerreire, acknowledged that
"Brazil is not in a comfortable
position to deny requests from
the Arabs," apparently a
reference to its need for Arab oil.
Brazil imports 400,000 barrels a
day from Iraq, more than 50
percent of its oil supply.
SAID FARHAT, Minister of
Social Communication who
serves as Information Minister,
and Ricardi Navajas, a Foreign
Ministry spokesman, have in-
sisted that the joint communique
"does not alter anything." They
said, "There is absolutely no
change because Brazil had
already recognized the PLO
through the 1975 United Nations
resolution" which gave the
Palestinian group observer
status at the UN.
Israel's Ambassador to i Jrazil,
Moshe Erell, said he was con-
vinced that the "PLO will not
open an office in Brazil .
The Hollywood Hills chapter of
Women's Aiherican ORT
(Organization for Rehabilitation
through Training) held its instal-
lation of officers on June 6 at the
wish turviiwur
JTHB
Emerald Hills Country Club.
Conducting the installation,
which highlighted the World
ORT Union's 100-year "Centen-
nial" celebration, was past
because their offices are caves of
subversion and murderers."
But Brazil's Jewish com-
munity is clearly alarmed. Dr.
Ben no Milnitzksy, president of
the Jewish Confederation,
protested the joint communique.
"Thus Brazil started to give
haven to the terror," he said. He
said the recognition of the PLO
and the future opening of a PLO
office "left the Jewish com-
munity anxious and resentful."
HE SAID he feared that "the
infiltration of anti-Semitic
materials into Brazil is almost
certain." One Jewish community
leader observed that PLO agents,
protected by diplomatic im-
munity, would mount an anti-
Semitic campaign.
ICnniO It dlTl ^ Jewi8|, Community Centers of South Florida, South Beach
rp -pw Activities Center, Miami Beach, recently played host to Trilok Deep,
1 OPS 111 DiVlSlOn who waN visiting the U.S. from India at the invitation of the Inter-
national Visitors Program of the U.S. government. As a reporter for a
news weekly, Deep was counting on his U.S. tour to provide him with
information covering such areas as health care, women's rights,
problems of the aging, etc. His visit to the JCC's South Beach
Activities Center gave him insight into the senior adult community in
South Florida. Miriam Zatinsky, director of South Beach Activities
Center, was Deep's hostess and guide for the day.
The Michael-Ann Russell Jew-
ish Community Center's Ladies'
"C" Tennis Team won the North
Division of the South Florida
Women's Doubles League.
Members of the team were:
Ruth Benson (captain), Florence
Alster, Adrienne Anchel, Ina
Eisenberg, Bernice Fine, Shirley
Fuchsberg, Ronni Fromberg,
Sandy Gordon, Sylvia Goren-
berg, Edith Hurwit, Lil Katzin,
Lois Kriett, Dotty Lipton, Irene
Lipot, Joan Myers, Sylvia
Rosenfeld, Bea Rubine, Marilyn
Staffman, Sue Steinberg, Margot
Tabb and Arlene Trachter.
The team was coached by Ray
Mitchell, who also coached the
first JCC Ladies "D" Team.
Their record this season was
eight wins, one loss. They
finished third in the league
standings.
president of the Broward Region,
Jeanne Wormser, representing
ORT District 6.
Cheri Rothschild was installed
as president for a second term.
Other officers for 1979-80 in-
clude: vice presidents, Beth
Ehrlich, Ellen Greenspoon,
Cathy Hoffeld and Carolyn
Kayne; treasurer, Ellen Living-
ston; financial secretary. Donna
Breiner; corresponding secretary,
Gina Saada; and recording sec-
retary, Geri Riskin.
ORT first began its vocational
training in Russia in 1880. Today
Women's American ORT plays a
major role in building and main-
taining vocational and technical
schools throughout the world. In
24 countries, 75.000 students are
preparing in such fields as elec-
tronics, computer science and
dress designing.
Locally, in the South Broward
area, ORT comprises 21 chapters
representing over 3,000 women.
For more information regarding
membership and activities call
the ORT Region office
Children Invited
Boys and girls ages six and up
are invited to design a dinner mat
for a favorite pet at the Holly-
wood Branch Library, 26th Ave.
and Hollywood Blvd., on Satur-
day, June 30, from 2 to 3 p.m.
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Page *
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 29,1979
What Happened to POC's?
The report by Robert Hawke, president of the
A ustralian Council of Trade Unions, that he was told
by Aleksei Shibayev, the Soviet trade union chief,
that the USSR will ease emigration restrictions and
release the Soviet Jewish Prisoners of Conscience
still in prison, has raised hopes in the Jewish com-
munity. Whether they are true or false hopes still
remains to be seen.
Hawke revealed the statement to Moscow
Jewish activists who released the news. But since
then, other Jewish activists in the Soviet Union have
said they were-told by an Interior Ministry official
that no one had been authorized to make such a
statement.
At the same time, it is hard to believe that a
Soviet trade union leader would make such a
statement to a,foreigner unless he had some official
authority. Observers have also speculated that the
information was given in preparation for Soviet
President Leonid Brezhnev's meeting with President
Carter in Vienna and as part of the Soviet effort to
get United States trade benefits in compliance with
the Jackson-Vanik Amendment which conditions
this on the USSR easing its emigration policies.
Turning the Clock Backward
The point is increasingly being made, and with
growing justification, that the United States effort to
dictate peace terms in the Middle East that are
detrimental to Israel's survival has only just begun.
There were clear indications of this tendency,
not only in the State Department where one would
most likely expect it, but in the Carter ad-
ministration as well, from the earliest days of the
Camp Davidjneetings between Israel and Egypt.
But as the current talks between the two
countires over the autonomy issue are getting under
way, the tendency now seems to have become a frank
bludgeon of intent.
As retired Admiral Elmo Zumwalt is noting
these days, we are submitting to the crassest
possible petroblackmail and are clearly willing to
sink Israel and to rely on our capacity to build up the
Arabs militarily as an alternative agent for our need
for an American presence in the Middle East.
This is not only suicidal to Israel by definition;
it is also suicidal to our own best interests by past
experience with Arab capabilities, let alone Arab
reliability in the long term.
Selfish American Motives
The major issue, of course, goes beyond this.
And that is that there is every indication that
Egypt's President Sadat is far more amenable to
settling the Gaza-West Bank autonomy question
along lines favorable to the Israeli position this in
the face of his desire to convince his Arab brethren
that he is pursuing Palestinian demands than is
apparent on the face of it.
But continuing American obsequiousness before
Arab petroblackmail encourages Sadat away from
the more realistic view of the autonomy problem.
In the end, the realpolitik of both Israel and
Egypt has progressed far beyond the selfish
motivation of American foreign policy in the Middle
East. In attempting to impose its own terms on a
settlement, the U.S. is turning the clock back and not
forward.
Why Should Anyone be Shocked?]
"Why is it so bad to be a
Nazi?" Prof. Pierre Maurerof the
Cochinport Royal Medical School
in Paris asked the other day. "I
don't see why anyone should be
shocked."
Herr Maurer, who served with
the Charlemagne Division of the
Adolf Hitler Institute, was
addressing his assembly of
medical students when he laid it
on the line. "I have been a fascist,
and I remain a fascist. I remain
totally for the elite"
HE MAY still be what he
considers for, by, and with the
elite. But as far as the medical
school is concerned, he is out,
removed, fired, sent packing.
And the medical students at the
Cochinport Royal, happy to have
four years of Maurer's teaching
~'dTewis!i Floridian
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Friday, June 29, 1979 4 TAMUZ 5739
Volume 9 Number 13
*
Robert
Segal
behind them, have issued a
forthright disclaimer: "Fascism
constitutes an appeal to murder.
Racism, condemned by law, must
be fought."
Perhaps we need this kind of
case history occasionally to jog
sagging memories about the
outrage of Nazism.
We had strong reminders in
1977 when an American historian
and a British writer tried to
whitewash the scarlet letter of
djfUWg^
Hitlerism Prof. Arthur R. Butz*l
of Northwestern University came
forth with a book called The
Hoax of the 30th Century in'
which his revisionist pen insisted
that the claim that six million
Jews had been killed by the Nazis
was a falsity, nothing more than
a Zionist plot.
AND OVER in London, David
Irving cooked up a similar pot of
mush in Hitler's War, insisting
that Hitler probably knew about
the concentration camps that
studded his Reich but surely was
unaware that his domain em-
braced extermination camps.
But the Nazi sickness is not
confined to a medical school in
Paris or to the scribblers now
busy sprinkling perfume over
depravity. Extremist German
rightwing organizations ap-
proximate 150 with more tha
20,000 members; ultra-rightist]
publications in the land locked
into Hitler's rule 35 years ago are
numbered well over 100.
CBS's hard-hitting 60 Minutes
shot fright into many hearts not
long ago by showing us how well-
entrenched in Paraguay today
are Dr. Josef Mengele, "the
Butcher of Auschwitz," and
Heinrich Mueller, who was near
the top of Gestapo activities
before finding a well-feathered
nest in Paraguay.
And in Paris, Louis Darquier
de Pellepoix, now 76, has hit the
headlines again with his defense
of service he provided the Nazis
as Vichy high commissioner for
"Jewish affairs."
IS THERE no good news than
in this sector of remembrance of
those years of horror? Not long
ago, Israel's ambassador to the
Hague bestowed Yad Vashenr
awards on 50 righteous non-Jews
who helped save Jews at their*
own peril when Hitler's spies and
agents hovered near. And during
the Passover and Easter holiday
season, a program produced by
the Anti-Defamation League paid
Continued on Page 9
Palestinians See Cause Weaken
By JOSEPH FTNKLESTONE
London Chronicle Syndicate
President Sadat's peace treaty
with Israel has caused anger
among many Arab leaders and
confusion, as well as division,
among pro-Arab supporters in
Britain.
When President Sadat went to
Jerusalem in 1977, the applause
which he received in the free
world was equalled by the denun-
ciations in the Arab world.
British supporters of the Pales-
tinian cause joined in the war-
nings against a unilateral peace
between Israel and Egypt.
THESE WARNINGS were
multiplied during and after the
Camp David meetings in
America. When new problems
arose, and the peace agreement
was delayed (while the Arab
States meeting in Baghdad,
including the "moderate" Saudis,
threatened Egypt with sanctions
and isolation), there was a feeling
of some satisfaction that Egypt
was being prevented from taking
a step regarded by her opponents
as harmful to the interests of the
Arabs in general and of the
Palestinians in particular.
However, President Carter's
dramatic and triumphant visit to
the Middle East, which ended in
an Egyptian-Israeli treaty, has
provoked heart-searching and a
deep reexamination among
leading supporters of the Arab
cause in Britain.
This revaluation had already
begun before the signing of the
treaty. Foremost among those
who questioned the negative
attitude of the Palestinians and
their supporters in the Arab
world and in Britain was Sir
Harold Beeley.
HE WAS one of the most
influential advisers on Palestine
to the late Ernest Bevin, the
British Foreign Secretary, who
followed a pro-Arab policy im-
mediately before and after the
birth of the State of Israel in
1948.
Sir Harold has made clear his
strong pro-Arab sympathies, but
he is a man whose actions are
influenced by practical and
humanitarian, as well as political
considerations.
He noted how often the
Palestinian Arabs had missed
opportunities to gain advantages
from which they could have built
up a strong base, as the Israelis
had so forcefully done.
Time after time, the British
Government and the world com-
munity had made major offers to
the Palestinians. These had been
rejected with contempt and
what the Palestinians rejected,
the Israelis gratefully accepted.
NOW, once again, the dreary,
arid scenario was being repeated,
even though the offer this time
came from an Israeli leader,
backed by the might of an
American President and the
vision of an Egyptian leader.
Sir Harold and those who think
like him have not lessened their
support for the full Palestinian
case, nor have they decreased
their criticism of many aspects of
Israeli policy. On the contrary, it
is precisely because they are so
attached to the Arab cause that
they feel that the PLO leaders,
and Yasir Arafat in particular,
are missing a golden opportunity-
Arafat refused several invi-
tations from President Carter to
change his attitude and to accept
the existence of Israel not by a
dramatic gesture, but by im-
plication, through the acceptance
of UN Resolution 242.
HE REJECTED them all and.
inflamed by the Moslem revo-
lution in Iran, has used flam-
boyant language about cutting
off American hands.
What are the alternatives to an
Egyptian-Israeli treaty? Can the
UN Security Council impose
peace? It has failed to do so for 30
years. Would a Geneva con-
ference, with the Russians taking
a leading part, provide a
solution? Not even the most
naive and optimistic could really
believe that. Does the PLO
assume that a victorious war
against Israel would give the
Palestinians a country? No prac-
tical observer could accept that.
It is this analysis that has led
Sir Harold to the strong belief
that the PLO must abandon its
arid policies. Prime Minister
Begin's autonomy plan for the
West Bank and Gaza is not an <
ideal solution, but it gives the
Palestinians major advantages
on which they could build their
hopes.
In his view, the PLO has!
totally failed to understand that
President Sadat has followed anj
absolutely consistent policy
Continued op Page 9