The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00200

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
Jewislh IFIciridliai m
>e
i
Number 13
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Hollywood, Florida Friday, June 30,1978
Price 35 Cents
>llow-Up
[ow Ruth Carter Stapleton
Snubbed Convert K hitch
Israelis Reject
LatestProposal
;i)Y EDELSTEIN
my press conference,"
ter Stapleton told the
room of reporters
lo her announcement
vould not address a con-
. Bnai Yeshua, a Long
jebrew Christian" mis-
roup. "No one else is
tit."
Stapleton, sister of
; Carter and a prominent
i-iil Christian, adjusted
and smoothed her
iri'd dress. Speaking
lie continued: "I made
i after many sleepless
nd much prayer. I tried
ay self into the mind of
rist. What would He do,
nyself."
iG made her decision,
apleton came to New
bold a press conference in
Boor conference room at
li-'in Ave. The location
sen to emphasize the
enre of Mrs. Stapleton's
nerican Jewish Commit-
ent a mailgram to the
Innouncing her ap-
1 it ion, Rabbi Marc
jm, the AJC's director
ligious affairs, was
a consultant" to Mrs.
I le said he had written
tersed several times with
Itapleton about Bnai
h liKl.F.SS, it seems as
one member of the
kmily who is listening to
feeders.
Ruth Carter Stapleton
Jewish community leaders on
Long Island expressed dismay
when it was learned last month
that Mrs. Stapleton had accepted
the invitation to speak at the
Bnai Yeshua gathering.
Bnai Yeshua is a Texas-based
organization which last year pur-
chased the Stony Brook Girls
Academy as a center from which
they proseletyze their odd
mixture of Jewish and Christian
customs.
Their office has recently issued
a barrage of press releases (which
are mailed in envelopes whose
postmark reads shalom) pre-
dicting that thousands of Hebrew
Christians would attend the June
8 to 10 gathering billed as
Shechinah '78 (Glory of God).
Having Mrs. Stapleton as key-
note speaker, it seemed to most
observers, lent a certain
legitimacy to the Hebrew
Christians' practices which have
been roundly condemned by both
Jewish and Christian groups.
MRS. STAPLETON, however,
Continued on Page 2
Israel has rejected
President Anwar Sadat's
latest proposals calling for
Israel to turn over the oc-
cupied West Bank to Jordan
and the Gaza Strip to Egypt
as a preliminary move toward
a Mideast peace.
Spokesman Arieh Naor said
after a meeting of Prime Min-
ister Menachem Begins
cabinet that the problem
centers on what the Israelis
view as the "preconditional"
aspect of the plan, that Israel
give up the territories prior to
negotiations on effective
arrangements for Israeli
security.
N CAPITOL HILL
UJSL Hints Solution On
Way With Veep Mondale
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The United States
indicated that it is con-
sidering offering its own
"suggestions" to bring
Israel and Egypt back to
leration Leaders Attend
Washington Meetings
Irs of South Broward's
I community represented
ish Federation of South
in Washington, D.C.,
IX, at meetings of the
nf Jewish Federations
ire Funds.
ei'tings marked the first
Council sessions were
Vashington. A number of
(meetings were arranged
Advantage of the access to
tration representatives
ibers of Congress.
[ADDITION, consider-
[ere given to planning the
immunity campaigns
> account the 1978
ces.
inipaign meetings, which
J jointly with UJA, con-
the issues facing com-
l at home and abroad.
Joard members and local
ty leaders also par-
in an assessment of the
on Capitol Hill and in
{ministration regarding
r peace in the Middle
implications for action
national and local com-
Bvels.
OTHER discussion items
included domestic developments
including tax policy and philan-
thropy, the needs of the growing
numbers of aged and urban
problems affecting Jewish people
and agencies.
Conferences also were arranged
for Federation leaders with local
Congressmen.
Additional subjects which
received considerations from the
Federation leaders were increased
resettlement of Soviet Jews;
strengthening Jewish family life,
planning and financing Jewish
education, staffing needs of Fed-
erations, leadership development,
women's services, fiscal manage-
ment, endowment development,
overseas services, energy con-
servation and dollar savings in
community institutions and
other needs.
Representing the Jewish Fed-
eration of South Broward were
Joyce Newman. Federation
president; Esther Gordon,
Women's Division president; Dr.
Phil Levin, Mission chairman;
Sumner G. Kaye. executive
director; and Marcy Gross,
public relations director.
the conference table and
that Vice President Walter
Mondale may convey them
to Israel when he visits
there at the end of the
month.
The State Department's chief
spokesman, Hodding Carter,
alluded to both possibilities
today. He also refused to charac-
terize or comment in any way on
the response sent by the Israeli
Cabinet to the American
questions about the future status
of the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
CARTER NOTED that
Ambassador Samuel Lewis in
Israel and Ambassador Hermann
Eilts in Cairo have met, respec-
tively, with Foreign Minister
Moshe Dayan and "Egyptian
authorities."
He hinted that the U.S. might
make its move after "con-
sultations" are completed. He
would not say whether con-
sultations are underway with any
other governments, although
Saudi Arabia is known to have an
overriding interest in develop-
ments and Jordan is expected to
express its views.
(Egyptian Foreign Minister
Mohammed Kaamel was quoted
as saying that his country
regretted "Israel's continued
intransigence and determination
not to respond favorably to the
honest efforts exerted by Egypt
and supported by the U.S. )
ASKED ABOUT the Amer-
ican "option" to offer its own
proposals for resuming the Israeli
- Egyptian talks,
Carter said,
"ISRAEL rejects without res-
ervation these suggestions by
President Sadat," the cabinet
statement said.
Israel will stick to its own pro-
posal for continued limited Pales-
tinian self-rule with continued
Israeli military presence in the
West Bank and Gaza for a five-
year period, Naor indicated.
After the fifth year, the status of
the occupied territories would be
open for negotiation.
"Israel is willing to discuss any
Egyptian proposal, providing it
is not presented as a precondition
for negotiations," said Naor.
LAST MONTH, Begin dis-
missed the Sadat proposal after it
Continued on Page 3
Community Israel Mission
A Sell-Out for Federation
For the first time in the 35-year history of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward, all available seats for the South Broward Com-
munity Mission to Israel have been sold out, according to Mission
Chairman, Dr. Phil Levin.
"The excitement is mounting for the 125 people who will see their
heritage redeemed, alive, growing toward future greatness; as they
explore Israel from Sept. 7 through 18," explained Dr. Levin.
"THIS MISSION will have the largest number of participants
ever to leave from South Broward. Increased Jewish awareness and
community involvement can account for sell-out," he noted.
"We do realize that circumstances arise which may cause a
cancellation for some participants," said Levin, "so we have set up a
waiting list to fill all vacancies. A deposit check must be submitted to
the Federation to place your name on the list. All vacancies for the
mission will be filled in order, from the list. We hope we can accom-
modate everyone who is interested in going.
"The participants of the Mission realize that September is just
around the corner and are busily planning for the vacation to their
homeland. There are many advance preparations to be made, in-
cluding passport validation, shopping for proper clothing, buying
electric current converters, and worrying how to fit a closetful of
clothes into one or two suitcases." he said.
Continued on Page 10
Dr. Phil Levin (seated left) confirms 125 mission participants to
Federation President, Joyce Newman (seated right). Standing
(from left) are Rev a Wexler, Federation campaign director and
Sumner Kaye, executive director. The South Broward Com-
munity Mission will be Sept. 7 through 18.


Page 2
"jfffK,. w Rkntar of Ureater HoUyu>ood
Slepak, Nudel Sentenced to Internal Exile
*~ I'.riw aHHoH "I think it in
NEW YORK-(JTA)-
Vladimir Slepak and Ida
Nudel, two of the leading
Jewish activists in Mos-
cow, have been sentenced
separately to "internal
exile," presumably in
Siberia, for "malicious
hooliganism," the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry
and the Union of Councils
for Soviet Jews reported
here. They said Slepak was
given a five-year sentence
and Ms. Nudel four years.
Neither of the two had
lawyers for their trials
which were held in different
parts of Moscow in courts
in the district where they
live, according to a spokes-
man for the SSSJ and the
UCSJ. Reportedly, it was
also the first time that
neither relatives nor friends
of the defendants were per-
mitted into the courtrooms.
THE SSSJ and UCSJ said
Nudel refused to enter the court-
room until her friends were
allowed in. They were not, and
she was dragged inside, accord-
ing to the two groups here.
Slepak and his wife, Maria,
were arrested June 1 by Soviet
plainclothesmen who broke into
their apartment after the couple
displayed a banner from their
balcony demanding reunion with
their son in Israel.
Although Mrs. Slepak waa also
charged with "malicious
hooliganism," she was released
after becoming ill. No date has
been set for her trial.
NUDEL, known as the
"guardian angel" of the Soviet
Jewish Prisoners of Conscience,
was arrested June 2 as she and 13
other Jewish activists demon-
strated against the arrest of the
Slepaks in Pushkin Square out-
side the apartment building
where the Slepaks live. All 14
demonstrators were arrested but
13 were released. Only Nudel was
charged.
Slepak. a 50-year-old electrical
engineer, has been seeking a visa
to emigrate to Israel for eight
years. He is a member of the
group of Soviet activists and dis-
sidents who are monitoring Mos-
cow's compliance with the human
rights provisions of the Helsinki
accords. Nudel has also been
seeking an emigration visa for
eight years.
President Carter said at a press
conference in Washington that he
does not consider the Slepak case
"a personal response" by the
Soviet Union to his human rights
campaign but an indication "of
whether or not the Soviet Union
can stand internal dissension and
monitoring of its actions by
private citizen groups.''

ConveRt klatch SnuBBe6
Continued from Page 1
said that she was unaware of the
precise nature of Bnai Yeshua.
She told the press conference that
her secretary had made the
appointment without consulting
her. It is the nature of her work,
Mrs. Stapleton maintained, that
she speak to groups of all faiths
to share her "psychological and
spiritual insights."
I am a Christian and my faith
stems from my perception of
God's love through Jesus
Christ," she said, smiling in a
manner reminiscent of her
brother.
asked me if I was aware of the
Jewish reaction to my ap-
pearance at Bnai Yeshua. And I
told him, quite honestly that I
hadn't."
WAS SHE influenced at all by
her brother?
She smiled again, this time
warmer and more sincere than
the President's Ultra-Brite grin.
'Jimmy, what must I do?' I
asked him. And he looked at me
and he said, 'Ruth, I've never
told you what to do. and I m not
going to tell you now. You must
seek your own guidance do
what is right in your heart.' "
AMERICAN SCENE
"Yet I have never attempted in
any way to negate the faith and
practices of any sect, however far
they might be removed from my
own personal beliefs, nor would I
ever willingly be used by any
group to attack the faith of
others.
"I WOULD NOT associate
myself with any effort that would
seek to undermine the survival of
the Jewish people as a distinctive
religious-ethnic group."
Mrs. Stapleton explained that
her work as president of Behold,
Inc., a non-profit, non-denom-
inational religious organization,
involves reconciliation and "inner
healing" a complicated
process in which tensions and
pressures are released through
acceptance of Jesus. She main-
tained that 8 he has not now and
never has been actively seeking
to convert Jews.
"Conversion is Bnai Yeshua s
calling. It is not mine," she said.
"Well, the hat time I saw
Jimmy waa at Billy's daughter's
wedding. He came up to me and
MICHAEL STOLOWIEZKY,
an Israeli who runs the World
Christian Travel Service in
California, was brought up to the
lectern. A balding, goateed man
in a white safari jacket, he'ex-
plained that he was the booking
agent for Mrs. Stapleton"s forth-
coming trip to the Holy Land.
"I've been with her constantly
for the past two months, and I ve
never heard her mention
anything of the sort that she is
trying to convert Jews," said
Stolowiezky, who added he had
lost members of his family in the
Holocaust.
"Mrs. Stapleton, what would
you do if one of your children
decided to convert to Judaism?"
The question was posed by Frank
Casey, a Black reporter for
WPIX-TV.
MRS. STAPLETON remained
silent for 46 seconds. At that
moment, the light in the room
pointed up the resemblance
between her and her other
brother, Billy.
Ht-n-n
Slepak, who has unsuccessfully
sought an emigration visa for the
past eight years, was a member
of the unofficial group monitor-
ing Soviet compliance with the
Helsinki Final Act.
CARTER NOTED that a
"substantial portion" of the
group's members "have now been
either harassed or imprisoned or
tried and I think this is some-
thing that is continuing."
He said. "I have expressed in
the strongest possible terms,
both publicly and in diplomatic
channels, our concern about the
actions of the Soviet govern-
ment."
He denied that he has stopped
talking about specific cases of
individuals. He said he has "done
so in the past," and "I intend to
do so" in the future. He said that
the Soviet actions "work against
the best interests of harmony and
peace between the Soviet Union
and other countries.
Carter added, "I think it is im-
portant for the world to monitor
what goes on in the Soviet
Union." He noted that the Soviet
Union "has voluntarily signed
the agreement at Helsinki" which
guarantees "certain basic civil
rights" within its borders.
IT WAS meanwhile reported
that Mrs. Maria Slepak was suf-
fering intense pain from an in-
flamed pancreas and was under
severe duress from Soviet police
interrogators when she was
forced to sign a statement that
resulted in her indictment on
charges of "malicious hooli-
ganism which grossly
violates public order and shows
open disrespect for society," the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
learned
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June 30,1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Jleged War Criminal
Attempts Suicide
, DAVID MARKUS
QE JANEIRO (JTA)
tged Nazi war criminal
iFranz Wagner was in the
ry of the federal prison in
, under close watch after
Iccessful suicide attempt.
j medical spokesman said
jth was satisfactory,
quest for Wagner's ex-
has already been filed
j and similar requests are
i from the governments of
West Germany and
[which say they will file
H-civing the necessary
ntation.
I.NER. who has lived in
ilo since 1950. was iden-
tr.ni ly by Nazi-hunter
,\ lesenthal as the former
commander of the
hs Trebllnka and Sobibor
ration camps. He has
he charge.
i s, ODS of them of
traction, have filed a
,s corpus with the
Supreme Court in
They are asking for
j release from detention
ction of all extradition
luwyers claim that
ir Wagner may have
I acted solely as a German
Hrmation Class
)ers Announced
lie Solel recently an-
the members' names of
nhrmation Class. Con-
include Lauri Berk,
lock. Beverly Cook, Debi
Sheri Fiske, David
Emily Goldstein, Debby
Jebi Kronengold, Halley
David Multer. Beth
[Debbie Topping, David
zenfeld, Joel Weiner and
lotsky.
-atest
oposal
linued from Page 1
t aired in the news media.
I at the time that the plan
equire Israel to give up
es "without negotiations
flout a peace treaty."
i semiofficial AlAhrman
er outlined Sadat's pro-
vhich includes the
tptian and Jordanian
pould replace the Israeli
in the West Bank and
?hich Israel took from
nd Egypt in 1967.
IDAN would assume
bility for the West Bank
>t for the Gaza Strip for
ar period. During that
purity measures for Israel
discussed as part of
aeli negotiations.
(Arab states would nego-
ph Palestinians living in
i territories so that Israel
ot have to deal directly
Palestine Liberation
Ition.
poposal was to be drawn
eek and transmitted to
M States, according to
Middle East News
quoting Egyptian
Imister Mohamed Ibra-
H.
E meantime, there has
immediate reaction from
ptian government on
jection of the proposal
patriot. "There was only one man
in Nazi German responsible for
the war crimes: Hitler," the law-
yers contended.
THEY CHARGED that Jews
have created a publicity machine
that distorts the facts about
Wagner.
Meanwhile, the Rio branch of
the Association of Polish
Resistance Fighters has called for
Wagner's extradition to Poland
on grounds that the law requires
that he stand trial in "the ter-
ritory where he committed his
crimes."
Inasmuch as Israel has filed
the first official extradition
request it is expected to be acted
on first by the federal Supreme
Court.
Children of Temple Beth Shalom Day School
combined efforts to make food baskets which
were presented to area nursing homes in
South Broward in celebration of Shavuoth.
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But, like a will,it's another method
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Tk. Jewish Floridian and Shofar^_Greater Hollywood
Friday
oewish Floridian 'Right to Life' a Pretense OJ
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
and SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
HoUywood Office 1S. Federal Hwy.. Suite JOB, Danla. Fla 004
Telephone 920-9018
MAIN OFFICE and PLANT 120 NE 6th St., Miami, Fla 3S1SS Phone "
FREDSHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and PublUher Executive Editor
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashrufh
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published Bl Weekly
Second Qua Postage Paid at Danla. Fla. 864600
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weakly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. worio-
wide News Service. National Editorial Association, American Association of
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (local area) One Year$7.SO. Out of Town Upon Request.
Friday, June 30,1978
Volume 8
25SIVAN-5738
Number 13
Some Carter Hokum
Now that Prime Minister Begin and his Cabinet have
sent another "unsatisfactory" explanation to President
Carter of Israel's future policy in the occupied territories,
pressure will mount for the President and the State
Department to take a more active stance in imposing a
peace settlement on the Middle East.
This is something that the Administration says it
didn't want to do. Bunk.
What was the Carter jet deal jointly concluded but
further pressure on Israel to come to terms with the Arabs
more favorable to the Arabs than to the Israelis?
In fact it is precisely this jet deal, contributing to an
already gross inequity in the Middle East arms balance,
that has made Israel more determined than ever not to
telegraph its decisions on the territories to be made five
years hence.
President Cafer has long ago given up his role as
honest broker between the contending parties. Why the
hokum about being sad that he must now "abandon" it?
New Era in Congress
The defeat of Sen. Clifford P. Case in the New Jersey
Republican Primary removes from the Senate one of Is-
rael's most ardent and effective supporters. The absence
of Case from Congress after 24 years in the Senate and
before that in the House may signal a new era for Israel's
relations with Congress.
The loss of the 74-year-old Case at the hands of
Jeffrey K. Bell, a 34-year-old political unknown, had
nothing to do with Israel. Bell presumably will support
Israel as does his Democratic opponent, former New York
Knicks basketball star Bill Bradley.
And, of course, despite the Senate approval of Presi-
dent Carter's sale of jet planes to Egypt and Saudi Arabia,
the overwhelming majority of the membership of both the
House and Senate support Israel and its right to live in
peace and security.
The Senate still will have such stalwart supporters of
Israel as Frank Church (D., Idaho), Henry Jackson (D.,
Wash.) and Bob Packwood, (R., Ore.). There are also
freshmen Senators coming along all the time: to mention
just two, Joseph R. Biden (D., Del.), who introduced the
resolution to reject the Mideast plane package, and H
John Heinz (R., Pa.).
But Case, along with Sen. Jacob Javits (R., N.Y.),
who is also 74 and up for reelection in two years, and the
late Hubert H. Humphrey, held a special status. The three
of them had dealt with the issues concerning the State of
Israel from the beginning. Their experience and prestige
provided immeasurable aid both for American Presidents
working out their Mideast policies and to the Israelis in
their dealings with the U.S. government and Congress.
Full Text of Israel's
Statement on West Bank
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Cabinet sent a
three-point reply to the United States Sunday in
response to the questions posed regarding the future
status of the West Bank and Gaza Strip. It read as
follows:
1. The Government of Israel considers it vital to
continue the peace-making process between Israel
and its neighbors.
2. The Government of Israel agrees that five
years after the application of the administrative
autonomy in Judaea, Samaria and the Gaza District,
which will come into force upon the establishment of
peace, the nature of the future relations between the
parties will be considered and agreed upon, at the
suggestion of any of the parties.
3. For the purpose of reaching an agreement, the
parties will conduct negotiations between them with
the participation of representatives of the residents
of Judaea, Samaria and Gaza as elected in ac-
cordance with the administrative autonomy.
Any pretense to humaneness
that the misnomered "Right to
Life" people have is belied by the
anti-life bills they are urging
upon the Congress of the United
States at this time.
We are about to witness a re-
peat of the 1977 battle over
abortion which held up passage
of the vital Health, Education
and Welfare appropriation until a
compromise was struck in the
final hours which pleased no one.
THAT THE House of Rep-
resentatives could get bogged
down on such an issue again and
again attests not only to the
venality of a majority of the Con-
gressmen but to the dogged
determination of the Catholic
Church to impose its morality on
America.
It also tells us something
about the people like Rabbi
Phineas Weberman who claims
that being against abortion is not
a religious issue but one of
human rights.
Here are some of the things the
"human rights" people have in
mind in the first moves in the
House of Representatives which
would limit Medicare funds only
to cases in which a woman's life
would be endangered if she went
through a full-term pregnancy:
9 If the pregnancy resulted
from rape, it would be elim-
inated:
9 I f the pregnancy, even of a
child, resulted from incest, no
funds could be provided for an
abortion:
9 If the pregnancy would
result in severe and long-lasting
physical damage to the woman,
there would be no funds.
THESE WERE the com-
promises of last year which the
"Right to Life" people would not
end. But they have some other
prohibitory amendmenta which
show their true colors, the ones
that go beyond abortion.
An example is use of family-
planning funds for abortions.
Legal services, funded by the
government, prohibit attorneys
helping poor women to secure
non-therapeutic abortions.
In that monstrosity of a bill,
S1437, the mailing of information
on abortion facilities is made a
felony subject to five years in jail,
a $100,000 fine, or both.
BUT THE really mean one of
those concerned with "human
rights" is the rider attached to a
Senate bill intended to guarantee
medical benefits and job rights to
pregnant women. That amend-
ment would allow employers to
withhold the benefits from
women who have abortions.
LIKE rr or not, N|
disagreement with any.
recent Supreme Court L
this nation is still ^S
those mteipreUuonsoU
tional rights.
And of course, the bwi
is really whether theTla
the Catholic Church ^\
Orthodox Judaism ?f
foisted upon those of MI
not accept their faith hi
efforts to deny human ha
women, as their acuon,,
they lose any claim to ho
their labeling themselva
organization favoring Rja|
The loving concern
people profess for the
fetus and it begins fort.
I have heard stated in ,
when the sperm meets the
the womb looks M
hypocrisy by their
actions against living, \,m
troubled women and chfldrau
The Catholics and someL
mentalist religious grounj
eluding the Orthodox Jj
rabbinate, insist that thari
considers the killing 0f i
within the mother's to
homicide. In its historic
decision affirming the right
woman to have an abortion i|
early stages of pregnincj.
which is what the "Right toli
people are seeking to i
these devious ways te)|
preme Court could find nod
answer to this question M
sophy, theology, saenet
justice
Leo frank Case 6ismteRRe6 in Atlanta
By STUART LEWENGRUB
Southeastern Director,
Anti-Defamation League
ATLANTA Recently, the
telephones at the ADL office in
Atlanta were ringing off the
hook. The reason for the flood of
telephone calls was the Atlanta
Constitution's five-part series on
the Leo Frank case.
Most, but not all, of the callers
were angry that the newspaper
was again bringing up a series of
events that has left some very
deep scars on Atlanta Jewry
Some were fearful that the ver-
batim repetition of the anti-Sem-
itism of the Frank trial might
lead to incidents of anti-Semitism
today. Several people asked,
"What can you do?"
THE REACTION, especially
of those who were in Atlanta
during that period, was under-
standable. Someone like myself
who did not live through the trial,
who did not experience the fears
and anxieties of the Jewish com-
munity, or the sending of women
and children to other com-
munities for their safety, can
nevertheless appreciate the bitter
taste that remains with those
who did. as well as the desire not
to have the memories rekindled.
Moreover, there is no absolute
assurance that people consumed
with hatred of Jews would not be
incited by this series to vent their
hatred in some destructive way.
What, indeed, could or should
have been done?
ADMITTEDLY. I would have
preferred not to see the Frank
case serialized, especially on the
front page of the major daily
newspaper. But we have neither
the right or the responsibility for
telling a newspaper what
historical events they should or
should not print.
Like it or not, as uglyuit
this trial and the eveotii
rounding it, do fall into |
category of famous
trials." As we all are fully i
the history of our people i
our State contains some p|
some as well as pleasant del
ters.
Moreover, once the
episode had been publisbsij
sudden cessation would
likely have created many
problems than it would
solved.
I, FOR ONE, would ratklj
in a position of supporting
innocence of Leo Frank anda
demning the antrSemitanl
convicted and murdered \
than of trying to justify why I
series abruptly ended. Is
dition, it is highly likely W
request to the newspapfi
"stop the series" would
been met with a aim
resentful negative response.
We have learned that m\
the surest ways to pratfj
printing of a story or sensir
ask an editor not to do so, r
there is a compelling ra
danger in running it.
Secondly, Celestine SibM
talented, competent jouMJ
was our judgment that r
as the newspaper had<
run the series, we ***W
wait and see how Ms. m\
treated it. Was she goingl
accurate, fair, and sensiti*
I HAVE now readandi
all five articles, and it W'
sidered judgment that wu
exception, Ms. Sibleydid.
provide an account oi
Phagan's murder, of U0"
trial, and of the evenu
companying both in n
sensitive, and fair manner i
Any reasonably r-*I
reader would concludei tw'
Frank was the victim of WJ-
kind of anti-Semitism
and'
the overwhelming ^*!j
suggests that he'""""Jr1
the crime of which he w
cused. J
The courage and pri*jj
Gov. John Slaton and uw
trasting bigotry of Tom"
Continued on Paf*12


June 30,1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
\he Came to Israel to be a Jew,
\ut They Call Her the Russian*
YOSEF MILLER
strange! I came to Israel
I Jew but here they call me
jssian.' Well, never mind,
pass. Look, lota of kids call
i American' too, because I
English 90 well."
glistening eyes in the Sara
rdt face belong to 15-year-
vetlana who animatedly
aboili her Youth Village
love of the theater.
ARE watching a Jewish
Youth Aliyah program
in part by the Jewish
Ition of South Broward's
lied Jewish Appeal Israel
ency Fund, in action in
Jver, a Youth Village near
jn. Here, as in many
[Villages in Israel, young-
Ifrom established Israeli
and immigrant youths
[development areas and
privileged city neighbor-
are helped through the
|t period of integration and
nent.
program offers a hard-
kg, supportive environment
in a peaceful, rural set-
rained, concerned teachers
age Svetlana and other
liters to get in touch with
Ireams and ambitions .
art preparing to realize
idition to a full school
n, the students do kitchen
ling room chores as well as
i with cows, chickens,
chards and other crops.
/EVER, as the costs of
ling this operation rise
the Jewish Agency,
Aliyah and Israel's
of Education are hard
financially to keep it
How much depends on
it going? Ask any of the
Biers. Faisa, for instance.
14, was born in a
country where her an-
had lived for hundreds of
j During a recent period of
nationalism when ex-
rioting took place, her
[was killed by a hysterical,
ning mob.
jlously, the rest of her
escaped unharmed and
md3$
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came to Israel, leaving behind
everything they had owned .
as well as a cultural heritage
Faisa only vaguely knew.
IN ISRAEL, before coming to
Kfar Silver, Faisa knew only how
hard it was to start life in a new
land where your mother works as
a janitor and has to support eight
children.
In the Youth Village, Faisa is
learning the story of her people,
beginning with Abraham. She
also receives tutoring in Hebrew
as part of her valiant effort to
assume her new identity.
"Isn't it strange?" she asks.
"Where we came from, I always
felt like an outsider, but here in
Israel, especially in the Youth
Village, I feel at home with my
people."
HER AMBITION? To become
a social worker and help other
new immigrants.
For 15-year-old Rina, who was
bom in Israel to immigrants from
Egypt, the Youth Village means
a chance to make a contribution
to Ofakim, the struggling
development town where she
lives. Like other marginal im-
migrant areas in Israel, Ofakim is
a town with an uncertain future,
where youngsters like Rina often
become dropouts from school and
from life. At Kfar Silver, she has
a different perspective: she can
begin to visualize Ofakim as a
town with improved medical
facilities, maybe a community
center a place where people
stay, a good place to grow up.
Rina plans to join the Nachal
after graduation and fulfill her
military obligation by joining a
group in a kibbutz. After that,
she wants to continue her studies
to become a registered nurse and
live and work in the Ofakim she
visualizes.
SVETLANA S plans for the
future are focused on a career in
the theater. Her only problems
are deciding if she wants to be an
actress or a film director and
a mild question of identity!
"In Russia, I considered
myself Jewish and not Russian,"
she says. "Here, everybody says
I'm Russian, so I don't feel
Israeli yet. But I know this is my
land and in time I will feel com-
pletely at home."
They all will aU 600 at Kfar
Silver and the other thousands in
the Youth Aliya programs ... if
the funds remain available.
Svetlana (center) is shown with her new friends at Israeli youth
village Kfar Silver. The Jewish Agency Youth Aliyah is funded
in part by JFSB's CJA-IEF program.
Low cost
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Pae6
T^T^hFlnridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Fridi,,
'<*!
ketuBa Revived as Wock of ARt
Nancy Green berg, the Miami
artist whose interest in Jewish
themes has led to the depiction of
religious holiday and synagogue
scenes and watercolor interpreta-
tions of Jewish-American his-
tory, is finding that one area of
her Judaic art attracting more
attention today is the Ketuba
the traditional Jewish marriage
contract.
Interest in Ketubot has grown
in recent years as Jews have
shown more concern for their
traditions, a concern that extends
to Americans of different ethnic
and religious backgrounds.
THE KETUBA, Greenberg
says, was actually created during
the Second Century B.C.E.,
during the exile of the Jews in
Babylonia. It was a document es-
sentially concerned with protect-
ing the bride, listing the duties
and obligations of the husband
and financial provisions which
discouraged any thought of easy
divorce.
::::::::i::::::::vi::&
vA-NfeW^XrW-w-w-WrX-r-x-:-:-:-:-:-::-:
Susari\ Panoff)
Chaim heazoq
Replies to
Israel's enemies
Who Stands Accused? Israel Answers lu Critics. By Chaim
Herzog. New York: Random House, 277 pp., S10.
AS ISRAEL'S Ambassador to the United Nations for the
past three years, Chaim Herzog has unfortunately often been
the only voice in support of Israel. The material in this volume
was never intended to be a book, but has been prepared in
response to the "continuous outpouring of attacks and ac-
cusations against Israel on every subject conceivable," and to
the "General Assembly sessions devoted to condemnations of
this one small Jewish democracy, as though there were no other
problems in the world today."
Herzog begins with the first of his two major speeches to
the UN: his response to the Zionism is Racism resolution of
November, 1975. However, he continues by speaking to each of
the issues that now dominate discussions and conditions of
peace in the Middle East.
ON THE ISSUE of Arab refugees, Herzog voices the clear-
cut evidence which we hardly ever hear over the cries of the so-
called friends of these refugees: "The Arabs have deliberately
kept the problem of the refugees alive for thirty years in order to
use it as a political weapon in the struggle against Israel. The
Arab world today disposes of an unprecedented glut of assets
and resources which are employed for such purposes as the
purchase of arms instead of the benefit of their kin the
Palestine Arab refugees."
In fact, despite the territorial and settlement problems with
Gaza and the West Bank, Herzog presents Israel's view that
"the administered areas are the only places in the entire Arab
world in which Arabs are free to express their opinion, avail
themselves of a free press, and engage in the free democratic
process of election by secret ballot."
FINALLY, the Ambassador keenly feels the double
standard expressed by the hostile UN members against Israel:
' Sometimes, as I listen to the tirade of accusations against
Israel at the United Nations, 1 cannot help but look at the vast
Assembly of nations gathered there and compute in my mind
the sum total of misery that most of them represents These
nations regularly practice every crime they attribute to Israel
and violate every human and natural law in the conduct of their
own affairs."
This is an excellent handbook which includes all documents
involved in the Middle East conflict. Most important.
Ambassador Herzog clarifies Israel's stand on the issues in the
conflict, and he eloquently defends the right of Israel to survive.
Zionist Year Book: 1978 (5738-39). Edited by Jane Moonman.
London: Zionist Federation of Great Britain and Ireland
360 pp., paperback, about $7.
Zionist Year Book is similar to the American Jewish
Yearbook, but on a smaller and less polished scale.
BESIDES INCLUDING a complete organizational
directory, this Year Book contains a lot of detailed
information concerning Zionism in Israel and the Diaspora
There is a "Who's Who" of important Israeli leaders, as well as
the Zionist greats of Britain.
In addition, the Year Book features articles indicating the
future trends of Zionist and Israel / Diaspora relations. .
Accordingly, the reader finds an article evaluating Sadat's visit
to Jerusalem, and another reflecting upon the sixtieth an-
niversary of the Balfour Declaration.
A third article examines Israel's communication media, and
still a fourth subject division outlines the problems of Jews in
other lands, specifically Arab countries and South Africa.
Nancy Greenberg Ketuba
features likeness of couple
"But beyond the legalities,
Ketubot represented one of the
few opportunities for Jewish
artistic expression outside the
temple," she says.
"The Ketuba came to be a
medium through which Jewish
artists were able to depict his-
torical and religious scenes, ac-
companied by vivid colors and
designs which formed the borders
around the Aramaic language
that spelled out the details of the
marriage contract."
AS THE centuries passed,
and the Jews scattered through-
out the world, different styles of
Ketubot gradually developed. In
: Spain and North Africa, the Sep-
hardic Jews favored oval wreaths
of demask rose?.
In Gibraltar, the Crown ot
England was an integral part of
1 the design. In F'ersia. floral pat-
terns and rising suns dominat.d
In Italy, the influence of the
Renaissance was felt and led to
ithfl intricate designs of this per-
iod.
"But eventually," Greenberg
says, "the art of Ketuba was
virtually lost. Especially the
painting of Ketubot on a custom
basis. In its place, especially in
the United States, Jewish
couples received pre-printed
black and white marriage con-
tracts, on which the rabbi simply
filled in their names."
"That has now begun to
change thanks to people like
Stewart and Sharon Mirmelli,
who have encouraged many
South Florida couples, both
bridal couples and long marrieds,
to replace mass-production
Ketubot with ones that have per-
sonal and direct meaning for
them as a result of the designs
and illustrations that are used."
GREENBERG SAYS that the
Ketubot she creates actually
interpret the personal history,
interests, achievements and goals
of the individual couple. Sym-
bolism can be important, but
many couples prefer having their
actual likenesses appear in the
| work.
One of the unusual Ketubot
she recalls doing over the past
| three years was one that friends
purchased as a gift for a couple
celebrating its 25th wedding
anniversary. Not only did the
likeness of the couple appear, but
also those of the couple's four
children.
In general, the complete proc-
ess of creating a custom Ketuba
takes from five to ton weeks.
Initially, the couple or whoever is
purchasing the Ketuba must dis-
cuss with the artist the style to
be created. They may choose a
variety of designs such as vig-
nettes of historical Judaic
themes, important milestones or
traditions of the couple, tradi-
tional floral designs or portraits,
or combinations of these ele-
ments.
GREENBERG WILL then
prepare preliminary sketches and
after more discussion, the cali-
graphy will be written by ths
Hebrew scribe on parchment
paper and then the art work com-
pleted.
Costs for a complete Ketuba
range from $400 and up, depend-
ing on the size and complexity of
the work. Often, a number of
friends and relatives of the couple
J6a.sa!ifH0r*k
dings ann.vers.nW
specud occasions. **
Nancy Greenberg
B
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Oberat
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June 30.1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
Come To Our Great
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at Pantry Pride
cPnde




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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian ^Shofarof Greater Hollywood
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Grade 'A'
IlSL
HA FRESH
SMAU DOZ
** SwissCheese 89
PANTIT PllOf
Sour Cream cSS 59
. YOU MAY PURCHASE ONE OR All STARRED ITEMS WITH A $7 ORDER OR MORE EXCl CIGARETTES
65"
PANTIT >riM IAST IO SPIIAO
Cream Cheese '?J,
SI A! nil MILK
Acidophilus..............JSE 85*
PANTIT HM COl OMD FOOD SlICIS
American Cheese "^l09
HUM
Cottage Cheese 'V?. 55*
KiArrt famous
Cheese Whiz
OOIDIN 100 ASSORTIO
Fruit Drinks
Wf IIBIIM
i or $159
.....JAI
GAl
CON?
OSCAI MATH MIAT Ot
Beef Franks H"
Reisman
Pretzel Rim
SAVE 54
PANTRY PRIDE
Charcoal Briquets
PANTRY PRIDE f
Hot Dogl
TIMIillinM
Sliced Brea
Mini s MilMM
English Muf
JWr"
Franks or KnocksJftM41
PAN1RT PIIM MIOCIT
Liverwurst_____i 49* /JllllllllVAv
PANTS' r*OMM MIA' Ot
Beef Bologna J&$1"
UMITONEBAG
WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF
$7 OR MORE
EXCL CIGARETTES
Double Hibachi J3"
SUE III"
001015
HEBREW NATIONAL KOSHER
{SLICED SALAMI OR
BOLOGNA
ClAUtMN I (WHOtl-tPIARSI
Pikles...................................m !
Creomed Herring ^.z$1*
1
( PRICE REDUCTION
ON ANY ITEM
oiouctiohomwc nxf
OI JAR IVANS
"AINUT IONino
iM
MUK> D10*I CHIIM """"imU
Pino______--1
OKHI MATIR tf*l
Variety Pack-^l
10'p-ic'1
'HI AMOUNT SHOWN ITU I M |fi9i UiK*
OioucTwraoMRtoPRKi j Ipl ""
I ONI
I COUPON .'.,.?' 'AIVA
Pit AH? TOPPING!
I I
PHSON
I pirkm RR"i""* i KOn
HOI JAtkuiMnv I I Pl
STRUF I PRON
HOI JAR
UUFT
UYMNUUSE
6 02. pkg.
PANTRY PRIDE MEAT OR ~
Beef Franks ^99*
fT^iiiiu'-m
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO IUVUT
! ra'^^ssr.?""1"' ^^h7I-o?I!t^wHI!tv ; tva'susf*
| Bi3i """OKRIC PRKI | I | OKHKTIDflOMIIC PttCI I Rj|
It OI CAN AMI PIAVOM -
ETTT CROCKER
rassnes
.1*01 POUtCA.Iu i I r,SJ,M '"""" I I HMO" "
"* *" $0l T0 D* N07.W0ViirP0iT-Vp6^A^lcArii.0
! ONI .uf
I I nt nncll
I I H0 mm"


e 30,1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

WITH THESE
COUPONS AND
7 ORDER OR
MORE EXCL.
CIGARETTES
[or Your Shopping
fonvenience We're
Open July 4th
9-6
GET FRESH WITH
OUR PRODUCE !
SEE OUR
GIGANTIC
AD IN
TODAYS
FOOD
SECTION!
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM
FRESH
Lots of Chicken
r-s
B
3 BREAST QTRS. W/BACKS
3LEGQTRS. W/BACKS
3 GIBLET PACKAGES


FRESH VALLEY BEEF ROUND
II III
FLORIDA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH A A A
Fryer Quarters Qj
FLORIDA or SHIPPED PREMIUM
Fresh
Fryer Parts
$109
THIGHS
DRUMSTICKS
BREAST W/RIBS -
FRESH Valley USDA CHOICE BEEF
Mb*
fftfiH VAtllV USOA CHOKI UIFIOIN "0 U il
Whole Top Loin$*jig9
Strip Boneless dL ,.
FftflH V Mil Y USDA CHOICI If I* IOIN TOP lOIN
Boneless
Strip Steak
$Q29
Round $0
Tip Steak *"
19
*

'
FRESH VALLEY BEEF ROUND
BOTTOM
Round Steak
IB.
FRESH VALLEY BEEF CHUCK
i;|i]^;i:]IH]
POT ROAST
IcHOiCfT:
BONELESS
**l*? %J***
GRADE A' QUICK FROZEN
TURKEY
BREAST
Beef Chuck
7-Bone Steak
MUM VAlllV
USDA CHOICI
19
f RE$H VALIIV
USD* CHOICI ft!*' CHUCK
Shldr.
Steak Boneless
Sliced
Beef Liver i.
89
i on sprat
Oven Cleaner..
MUIMIMAN GOIMN DILICIOUS
14-OI.
...CAN
$1
1
i ir ION MUSHIOOM Of
Apple Sauce..................mi OD
2*49*
KIWI OCHOf N CMMI
IC-OCOIAII OONU1S Ol
Cruellers9ft 49*
cood Bar ....'Hi. 69*
63*
Salad Dressing "ft *1 "
MMI-SWIII ..
Nestles Morsels "c *105
UPTON MUSHIOOM Oft
TS RINT REG. PRICE SPECIAL PRICE WKkll H.H
11 s2.87 s4.07 NE 39 thru M.87 *3.07 JUIY
>ODJU
Onion Soup..................i" 65*
IICMNUI SST D VAIIIIII5
Baby Food 5 4i,I99*
mnoo..u.,ooao. MI $,
Ginger Ale .'>.rr.-o .*. i
Onion Soup...................IS: 65*
Corned Beef .!%& $1,y
CtllCO TO
Shortening 28i *179
HCGII (OOO STOtAGI
Alligator Bags 3S $1
PftlNCH _^ ,
Mustard *3& 67*
AltTO HAVOIi OUT
Shasta Sodas 6 BS 99*
Will IWINPAK ^^ .
Potato Chips !2S 79*
MORTON FROZEN
Fried Chicken
2^*229
o- $1
FKGJ
MOtION ASM 0 VAIIIIUS
Pot Pies 4
notion AIM O VAIITII1
Dinners 2 V0o, $ 1 *
Ml IIIZ AJJI 0 VAIIITIS
Cream Pies 2 VSJ: $1
SUGAR FREE SPRITE. TAB FRESCA. MR. PIBB OR
SPRITE, MR. PIBB OR
Coca Cola (
39
cPtide
PRKIl IFFICTIVI TMUM.. JUKI MTMU
WtO JMV t. AT All PANTRY PRIOf STORM
FROM FT niKI TO HIT WMT
FREE I
SLACK I DECKER CORDLESS
iRASS SHEARS
IWITH YOUR GOLD
REGISTER TAPES
3ECKER
INE GRASS
(WITH YOUR
USTER
FREE I
BLACK C DECKER
JIGSAW WITH
YOUR GOLD REGISTER
TAPES.
OFFERINGS
WF.DNF.SDAY JULY 24
FREE!
HIS 'N HER
APPLIANCES
JUST FOR SHOPPING
PANTRY PRIDES
SAVING YOUR
GOLD RE- i
GISTER
TAPES
-------------OPEN 9 TO 6
ON JULY 4th!
FOR MIR
FREE.' PROCTOR TWO SLICE TOASTER
WITH YOUR GOLD REGISTER
FREE! tapes.
y ELECTRIC FOOD WARMING
TRAY WITH YOUR GOLD
REGISTER TAPES.
G|-------"
'"'''IffiS&'JZ* -
1
PROCTOR STEAM t DRY IRON
WITH YOUR GOLD
REGISTER TAPES.
FREE!
HAMILTON BEACH
ELECTRIC BEACH
ELECTRIC SCISSORS
WITH YOUR GOLD
REGISTER TAPES.
Wl RISIRVt THl RIGHT TO tIMIT
OUANTITIK. NONI SOID TO DF.Alf.RS NOT RISPONSIRlt FOR TYKKWAfMICAt IRRORS
' Page9


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian nnJShofarof Greater Hollywood
Israel War Veterans Welcomed Into
American Jewish Homes in June
By HELEN FERN
Fifty disabled Israeli war
veterans are being welcomed into
the homes of American Jewish
families this month in a cultural
exchange launched by Mrs.
Donald M. Robinson, whose
husband is the president of the
American Jewish Joint Dis-
tribution Committee, which is
funded in part by the Jewish
Federation of South Broward's
Combined Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund.
During June, there will be 10 to
12 Israeli veterans hosted in
Pittsburgh, Pa., Great Neck,
NX., Stamford Conn.
Washington. DC. and Toronto.
Canada.
THE PROGRAM, now in its
fourth year, began after Mrs.
Robinson learned about Euro-
pean visits of Israeli disabled
soldiers while at a JDC con-
ference in Geneva with her
husband. Since then she has
experimented each summer with
bringing small groups to such
cities as her home community of
Pittsburgh, as well as Detroit.
Chicago and this year's par-
ticipating communities.
What are the results?
Tremendous,'' Mrs. Robinson
says. "The cities and families
who are eager to be host to the
disabled veterans outnumber the
number of young men arriving
New Laws Accommodate Florida Jewry
Before it adjourned, the
Florida State Legislature
enacted a bill changing the
date of the second primary
election this year from
Tuesday, Oct. 10, to Thurs-
day, Oct. 5.
The Rabbinical Associa-
tion of Greater Miami has
sent a note to all Florida
rabbis informing them of
the change in date.
RABBI SOLOMON Schiff, di-
rector of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation's Chaplaincy Ser-
vice, said that the bill was en-
acted in order to avoid a conflict
between the primary date and
Erev Yom Kippur.
"The Oct. 10 date would have
imposed difficulties on Jewish
voters in general, but especially
on Jewish poll-workers who, by
law, have to remain after the
polls close at 7 p.m. to prepare for
the counting of ballots,'' Rabbi
Schiff explained.
"This would conflict with their
ability to attend Kol Nidre ser-
vices, which this year falls at 6:58
p.m., Oct. 10. Making Thursday
a voting day, which is most
unusual, became necessary since
the others Tuesdays Oct. 3, 17,
and 24, all conflict this year with
either Rosh Hashonah, Sukkot or
SimchatTorah."
IN ADDITION to changing
the primary date, the Legislature
also enacted a bill which amends]
the existing Florida marriage
statute to provide for rabbis to
solemnize marriages.
Said Rabbi Schiff: 'Whereas
Florida law dating back to 1828
recognized persons authorized to
solemnize matrimony as 'All
regularly-ordained ministers of
the gospel' the new law adds or
other ordained clergy.'
Commending the Legislature.
Rabbi Schiff explained in his note
to Florida rabbis that "The Rab-
binical Association played
an active role in the initiation and
the passage of these bills.
He also said that the dis-
semination of the information to
them "is in keeping with the
commitment of the Association's
newly-installed president. Rabbi
Michael Eisenstat of Temple
Judea. to continue to make the
Association a source of increased
information and education for the
community."
Continental
Cuisine
FRED JOSSI
you bjc* 'o
l "o*ned
STUDIO
RESTAURANT
fc a unique
dining efi<
Vaicn r table I
nood mom :. i
'OOmi The T>" '
.-. ; .
ia S a u f na.ei
David Maddern
at the Piano
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
I private Luncheons arranged!
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THE GROTTO"
MOST MAJOR
Pres. Kaunda: "Russians and Cubans
what you're talking about." Die Burger
in Africa? I don't know
U.S. Hints
Solution
Continued from Page 1
"We have said in the past that at
some point the U.S. may decide
to make suggestions of its own on
this issue in order to help the two
governments move the process
forward and obviously reach an
agreement. We used the process
to reach an agenda for the
Jerusalem meeting in January."
He also said, in response to
questions, that "no decision haa
been taken (as to) what American
suggestions might be put for-
ward at some point." However,
he added, "this carries with it the
implication that obviously con-
sideration has been given to the
need for such action by the U.S."
Asked whether Mondale's up-
coming trip to Israel would be a
"substantive trip or a good will
mission," Carter replied that the
Vice President "always carried
substantive weight." Officially,
he is going to Israel June 29 to
participate in the continuing
festivities marking that coun-
try's 30th anniversary.
GRAND OPENING WITH
TONS OF FRESH SEAFOOD!
^EDUCATED
FISH
' MOM
setfooo
RfSIAURAKl
4
I DAILY FLIGHTS FROM BOSTON AND N Y s
[FULTON FISH MARKET BRING OUR FRESH FISH
fresh
/ AnV
Great
Because
GRAND OPENING SPECIAL
Fresh Boston Scrod e -__
Brook Trout Amandine
Endless Salad & Raw Bar Available
Boston Scrod-Norfhern fbonder
Fresh caught/oca/ rfsr?
THE EDUCATED FISH -
667-6666 925-4735
THE FIRST experience helped
us plan guidelines for other com-
munities. The effort and planning
involved much more than the
dozen families who become hosts
in each city. Other families raise
funds, plan and implement cul-
tural trips and help insure a
successful experience."
How do the children of the host
families react?
They make the men feel
accepted. Getting to know and
observe them helps overcome
difficulties for the children," Mrs.
Robinson says. "These veterans
are eager to leam so they focus on
us rather than themselves.
the
Putting our 2!
at eaae. ^^* I
"LETTERS u* ,
have followed
both Amenc^T'
feeling that they ]
families acro^ '
Robinson expbin,
families have had
reunions with
Israel.
Mrs. Robjnio
president of the Pfa
erations Women',
brings truth tothe(fl
I he busy per*,,, g^P
other important thu^'
"Foremost," she 8,J
very supportive*1
daughter. Carol; v\
and husband Don
thusiastically pUn
ticipate with our IsrJj
each year. Together,
closeknit family."
PIZZA!!
AT ITS BIST
MAM*
Hirttoj -rkta
EARLY BIRD SPf
from 4 to 6 PI
SPAGHETTI 1 MEATBALLS $1
tf MEAT SAUCE I,
'** REST*1
(..... .1 HI I *,. V Ml,
.?"
I'.
in
961-5008
K Mart Plaza
EGGPLANT PARMIGIANA
rill Site oroor if Siapirtti
'1.
IARED ZITI
CHICKEN BREAST
PARMIGIANA
with slot orter of SncMtli
$t
VEAL PARMIGIANA
with sitfe oricrof Spiehetti
$2J
HOMEMADE IASAGNA
1
All Dinners include Garlic I
FREE CHICKEN DINNER
GOOD
OLD FASHIONED
CHICKEN
THIS MONTH'S SPECIAL!
SPECIAL BASKET FREE
*1" Value Contains:
* WunrU-r < hi< k<-u cut in 2 |mcrs
* Krc-iu.h Trios
* Apple turnover
WITH PURCHASE OF ONE
HEARTY DINNER SPECIAL
*3** Value Contains:
Half chictUHl cut in 1 |iie<<-s
I'oUiIosuIjmI
Two rolls
ALL FOR ONLY
$2
97
(*4- VALUE)
NO COUPON NEEDED
UMIT ONE SPECIAL PER PERSON
OPEN DAILY 11 A.M. It 9 P.M.
6791 TOT STRfflf^d
989-6144 -&-
mOM AHEAD FOR FASTER CAHUT OUT SMVK*


s30.1978
The Jewish Floridianand Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
nit's Nuclear Role in Latin America
[ROBERT HELD
kfurtcr Allgemeine
Lilf have a population of
i 210 million by the end
Itury. By then, we shall
it use the 1975 nuclear
3onn has proved.
ling-term view is the
hd against which the
onn by Brazilian Presi-
Bto Geisel is beet seen.
kic ties have long been
h Brazil preferred to
widely from this country's one
main object of the visit was to
maintain mutual confidence.
Brazil must be assured that
this country will not submit to
pressure and unilaterally amend
the treaty. While Bonn can only
stand hrm as long as it feels sure
that Brazil will not play with
nuclear fire and hanker after a
nuclear arsenal of its own.
CERTAINTY in both respects
can undoubtedly be fostered by
moreover, dependent on three
aspects of U.S. policy:
Non-proliferation and all it
entails, which is also backed by
Moscow;
Washington's policy on
Latin America;
The commercial intents of
U.S. industry.
| IN GERMANY
aerica by German in-
1AS partly because the
as tough in North
whereas Brazil gave
riits of fancy. Perhaps
[decision to invest there
on rational con-
i Willy Brandt's days aa
ancellor, Social Demo-
at pains to maintain
|cal unrest in Brazil was
ggerated.
fcision to invest in Brazil
(to be regretted, while
1 Geisel'4 tenure of office
steadily less occasion
I unhappiness.
IE terms of the 1976
p.il. Bonn also set aside
policy misgivings,
Ithe risk of upsetting
til's neighbors and the
a tea.
f>rding of the deal gave
ession that no one in
fas frightened that
Monroe's ghost might
liking the international
cene.
ess attention seemed to
paid to the latter-day
Ins of the Monroe
clear cooperation agree-
ks a hunk of realpolitik
|more along Frencn than
lines by present-day
EQUATION was tempt-
traightforward. Neither
! has oil, but Brazil has
\. and this country has
-how to use it.
ps due to these con-
circumstances, the treaty
unded a surreptitiously
note, perhaps even a
pnal one.
tie words not the music
I U.S. State Department.
ssinger wan first to
a. and still retains his
T THE deal was clinched,
foreign policy Tami-
ls were dealt with.
[ton is still not at ease,
the two sides in 1976 at
ne to show greater lu-
lling of viewpoints.
[975 agreement was sal-
foreign policy terms in
ut had Bonn been in a
I position in its dealings
t United States last year
:lear deal would hardly
rvived President Carter's
Iteration zeal.
Is immediate neighbors,
upset by the nuclear
of Brazilian national-
ve also been pacified
ly Venezuela, so sensitive
I issue that it even con-
tith the military leaders in
ha.
I WITH Brazil, otherwise
?tent (at least, in
| have suddenly assumed
7>ce in world affairs.
' unlikely to have taken
P on the agenda of Presi-
""el's talks in Bonn -
erhaps in an attempt to
|w trilateral ties between
f Washington and Bonn.
'hat the Brazilian sys-
government differs so
close and cordial personal con-
tacts.
The nuclear treaty with Brazil
represents a new stage in Bonn's
foreign policy, a coming of age, a
new leeway in dealings with
Germany's allies.
This advance is still in the
experimental stage and Bonn is
still learning its new role. It is,
Peres Reveals Sadat Said
He Would Okay Border Changes
Armin Lovenvirth
American Savings
Appoints Lovenvirth
Armin F. Lovenvirth has
recently been appointed manager
of American Savings' Mai land ale
office in the American Savings
Building. The appointment was
announced by Morris N. Broad,
president of the South Florida
financial institution.
Lovenvirth, who joined
American Savings in April, 1977
was previously employed with
First Federal Savings and Loan
Association of Philadelphia as
branch manager of the main
office
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Labor Alignment Leader Shimon
Peres, revealed that President
Anwar Sadat of Egypt told him
he might countenance minor
border changes on the West Bank
and the stationing of Israeli
troops across the border after
peace was reached.
Peres made the disclosure after
sharply criticizing the cabinet's
response to the American ques-
tions on the future of the West
Bank und Gaza Strip.
HE SAID that he had secured
Sadat's agreement recently,
through a third party, to reveal
details of their two-hour talk in
Salzburg, Austria, last February.
Peres said that Sadat recog-
nizes Israel's genuine security
problems on the West Bank and
also recognizes the distinction
between the international border
between Israel and Sinai, which
is a universally accepted line, and
the uncertain legal status with
respect to the West Bank borders
and sovereign rights.
Sadat expressed readiness for
minor changes in 1967 lines on
the West Bank and for the main-
tenance of Israeli strongholds
across whatever borders are
finally agreed to in a peace settle-
ment, Peres said.
HE SAID Sadat sought a joint
declaration of principles that
would facilitate Jordan's entry
into the peace negotiations.
Peres' apparent purpose in
making his disclosure was to
bolster his argument that Israel's
acceptance of the principle of ter-
ritorial compromise on the West
Bank would open the way to re-
sumption of peace talks with
Egypt. He is also seeking to
refute Prime Minister Menachem
Begin s contention that there is
no distinction between Israel's
security needs and its claim to
retain the West Bank.
THE UNITED STATES is so
insistent on nuclear non-prolif-
eration that Bonn can hardly
hope to repeat the nuclear deal
with Brazil with a further
customer.
U.S. policy on Latin -America is
an a state of flux, on the other
hand. The outcome is unclear but
will probably approximate to
European respect of (he inde-
pendence of other countries.
Yet Europeans would do well
to remember that in Latin
American eyes, which means
Brazilian ones too, the U.S.A
remains an overwhelming neigh
bor. The United States may at
times be hated, but it is in-
variably admired.
However much Washington's
motives may be mistrusted,
Latin Americans still tend to
regard the United States as No.
1.
THIS COUNTRY, and
Western Europe as a whole,
cannot evolve an independent
policy on Latin America. It must
coordinate policy with Washing-
ton, not in abject passivity, mind
you, but only inasmuch aa
Washington will deign to do so.
The fight for markets and raw
materials is bound to remain
unrelenting, so there is every
reason to clasp a hand proffered
in friendship.
A NEW ERA
in .Ko.slur
Catering
FOR ALL SOUTH FLORIDA
"?
r.


C'fIKS JMOVAHIO
(jYrya/irr
l.. Cotrf'ihg lor yoi I
Wtdtlx 9 Rot Mi'/"t*i *< < t '
O'qa',.*',t'0#iot Vf#l.t-q. DifMMI 01 lun IM. l.pin
*-t t,hi ),<-( M O.V.H.
Dadc I*lrphonf 940-0197
reward 5C1-3SOO
Palm Boach 842 2889
* SHO*tE RESERVE NOW FOR
HIGH HOLY DAYS
12 DAY SPECIAL!
Prominent cantor services
Oct. 1 to Oct. 12
ON THE OCEAN AT 19th STREET
MIAMI BEACH. FLA. 33139
MIAMI 538-7811 ^.i/
KOSHER
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a 1 _flSA I 'n Raom
f_J 75 of 2JS Rooms
^ H Ote. 10
INCLUDES 2 MEALS DAILY
Strict Dietary Laws
Observed
Under Rabbinical
Supervision
Resident Maschgiach
Two Meals
Oaily Complete
Breakfast
Deluxe Full Course
Dinner
Three Meals Shsobos
YEARLY RATES
AVAILABLE!


Page 12_______________________The Jewish Floridign and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Pilotless Plane to Offset Arab Advantage
r~ .,,. t_j:_.......___,____.._:. f^M nH rnnstitute double the nomic. these figure
Fri4
'.Ji
TEL AVIV To offset
the vast amount of arma-
ments which the Arab
countries are amassing,
Israel has come up with a
miniature pilotless drone
aircraft, small enough to
escape detection by most
radar units and fast enough
and large enough to deliver
bombs into any of the
neighboring Arab coun-
tries.
This was unveiled for the
public here this week and
will be displayed at an ex-
hibition of military com-
munications and electronic
equipment opening in
Washington next month.
THE PILOTLESS plane,
manufactured by the Tadiran
Company, an Israeli producer of
electronic and communications
Tadiran says a package unit,
consisting of six drones and
monitoring equipment, will sell
for $600,000, about a quarter the
price of similar units manu-
factured in other countries. The
entire package, called the
"Mastiff," represents four years
of research and development and
an investment by Tadiran of $4.5
million.
The drone carries a video
camera and is designated of-
ficially as a reconnaissance plane.
But it has other potential uses
that remain classified.
Officials here pointed out that
the pilotless plane can. be con-
trolled from the home base, and it
will help to offset the quantity of
planes and pilots which the
Arabs possess.
ACCORDING to UN Israeli
Ambassador Chaim Herzog, the
Arabs have 3,000 more tanks and
700 more combat aircraft than
NATO.
"By 1980." he said, "the air
forces and constitute double the
air power of NATO and three
times that of the People's Repub-
lic of China. In terms of ground
forces, the Arab states have
almost as many tanks as the
U.S.A. and more artillery than
the U.S.A. From every per-
regional. global.
noi
staggering.
figures are
eco-
spective
Leo fpank Case fcisinteRReo
Continued from Page 4-A
"Since 1967 the Arab states
have ordered arms to be supplied
by 1980. in the amount of $35
billion of which $24 billion rep-
resents arms ordered by Saudi
Arabia alone. Jewl$n PrtM
SM2Lm*aSW? fr,U9e b.y |Pwer f th* Arab states will
abroad "* and fT aale equal the combined Warsaw pact
in whose expressions of intol-
erance was directed against Jews.
Blacks, and Catholics, were high-
lighted as they well should be in
reviewing this case
I regretted that there was no
mention of the reported death-
bed confession of Jim Conley. It
is a shame that Judge Arthur
Powell's letter was never pub-
lished, because it almost cer-
tainly would have once and for all
cleared Leo Frank's name and
pointed to the true murderer of
Mary Phagan.
NONE of us want bad
memories to be resurrected. The
Frank case is among the worst of
Art Work Erected in Technion Yard
By DANIEL GREBLER unification of the Jews living in Israel and for the
HAIFA "The Breastplate of the High Priest umly of the Jew*hP^Pleeverywfcere."
Aaron IHaChoshenf has been erected in the Protruding from the two parallel surfaces of the
courtyard of the Ohel Aharon Synagogue at the rough-hewn stone are twelve rectangles of bronze
lecnnion-Israel Institute of Technology. The arranged in four vertical rows of three.
work, a massive rnrtnnirU n( flu u.i_____. renrpspntintr tho sinnu nn >u i,......_i... -*
representing the stones on the breastplate of
Aaron. Each rectangle fixed into the stone ap-
pears to be the continuation of the opposing one
on the other side.
Eu5 a ?.fSre ""*& of flat Hebron^ stone
SS.KWlth Kbr0n2e' ? by l9raeli 9cuPtor Zv!
SJJSfc ,W,h08e, 9CulPtur are to be found
throughout Israel as well as in Europe. Australia
*~SttrSJESEXi by ^dw^l T sculptor de9Cribed the challen8e9
construction off hi J^k> wno a,9 sponsored the involved in producing the work: to create a
construction of the campus synagogue. sculpture effective in its monumental simplify
h=- n y ch"ahood when I came to the and to mt*grate it harmoniously with the modern
description of Aaron's robes, I was inspired bv are^^ture of the synagogue.
h^h S,8^ lPltnd0r f the b"*stpla* of the
nigh priest winch contained two stones of
SS^?2Sthe pereonal ** of **
THE BREASTPLATE which the high priest
wore over his heart was adorned with twelve
precious stones, each one different, symbolizing
the twelve tribes of Israel. The motif I was asked
to design was. therefore, acceptable to me. For in
ancient times the breastplate was a part of the
religious ritual, symbolizing the unification of the
tribes of Israel into one people.
"In our own times, the breastplate of the high
priest might serve as a symbol and a hope for the
I had to find an artistic expression for a
national and religious idea within a modern
concept, in a way that would please the taste of a
distinguished public and at the same time be close
to the understanding of all kinds of visitors he
said.
1 also wanted to refrain from the use of
modem materials such as aluminum and stainless
steel, or decorative materials that are breakable
such as colored glass or ceramics. I also wanted to
ZnZv VT? IT?."' which in our tradition
symbolizes bloodshed.
The Ohel Aharon Synagogue was built on the
lechiuon Mount Carmel campus in 1969 and
named in memory of Jesselson's brother, Albert
Remembering Berlin and Gen. Clay
By LISELOTTE MULLER
Hannoversche AUgemeine
Lucius Clay, former American
Military Governor in Germany
and organizer of the 1948 Berlin
airlift, is dead.
The people of West Berlin owe
their freedom to his uncomprom-
ising attitude during that crisis.
The Federal Republic of Ger-
many too has much to thank him
for. He helped speed up her inte-
gration into the Western nations
after the terrible crimes of the
Hitler era.
LUCIUS CLAY will go down
in history as the man who won
one of the great battles of the
Cold War without the loss of a
single life. Three years after the
war, the Soviet Union blockaded
West Berlin and the people of the
city were faced with the choice of
starving or capitulating.
President Truman asked Gen.
Clay, the American Military-
Governor in Germany, if he could
get supplies to Berlin by air.
Clay's answer was a simple
"Yes."
The Berim airlift began. For
ten montt. the two-and-a-half
million pen, of Berlin were sup-
plied with i -essities by the air-
lift, one c ne major technical
and organ ional achievements
of modert times. Berlin was
saved from soviet rule.
THIS WAS undoubtedly the
height of Clay's career. The son
of a Georgia senator, he started
his military career at the famous
Gen. Lucius Clay
West Point Academy. As a
young officer, he was fascinated
by technology. He became an ex-
pert on building airports, ports
and dams.
During World War II. he or-
ganized the invasion supply lines.
He made a name for himself out-
side military circles when he got
the port of Cherbourg, which had
been destroyed, back in working
order in a short time.
His post-war career reflected
the changes in German-American
relations.
Clay returned to the U.S in
1949 and retired from the army.
Twelve years later, after the Ber-
lin Wall was built. President
Kennedy sent him back to Berlin.
AS SPECIAL Commissioner
in West Berlin, his task was to
personify the United States'
readiness to defend the city. His
policy was clearly military with-
out being martial.
He demonstratively underlined
X?-8. ?f America and We8tern
M "* aCCess by ordering
troop movements along the tran
sit autobahns, "
ri,kl,ar als underI'ned the U.S
nght to a presence in East Berlin
according to the Four p0w
status of the city. When the GDR
attempted to limit the alLW
nght of access to East iff
gay ordered tank^ufcTecfe
CharbeinFriedrichstrasse
A FEW DAYS later. Clay re-
ceived orders to withdraw them
because Washington feared tlu8
k"fd of nuujary pressure would
reduce the chances of a diploma-
tic solution to the BerUn crisis.
h lhf" the purpo8e of the
show of strength had been
achieved Clay had forced Z
Soviet Union into a countter
demonstration and an ack-
nowledgement that the Soviet
Union and not the GDR was re-
sponsible for East Berlin.
uUS 0VeJr 8'X months later Clay
told President Kennedv that his
mission was completed. The pall
of fear had lifted from the city
RELGOJNC.
Rtliglwt A om Art.cltt
-per sell. R.cora,4CT*
memories. It reminds us how
mindless bigotry can surface and
can be used to destroy a man and
strike fear and divisiveness into a
community.
It reminds us that public
officials and personalities can
stoop so low as to cause the
taking of a man's life to further
their own careers, using religious
bigotry as the vehicle. Thank-
fully, Celestine Sibley did remind
us of those things.
Personally, I would still prefer
not to see this 65-year-old in-
cident replayed over and over
again. That part of me which is
cynical says, the prejudice of the
bigot will be reinforced, the
rationality of the logical man will
be offended by this event. The
scars will remain with those who,
young as they may have been,
experienced terrible fear just
because they were Jews.
Artist's Works to Be
Exhibited at Mall
Artist Eugene Saret's water-
colors will be exhibited this
Friday and Saturday, June 30
and July 1 at Hollywood Mall.
Saret is a member of 20th
Century Artists, Miami Water-
color Society and the North
Miami Beach Artists Guild.
One of I
Best Senm
Frientk
Beaten at,
By DAVID PRIQ)J
NEW YORK -uj
ord P. c, a
"ding support*,, 3
g^.wMdefaitadJ
New Jersey D-r,J
tn his bid for Ven
fifth term in the S__
Case lost in.cloieo-
34-year-old coop,*!
known candidate, JeftJ
a conservative who*.
paign theme was a 30m
in the Federal incomj J
BELL WILL
November general *
Democratic Candida
Bradley, a former 1
Knicks basketball
Rhodes scholar. Bradls
landslide victory ova
ponents in the
primary.
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Personal Service Boo*
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In the practice ol Internal Medicine
4900 West HaUandale Blvd. Suite 1
Hollywood, Fla. 33023 981-0888
aaJurlL*!! h'8hest st-ndards ot excellence hmJ
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See us first we care
HaUandale Rehabilitation Center
2400 E Hallantfal* Saaeh Boulnard
u Opposite Thru /f/antfs ..
M.ll*,d^., fton

TheJewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
First Quarter Activity Up 9 Percent
Bsisted 3,182 Jewish
new homes in the
ntes and other free
Countries during the
U of the year, a nine
Crease over the corres-
kriod last year, Be-
rn I AS board member,
Ih'hiT.
II. Jacobson, executive
dent of the worldwide
ation agency, funded
[the Jewish Federation
IBroward's Combined
peal Israel Emer-
campaign, indicated
cent 3,130 of the
by HIAS came from
Europe, the remainder
ca, Asia and Latin
ITED that there was a
[increase over the com-
eriod of 1977 in the
[Soviet refugees helped
animation: 3,069 versus
helped by HIAS
i first quarter, 2,823 (89
percent) came to the United
Slates, 84 (three percent) went to
Canada, 191 (six percent) to Aus-
tralia and New Zealand, 60 (two
percent) to Western Europe, and
24 to Latin America. Of the total
arrivals in the United States, 98
percent comprising 2 764
persons were from the USSR.
As of the end of the quarter,
some 3,500 Soviet Jews were in
Rome undergoing processing by
HIAS for migration mainly to
the United States. In addition,
10,266 Soviet Jews were
registered with the agency by
their relatives for migration aid,
the vast majority for our country.
OF THE refugees who came to
the United States during the
quarter, 34 percent remained in
the Greater New York area where
the New York Association for
New Americans (NYANA) pro-
vides resettlement assistance,
and the balance were resettled in
92 communities.
The new arrivals from the
Soviet Union consisted of 1 024
family units with an average of
z' Persons per family; 1,310 (47
percent) were males and 1,454 (53
percent) were females. By age
categories 698 (25 percent) were
20 and under; 1,328 (48 percent)
were between 21 and 50; and 738
were 51 or over. A total of 1,672
(60 percent) were in the labor
force and 1,092 were children,
students, housewives, retirees
and others.
The labor force consisted of 831
(63 percent) males and 841 (58
percent) females. Of these, 784
(47 percent) were highly trained
and / or university educated
persons; 251 were engineers, 111
were technicians and 422 were
categorized in other professions.
WOMEN outnumbered men
among the professionals (17
percent versus 8 percent), white
collar occupations (15 versus 2
percent), and service occupations
(8 versus 5 percent). The reverse
was true in engineering (11
versus 4 percent) and in blue
collar occupations (17 versus 2 majority coming to the United
percent). States. In 1977, the agency aided
HIAS estimates that it will 8,676 refugees, of whom 7,080
assist over 12,000 persons to new were resettled in the United
homes this year, the vast States.
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Page 14
The Jewish FbrU^^dSho^^^^^^
Dulzin Urges End to Agency Friction
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
r
LONDON (JTA) Immi-j
snts to Israel should be cared
in the future by a joint'
authority of the Jewish Agency:
and the Absorption Ministry as a'
way to end the longstanding'
friction between these two'
bodies, Leon Dulzin, the Jewish '
Agency acting chairman.
propOMd here.
Under the plan, which is
currently being considered by
Prime Minister Menachemi
Begin, the new authority would
be headed by the Absorption
Minister but the Jewish Agency
would have day to day respon-
sibility for dealing with absorp-
tion problems. The Ministry
would be responsible for coor-
dinating housing, education and
jobs for the newcomers, Dulzin
told a press conference here.
DULZIN. who is also chairman
of the World Zionist Organiza-
tion Executive, is in Britain to
see Jewish and Zionist leaders.
He said the Jewish Agency wants

j^| 0^ ^f
^V ^^L _^ ^ ^riSI^^^ V *'
*^1 ^^r h t^M ^^l 3 k-
^^ ^^^F 1 1 1 P
V^^TJ V V
I ""^Sj* F-
f. ''f "tA
A class in calligraphy will be
offered to senior adults at the
Jewish Community Center -
Hollywood extension, announced
Gail Weisberg, project director
for the Senior Adult Center at the
JCC.
The class will be taught by
Saul Levine. Levine has inscribed
names on award certificates for
the Jewish Federation of South
B roward.
The class will be offered on
Monday mornings during July,
and is open to 20 people. The JCC
is handling pre-registration.
"Calligraphy is the art of fine
penmanship," Levine said. "I
have studied the art and feel
anyone can learn how to do it."
Saul Levine
INITIALS
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HOURS.
FRI-
Member* of the Shalom Committee of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward Women's Division met to discuss the upcoming
Shalom events which welcome newcomers into South Broward.
Reviewing the dates of Sept. 4 and Oct. 21 for these events are
(from left) Joyce Gould, Geraldine Babbitz, Barbara Rosen-
berg, Susan Singer, chairman; and Beverly Shapiro.
Calligraphy Class to be Offered To
Senior Adults at Hollywood JCC
3 take over responsibility for
some of Israels overseas broad-
casting to the United States and
Latin America.
Although the Agency paid
IL 30 million a year to the Israel
Broadcasting Authority for this
purpose, the result was very
unsatisfactory. he said.
For three years, the broad-
casting staff had refused to
broadcast programs during the
night and an expensive trans-
mitter, bought especially for that
purpose remained unused. A
report by a working committee,
under the chairmanship of Eli
Eyal. would soon be ready for
implementation, Dulzin said.
ON SOVIET Jewry, Dulzin
expressed alarm at the rising
proportion of those who
"dropped out'' from Israel pre-
ferring to go to the U.S., Canada
or Australia. Until two months
ago. 50 percent of the Soviet
Jews were still going to Israel.
But in March and April, the pro-
portion of those going to Israel
had dropped to 42 and 4fi percent
respectively.
This partly reflected the fact
that the latest emigrants come
mostly from the large Soviet
cities such as Moscow, Odessa.
Kiev and Kharkov, and had been
cut off from Jewish life for
detail
200,000 outstanding affidavits
which had been sent to Soviet
Jews from Israel to facilitate
aliya. These affidavits were being
sent at the rate of 4.000 a month.
ADMITTING that the Agency
could have stopped sending so
many affidavits as a way to
staunch the flow of Jews who by-
passed Israel, Dulzin said they
did not want to take "one-sided
steps."
In his meeting with fund-
raisers here, Dulzin discussed the
five-year project to raise S6O0
million in the diaspora to
rehabilitate 45,000 Israeli
families living in slum conditions.
Of the $48 million budget author-
Frid>
On Soviet JtWn
expressed alar*
'Pitts!
train. Until tll0
Soviet Jews ,W>
going to hnul
jzed this year, two-u^J
be raised in the Ui
and the rest in othere
L V.
1:

i 6
;
Since 1973. too Israeli broad-
casts to the Soviet Union had
been jammed. The only other
foreign broadcasts heard by
I Soviet Jews were the "pro-Arab"
BBC and the Voice of America
"which sells beautiful America,'"
Dulzin said.
HOWEVER, Dulzins main
complaint was against the activ-
ities of H1AS and the Joint Dis-
tribution Committee in the U.S.
in readily assisting new arrivals
at Vienna who announced that,
although allowed to leave the
Soviet Union for Israel, they now
preferred a different destination.
In his latest talks in the United
States with these organizations.
Dulzin had warned that if the
"dropout" rate continued, the
entire emigration from the Soviet
Union could be endangered, since
the struggle to leave was carried
out only in the name of aliya to
Israel. He said he would be
having further talks with these
bodies in Jerusalem at the end of
this month, when the Jewish
Agency Assembly will also be
meeting.
In the last six months, the
Soviet Union has been allowing
between 1.900 and 2,000 Jews a
month to emigrate. However,
this had to be compared with the
South Florida Israel Bond leaders conferred
Minister Begin's liaison, Avraham Sharir (center)atn
for members of the Israel Bonds Prime Minister's!
left ure Jack Saltzman, Solomon Klein. Sharir. M
stein, president of the Broward Israel Bonds Prime 1
Club; and Nathan E. Greenberg. Sharir is majority I
Knesset and parliamentary whip for Prime Minister I
Likud party.
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930,1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 15
lantanamo: The Jewish Connection
)NY DE MARCO
.TANAMO BAY, Cuba
[ild-mannered and
Howard B. Schero
rhill. Fla., the bearded
lay leader of the
U S. Naval Baae at
amo Bay, Cuba, speaks
I voice.
I has been a great week for
. in Gitmo."
wasn't Chanukah or
lavy rabbi from Norfolk,
visiting the base, the
IS. military facility on
aist soil. A rabbi hadn't
}itmo, as it is commonly
i years.
MILLIONS of Jews
nut the world, seeing the
fa weekly routine, but for
in Schero and his 26
vorshippers, this was a
norable occasion.
, the son of Mrs. Joan A.
of 3330 Spanish Moss
in Lauderhill, escorted
bbi. Lt. Cmdr. John
tt, on his visits with the
[ Guantanamo Bay.
p. i..'. Rosenblatt con-
I prayer service for us and
remendous help and in-
to me," says the 1969
of Coral Gables Senior
:hool. Plans were also
hold a Passover Seder
IJewish community.
and Cuban govern-
the U.S.
menta.
Located on the southeastern
shore of Communist Cuba, this
45-square-mile piece of property
(14.4 square miles is water)
consists of palm trees, rocks,
sand, cactus, scrub brush and
iguanas, 17 miles of cyclone fence
and an active land minefield.
SPEAKING OF Gitmo, as it is
commonly called, Schero says,
"This is my second tour of duty
at AAWC. I was here from 1971
to 1973, when I met my wife-to-
be, Coleen. She lived here with
her folks who arrived in Guan-
tanamo in 1956. They were
civilian employees who liked it
and decided to stay. I'm glad
they did."
High atop a hill overlooking
the base, the bay and the Carib-
bean Sea. amid an array of
whirling antennaes and electronic
consoles, Schero and his radar
operators are "on watch." They
alertly monitor the skyways
around them so that the 6,200
military and civilians living on
baro can conduct their daily
routines in a relaxed manner.
A ROUTINE statement of the
center's mission reveals that men
and women working there pro-
vide radar air surveillance with-
in 100 nautical miles of the
Guantanamo base, a key defense
mechanism necessary to ensure
protection of the site. This
function, in turn, lets the base
carry out its mission of support
to the ships of the fleet through
training.
Although small and compact in
its own right, the naval base
serves as headquarters for men
and women engaged in a massive
training program designed to
hone the skills of crewmen
serving aboard warships of the
U.S. Atlantic Fleet.
Nearly 100 ships a year
complete the rugged training
program under the watchful eyes
of Navy Fleet Training Group
instructors from Guantanamo
Bay.
LDDITION
duties,
Schero
lor at the
to his lay
Operations
is a radar
Guantanamo
Hi-Air Warfare Center
Jnited States leased the
amo Hay site from Cuba
In 1934, the treaty was
ated giving the U.S. a
leased which can only
I by abandoning the area
ntual agreement between
Navy Operations Specialist Howard B. Schero spends some off-
duty time with his wife, Coleen, and their daughter, Jennifer.
ik Abe
By Abe Halpern
i
4- '
cation: Is there any knowledge based on
rn scientific techniques and archaeology to
in the reason for the fall of the walls of
ho?
Joseph Perlstein
Hollywood
Iswer: The story of the walls of Jericho can
and in the Hebrew Scriptures, in the Book of
ua 6:1-20. According to these passages,
ho was a well fortified city and the Israelites
ed outside the city walls. On the seventh day
encircled the walls seven times. The
pels blew, the people shouted, and the walls
jmblingdown.
richo is one of the oldest, if not the oldest.
bment in the world. It is located approxi-
five miles north of the Dead Sea and is 825
flow sea level. Its first city wall goes back to
leolithic Period 5000 B.C.E.
IK HEBREW name Yericho is a word of dis-
meaning. It means either fragrant city or
city. Jericho was also known as the city of
1968, on a trip to Israel, we visited many
rical sites mentioned in the Bible. Mrs.
em and I traveled alone with our own
guide, knowledgeable in biblical history
[archaeology. One morning we went from
Jalem to Jericho through Ramallah and the
'Hank.
I traveled on very picturesque roads through
Dns and cliffs of the Judean hills. As we
ached Jericho we stopped and climbed to
op of a hill. The modern city of Jericho, an
I in the middle of the desert, looked to us like
garden of Eden.
OLD CITY of Jericho is to the left of the
There ia a Tel with excavations of the
al city including the remains of the walls
>ad fallen. There ia also a tower about 7,000
old built about 4,000 years before the
Uest by Joshua.
the way back to Jerusalem, we discussed
guide the story of Joshua and the battle
cho.
came to the
conclusion that there are
several possible explanations as to what actually
happened.
ONE IS, of course, the one told in the Bible
that it was Divine providence that caused the
walls to come tumbling down and for Joshua to be
able to take the city.
Another explanation is that the walls were
weakened as a result of an earthquake. Our guide
told us that this area is known to have had many
earthquakes during biblical times.
A third explanation is given by modern ar-
chaeologists who have studied the excavations of
the ruins of the old city and the walls. They base
their conclusion partly on their study of these
excavations and partly on the Bible.
THE BIBLE tells us that Joshua sent two
"intelligence" agents into the city to view the
land and find out all about the fortifications of the
city. They spent the night with a woman of the
town who hid them from the authorities who were
looking for them. {Joshua 2:1-6)
Based on this story, the archaeologists say that
it is very possible that these two agents found out
all about the structure of the walls and were able
to direct the engineers of that time to dig under
the walls from the outside thereby weakening
them.
According to the biblical story, it took seven
days during which time everyone was quiet and
there was no noise. At the end of the seven days,
upon a pre-arranged signal between Joshua and
the engineers, trumpets were blown, the entire
multitude shouted, and the resultant sound
waves caused the weakened walls to collapse.
Joshua took the city by surprise.
Who can tell which interpretation is the correct
one? Perhaps there is some truth in each one of
them and a combination of all three is quite
logical
Editor's note: Send all questions to:
ASK ABE ____. _.
c / o Jewish Federation of South Broward
2719 Hollywood Blvd
Hollywood, Fla. 33020
THEIR training operations are
conducted in a 14,000-square-mile
ocean area south of here and
include such shipboard functions
as navigation, gunnery, damage
control and general seamanship.
Petty Officer Schero married
Coleen in September, 1973, and
moved to Miami for duty at the
Naval Reserve Training Center.
While there, both Scheroa at-
tended the University of Miami
on a part-time basis.
Two years later, he transferred
to the Norfolk, Va.-based am-
phibious assault ship USS Guam,
Religious
Directory
NORTH BROWARD
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100 W Oak
land Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Phillip A. Labowltz. Cantor Maurice
A. Net).
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive. Reform (44)
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. (44 A)
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Drazin.
Cantor Abraham K ester (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE BETH EMET. 200 NW
Douglas Rd. Liberal Reform David
Goldstein, ed.dir.
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9139 Taft St.
Conservative. Rabbi Bernard I
Shoter. (63)
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi
SheON J. Harr. (64)
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA
GOGUE. 7473 NW 4th St. (69)
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Carl Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob Dan
ziger.(12)
and visited Spain, France, Italy,
Kenya, Egypt and Greece.
In 1977, the 27-year-old sailor
reenlisted and requested duty
"back home in Gitmo."
WEIGHING the pros and cons
of duty here, he comments,'' I like
the climate, the location and the
recreational facilities plus the
fishing's great. You can also save
a lot of money because the cost of
living is considerably less than in
the States. Sometimes the
dependent wives here with their
husbands complain about the
lack of conveniences and big
shopping centers, but Coleen is
here with her folks, so she's really
happy."
Schero ia quick to note that as
with any isolated duty station,
travel and home visitations are
very limited.
While Guantanamo Bay may
not offer the day-to-day luxuries
of life that Schero enjoyed while
living back in the United Statea,
he's not living in total isolation.
GUANTANAMO IS self-
supporting and has been since
1964 when the Castro govern-
ment cut off the water and elec-
tricity supplied by Cuba. A
seawater conversion plant,
capable of producing 2.3 million
gallons of fresh water daily, also
produces 23,000 kilowatts of elec-
trical power.
The base also has a modern,
fully-equipped hospital, dental
services, a color television
station. AM and 1 M .radio
stations, a bowling center,
several free movies daily, res-
taurants, one commissary
(supermarket) and two base
exchanges (retail stores).
Schero says he's looking
forward to an Ft & R (rest and
relaxation) trip for his wife and
two-year-old daughter. Jennifer.
"It'll be a good change of
scenery."
NORTH Ml AMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kongsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. (37)
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. Assls
tant Rabbi Jonathan Won. (45)
IEVITT
memorial chapols
1*21 Pembroke Rd.
Hollywood, Fla.
sj* *
Sonny Levitt, F.D.
11MSW. Dixie Hwy.
Nortti Miami, Fla.
49-431S

CANDLELIGHTING
HOLLYWOOD
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max Land
man. (47B)
to
TIME
7:57
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601 Arthur
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
25SIVAN-5738
mmmmmsmmmmm
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi Paul M. Katz,
Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro.
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun. (65)
TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.,
Hollywood, Fla. 33021. Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Robert P. Frazin.
Cantor Bruce Malin. (47C)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
3291 Stirling Road, Oaks Condomini-
um. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe Bomzer.
(52) _________.________
|_L,_^L_L_LJJL
as
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FUNERAL HOME
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
FOR TWO GENERATIONS
Sennit Ihr J,-lnl< S tttll hior-Jt
ultiif *!*" t >'"'' ll't I"*1' tlJ'iljrJ ,'t the
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100 S DIXIE HIGHWAY
JUST OFF HALLANDALE BEACH BLVD.
HALLANDALE
ICHAODO M*Th|m
UNIOAl DIGICOM
454-9999
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOO, FLORIDA
lempCe 3etk 6
tHemaUat
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The all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
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For information call: 9204225 or write.
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PHONE:


Page 18
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The child who drew this dream house...
lives in a shack in Israel.
Cash can make the difference.
Please pay your pledge.
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JEWISH FEDEMTIOn OF SOUTH BROWRRD'S
1978 GOmBIRED ^jM^S
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