The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00222

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text

Page 2
The Jewish Floridurnm^SiSfixrofffrwter HoUywood
Friday, May 4,1979
Special Ceremonies Marie Hadassah Event
Installation of the 1979-1980
officers of the Florida Mid-Coast
Region of Hadassah took place at
the banquet during the Region
Conference, April 30, at the Dip-
lomat Hotel, Hollywood. Rabbi
Morris A. Skop of Temple
Sholom, Pompano Beach, offi-
ciated at the ceremonies.
Incumbent president, Esther
Cannon, was installed for a
second term. She has been in-
volved in Zionist activities since
before the reestablishment of the
State of Israel. Her acceptance
remarks on this occasion, which
coincides with Israel's 31st
anniversary of regained inde-
pendence, emphasized the strong
relationship between Hadassah
and Israel during these years and
during the years prior to inde-
pendence.
Other officers are Myra
Boosin, Devora Friedman, Pearl
Golden berg, Helen Kamer, Mollie
Lewis, Josephine Newman, Mary
Pavony, Ann Selkin, all vice
presidents; Dory Tarlow,
treasurer; Frances Auerbach,
recording secretary; and Adeline
Moll, corresponding secretary.
The Hollywood Strings enter-
tained during the dinner, and the
Habimah Players presented the
musical, "Survival '79."
The program also featured
Beatrice Usdan of the National
Hadassah Board who spoke on
Hadassah s latest achievements.
At the conclusion of the pro-
gram, the guests were invited to
a cocktail celebration in honor of
the newly installed officers.
Adeline Moll was region chair-
man of the Conference, and Rita
Sherman was local chairman.
Hostesses of the conference were
the Hallandale, Hollywood and
Southwest Broward Chapters of
Hadassah.
Hadassah Installs Rita Sherman
The first president of the
Southwest Broward Chapter of
Hadassah, Lillian Packer of
Miramar, will pass the gavel to
Rita Sherman of Holly brook, who
will be installed by the Florida
Midcoast Region president,
Esther Cannon on May 9 at Roll-
ing Hills Country Club.
Arranging the affair is Minnie
Sabow, chairperson.
Also taking the oath of office
will be Jackie Mayne, cor-
respondent secretary; Lee
Harris, financial secretary;
Augusta Rifkin, treasurer; Bella
Wiesner, education vice president
coordinator; Libby Lehrman,
program vice president coor-
dinator; and Paula Fields, mem-
bership vice president coor-
dinator.
This chapter was formed in
April 1977 and encompasses the
following groups: Avodah-Pem-
broke Lakes, Eleanor Roosevelt,
H'atid, Henrietta Srold, Park
Place and Tel Chai.
Jewish Fanuly Service Annual Meeting
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County will hold its
17th Annual Meeting on Tues-
day, May 8, at 8 p.m., at the Jew-
ish Community Center, 2838
Hollywood Boulevard, Holly-
wood.
The Annual Meeting Commit-
tee, under the chairmanship of
Mrs. Natalin Heiden, stated that
at this meeting an annual report
to the community will be pre-
sented by outgoing president,
Mark Fried. Officers and mem-
bers of the Board of Directors will
be elected, and the Esther
Lowenthal Community Service
Award will be presented. Re-
freshments will be served after
the meeting. This meeting is open
to the general public.
Jewish Family Service is a
counseling agency which offers
its services to all residents of
Broward County. The principal
activities of the agency are
parent child, marital, and group
counseling and services to the
aged. The agency also offers fam-
ily-life programs to community
organizations as well as an active
Russian Resettlement Program.
Jewish Family Service is a li-
censed adoption and foster care
agency. Offices are maintained at
1909 Harrison St., Hollywood
and 3500 N. State Road 7, Fort
Lauderdale.
The agency is a financial reci-
pient of United Way of Broward
County, Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale and
Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
Young Leadership Weekend
The United Jewish Appeal
Young Leadership Cabinet
Region IV and the Young
Women's Leadership Cabinet
Region IV and the Committee for
Leadership Development Council
of Jewish Federations sponsored
the 1979 Region IV Young
Leadership Conference, April 27-
29 in Orlando, according to con-
ference chairman, Dr. Meron J.
Levitats.
The theme of the conference
was "Young Leadership Jew-
ish Identity Jewish Renewal."
Guest speakers included Barry
Shocket, legislative assistant to
Sen. Richard Stone; Ralph Stern,
national chairman UJA Young
Leadership Cabinet; Rabbi Lynn
Gottlieb of New York; Ted
Comet, director, overseas ser-
vices and leadership development
CJF.
Representatives from South
Broward included Dr. and Mrs.
Dr. Meron Levitate
Meron Levitats, Dr. and Mrs.
Robert Heller, Larry Weiner and
Gary Fisher.
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OuUMa ot Fla. caN ToH Fro* *O0-327-5740
M-*4-7
'JDC Shopping
The Joint Distribution Committee if funded in part by the
Jewish Federation of South Broward s Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
For Jew* in Rumania:
a) $125 a month will maintain an elderly person in a nursing
hbr40inaBmohnTh will provide a hot lunch doily to a bedridden
?M?:tj2r"wiU provide seven food pockages a yeor for on
d,^ rrmTnth will cover a hot me., o day for oged in JDC-
:rs7^ro^a"di3tribution of new clothing for on
elderly couple.
For Jew* in Yugoslavia:
a) $70 a month will help care for an elderly person m the old age
home in Zagreb. ___
b) $100 will send a Yugoslav youngster to a Jewish summer
camp for one month.
For Jews in Morocco:
a) $40 a month will pay for food for an indigent aged living alone
in Morocco. L-ui t u
b) $325 a yeor will cover costs of education for o child in a Jewish
day school. .....
c) $45 a year will feed a child at the school canteen.
d) $65 o month will cover maintenance for one person m an old
age home in Casablanca.
For Jews in Tunisia:
a) $40 a month will maintain an elderly Jew hving alone in the
city of Tunis.
b) $70 a month will cover full coats for an mfirm aged m an old
age home in Tunis.
c) $400 a year will cover costs of sending a duld to a Jewish day
school.
For Jews in India:
a) $15 a month will feed a Jewish child attending the ORT school
in Bombay.
.
MAKE YOUR PLEDGE NOW TO THE JEWISH
FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD!
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counties is staffed only by Riverside
people who understand Jewish tradition
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And in that tradition we serve every
family, regardless of financial
circumstance.
Miami Beach/ Miami/North Miami Beach: 531-1151
Hollywood: 920-1010
Ft. Lauderdale (Sunrise): 584-6060
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
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Friday, May 4,1979
+J?wttffkr**>rL
Page 3
ML'
Holocaust survivors and members of the David Ben Gurion Cultural Club, seated from left, are Rosalie
teinweis, Manya Roaenkopf, Jean Grundman and Helen Jakubowski. Standing, from left, are Samuel
hniter, Oscar Shapiro, Dova Piaaler, Rose Rotmenk Singer, Fannie Gardin, Betty Finkdstein, Max
Finkelstein, Solomon Hirachhorn and Carl Roaenkopf. mm
Holocaust Remembrance
at Temple Sinai
The South Broward Council of Rabbis and the
Jewish Federation co-sponsored a Yom Hashoa
observance at Temple Sinai. The service was held
in remembrance of those Jews who perished in the
Nazi Holocaust.
The program opened with Rabbi Harold Richter
leading the 175 attending in "Am Yisrael Chai."
He then gave the invocation. Federation Presi-
dent Joyce Newman extended greetings on behalf
of the Jewish community. Rabbi Morton Malav-
sky represented west Hollywood and led the
readings and kaddish.
Members of the Gold Coast Council of BBYO.
the David Ben Gurion Cultural Club, Cantor Naf-
taly Linkovsky, Rabbi Samuel Jaffe and Rabbi
Bernard Shoter also participated in the program.
Rabbi Jaffe, chairman of the event, gave his
reflections on the Holocaust. The event was co-
chaired by Esther Gordon, president of the
Federation's Women's Division.
Landau Heads Technion
Members of the Gold Coast Council of the B'nai B'rith Youth Organization who participated in the
program. ^__________
Charles D. Landau, vice presi-
dent, investments, Loeb,
Rhoades and Horn blower, has
been elected president of the
newly-formed South Broward
chapter of the American Society
for Technion Israel Institute of
Technology.
Initial meeting of the board of
directors of the unit, which sup-
ports Technion University in
Haifa, Israel, was held April 29 at
Landau's office in Hallandale.
Other officers elected include
Cy (icier, sales manager of Bra-
man Cadillac, vice president; and
Steven B. Dolchin, attorney,
secretar -treasurer. Members of
the board elected include Harry
Carson, Jerome Gevirman, David
Harris, Samuel Kallman, Mrs.
Betty Kallman, Meyer Kaplan,
David Posnack, Julius Shrage'r
and Leo Stillman.
' Persons interested in joining
the chapter should contact Lan-
dau.
The Technion University has
more than 9,000 students in-
cluding several hundred from the
United States and Canada. It
includes a medical college, sev-
eral engineering schools, an agri-
cultural college and other
divisions.
Southeastern regional offices
of the American Society for
Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology are located in the
City National Bank Building, 300
71st St., Miami Beach.
Dr. fj/rm to Head Phyitians Group
Dr. Jerold Lynn, originally
from Dalas and a graduate of the
University of Texas, has been
elected president of the Broward
County Osteopathic Medical As-
sociation. Other officers are
Ferdinand Manlio, D.O., vice
piesident; Donald Tonkin, D.O.,
secretary; and Wayne Bizer,
D.O., treasurer.
Dr. Lynn, who is a Diplomat*
and senior member of the College
of Ostatericians and Gynecolo-
gists, received his D.O. degree
from The College of Osteopathic
Medicine and Surgery at Des
Moines. He has been in the Fort
Lauderdale area for eight years.
r. Lynn
!
SER VING SOUTH FLORIDA AND ALL 50 STA TES.
BROWARD
DADE
861-7301
742-6000
PALM BEACH
833-0887
6Q00 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale (Sunrise), Florida 33313
2305 Writ HilUboro Boulevard
Dttrfitld Beach. Florida 33441
5915 Park Drive at U.S. 441
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NEMfSCNTING
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ST AN ETSK V SCHLOSSBE RG .SOLOMON
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JEWISH OWNED MANAGED
MbMbMj
Who cares
about Reba?
She came to Israel twenty years ago from Poland
with her husband and three fine sons. Illness took her
husband from her. Wars took her sons. Now she lives
alone with her memories. The world is hardly aware
that she is in it.
There are many Rebas. In Israel. Here. The world
over. It is possible to forget them.
But to forget Reba, you must forget who you are.
You must ignore a heritage of nearly six thousand years
of shared joy and sufferingthe oneness of all Jews
everywhere. Reba is youand her needs are your needs,
with a different emphasis.
Renew yourself as you renew her life and Jewish
life everywhere. Make you pledge today to the 1979
campaign.
Who cares about Reba?
i We do. You do.
Make Your Pledga Now I
lapport Tha Jawlah Fadwallaii 1 ton*
wnom
ISTtCawblmJ JawMH AppiM
3719 Hollywood lalllli, Hollywood. Florida 3M20-Rtmna*M-J10
'tear of Jewish Renewal at Home and Overseas


Page 4

The Jewish Floridian andShofar of Greater Holiywood
Friday, May 4,197T
Ofewish Floridian
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
an* SHOFAR Or G" KATER HOLLYWOOO
Hollywood Offlc -1* S Federal Hwy Suite MS Danla. Fla SKJW
UMajia MMM
MAIN' OFFICE and PLANT IX NE tth St.. Miami. Fla SSI a Phone 373
FREDSHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHBT
Editor and PubUaher ExecuUve Editor
The Jewish FtarMiwi Dm* Not OMrartaa The Kashnrlft
Of The Merchandite Mvarttosa In Its Commas
PubUaned Bl Weekly
Second Class Postage Paid at Danla, Fla. 864600
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed At Jewish Unity and Mm Jewish Weekly
Member el the Jewish Tetefraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndicate, World-
wide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association of
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (local area) One Year7.S#. Out ofTewn Upon Request.
Zbig's Three Circles of Strategy
__.___ __ ., principal client* want one. Bo
A STRATEGY reportedly Either Arafat nor Habash no
Friday. May 4.1979
Volume 9
7 IYAR5739
Number 9
Florida's Federations Meet
There is no doubt about it. The rapid rate of
growth of the State of Florida is little short of
phenomenal. Time was when we thought of the
Jewish community as being situated in a complex
cluster along the southeastern shore of the state.
But a gathering in Orlando last weekend of the
executives and professionals of nine Jewish
federations throughout Florida, joined by their lay
leadership, indicates that as the state grows, so
grows the Jewish community.
Fact is, we can no longer speak of a single
Jewish community cluster. The nine federations at
the Orlando planning conference represented a whole
new series of growing Jewish communities ranging
from the southeast coast to the north and west of
Florida.
What the federation leaders met to do was to
determine the need for a program of interchange of
ideas from all the communities involved on problems
common to all of them Jewish education, the aged,
youth, integration of Soviet Jews.
There is no doubt that this input can be of
benefit to all of the Jewish communities of Florida as
they meet the challenges of growth and the com-
plexities of a highly-detailed Jewish civic, philan-
thropic and traditional consciousness.
Independence Day, 1979
Israel will be celebrating its Independence Day
May 2 in an atmosphere completely different from
that which previously marked this day. For the first
time in its 31-year history, the State of Israel has a
peace treaty with one of its Arab neighbors, Egypt.
Independence Day will indeed mark the begin-
ning of a month of momentous events which will be
highlighted by meetings between Prime Minister
Menachem Begin and Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat at Beersheba and El Arish. This month also
marks the opening of the borders between Israel and
Egypt, an event that may result in benefits yet
unforeseen.
Israel will not forget the price in lives it has paid
to reach this point. In fact, the day before Indepen-
dence Day is always observed as Memorial Day to
pay tribute to Israel's fallen soldiers.
A STRATEGY reportedly
attributed to National Security
Adviser Zbigniew Brzezinaki
defines the new Middle East
detente in terms of three circles of
concentric escalation. The first is
the one just concluded: wringing
the lifeblood out of Israel through
radical amputation of the Sinai
and the achievement of an accord
with Egypt.
The second circle is the one for
which Israel is now preparing:
negotiations over the autonomy
question, which she will be bound
to lose, thus returning Israel to
her essentially pre-1967 borders.
This will bring Egypt back into
the good graces of the other Arab
nations, except perhaps for the
most recalcitrant of the con-
frontation states, which no longer
will be able to claim that Egypt
betrayed Araby.
THE SECOND circle also
includes the reestablishment of
U.S. preeminence in the Middle
East as a benevolent supporter of
pan-Arab interests, with a dis-
membered Israel as prima facie
evidence that Washington no
longer'supports the Zionist state
unequivocally.
The third and last circle of the
so-called Brzezinaki strategy is
by far the most complex. It
focuses on the Soviet Union. The
Muscovites have had no role in
the new "peace treaty" as a con-
sequence of a bungling diplomacy
of which they are not often
guilty: losing the game by
playing so flamboyant a hand
that they were invited to leave
the table, or at least not invited
back to it after intermission.
Now, therefore, or so the third
of the concentric circles in the
strategy alleges, an adjustment
must be made in the Soviets'
favor to soothe their wounds for
having wanted and failed to win
everything their way at another
Geneva. In the end, or so the
strategy alleges, there can be no
Leo
Mindlin
peace in the Middle East without
Soviet approval.
BESIDES, when Israel finally
loses the autonomy negotiations,
she will be in exactly the same
position that the Kremlin had in
mind for her in the first place.
The Kremlin will have won, even
if the Kremlin will not be
acknowledged as the winner. It is
American friendship with Israel
that will have succeeded in
reducing Israel to a shadow of
herself, not the Draconian
honesty of frank Russian anti-
Zionism. The results will be the
same Israel victimized.
But, of course, it makes a vast
difference as to who can claim
credit for the achievement. The
Soviets know that, in this, they
have lost a major round, but we
mustn't rub it in. And anyway,
they are by no means ready to
concede the game. There are
other tricks ahead, and it is these
that Brzezinski has in mind.
For example, when Israel
finally loses the autonomy
struggle, that does not neces-
sarily mean the triumph of Y ash-
Arafat (PLO) or George Habash
(PFLP), both of whom Egypt's
Anwar Sadat fears and despises
as much as do the Israelis.
THIS MAY be good enough
reason for, say, the State Depart-
ment to seek alternate solutions
to the "Palestine problem,"
particularly because their
principal clients want one. Bat
neither Arafat nor Habash nor
any of their prototypes will give
up just because Egypt and Israel
can not be counted on to deal
with them. At the
same time Moscow may be
depended upon to make sure that
they do not give up precisely
because they suit neither party to
the "new peace," nor the U.S.,
either.
The struggle in Lebanon
today, with the thinly disguised
Syrian pro-Soviet role in it,
attests to that. So do the
escalating PLO terrorist forays
into Israel from Jordan, whose
King Hussein for a third time
since the 1967 war is choosing the
wrong side with which to align
himself.
Then there is Iraq, different
from, say, Libya, but which one
also finds it hard to conceive of as
ever accepting the Brzezinski-de
signed Middle East detente no
matter how miniscule Israel is
made as a consequence of it. The
part Moscow will play in this
grand refusal is no insignificant
one.
AND FINALLY, if only to
mention a third condition of
Middle Eastern reapolitih to
match Brzezinski's own three
concentric circles, the political
realignment in Saudi Arabia
today anticipates one of the
west's greatest fears: a revo-
lution in that country along the
lines of the revolution in Iran.
While (ran's large and power-
ful middle class created a vacuum
against Marxist enterprise into
which the Khomeini religious
forces could burst to seize the
reins of power, no such middle
class exists in Saudi Arabia, and
therefore no such immunity
against a Marxist takeover.
To forestall a possibility
in
Continued on Page 13
The Double-Message Peace Treaty
By KENNETH JACOBSON
Director, Middle Eastern
Affairs Department
Anti-Defamation League
ofB'naiB'rith
ASIDE FROM Sadat's sense
of the economic benefits to his
country by virtue of peace with
Israel, fear of Soviet ex-
pansionism in the region served
as the major catalyst toward
Egyptian-Israeli reconciliation
Israel had been warning for
some time of the threat to pro-
Western regimes from the
Soviets; it took developments in
Ethiopia, South Yemen, and
Afghanistan to persuade Sadat
that he no longer could afford the
luxury of the struggle against
Zionism.
Jim Hoagland of the
Washington Post put the Soviet
factor in proper perspective in an
analysis of the Camp David
meetings (Sept. 24): "In a
metaphorical sense, the Russian
Menace occupied the fourth chair
at Camp David" Sadat had
opted for full cooperation with
the United States, including
movement toward normalization
of relations with Israel, to place
his country under the protection
of the American, anti-Soviet
umbrella.
And indeed, in the intervening
months since Camp David, it is
evident that Sadat continued to
see the Soviet and Soviet-backed
threat in the region as a major
element in the signing of the
treaty. His requests for massive
military aid from the U.S. are
predicated on that threat and on
Egypt's potential role in the area
BUT IT was not only the
Egyptian reaction to the Soviets
that was perceived as a force for
peace with Israel: officials of the
Carter Administration following
Camp David pointed to the
Soviet factor as the key to the
Saudis and Jordanians joining
the process. Faced with the
choice of linking themselves to
Sadat or abandoning him for the
radical camp of Syria-Iraq-Libya
with Soviet backing, Jordan and
Saudi Arabia would surely
choose the moderate path.
The Iranian revolution,
however, produced startling
developments. The inability or
unwillingness of the U.S. to save
the Shah raised doubts in the
minds of Saudi leadership as to
the reliability of their American
friend. If the trend in the region
were to be a radical trend, seemed
to reason the Saudis, then we
ought not to distance ourselves
too much from those factors.
Hence the Saudi leadership
responded coolly to Secretary of
Defense Brown's offer of a U.S.
military presence in the area;
hence Prince Fahd called off a
visit to the U.S.; and reports
circulated that the Saudis were
toying with the idea of
establishing relations with the
Soviet Union.
The double-message: 1) The
Soviet menace has acted and will
act as a force toward moderate
Arab-Israeli reconciliation; and,
2) Saudi reaction to the
revolution in Iran indicates
possible pacification of, not
alliance against, the Soviet-
backed radical forces in the
Middle East.
Finally, the Israeli people and
representatives see a double-
message in the autonomy plan for
the West Bank and Gaza.
FROM THE perspective of the
government, this plan was an
attempt to find a functional
solution to the problem of the
West Bank, inasmuch as the
Arabs have repeatedly rejected
Labor's territorial compromise
proposal, the Allon plan. It also
was intended to leave open the
question of sovereignty of the
area for five years, and to prevent
the rise of a Palestinian state
through Israeli veto over the
form autonomy Cakes.
Many Israelis, however, fear
that autonomy could very readily
be transformed by the Arabs into
the dreaded Palestinian State.
What would prevent the self-
governing authority from
declaring itself a state? How
could Israel offset the growing
demand for full Palestinian self-
determination once the process is
set in motion?
Increasingly, there is an
awareness in Israel that
autonomy, which has often been
attacked by the Arab world & an
example of Begin's alleged
"intransigence," carries with it
the seeds of a PLO victory. The
need to monitor autonomy at
every level, to establish
modalities which will indeed
grant self-rule but will assure an
Israeli military presence becomes
crucial. The resolution of the
West Bank problem, whether as
an area of Arab-Jewish
cooperation endangering no one,
or as a base for the PLO en-
dangering the stability of Israel,
Jordan, and the whole region, has
yet to be determined.
The double-message: 1)
Autonomy as self-rule for the
Arabs and security for the Jews;
and, 2) Autonomy as the seed of a
PLO state.
IT CAN only be the hope of
Israel and all friends of Israel
that the positive sides of these
double-messages come to pass:
that Sadat will indeed make real
the treaty with Israel irrespective
of the decisions of Arab *)*".
tionists; that the U.S. as a "u|1|
partner" will function as a
constructive factor to encourage
reasonable solutions; that
pragmatism will triumph over
extremist Islamic ideology; tnai
moderates in the area will
coalesce against radical ex-
pansionism rather than to seeb,
the counterproductive path of
appeasement


Friday, May 4,1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Pages
Brezhnev Pardons Five Prisoners Hollywood JCC Happenings
0 In an unprecedented action,
Soviet President Leonid Brezh-
nev personally pardoned five
hY Jewish Prisoners of Conscience
(POCs) and had them released
from prison, according to in-
formation obtained by the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry (NCSJ). The NCSJ
learned in a telephone conversa-
tion with Wulf Zalmanson and
Anatoly Altman in Riga that
Arieh Khnokh, Hillel Butman
and Boris Penson were released
from their labor camps and
prisons after Brezhnev signed the
pardoning order.
They were arrested in June
1970 and sentenced to 10-year
terms, due to expire in June 1980.
Although pardons are normally
given after a prisoner admits
guilt, none of these prisoners
" admitted culpability in any of the
crimes for which they were con-
victed. It has long been asserted
by Jewish activists in the Soviet
Union that they were actually
persecuted for their desire to emi-
grate to Israel.
According to the Conference,
Zalmanson, Penson and Khnokh
already have exit visas while Alt-
man and Butman will be apply-
ing. Thefive men were informed
that they were to leave the Soviet
Union for Israel by April 30.
In a recent analysis of the
Soviet Union's new Conditional-
Parole Act, the Soviet Jewry Re-
search Bureau, an affiliate of the
NCSJ, determined that while
many Jewish POCs would be
eligible for early release under its
terms, none of the men just
released would in fact have quali-
fied.
Eugene Gold, chairman of the
NCSJ, said of the early release,
"This is the first positive sign we
have seen regarding the pri-
soners. For years we have in-
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sisted that the only real crime of
the Jewish POCs has been their
struggle to emigrate to Israel.
While Soviet authorities have in
the last six months allowed more
people to emigrate than in pre-
vious years, they had shown no
signs of a change in other im-
portant areas of concern to Jews
in the Soviet Union."
"I have met the relatives of all
of these people here and in
Israel," continued Gold, "and I
am overjoyed for them at the
good news. Equally significant,
the Soviet Union has made a ges-
ture with the release of these five
brave men, as well as the release
of some hard-core refuseniks in
recent weeks. We will have to see
whether this is a continuing trend
or a momentary shift."
All of the five POCs were con-
victed of treason and other asso-
ciated charges in connection with
an alleged plan to steak a Soviet
airliner and fly to Sweden. Alt-
man, Khnokh and Penson were
convicted in the "First Leningrad
Trial," December 1970; Zalman-
son was convicted in a military
tribunal, January 1971; and
Butman was convicted in the
"Second Leningrad Trial," May
1971.
A number of programs will be
held in early May at the
Hollywood Jewish Commun-
ity .Center. The center will offer
an S.A.T. College Preparatory
Class, an Israeli Coffee House for
young adults, co-sponsored with
Federation's Israel information
desk, and tween volleyball activ-
ity nights.
A Scholastic Aptitude Test
preparation course will be offered
at the center beginning on Tues-
day, May 8, to take place each
Tuesday and Thursday evening
through May 31. This 16 hour
course is from 7 to 9 p.m. nightly
and will prepare the students for
the June 2 exam.
The JCC will co-sponsor its
second Israeli Coffeehouse on
Saturday, May 12 at 8 p.m. with
the Jewish Federation's Israel
Information Desk. Socializing,
Israeli food and entertainment
are planned. The Coffee House is
geared for adults 18-25.
Tweens (sixth and eighth
graders) are invited to Hollywood
Hills High each Wednesday for
volleyball from 6:30-8:30 p.m.
There is no charge.
a
If you are not currently on the
mailing list or want to become
more involved, call Bob Schwartz
at the JCC.
Washington Federal Presents
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PLANTATION (Opening 1979)
Jacaranda Plaza Shopping Center


.*

- I.
Page 6
. v-.v (Wi .
The Jewish Floridian andShofarofGreater Hollywood
Friday, May 4,1979

Senior Housing Project Prospectus
1. THE NEED:
The housing problem for the
senior is a specific form of the
general housing problem in
Israel. Many older persons live in
quarters either too large or too
difficult for them to take care of.
The middle-income senior can
find little suitable housing, and
"Homes for the Elderly" are
generally planned for lower-
income seniors whose problems
are often further intensified by
social problems.
Middle-income persons do not
need or want "charity housing,"
nor do they wish to lose their
independence of decision making.
They cannot, however, afford to
live in the senior residences
available at the other end of the
social scale and available on the
private market.
2. BASIC PRINCIPLES OF
THE PROJECT:
A.Independence
The senior residents on whom
this project focuses are generally
financially independent as well as
socially independent and capable
of running their own affairs. They
do not want the completely
serviced institution wherein the
residents are treated as "in-
mates.** Thus, this project is
based on building a residence in
which residents will be inde-
pendent and will democratically
and cooperatively help in running
the "house" in which they will
have had an important role in its
realization.
b. Non-profit
This project is to be completely
non-profit. Notwithstanding the
social and financial independence
of the participants, the project
cannot be completed without
important assistance from public
funds and or government
sources. This clearly forbids
profit making. Those middle-
income seniors for whom the
project is planned are able and
willing to contribute to the
capital and to share in the
financing.
C Admissions
Persons investing in the
project must be healthy and able
to take care of their own needs.
Eventually, however, the need for
more medical and social help may
arise, for which the projected
residence will provide.
d. Social aspects
Management and government
of the residence will be the
responsibility of elected rep-
resentatives of the member-resi-
dents and representatives of the
sponsoring participants. This will
encourage a sense of community
concern even while allowing for
necessary privacy.
e. Financial aspects
As realization of the project
will require financial assistance
from public institutions and
others, it is premature to discuss
the financial arrangements. Some
principles have been established,
however:
A. A prospective resident will
invest in the project a certain
amount of money to be specified
when the final prospectus is com-
pleted.
Social activity, recreation
and mobility being important for
the well-being of the older person,
provisions will be made for these
in residence. The services offered
and what the individual can do
for himself will be carefully
balanced in order to avoid the
total dependency found in many
charitable institutions.
3. THE PLAN:
. a. Housing Unit*
There will be apartments of
various sizes of 1' i to 2'i rooms,
with an average sire of ap-
proximately 46 square meters.
The smallest unit will be a stud
apartment and the largest will
have an added half room. Each
apartment will include a kitchen,
shower-bath and toilet facilities,
and built-in closets / cupboards.
Additional living ac-
commodations for the personnel
needed for round-the-clock main-
tenance are also planned.
b. Communal facilities
The project will include all
basis communal facilities such
as:
1. Recreational: library, tele-
vision room, music room, etc.
2. Therapeutic: physical and
occupational in connection with
an infirmary. The "patient" room
may be multi-purpose, serving
for visitors as the need and their
availability arise.
3. Medical: office and/or
quarters for physician or nurse.
4. Laundry: automatic
washers and dryers in special
area.
5. Dining: central kitchen and
dining room (kosher), coffee
shop.
6. Religious: a synagogue.
c. Special features
Everything in the building is
to be especially geared to the
elderly:
1. Wide halls with handrails,
and able to accommodate wheel-
chairs;
2. Elevators, also able to ac-
commodate wheekhairs or a
single bed.
The resident's investment will
entitle him to an apartment in
which he may live (with his
spouse or close family member)
for his lifetime and / or that of his
spouse:
The apartment cannot be sold
nor left as an inheritance by the
resident, but
The investment can be left as
an inheritance.
Editor's note: At the time that
this was compiled, the exact
amount that residents will be
expected to invest was not
known. The initial assessment,
valid until March 31. 1978, was
as follows:
Single
Registration fee
(non refundable)
Down payment
Couple
$300 $400
2,000 2,500
$2,300 $2,900
MEYER
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The Hollywood Chapter of
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee was to hold
its installation luncheon meeting
on Thursday, May 3 at noon at
the Aventura Country Club in
the Garden Room. Billie Hyman
was to review the story of the life
of Lillian Hellman.
The slate of incoming officers
for 1979-80 are: president,
Katharine Packer; vice presi-*
denta, Winnie Berman, Dorothy
Appleby and Sophie Bobb; treas- *
urer, Roz Bernstein; financial
secretary, Teas Goldman;
association financial secretary,
Roz Fields; corresponding secre-
tary, Frieda Greenfield and
recording secretary, Sydelle
Silver.
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Friday, May 4,1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
AJC Presents Awards at Animal Darner *<**<* Now for JC Summer Gamp
Two awards were presented at
the Annual Awards Dinner of the
Broward Chapter, American-
Jewish Committee last Sunday
night. Nearly 300 persons at-
tended the event at the Hillcrest
Country Club.
Cathy and Bob Anderson of
Hollywood received the AJC's
"Community Service Award" for
their outstanding contributions
as civic leaders in the South
Broward area. Bob Anderson is
vice president, Barnett Banks of
Florida. Cathy is vice mayor and
commissioner of Hollywood. The
award was presented by Dr.
Rubin Klein, past president of
the American Jewish Committee.
Bill Koenig of Nova High
School was the recipient of the
"Student Human Relations
Award" as the graduating senior
of a Broward high school who
exemplified the AJC philosophy
BUI Koenig
of an individual whose concern
and care for others, regardless of
race, creed or religion set a shin-
ing example for others to follow.
The presentation was made by
Circuit Judge Alcee Hastings
who was one of three individuals
who judged all candidates nom-
inated from the schools by their
principals. The other judges were
Byron C. Campbell, publisher of
the Fort Lauderdale News and
Sun-Sentinel, and David Rush,
president of ARC Electronics,
Inc.
Koenig, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Paul Koenig of Hollywood, is
salutatorian of Nova's 1979 Sen-
ior Class and star shortstop on
the baseball team. He had prev-
iously received the Freedoms
Foundation Award at Valley
Forge, Pa.'Koenig has been ac-
cepted at Harvard University for
its Fall term.
Co-chairmen for the dinner
were George Bursak and Fred
Feinstein. Seating and arrange-
ments chairperson was Dorothy
Fine. Student Human Relations
Award chairperson was Leah
Weinstein.
President of the chapter,
Joseph Kleiman, reviewed the
major accomplishments of the
AJC in a special report presented
for the audience.
The AJC Board of Directors
will meet on Thursday, May 10,
to discuss plans and programs for
the 1979-80 year. Emphasis will
be on the AJC's efforts to help
mobilize a concerted energy
policy not only for this a.eii but
the entire nation.
The Michael-Ann Russell Jew-
ish Community Center Summer
Day Camp begins June 25 and
ends Aug. 17. Camping hours are
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. five days a
week.
Heavy registration has been
coming into each of the seven
camp divisions; Pre-School
Camp, Camp Shelanu (all around
camping program), Creative Arts
Camp, Sports Camp, Teen Travel
Camp, the Leadership Appren-
tice Program (training program
for prospective counselors) and
the Summer Happening in Israel
(the JCC guided tour to Israel).
The year marks the fourth
, camp season at the JCC of North
! Miami Beach. The camp offers
| two pools (indoor and outdoor), a
I fully equipped gym, a tennis
complex, ball fields and a modern
camp building.
For detailed information on
each of the seven camps, call the
JCC of North Miami Beach. Bro-
chures, membership information
and personnel interviews are all
; available upon request.
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BILL GOLDHING The "Dean of Florida Caterers, and our Vice President, brings his
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Available
Shown at a reception in the House of Representatives, honoring
Prime Minister Menachem Begin, left, are Speaker of the House
Thomas P. O'Neill Jr., and Rep. Edward J Stack of the 12th
District of Florida.
a.
After
shopping.
relax with a
great cup of
coffee.
Maxwell
House
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welcome
home.
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A living tradition in Jewish homes for more than half a century.


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 4,1979
Absorption Center
DIARY OF
Pictures arid 1
Air Force Base
This Absorption Center provides a multitude of services for new
arrivals. Individuals are provided with living space and job training in
an effort to get them integrated into Israeli society as quickly as
possible. That integration involves instruction in basic education,
Hebrew Jewish culture, both social and religious, and the services of
trained social workers and psychologists to deal with the inevitable
culture shock and disorientation.
Mai Ben
Schmul Frankel, a 29-year-old escorting officer, told the group, "The
pride you feel here at the Air Force Base is the same pride we feel for
our country all the time." We watched the A-4's and F-15's in practice
runs. Bobbie Levin said, "Its beautiful to see the Star of David on the
aide of the planes." We all shared in Schmul Frankel's pride in being
Jewish in a land defended by Jews.
,,lW'i*
The Western Wall
Dr. Robert Heller said, Peopta
Renewal." Renewal means an impm nen
46,000 Israeli families who are an rvii
Israel. A social worker in Dora ai of
helping these people, we are world*] ith
address the social needs of 300,111 sra
children who represent the next gen tior
The Rishon Li Zon is a Mai-Ben which money is allocated to. We were
briefed on the ever-increasing geriatric popuhis. Its problems are a
complex situation which take money, time and education to solve.
We visited with the elderly in the occupational center. Here everyone
was diligently working on various products, purses, dolls, potholders,
rugs, pillowcases, etc. They are taught to be productive. Each is
responsible for his and her living quarters.
It was a great feeling conversing with the people in Yiddish. This is a
true representation of the Diaspora Jew.
Yitzhak la
Kabblat Shabbat at the Western Wall is a sight one will never forget.
To see, touch and hear the voices created a moment of beauty and
sheer awe. All about the Wall were throngs of people over 200
young, vibrant boys and young men gathered for Shabbat. The
youth of Israel, the future of Israel from young Yeshiva to old
Chassidim. The marching and chanting of the Yeshiva boys was
absolutely thrilling.
Yad Vashem
...,; gsajaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaan1
At Yad Vashem one realizes that when Israelis say "never again" they
are stating a feeling that permeates the very soul and consciousness of
the nation. The Federation's leadership participated in a Yiskor
Service. When Joyce Newman, president, placed a wreath beside the
Eternal Light, the entire Mission group had tears in their eyes.
The rood to Msssda is filled with historical significance such aa Cum-
munan Cave where Dead Sea Scrolls were found. Here, for the first
time, yon are actually seeing how the Klbbutzum and settlements
have taken large areas of desert and turned them into an oasis. Some
Mission participants traveled up to Masada by cable car; others
walked. There is s narrow winding path up the aide of the mountain,
etched out by the original builders. It was this Utter route the so
called "snake path" that Dr. Elliot Levy and Allen Gordon elected to
run. The overall height is just over one mile, but the "snake path"
route is more than two miles. It took the men 20 minutes, 46 seconds,
but they vowed next time they would do It in 16 minutes.
We visited the Dead Sea at E
the Dead Sea ScroUa were fou
walking through Old Jerusalem, rvi
and agea.


Friday, May 4.1979
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
MISSION
Memories
?* 18, 197
The Northern Galilee
Golan Heights
rnewal
'..'-^L

r*. w
the main point of Project
nt in the quality of life for the
Irving in pockets of poverty in
of Tel Aviv said, "We are not
j ith them." Project Renewal will
*
br
sraelis 200,000 of them are
in tion of Israel's leadership.
The road to the top of the Golan waa heavily fortified with Israeli
soldiers and armed vehicles. Barbed wire waa everywhere and the
fields were filled with mines.
Reaching the top, we entered an Israeli banker. We saw how the
soldiers ate, slept and lived in small, dingy underground quarters.
Military Cemetery
During the rest of the morning and into the early afternoon, we moved
both forward and backward. During moments of intense reflection and
remembering, we visited the tomb of Hertzel and the military
cemetery in Yad Vashem. Our guide, a seasoned veteran of five wars
and hundreds of tours, shared our tears at the graves of Israeli
children who gave their lives in the Sinai, Golan, Gaza and West
Bank. The ages read more like a high school and college year book
than a cemetery 17 years old, 20 years old, 21 years old, etc.
Going Home
______________ggjgsjsjBffjBjBBjBjBjBjgnsjasjBja^B^gg
e stopped at the cave where
tnt the rest of the afternoon
,, a rveling at the mixture of culture
Unfortunately, the trip ends. We must return
We wifl return to Israel. The experiences wo shared and the impression
this remarkable land and its people made upon us will last forever.
Outside of Mettula is "The Good Fence" the most northern of
Israeli borders and the Southern Lebanese border.
Here at "The Good Fence" we witnessed an easy flow of South
Lebanese coming and going. This is an open border with more than
800 Lebanese crossing daily.
The border gives us hope. It is a positive sign that Arabs from dif-
ferent countries can develop good relations with Israel.
The Caucus
After Yad Vashem the men and women met in individual sessions. The
dollars raised on our Mission indicate the commitment which in-
dividuate felt as s result of our stay in Israel. At the Caucus in-
dividuals shared their feelings about what they had seen. Dr. Philip
Levin, Missions chairman, stood st a microphone and said when the
history of this period is written, the Israelis will be recorded as among
the most courageous people who ever lived. We are walking through
an entire country of heroes. The 118 people from South Breward who
were on the Community Mission committed $423,117 to the 1979
Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund.
JOIN US m ISRAEL
SHHaBBsaBaSHaBBSaSsl BssnssVBBmBBsmBsBBBmMHMaaW
Family Mission
August 9-20, 1979
Community Mission
November 1-11, 1979
Be Part off the Next
Diary off a Mission
For further information cull the
Jewish Federation
off So Mill Broward
921-8810


'/
Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 4,1979
Emotional Welcome for 5 Soviet Soviet Emigration
Jewish POCs on Arrival in Israel
Continued from Page 1
that we shall soon have here all,
all the prisoners of Zion, freed
from Soviet jails and gathering in
Israel. Together with your
families you will live in the
mother country, you will be free
citizens and together with us you
shall help build Israel so it
becomes an example for the
entire world."
ALTMAN, WHO replied on
behalf of his comrades, thanked
everyone in Israel and abroad
who had labored for their release.
He recalled the poem of Chaim
Nachman Bialik who spoke of
those who may be forgotten and
urged that efforts must be
doubled for the release of the
others still in Soviet jails. Alt-
man, speaking in accented
Hebrew, declared: "We shall
never foreet our friends and
brethren." A highlight of the
greeting was the presentation of
immigrant cards to each of the
five men by Minister of Absorp-
tion and Housing David Levy.
The scene at Ben Gurion
Airport had only one counterpart
when the Israeli hostages were
returned from Entebbe, Uganda
in July, 1977. Throngs packed
the immigrant processing hall at
the airport despite a severe heat
wave. The dignitaries present
constituted a "who's who" of
Israel.
Leon Dulzin, chairman of the
World Zionist Organization and
Jewish Agency Executives,
greeted the newcomers in the
name of the Zionist movement.
He said their release was the best
present Israel could have
received on the eve of the
Independence Day celebrations
that began Tuesday. He thanked
all responsible for the release of
the prisoners and vowed that
efforts will be continued to free
the others still behind barbed
wire or in the labor camps of
Siberia.
Ex-Guards at Maidanek
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Phone Wt > S6
We ship any\ntiere
m the U.S.*.
(JTA) A
three former
guards at the no-
Maidanek concen-
camp were ac-
hy a Dusseldorf
court for lack of positive
identification as the per-
sons involved in the mur-
ders of 250,000 inmates,
most of them Jews, during
World War II.
Although the verdict was
not unexpected inasmuch
as the prosecutor himself
had recommended ac-
quittal, it touched off a near
riot among spectators in
the courts who overturned
benches and shouted "Nazi
murderers."
THE DEFENDANTS were
Dr. Heinrich Schmidt, 66, who
had been chargned with selecting
children, sick and elderly inmates
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for the gas chambers, and camp
guards Charlotte Mayer, 61, and
Rosa Suess and Hermine
Boettcher, both 60, charged with
assisting in the selection process.
Shalom Hadassah
Installs Officers
The Shalom Group of Holly-
wood Hadassah held its closing
meeting and installation of offi-
cers on Wednesday, May 2, at the
Washington Federal Building,
450 N. ParkRd.
The executive director of the
Hollywood Chapter, Maxine
Heicken, installed the following:
President, Ruth Greenspan' vice
president, Rae Hanellin; fund
raising vice president program,
Sadie Nabel; vice president
education, Mildred Goldberg;
vice president membership, Gert
Jasnoff; treasurer, Sylvia David-
son; recording secretary, Belle
Grandberg; correspondent secre-
tary, Sally Kovek; financial
secretary, Helen Storfer.
Continued from Page 1
would lead substantially to free-
dom of emigration. The President
can then inform the Congress he
would grant most favored nation
treatment to the Soviet Union for
a year.
Vanik was reported to believe
that if the People's Republic of
China is provided with most
favored nation treatment and not
the USSR, the results would be
disastrous for the U.S. Jackson's
office told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that China is prepared to
provide such formal assurances
and in any case each country's
situation must rest on its own
merits. The JTA was also told by
Jackson's office that "we stand
firmly behind Jackson-Vanik.
This is no time to tamper with
it."
Brademas also said that when
Gromyko was asked for formal
assurances, he pointed out that
between 1970 and April 1 of this
year 98.4 per cent of those who
asked for emigration visas were
given permission to leave.
Gromyko seemed to say, Brade-
mas observed, that "we can't
agree to linkage but we are
letting more people go. q
Asked whether Gromyko's
percentages are not "terribly
misleading" since the basis for
his calculations are unverified,
Brademas replied he "was not
justifying Gromyko's figures."
Brademas said he is "open-
minded" and has not decided
about a waiver for the Soviets.
Michel observed that when the
waiver proposal arose, the
Soviets indicated they needed
additional definittions of waiver.
PREYER SAID that when the '
Vanik proposal was raised at a
meeting with Soviet refusniks the
"reaction was mixed." Dr. Alex-
ander Lerner "took a rather hard
line against it," Preyer said. But
"a majority of the refusniks,'^
while believing the JacksonT
Vanik Amendment was respon*-5
sible for better treatment for
Soviet Jews, "realized broader
issues are involved" and is trust-
ing Congress to act in their bast
interest. There was no specific
mention of the Anatoly Scharan-
sky case, Preyer said.
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. iM" .-. -'*
lay, May 4,1979
The Jewish Floridian and Sho far of Ortattr Hollywood
Page 11
>
You Can Retire in Israel
Soviet Jewry Update
)id you want to retire in
Bel, but didn't know how?
you can let the AACI
Bsociation of Americans and
iadians in Israel) help you.
Following is information on the
nior Housing Project, spon-
ged by the AACI, in Kiryat,
bvel section of Jerusalem. The
.es of apartment vary, and the
_es vary from 35 square meters
[58 square meters. The cost of
bartments are tentatively
jtimated between $30,000 and
10.000. There will be about 150
apartments in the project. If you
have questions and are in-
terested, write to: Dr. Harold
Wershow, 12 Vine Street, Bir-
mingham, Ala. 35213, or to
Israel: Association for Housing
of the Aged, P.O. Box 4085,
Jerusalem, Israel. Now is the
time to think ahead!
A groundbreaking ceremony
was held on Nov. 15 for a 150-unit
housing development for older
Olim that will be built in Kiryat
Yovel, Jerusalem. Celia Mar-
golin, the project's 77-year-old
initiator and chairman, has sent
us the following prospectus and
information.
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Whether you fly First Class
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Weflytheworid
the way the worid wants tofly


Page 12
- i\ : >,': v. ,'- .. .,. \VJ '
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hottywood
Friday, May 4,1979
Moriah Blum to Launch Golda Meir Club
Moriah Blum, wife of Israel's
Ambassador to the United Na-
tions Yehuda Blum, will be the
guest of honor at the inaugural
meeting of the State of Israel
Bonds Golda Meir Club, which
will be held Wednesday, May 9,
at the home of Dr. and Mrs.
Maxwell Dauer.
Mrs. Dauer will host more than
100 area women at a garden party
which will officially kick off the
Golda Meir Club in South Flor-
ida. Enrollment in the club, for
women only, is a 1979 minimum
purchase of $5,000 in State of
Israel Bonds.
At the same time, Mrs. Blum
will announce the beginning of a
$25 ..million reinvestment pro-
gram for the Israel Bonds Or-
ganization in this area.
Mrs; Blum, a sabra, is an ac-
complished architect and interior
designer who has assisted in con-
struction plane ter several of Is-
rael's major museums. She will
present specially designed char-
ter scrolls to each charter mem-
ber of the Golda Meir Club. In-
formation about this select group
may be obtained by calling the
Israel Bonds office.
*.+***.*++++****+****+**+**********+
ill
Grossberg Cited at
Israel Bond Event
Carl Grossberg, president of
Riverside Memorial Chapel, Inc.,
in New York, and well known to
South Florida Jewry, received
the David Ben-Gurion Award at
an Israel Bond testimonial dinner
on April 24, at the Sheraton
Centre. Manhattan.
The dinner inaugurated the
industry-wide program of the
Funeral. Cemetery, Casket,
Monument and Allied Industries
Division of State of Israel Bonds,
said general campaign chairman
Joel Kirschenbaum of Kir-
schenbaum Bros., Inc., in an-
nouncing the event.
"No worthier candidate than
Carl Grossberg could have been
chosen to lead this vital and
timely effort to strengthen
Israel's economic defenses as it
pursues its quest for peace in the
Middle East,'' Kirschenbaum
said. "He has given unstintingly
of his talents and energies in
service to the Israel Bond
program while at the same time
providing outstanding leadership
over many years in enhancing the
well-being of the funeral in-
dustry."
Grossberg has been active in
Jewish and communal affairs for
more than four decades. In
addition to his service in the
Israel Bond campaign, he is an
honorary past president of the
Jewish Funeral Directors of
America, a lifetime trustee of the
West Side Institutional
Synagogue, an involved member
of Park East Synagogue, a past
president of his B'nai B'rith
lodge and past master of the
Masons' Garfield Lodge.
Other industry leaders active
in organizing the dinner included
Andrew Fier of Riverside
Memorial Cahpel, Martin Kasdan
of Boulevard-Park West Chapels.
Seymour Weinstein of Sun
Casket Co., Warren Rosen of
Beth David Cemetery and Hy
Sprung of Sprung Monuments.
Guest speaker at the event was
Yehezkel Flumin, Israel's Deputy
Minister of Finance and a mem-
ber of the Knesset.
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Who cares
about \kcov?
Yacov and his family were lucky. They were among the last to leave
a Moslem "area of distress" before the gates closed down. But now
they wonder if they've come home only to be left behind. Yacov has
to learn a new trade. His wife needs adjustment counseling and
guidance. His teenage children, on the verge of dropping out of
school, need special instruction. They are all on waiting lists.
There are many Yacovs. In Israel. Here. All over the world. Highly
visible when they arrive in a free land... invisible all too soon. It's
possible to forget them.
But to forget Yacov you must forget who you are. You must ignore
a heritage of six thousand years of shared Joy and suffering the
oneness of all Jews everywhere. Yacov is you. His needs and his
family's needs are your needs with a different emphasis.
Renew yourself as you renew their lives and Jewish life
everywhere. Make your pledge to the 1979 campaign.
Who
abort \hcov and hisfamilV?
Wedo, \budo.
Make Your Pledge Now!
Support The Jewish Federation of South Broward'i
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2719 Hollywood Boulevard. Hollywood, Florida 33020-Phone 921 -mi0
^feor of Jewish Renewal of Home and Overseas
'-


f. May 4,1979
o Minn;..
The Jewish Fhridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
'big's Three Circles of Strategy
Soviets Warn They'll
'Solve Jewish Problem'
Continued from Page 4
Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Syria
a new Syria-Lebanon entity
lid emerge to destroy the
He East detente created at
ip David, the third Brzezinski
le has been hand-crafted, or so
[strategy goes, to invite the
lets back into the fold as a
kardian-partner" in the
bnte precisely as if there had
been another Geneva on Soviet-
Arab terms, and with nothing
lost to Moscow except perhaps a
bit of face which the Soviets can
easily retrieve by rewriting the
history books.
IT IS NOT unrealistic to
assume that the bait is made
more tempting by our own
struggle with Moscow over
detente in Europe and the
signing of a new SALT agree-
ussein's BrotherHassan
Unhappy Over Policy
By DAVID LANDAU
Jerusalem (jta>
IA surge of political ten-
punctuated by
|ence and suspected as-
sinations and attempted
issinations, is reported
iJordan.
the tension is believed to
from a deep division
| opinion between King
ssein and his heir ap-
mt and brother, Crown
ice Hassan, regarding
Man's steady drift
jards the rejectionist
(up of Arab states led by
I and Syria.
WILE HUSSEIN has been
ing in this direction ever
|e Camp David, Hassan is
ring more and more unhappy
it and he is supported by
fiificant sections of the officer
rps and of the Jordanian in
enous (as opposed to Pales-
fan) elite.
'lashes on Amman Univer-
|y's campus recently between
ilestinian and other students
explained as a reflection of
tension in the governing
helons.
\ Haaretz led off its front page
1th a report compiled by Arab
lairs monitor Oded Zarai of the
ious stories and rumors of
awing unrest in the Hashemite
Ingdom.
I The Haaretz headline said the
f.S. was planning for the
vacuation of American citizens
nd companies from Jordan.
THE STORY itself reported
hat the U.S. Embassy in
Lmman had been angrily ques-
roned about this by the Jor-
iinran government and had
esponded that the contingency
^lans were merely routine and
vere not connected to any
articular political situation.
The Haaretz report cited
Jordanians visiting the West
Bank, and West Bankers known
lor their dose ties with the royal
pouse, to authenticate the signs
pf tension in the neighboring
ptate.
A group of prominent West
'ankers protested to Amman
ast week at the method by which
tolice had broken up the campus
Demonstrations apparently
because injuries were sustained
P'y Palestinian students.
JORDANIAN travelers re-
orted that prices on the Amman
Stock exchange were falling and
lhat key families involved in
[commerce were moving funds out
f the country.
Meanwhile, the not-entirely-re-
lliable Phalangist radio station in
lU'lmnon has reported that a
I jtin'an aeronut'cal engineer
Inad been arrested in Jordan on
[suspicion of trying to plant a
|w>mh aboard the King's plane as
I" was about to fly Hussein to
I' ienna. As a result, security had
been tightened on all Alia Airline
flights, the radio said.
The Haaretz report also
discussed two mysterious ac-
cidents in Amman in which high-
level political allies of Hassan
had met an untimely death. In
one, Sherif Nasser Ben-Jamil, an
uncle of the King, and passionate
foe of the PLO, lost control of his
car and crashed to his death.
"There are rumors rife in court
circles," according to the report,
"that the car was tampered
with."
IN THE other incident, the
chief of internal security, another
close supporter of Hassan, was
killed at Amman Airport on his
return from Qatar. A brief official
statement said only that his car
had collided with another vehicle.
There has also been a spate of
explosions in Amman in recent
weeks, which government
authorities there have attributed
to "Zionist agents."
ment. Dealing from the bottom of
that deck of cards is by now so
customary that one more time
can hardly matter.
The stunning announcement
last week that Leonid Brezhnev
had commuted the sentences of
five Jewish refuseniks and or-
dered the processing of their exit
visas as quickly as possible
shows that the wind is surely
blowing in such a way as to give
the Brzezinski theoreticians
validity.
But neither men nor their
countries die without gasping. To
counteract Brzezinski's three
circles, a Dantesque nether-world
ot hellish inevitability for Israel,
but without Dante's Paradiso of
salvation, there is some evidence
these days that Israel is playing a
game of her own: the China card.
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) A
Soviet official warned in Moscow
that there would be a "solution of
the Jewish probelm" after the
end of next year's Olympic
Games in Moscow. Konstantin
Zoltov, an official of ovir, the
organization which processes exit
visas, gave the warning to Alia
Smuliansky who, with her
husband Mark, has been trying
to leave for Israel for the past
nine years.
A FEW OF
refusniks would
emigrate before
of the other
be allowed to
the Olympics,
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> WAMLW U/^A.VVAVA's V .


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 4,1979
Ask Abe
By Abe Halpern
ON A PERSONAL NOTE
This is column number 130 and completes five
years of continuous publication. I have never
missed a deadline. In April 1974 when this
column started, the then editor of the Jewish
Floridian and Shofar stated:
"We are happy to announce a new column
starting in this issue called ASK ABE. Readers
are welcome to send in questions relating to Jew-
ish history and folklore ... Mr. Halpern
appears to be a walking encyclopedia of Jewish
facts." {Jewish Floridian and Shofar, April 26,
1974, p.2)
At that time I did not expect that this column
would attract so many questions. The first ques-
tion dealt with the inscription on the Liberty Bell
and what is its significance. Since then the ques-
tions were about Jewish history, Jewish folklore.
Biblical personalities and Jewish customs. I
receive many more questions than I can use. It is
therefore not possible for me to publish all of the
questions submitted. Some of those not published
I answer in person.
In addition to questions submitted we receive
many other communications. Following are a few
brief excerpts from some of the letters.
"Upon receiving your answers in your column
to the various questions I found your articles very
inspiring and enlightening. You know how to
answer, and you substantiate your replies with
valid facts."
Rabbi Samuel Newberger
North Miami Beach, Fla.
A letter to the Jewish Federation: "Gentlemen,
I am writing to inform you of my pleasure in
reading the ASK ABE column in the Jewish
Floridian and Shofar. Mr. Halpern is a very
erudite person who shows a deep capacity for
research in seeking the answers to many ques-
tions pertaining to our faith ."
Herman Yorka,
Hollywood, Fla.
"Will incorporate a thought you advance in one
of your fact filled columns this at a Seder I
shall conduct across the street ... We look for
ASK ABE in each issue. Your job as a Melamed
(teacher) is far reaching, and we are much the
better for it. Did Chaucer have you in mind when
he coined Gladly he teaches Gladly he learns.'
In any case we are in your debt for your pain-
staking labor of love "
Blanche and Isidor Bookbinder
HaDandale, Fla.
To the Editor of the Jewish Floridian: "Dear
Sir: I wish to commend you for including in your
newspaper the column ASK ABE written by Mr.
Abraham Halpern. I find his answers to questions
about Judaism informative, clearly written, and
beautifully expressed. Abe always quotes from
several sources, thus giving specific facts and
references.
"These articles are so worthy, I am saving each
column, not for myself, but for my grandchildren.
The questions and the answers enable us to have
a better understanding of our history and
culture."
Mrs. Murray M. Feuerstein
HaDandale, Fla
"Dear Editor: My sincere thanks for sending
me your paper. Not only is it an excellent journal
concerning Jewish news and issues, but it also
stimulates Jewish pride in our heritage, culture
and accomplishments.
"1 particularly enjoy the column ASK ABE. It
is most interesting, factual and informative. Good
luck in all your journalistic efforts."
William Kropf M.I)
HaDandale, Ha.
"My reaction to your answer (to the question
why Sarah did not have a child until she was 90?)
is very well done, with a lot of information. Thank
you very much."
Heather Levine
Long Island, N.Y.
Editor's Note:
Please send all questions to:
ASK ABE
co Jewish Federation of South Broward
2719 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
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JEWISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD WOWJEN'S DIVISION
Awards and Installation of Officers and Board, 10 a.m.. Emerald
Hills Country Club. 4100 North Hills Drive.
MIRAMAR CHAPTER OF PIONEER WOMEN, Regular Mooting, noon
Miramar Recreation Center, 6700 Miramar Parkway, Miramar, call
989-7870 or 989-4240. '.
May 17
SABRA-SCOPUS GROUP OF HOLLYWOOD HADASSAH, Installation of
Officers and general meeting, 7:30 p.m. for the Boutique and 8
p.m. for the meeting. Temple Solel. 5100 Sheridan St., contact
Shirley Rosenblatt at 962-6213.
May 20
JEWISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD, Annual Meeting, 10
a.m. at the Federation office, 2719Hollywood Boulevard.
MIRAMAR CHAPTER OF PIONEER WOMEN, Luncheon and Card Party,
noon. Donation $3.75 at the Miramar Recreation Center, 7600
Miramar Parkway, contact Nellie Fine at 989-7870.
4
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ky, May 4,1979
P*V
.m a.
The Jewish Ploridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
. m
Page 15
fioutfc Qnowakd
Qpotiiqh by Every Jewish gourmand (freeser) is probably familiar with
South Miami Beach restaurant "The Famous." From the
pilte fish and sour tomatoes to the kreplach with matzah ball
up to the stuffed breast of veal, it is invariably a night of over-
Ling followed by indigestion.
Dr. Wally Slff was celebrating his 50th birthday and chose
Bhare the evening with lovely wife Phyllis and a bottle of "2
its plain." Close Friends decided to invite themselves, and the
nit was a surprise after-dinner roast. Those attending were
Norman and Natalie Bluth, John and Donna Eaton, Sonny
I Betty Finkelstein, Mel and Gloria Friedman, Andy and
enda Greenman, Dr. Lou and Natalie Joblove, Dr. Howard
Sandy Kelner, Bob and Barbara Roberta, Dr. Al and
ice Roaenthal and Dr. Bob and Mimi Sabra.
Wally received gifts and good wishes from everyone. We
l forward to being together again at his 75th birthday party.
Marcy Kameroa and Rita Goldman of Temple Sinai Sister-
d planned a Springtime Scholarship Supper. Those who
ended enjoyed a delicious meal and helped support a diver-
1 scholarship program.
Next season Marcy Kameron will be Sisterhood president;
i Widliti, fund-raising; Rose Colin, membership; Dorothy
CEAC; Mildred SUbowitz and Viola Saperstem, sec-
iries; and Ida Gotatein, treasurer.
Skiing is a popular sport even for tennis-playing Floridiana.
sying the spring skiing at Lake Tahoe were Dr. Harvey and
i Perets and Dr. Norman and Natalie Bluth.
More tennis loving vacationers were Dr. Paul and Ruth
iensky who flew to California. They visited daughter Debbie
San Diego and traveled up the scenic Pacific Coast.
Welcome home, Bea MogOowitz, who was also in California,
visited her daughter and their families in Los Angeles and
i Francisco.
Another traveling physician is Dr. Myles Krieger. Myles
wife Regine attended the International Congress of Facial
stic Surgery in New Orleans, La. Regine, born in Paris, had
opportunity to sample New Orleans French Quarter cooking.
Spring holiday brings many sun-seeking northern visitors.
>ls, tennis courts, apartment and condominium elevators are
j)t very busy, along with tired grandparents trying to keep the
Jdren happy.
In Carriage Hills Rose Greenberg enjoyed a visit by her
jhter Jackie Seidenberg with grandchildren Alisa and
ert. Eve and Phil Levine entertained grandson Glenn
luster and granddaughter Randee Schuster from Peabody,
is.
In Emerald Hills Jane and Larry Glick were visited by their
son, daughter-in-law and two granddaughters. Sylvia and Bob
Schlanger welcomed their daughter from California.
Hillcrest was jumping with visitors. Nellie and Irving
Shanler, as well as Hilda and Charlie Gradmger, were hosts for
the holidays to their grandchildren, both from New York. Gert
and Irv Gmen enjoyed seeing their grandson and grand-
daughter.
Now that all the crumbs from the matzahs have been swept
away and the house is quiet and back to normal, we still cherish
the warm memories of our visitors.
Grace Finkel will serve as president of the Friends of the
City of Hollywood Art and Culture Center. Adele Levine, Ruth
Galvin, Robert Goldberg, Laura Rotstein and Rezy Abeles will
be among those elected to the Board of Directors. Edgar (Bud)
Galvin will serve on the Board of the Art and Culture Center
located on South Ocean Drive.
Minerva Davis and Elayne Rubin handled reservations for
a cocktail party held at the home of Rita Ilowit benefiting the
"Friends for Life," which supports the University of Miami
School of Medicine.
Congratulations to Dr. George and Roby Kline on the Bat
Mitzvah of their daughter Wendy. Best wishes to Leonard and
Phyllis Grand on Paula's Bat Mitzvah.
A very happy 21st birthday to Michael Levin, son of Mort
and Marcie Levin. Michael is a senior at the University of
Florida and will attend law school in the fall. Brother Mark was
asked to serve as a staff member at the AZA Regional Con-
vention. He is one of the youngest to serve in that responsible
capacity.
Dr. Saul and Millie Nitzberg are extremely proud and
happy parents. They have much to celebrate. Son Bui graduates
from Emory University Medical School. Son Mark has become
engaged to be married and next year will complete his doctoral
program in psychology at Nova University. Daughter Lisa
completes her graduate degree at Columbia University. Son
Ricky graduates from Harvard University and will enter
Harvard Medical School. Youngest daughter Lanri continues
her studies at the University of Pennsylvania.
Millie is diligently keeping pace with her studious family by
continuing her graduate studies at Nova University. While all
his family is attending schools, Saul is studying his checkbook.
Charles Morgenatein, son of Dr. Karl and Carol. Morgen-
stein, has become engaged to Melody Bard. Charles is a second
year student at the University of Miami Law School. He was
recently elected an editor of the Law Review, which is the
organization of top students.
Speaking of attorneys the South Broward Bar
Association Auxiliary has chosen new officers: President,
Barbara (Mrs. Joel) Kopelman; Vice President, Jo Ellen (Mrs.
Neal) Kalis; Treasurer, Joan (Mrs. David) Romanik; Cor-
responding Secretary; Diane (Mrs. Jeffrey) Wasserman,
Recording Secretary, Linda (Mrs. Jeffrey) Weissman. The
organization presents an annual scholarship to a Nova
University Law School student.
I remember many years ago when the group was organized
at a meeting held at the Reef Restaurant on Oct. 26, 1960. Over
100 women gathered to elect Roeemarie Yeslow as president. I
was chosen recording secretary, and I am still writing.
Grossmans to Receive Bonds Honor
adge Mel Grossman and Israel
Imissioner Nicki E. Gross- Salute
will receive the State of honor
Generation Award at a
to Israel held in their
at Beverly Hills Social
land Mrs. George Kahn, residents of La Mer, receive the State of
jel Lion of Judah Award at a Salute to Israel held in their honor at
IHallandale complex. The Kahns were honored for their extra-
par y service to the Jewish people in this country and in Israel.
king the presentation is Ben Schwab.
Mel and Nicki Grossman
Club, 5300 Washington St.,
Hollywood. The event is slated
for Sunday evening. May 6, at 8
p.m., in cooperation with the
State of Israel Bonds Or-
ganization.
According to chairman Phil
Singer, the Grossmans are being
honored for their longtime in-
volvement in Jewish philan-
thropic and service organizations
in the Hollywood community.
Judge Grossman has served as
assistant attorney general for the
State of Florida; as counsel for
the U.S. Senate; as legal advisor
to the Hollywood Police Depart-
ment and assistant general coun-
sel for Broward County.
Commissioner Grossman
serves on the Broward County
Metropolitan Planning Organiza-
tion, the Broward County Plan-
ning Council and is active in
ORT, National Council of Jewish
Women and B'nai B'rith.
Special guest at the Salute to
Israel will be Emil Cohen,-a well-
known American Jewish folk
humorist.
IEVITT
inirtmbrttitM.
Hollywood. Flo
21-7200
Sonny Lovlfl. P.O.
11HSW Dixie Mwy
MertR Miami, Pla.
MMS1S
-
AbeU Joins
Bank
of Hallandale
William E.
has joined t
Bank of Hallan
dale and Trus
Company as
vice presiden
and marketing]
director. The an
nouncement was
made by Carol
Owen, president
of the full service
commercial
bank.
(Bert) Abell
AbeU
Abell is active in community
and civic work. He is a past
president of the Hallandale
Rotary Club and Hallandale
Chamber of Commerce and a
director of the Metropolitan Din-
ner Club in Hollywood.
Religious
Directory
NORTH BROWARD
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Phillip A. Laoowltx. Cantor Maurice
A.Neu.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
Drive. Reform (44)
21S1 Rlvertide
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
STttl St. Conservative Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman (44 A)
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 69M SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Paul Plotkin.
Cantor Yehudah Heilbraun. (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE BETH EMET. 200 NW
Douglas Rd. Liberal Reform. David
Goldstein, ed dir
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. ??30 Sterling
Rd., Hollywood. Conservaftve. RaBW
Bernard I. Shoter.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi
SheON J.Harr. (64)
RECONSTRUCTION 1ST
GOGUE. 7473 NW 4ttl St. (69)
SYNA
HAlLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
. NE Ofh Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Carl Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob Dan
Mar. (it)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DAOE.
1BM1 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kongsley Cantor Irving
Shulkes. (37)
HOLLYWOOD
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max Land-
man. (47B)
BETH EL TEMPLE. I3S1 S. 14ttl Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. Assis-
tant Rabbi Jonathan Woll. (45)
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601 Arthur
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi Paul M. Katz,
Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro.
Cantor Naf taly A. Linkovsky. (45)
TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.
Hollywood. Fla. 33021. Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Robert P. Frazin.
Cantor Phyllis Cole. (47C)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE 3291 Stirling
Road. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe
. Bomier. (52)
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