The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00196

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
[ency! Stop Arms Sale to Saudi Arabia
Peace Threatened if F15's Are Sold
ICCe (if the National
stions Advisory Council
Bey conferences in
nlted Stales.
tags, held in Atlanta,
Pen Francisco dealt
that the Mideast
i the Administration's
____ :ould have serious repur-
!d peace.
REPRESENTING the Jewish Federation
of South Broward and the concerns of the
Jewish community in South Broward were
Mark Fried, Moses Hornstein, Dr. Stanley
Margulies and Dr. Joel Schneider.
Upon their return to South Broward, they
began immediate action to involve the com-
munity in an Emergency Action Program.
"This program is aimed at our senators and
congressmen that will soon be voting on
President Carters proposed package sale of
war planes to Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Israel,
explained Hornstein.
"Assistant Secretary of State Douglas
Bennet, Jr. wrote a letter to the House Inter-
national Relations Committee on behalf of
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance to stress the
immense importance of Saudi Arabia in pro-
moting a moderate and responsible course in
Continued on Page 13
Wiislh Floridihi in
mm thoiar of Of of r Hollywood
Hollywood, Florida Friday, May 5,1978
Price 35 Cents
ance Can't Decide
Begin Talks Again
EDM
(JTA) -
Minister Moshi
Secretary of
i at the State
[ the indications
| the U.S. still
an agreement
on Middle
from the
later than
nly that the
^^rtjations
pact" he
repeat or
he made
Israel
Barter
ed
that
the planes for itself rather than
see any delivered to Egypt and
Saudi Arabia.
What Dayan did say was:
"Should the American
Administration decide to punish
us and not supply us with the
planes, we shall have to absorb
the punishment and continue to
oppose the package deal. *'
DAYAN told reporters that he
has already said what he has to
say on the subject. When they
continued to press for
clarification, he ended the brief
press conference and walked off.
Dayan was accompanied by
the U.S. Ambassador to Israel,
Smauel Lewis, when he left
Vance's office, although normally
the Secretary of State escorts a
visitor after a meeting. Lew is h
said that Vance was detained. He
said Dayan and Vance were in the
midst of talks on Mideast peace
negotiations.
posed
Israel,
of
ihe had
forego
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las director
Dayan_Saya;
Israel Not Interfering in U.S. PoM
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israeli Foreign Minister Moshe
Dayan denied here that his
country was interfering in the
American political process hi any
form.
"I did not come here to lobby"
or to question any decision made
by the U.S. government, Dayan
told reporters following his
meetings with Secretary of State
Cyrus Vance at the State
Department.
DAYAN'S statement was
apparently prompted by a
remark by White House Press
Secretary Jody Powell that
Washington, not Israel, will
determine what is in the best
interests of America.
Powell was speaking in con-
nection with the Admin-
istration's proposed aircraft sales
package for Israel, Egypt and
Saudi Arabia which Israel vig-
orously opposes.
The implication, according to
some press reports, was that the
Administration believes Israel is
exerting undue pressure to block
the package deal.
THE STATE Department
chief spokesman, Hodding
Carter, was asked if the Carter
MOSHE DAYAN
Administration considered Israel
to be interfering in American
politics. He replied that he could
not speak for the entire Admin-
istration but "I have heard no
such remark from the Secretary
of State."
The spokesman added that all
countries concerned in the air-
craft sales package Israel,
Egypt and Saudi Arabia have
made their views clear on the
matter. "We can hardly say to
any government that they should
not express a view on a matter
that deals with their security," he
said.
Carter also cautioned reporters
that "no dramatic announcement
should be expected" from the
Dayan-Vance talks, which he
described as part of the con-
tinuing process of seeking
progress toward peace in the
Middle East.
DAYAN told reporters that his
discussions with Vance were
devoted entirely to Middle Ea3t
peace negotiations. Pressed by
reporters to repeat his statement
of Israel's views on the aircraft
package deal, Dayan said he had
expressed himself on that subject
before leaving Tel Aviv for
Washington.
However, when the newsmen
insisted, Dayan reiterated that
Israel will continue to oppose the
package and if the Admin-
istration "punishes us" by not
supplying Israel with planes, "we
shall accept the punishment but
we will not change our view."
Dayan said he made the same
statement to a group of Senators,
whom he did not identify, at a
breakfast meeting devoted to the
aircraft package issue. Dayan
also disclosed that he had a
private meeting with Zbigniew
Brae :inski. President Carter's
National Security Adviser, but
would not divulge what was
discussed.
Concerned About Ongoing Efforts
German Official Fears Series
May Hurt Relations With Jews
of the Arabic Department of the
Haganah from 1946-49; in
Israel's embassies in Argentina
and Uruguay. 1949-50; as
political secretary to former
Foreign Minister Moshe Sharett.
1951-52, and then as political
secretary to former Prune
Minister David Ben-Gunon. a
post of particular importance,
1952-63.
After Ben-Gur ion's retirement.
Navon worked for two vears in
Continued on Page 6
By LEO MINDLIN
ERNST INGENDAAY is the
German Federal Republic's
consul general in Atlanta, and he
wonders with some degree of
anxiety what the effect of the
Holocaust series will be on his
government's relations with Jews
in the foreseeable future.
There is a considerable amount
of progress, in his view, that has
been made since the terrifying
Hitler years. Perhaps not so
much in the quelling of the terror
time alone has dulled that.
And certainly not in attempts to
whitewash the facts of history
themselves there has been no
official German effort in this
direction, and such efforts as
have been made elsewhere are
among right-wing and neo-Nazi
elements outside the Federal
Republic.
THE PROGRESS to which
Ingendaay refers is two-fold: It
Continued on Page 15
j Federation Marks 35th Year
The Jewish Federation of South Broward will hold its :
: Annual Meeting and Dedication Ceremonies, Sunday, May 21 at
I 10:30 a.m. |
The Annual Meeting will mark 35 years of Federation :.|
: service to the South Broward community. ;
I FOLLOWING the Annual Meeting, at 1 p.m.. Dedication |:
i Ceremonies will be held for the new headquarters of the :
Federation. Guest speaker will be Rep. J. Herbert Burke, 12th :
: District. Florida.
Highlights of the Dedication Ceremonies will include a
mezuzzah ceremony, a ribbon cutting ceremony by area mayors, :
: a historical review of the 35 years of th Federation in South :
: Broward and a projection for the future. :


Pag* 2
The Jeuish Florid** nd Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Fl%|
Campaign Awards Slated
May 14th at Beth Shalom
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward will hold its
Annual Awards Breakfast on
behalf of the 1978 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emrgency
Fund. 9:30 a.m.. Sunday May 14
at Temple Beth Shalom in
Hollywood.
According to General Cam-
paign Chairman. Dr. Stanley
Margulies. the campaign break-
fast gives the Federation the
opportunity to honor those
people who worked to coordinate
the successful CJA-IEF effort in
South Broward.
"MORE than 250 Awards will
be given out for outstanding
leadership in the campaign and
dedication to the survival of the
Western Odyssey
For the young person who
loves the outdoors for hiking,
mountain climbing as well as
visiting museums and learning
geology, geography and botany
of various areas, then Western
Odyssey Camp is the place to
spend the summer.
An alternative to regular
summer camps. Western
Odyssey Camp provides campers
with visits to snow-capped
mountains. deserts. forests,
rivers and waterfalls.
The trip involves tent camping
as well as some nights in cabins
or motels Some meals will be
eaten out. although most will be
prepared at camp.
Jewish people. declared Dr.
Margubes.
The needs of Jews all over the
world are growing even day Not
just the Jews in Israel, but in
Rumania. Yugoslavia. Morocco.
Tunisia. India and right here in
South Broward.
The onlv way we can begin to
meet these needs is through
continued support and increased
giving to the Federation s CJA-
IEF campaign.
"THIS years campaign
workers were able to see that
there are still unmet needs
Through their efforts, the 1978
CJA-IEF campaign has sur-
passed monies raised in 1977."
explained Dr. Margubes.
1 Women's Divion f
:::: B
S;Awards Brunch Set!
The Women's Division ofjj:
:: the Jewish Federation ofx-
South Broward will hold its:
'<: annual installation of officers:*
j-j-and board and awards ::
:: brunch. Thursday. Mav 11 at::::
10 a-m at the Emerald Hills |
:: Country Club. >:
Installing officer will be :'<
j&Muriel Russel. president of ::
xfthe Jewish Community ::
Renters of South Florida.
Marion Salter
and
Nancy Atkin
Pov Haste Shopping Cente*
4525 S*e- do>- S" ho Vwood Flo
Phone 96>-6996
Perjono Se>. ce Book S'cxe
10% OFF
rent
a car
for
less
Cars ana trucks a' kj aa we*-- v montfi. rate-
Rent a fuel sa..ng Oatsur
makes of automob-ies or trucks tor ess
LASE PLANS ALSO AVAILABLE
A short or iong term ease ta >ormaoe tc .
circumstances and your convenience
YOUR MAJOR CREDU CARD WELCOME
Think of the things you can oo mU> :ne mone, you save
by renting the rite way
RITEWAY LEASING
In our second decade of satisfying customers
6027 PEMBROKE ROAD
HOLLYWOOD
987-4085
Where
CJA-IEF
$ Help Jews
In Rumania. S125 a month
will maintain an elderly
person in a nursing home in
Bucharest; M0 a month will
provide a hot hinch daily to a
bedridden person at home;
$75 a vear will provide seven
food packages a year for an
elder!v person; >25 a month
will cover a hot meal a day
for aged in J DC-sponsored
canteens in Rumania: and
$75 will provide a yearly dis-
tribution of new clothing for
an elderly couple.
In Yugoslavia. $65 a
month will help subvention
an elderly person in the old
age home in Zagreb. $100
will send a Yugoslav young-
ster to a Jewish summer
camp for one month
IN MOROCCO. $40 a
month will pay for food for
an indigent aged living alone
in Morocco; $250 a year will
cover costs of education for a
child in a Jewish day school;
$40 a year will feed a child at
the school canteen; and $45 a
month will cover maintenace
for one person in an old age
home in Casablanca.
In Tunisia. $30 a month
will maintain an elderly Jew
living alone in the city of
Tunis: $50 a month will
cover full costs for an infirm
aged in an old age home,
Tunis: and $330 a year will
cover costs of sending a child
to a Jewish day schooL
In India. $15 a month will
feed a Jewish child attending
the ORT school in Bombay.
Support the 1978
Combined Jewish
Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund...
Jewish Federation
of South Broward.
RELGO, INC.
""w Goods, Gift,
Books I Ascorts,
1507 WASHINGTON AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
532-5912
CONTINENTAL
JANITORIAL CORP.
'-eB-o'ess.o"o Do The Job
HOVE CLEANING
SHAMPOOING
OW CLEANING
FLOOR WAXING
Insured* Bonaed* References
Offices Homes -
Condominiums
free Estimates:
_______917-9491
Mi-$.7i
DIAL-A-MAID
KWILE SERVICE COMPANY.
NM UCEUSEO Wf 00 OFFICE
mmi. HOMES. tfMTM[NTS
MO CONNS-IWTRMSPeiTI
TION.
PHONE: 940-3011
H-s-s-n
SLATE OF DIRECTORS
Jewish Federation
of South Broward
From Nominating Committee:
TERMINATING WITH ANNUAL
MEETING OF 1981
Norman Atkin. M.D. TORMlNATnJ
Allen Gordon ANNUALr
Moses Hornstein F I960
Paul Koenig
Stanley M argulies. M. D. p"l Wen*
Joel A. Schneider. M.D.
R. Joel Weiss. Esquire
OFFICERS
President
Vice President
(Community
Relations) .
Vice President
Treasurer
Joyce Newman
Nathan Pritcher
Moses Hornstein
Allen Gordon

Secretary Samuel M. Meline DMD
FOR INFORMATION, THE FOLLOWING Win a
ON THE BOARD PURSUANT TO PRIOR SELECn
1979
I. AbeDurfoin
Abraham B. Halpern
Sydney Holtzman
Mrs. Sherman Katz
Meron J. Levitats, M.D.
Mrs. Stanley Margulies
Robert PitteU. M.D.
1980
UOi
Isfej
I

Melvin H. Bier ___
Samuel M.MeliMDj^
James Fox Miller
Mrs TheodoreS^ I
Nathan Pritchs *
Ben Salter
PAST PRESIDENTS
Lewis E. Conn
Herbert D. Katz
OTHER BOARD MEMBERS WILL BE:
Women's Division President
Young Leadership President
President of the Broward Board of Rabba
President of the Jewish Family Service
a

ihl

PLUS THREE TO BE APPOINTED BY THE PRESM
FREE CHICKEN DINNER
j
THIS MONTH'S SPECIAL!
SPECIAL BASKET FREE
M" Volue Contoins:
' IfUiirtlT ehlckell rill III 2 |IMT<".
* I'rein h fries
Apple turnover
WITH PURCHASE OF ONE
HEARTY DINNER SPECIAL
3" Value Contains:
* Half ehic-ki'ii cut in 1 purrs
* Potato salad
* Ciwn on the eon
* Two rolls
ALL FOR ONLY
$2
97
(4* VMM
NO COUPON NEEDED!
UMIT ONE SPECIAL Pit PflBON
OPEN DAILY 11 A.M. ta 0 f*>____
spar
cnuSSeS ope" fo" lu"ch ssss1
CMICKEMtajav aaa Man* aooa <* CMJ\
RHORl AHEAD FOR FASTER CARRT-OUT SI
M-S-WS


1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Grea ter Hollywood
Page 3
ff
k-4*

lip package Passover goods for patients in South
Ltilutions. Over 400 packages were distributed to
\ homes.
>ver Foods Distributed
>n J. Levitats
the chaplaincy
mounced that the
ervice of the Jewish
f South Broward
Passover Package
patients in South
Itutions.
400 packages were
Dania Nursing
st Nursing Home,
lills Nursing Home,
Manor Nursing
Ihe Hallandale
Center, Lincoln
ement Center, the
i State Hospital, the
ectional Institution
ads Village. Also,
individuals were
Passover foods.
)S for the Passover
\rv supplied by the
mint v Centers of
la, Broward B'nai
es and several in-
tio made personal
to the Passover
ct.
The packaging took place at
the Federation Building. The
following participated in the
packaging: William Broder,
president of Ben Gurion Lodge of
B'nai B'rith, Arthur Lezar
Community Volunteer Service
Chairman of B'nai B'rith Council,
and the following members of
Ben Gurion Lodge: Bob Sher-
man, Aaron Kamhi. David M.
Green, Sam H. Wiletsky and
Louis Dunoff.
The following members of JCC
of Hollywood also participated:
Edith and Bill Halpern, Fannie
and Ixrois J. Cantor, Rose and
Manassse Herbst and Rachel
Postal.
Blood Pressure Taken
Free blood pressure readings
are taken every Thrusday from 9
a.m. to noon at the Red Cross
South Service Center
Hollywood Blvd.
on
inert
anK
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
reet at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
Jrumbacher Art Supplies Hardware & Paint, Inc.
House wares Gifts Hams Decor
Potio I DhMtlt foraHvre latti Closet Shop
BEA0D WINDOWS ROOM DIVIDERS
WINDOW SHAMS ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS
DRAPERY RODS fOU AG{
WALLPAPER PIANTS
KEY SLOCK WORK PAIIO FURNITURE
Store Ho-ri: 7:30 MM. 6p.m. Cloi.d too Et iMcb Isstwsrt
, PkfMa 33009
456-05*6
COL/PON
intation Auto Supply
ISW '45th St.
luderdole
Orange Drive
Industrial Plaza
Jones: 792-9570 792-9571
'ACUATE AND RECHARGE
^-CONDITIONING SYSTEMS
INSPECTION OF SYSTEM
*12.95 PlusTax
(offer good with coupon only )
Holocaust
Memorial
Jewish Family Service
Announces Annual Meeting
1 Program Set 1
Religious and Hebrew Schools
of the Hollywood area are joining
together for a CJ A-Holocaust
Memorial Program, Sunday,
May 7.
The program will be held at
Temple Beth El in Hollywood at
10 a.m. It will be joined by the
students of Temple Beth Shalom,
Temple Sinai, Temple Israel of
Miramar, Temple in the Pines,
Temple Solel, Temple Beth Emet
and the Jewish community.
THE program will feature a
presentation by the youngsters of
the Keren Ami Council. The
council is a group of rep-
resentatives from every Temple
Religious School and is advised
by Ms. Stephanie King.
There will be a discussion by
individuals involved during the
Holocaust. Sing-along will be
offered everyone, as well as a
report of the Keren Ami Con-
tributions from the combined
efforts of all the youngsters of the
religious schools.
The program is cochaired by
Rr.bbi Jonathan Woll of Temple
Beth El and Leon Weissberg,
educational director of Temple
Beth Shalom Religious School.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County will hold its
16th annual meeting Thursday,
May 18 at 8 p.m. at the Jewish
Community Center of Greater
Fort Lauderdale.
The annual meeting commit-
tee, under the chairmanship of
Mrs Natalin Heiden, stated that
at the meeting an annual report
to the community will be
presented by President Mark
Fried. Officers and members of
the Board of Directors will be
elected as well as the pre-
sentation of the Esther Lowen-
thal Community Service Award.
The meeting is open to the public.
DIANE BLANK, chairman of
the nominating committee, has
announced the following slate:
Mark Fried, president; Fred
Greene, first vice president;
Brian Sherr, second vice presi-
dent; Linda Winn, treasurer; and
Linda Levin, secretary.
Nominated for a three-year
term are: Mel Baer, Selma
Barron, Charles Dubin, Diane
Blank, Natalin Heiden, Francine
Knee, Dr. Alfred Martin, Dr. Joel
Wilentz, Rovi Faber, and Abram
Silverman.
For a two-year term: Peter
Lazerus, Janet Cohen, Rabbi
Katz, Sandra Friedman, Frank
Gobel, Richard Romanoff,
Evelyn Denner, Sheldon Polish,
Rabbi Sheldon Harr, and Elaine
Fischer.
FOR a one-year term: Dr.
Robert Heller, Joyce Kaplan,
Mrs. Roger Stewart, Jacob
Brodzki, Charles Ruben, Al
Lang, Edward Nacht, Max Dick-
stein, Saul Lipsman, and Renee
Lieberman.
The nominating committee
consists of: Fred Greene, Mark
Fried, Brian Sherr, Dr. Joel
Wilentz, and Diane Blank,
chairperson.
Jewish Family Service is a
counseling agency which offers
its services to all residents of
Broward County. The principal
activities of the agency are
parent / -hild, marital, and group
counseling and services to the
aged. The agency also offers
family-life programs to com-
munity organizations as well as
an active Russian Resettlement
Program.
Broadway's 'Death trap'
Plays at Parker
Patrick Macnee, television's
protagonist of the series. The
Avengers is making his South
Florida debut along with Ira
Levin's thriller. Deathtrap as
Broadway's newest hit plays as
the season's finale at Fort
Lauderdale's Parker Playhouse.
From $75 a week
the possibilities are endless
inlhe Bahamas.
The endless
islands with endless
possibilities.
The Bahamas have
more things to do and
places to do them than you'd
ever imagine. There's golf-
ing, beaching, tennis and
scuba. Boats to sail. Fish
to catch. Every day brings
a new dream to follow.
And oh, our en-
chanted evenings. You can
spend them wining, dining
and gambling. Dance cheek
to cheek beneath the stars
or stroll hand in hand on a
moonlit beach.
Beautiful Bahamas
vacations are waiting for
you in Nassau/Paradise
Island, Freeport/Lucaya
and the Out Islands. And
with our wonderful prices,
you don't have to wait
to enjoy them.
You can spend a week in
Nassau/Paradise
Island for $75 to $285.
Thatsone
beautiful possibility
Let us enchant you
with old world charm. Or
thrill you with new world
excitement. Nassau/
Paradise Island has it all.
Your choice of pack-
ages includes accommoda-
tions for 7 nights, an island
sightseeing tour, a visit to
the Sea Floor Aquarium and
other extras. If you can't
spend a week, spend a lovely
long weekend with our
4-day/3-night packages for
$35-$125.
Another beautiful
possibility. A week in
Freeport/Lucaya
for $85 to $173.
Watch the sun rise
from fashionable beaches or
linger long past sunset in
night spots that swing till
dawn.
You'll get 7 nights at
your choice of hotels, a visit
to Jacques Cousteau's
Underwater Museum,
sightseeing and more. All
for the price of your
package. Freeport/Lucaya
4-day/3-night packages are
also available for $38-$77.
More beautiful
possibilities.Out Island
weeks for $77 to $193.
Leave the rush of
today and relax to the un-
hurried rhythms. There's
no more beautiful away-
from-it-all place than a
Bahamas Out Island.
Our 7-night get-away
packages give you a choice
of islands and accommoda-
tions. Plus island souvenirs
to remember us by. Or take
your pick of our 4-day/
3-night packages for $33-$83.
These low off-season
rates are effective through
December 16. Prices are per
person, double occupancy,
and do not include air fare.
Your Travel Agent
has complete details on all
our Bahamas vacation pack-
ages. Stop by today. Or call
toll-free 800-327-0787.
In Florida, call
800-432-5594. In Dade
County, 443-3821. Be sure
to ask for our free
Bahamas Vacation brochure.
(_jfe Better InThe Bahamas ])


Page 4
The Jen
ish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday i
Israel's New President
Israel's new President Navon is a Sephardi. This is a
first'" an important "first"' because Israels
Sephardi Jewish community has said over and over again
that its member are treated as second class.
Even on a political level, the bitter comment has been
that Sephardi Jews make good police chiefs, meaning that
that is about as high as a Sephardi Jew can climb in the
establishment.
Savon's election has changed all that, at least
symbolically. Like all other Israeli Presidents in the past.
Navon is no exception otherwise in the fact that he is an
intellectual giant in his field literature.
But his Sephardi origins can not be brushed aside
lightly.
Sephardi Jewry has an ancient and distinguished
history. For example, among the Jews expelled from
Spain in 1492 was Judah Abravanel. son of the famous
rabbi and stateman. Don Isaac Abravanel. Sephardi Jews
can go on and on. embellishing the listing of their past.
In President Savon's election lies the hope that
finally the bridge will be gapped between two Israeli
Jewish communities and that one of them, the Sephardi.
will cease feeling that it has been relegated to a place of
second class.
Giving to CJA-IEF
In addition to the many communal activities in which
the Jewish Federation of Broward County is engaged
these days, its Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emer-
gency Fund campaign continues unabated.
Object: To remind us that the political crisis in the
Middle East aside. Israel's ongoing needs, those needs
that our community is dedicated to helping meet, must be
met with even greater generosity than ever before
Reason: If increased levels of generosity are not
forthcoming, the forces currently operating on Israel to
reduce her to a splinter, to amputate her outer reaches will
misinterpret our true commitment to Israel and pres-
harder to achieve their insidious aims.
What else can we say?
This should be commitment enough on our part to
give to C JA-IEF beyond our giving before. Let
Washington understand, let the Arab petrobillionaire*-
-nize that we are not reduced in our determination by
fear in precisely the same way that Israel is not reduo
fear
Let Washington and the Arab petrobillionaires know
-o the contr are bent on supporting [srai
richly than we have ever supported her I
ar of need is all our need. In Israel"s dan.
all our dar.
Through CJA-IEF we can mett the danger and
n\ercome it
Footsie With Moscow
The Belgrade conference has ended. Its purpose was
to remind the Russians that they did not live up to their
commitments made at the Helsinki conference com-
mitments having to do with human freedoms.
At Belgrade, a basic human freedom went down the
drain because delegates to the conference were too chicken
to eyeball the Soviets on this issue. We have in mind
Soviet Jewry and their right to leave the country.
The very first time that Soviet Jewry was mentioned,
the Russians threw a tantrum, and everybody else went
into a sweat of silence. Let's not get the Rooskies upset -
this seemed to be the theme of the conference and it
reminds us very much of the reaction of the Chamberlain
clan in Munich, when Hitler threw a tantrum and
Czechoslovakia went down the drain.
Our American delegate. Arthur Goldberg, as we
understand it. did tell the Soviets to knock off their act
and the Soviets listened, but only briefly, because
Goldberg could get no other support for his gutsy deed.
Then what was Belgrade all about? It was pretty
much what Helsinki was all about: a soft-shoe routine
playing footsie with Moscow.
Jewish Floridian
*^ SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood Office IMS Federal Hwy Suit* 208 Dama Fla 3M04
..._____ Telephone 830*018
F^^DAKSsoaTn*1PLANTl20NE8U,S, **"'' 3UJ Phone 873-^0
Editor and Publisher SUZANNE SHUCHET
!l J8w.SK Fkmd.an Do* Not Ouar.Me. TIs. K,rsitUve "'""
Of TIN!Merchand.se Advertised In Its Columns
Published Bl-Weekly
Second Claas Postage Paid at Danla Fla SSaaod
FREDK SHOCHET -FRIDAY. APRIL 21. 1*71
TM *****'* ft .<* w Jew.sh Uaity ami mo Jems* weeki.
Me., ber ot the Jew.sh Teleoraph.c Ae .de News Serv.ce National Ed.tar.ai Association. American ^saacsatia* *
English Jewish Newspaperi and me FlorKU Press AsteoalKMi
SUBSCRIPT ION HATES: (local araal One Yeac-a/jr Oat of Town Upar. ooMtv
Golda Meir on Her 80th Birth
By MOSHE PEARLMAN
London Chronicle Syndicate
What is it that has made Golda
Meir so formidable an Israeli
institution, he asks.
Anv attempt to analyze the
source of her power inevitably
invites comparison with the
outstanding Jewish leaders of the
recent past There were two in
our own time whose greatness
was manifest. Chaim Weizmann
and David Ben-Gunon. Both
towered above their fellow-men
Each fitted the biblical
description of King Saul: From
his shoulders and upward he was
higher than any of the people
What of Golda who turns 80 on
May 3 To which group does she
belong'
I THINK she would produce
one of her rare blushes at the very
idea of being considered in the
same breath with Weizmann and
Ben-Gunon As she herself says
and though one cannot always
trust what leader* say "bout
themselves, in this case I'm sure
Golda means it she never
relished the highest office and
never sought it-
She accepted the Premiership,
following the sudden death of
Prime Minister Eshkol. as a duty
and to preserve party unity. And
this occurred some four years
after her retirement from
Government (though not from
politicsl and when she was past
70 She had always been content
to be a member of the team, and
had never aspired to the cap-
taincy
Yet if she is no Weizmann or
Ben-Gunon, she added her own
dimension to the Premiership,
and was soon commanding
enormous respect both at home
and abroad I think that springs
from a rare combination of
qualities
SOME OF course are common
to all notable leaders, and
essential: single-mindedness. an
"" *iH. *nd th,
make critical
exudes n iUri
strength To the*. J
compassion ItWj
tough when STJ
simplicity and
pragmatism. And sWi
common touch. It ,,
binatwn that is unique
No matter where tkj
whom, whether *
Minister at a Cabins,
the outbreak of ZL
Minister holding the L.
UN; Labor Minis*
ahead with public i
social legislation; sp
fund-raising meetine
leader at a workerj.
mission-head in MoscosI
always gone to the hga]
matter, presenting ha,
straightforward blacki
terms.
IT SEEMS evidat i
utter single-rnindeda
Jewish survival and _
was forged as a child in ||
stetl during a po
amidst constant
pogroms It was as
ears rang ever after wtkj
of the hooves of the)
horses and the "Deaij
Jews" cries of their
powering her dete._
devote her life to the i
her people
As pupil and then
teacher in Milwauka
emigrated to America i
family when she wasi
pioneer kihhutinik. labolj
and Jewish Agency a
Mandatory Palestine, i
first diplomat in Rut
member of successive i
thereafter, her sole at
absorbing concern
development, consob
safely of the Jewish
homeland and the welfare*!
everywh'
THE CHILDHOOD!
of pogroms engen
Don -1 >ach to i
statecraft, and whiki
improve the lot of the.
has
enhance the lot of I
This mi ; rticularrt
when shi moved trorata
Continued on Pistil
Reform Bill Called Repressive
Friday. May 5.1978
Volume 8
28 NISAN-5738
Number 9
If you maintain your interest
in Senate Bill 143?' to the very
end of its 682 pages, you come
across Section 1163 which
reenacts the Logan Act If you're
hazy on your history, the Logan
.Act was originally passed in
It provides that any citizen
who directly or indirectly com-
mences or carries on any
correspondence or intercourse
with any foreign government or
any officer or agent thereof, with
intent to influence the measures
or conduct' of that government
officer or agent in relation to any
dispute or controversies with the
United States" shall be guilty of
a criminal offense.
READ IT carefully if you are
Jewish, particularly, and in-
terested in our relations with
Israel. Worried about your
constitutional right to freedom of
speech'' Thomas Emerson.
Professor of Law Emeritus at
Yale, and one of the great con-
stitutional lawyers of our time, is
concerned about this and a host
of other portions of S-1437
commonly known as Son of S-l"
for the danger it poses to all of us
And you should be if you grasp
its implications.
This monstrosity, which may
become law. is only one small
portion of an onmibus bill
designed to reform the Federal
criminal code. Instead of reform,
however, it would contribute
*,?. ^ the morion of civil
rights tor individuals, even those
who would never get involved in
dissent or other activities which
Edward
Cohen
they believe would put them in
jeopardy
For the far-reaching effects of a
number of other sections go
beyond the stated concern to
keep political activity within
legitimate bounds, and can trap
even the most unsuspecting and
apathetic citizen.
THE Criminal
provision (Section
Conspiracy
1002). for
instance, wculd make anyone
present at a meeting where it was
agreed to block construction of
an interstate highway through a
park guilty of criminal con-
spiracy That is even if he or she
never even participated in the
demonstration, wasn't within
miles of it. and was not even in
agreement with the proposal.
And. if any criminal offense is
committed by aome demon-
strator the .pathetic, non
Participating citizen is also liable.
J" Unfu"e that is dear in its
Went. S-1437 designed to
Prohibit legitimate activity by
government policy, ^
opposition to goveraraanul
actions and to resist
mental abuses.
PROF. EMERSON
as having been drafted.
an eye to encouraging'
participation by citizens!
affairs, but from a ""
as fortress ment
view to shielding thegova
at every turn from the
of taking into account UN
and wishes of its citizens
Despite all we havel
sincethen.it is the feaW
libertarians that UaM]
the product of theilf
repression of the Met
and. to repeat, could |
ordinary citizen in I
danger of going w
criminals and *"*
codification is presuroW
at. It has been pajg]
testimony that a peri*
charged with viotauonj
1301 (Obstructing*"0"
Function! by giving l
the wrong direction4^"
THERE IS a If
Criminal Justice so"
of the House of R
(HR 23111 *bich
complish the worth""
of the Federal CruW*
is not. as is 1'-
with maintaining our
individual rights
There is no "fl
codification of "* ,.
criminal law cans*
complished in J"
strengthens rather
derminee our d
atitutions. wd <**
Congress should be*>'
eh*'


iy 5,1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Huge Anti-Nazi Rally in Cologne
(JTA) Europe's
t-war anti-Nazi rally
in Cologne on Satur-
about 25,000 demon-
embled in Cologne to
dissolution of SS
ns and the banning of
izi activity and
aeously, ex-Chancellor
tat chairman of the
tial Democratic Party,
ndt. issued a major
on the spread of neo-
Germany, describing
nee of young Germans
Third Reich as
fiction and that the confessions of
Nazi criminals were extorted by
torture or brainwashing Gold-
stein added: "We must ensure
that the truth about the camps in
Hitler Germany breaks
through."
A DECLARATION passed by
the gathering described in-
creasing, "provocative" meetings
of former SS members both in
Germany and elsewhere, and
international links and activities
"encourage neo-Nazi and racist
groups which have carried out
terror attacks on the offices of
resistance movements,
desecrated Jewish memorials and
state of Baden-Wuerttemberg
declaring that the far-right
National Democratic Party did
not follow any anti-constitutional
goals.
NPD-aff ilia ted newspapers had
attacked West German democ-
racy, portrayed resistance
fighters as criminals and glorified
IN GERMANY
ILLY and the Brandt
followed a government
ent last week that
ensures would be taken
[the circulation of Nazi
aimed at young
ologne rally was at-
groups from through
and western Europe,
^servers said about 80
kf the participants came
t Germany.
^raeli delegation repor-
lled off plans to attend
Ting of the anti-Zionist
of some of the groups
But there was spon-
applause among the
^hen it was mentioned
eli supporters had sent a
i backing the protest.
|igh the groups did in
ar to be mainly left or
^ist-leaning speakers
oint of avoiding political
recalling instead the
committed by the SS
essing concern at in-
activities by ex-SS
id participants were
sncentration camp sur-
aml a small group of
en in German Air Force
Dr. Maurice Goldstein,
of the International
tz Committee, told the
i m l> young (under 25)
[can never accept or
khat ex-SS members sup-
}y neo-Nazis revive and
eirlies."
to neo-Nazi propa-
rhich claimed that the
ation camps were a
cemeteries and slandered former
resistance fighters and survivors
of Nazi persecution."
In an article written for Die
Mahnung (The Warning), a pub-
lication of the Federation of Nazi
Regime Victims in West Berlin,
Brandt said it would "be an
exaggeration to talk of an acute
and threatening danger of neo-
Nazism."
But, "more than in previous
years," it was necessary to be
vigilant and unyielding against
extreme right-wing activities.
"Reports about increasing
commercial activities with Nazi
records, books and films have
spread as much in recent times as
have reports showing the begin-
nings of a right-wing terrorism."
Brandt referred to a report that
a 20-year-old youth had launched
an Sa-Sturm in Hamburg, and of
groups of schlaegertrupp (assault
troops) and of pai a military
maneuvers by such groups in
"preparation for the critical
time." ,.
Maihofer was investigating the
extent to which state govern-
ments in German were imple-
menting anti-extremist laws.
BRANDT commented: "one
asks oneself with a feeling of both
fear and disgust why young
people band together into mo-
Fascist groups."
Brandt recalled that federal
Interior Minister Werner
If necessary, new laws would
be passed, but it was "an
illusion" to believe that laws
alone could stop the activity." In
this respect, Brandt criticized a
recent court judgement in the
uf m Nazis neto A PMf
SttMe. 4Mb HT C4MR,*

the Third Reich. This could not
be countered "simply by shurg-
ging one's shoulders."
THE NEO-NAZI revival was
"not a matter of a few incurable
old Nazis, or the unsatisfied
curiosity of young people left
alone by parents and teachers."
It was "more a case of young
people seeking an escape in neo-
Fascism's glorification of
violence."
Brandt spoke of "inadequate"
treatment of the Third Reich in
school history lessons, and the
"shocking" ignorance of young
people about the Hitler era.
Teacher-training programs and
school syllabi should "take
account of the bitter experience
of the past. Those who do not
know their past are unable to
come to terms with themselves in
the present."
\
Tradition
Although the dream of a
Jewish Homeland began
centuries before, it has only
become a reality in these past
three decades. Israel has
become a homeland for our
people... a nation enriched by
traditions spanning thousands
of years. To Israel and the spirit
of a great people: May you live
and be well.
iLenderk
B&ciels
HKSUCtD y*
The Lender Family
"The Frozen Bagel People"
Lender's Bagel Bakery. Inc.. Post Road. West Haven. Connecticut 06516
Stress can squeeze years
off your life if you don t know
how to handle it.
The problem with stress is not how to get rid of it. It's a part of
life. And it's not even all bad. The real problem with stress is how to
recognize it and control it. So it doesn't control you.
Your body reacts to stressful situations with its nerves, glands and
hormones. And because these systems function throughout the body,
what affects them can affect other parts of your body that may be
vulnerable at the time.
That's why stress is a factor in many people's heart attacks,
hypertension, ulcers, asthma, possibly even cancers, and probably
many other ailments. That's also why, in these times of many stresses,
it's a major factor in increasingly costly health care.
You can recognize stress by heeding the warnings of your body
and emotions. Frustration. Anger. Hostilities that build up. Heavy
pressures of responsibility time demands and conflict. Headaches,
insomnia, muscle tension.
The key to handling stress is learning. Learning to air your
feelings in constructive ways, to train your body to relax, to repair a
lifestyle before you're faced with expensive medical repairs. You have
to learn what your stresses are and the best ways for,you to deal
with them.
But they must be dealt with.
Because the longer you remain in the
grip of stress, the more crushing and
costly its effects.




\
1
BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA
For a Iree booklet about stress and preventive health care, write
Liberty National. Communication Department. PO Box 2612. Birmingham. Alabama 3S202
JF
NAME
I
I
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| ADDRESS
CITY--------
I______
STATE
ZIP-


Page 6
TheJe
u-ish Floridian and SHofarof Greater Hollyuood
Fri"W.i
Israel's New President is Sephardi
Continued from Page 1
the Ministry of Education and
Culture.
IN ADDITION to being a
seasoned politician and diplomat
experience which will serve
him well as President his love
of Sephardic folk culture has
resulted in two theatrical
.actions, numerous short
stories with Sephardic themes,
and the groundwork for a still
unfinished play on Jews during
the Spanish Inquisition
In the course of his
distinguished political career, he
has suffered two major defeats
once as speaker of the Km
and. in 197;?. in his bid for
President ot Israel. That election
sparked a stormy debate and
time after withdrawing
from the race. Navon remarked
that it is time that Oriental Jews
in Israel be allowed to be more
than police commissioner, a post
traditionally held by Sephardim
His origins and the position of
Sephardim generally within
Israeli society are important to
him The argument that this is
the generation of the wilderness
and that the next one will fourish
is invalid, he wrote in 1973 on
the social ethnic gap.
"IF THERE is no change in
the environment, in housing
conditions, in the level oi
schooling, and the general at-
mosphere in which the child is
raised, there is a strong
possibility that the son will fol-
low in his Darents' footsteps
.... There is'no'community (in
Israel) which has not a con-
tribution to make nor is there any
which historically has failed
to make a contribution. he
wrote.
He felt most strongly what he
wrote about the contribution of
Sephardim to Jewish life and
culture. Going back to his early
writing in the mid-1940 s. he has
always written of Sephardic life
and customs. Because of this
shortly before Independence 1 ..\
1967,'Yossi Bannai and Rivka
Miihaeli asked him to write a
plav with Sephardic corner.:
Habima to perform on
Independence Day The result
.d.
Later, singer Yehoram Gaon
asked him to w rite a text binding
together se> <-ral Sephardic s,
And on the first anniversary of
Jerusalem Day ithe anniversary
of the city's" reunification), he
wrote a story entitled Six /
and Seven Gates, which was so
popular it was translated into
English and performed in the
United bates and south Africa.
BUT HIS major literary
achievement came in 1970. "My
aim in writing The Sephardic
Garden and I admit it was too
ambitious was to give an
answer to the questions. What
Broward Kosher Supervision To
Ask County for Kosher Ordinance
Broward Kosher Supervision,
Inc.. also known as Broward
Vaad Hakashrut, is an
organization officially one year
old. serving Broward County to
help administer and verify those
business establishments in the
county that sell kosher foods are
verified and supervised.
The Vaad has appointed Rabbi
Abraham I. Jacobson as admin-
istrative supervisor. Rabbi
Avrom Drazin as executive
director. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky as chairman and Rabbi
Moshe Bomzer, all of whom form
the executive board of the Brow
ard Kosher Supervision.
RABBI Moshe Bomzer of
Young Israel in Kmerald Hills
baa helped the Broward Vaad in
placing on the table for
in before the Broward Com-
missioners a county ordinance
Rabbi Bomzer invited Stanley A
Kaufman, director of the con-
sumer affairs division to attend
an executive meeting of the Vaad
to discuss a kosher ordinance for
Broward Countv
The following rabbis were in
consultation and approval for an
ordinance: David Berent. Moshe
Bomzer. Avrom Drazin. Robert
Frazin. Joel Goor. Sheldon Harr,
Samuel Jaffe. Carl Klein. Paui
Katz, Phillip Labowitz. Morton
Malavsky. Harold Richter.
Emanuel Schenk. Bernard
Shoter. Morris Skop. Israel
Zimmerman.
An ordinance would mean that
every establishment that is so
labeled must comply with all
rules and regulations regarding
dietary laws. The Rabbinic
supervision is for religious pur-
poses, whereas the county in-
volvement would be to make sure
that the consumer receives
exactly what is advertised.
AT present. Broward Kosher
Supervision is in charge of ap-
proximately one dozen establish-
ments, with a number of others '
making application.
Girls 8-18 will love being losers

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makes a Sephardi a ,-*pharciV
What is unique about him. JH nat
makes him tick" he said in an
interview after the muscial play s
Jerusalem premiere on Sept. 14.
1970
I had in mind presenting a
vast theme the glories of the
Golden Age. the expulsion from
:n. the Marranos, the
,n throughout Furope
ami Vfrici Hut I found after
nths that all this could
into one play.
itadby
thf the Moroccan
. of fun
>r a delinq
words of
Jewish life is
full of b< -dom. for
ind it
HELPING TO foster this
un there a-- principle*
which nder
The common denominator must
be Jewish tradition, that
adhesive force which keeps all the
sectors and factions in this nation
together. Any culture
which cuts us off from the roots
of Judaism will always be a
foreign element in our midst."
There is plenty of room for
diversity in Israel. What the
nation "wants, the nation will
get." Yitzhak Navon wrote.
What it does not want will be
rejected The rose is a very
beautiful flower But must my
garden have only roses?"
This aspect of Yitzhak Navon s
outlook is particularlv suitable to
the man in line to be Israel's fifth
President. Former Presidents
have included Chaim Weizmann.
who served from 1949 to 1952.
the outstanding scientist and
leader of the Zionist Movement
between the two World Wars:
mzhak Ben-Zvi. 1952-63.
colleague of Ben-Gurion in
decades of Zionist struggle and
well-known Orientalist; Zalman
Shazar. 1963-73. writer
educationalist and member of the
Zionist Kxecutive. in charge ot
the Fducation Department, and
r."phraim Katzir. who served fron.
1973. world-renoww! scientist
v. ho is gi\ mg up a further term in
office in order to return to his
laboratory in KehoMit
Accepting the Israel Leadership Award on behalfj
()l> mpus B'nai B'rith Lodge and Olympus H nai B'ritlj
at a recent Night for Israel on behalf of Israel [
s, \ niimr (Joll. William Monashkin. Larry Horn, En
( ohen. chairman, and Charles S. Kroll.
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r 5.1978
The Jewish Floridian and Sho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
CRT 1UHKI
. RCLATIONa
^MINISTRATION
IITTB ON
kauSE AMD CONTROL.
u Omez Bun
-. DC. Mil
Congress of ttje ftniteb States
Souse of fteprtstntatibes
8Baf)inaton. .C. 205X5
April 28, 1978
Fred Shochet
tor-Publisher
ish Floridian
. Box 29TS
i, Florida 33101
Mr. Shochet:
The NBC television program "Holocaust" brought the story of the extermina-
of the Jews in Nazi Germany during World War II to millions of people in
country. Some of the young did not know it. Some of the middle aged wanted
|forget. Some of the old people only vaguely remembered.
The good which came from this televised series is the awakening in our
jle that it could happen again. The Nazi holocaust stirred only weak protest
European nations 40 years ago. Mollifying Adolf Hitler took precedence
fighting to save the Jews from slaughter. This year at the Belgrade Con-
ence on European Cooperation, when the Soviet delegate threatened "terrible
sequences" if western nations made an issue of Soviet antisemitism, allied
nates turned from asserting the rights of Soviet Jews and other religious
jrities under the Helsinki Accords to placating the Soviets. Our resolve
[prevent future holocausts must not falter.
The bad which came from the show has been sporadic acts of anti-semitism
\r the Passover holiday. This ugly hatred has caused Jewish synagogues to be
faced and vandalized. The first amendment to the Constitution guarantees the
it of all U.S. citizens to freedom of religion. There are many places in
world today where individuals are not allowed to practice their religion,
le these vile acts of harrassment are not part of a pattern of organized
ror in our country, they are in the Soviet Union and many other places in
world.
The American people are free and we have fought hard to stay free,
cannot ignore sporadic acts of anti-semitism and hope they will go away,
lence might be construed as consent. We must denounce the perpetrators of
ese acts not as enemies of the Jews, but as enemies of our freedom of religion
our way of life.
Sine;
c4m-^^
Member of Congress
):cd
11 Never Return West Bank -- Begin
lALEM (JTA> -
lister Menachem Begin
he weekend with three
stives of the Peace Now
but there was no
f minds.
, representing some
officers who have
; a more flexible policy
3vernment under the
it an Israel at peace is
Drtant than a "Greater
ras told by the Prime
Tiat he had no intention
aoding over the West
Gaza Strip to foreign
insisted that his
ere endorsed by the
I last May and he would
pon them. A spokesman
ace Now delegation told
afterwards, "We came
meeting feeling that
\ Minister confirmed our
he prefers a Greater
peace and that he is
by ideological motives
trent him from making
Drial concessions on the
for the sake of
lie delegates told Begin
I segments of the Israeli
their view that his
was not doing
achieve peace, the
linister reportedly
responded, "This government
has won the confidence of the
people. Would you expect it to
act contrary to the platform with
which it went to the elections?"
The members of the Peace Now
movement said they would con-
tinue their campaign, neverthe-
less, to soften the government's
policies.
wnmmn
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PEMBROKE PINES, FLORIDA 33024
PHONE: 981-7759
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Mr. and Mrs. Mrs. Michael Charmatz were the recipients of the
Israel Bonds Scroll of Honor at a recent Night for Israel
sponsored by the B'nai B'rith Herzl Lodge. Taking part in the
presentation ceremony are (from left) Jack Solot, chairman;
Mayor David Keating of Hollywood; and Rabbi David Shapiro,
Rabbi-Emeritus of Temple Sinai, who made the presentation.
s
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OF
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27l Hollywood Blvd Hollywood. Florida 33020
- Broward: (306) Kl10 Dad*: MSOM4
Shalom!
For 10 years, the Jewish Federation of Sooth Broward has
offered an important link between family and the Jewish world. Your
complimentary subscription to the JEWISH FLORIDIAN is the vital
instrument in South Florida which gives the broad coverage of news,
opinion, in-depth analysis and reviews that are essential to keep you
abreast of events which affect us all.
As a contributor to the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund, you have a deep concern for the survival of the
Jewish people and for the quality of that existence. We are in the
midst of crippling world wide inflation which has played havoc with
Israel's economy and with the spending power of our senior adults on a
fixed income. We know that you will understand that the dollars now
allocated to bring this valuable publication into your home can be put
to work to help the Jewish people at this critical time.
We urge you to join the growing list of "personally paid"
subscribers to the JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
Sincerely,

n sincerely,
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Page 8
The Jewish ***** d SkofirofO*Ho*y
Belgrade Was Only One Small Step Toward Detentt
_____________, They are not a copy, con- T
By WALTER OSTEN
Vorwarts
BONN There is no ac-
ceptable alternative to detente.
The final declaration at the
Belgrad CSCE review conference
may have seemed a meager out-
come to months of talks, but
there can be no gainsaying that
detente has made headway.
Belgrade must be viewed as
merely one step, if a specially
important one, in the direction of
detente. Others will follow, not
only the next full conference in
1980 but also a succession of
special gatherings.
"AN honorable outcome after
all," the Swiss delegate con-
cluded. This, it may fairly be said
of the final communique, is a
balanced, objective view. But it
leaves much unsaid.
The declaration does not say
much and has caused widespread
disappointment. But it must be
acknowledged that something
has been achieved. Perhaps
future CSCE conferences will
accomplish more; one can only
hope so.
The communique is misleading
as to the results achieved at
Belgrade. It is somewhat scanty
because of the standing orders
adopted at Helsinki, especially
the provision that decisions must
be unanimous.
Unanimity proving impossible
on a number of issues, issues
simply not mentioned in the final
declaration.
THIS at least sidesteps a risk
Herbert Wehner, Social Demo-
cratic parliamentary party leader
in Bonn, drew attention to before
the conference even began.
He uneasily anticipated the
possibility of one side assuming
the self-appointed role of "a kind
of arbiter of the consequences of
the Final Act" (at Helsinki).
Austrian Chancellor Bruno
Kreisky felt it would be "by no
means so bad" if the Helsinki
balance sheet led to both sides
totting up each other's debit and
credit balances.
"This will oblige us to pay
greater attention to our own
problems," he said. One problem
was the right to work. It was, he
said, proclaimed in theory but
not enough was done to ensure it
in practice.
NON-Communist delegations
in Belgrade justifiably com-
plained about travel and exit
restrictions in East bloc coun-
tries. East bloc delegates
countered that Poland and
Czechoslovakia, for instance,
issue visas for Western visitors in
a day or two or promptly at their
borders.
When their nationals wanted
to visit Britain, on the other
hand, they had to wait four to six
weeks for visas, even longer for
the United States, and fill in
questionnaires with up to 35
partly personal, partly purely
political questions.
Yet there could be no denying
that progress has been made in
the direction envisaged at Hel-
sinki. Where the East bloc is con-
cerned this is particularly true of
reuniting divided families,
freedom of movement for
journalists, freedom of in-
formation and "confidence-build-
ing measures."
Frequently these improve-
ments have proved inadequate
and been accompanied by
relapses into pre-Helsinki days.
But comparatively speaking
there have at least been signs of
progress towards implementation
of the Helsinki accords.
AN INSTANCE of the effect
of measures of this kind on East
bloc domestic affairs comes
readily to mind. Western cor-
respondents say local radio
stations provide more objective
coverage now that jamming has
stopped in the Soviet Union
(except of U.S. transmitters) and
it is no longer an offense in the
GDR to listen to Western
programs.
Since Helsinki, people in nearly
all East bloc countries have
claimed their human rights. They
would not have been able to do so
had it not been for the pub-
lication of the accords in millions
of East bloc newspapers.
In this country, incidentally,
only the Social Democratic
(Cartoon BbrbfMf/BrlMuf Morfport
"Inviolability of frontiers" and
respect for the territorial integ-
rity of each and every par-
ticipating country" are
demanded, while at the same
time "any kind of armed inter-
vention or threat thereof" and
any activity aimed "at the
violent overthrow of the regime
of another participating country"
are condemned.
HUMAN RIGHTS
weekly, Vorwarts, published the
full text of the Helsinki accords.
Helsinki committees set up to
monitor progress towards their
implementation have only been
able to carry out their semi-legal
activities in East bloc countries
by virtue of the Helsinki
declaration.
WESTERN European Com-
munist Parties, having
previously approved Soviet
detente policy virtually without a
murmur, now take a more varied
view of Soviet foreign policy.
The Italian, French and Greek
parties and groups of intel-
lectuals in Yugoslavia and
Hungary sounded, with reference
to Helsinki, such vociferous
protests against persecution of
the signatories of the Czech
Charta '77 that the Prague
authorities were obliged to beat a
retreat, at least for a while.
The Helsinki accords in Bas-
kets One and Two continue to be
implemented with less hue and
cry. But views differ on the eval-
uation of Basket One, to which
the East bloc attaches such
importance.
THE EAST bloc countries
quote these provisions mainly
with the activity of anti-Com-
munist groups in mind; the West
thinks in terms of Soviet inter-
vention in Prague in 1968.
What the West terms armed
intervention is considered by the
East to be assistance to which
Communist countries are duty
bound by their commitment to
proletarian internationalism.
Communist parties in Western
Europe are well aware of the
dangers inherent in this misinter-
pretation of the Helsinki accords.
They invariably refer to East bloc
intervention in Czechoslavakia
with reference to Helsinki.
THE WEST attached little
importance to discussion of
Basket One at Belgrade, which
suited the Soviet Union.
But differences of interpre-
tation are much wider when it
comes to human rights.
According to Horizont, a
magazine associated with the
GDR Foreign Ministry, human
rights are fully guaranteed under
socialism.
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tinuation or extension of
bourgeois human rights dec-
larations. They owe their force to
the exercise of political and eco-
nomic power by working people.
This is a point on which Euro-
communists would differ. But the
writer goes on to list as human
rights guaranteed under social-
ism "freedom of opinion, freedom
of the press, freedom of
assembly, freedom of association
and the citizen's right to lodge
complaints."
This too would give rise to no
more than a wry smile among
Eurocommunists. People in the
GDR would certainly echo this
sentiment.
BUT to try to convert the
human rights debate into an anti-
detente weapon, as this country's
Christian Democrats would like,
is to play into the hands of those
who would like to deny human
rights.
On July 25, 1975, the CDU
called on the Federal government
to refuse to sign the Helsinki
accords.
Detente, however, is the only
context in which the debate could
possibly have spread to the East
bloc countries to such an extent
that Leonid Brezhnev by now it
far less enthusiastic about his
part in bringing about the
Helsinki agreement than he was
two years ago.
CSCE conferences have to live
with these differences of opinion.
Views can only be approximated
in dispute and debate.
and
groups of JS*'
Yugoslavia and 3
Helsinki, such L
protests again,,
were obliged
retreat .
That is why one of J
comings at Belgrade j,
final communique onh-,
for three special
between now and thn
session in 1980.
ANOTHER i, th i
suggestion, endorsed9
to set up standing i
energy and environ
was not followed up.
So it will beaUus,
portant to prepare
pecial conferences
Bonn is certainly
do so.
The Federal govemmJ
of the opinion that "I
Pt of the process of',
cannot be regarded m I
been in vain," to opt]
Chancellor Helmut
government policy i
What matters now it
Helsinki a permanent I
which to discuss _.
cooperation in Europe. 1
ference set itself a tail
take decades.
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(5. 1978
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
ibs in Control Of World Terror
_ So-called
nrism" based on the
struggle against
I has, over the past
ne international.
I its backbone the
al framework and
; the training bases
places; the travel
nd arms and also the
have been
dy Palestinian and
nerged very clearly
elevision report on
-national presented
fgoldonBBC-lhere.
orist extremists in
st Germany and
been and remain
hunted tactions
i the underground of
(countries.
vicious activities
immeasurably
B tor **
strengthened and given in-
tercontinental significance by
their link with the Palestinian
terrorist movement, especially
the Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine (PFLP)
which operates in the open inside
and with the full backing of, Arab
host-States like Iraq, the
People's Democratic Republic of
Yemen, Libya and Algeria.
MANGOLD
effective in
fraudulent claim of the leader of
the PFLP George Habash, that
he had renounced international
hijacking and had broken all
political (as distinct from per-
sonal) ties with his life-long
friend, Wadi Hadad.
It is Hadad, who died recently,
was the acknowledged, though
shadowy, chieftain and top
planner of international
terrorism.
was especially
exposing the
O '
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It was interesting to note that
on one thing at least there was
complete agreement between
Israeli expert (Prof. Ittamar
Rabinovich, of Tel Aviv
University) and the Baghdad-
based Prof. George Hajjar who
proudly asserted that "Hadad
was the PFLP."
The program failed to mention
that the PFLP is an affiliate of
the supposedly "moderate"
Palestine Liberation
Organization (PLO), headed by
Yasir Arafat, and that both have
been drawn even closer together
in the Arab rejectionist front
formed recently against
President Sadat's peace
negotiations with Israel.
NOR DID it mention that the
PLO stands in the same "Jekyll-
and-Hyde" relationship to its
offshoot, Black September, led
by Arafat's deputy Abu Iyad, as
the PFLP does to the late
Hadad's allegedly breakaway
group.
The most frightening aspect of
the presentation was the warped
mentality displayed by the
supporters of Terror Inter-
national.
Sholom Hadassah To
Install Officers
The Sholom group of Holly-
wood Hadassah will hold an
installation luncheon, Tuesday,
May 9 at noon at Valle's in
HaUandale.
Maxine Heichen of the Holly-
wood Chapter will install the
following officers: President
Ruth Greenspan; Fund raising.
Vice President, Rae Hanellin;
Membership, Vice President Gert
Jasnoff; Education, Vice
President Mildred Goldberg;
Program, Vice President Adeline
Davis; Treasurer Sylvia David-
son; Recording Secretary Miriam
Goodman; Financial Secretary
Sadie Nobel; Corresponding,
Ann Levy and Sally Kovel; and
Parliamentarian Lillian Hutter.
A musical program will follow.
Meeting the needs of the people of Israel was one of the topics
discussed at the Paradise Towers brunch on behalf of the
Jewish Federation of South Broward's Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. From left are Dr. Meron J.
Levitats, guest speaker; Eda and Nathan Solomon, hosts. Mr.
Solomon also served as the Paradise Towers chairman.
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Page 10
TheJeuisk FU,ridian and SHofar of Greater Hollywood
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ly 5,1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
Start Your Set Today

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PATTERN

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Hibachi 4


Page 12
The Jewish Flondian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Independence Dinner To
Mark Golda's 80th Birthday
GoldaMeir on Her 80th Birth
The Israel Independence Day
Dinner celbrating Israel's 30th
year of independence will be the
occasion for a gala celebration of
Golda Meir's 80th birthday.
William Littman, chairman of
the Broward County Board of
Governors, State of Israel Bonds,
announced that 80 leading
members of the Jewish com-
munity of South Florida will be
honored at the dinner Saturday
evening, May 13, at the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel. Miami Beach,
in celebration of Golda Meir's
birthday.
IT IS expected that a number
of prominent women of the
Hollywood and Fort Lauderdale
areas will be among those
honored for their contribution to
the building of Israel and the
Jewish community of South
Florida.
Gen. Mordechai Gur, cheif of
staff of Israel's Defense Forces,
will report on the current Middle
East situation and participate in
the awards presentation
ceremony.
Gen. Gur has played a major
role in his country's military
operations since statehood. Prior
to assuming his post as Chief of
Staff in 1974, he served for two
years as Israel's Military Attache
to the United States and Canada.
IN 1970. he was made com-
mander in chief of Israel's
Northern Command. From 1967
to 1969. he was the military
commander of the Gaza Strip and
Gen. Mordechai Gur
the Northern Sinai, and before
that, was in charge of Israel's
Armed Forces Command and
Staff School.
During the Six-Day War in
1967, the General commanded a
paratroop brigade which par-
ticipated in the liberation of the
Old City of Jerusalem.
Immediately following the war,
he was a member of Israel's
delegation to the emergency
session of the United Nations
which debated the issues ir
volved in the Israel-Arab conflic
Singers to Receive Scroll of Honor
The Israel Scroll of Honor will
be presented to Philip and Mollie
Singer at a Night for Israel
sponsored by the Beverly Hills
Israel Bond Committee. Sunday
May 7. at 8 p.m. in the social
club.
Nat Newman and Bob Davis
are co-chairmen and Charles E.
Kurtzman will serve as toast-
master. The entertainment
program will be headed by the
American Jewish entertainer.
Larry Dom.
Singer is president of the
governing body of the complex
and has served for three years as
president of the Beverly Hills
Social Club, as well as president
of Corporation Six several times.
Mr. and Mrs. Singer are active
^*^.
Mr. and Mrs. Singer
on behalf of many philanthropic
causes. He is the past chanceller
of the Knights of Greater
American Lodge in Manhattan.
Mrs. Singer served as president
of the Deborah Cahpter in
Beverly Hills for two years.
Warren Levine Meats & Caterinas
7567 W.Oakland Park Blvd. *
Lauderhill, Florida
IS NO LONGER UNDER OUR SUPERVISION
BROWARD KOSHER SUPERVISION, INC.
Broward Va'ad Hakashrut
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I
Continued from Page 4
become
to
Ministry in 1956
Foreign Minister.
She was happiest at the
Foreign Ministry with the
remarkable technical aid
programs in countries under-
developed countries, launched
when she was in office. Here was
the chance to give practical help
to others, to offer the new nations
the product of Israel's own ex-
perience in devleopment projects
and in the training and set-
tlement of new immigrants.
Unlike leaders who concern
themselves with the forest.
Golda's concern is with the in-
dividual trees. She loves people
with a special love reserved
for her own people She loves to
be with them, talk to them, listen
to them. She is perhaps the most
sociable of all her counterparts,
and prefers company to privacy.
She is also tireless.
BECAUSE of her intense love
for the Jewish people, Golda's
greatest moment was un-
doubtedly the historic demon-
stration of welcome from Russian
Jewry, when 50.000 braved the
dangers of greeting her at the
Hollywood Blvd M
48th Avenue A
2477 East Sunns, Blvd
It I *ud*rd*k
WANTED
USED OR OLO
PERSIAN &
ORIENTAL RUGS
"ANY SIZE OR CONDITION-
TOP CASH PAID
MOE 77*7894 nomurS 46? 0730
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RESTAURANT
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David Maddern
at the Piano
0PEMS AT 5 P.*.
P"valelunchoni arranged
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
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MOST MAJOR
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HONORED
2340SW32Ave.
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closed Mondavi
further demand u, .a,,,
through to Egypt*,
Third Army, whidi
magnitude of l8rJ:
victory. ""
Many have ben
liken Golda to l
forebear, Deborah tajS
comparison is slight L
largely by the f^'
womanhood. HowevB"|
often thought that thi'l
the Song of Deborik,
after the battle nit
Tabor in the Valley of J
alaocharacterkticof
mmomij
Golda Meir
approaches to the synagogue in
Moscow which she attended on
Rosh Haahanah shortly after her
arrival as Israel's Minister in
1948.
For the same reason, the moat
tragic moment in her public life
was the surprise attack on Yom
Kippur 1973. The most trying
moment came two-and-a-half
weeks later, when she felt
compelled to accept the American
ceasefire demand, followed by the
IN THAT
there a high praise fcri]
who rallied to the ,
danger threatened,
scorn for those who s*
Of Reuben: "Why did,
among the sheepfolds i,
piping for the flock,'
Dan. why did he abide,
ships? Asher sat still
could not have said it,]
that way she would!
to claim for herself,
poetic genuis.
But I have seen mei
with embarrassment
scornful look in Go
when they have been r
show solidarity, Bii
their brothers in time of a
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SOUTHERN PHOTO SERVICE


5,1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
Imergency! Stop Arms Sals to Saudi Arabia
Continued from Page 1
East regional development, including
kaking," he said.
|LE noting his concern that such
was present, Hornstein declared, "The
ind most deadly PLO terrorist attack
iefenseless Israeli civilians along the
Ly from Haifa to Tel Aviv was a pre-
ed massacre, which was denounced by
ent Carter as 'an outrageous act of law-
ks and senseless brutality.' The arms
|n the attack were U.S.-issued arms
I to Saudi Arabia,
view of the previously mentioned facts,
the sale of F15's to Saudi Arabia i. contrary to
U.S. national interests and shou'd be blocked
by Resolutions of Disapproval in t he House and
Senate. The F15 would encourage the Arab
states to seek military solutions anc undercut
negotiations.
"Saudi diplomatic policies to date have not
been sufficiently forthcoming to justify an F15
sale. Saudi oil moderation is also a myth since
its oil policies have actually teen self-serving
and damaging to the West. Quadrupling of oil
prices is undeserving of a rewa .-d.
"FINALLY, if Saudi-U.S. friendship hinges
on the sale of F15's, then the basis of this
friendship requires re-evaluation."
Hornstein urged all "peace conscience"
citizens to send letters or postcards to Florida's
senators and congressmen, asking for their
support and voted against the arms sale to
Saudi Arabia.
All correspondence should be sent to: Sen.
Richard Stone, Senate office building,
Washington, D.C. 20510; Sen. Lawton Chiles,
Senate office building, Washington, D.C.
20510; Rep. J. Herbert Burke, House of Rep-
resentatives, Washington, D.C. 20515; Rep.
Dante Fascell, House of Representatives,
Washington, D.C. 20515; Rep. Andrew Ireland,
House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.
20515.
Our
Checking Account
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HECKING
OR ALL
USINESS
HECKING
CCOUNTS!
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ill Checks Deposited Or Withdrawn Are Covered!
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WKVKCOT THE WHOLE
TREASURY BEHIND US!

r .


Page 14
The Jewish
Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
CRC Urges Letters Be Sent
Requesting Exit Visas for Family
It has been seven long years of
waiting seven long years of
threats, intimidation, arrests,
and harassment of every kind
since Eitan Finkelstein and his
wife Alexandra applied for exit
visas from the USSR in 1971.
Eitan became an early leader of
the refusenik community of
Vilnius and risked himself many
times trying to help others obtain
permission to emigrate. The
Soviet auuthorities kept Eitan
under constant surveillance,
often picking him up for inter-
rogation and detain men t For
several years, the authorities
separated Eitan from his wife,
forced him to live in Vilnius,
while Alexandra was forced to
live in Moscow.
EITAN has written numerous
protests to Lithuanian and
Soviet authorities and he was
threatened with ten years in
prison for participating in the
publication of the Jewish journal
Jews in the USSR" He wrote:
"As a first hand observer of the
life of Soviet Jewry for the last
fifteen years and as a direct par-
ticipant of many important
events in this life, I declare that a
cultural genocide of the Jews is
being conducted in the Soviet
Union."
During this difficult period.
Alexandra gave birth to a baby
girl. When the Finkelsteins went
to the registration office to name
the baby Miriam (a Jewish
name), they were told that this
was not a name since it was not
listed in the Russian book of
names. They struggled against
Soviet authorities and persisted
until given permission to name
their daughter Miriam. They
hoped Miriam would not remain
in the USSR for long, but that
she would grow up in Israel.
More years passed. In a letter
written Jan. 19, 1978, Alexandra
writes: "Miriam is three and a
half years old now and she begins
to understand a lot. We don't
know what to do to laugh or to
cry ... In Chinese calendar the
1978 is the Year of Horse. Maybe
it'll be our horse to ride to
Eretz?"
_I^.I*J
AT THE present time. Eitan
Finkelstein is in danger of arrest
Send protest letters to Soviet
officials. Request exit visas for
the Finkelstein family of Vilnius.
Send letters to:
Secretary Shepelis. Central
Comm. of the Communist Party.
Vilnius. Lithuanian SSR. USSR;
Secretary Grischkjavichus,
First Secretary of the Communist
Party, Vilnius, Lithuanian SSR.
USSR:
Anatoly Dobrynin, Soviet
Embassy. 1125-16th St.. N.W..
Washington DC. 20006.
Congressman J. Herbert Burke (R., Fla.) is
shown with Majority Leader Jim Wright.
Speaker of the House Tip O'Neil and Rabbi
Moshe E. Bomzer and his family. Rabbi
Romzer. spiritual leader of Young Israel of
Hollywood, offered the opening prayer at the
April 18 session of the House of Rep-
resentatives in Washington, at the invitation
of Congressman Burke.
Mitterand Turned Off French Jewish Vote
By JACQUES MALEH
PARIS Francois Mit-
terand. the French Socialist
leader, has shattered his image as
a friend of Israel, and has swung
round to the views of the far Left
of his party.
A considerable minority of the
French Socialist Party has
traditionally been pro-Arab,
while Mitterand and the majority
have always been regarded as
pro-Israel.
Now. Mitterand has changed
his mind and come out in open
support of the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
SPEAKING at the weekend,
he declared that the PLO. headed
by Yasir Arafat, was the sole
representative of the Palestinian
people.
After paying lip service to
Israel's need for secure and
guaranteed frontiers, Mitterand
went on to urge the establish-
ment of a separate Palestinian
State on the West Bank and in
the Gaza Strip.
A recent survey indicated that
some 56 percent of France's
390.000 Jewish voters expected
to vote for the Socialists, despite
their alliance with the Com-
munists in the recent elections.
(The Communists were expected
to obtain some 4.000 Jewish
votes altogether.)
A SIMILAR survey taken
today shows a much smaller
percentage of the Jewish elec-
torate voted for the Socialists.
The reason is that, although
national issues clearly influenced
Jewish voters in France, Israel
was the central issue for the
overwhelming majority of them.
Jewish communal and religious
leaders did not issue any advice
on how to vote.
However. Crif. French Jewry's
representative council wrote to
all communities and
organizations suggesting some
questions be put to candidates
with regard to Israel and related
issues.
THE CONSISTOIRE Central
the country's religious
representative body and Rabbi
Jacob Kaplan, the Chief Rabbi of
France, issued a statement
saying that they, too, would
refrain from making suggestions
about how to vote.
Nevertheless, the statement
continued, before voting ac-
cording to their conscience,
French Jews were to take into
consideration the attitude of all
candidates towards Israel, the
French Jewish community and
Jewish schools.
Salute to Israel To
Air May 8 on ABC
ABC Television will broadcast
coast to coast a special pro-
gram entitled The Stars Salute
Israel atHO, Monday, May 8 from
9-11 p.m.
The program is being pre-
sented under the auspices of the
American Committee to Cele-
brate Israel's 30th anniversary,
of which Vice President Walter
Mondale is chairman.
The reason for mentioning
Jewish schools was the tear that,
if the Left-wing parties won the
elections, they would introduce
legislation severely curtailing
religious education
It is of interest that Moslems
have now become the second
most important group in France
after Roman Catholics. A survey
published recently shows that
there are some two million
Moslems in the country, most of
them from France's former North
African colonies. This compared
with an estimated 550,000 Jews.
Mr. Sam Stulberg
Mr. Sam Stulberg of Hallan-
Park m APrU Highland
He leaves his wife. Frances
daughter Rena Legator, brothers
Joe and Morris, sisters, Sadie
a; 0%? and Helen and two
grandchildren.
Can^' U^k Place in Toronto
t-anada where Mr ..,iu .
family are buhed. StU"*' s
Support the 1978
Combined Jewish
Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund...
Jewish Federation
of South Broward.
Passover Model Seders Helpjff
Ten South Broward Instituti^i
The Chaplaincy Service of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward sponsored model seders
at ten institutions in South
Broward and supplied more than
800 hagadahs to the area in-
stitutions.
Many of these seders were
conducted by children of Day
Schools as well as Synagogue
Youth groups and B'nai B'rith
Youth. The model seder at
Washington Manor Nursing
Home was conducted by students
of Temple Beth Shalom Day
School; the seder at the
Hallandale Rehabilitation Center
was conducted by students of the
Hillel Day School; the Seder at
Hollywood Hills Nursing Home
was led by Temple Solel's Junior
and Senior Youth Groups: the
model Seder at Dania Nursing
Home was led by Reyna Nyad of
Tkvah B.B.G.
THREE model Seders
held at the South Florida State
Hospital. Rabbi Richter con-
ducted the seder for the geriatric
wards. He was assisted by the
members of the Hollybrook
chapter and the Aviva chapter of
Women's B'nai B'rith.
The model seder for the general
patients was y i
Harold Richter ^
Draan. They Were*J
the Einstein AZA TV
was prepared by the
the Hillcrest YJ
Chapters of WoaJ
B'rith. Mrs Sg*
chaired the collation.
A third model sed J
at the South F^y
Hospital for *!
division, conducted U
Chaplain of Federation^'
RABBI Richter sjj
model Seders it
Medical Center cL
Hospital of South Br3
Hollywood Medical CeJI
Two institutions uj
never before observed M
also held model Sedit]
Broward Correction*! Imb
and Crossroads Village,
stitution for retarded al
Rabbi Richter conducuj]
seders at both these its?
He was assisted by Rcyp
of the Jewish Community [
of Hollywood at the f
Correctional I nstitutioo an
the B'nai Israel AZAI
Crossroads Village.



Mr. und Mrs. Max Scheman (left) were the recipients*!
David Hen-Ciurion Award at a Night for Israel sponsoredbi
La Mer B'nai B'rith Lodge No. 3014 Israel Bonds Comai
At right is Ben Schwab, president of the lodge, who!
< hnirman of the occasion.
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lav 5,1978
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 15
d 'Holocaust'Hurt Progress?
Itinued from Page 1
|ith the assertion that
nanyl can not forget a
criminal period in our
must live with the
f it. But we have worked
I hard since the Hitler
forge new links with the
rcmunity."
impulse is to believe
great German-Jewish
has been irretrievably
in art, science, politics,
music, academics
i not be forged anew.
I recent discussions with
Lral Republic'8 Ambas-
thc United States Bernt
fen, there was the con-
t struck that Germany's
immunity today is not a
not a vibrant one, not
[one.
}0 what can Dr. Ingen-
bii about forging new
; what Ingendaay has in
Germany's best in-
We can not, he says,
the past; but in a
sense, it is in Ger-
9t intentions, not so
Dward German Jewry,
admittedly a remnant,
1 world Jewry, that his
tin and, one hopes, his
ek to make amends.
again with respect to
it, will the NBC series
the expression of Ger-
Ibest intentions toward
i legatees of Germany's
|iant Jewish community?
WERE Holocaust not
rable piece of aesthetic,
[and academic detritus
sst patently is, I would
t, I assure him.
it does, then the three-
long positive process
! hopes has been taking
etween the Federal
and world Jewry,
we may choose to
ze the process, can not
telling one and must
a miserable prognosis,
[ without Holocaust, from
' beginning.
kdaay, a thoughtful man
whose own journalist father was
twice shipped off to concen-
tration camps, and who himself
ran afoul of the Gestapo on a
number of occasions, neverthe-
less breathes uncomfortably in
his assessment of the NBC
production.
"IT WAS absolutely untrue."
he observes, meaning that the
production bore no resemblance
to the magnitude of stark horror
of the Hitler years.
"Can you," he asks, "imagine
visiting rights at Dachau, which
the film showed? Connubial
rights as a result of which there
was the birth of a healthy, happy
child? Prisoners, who appear
reasonably tranquil and well-fed.
engaging in open discourse with
one another?"
I join the fantasy and wonder
about the Eine Kleine Nachts-
musik quartet, whose purpose in
Holocaust was more of an exis-
tential riddle than what Alain
Resnais teaches us of such con-
centration camp disguises in his
28-minute Nacht und Nebel, a
documentary of terror that
NBC's nine-hour spectacular
never even approached in its
mythic grandeur.
IN RESNAIS, you see Keats'
vision of youth which "grows
pale and spectre thin and dies."
In Holocaust, you almost believe
in the Hitlerian dictum of Kraft
durch Freude, especially for
Jews.
"Or," says Dr. Ingendaay,
"the Warsaw Ghetto uprising as
Holocaust staged it." Instantly,
I think of a Kirk Douglas shoot-
em-up at the O.K. Corral. Or the
miserable Entebbe films that
took a Maccabbean occurence
and reduced it to a John Wayne
festival.
"The Warsaw Ghetto was a
full scale war," Ingendaay ob-
serves, meaning a heroic con-
frontation with mythic im-
plications for Jewish resistance
to tyranny in the face of indif-
ference on the part of a world
which should have exulted in it,
"but a war reduced in the NBC
series to a street fight." The
Ask Abe
By Abe Halpern
tragedy is that John Wayne
never comes to save the day.
THEN WHY the fear that
Holocaust, which misinstructs
and which insults both Germans
and Jews alike Germans,
because they were so much more
efficient and damned near
successful at terrorizing, humil-
iating and destroying a people
than the series ever came close to
hinting at; Jews, because they
suffered on an order of magnitude
far beyond anything the makers
of the series either envisioned in
their feverishly commercial
minds or were capable of
documenting for lack of artistry
or, what is worse, conviction
why the fear that Holocaust will
disturb German-Jewish
relations?
Dr. Ingendaay thinks
carefully, and in retrospect I am
not sure that his answer is not
non sequitur, but in any case it
stands the test of what Sartre
calls facticity.
"If we are to bear the burden of
the past," he says, "and there is
no way that we should not want
to, or be able to, then so must the
rest of the world." The implica-
tion is clear: If the past is to be
known, then let it be known,
including our own devilish in-
volvement in it.
IGENDAAY means the other
western nations, the Churchillian
Grand Alliance against the Nazi
horde. He means: What did the
rest of us, the great old U. S. of A.
included, do to save the Jews
from Hitler's final solution?
The SS St. Louis story is by
now a cliche. Dr. Ingendaay is
informed far beyond that. He
recalls the July, 1938 meeting in
the Royal Hotel at Evian-Les-
Bains of 32 nations just 15 weeks
after Hitler annexed Austria.
Among observers: the Nazi
victors, taking notes assiduously
against some future, still un-
charted conquest, as if to in-
timidate those who would
speak sympathetically of Jews
because they might, themselves,
be victims someday of the
juggernaut; also, Dr. Chaim
Weizmann, spokesman for the
T2*
4-
mi: What is the difference between
I Ketubbah?
Dr. A. David Smith
Hollywood
:As I explained in the last column,
p a Hebrew word meaning conditions. It
ne for the ceremony, the writing of the
t specifying the conditions for the forth-
rriage and the written document.
oah is a Hebrew word meaning writing.
I document embodying the obligations of
room toward his bride. The economic
[formerly fluid, now generally follow a
1 formula. Additional clauses (Tenaim-
Dns') were formerly often appended to the
to its importance and the festive oc-
Bscciated with it, the Ketubbah was
fy engrossed on parchment with
I borders.
decorated early fragments have been
| the Cairo Genizah, and one fine German
of 1392 is extant. But the art of the
Ketubbah is associated especially
Jy. where from the Renaissance Period
som magnificent specimens were
1 each town ultimately developing its
-ictraditoin."
ere kind enough to provide me with a
&t handwritten in Hebrew which is the
[of your wife's parents. This document
many details including the dowry,
1 other conditions, such as the date of
Paing to be. It also states that the
will be paid for by the father of the
m the city of Kielce, Poland. The
I the bridegroom lived in Stashuv.
ave also provided me with a wedding
of your wife's parents printed in
Hebrew. The invitation states that the wedding
will take place in the home of the father of the
bride in the city of Kielce, the Chupah at 8 p.m.
and the reception at 10 p.m..
The date of the tenaim document is May 23,
1900 and the date of the wedding is Feb. 6,1901.
The Tenaim document has the signatures of the
bride, the groom the father of the bride, the father
of the groom and two witnesses.
WHEREAS the Ketubbah in many cases also
had the Teaim appended to its, it seems the
documents you provided are proof that the
Tenaim was a separate ceremony in that part of
the world at that time, and took place in advance
of the marriage.
I am very interested to find additional
documents pertaining to the Tenaim. 1 am
especially interested to locate Tenaim documents
of recent origin. If anyone has any such
documents please communicate with me. I will
share the information in a future column.
A personal note: Today's column completes
four years of publication. The first column ap-
peared on April 26.1974.
I wish to take this opportunity to express my
sincerest thanks and appreciation to all those who
have sent in questions or made comments. I
receive many more questions than I can use in
this column. Many of them I answer personally.
The response of the readers to this column has
been a source of inspiration to me. Please con-
tinue to send in your questions
Editor's note Send in all questions to
ASK ABE
c o Jewish Federation of South Broward
2719 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood. Florida 33020
Jewish Agency.
Object of the meeting: How to
rescue "the Jews of the Greater
German Reich, help them to
reestablish their lives elsewhere."
88 Peggy Mann puts it in a
splendid Apr. 16 piece in the
Washington Post.
IT IS a fact, Ingendaay recalls,
that at Evian-Les-Bains the
world turned its back on
Europe's Jews, giving Hitler a
feeling that, after all, he was
right
What if. wonders Ingendaay,
at that conference, each of the 32
nations had agreed to take in just
17.000 Jews at once? He recalls
Mann's observation: "Every
Jewish man, woman and child in
Germany and Austria would
have left for a new homeland"
instead of the showers and
crematoria, Nacht und Nebel.
As for the U.S.A., Mann's
reminiscences speak for them-
selves. At Evian-Les-Bains,
American Ambassador Myron
Taylor dutifully explained the
workings of our National Origins
Quota System which, one is
meant to believe, regrettably pre-
cluded such a possibility. (Think
not of the 800-odd Jews of the St.
Louis denied admittance to
Miami, but of the more than a
quarter of a million Cubans wel-
comed through that port just a
quarter of a century later).
RECALLS Mann: "Although
the total German quota was
25,957 per year... a total of only
27.000 Jews had been admitted
to the United States during
the past (previous to the 1938
Evian Les Bains con-
ference) six years." Reasons:
"They ranged from a roadblock'
set down by President Herbert
Hoover in 1932 to the out-
right anti-Semitism of certain
local U.S. consuls (italics
mine) ."
I think, although I dare not
say it, that we, too, were the
Holocaust. Dr. Ingendaay senses
the thought which, of course, he
developed in the first place, and
so, in a sort of chess game, I
return the burden to him by
wondering somewhat defensively
about how it could be that the
mass of Germans stood quietly
by.
"How can it be." Dr. Ingen-
daay replies, that at Evian-Les-
Bains they did not even let
Jewish Agency spokesman Dr.
Weizmann speak?"
OR, I conclude, that in the
concentration camps, the Jews
lined up quietly for their showers.
Always, the good is destroyed in
a conspiracy of silence.
"Even the good Germans," Dr.
Ingendaay observes, and I agree
that some of them must surely
have been struck dumb by the
same forces that made the Jews
line up so docilely. All, all of them
perished by the assent of silence.
And that was mainly what was
wrong with Holocaust. It was too
noisy.
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Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Draiin.
Cantor Abraham Kester. (48)
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Conservative. Rabbi Paul M. Katz,
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TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.,
Hollywood, Fla. 33021 Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Robert P. Frazln.
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ADDRESS: __________________________ PHONE:


Page 16
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
FriW.i
CJF Supports Wider Use Of Charitable Deductions
WASHINGTON, DC. -
Testimony has been given to the
House Ways and Means Com-
mittee by a spokesman for the
Council of Jewish Federations
urging support of legislation to
provide charitable tax deductions
for persons who take the stan-
dard deduction on their Federal
income tax return.
Norman A. Sugarman. a
member of the CJF Board of
Directors, chairman of its en-
dowment fund committee and a
former assistant IRS com-
missioner, voiced support for HR
11183. introduced bv Rep. Joseph
L. Fisher (D-Va.) and Rep
Barber B. Conable (R-NY) and
co-sponsored by 10 other
members of the Ways and Means
HIS PRIORITIES ARE
AIL MI/ED OP
Committee, which would permit a
separate charitable deduction
even for the 77 percent of tax-
payers who currently use the
standard deduction.
HE noted that current
Administration tax proposals
will "reduce the support of
charities and thereby hurt all
needy people.
"The Administration's
proposals would switch an ad-
ditional six million Americans to
the standard deduction, thereby
rewarding them for contributions
even though in fact they may
make no contribution what-
soever." Sugarman stated.
He noted that the Council of
Jewish Federations "is concerned
about the trend in our tax laws
limited space remaining
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away from support of charitable
institutions because we see this
trend undermining community
responsibility."
THE expenditures for Jewish
communal services total four
times the amount raised in
contributions, thus developing a
multiplier effect since the ser-
vice* contributions finance
generate additional support, he
stated.
Pointing out to the committee
that Jewish communal agencies
serve well over 1.2 million per-
sons annually with Jewish
hospitals serving over 65 percent
non-Jewish patients. Sugarman
stated that any proposal
reducing charitable support could
set off a chain reaction reducing
services to individuals
resulting in a need for govern-
ment to make up the lost funds in
order to continue needed services.
"This change (HR 111831
would protect the charitable
deduction from further erosion
and would also extend the
charitable deduction to the full
spectrum of income classes,
Sugarman testified. "It would
mean that charities could look
increasingly for support from
persons of moderate income as
well as the generous gifts from
upper income taxpayer!
IF THE Administration tax
proposals are adopted donors
may choose not to make
charitable gifts at all "thereby
hurting all needy people and
depriving them of assistance and.
as a result, impairing the well-
being of society." he added.
"People are better people if
they give." Sugarman concluded.
Giving patterns affect the
quality of the ComiB
t'me has come^l
encouragement to at
orchanUblegiv^A
the charitable dedi^l
deduction fa, rj^i
gross income." ^*
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r 5, 1978
The Jewish Floridian andShofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 17
30THANNA/ERSARY'/37B

The Maturing Miracle-Israel at 30
\nt message from
hn and Sumner Kaye
of Israel's existence
tahlLshment in 1948 is
Oracle, and despite the
30th anniversary
traditional qualities
with "silver" or
n.mersaries, this year
i-s a significant mile-
ad.
who feel the need to
lumber" to celebrate.
I he 11 th anniversary
plication of Jerusalem,
has ben one of the
achievements of
el modem history.
Lhe old image of Israel
|tle l>oy in the Dosh
Bo longer seems ap-
The little boy has
land has had his mettle
ire devastating wars.
[retained his idealism,
longer starry-eyed. He
(I a sense of realism,
M
Sumner G. Kaye, Lewis E. Conn,
Executive Director President
Jewish Federation of South Broward
but has not become cynical. He
has experienced temptation and
political corruption, but his
general good health has enabled
him to recover with democratic
institutions intact. He has been
shunned and pilloried at the
United Nations, which gave him
birth, but continues to exist as
the greatest expression of fulfill-
ment of the ideals of the United
Nations Charter.
At 30, Israel can no longer
claim to be the youngest nation
in the world. It is, however, still
the youngest viable democracy in
the world. The mental capacity of
Israel also has matured, and the
country now boasts nine major
universities and scientific in-
stitutes of global significance.
While Israel still suffers from
crushing economic burdens and
the ravages of inflation, it has
developed an impressive degree
of commercial, industrial and
scientific growth, in addition to
transforming a desert into a lush
agricultural center.
IT IS unnatural for a 30-year-
old to have already experienced
five major shooting wars. Indeed
the principal frustration in
Israel's quest for fulfillment as a
mature being has resulted from
its endless quest for peace.
Israel has had a blocked love
affair with peace 3ince its incep-
tion, and even calls out to it with
its day-to-day greeting of
"shalom." Since its very in-
ception, Israel has held out its
hands to its Arabs neighbors,
only to be rebuffed five times in
wars.
We pray that Israel will ob-
serve its 31st anniversary in
peace, so the fledgling nation will
be able to develop to its full
potential as a mature, healthy
society and as a beacon of hope
for the Jewish people and
humankind.
ON BEHALF of the Board of
Directors of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward
the central address of South
Broward's Jewish community,
we share Israel's pride in this
special anniversary.

ee Decades of Israel Economy 5T* ^ ^^
Ithiriv-year period, the
p: Israel has gradually
into a modern
lespite the need to
i hanging problems of
proportions. Such a
process cannot be
properly in a brief
|hus, all that is at-
ere is a bare outline of
plopments.
wade:
of Mass
Dnomy of the newly
nt State of Israel had
for the needs of a
war, while trying to 9et
fistitutional framework
for conducting
pttlicy. While (Jus was
lie, the gates were
mass immigration.
>H7,000 immigrants
Ihich meant a doubling
ilation within less than
I The economic absorp-
V'h an influx took a
priod, and required sus-
lorts and heavy sac-
k solution of this basic
I dominated the first
pw immigrants' im-
quirements were food
wrary shelter; their
anent needs were
Pid productive employ-
es necessitated rapid
development, which
be achieved without
initiative in the
priorities and the
of resources for a
vestment program,
."me 100,000 people
I >n temporary shelters
and over 10 percent of the labor
force were unemployed. By the
and of the Decade, almost all the
new immigrants had obtained
permanent housing and unemp-
loyment virtually disappeared.
EMPLOYMENT was provided
on new farms and factories, in
housing construction and in
public services, and in the con-
struction of the communication
and transportation infrastructure
necessary for a modern economy.
Normally, the economic de-
velopment necessary for the
economic absorption of such an
influx of immigrants would nave
necessitated a severe and
prolonged cut-back in standards
of living, to release the resources
needed for investment. And in
fact, the first years were marked
by a severe austerity program.
But by and large, the ab-
sorption of immigration was
accompanied by substantial rises
in living standards. This unusual
achievement was made possible
by the availability of additional
resources from abroad, an excess
of imports over exports, financed
in large part by unilateral
transfers and capital inflows. The
main sources of these resources
were World Jewry, the U.S.
government, and the Federal
Republic of Germany.
The Second Decade:
Development and Consolidation
The second decade was one of
more normal developments.
Although there were unusual
events with economic reper-
cussions, such as the Sinai Cam-
paign, a sudden influx of new
immigrants, the recession of
1966, and the Six-Day War at the
dose of the decade, the period can
be characterized as one of fairly
steady growth and consolidation,
expansion on the base built up
during the previous period.
Two major economic trends
deserve emphasis: industrial-
ization and the growth of ex-
ports. The pre-State Jewish
economy had placed great em-
phasis on agricultural develop-
ment, for economic and ideo-
logical reasons, and agricultural
settlement received major
priority during the first decade
after Statehood was attained.
BUT IT soon became evident
that despite phenomenal achive-
ments and agricultural develop-
ment, limited water resources
imposed a constraint on future
growth. Consequently, greater
reliance had to be placed on
manufacturing, as the leading
sector of the economy for con-
tinued rises in the standard of
living and for geographical dis-
tribution of the population.
Israel's natural resources are
very limited. Thus, industrial
development followed two paths:
the optimal use of what resources
were available (for example Dead
Sea minerals and Negev phos-
phates formed the basis of a
major chemical industry), and
the expansion of manufacturing
activities where the absence of
domestic raw materials was not a
major constraint. Diamond
polishing and electronics
exemplify skilled, intensive
manufacturing, and textiles
represent an intermediate case
where new immigrants in
development towns could be
introduced to manufacturing.
The growth of industrial ex-
pansion was of great importance
The rising cost of living in Israel has made marketing a tense
daily chore, as inflation undermines the people's capacity to
build their society and meet human needs.
in the development of exports.
The balance of payments deficit,
which provided the important
additional resources from abroad,
could not be relied on in-
definitely. In the long run, it
would have to be reduced, if not
eliminated.
IN THE early years much of
the expansion of output was in
the form of import substitution.
Further reductions of the balance
of payments deficit called for
more reliance on expanded ex-
ports than on reduced imports.
Continued on Page 18


Page 18
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Frid.,1
Tourism to Israel Portrays Centuries LongI
i^. -_____, .v .... ........... _____ ___, rinrf them a growing reached by train from Cairo and well as r~..J: I
The story of the last thirty
years of tourism to Israel por-
trays the climax of a centuries
long epic. For Israel is the
world's oldest tourist
destination.
For thousands of years,
visitors have walked, ridden,
sailed and flown to Israel. 250C
years ago it wasn't unusual for a
million pilgrims u> converge on
Jerusalem for Passover. Romans
spent vacations at Caesarea and
Tiberias. And after the
destruction of the Second Tempk
in the yar TO. it became the drean.
of Jews dispersed around the
world to return to their
homeland, if only for a visit.
AT varying stages through the
last two thousand years
visitors came to the Holy Land,
usually for pilgrimage Jew-
Christians, and. later. Moslems,
to visit the sites they revered.
Sometimes their efforts were th-
warted or encouraged by con-
secutively cruel or tolerant oc-
cupiers of the Land of Israel. But
even when tremendous obstacles
were placed before them, pilgnms
still found ways to visit the Holy
Places of Jerusalem. Bethlehem.
Hebron. Nazareth; along the sea
of Galilee shores: in Tiberias and
Safed
In the mid-ninteenth century,
the travel industry, in its infancy,
looked to the Holy Land as one of
its first destinations. So it was.
that, in 1869. Thomas Cook led
his first Cook's Tour- to the Holy
Land.
Those first travelers rode on
horseback and slept in tent*
grew around them a growing
interest in visiting the Hob-
Land.
BY THE end of the First
World War. Palestine had been
conquered by the British, and
was no longer part of the Turkish
Ottoman Empire. In 1920 the
first Palestinian run travel
Ben Gurion International Airport. Israel: (her 80 percent of
Israel's tourists arrive by air. Israel's national airline. Kl Al.
and fifteen other major international airlines maintain regular
schedules to Ben Gurion International Airport.
agency opened and the Bay of
Haifa became a regular port of
call for passenger shipping.
Palestine, the cross-roads of
the Middle East, could be
I complete with carpets and iron
bedsteadsl! As Jewish pioneers
returned to Israel to turn the
barren wilderness and malarial
swamps into lush famland. there
How Volunteerism Works
Although Clara Yarkoru. a
Jerusalemite in seventh grade,
was looking forward to getting a
large family, she has sealed
temporarily but not unhappy
for one with three brothers and
poorly-sighted parents. Is Clara
part of Israel's tremendous knot
of social problems? No. Clara is.
in fact, part of the solution.
The 12 -year-old sabra. the
daughter of immigrants from
Spain and Morocco, answered an
urgent call for a tutor to as- -
two of the brothers in her neigh
borhood of Kiryat Yovel in their
school work She would have
prefered working with a large
family so that more of her time
could be used. Clara is a member
of Israel's new movement on an
old theme: volunteerism. She is
part of "One People One
Heart.'' an ambitious program
seeking 10.000 volunteers to
reach out to 10.000 hearts.
LIKE her peers. Clara
attends school and has her own
homework and chores to do. But
unlike those children who are
spending much of their time
enjoying the benefits and
pleasures of early adolescence,
she is using her recreation time
as a volunteer helping other
people.
Clara visits "her" family twice
a week, three hours per session.
Her task is to help a first grader
and a third grader with their
school work. "At first they didn't
want to study." she explains,
"but after a while, they began to
like their lessons and progressed
with the extra work I gave them.
Their father tries to help, but he
is handicapped by this blindness
Their mother works, and the
house is well kept. Another
volunteer also visits them twice a
week.
I'm happy to do what I'm
doing.' she says. Some tune in
the future I think 1 will go to a
large family to help it get ahead
in Israeli society. Here I do only
teaching, but in a large family I
could also jbe of help m the
household. My mother saki that
if I do volunteer work with a
large family, she would welcome
them into our home as friends
ACCORDING to Avraham
Tobol. Assistant Director of the
Department for Family Services
of the Jerusalem Mumcipa.
"There are paid social worker-
out we also need volunteers The
Family Service cannot do its
work without them. Even
A "One People' volunteer knows where she is needed. The
experience is meaningful for both of them.
volunteer can greatly change a
family s situation for the better."
There are currently about 160
"One People" volunteers working
in the Jerusalem area
representing all ages, but most
are young like Clara. There a^
about 3,500 volunteering across
the nation. .As Tobol recounted
before a meeting of Clara's
volunteer group one evening, in
Jerusalem alone, there are
thousands of elderly people who
need help.
We must find out where thev
are and who they are so that we
can be of help to them." he said
"There are large families who
cannot always help their children
with their schoohvork. or take
them on an outing, to a museum.
It is the volunteer who give
meaning to the life of an elderly
person. A volunteer who gives
even so much as one hour of his
or her time per week is of great
help
"Such help is priceless." saus
avraja. Tobol. "It is One People
One Heart at its caring,
human best."
reached by train from Cairo and
the Suez Canal, Beirut and
Damascus. In 1931 the famous
King David Hotel in Jerusalem
opened it-- doors. An aerodrome
was opened in 1936 near the town
of Lydda (Lodl midway bet wen
Tel Aviv and Jerusalem and
by the end of the decade, had
"tonal tU^SF
f**"^ rW
forrd,aixidZ7,
beginnings *
'"to efficient
companies Ro^
"d ** Miwav,
*>-*

*

HAIFA. Israel The long-retired cruise liner SSt
during a call at Haifa in the 1950s. There is no loam]
transatlantic steamship service to Israel, but oL
tourists from around the world visited Israel oncruiwJ
Esssassssa
workshops in cooking and Jwtng ""^ "Ms '"eluding
become a major stop on the
various French. Dutch and
British air-routes to the far east.
World War II and Israel's
post-war. pre-Independence
struggle put paid to much
touristic development, and it .was
not until 1949. when armistice
agreements had been signed with
i gypt, Jordan, Syria and
Lebanon, that Israel's leaders
could give attention to what was
to become, and still is. Israel's
major source of foreign currency
tourism.
BIT at the establishment of
the State of Israel, thirty years
ago. attracting tourists to Israel
ma not an end to itself There
was only one hotel m the country
of international repute. Land
travel to Israel had been cut off
the hostility of the new
country' neighbors.
Thus, ;i government tourist
department was set up to
promote travel to the country', as
And so. as Israel ,
its fourth decade, i |
burgeoning intern
standard tourism
welcoming over act
visitors in 1977 m J
record for this countni
population of just 3.5i
A visit to Israel is ai
from the spartan _
thirty years ago. TodijM
arrive in comfortable L
jet aircraft They hawi
of fine hotels. pensKu.]
hostels and kibbutz ^,-
to choose from. Thej i_
country by air-condkni
car or plan.
THEY swim trom
beaches lining Israel's I
or relax in Galilee and[.
health-spas They vatl
Sites with their ml
reverence and tranquikj
they dine in a multiuM
ternaliona. resuurants.il
discotheque-, scuba drJ
tennis, goli. sunbathe, an
relax.

Israel's Economy
Continued from Page 17
Industrial exports expanded
rapidly and were diversified:
whereas exports in the early
years were dominated by two
items, citrus fruit and polished
diamonds, they now included a
wide variety of manufactured
goods, including processed foods,
chemicals, textiles, metal
products and electronics.
The Third Decade.
4 Semi-war Economy
The Six-Day War of June,
1967. the War of Attrition that
followed it till August. 1970, and
the Yom Kippur War of 1973
obviously entailed tremendous
economic burdens. But even
when there was no actual
fighting, the economy was on a
semi-war footing, in the sense
that the public consumption item
represented by military expen-
diture for armaments, con-
struction and training, amounted
to a consistently high fraction of
total available resources.
Whereas defense expenditures
were generally equal to some 8-9
percent of total resources in the
1955-1965 period, since 1967 the
Duraer. has been around 20
percent This fact has dominated
the last decade
THE MOST obvious mani-
festation of the defense burden
nas oeer. the balance of pav
current account
deficit which was generally teas
me-half billion dollars 'in the
**ades. grew rapidlv
and ieaped after 1973,
to four biluon dollars
Despite iarge sums of financial
aid. primarily from the U S
government and from World
Jewry, the foreign d*|
rapidly. In 1975 and lWj
reductions in the defa]
achieved, but only at toil
virtual economic sugM|
However, though tte I
the decade was marked t?l]
of momentum, as
the previously
amazingly high rates of I
per capita gross national.
continuous progress wail
the modernization
economy: the dewy
sophisticated nn,nc*
tut ions: the reduction of
protection of domestic i
which was preP**'
competition with in*
Western Europe: andi
of public health and e
At the same tin*
inequality was reduced!
through increases I
payments.
Goals and Prospects
As Israel enters \
decade, its main r
problem is a two-Wd
attain once more raj*' .
growth, while at the s*J
reducing its !*"-
aid. This requires son*'
turing of the economy"
faster growth in mdufo?
and
livrt
public services,
moderate rises i
dards.
Can these P^^S
The achievement* T\
conclusively ,nc"*(^|
necessary econonuc ca
wructure and ability e*
success depends on 1
suance of ^L\{
policies whose ****j{
depends on the m**
attain these goals.


lay 5,1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 19
sturn to the Jewish Quarter: Portrait of a Family
^n, Israel May 27,
venteen hundred Jewish
t of Jerusalem's Old City
orrowrul exodus through
r's Zion Gate, ending
_,j of continuous Jewish
[within the ancient walls.
Jewish Quarter, which
90 bravely defended,
to Jordanian soldiers
risrael's fight for in-
hce. Exhausted by the
kened by a shortage of
nd arms, the weary
j left behind their homes
[Quarter, their ancient
f worship and their most
, the Western Wall.
| of the last to leave the
and pass through the
tarred Zion Gt>te was
he daughter of the leader
of the community, Rabbi
Mordecai Weingarten, who
together with his family, had
been living in his wife Ester's
ancestral home. The thick-walled
dwelling, domed and vaulted,
was built around an inner
courtyard and formed a complex
with other dwellings and two
very old and fine synogogues.
Until 1948 the home had been the
center of communal and religious
activity.
June 7, 1967. In the
culmination of the lightning Six
Day War, Israel's armed forces
took the Old City. Walls and
barricades came crashing down;
Jerusalemites streamed in
multitudes through the Old City
gates, to offer thanksgiving at
the Wester Wall and prav again
lArabs and Israelis Create
Hot house in Desert
no Achmad Nammari
a shimmering lake of
in Jericho near the Dead
der the sheets of clear
lene which cover the
I in this water-rich oasis
re a startling array of
Des. cucumbers and
[its These vegetables find
vay to tables in Israel,
land Samaria in the West
nd even to Arab countries
the Jordan River. They
ade Achmad Nammari, if
|realthy man, at least a very
able one.
A successful vegetable
r. Nammari is typical of a
ireed of Arab farmers in
i and Samana on the West
the Jordan River, who
taken advantage of the
larming skills made
i to them since 1967
Ithr Israelis took over. It is
|stin ring of skills made
pie to them since 1967
I the Israelis took over. It is
paring of skills and an ever-
Ing eagerness to work
Tier with Israeli experts that
I caused the agricultural
lit of the administered
Hies to increase an amazing
euent since 1967.
he Green Revolution" is the
I now used to describe what
ken place in the last ten
in Judea and Samaria and
pa/ ,i Strip. Until the Six Day
Jordan was the ad-
trative, organizational and
fctional center for the West
areas. The only officials
clerks with no special
dtural knowledge.
nee Israel assumed
bnsibility, a network of
pet agricultural offices with
raeli instructors has been set
Six hundred local residents
ved specialized training and
her with the Israelis run
Btions in the six subdisthcts
region. At every district
K, veterinary services,
facilities and a chain of
pimwiUJ stations have been
efforts invested in
plture in the West Bank
clearly borne fruit. The
annual wage here has
' pushed from $900 to more
> $4,000 today.
Sow we plug the television
|a wall socket and not into the
or battery," says Nammari,
^riuiK on how his life has a
has improved
auially in the past several
I le ls eager to show off the
used generator, which
Js rhythmically in a deserted
"P behind the house.
recently.purchased
1 which give6 enough
ttncitv for lights, the
[[Won and refrigerator, is
"""an s first luxury purchase,
ints out.
pammari attributes his "jump
up" in the worid to his visit in
1970 to an agricultural exhibition
in the town of Jericho. He was
impressed by what he saw.
HE MET Israeli fanning
expert Yaacov Katzir and on the
spot the two men made
arrangements for a loan to buy a
tractor, which, with proper in-
struction, could be used not just
for ploughing, but for spraying,
mulching and spreading fer-
tilizers.
Nammari soon started using
the successful Israeli trickle
irrigation system. Called the
"tiftuf' system (which in Hebrew
means "droplets'), water is
carefully deposited near the roots
of the plants through tiny holes
in special hoses which lie in rows
alongside the seedlings The
water goes directly into soil,
saving almost 40 percent which
would be lost through
evaporation in conventional
methods of irrigation. Along with
new fertilizers the trickle system
began to give an impressive
increase in yield.
Soon after, polyethelene
coverings came to Namman's
farm which by then had grown
from two to 35 acres. Strips of
plastic placed directly on the
earth kept in the moisture; black
plastic served a double purpose
by keeping out weeds.
TODAY, the Nammari family
farmhouse is surrounded by miles
of plastic hothouse tubes
standing two to three feet in
height; they keep in the moisture
and keep out the harsh winter
cold at night, which is typical of
the strange climate in Jericho,
the lowest point on earth.
Life is much better for Achmad
Nammari and his family. His
brothers help his father manage
the farm and the oldest brother,
aged 34, is a police officer in the
town of Jericho. "I want to make
things easier for my family," he
said, giving as an example the
new electricity generator. "But at
this point, we're so impressed by
our increased yields that we are
putting most of the profits back
into the farm." The Nammari
family has bought a second
tractor and a small tender truck.
They manage an average of 40
laborers on the farm Besides the
vegetables, they grow oranges
and papayas. which are
characteristic of Jericho, which is
the oldest city on earth.
Life most certainly is not yet a
complete paradise for Achmad
Nammari. He still has political
disagreements with the Israelis,
but Nammari has found a
practical road of cooperation with
his Jewish neighbors. He has
developed friendships, overcome
previous suspicions. Thanks to
peaceful coexistence, a crack has
been opened in the door to peace.
The relationship has benefited
him and his family and certainly
bodes well for the mutual
development of agriculture in a
potentially fertile land.
" at the holy site. While Arabs from
the Old City and East Jerusalem
thronged in reverse direction to
explore the new city, Jewish
Jerusalemites roamed in
curiosity and delight through the
crooked alleyways and crowded
bazaars of the Old City.
Naturally, the former
residents, like Rivka Weingarten
hurried toward the Jewish
Quarter, scanning the scene for
their homes and familiar land-
marks. Instead they encountered
a scene of desolation.
MOST of the Quarter had been
destroyed or damaged during the
preceding 19 years. Of the 60
synogogues, most had disap-
peared, stone by stone, many
structures were hollow,
blackened shells, the interiors
used as henhouses and stables.
The few houses that escaped
complete destruction wree partly
ruined and inhabited by
squatters.
Rivka Weignarten, now a
grandmother, discovered that her
old home had been luckier than
most dwellings in in the neigh-
borhood; it was still largely in
one piece. Looking at the
destruction around her. Rivka
made a resolution that was based
on pain and love to create a
memorial on this spot.
Although plans were im-
mediately afoot to reconstruct
the Jewish Quarter, the special
character of the lost world could
never be regained. So while the
newly-formed Society for the
Renovation and "Development of
the Jewish Quarter embarked
upon their massive project of
rebuilding a destroyed city
quarter, Rivka Weingarten was
forging ahead using plans of her
own. With the generous help of
Teddy Kollek and the Jerusalem
Foundation, private donors, the
Kaplan family of Cape Town
South Africa, the thick walls
were repaired, the vaults and
arches replastered.
IN ORDER to give tangible
expression to the distinctive way
of life of the vanished com-
munity. Rivka created a
museum, the Old Yishuv Court
Museum, which exhibits living
quarters showing the lifestyles of
the communities that once dwelt
there, the various trades
professions and crafts in-
dividually exhibted, and lastly,
the two great synogogues, now
restored, and sometimes in use.
Today. Tivka Weingarten has
the satisfaction of seeing her four
grandchildren playing in the
renovated streets of the Jewish
Quarter. Her son Moshe and
daughter Moria live nearby. They
were bom outside the Old City
walls after their parents' ex-
pulsion from the area however
their children were bom in the
newly restored Quarter. Tourists,
school-children and people too
young to have known the Jewish
Quarter before its destruction can
stroll through the complex of the
Old Yishuv Court Museum and
absorb some of the atmosphere of
a distinctive way of life that was.
The work of restoration still
goes on. Never since the days of
the Second Temple, when Herod
launched his talents as builder
upon the city.has Jerusalem seen
such activity. The problems are
enormous: To wave the Jewish
Quarter area into the Old City
pattern, which includes three
other quarters Moslem,
Christian and Armenian. At the
same time planners seek to
preserve the special character of
the place, and avoid its becoming
a cold museum. The ultimate goal
is to build a residential neigh
borhood where people can lead
ordinary lives without ignoring
the traditional values.
AS FAR as possible, existing
remains are being restored,
forming a composition of arch,
dome and valut. combined with
the newer thick walls in golden-
pink Jerusalem stone. Within the
contrasting play of light and dar,
narrow alleyways tie together the
buildings and lead into unex-
pected courtyards.
There are peculiar difficulties
of doing renovation work in the
Quarter transport of material
is largely by donkey due to the
anrrowness of the alleys, and
much work must be done by hand
as access to the sites by large
machinery is impractical.
Wherever possible, the outer
shells of existing buildings were
reinforced and preserved to make
use of the original graceful lines
of the architecture.
Side by side with the builders'
rubble and the already completed
structures of golden Jerusalem
stone is an exotic, modem
tapestry of the Jerusalem scene:
Yoflng Yeshiva student; bearded,
bent rabbi; black-robed and
mitred Armenian monk; tur-
baned priest; Arab children
frolicking through the alleys on
their grey donkeys. Upon a step,
a tawney Siamese cat suns
herself, almost indistinguishable
from the stone's ochre hue.
Nearby, her less aristocratic
sisters grub around in a dustbin.
WHAT IS it like to live in the
restored Jewish Quarter? There
are problems, of course, all that
stone can seem forbidding. There
is still a lack of greenery, trees,
parks not enough space for
children to play, except for the
stone courtyards. Access to
homes in some areas is through
broken alleys, which during the
day are crowded with workmen
and donkeys.
Yet most families living in the
Jewish Quarter today are happy
and want to remain there. Almost
without exception they find life
there rewarding. Many, like
Rivka Weingarten and he
family, feel they are living, not
just for today, but for tomorrow
and in memory of yesterday.

I


Page20
The Jewish Flondian nnJShofarof Greater Hollywood
ON THE OCCASION OF THE 30TH TINNIVERSTIRf
OF THE ESTABLISHMENT I
OF THE THIRD JEWISH CCM/VDN\AOLTH
WE OFFR H7IRTFLTCONGR7ITUL7ITIONS TO
THE PEOPLE OF ISRAEL
TH LIGHT OF TIN (ENTIRE GENERATION
1948-1978
SUPPORTTHE
JEWISH FEDERRTIOR OF SOUTH BROUJRRD'S
1978 COmBinED JEWISH RPPERL/ISRREL
EmERGERCV FUnD.
1,19 Hollywood Bouk-vard. Hollywood, Florida 33020. Phone 921-8810.
The Jewish lifeline
00 "fearsof Partnership


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