The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00189

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJewisti Florid fan
Volume 8 Number 2
mm* thoiar of Of of r Hollywood
Hollywood, Florida Friday. January 27, 1978
Price 35 Cents
kv
The Shoshana Women's Division planning committee set-
ting the arrangements for the Feb. 14 brunch on behalf of
the 1978 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund campaign are (standing from left) Brenda Green-
man, vice-president, campaign; and Ann Cohn. Seated
from left are Marilyn Ponn, Shoshana co-chairman; Claire
Anrhel; and Jo Ann Katz, Shoshana co-chairman.
Shoshana Women's
Brunch Set
dance to support Israel as
the search for peace is so
near fruition.
Our Shoshana brunch \s
an important part of the 1978
effort to benefit world Jewry
and develop and increase the
services offered to the Jewish
community right here in
South Broward." said Mrs.
Katz.
The Shoshana Brunch of
the 1978 Combined Jewish
\ppeal- Israel Emergency
Fund campaign, sponsored
by the Jewish Federation of
South Hroward Women's Di-
vision, will be held at 11 a.m.
on Tuesday. Feb. 14 at the
home of Edith I'ost in Hol-
lywood.
"The S2.500 minimum wo-
men's commitment annual
brunch will bring South
Hroward Jewish communal
leaders together to pledge fi-
nancial and moral support to
the people of Israel." accord-
ing to Women's Division
President Phyllis Kraemer.
SHOSHANA Co-chairmen
Jo Ann Katz and Marilyn
I'onn expect a record atten-
"As a united Jewish com-
munity, we in South Hrow-
ard must show that we can
raise more money with Israel
on the threshold of peace
than we did in war. And we
are fortunate that we have
the support of our women to
make this a reality.'' com-
mented Mrs. I'onn.
CJA-IEF Pacesetters Dinner
To Feature Joseph Sisco
More than 600 Jewish
communal leaders are ex-
pected to gather Saturday
evening, February 4, at the
Pacesetters Dinner of the
1978 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund. The major fund-rais-
ing event will be held 7:00
p.m. at the Diplomat Hotel
and is sponsored by the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
According to Dr. Stanley Mar-
gulies, 1978 CJA-IEF general
campaign chairman, the featured
speaker of the evening will be
Joseph Sisco, former Undersec-
retary of State for Middle
Eastern Affairs during the last
Republican Administration.
"WE ARE fortunate that a
man of Mr. Sisco's caliber will be
joining us for one of our most
important campaign functions,"
Dr. Margulies said.
Dr. Margulies said that Joseph
Sisco is a veteran of 25 years with
the U.S. State Department and is
currently president of American
University.
"Mr. Sisco is one of the most
articulate and knowledgeable
figures on the Washington scene
who is in a good position to fill us
in on current Middle Eastern
affairs," he noted.
IN 1967. Sisco spent months at
the UN in negotiations leading to
the Security Council Resolution
which was the basic framework
for the settlement of the Arab-
Israel dispute. He was the prin-
cipal negotiator of the Egypt-
Israel cease-fire of 1970 and from
1972 to 1974 accompanied Sec-
retary Kissinger on his shuttle
diplomacy missions.
Dr. Margulies reminded
members of the community that
now is the time to show solidarity
with world Jewry.
"Being a Pacesetter in South
Broward means a minimum
family commitment to the Jewish
people of $1,000, but more im-
portant it means becoming part
of the growing number of Jews
who realize, to the fullest, their
responsibility to Jews in Israel,
in Eastern Europe and in the
South Broward community," he
said.
FEDERATION President
Lewis E. Cohn stressed the
continuing need for support of
the many Jewish agencies in
South Broward which depend on
CJA-IEF funding to maintain
their educational, cultural and
community relations projects.
"The needs are growing as the
community grows. We must raise
record amounts this year so that
we can keep these important
agencies alive, as well as sup-
porting our brethren in the
Jewish State," he said.

::::::::*::
::
Pacesetters Arrangements
Chairmen Named
Arrangements chairmen
for the Pacesetters Dinner of
the Jewish Federation of
South Browards 1978 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund will be
Brenda Greenman, Jo Ann
Katz and Joyce Newman,
according to Dr. Stanley
Margulies. 1978 CJA-IEF
general campaign chairman.
Dr. Margulies also an-
nounced that Eleanor Weiner
will be chairman of the
Hostess Committee.
MRS. GREENMAN is
active in Jewish communal
affairs and is currently cam-
paign vice president of the
Federation's Women's
Division. Mrs. Newman is
immediate past president of
the Women's Division and is
now assistant executive
director of Broward Chapter
of American Jewish Com-
mittee. Mrs. Katz is im-
mediate past Women's
Division campaign vice
president and has been long
active in the Jewish com-
munity.
Mrs. Weiner has served as
an active worker with
previous Pacesetters Dinners
and was a chairman of the
Women's Division Pace-
setters Event.
Dr. Margulies expressed
confidence in the four
women, noting, "they are all
extremely skilled and exper-
ienced and will see to it that
the 1978 Pacesetters Dinner
is a huge success for the
South Hroward community
and the people of Israel."
:: BRENDA JOYCE ELEANOR JO ANN
GREENMAN NEWMAN WEINER KATZ
::^^
'.....'!
x>:-;';-;-; ;;-::;:-:::
No Rose-Colored Glasses for
'Village of Vision' Today
By NORMA A. OROVITZ
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
CHICAGO The Village of
Skokie, IU., alternately known as
the world's largest village and
the "Village of Vision," is not be-
ing seen through rose-colored
glasses these days. The Skokie
Village Board, in fact, has hired a
public relations firm to help re-
create its image.
How one sees Skokie. however,
is immaterial to the First
Amendment battle which caused
its PR problems and is now being
waged in the Illinois court sys-
tem with the densely Jewish-
populated hamlet at the core.
One one side of the Skokie di-
lemma is Frank Collin and his
1970 creation, the Nationalist
Socialist Party of America
(Nazi), part of the umbrella
Nationalist Socialist Congress.
Collin and his colleagues wish to
march in full brown shirt regalia
through the streets of Skokie.
is the Illinois American Civil
Liberties Union represented by
attorney David Goldberger.
CAUSING as much hullabaloo
as the Nazis' requested yet re-
fused petition to march is the de-
CHICAGO REPORT
Waging the judicial battle
against Collins right to assembly
is the Village of Skokie. B'nai
B'rith's Anti-Defamation League
and Sol Goldstein, the chairman
of an organization of Holocaust
survivors.
If politics makes for strange
bedfellows. then the First
Amendment makes for even
stranger soulmates. Defending
Collins right to march in Skokie
fense by the ACLU. "Member-
ship resignation, institutional
abuse and loss of revenue" aside.
Illinois ACLU Executive Direc-
tor David llamlin says he has no
regrets, personal or professional,
about the stand his organization
has taken.
In spite of having represented
Collin in earlier court cases, it
had occurred to Hamlin to send
Frank Collin elsewhere in search
MAYOR ALBERT SMITH
of an attorney. Hut. as the Skokie
situation flared suddenly, various
considerations precluded calling
in a private attorney.
As David Goldberger, one of
two ACLU staff attorneys, is a
"First Amendment expert," it
was decided that the Illinois
Continued on Page 11
CJA-IEF
Calendar
Following is the Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emer-
gency Fund calendar of
events:
JAN. 29
Fairways Royale, breakfast
Galahad North, breakfast
Galahad III. breakfast
Meadowbrook Phase V.
breakfast
JAN. 30
Hillcrest Women's Division,
luncheon
FEB. 2
Quadomain Women's Divi-
sion, luncheon
FEB. 4
Clifton Apartments, break-
fast
llallandale Jewish Center,
breakfast
Imperial Towers, breakfast
- V


Page2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 27,197s
Aquarius Committee Plans for CJA-IEF Consul General to Speak at JCC
The Aquarius committee making plans for
the Feb. 19 breakfast on behalf of the 1978
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund campaign are (standing from left)
Manny Fass, Paul Frost, Larry Siegel, Alex
Garber; (seated from left) William Broder,
Nat Sedley, Paul Weiner, Aquarius chair-
man; Harold Shapiro and Bernard Gold
berger. All committee chairmen are expect-
ing record attendance and increased giving.
Bonn Given Verbal Lashing
By PETER HOPEN
Bremer Nachrichten
Never ha9 a friendly foreign
statesman given Bonn such an
unmistakable verbal drubbing as
Israel's Moshe Dayan early in
December.
Bonn had still not recovered its
composure after President
Sadat's visit to Jerusalem the
previous weekend; it took its
medicine a little helplessly.
Israel and Egypt, erstwhile
mortal foes, now plan to
negotiate their own settlement of
the Middle East conflict. Some-
how this is hard to reconcile with
the hitherto accepted view of
world affairs as seen from Bonn.
IT IS certainly the first time
this country's foreign policy
objective of keeping one step
ahead of world affairs has so
clearly been called into question.
This desire to adapt in advance
to anticipated trends played a
leading role in Ostpolitik, Bonn's
policy towards the Eastern Bloc
in the late sixties and early
seventies.
It has also been applied to
other parts of the world in-
cluding, for instance, South
Africa.
IN Southern Africa, Bonn is
hanking on its conviction that,
the only way to deal with the
major conflict that is brewing
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between Black and white is to
adjust in good time to develop-
ments that are deemed
inevitable.
On his visit to Bonn, Dayan
pressed home the advantage
afforded by the encounter bet-
ween President Sadat and Prime
Minister Begin to demonstrate
that there are other viable ways
to conduct foreign policy.
He also took the opportunity of
telling this country, as a leading
member of the European Com-
munity, to hold fire in future with
its premature advice.
Bonn, he told his hosts, has
been anything but an able ad-
vocate of the Israeli cause. Why
did this country, unlike the
United States, vote in favor of a
UN resolution anticipating an
outcome to peace talks that was
clearly to Israel's disadvantage?
"IS THAT the gospel as far as
you are concerned?" Dayan
countered on being reminded that
the concept of a Palestinian
national home had been coined by
President Carter.
Yet the two countries proposed
to negotiate with one another and
sound out a compromise or
bridge of some kind or other
and to meet at the conference
table without fulfilling prior
conditions.
THE leeway open to
negotiations must not, Bonn was
firmly told, be rendered even
narrower than it already is be
anticipating what may or may
not be deemed a desirable out-
come.
This country, Dayan advised,
must content itself with recom-
mendations of a general nature
and not try "to solve problems by
itself and tell us what we ought to
be doing."
Both President Sadat and the
Israeli government, he claimed,
had been taken aback by the U.S.
attempt to reactivate the Soviet
Union on the Middle East and
coordinate American policy with
the Kremlin.
Marion Saltei
and
Nancy fttkin
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Phone 961 -6998
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1507 WASHINGTON
AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH
532-5912
overseas missions. He has been
assistant Director General in
charge of Administration of
Foreign Service, as well as a
member of the Israeli Mission to
the United Nations.
Joel Arnon, Consul General of
the State of Israel, will discuss
"Peace Moves in the Middle
East" on Sunday, Jan. 29, in the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center's Katz
Assembly Hall in North Miami
Beach.
The program, which is part of
the Center's "Sunday Nite at the
JCC Public Affairs Series," will
begin at 7:30 p.m. and is free and
open to the entire community.
Arnon was recently appointed
by the Begin government as the
Israeli representative in the
Southeastern United States. His
position is considered one of the
most important Israeli foreign
posts because it includes Presi-
dent Carter's home state of
Georgia.
PRIOR to taking up his duties
in Atlanta, Amon served the
Israeli government in numerous
Nathan Pritcher To Chair Dinner
Before joining the Foreign
Ministry, Amon served with the
Israeli Ministry of Finance. He
has also been a member of a
kibbutz, and the Haganah, and
he helped organize the im-
migration of Jews in Greece to
Palestine, in 1945. He attended
college at the University of
Michigan.
The Consul General's talk at
the JCC will focus on the search
for peace between Israel and her
Arab neighbors. The audience
will also have an opportunity to
question Arnon on the latest
developments in peace talks
between Israel and Egypt.
Stanley Bogen, president of
the American Friends of the
Hebrew University, announced
that Nathan Pritcher, vice presi-
dent of the Hollywood Hallan-
dale Chapter, will chair the
Annual Associates Dinner in
Hollywood on Feb. 27. Otto
Stieber, president of the Chapter,
said that Moses Hornstein will,
for the second consecutive year,
be honorary dinner chairman.
Nathan Pritcher has spent
many years working for Jewish
causes and the State of Israel. He
has served as treasurer of the
South Broward Jewish Fed-
eration, is a member of the Board
of Directors of HIAS, board
member of the Jewish Com-
munity Centers of South Florida
and according to Mr. Stieber, he
is "a vital member and a Founder
of the Hollywood Hallandale
Chapter of the American Friends
of the Hebrew University."
THE DINNER will be held at
the Eden Roc Hotel and all funds
raised will go for scholarships, to
young people attending the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
The assurance
of service. In the
Jewishtradition.
At Riverside, we take full responsibility
for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
community and the high standards
demanded by Jewish Law and Custom. For
this reason we do not allow our name to be
represented by any other organization. Each
chapel is exclusively a Riverside Chapel.
Our staff of Riverside people consists of
the largest number of Jewish professionals
employed by any funeral director in the State.
They are people who understand Jewish
tradition and honor it.
Since 1935, these policies have been
our assurance to a fami ly of service that
respects their needs and the dignity of Jewish
funeral ritual.
It's a trust we've never taken lightly.
HOLLYWOOD:
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SUNRISE:
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Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan area.
Riverside
Memorial Chapel, Inc./Funeral Directors.
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
-Hl4.-rf.-7i-


Friday. January 27, 1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
'Let My Family Go' Cries Refusenik Alexander Slepak
By Bruce Engleman
With his American wife by his
side. Alexander Slepak. son of
Soviet Jewish activists Vladimir
and Maria Slepak, emotionally
described the eight years of tor-
ment and heartache his family
experienced after applying to the
Soviet government for exit visas
to Israel.
We all suffered numerous
searches, beatings, interroga-
tions and needless harassment,"
he said, to the Jewish Federation
of South Broward's Community
| .-Relations Committee.
"THE KGB (secret police)
have been stationed in front of
our apartment since we applied to
leave Russia in 1970," Slepak
noted.
Quite unexpectedly, Slepak
was offered an exit visa last Oc-
tober when he married his wife,
California born Elaine, in Mos-
cow. At the time, she was an em-
ploye of the American Embassy.
"Even now, when my father or
I rmother leave the apartment, they
are followed. Just to go to the
store is an ordeal, because the
KGB agents wait with them in
the lines." he explained. "Anoth-
er problem now is that my
younger brother Leonid is some-
where in Moscow in hiding. He
was drafted into the Soviet Army
last fall and he did not choose to
serve because after military ser-
vice, obtaining an exit visa is
nearly impossible. If he is found,
he will surely be arrested,"
Slepak said.
A VICTIM of numerous ar-
rests himself, Slepak feels that
the Anatoly Sharansky case is
being used to scare additional
Russian Jews into not applying
for exit visas. Sharansky is cur-
rently being held in a Moscow
prison on charges of spying for
the CIA. "This is ridiculous," he
said. "Sharansky's only crime is
that he wanted to live a free life
outside the Soviet Union."
Slepak said that the Russian
Jews can still fight for freedom,
but not openly. "The only open
fighting that can be done is in the
West." he said, "and I implore all
American Jews to fight for their
brothers and sisters in the Soviet
Union. We can make it with your
support.
"Letters must be written and
telegrams sent. There can be no
rest. The Soviet government an-
swers to pressure from the West.
It has been proven. Help us.
please. We are counting on you,"
he pleaded.
Hillcrest Women Set Date
A luncheon celebrating the
:10th birthday of the State of
Israel by the Hillcrest Wo-
^ men's Division of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward
will be the official kickoff for
the 1978 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund campaign at noon
Monday. Jan. 30 at the Hill-
crest Country Club.
Hillcrest Women's Divi-
sion Co-chairmen Alice Bere-
zin and Eleanor Lerner are
anticipating record attend-
ance for their fourth annual
(MA-IEF endeavor.
"THE HILLCREST pro-
gram will include Jeanne Da-
man, a World War II heroine
who rescued thousands of
Jewish children from the Na-
zis. She was the recipient of
the Yad Vashem medal by
the Israeli government,
noted Mrs. Berezin.
Mrs. Lerner added, "We
are at a point when peace for
Israel is just at our finger-
tips. It has never been this
close, and the support of
Hillcrest women will never
slacken. We are needed now,
more than ever," she said.
Preparing the invitations for the Jan. 30 Hillcrest Women's Di-
vision Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund lunch-
eon are (from left), Gert Kronovet, Alice Berezin, Hillcrest co-
chairman; Eleanor Lerner, Hillcrest co-chairman; Hannah Adel
and Ellie Rabins.
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Meeting with members of the Jewish Federation of South
SILENT NO MORE 1{rinvi,r Joel Schneider, CRC co-chairman; Alexander Slepak; Elaine
Slepak; Joyce Newman, CRC co-chairman; and Diane Blank.
Women's Vanguard Termed Success
The Jewish Federation of South Broward
Women's Division launched the 1978 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
campaign with the Jan. 18 Vanguard lun-
cheon. Meeting with guest speaker, Jeanne
Daman (center), are (from left): Delia
Rosenberg, vice president campaign; Ruth
Rodensky, Vanguard cochairman; Bobbe
Schlesinger, Vanguard cochairman; and
Brenda Green man, vice president campaign.
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Pajje4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 27, 1975
The World Must Know
Alexander Slepak, the world-renowned Soviet
refusnik, was in Hollywood Thursday to tell the terrifying
story of his family and its agonies at the hands of the
vicious Communist regime.
For over seven years now, the Slepak family have
waited for exit visas to go to Israel. During this time, the
Soviet Union's authorities have launched a campaign of
harassment against the entire family, now centering on 18-
year-old Leonid Slepak in hiding from charges of "draft
evasion."
Young Leonid faces this dilemma: If he served, then
the Soviet Union would deny him an exit visa to Israel on '
the grounds that his service gave him access to "military
secrets." Now that he is in hiding, he faces three years of I
imprisonment for "draft evasion" if he is caught.
The Soviets have the Slepaks coming and going.
Ditto for the Anatoly Sharanskys, married on July 4,
1974, in a traditional Jewish ceremony in Moscow, with
their honeymoon over the very next day, July 5, 1974. For
it was on that day that Natalia Sharansky had to leave the
Soviet Union or never be allowed to leave again.
Natalia is in Israel now, while Anatoly is in prison on '
trumped-up charges of "treason," the two lovers living
their lives of private agony worlds apart.
But the Sharansky story must not be private. The
Sharansky agony must not be private. Neither must the
Slepak agony. Both are hideous examples of anti-
Semitism of the suppression of human rights at the
hands of the Soviets, whose phony protestations that
theirs is a free and democratic society makes a mockery ol
freedom and democracy. ,
The world must know. 1
Pacesetters78-Year of Opportunity
For thirty embattled years, through five wars, the peo-
ple of Israel dreamed of peace. It seemed an impossible
dream, answered only by silence and impasse.
Now, at last, there is an opportunity to turn that dream
into reality, for this generation and generations to come.
WE, IN THE South Broward Jewish community, have
shared the dream of peace with our Israeli brethren. We
rejoice in their opportunity.
As the Jewish Federation of South Broward celebrates
its 35th anniversary this year, we are all reminded of the
many years of support and concern that our community
has shown for the human needs facing the people of Israel.
That concern will manifest itself on Saturday evening,
Feb. 4 when the Federation holds its Pacesetters Dinner
for the 1978 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund. The entire Jewish community will have the oppor-
tunity to show its concern for world Jewry by attending
the $1,000 minimum family gift dinner.
THE PROSPECT of peace must motivate us to give
more than we ever gave in times of crisis. In our 1978
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund cam-
paign, we must seize our opportunity by acting boldly and
giving generously to sustain, build and improve the qua-
lity of life for our people. We Are One.
Chasing the Russian Rainbow
Young Leaders Conference
Set for Hollywood
The Young Leadership Cabinet of the United Jewish
Appeal will hold their 1978 Regional Young Leadership Con-
ference Friday, Jan. 27 through Jan. 29 at the Holiday Inn, 4000
South Ocean Drive in Hollywood.
Following the theme of "Leadership Awareness A
Jewish Responsibility," the guest speakers will include: Nor-
man Lipoff, UJA national chairman; William Lehman, North
Dade Congressman; Zvi Rahah, counselor for the Israeli
Embassy in Washington; Neil Cooper, national Young Leader-
ship Cabinet chairman; and Rabbi Irving Greenberg, director of
the National Jewish Conference Center.
Conference workshops will include: "Washington-Jeru-
salem-American Jewry Lifelines, pipelines, boundary lines,"
"Doing Jewish The Implications for Leadership," and
"Leadership Communication Skills."
Conference special features are dialogue and Shabbat with
Rabbi Irving Greenberg, a comprehensive update on current
Middle East negotiations, a panel on Leadership Development
concepts, and women in Leadership Development.
ALL OF us must applaud the
recent resolution of the Com-
munity Relations Committee of
the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration urging American Jews to
be wary of supporting cultural
and sporting events involving
Soviet participants.
The resolution took a lot of
guts to pass because it violates
the obtuse attitude, particularly
among Jewish culture vultures,
that art has nothing to do with
politics and who will now be
doubly vociferous in their criti-
cism of those who commit them-
selves to acting on the principle
that it does.
IT IN no way diminishes the
value of the Federation resolution
to suggest that it should have
been passed years ago. I, myself,
Leo
Mindlin
5mn
have long refused to attend
concerts or recitals featuring
Soviet artists much to the
anguish of friends who could not
OTJPr
understand this "bigotry" in me.
I freely confess that, originally,
my refusal was an affectation. 1
simply gagged at the wiid,
starry-eyed reactions of these
friends in their worship of the
latest Soviet phenomenon on the
fiddle or keyboard, or to the
latest Soviet screamer in lachry-
mose performances of songs by
lachrymose Mussorgsky or
Rachmaninoff.
"Surely, we've got some
American-born, American -
trained musicians who are just as
good," I'd say in my usual
atheistic way. "Just because
they're Russians, does that make
them divine?"
WHAT I got back all these
years was derision and the kind
of contempt reserved for a
peasant who fails, say, to ap-
preciate the virtues of a Mercedes
and would just as soon settle for
a Honda.
But when my refusal to join
them in their worship at the
fountainhead of Soviet culture
turned from a simple stubborn-
ness a simple unwillingness to
be part of a mindless crowd
when it turned fom that to an
awareness of how the Soviets had
begun to use cultural and
sporting events as pageants of
propaganda designed to demon-
strate the superiority of the Com
munist state, that's when the
stuff hit the fan.
"Art has nothing to do with
politics," people told me en-
dlessly. The heaviest burden I
bore was when the latest Russian
whiz, Lazar Berman. showed up
at the University of Miami a
couple of years back, and I
refused to go to listen to him
bang out his Liszt in a most un-
transcendental way.
"HE'S A crumb bum," I said
simply to shock. "Give me
Frederick Frankenhauser any
day, born, raised and trained in
Dallas. His way with Liszt makes
Berman sound like a bungler."
To my knowledge, there is no
Continued on Page 12
Hubert Humphrey: A Short Memory
Hollywood Office -IMS. Federal Hwy..| Suite 208 Danla, Fla. 88004
___ Telephone 830-0018
i^^2urJSJS,dPUANTUO,jE"h8,M1mllri Phone878-4*06
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Published Bl Weekly
Second Clan Poeta(e Paid at Dan la. Fla. 864M0
The Jewish Floridian has absoroed Hie Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly
Met..ber of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndlcete, World
wide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association of
English Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (local area) One TearM.so. Out of Town Upon Request.
Friday, January 27,1978 19 SHEVAT 5738
Volume 8 Number 2
In the history book of my
times, Hubert Humphrey occu-
pies a central position. I was
there in Philadelphia the summer
of 1948 when he alone; in my
opinion, turned certain defeat
into victory for Harry Truman
and the Democratic Party.
It was as dramatic an example
of brilliant oratory as one could
hope to hear in a lifetime when
the young mayor of Minneapolis
delivered his challenge for the
Democratic Party "to get out of
the shadow of states' rights and
walk forthrightly in the bright
sunshine of human rights."
TWENTY YEARS later, al-
most to the day, his dreamed-for
nomination as the Democratic |
candidate for President of the |
United States set off demonstra-
tions quite the opposite to the
one which thrilled us in
Philadelphia.
"Dump the Hump" was only
one of the milder banners which
young radicals and old liberals
carried to express their oppo-
sition to the hero of 1948, now the
enemy of 1968.
Even I could write in The Jew-
ish Floridian of Oct. 18, 1968,
that "It takes a heap of courage i
to vote for Nixon, but for at least
one reason, this seems the least of
the impending evils. That reason
being the obvious fact that only
the crushing defeat of the old
Democratic Party could bring
about the reformation of a party
which again would represent the
moderate liberal forces in this
country ... (however) I shall vote
for Hubert Humphrey..."
But the unreconciled followers
of Eugene McCarthy would not
Edward
n
recognize the implications as 1
did of the victory of Nixon, not
only in extension of the Vietnam
War which was their hangup
(mine, too), but in the appoint-
ments to the Supreme Court and
other policies which have affected
the course of American history.
THEY RE MAIN EIJ hom.e. on
Election Day, skipped the vote
for President if they did go out
and vote, or voted for Richard
Nixon.
Since I write of decades, my
history takes me back 30 years to
the end of 1947 when I first met
Hubert Humphrey, McCarthy,
Orville Freeman, Art Naftalin
and a brilliant group of young
men and women at the conven-
tion of Minnesota's Democratic
Farmer Labor Party.
By coincidence, I flew back to
New York on the same plane with
Humphrey and spent several
hours discussing politics with
him. I have never forgotten the
remark the man next to me made
when I returned to my seat:
THAT FELLOW is going to
be our next United States
Senator. I'm a Republican, but I
believe moat of us will vote for
him because he's a man of such
great character." The results in
his bid tor the Senate in liJ48
proved the respect the people in
his state had, regardless ol party.
A few weeks later literally it
was dated January 15, 1948 I
wrote in a weekly which I had be-
gun after my discharge from the
Army that Humphrey was an
important part of a new move-
ment seeking to rejuvenate
liberal politics. The creation of
Americans for Democratic Action
(ADA), a liberal organization
specifically excluding Commu-
nists, had generated a fierce de-
bate in which I was an active
participant as a member of the
National Board, abng with such
personalities as Eleanor Roose-
velt, Arthur Schlesinger Jr.,
Reinhold Niebuhr and others of,
to me, awesome stature from the
New Deal era.
Newcomer to this group
though he was. Hubert Humph-
rey was not to be denied an early
leadership role.
THE TITLE of my article
almost 30 years to this day was
"The Liberal Dilemma." In the
career of Hubert Humphrey,
which took in that entire period,
the heading was particularly
apropos. Constantly wavering
between idealism and prag-
matism, the liberal seems to act
only in terms of imperfect
alternatives.
If in his political life this was
the fate of Hubert Humphrey, it
was one he shared with many of
us. That he chose to walk more
often than not on the side of the
street where there was the
"bright sunshine of human
rights" is to me the real memory
of a great man of my times.


Friday, January 27,1978
1 >
The Jewish Fbridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
attend the 1978 Cja-ief pacesetteps OmneR
^x\\^TY^
7:00 p.m., SatUR&ay, fee. 4
at the diplomat hotel
f or ReseRvations Call:
Jewish fe&epation of South Browar& 921-8810 ofs^

r-
s

<
#T

*
1
#
*
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*


CHILDREn.
She had the same dream so many oilier 15-year
jld girls had at that time. To fall in love. To marry.
h have children of her own. And to raise those
.children in the same faith her parents had
raised her.
But of course, that was far too dangerous
|a dream.
Because she was a Jew.
In the 34 years since Anne Frank was mur-
dered, we have been told time and time again
; that the Holocaust was an isolated nightmare
inhuman history and could never happen again.
hat it is no different, no more dangerous, to be
a Jew now than it is to be anything else.
lien why were Mark Slavin and David Berger
and 9 other ()l\ mpic Athletes murdered at Munich
in 1972?
Then why was it necessary for Israeli commandos to travel
2500 miles to rescue 103 hostages, some of them American Jews.
at Entebbe in 1976?
And why were the German terrorists who seized the Lufthansa
plane in October of 1977 so intent on finding out which of its
passengers were Jews?
That is why it is necessary for the Jewish Federation of South
Broward to say to ourselves and our friends and pur enemies, that
what happened to Anne Frank and so many other innocent Jews
since Anne Frank, must not happen again.
Today, while we hope and pray that present events may lead to
a lasting peace in the Mideast and the reduction of global anti-
Semitism, we must realize that the people of Israel and Jews all over
the world need our help now as much as ever.
And as Israel endures and is finally recognized by all nations as
the spiritual home of Jews everywhere, the world will become a bet-
ter place for all of us.
Then one day, it may be perfectly safe to be fifteen years old and
a Jew. In Israel. Or Russia. Or anywhere else.
You and me. We are one.
SUPPORT THE JEWISH FEDERflTIOn
OF SOUTH BMNIMMrS 1978
COMBinEDJBUISHRPPEftL
BMH.BIIERGBKV FUm.
2838 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood, Florida 33020
Phone 921-8810

? :


Pge6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofarof Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 27,1978
HHH
I
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey, ever
thoughtful of the concerns of the
Jewish people, left a legacy to
them in the form of a statement
prepared shortly before his death.
He died Friday night at his home
in Waveriy, Minn, of cancer at
the age of 66.
Humphrey served in the Se-
nate from 1949 until he was elec-
ted vice-president under Presi-
dent Johnson in 1964. After his
defeat for the Presidency by
Richard Nixon in 1968, Humph-
rey was re-elected to the Senate
in 1970. Throughout his career he
had been a strong supporter of
Israel and had worked closely
with the Jewish community on
many domestic issues of concern
to it.
IN AN exclusive statement to
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
written shortly before his death,
Humphrey urged American and
Arab government leaders to
understand that Israel has "a
special relationship with Amer-
ica." Explaining this, Humphrey
said:
"I have absolutely no dis-
agreement with the goal of secur-
ing the trust and friendship of the
Arab world. In fact, I believe it to
be imperative. But while we are
pursuing this policy, we should
not forget that Israel, for the
United States, cannot be regard-
ed as just another nation among
nations in the Middle East. We
"/ have absolutely no dis-
agreement with the goals
of securing the trust and
friendship of the Arab
word. In fact, I believe it
to be imperative. But
while we are pursuing this
policy, we should not for-
get that Israel, for the
United States, cannot be
regarded as just another
nation among nations in
the Middle East..."
must declare without embarrass-
ment, and without apology, that
Israel has earned a special rela-
tionship with America.
"The Arab world must under-
stand that if it desires better
relations with the United States
it must accept our good relations
with Israel. No administration
should ever mislead any Arab
leader to believe otherwise."
HUMPHREY was eulogized at
the Capitol's Rotunda by Presi-
As he once was
"First Golda Meir Award" on
Oct. 17 by Pioneer Women which
carried with it "a perpetual scho-
larship for advance of education
for deserving students." Accept-
ing the award for him, Humph-
rey's sister, Mrs. Frances
Howard, read a statement hailing
Mrs. Meir as "a woman who per-
sonifies the intellect, the human-
ity, the courage and the spirit
which epitomizes one of the most
exciting developments of this
century the establishment of
the modern State of Israel."
HUMPHREY'S defense of
Zionism rose to a crescendo after
the United Nations General
Assembly linked Zionism with
racism. In a Senate speech Dec.
3, 1975, he declared that "The
charge of racism against Israel is
so manifestly absurd one's first
reaction is not even to dignify the
charge with substantive re-
sponse. But recent discussions
and inquiries make it clear that
there is much ignorance and con-
fusion about the nature of Israeli
society, the result of massive
propaganda efforts designed by
Israel's adversaries to support
their absurd charges."
He referred to the General As-
sembly resolution as having
"sinister implications" which
"only add obstacles to the strug-
gle for peace in the Middle East
and which threaten the useful-
ness of the United Nations it-
self."

Humphrey, performed at the
memorial ceremony.
Humphrey was a firm support-
er and friend of Israel throughout
his political years dating back to
the time he was mayor of Minne-
apolis when Israel's birth was in
question. He was elected to the
Profile
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Senate in 1948, the year Israel
became a state. He visited Israel
on numerous occasions during
the following years.
His concern for the security of
"this tiny democratic state in the
Middle East," as he had referred
to Israel, was translated both
spiritually in the form of inspired
addresses as senator and vice
president and also into effective
action, particularly since 1973
when, as the Senate Democratic
leader dealing with foreign aid, he
insisted that U.S. assistance be
adequately provided to Israel
sorely wounded by the Yom
Kippur War.
HUMPHREY was the confi-
dant and friend of Israel's lead-
ers. When Golda Meir visited
Washington on her last trip, she
went to his Capitol Hill office
saying, "I would have gone to
Minnesota to see you."
When Prime Minister Mana-
chem Begin was in Washington
in December, he went to Humph-
rey's apartment to chat with him.
Earlier, on Begin's first visit as
prime minister in July, he was
warmly welcomed by Humphrey
at the Capitol and posed for
photographs with him.
What was apparently the last
award of the many given him by
Jewish organizations was the
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Friday, January 27, 1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
Officers Installed
Olympus Lodge of B'nai B'rith
held its installation of officers for
1978 recently at the Rolling Hills
Country Club.
Installing officer was Isidor
Jan Bookbinder. Officers in-
stalled were Emanuel M. Cohen,
president; Seymour Goll, Leo
Hilzenrath, Charles S. Kroll and
William Monashkin, vice presi-
dents; Leo M. Fisher, treasurer;
Abraham Appel, financial secre-
tary; Meyer Kellman, recording
secretary; Nat London, warden;
Theodore Fisch, auditor; and Is-
rael P. Frutman, chaplain.
MEMBERS OF the Board, in
addition to the officers, include
David B. Berlin, Abe Dolgen,
Samuel Goldstein, Joseph Horn,
Martin Kobrin, Paul Lederman,
Samuel Mirkin, Meyer Reizman,
R. Harold Stein, Joseph Strass-
ner, Herman K. Sklarin, Myron
M Wepner and Henry Witriol.
u Champagne Brunch
Set for Hadassah
A champagne bruncheon will
be the first annual AMI affair of
the Southwest Broward Chapter
of Hadassah on Wednesday, Jan.
25 at Emerald Hills Country Club
at 11 a.m.
Mrs. Roz Soltz, a past pres-
ident of the Florida Region of
Hadassah and a past national
board member, will be the guest
speaker, announced Mrs. Jackie
Mayne, chairman of the day.
MRS. RITA Sherman, chapter
. program vice president, has
arranged for a fashion showing
by Nat Allen of Hollywood, with
musical accompaniment by Jack
Cagan.
Mrs. Lillian Packer, chapter
president, announced that the
chapter will honor Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Shaprow of Pembroke
Pines, who recently established a
Cardiology Research Laboratory
at Hadassah Hebrew University
Medical Center in Ein Karem.
Israel, in memory of their son
David.
Chaverim At Sinai
Temple Sinai kicked off 1978
with a "Chaverim" on Saturday
evening, Jan. 21. Angel Arroyo, a
local Disco dancer at the Cricket
and California Clubs, was the
guest.
A "Chaverim," which means
friends in Hebrew, is a social and
cultural club. According to
Florence Roth of Temple Sinai,
"the evening was an outstanding
success and we are looking
forward to more cultural happen-
ings which the community can
enjoy."
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ARTHUR H. COURSHON
Chairman of the Board


Page8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 27,1978
CRC Symposium Hosts Schulman, Lehman
Women's Division March 8
An energy symposium, sponsored by the
Jewish Federation of South Broward's Com-
munity Relations Committee, related the
current Middle Eastern situation to former
and present world energy crises. Par-
ticipating with Chairman of the Day Dr.
Alex Buchwald (at podium) are (from left)
Dr. Fred Schulman, former chief of nuclear
systems of NASA; Congressman William
Lehman; and CRC Chairman Dr. Joel
Schneider.
Advance planning has begun for the Jewish Federation of
South Broward Women's Division Pacesetters Luncheon on be-
half of the 1978 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund. Arrangements for the March 8 luncheon at the Emerald
Hills Country Club are being made by co-chairmen (from left)
Evelyn Stieber, Carol Morgenstein and Audrey Meline.
Joyce Newman to AJCommittee
Joyce Newman has been
named assistant executive
director of the Broward County
chapter of the American Jewish
Committee.
Long active in Jewish com-
munal affairs, Mrs. Newman is a
past president of the Jewish Fed-
eration of South Broward Wom-
en's Division. She is actively
involved with the Federation's
Combined Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund campaign,
while also serving on the Board of
Directors.
Mrs. Newman is a life member
of Hadassah, a member of
Temple Solel Sisterhood, B'nai
B'rith Women, ORT and the
National Council of Jewish
Women.
Crisis in Water
To be Discussed
The pharmaceutical fraternity,
Rho Pi Phi, in association with
the South Florida Alumni Chap-
ter, will present a program on the
"Crisis in Water, A Problem for
Pharmacy," on Sunday, Jan. 29
at Washington Federal Savings
and Loan on 167th Street in
North Miami Beach
Dr. Daniel Jackson will speak
on "Water and Health." Dr.
George P. Fitzgerald will speak
on "Evaluation of Chemicals for
the Control of Bacteria" and Dr.
J. Alan Beech will speak on "The
Toxicology and Pharmacology of
Pollutants and Contaminants in
Our Environment.
r
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JOYCE NEWMAN
Grossman Qualifies,
For Commission
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NICKI ENGLANDER
GROSSMAN I
Nicki Englander Grossman has
qualified for the Hollywood City
Commission. She is an organiza-
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dominium and Co-op Executive
Council and is affiliated with
A viva B'nai B'rith, Hollywood
Junior Woman's Club, National
Council of Jewish Women and
Women's American ORT.
Rabbi to be Installed
A Shabbat dinner in Honor of
Rabbi Katz's installation will be
served on Friday, Jan. 20 at 6
p.m. in the Lipraan Youth
Lounge. Temple Sinai Board
members have bqajj invited to
attend. Services mH follow the
dinner, with Rabbi Katz of-
ficiating and Cantor Yehudah L.
Heilhraun chanting the liturfrv.
Eat Like the Dickens.
A Tureen of Soup
Pickwick Salad
14 oz. Roasted Prime Rlbc of Beef
Yorkshire Pudding
Baked Potato
Spinach Souffle or
Creamed Corn
Coconut it Cheese Bread
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also featuring
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English Tea & Curiousitles Called Coffee
Seafood Bar* Pub
If;. Olivers is an I850's happening
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From the moment the Artful
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starts you wondering whether
At he'll sell it while you're eating.
you enter the immortal world of
Boz. You'll be greeted and
seated by Nancy Sikes, Little
Nell or Kate Nickelby. served by the likes of Rosa
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likely to be coming over to your table and filching a
watch or necklace; Ebenezer Scrooge admonishing
you not to leave too big a tip. At Oliver's, you dine in
the Tine tradition of Dickens' world, surrounded* by
his marvelous characters. And unlike Oliver himself,
you'll never feel you have to ask for more.
OLIVER'S
^| HOUSE Of PtIMt |fjP
Restaurant, Seafood Bar & Pub at Runaway Bay 79th St. Causeway, Miami Beach, Fla. R.: 865-1511

t


day. January 27,1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
adassah Presents Education Series
The Education Department of
lie Hollywood Chapter of
Radassah announces the second
lecture in the series titled "The
lie wish Woman," to be held at
Kmple Beth El in Hollywood on
\iesday. Feb. 7.
[ A Kallah ... on the arts will be
torn 10 a.m. to noon with
eborah (ilass. professor of Art,
literature, Philosophy at Nova
(niversity.
From 1 to 2:30 p.m. Mrs.
jro'.hy Zuckerman, musical
artist, will present the topic,
"Jewish Women in Music."
Chairmen of the day include
Naomi Needier, Hillcrest, during
the morning and Charlotte
Silberstein, Hallmark, during the
afternoon.
Others involved include
Frances Visenthal, president,
Hollywood chapter of Hadassah;
Jae Ruderman, education vice
president, Hollywood chapter of
Hadassah; and Esther Sklar,
chapter publicity chairman.
Quadomain for CJA-IEF
To help launch the 1978 Combined Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund campaign at a Big Gifts Parlor meeting in
Quadomain are (from left) Jack Leffel, chairman; Sidney Hoff;
Joseph Allentuck; Henry Levy, guest speaker; and Nat Sedley,
I CJA-IEF vice chairman Hollywood Beach.
La Mer for CJA-IEF
The La Mer building chairmen meeting to plan the La Mer
effort of the 1978 Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency
Fund for the Jewish Federation of South Broward are (from
left) Herman Karmiel, Dr. Benjamin Fridman, La Mer general
Miairman; Jeanne Frayne; Jerry Rosenberg; and Leon Glat-
tman.

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EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
It was first with amusement
and then with dismay that I read
the Leo Mindlin column (Eriday.
Jan. 13) on "Books? They're for
Burning."
I can appreciate Mr. Mindlin's
embarrassment. I cannot speak
for the other agencies he contact-
ed, but as a librarian with the
Hollywood Branch of the Bra-
oward County Library System
for the past 14 years, I must set
the record straight concerning
donation of books to public li-
braries.
OF COURSE, the attitude of
the librarian he contacted is not
to be condoned, but Mr. Mindlin
should be aware that most of the
donations are simply not usable.
They are worn, they are soiled,
they are old with torn bindings
and they are usually (if non-
fiction) completely obsolete in
content.
We have found roaches, pieces
of food, and because the books
have most probably been stored
away, the odor of mildew is over-
powering and sickening.
We never refuse donations and
go through every book carefully,
not a pleasant job at best. It is
rare when we find something we
can use. The evidence is over-
whelming that the donor has
simply cleaned house and is look-
ing for a depository in lieu of
throwing their old books away.
IT MUST be understood that
we systematically and periodic-
ally discard books from our own
collection and replace them with
new and revised editions when-
ever possible.
For Mr. Mindlin to equate the
spraying and discarding of old
materials with Dachau is unwor-
thy and incomprehensible.
PAULA KRAVETZ
Assistant Head Librarian
Hollywood Branch
engagements
Boniske-Mulcahy
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond
Boniske of Miramar have an-
nounced the engagement of
their daughter, Stacy Odette
to Robert J. Mulcahy, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Mul-
cahy of New Rochelle, N. Y.
Stacy and Robert are both
recent graduates of Florida
Technological University in
Orlando.
A wedding is planned for
this spring.
Federation Honors Dincin
Dr. Edward A. Dincin, right, was honored with the Shofar
Award of the Jewish Federation of South Broward. The presen-
tation was made by Dr. Joel Schneider, chairman of Federa-
tion's Community Relations Committee. Dr. Dincin has been
long active in Jewish communal affairs and is a stalwart of the
,1 FSB Community Relations Committee.
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Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 27, l Increased giving and support for the 1978 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund were apparent at the Jan. 19
Jewish Federation of South Broward Women's Division lun-
cheon at Galahad South. Galahad co-chairmen pleased with the
success of their efforts are (from left) Ernestine Germaine, Ida
Rakoff and Ethel Endler.
\
Maxine S. Hess (second from left), will be awarded the Solomon
Schechter Medal by the Jewish Theological Seminary of Amer-
ica at the annual Luncheon of the Seminary's National Wo-
men's Patron Society on Wednesday, Feb. 8 at noon, at the
Diplomat Country Club in Hallandale. Standing next to her is
Mrs. Louis E. Goldstein, national chairman of the Women's
Patron Society and a member of the Board of Directors of the
Seminary; Henry Hess (left), a member of the Board of Over-
seers of the Seminary; and Louis E. Goldstein (right), chairman
of the Seminary's Legacies and Bequests Committee.
Come cruise with me on
the great Leonardo da Vinci
for as little as H55."
MITRE 0 HOTEL lORiNJO IEHCARI
3-night cruise leaves every Friday,
4-night cruise leaves every Monday, from
Ft. Lauderdale, all year to Freeport/Nassau.
Cruise with us 3 nights
to Nassau.
On any Friday the year round,
the moment you board the
Leonardo you'll know what makes
her an Italian masterpiece 5 pools
Gourmet meals Gracious service
Dock m Nassau tor two glorious
days ot tennis Golf Shopping
Deep-sea fishing At-Paradise
Beach, bask in the sun. see fabu-
lous shows and try your luck at the
Casino On your return voyage,
just relax and enioy memories that
will last a lifetime
Cruise with us 4 nights
to FrMPort/Nassau.
Every Monday the year round,
the great Leonardo leaves Ft
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luxury You'll swim in the bluest
waters You'll visit pastel villages,
tropical beaches, go bargain shop-
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Leonardo is your floating resort
hotel, and our Italian crew knows
how to pamper you.
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Saudi Snub of Rosalynn Deplored
Women's rights leaders from around the nation
have reacted angrily to the second-class treat-
ment accorded Rosalynn Carter by Saudi Arabian
officials during the President's visit to the male-
dominated desert kingdom, the New York News
reports.
Mrs. Carter was given no place on the
welcoming platform at the airport, where Carter
got a red carpet reception, and had to walk sue
feet behind her husband at all times in public.
Mrs. Carter also was excluded from the state
banquet for Carter and dined with women in a
separate part of the palace, according to the
News.
"The role of women in the Middle East is
shocking," said Eleanor Cutri Smeal, the first
housewife elected president of the National
Organization for Women. NOW, with 700
chapters and 65,000 members, is the largest
American organization devoted to feminism.
A gay rights bill which is expected to be intro-
duced in the City Council of New York City this
month, is an infringement upon the religious
rights of Americans and a severe blow to funda-
mentals in education, a major 55-year-old Ortho-
dox Jewish group stated this week.
Dr. Bernard Fryshman, chairman of the Com-
mission on Legislation of Agudath Israel of
America, announced that the organization, whose
policies are set by distinguished Jewish scholars,
will mobilize the Orthodox Jewish community to
ROSALYNN CARTER
defeat any measures which would compel schools
to hire homosexual teachers or require that a
family rent to an avowed homosexual couple.
Dr. Fryshman stated: "It is a red herring to
charge that those who refuse to hire homosexual
teachers are violating their civil rights because
society has the right to protect itself against any
group or individual whose conduct and practices
violate religious and social mores."
FROM $92.50 A WEEK
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Or wining, dining, and
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Hotels, casinos,
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And for your
money, you get an air
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Plus extras. From $42.50
to $162.50,4-day/
3-night vacations are
also available.
From $103 to
$257, pick a week in
Freeport/Lucaya.
If you're into
sports, you should be on
our tennis courts or golf
courses (we have six of
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you can dive or fish.
Or play the games of
El Casino. Or dance 'til
dawn. Or sample gour-
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shop to your delight in
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Your price in-
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Other packages are
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To really get
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Charter your own
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Sun, swim, stay longer
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As it is, your price
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See your Travel
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These vacation
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There are other vacation
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For reservations
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There's no better
time than now.
ITS BETTER
IN THE BaHaMBS.
NH^faeUod fTMporvtucata
HmOmi


^t January 27,1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Pagell
No Rose- Colored Glasses
I ( ontinued from Page 1
Dter would take up the mantle
[Collin's defense. "We have
Hamlin says definitively,
ken up his cause."
("HIS MOST recent cause can
[dated from Apr. 30 of last
Skokie was only one of a
en or more Chicago suburbs
irhich Collin applied for march
nits. The Village issued an
knction to stop a demon-
Ition planned for May 1. Col-
land company then opted to
ch on Apr. 30.
Lccording to Collin, he was
ttpped at the border and
ned from Skokie forever."
Wording to Hamlin, a judge
hailed in the emergency of
morning to issue an injunc-
against the Nazi march on
30 and "subsequent days."
^reby, a "narrow injunction
jme open-ended," which
lees for the exceedingly rare
> of prior restraint,
["he case is presently before the
sis State Supreme Court,
state's Appellate court has
eady ruled that the Nazis may
Jrch sans the swastika. The
jment being considered now
[whether the Nazis may as-
nble in "full uniform." which
lludes the odious Third Reich
oboL
The Skokie case against Collin
Ums the Nazi march would pro-
ke violence on the part of the
|lagers. That is the legal jargon.
humane aspect, whether it
nes from survivor Goldstein or
layor Albert Smith, is more
Ugnant.
[GOLDSTEIN. who sees
mself as a "defender of the
rst Amendment." says here
he views the potential Nazi
irch as "abuse." The Nazis, he
ates, "want to create a disturb
ice. The swastika is a reminder
[what can happen."
(Mayor Smith, in a statement
pre to The Jewish Floridian,
ate that "all speech is not pro-
ved by the First Amendment,
belous, defamatory utterances,
cenities and pornography in
plation of community stan-
rds and the factual equivalent
shouting Fire!' in a crowded
eater do not merit First
nendment protection."
Vhile the Village brought suit
finally, the ADL and Gold-
tin are also suing the Nazi
Dup. According to Hamlin, the
}I. case is "wandering around
Appellate Court," and both
its are too narrow as they only
bresent the survivors living in
|okie rather than the entire
pulation. There are an estimat-
through questionable, 7,000
(locaust survivors living in the
Plage.
IN THE meantime, Nazi leader
|lin readily admitted to this
orter in an interview here that
[intent is to "cause disruption
raise hell." Ostensibly, he
lid like to "propel free speech
the open," although he also
^nds to "draw the tarantula
of the nest by goin^ to the
Jple who would scream the
dest."
hile he has not, to date, even
idged near the edge of the
his march in Skokie leaves
fmany questions unanswered.
lamlin, who describes Collin
i "creature of street activity."
|s the Nazi would probably be
abiding if only not to risk
Srceration. Aside from the
mnal factor, the longer Collin
Hains free, the longer he re-
ins in the public eye.
WILE THE United States
preme Court ruled in June that
|ere prior restraint has been or-
1, there should be an expedi-
iia rehearing of the case. Sko-
is still waiting for a ruling on
swastika. Additionally, there
three Skokie ordinances
iiting a ruling on constitu-
nality in a Federal District
irt. The local laws, passed in a
rry, have raised as many ques-
ts as has the whole situation.
)ne ordinance requires a 30-
day notice for any sidewalk
demonstration of 50 or more per-
sons (including onlookers), as
well as $350,000 in liability insur-
ance. According to Hamlin's
ACLU defense, an insurance
bond of that nature is a difficulty
if not an impossibility, and there-
fore "puts a probable price tag on
First Amendment activity."
The kicker is that the Village
Board may, at its discretion,
waive the requirements.
ANOTHER NEW local law
bans "political demonstrations"
where participants wear 'mili-
tary-style uniforms." The intent
is obviously to limit Collin's Nazi
colleagues, but other groups
(veterans, marching bands, etc.)
may also be affected.
The third ordinance being
questioned is a dual ban involv-
ing "group libel" and "symbols
offensive to the community." The
former, says Hamlin, is not
applicable, and the latter consti-
tutes a ban on "symbolic
speech."
The irony of the ACLU's de-
fending the free speech of Collin
and cohorts is not so puzzling
when seen from Hamlin's
viewpoint. "Assuming that
Frank Collin wins, the only per-
son who loses is Collin because
he's against the First Amend-
ment."
When the situation is seen
from Collin's vantage point,
charges of cop-out and expe-
diency are lenient and benign. Of
attorney David Goldberger, Col-
lin allows how the lawyer is a
"good Jew." But why go to a Jew
for your defense? "I would deal
with the devil to get my rights
back. It's only a means to an
end."
WHEN SEEN by the commu-
nity, the dichotomy is not so dis-
tinct. Local rabbis, representa-
tive of and sensitive to communal
feeling, are at once puzzled and
hurt by the ACLU stance. Rabbi
Neil Brief of the Niles Township
Jewish Congregation has encour-
aged townspeople to take a con-
crete stand out of deference to the
survivors.
Paul Feinberg, associate rabbi
of Temple Sholom, says in his
argument for not allowing ob-
noxious symbolic representation
that "there's a point where free
speech is license to harm."
And so, th> Village of Skokie,
is still the Village of Vision to
some who see the battle begun in
Germany several wars ago being
fought in a small Illinois hamlet
because the world did not say
"No!" soon enough and loud
enough to Frank Collin's
prophet, the diabolical Adolf
Hitler.
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'


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 27,1978
//
Leo MlitdHji |
Chasing the Russian Rainbow
Continued from Page 4
Frederick Frankenhauser not
that there aren't American
pianists of Berman's stature or
better but it made the point
especially well when a debate
followed which I lost because I
was outnumbered, but in which
no one denied Frankenhauser's
existence, only that Herman was
better, particularly in the Chasse-
neige, which Frankenhuaser
could never play that way in their
opinion.
Why Jews are so snobbish
about Soviet performers is, in
itself, a political thing, which
right then and there puts a
wrench into their vociferous saw
that art and politics are
irrelevants.
JEWS, as 1 said in this column
only the other week, have pro-
foundly ambivalent feelings
about the Soviet Union, in fact,
schizophrenic feelings. They
remember czarist Russia's anti-
Semitism, and continue to be
impressed with Leninist doctrine
that pegged anti-Semitism as a
societal poison.
Hence, they admire the early
Soviet state for its theoretical
eradication of anti-Semitism long
after the Soviets resumed op-
pressing Jews right up to our
own time, and with a fierce dedi-
cation that frequently matches
the old czarist pogroms at their
worst.
This love-hatred uniquely
characterizes the sons and
daughters, grandsons and grand-
daughters of the victims of
czarist oppression as an
emotional flaw in them. What is
worse, it is they who are the
mainstays of the cultural elite
within the American bourgeoisie,
and it is their acceptance that is a
sine qua non of the myth of
Soviet supremacy in matters
artistic.
IT IS this emotional flaw that
impels them to love Herman and
Vishnevskaya, young Oistrakh
and Svetlanov not to mention
the latest ballerina out of Lenin-
grad or the latest Muscovite
gymnast sensation and that
makes them incapable of relating
the artists, the sports stars and
their American tours to the
political purposes toward which
their achievements are being
directed by the Soviet state
though, admittedly, not neces-
sarily by the performers
themselves.
A word about the dictum that
art and politics have nothing to
do with one another. Any first-
year student of art can debunk
this back to Virgil (70-19 BCE)
and even before.
The purpose of Virgil's Aeneid
was to glorify Rome. This was a
political, not an aesthetic goal
which, in fact, caused Virgil to
attempt suicide, so filled with
despair was he at having his art
exploited by Caesar's far more
practical and less lofty purposes.
WHO WOULD deny the
political rage in the great Irish
Renaissance writers from Synge
to O'Casey? Or in Picasso's
Guernica? Or even in the four-
square artlessness of Soviet
monuments, statues and painted
panoramas memorializing the
latest achievements in steel and
grain production artless
because Soviet propagandists,
not artists, set the standards of
art in that country, averring that
art is its message, not form.
Form, after all, is individual, and
therefore counter-revolutionary.
No less a Marxist theoretician
than Herbert Marcuse long ago
issued the edict that modem
man's highest art form should be
political graffiti, and travelers in
Europe these days, mainly
through politically-torn Italy,
which is Communism's next
wolfish victim, will observe the
omnipresence on walls and bill-
boards there of terse, Marxist
messages ad nauseam in humble
compliance to the edict.
Put in a nutshell, when Ber-
man performs at the piano in
Miami or New York, his Soviet
puppeteers are announcing to
Miamians and New Yorkers the
excellence of the Soviet world
that ostensibly produced him,
and that my non-existent
equivalent. Frederick Franken-
hauser, cannot in fact exist in an
inferior American civilization.
And the doyens of the cultural
elite within the American bour-
geoisie, the Jewish sons and
daughters, grandsons and grand-
daughters of the victims of
czarist oppression, mutely agree.
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OHrnetf 8 Directed by a Miami Family lor SO years.
Morgan I. Levy, C.C.D 1531 S.W. 82nd Court
Miami, Fla. 33144 Phone: 264-6389
STAFF INQUIRIES INVITEDeMINIMUM ACE 1
ACCREDITED
CAMP
AMERICAN CAMMMC
ASSOCIATION
__I
IN THIS sense, Herman is the
Soviet pig's kosher foot, and
Jews have every reason therefore
not only not to agree, but to snub
him. Even were there no real
Frederick Frankenhausers to
hear, Jews should snub him
and all the others who descend
upon us season after season like a
culture klatch.
It is about time that American
Jews got over their political
schizophrenia vis-a-vis the Soviet
Union. The agony of Sharansky
should help them do that, if
nothing else.
The agony of Sharansky
should tell them that the Soviet
legatees of czarist oppression are
no better than their ancestors in
the matter of human rights.
IT IS also about time that
American Jews got over their
snobbism about Soviet artists. Of
course, there are real Frederick
Frankenhausers among us and all
over the place. All we have to do
is listen to them with an open ear.
not with pre-set Muscovite
musical opinion, which no less a
giant than Igor Stravinsky could
not tolerate either.
It seems to me that once the
political schizophrenia goes, so"'
too will the artistic snobbism.
The Community Relations
Committee resolution of the
Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration emphasizes the practical
realities of the theories I have
here set forth. Dr. Joel Sandberg,
chairman of the South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry, has
observed that "Soviet authorities
have recently instituted an in-
tensive and virulent campaign of
anti-Semitism ... At this critical
time, support of Soviet-American
cultural and athletic exchange'
could be interpreted as condoning,
such repression."
This says it all.
AND SO, when a temple series,
when the University of Miami,
when the Florida Philharmonic,
all with their eyes on our Jewish
culture vultures, feature the next
Soviet whiz, just stay home.
Absence, an empty concert hall
or recital auditorium, will tell the '
Soviets that we understand their
tactics well enough that we
will not trade Jewish lives for the
mystique, of^ Muscovite
musicality. Forget their wheat
deals with us we keep ringing
the cash register at their box
offices, too. Once the ringing
stops, they'll get the message all
right.
GB AND OPENING
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NATHAN R. LESSIN, D.M.D.
announces the relocation of hi* office for the practice of
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5904 Qkttmdak <$each 791-0121


ky, January 27,1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
feBRUARy Community Calendar
II organizational and congregational
publicity must be mailed to:
rcommunity Calendar," Jewish Fed-
ation of South Broward. 2838 Holly
ood Boulevard, Hollywood, Fla.
13020.
the deadline for the March calendar
moon, Feb. 14.
WEDNESDAY"
Mai B'rlth Women, Twin City Council,
Regional workshop, 7:30 p.m.,
K'ashlngton Federal, 480 N. Park Rd..
^^'""'^THuPsbAV
-IEF Quadomaln Women's
Hvlslon, luncheon, California Club,
) NE 195 St.. North Miami Bch. Call
1-8810.
------------ SATURDAY
-i-IEF Pacesetters Dinner, Diplomat
Hotel, 3915 South Ocean Drive. Holly-
food Call 921-8810.
SuNGAy
chnlon, South Broward Chapter,
theater Party, Donation S5. 2:30 p.m.
allandale High School, 720 NW 9th
\\, Call 925-1315.
nple Solel, Adult Education Com-
nlttt'i'. "The Jewish Family" with
ir. Mervln Verblt. 7 p.m., 5100
(it-ndan St. Call 989-0205 or 987-4985.
JA IKK Clifton Apartments.
IEF Hallandale Jewish Center.
-IKK Imperial Towers.
IEF Beach Plaza Apartments.
MONDAY
WEDNESDAY
I'nat B'rlth Women, Golden Chal
Luncheon, fashions with music by
Saks Fifth Avenue, 11:30 a.m.,
Konover Hotel. Miami Beach. Call
| 963-3458
I'nal B'rlth Women. Aviva Chapter,
I membership tea. 8 p.m.. 3190 N. 34th
| St.. Hollywood. Call 961-8168
nal B'rlth Women. Tova Chapter.
Irnembership tea. 8 p.m.. 3328 Park
fRd Call 962-8424
SUNftAY
nencan Jewish Committee. Broward
phapter. breakfast. 9:30a.m., Temple
Emanu-EI
[A-IEFQuadomain
lA-IKF Hemispheres
[AlKKTemple Israel of Mlramar.
lA-IKF Diplomat Towers
f A-IKK Golden Bav Towers
IA IKK Galahad Court
lA IFCFLaMer
lA-IEKHollybrook
MONDAY
IA IE F Beacon Towers
TUESDAY
imple Beth El Sisterhood, luncheon
meeting, noon. Tobln Auditorium.
1351 14th Ave. Call 927-0876 or 454-
Mfl
lA IKKHIlIcrest
lA-IEF Shoshana Women's Division.
luncheon, noon. Call 921-8810.
IA IEF Suburban Coffee. Women's
Division. 8 p.m.. 4901 N. Slst Ct..
-lollywood.
fSB Executive Committee Meeting,
7:30 pm, 2838 Hollywood Blvd.,
lollywood. Call 921-8810.
WEDNESDAY
Coffee. Women's
4920 Jefferson St.,
JAIEF Suburban
Division, 9:30 a.m.
Hollywood.
[A IEF Suburban Coffee, Women's
division, 8 p.m.. 4401 Sanders St..
riollywood.
WBBBSC
|gdal Yam Hadassah, Sea Air Towers
spter, meeting and film, 13:30
l.m Sea Air Towers Social Hall. 3725
'. Ocean Drive. Call 456-5128
nal B'rlth Women, Tova Chapter.
Iieetlng with drawing for color TV, 8
"B., Hollywood Federal, 4eth and
erldanSt. Call 966-9S43.
EF Suburban Coffee. Women's
(vision.9:30a.m.,3400 N. 32nd Road.
Bllywood.
Sunday"
IEFTemple Sinai
1EK Temple Solel
IEF Temple Beth Shalom
'IEF Aquarius
I IEF Galahad South
|A IEF Presidential Towers
A-IEF Desoto Park
lA-IEF Golden Sails
1A-IEF Malaga Towers
gA-IEP Olympus
MONPAV
fclmlon. South Broward Chapter,
inch and card party. $8 donation,
toon. Galahad North. 3001 S. Ocean
pr. Call 456-0269
TUESDAY
glywood Hadassah, Sabra-Scopus
roup, membership meeting.
Peaker, Dr. Robert Green, noon,
Sisterhood Hosts
benefit for Blind
J The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
V. Hollywood, is having a
Nsert and card party for the
Ifiefit of the Service to the
pid, on Tuesday, Feb. 28 at
Ipn, in the Tobin Auditorium.
In0/. tickets "nd reservations,
V\ Mrs. Rea Finn, Mrs. Esther
ipern. or the Temple office.
Washington Federal. 450 N. Park
Road. Call 961-0889.
CJA-IEF Suburban Coffee. Women's
Division. 9:30 a.m., 4850N. 33rd Ct..
Hollywood.
CJA-IEF Golden View
CJA-IEF Emerald Hills Apartments /
Townhouses / Villas
Hadassah. Hallmark Group, meeting,
noon, 3800 S. Ocean Drive. Call 456-
7767.
CJA-IEF Suburban Coffee. Women's
Division. 8 p.m.. 2001 N. Slst Ave.,
Hollywood___________________________
23
THURSDAY
Group, dinner-dance and show, 7:30
p.m., Konover Hotel, 5445 Collins
Ave.. Miami Beach Call 962 3999 or
961-0889.
27
WEDNESDAY
CJA-IEF Suburban Coffee, Women's
Division, 9:30 a.m., 4860 N. 37th St.,
Hollywood.
B'nai B'rlth Women, Aviva Chapter.
speaker, Al Golden. 8 p.m..
Washington Federal. 450 N. Park
Road. Hollywood. Call 962-1777 or962-
3138.
CJA-IEF Suburban Coffee. Women's
Division. 9:30 a.m.. 4931 N. 35th Ave..
Hollywood
2T
u SUNDAY
CJA-IEF Temple Beth El
CJA-IEF Parker Plaza
CJA-IEF Hallmark
CJA-IEF Avant Garde
CJA-IEF Lake Point Towers
27 MONDAY
SATURDAY
Hollywood Hadassah. Sabra-Scopus
American Jewish Congress. Hollydale
Chapter, book review, noon. Galahad
Court. 3801 S. Ocean Drive. Holly-
wood. Call 454-7254.
21 TUESDAY
Hallandale Jewish Center, Men's Club,
review, 8 p.m., 416 NE 8th Ave.,
Hallandale Call 454-9100.
CJA-IEF Suburban Coffee. Women's
Division. 9:30 a.m.. 1141 NW 89th
Terr.. Pembro e Pines. .
CJA-IEF Galahad North. Women's
Division, luncheon, noon.
CJA-IEF Fairways Apartments
JFSB Board of Directors, meeting. 7:30
p.m., 2838 Hollywood Blvd., Holly-
wood. Call 921-8810.
I
bllywood Hadassah, Hlllcrest Group.
speaker. Dr Sam Meline. noon. Hlll-
|crest Playdlum. Call 963-0566.
allonal Council of Jewish Women.
[Hollywood Section, book review by
|Mrs. Louise Flannery, 12:30 p.m.,
(Temple Sinai, 1201 Johnson St. Call
[923-4286.
?omen's American ORT, Estates.
I meeting, 7:30 p.m., De Anza Estates,
I 3300 N. State Rd 7. Call 966-0978.
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(Miami takes Or t ladlam Rd Neit lo Puhii. and Ecletds). Miami. Ph 558 5500 aVU PLAZA MOfftac
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Ph 626 57f n CTTT MAU- 400 N Law Bred 1 Federal Hwy (Between I M f*Ms 1 Sears) N Palm BeKh
Ph I4413SI

- ^ .


T-
Page 14
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Friday, January 27, 1978
Scholarship Council of Histadrut to HostLunch
The newly-formed North Dade
- Broward Histadrut Scholarship
Council will host a luncheon on
Wednesday, Feb. 1, at the Reef
Restaurant in Fort Lauderdale,
announced Abe Dolgen and Dave
Silverbush, chairmen of the
group formed to provide scholar-
ships for needy children in Israel.
Ben Sella, the new labor at-
tache of Israel's embassy in
Washington, D.C., will be the
guest speaker. Sella, who was
raised in the United States.
settled in Israel in 1947 and spent
11 years as a member of a kibbutz
in northern Israel.
IN 1960, he was a labor adviser
to the Ghana Trade Union Coun-
cil and Ministry of Labor and
later served as first secretary and
labor attache for the embassy in
Tokyo.
A ma I. a documentary film
showing young Israeli boys and
girls, Jews and Arabs, preparing
for lives in the Israeli economy,
will be shown.
'The Distant Shores" will
perform a program of Hebrew,
Yiddish and English songs.
The Histadrut Scholarship
Fund, since its establishment in
1957, has provided more than
60,000 scholarships to under-
privileged children of all back-
grounds in Israel.
TICKETS and reservations
can be made by contacting Nat
Lacov.
NORTH DADE-BROWARD
p.
v>,
I
AJCong. Takes Out After Cults
ic :".S"'-.<-
4
-1
NEW YORK Young people
or parents who wish to bring suit
against religious cults for im-
prisonment, breach of contract,
violations of child labor laws and
other illegal activities will be
assisted by the American Jewish
Congress under a new program
launched in response to growing
concern in the Jewish community
about cult activities and their
effects on impressionable young
people.
The new Committee on Cults
will be chaired by Harold Becker
of Flushing, N.Y., corresponding
secretary of the AJC and a leader
of Jewish community affairs in
New York City.
IN DESCRIBING the pur-
poses of the committee, Becker
said:
"The American Jewish
Congress is strongly committed
to religious freedom as guaran-
teed by our Constitution. But
some cults recruit and retain
members through tactics that are
clearly in violation of basic civil
liberties.
"One of our primary functions
will be to provide legal assistance
to young people or their parents
who seek redress from the courts
for illegal actions by religious
cults.
"We are enlisting lawyers
across the country to serve as
volunteer attorneys in this liti-
gation," the AJC leader said,
surge of activity by religious cult
groups and the response in the
Jewish community, the American
Jewish Congress has noted that
both the cult groups and those
individuals and groups who have
been injured by their activities
have frequently sought
assistance from the courts and
from legislative bodies and other
government agencies.
"We have concluded that this
essentially legal aspect of the cult
problem should be closely moni-
tored, with a view to possible
participation by Jewish
organizations, where appropriate,
in both court cases and legis-
lative and executive action.
He said the Congress would
gather information on illegal
activities involving the cults and
report to the Jewish community,
with particular emphasis on:
Bills pending in the state
legislatures and local legislative
bodies dealing with cult activity
in any form;
Investigations of cult ac-
tivities by legislative com-
mittees, state attorneys general
and other official agencies;
Other proceedings involving
cults conducted by official
agencies, such as tax authorities;
and
Court cases.
OTHER functions of the com-
mittee, he noted, will be to
consult with Federal officials on
investigating illegal cult ac-
tivities, and to prepare an in-
formational bulletin on matters
affecting the activities of cults.
In considering the recent surge of activity by religious cult
groups and the response in the Jewish community, the
American Jewish Congress has noted that both the cult
groups and those individuals and groups who have been
injured by their activities have frequently sought
assistance from the courts and from legislative bodies and
other governmental agencies.
The North Dade-Broward Histadrut Scholarship Council in
eludes (from left) Irving Gordon, executive director of the Israel
Histadrut Campaign of South Florida; Nat Lacov, executive
vice chairman of the scholarelup group; Nathan Erhch,
treasurer; and charter chairmen of the Histadrut Scholarship
Council Dave Silverbush and Abe Dolgen.

(DOME TO THE
BILLION DOLLAR
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IN HOLLYWOOD.

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i
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We*ve got a lot to celebrate.
American Savings recently passed the billion dollar
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loan associations in the United States.
What's more we've just finished remodeling our offices
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able to offer you the same outstanding service in even
more pleasant surroundings.
Just stop by at either office and you'll receive a free
gift. A handsome collection of Americana
Documents, suitable for framing. These include
The Declaration of Independence, The Constitution,
The Monroe Doctrine, and others.
It's our way of celebrating. Also a way of saying,
"Hello. It's good to see you.
And while you're here, you can choose from a wide
selection of beautiful gifts if you open a certificate
account for $1,000 or more.
The American Savings offices in Hollywood.
Where your savings have always earned the highest
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something to celebrate.
One gift per family, please.
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HoDywood Office: 113 S. 17th Avenue, Hollywood 33020 Phone- 920-6085
t Hollywood Office: 100 S. State Road 7. W. Hollywood 33023 Phone: 981-8700
111 QfUitinH^I 1d(-iSuutai Im C.ik I_"l-__I.
West HoBywood
, rearral Kef
18 additional locations in South Florida
Aaaetaei niMn m iMha aifan.
I MMrrru ptaaM} a naatrae) far earl; nhd r.i horn aat m i> rartaWaw
the MMl Govemmenl Aiwrm IUhmm a l *.!:..__
> rMem khiiim.a mil ama a) a reaatraa rar can; Kaaraalrrwaaat la.iaocertaWato
Your Mvaujs nsured lo M0.000 by an Afency ol the federal Government American Savvaji & Loan Auonalion ol Flondi
ESLIC
The Committee on Cults will
work in conjunction with the
Commission on Jewish Life and
Culture of the AJC, whose .................................,.........:. ,.-. .. ,,,..;
c


[January 27, 1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
mm

Ask Abe
By Abe Halpera
up si ion: I am a faithful reader of your column
11 am waiting patiently for your answer to the
iwing question. I quote from the Book of
fesis, Sedra "Vayyechi," chapter 50, verse 2.
lid Joseph commanded his servants the physi-
is to embalm his father: and the physicians
palmed Israel." According to verse 26 Joseph
i also embalmed. I was of the opinion that em-
ling was not permitted in the Jewish religion.
Irving S. Kelson
Hollywood, Florida
Answer: Most commentators and biblical
lolars agree that in reading Scripture the foi-
ling two points have to be taken into con-
feration. 1( We cannot take a single sentence or
Vase out of context. It has to be considered with
at precedes it and what follows. 2) We should
isider as a frame of reference the time period of
Particular event being described and the culture
customs prevailing in that part of the world
tiat time.
acob died in Egypt approximately in the year
B.C.E. The time period is more than 265
lars before the Exodus and Revelation at Mt.
Liai, approximately in the year 1236 B.C.E.
[JOSEPH was the viceroy of Egypt, second
lly to Pharaoh. Out of respect for Joseph, Jacob
as mourned by the Egyptians for a period of 70
ays. (Genesis 50:3)
1 Jacob charged his children to bury him in the
lave of Machpelah where Abraham and Sarah,
iaac and Rebekah were buried. He also reminded
$s children that he buried his wife Leah in the
ve. (Genesis 49:29-32)
Following the mourning period, Joseph re-
eived permission from Pharaoh to take Jacob's
Ddy for burial in Canaan, and the children did as
lacob had instructed them. (Genesis 50:12,13)
, THE EMBALMING of Jacob therefore should
le understood under the circumstance of the ne-
cessity of moving the body and the prevailing
Egyptian customs at the time.
Following are several commentaries with refer-
rice to the embalming of Jacob.
According to a commentary by Rashi on Gene-
sis 50:2, the embalming reference in the text re-
ers to the use of aromatic oil, ointment, perfume
knd spices.
(VERSE) "2. To embalm his father. Not in imi-j
tation of the custom of the Egyptians, who took I
care to preserve the body after death and keep it I
ready for occupation by the soul. Joseph's pur-
pose was merely to preserve it from dissolution
Dtore it reached the Cave of Machpelah."
(Soncino Edition of the Pentateuch and Haf-I
torahs edited by Dr. J. H. Hertz, p. 188)
Samson Raphael Hirsch, in a lengthy explana-;
tion of this part of Genesis, points out that the j
Egyptian custom of embalming also included
wrapping the bodies with bandages. He further j
points out that the Egyptian custom of the em-
Palming process shows a marked contrast to the I
ideas expressed by Judaism.
To the Egyptians, the body was embalmed and
preserved so that its individuality should persist.
The soul did not remain in its personal individu-
ality, but wandered from body to body even to
animal bodies in manifold metamorphosis.
TO THE Jew the soul persists, the body wan-
ders; once the soul has gone home to the circle;
where it belongs, the body has nothing more to do |
with the individual.
The Egyptian believes in the wandering of the
soul and tries to protect the body from wandering
or change. The Jew believes in an eternal personal
existence of the soul and hands the body over to
material earthly change.
Furthermore, Jacob made Joseph swear not to
bury him in Egypt to avoid the Egyptians mak-
ing a god out of his body. The preserving of mum-
mies in Egypt usually resulted in making the
body into a god and praying to it.
"EMBALMING was, accordingly, not Jewish,
and Joseph here may only have made a conces-
sion to the Egyptian customs as they would have
considered an omission as showing a great lack of
piety." (The Pentateuch Translated and Ex-
plained by Samson Raphael Hirsch. vol. 1, Gene-
sis, pp. 679,680, 681)
Editor's note: Please send all questions to:
ASK ABE
c / o Jewish Federation of
South Broward
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood. Fla. 33020
jligious Directory
NORTHBROWARD
EMPLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100 W. Oak
land Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Thillip A. Labowitz. Cantor Maurice
" Neu
Watergate Night for Israel Set Feb.2
Plans have been finalized for a
Night for Israel to be held
EMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive. Reform (44)
IMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
|7th st Conservative. Rabbi Israel
immerman. (44 A)
MIRAMAR
AEL TEMPLE. 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Drazln.
Cantor Abraham K ester (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
IMPLE BETH EMET. 200 NW
^ouglas Rd. Liberal Reform. David
Goldstein, ed. dir.
EMPLE IN THE PINES. 9139 Talt St.
[Conservative. Rabbi Bernard I.
IShoter. (63)
PLANTATION
LANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
ITION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi
ISheON J.Harr (64)
ICONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA
IGOGUE.7473NW4thSt. (69)
participated in the synagogue
choirs. They have organized a
musical ensemble of retired
musicians that perform mainly
for nursing homes, institutions
for the blind and other similar
groups. They are members of
Temple Beth El in Hollywood.
Raff is a private investigator for
area law firms.
Mickey Freeman, American
Jewish humorist, will be special
guest. Watergate Women's Club
President, Ruth Spivack, is
assisting in the arrangements.
HALLANDALE
ALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Carl Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob Dan
iziger (12)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
INAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
101 ne 22nd Ave. Retorm. Rabbi
Bhulkes. (37)
HOLLYWOOD
ETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 62nd
Ave Conservative. Rabbi Max Land-
nan. (47B)
|TH EL TEMPLE. 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. Assis
ant Rabbi Jonathan Woll. (45)
|TH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601 Arthur
it. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Kaiavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
NAl TEMPLE. 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi Paul M. Katl,
pabbi Emeritus David Shapiro.
Cantor Yehuda Httlbraun. (65)
IMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.,
Hollywood, Fla. 33021. Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Robert P. Frazln.
Cantor Bruce Malln. (47C)
PUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
fi Stirling Road, Oaks Condomlni
En- Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe Bomzer
ABE RAFF
Thursday. Feb. 2 at 8 p.m. at the
Watergate Israel Bonds Com-
mittee.
In making the announcement,
Irving Jacobs and Harry Alcoff,
chairmen of the event reported
that Mr. and Mrs. Abe Raff will
be recipients of the Israel
Solidarity Award.
THE RAFFS, former residents
of North Bergen, N.J., were long-
time members of Temple Shaarei
Zedek and Beth El where they
CANDLEUGHTING
IEVITT
memorial chapols
1*21 Pembroke Rd.
Hollywood, Fla.
S24-M97
Sonny Levitt, F.D.
13M5W. Dixie Hwy.
North Miami. Fla.
MMJ1S
w
0
TIME
5:41
19 SHE VAT-5738
BOULEVARD CHAPELS
100 SOUTH DIXII HIGHWAY
Mat on HaMaotata <> *>*
HALLANDALE. FLORIDA 33009
The Only Family Owned
Jewish Funeral Horn*In
reward County.
We observe the oemplete
tradition ot
Chevra Kvod Hmet
TBL:3M-S-m*
Donate* Laaaroa. UF J>.
T
At the recent Temple Beth El Israel Dinner of State, Owen
Lewis Wyman (right), president of the Temple Beth El
Brotherhood, vice president of the temple and its Israel Dinner
of State chairman, presents the United Jerusalem Award to
Alfred Golden (left). Jewish community leader, as Rabbi
Samuel Z. Jaffe (second from left), the congregation's spiritual
leader, and Mrs. Wyman, look on.
Hollywood JCC Schedule
MOVIES
FEB ] WEDNESDAYS, 1 p.m.
Gertrude Stein When This You See, Remember Me -A portrait of
the author, hostess and art collector
FEB. 8
Showboat with Howard Keel and Kathryn Grayson
FEB.IS
Go Ida Meir
FEB. 22
Merrily We Roll Along narrated by Groucho Marx
LECTURES
FEB. 2 THURSDAYS, 10:30 A.M.
300 Years of American Art. Lecture and slide presentation. Mrs.
Alice Seligman.
FEB. 9
Birds of South Florida, presented by Audubon Society
FEB. 16
Street Crime. Hollywood Police Department. Crime Prevention
officer, Dawn Miller.
FEB. 23
Morning Sing-Along. Bob Brown and his accordion.
-
Bill
wiij
ASK YOUR
RABBI ABOUT US
JOHNSON-FOSTER
FUNERAL HOME, INC.
1650 HARRISON ST. HOLLYWOOD, FLA. PHONE: 922-7511
Paul J. Houlihan,
L.F.D.
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
Jempte Betk 6
Wemotiat
CjazcUns
The all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beau-
tifully landscaped, perpetual care, rea-
sonably priced.
For information call: 920-8225 or writ*:
"~TEMPLE BETH El. /?.**:"--
13SI S. 14th AVE.-HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA33020
fleas* *nd mt literature on the above.
NAME: _________________________________________________

ADDRESS.
PHONE:
in
J -
_vv


Page 18
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wooa
Friday, January 27
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT. JAN. 28th
AT All PANTRY PRIDES FROM
FT. PIERCE TO KEY WEST
* VOU MAY PURCHASE ONE OR All STARRED
ITEMS WITH A $7 ORDER OR MORE OF OTHER
ITEMS EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
SXVK.'M.T"0
FOR AllYOURIAUNDRY
Era
Detergent
'16-OZ.
BTL
UMIT TWO BUS WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF *7 OR MOII
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
PANTRY PRIDE All TEMPERATURE
Blue no
Detergent ?.*.. OT
SAVE 30'
SALAD DRESSING
Miracle
{ Whip
32 OZ
JAR
IIMII ONE JAR WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF S OR MORE
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
PANTRY PRIDE
Instant
DrVMilk 10.o'x$2
S049
fig*
\ suci. '.
M
SAVE 20*
YELLOW CLING
iFyne Taste
Peaches
HALVES
OR
SLICES
' LIMIT ONE CAN WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF S OR MORE
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
PANTRY PRIOE
Assorted
"ull,:u HOC! ft,
Napkins OT
SWK.W0?11
??n FYNE TASTE
Sweet
\ Peas
-16-OZ.
CAN
> LIMIT THREE CANS WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF S7 OR MORE
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
SUNSHINE PEANUT iUTTER
Sugar
Wafers........m
1 79'
\ SAVE 16*
PLAIN OR SELF RISING
Gold Medal
\ Flour
lJ BAG 3 Zf
UMIT ONE BAG WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF S'OR MORE
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
DOUME STUFF
Nabisco a ah
Oreo Cookies XV 89 c
PRICE REDUCTION
usda Choice
Beef
Assures You of Tenderness
NATURALLY TENDER US CHOICE HEAVY WESTERN BEEF
THAT'S BEEN SPECIALLY SELECTED FOR TENDERNESS 4
FLAVOR. AND EVERY PACKAGE IS DATED FOR FRESHNESS I
YOU'LL FIND THE SAME TOP QUALITY IN OUR POULTRY
AND PORK.
FRESH VALLEY USDA CHOICE BEEF ROUND
BUY ONE
GET ONE
free:
PIUS
DEPOSIT
REGULAR OR DIET
8 PACK 16-OZ. BUS
.Pepsi Cola
or Mountain Dew
UMIT TWO DEALS WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF $7 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES.
Btm. Round Steak $15?
FRESH VALLEY USDA CHOICE BEEF LOIN fc^-^rfcrt
Porterhouse Steak 2 LB
Breyers
Ice Cream.wt?.^
AIL FLAVORS
EXCEPT
8169
1
HALF
GALLON
U.S. OOVT. INSPECTED KUBBMD SHANK PORTION
FRESH VALLEY USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK
UNDER
BLADE
U.3. WV 1. iHJriviiUBiuiPini/ *..#-... -- .- -_ ^^^
Smoked Hams lb o9c
id MP PORTION.....I n.99''
__ __ Oft QQ FRESH VAUEY USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BNIS. a-. .
Pot Roast Jl*9 Shoulder Steak *P9
SLICED _* _-
Beef Liver 69c
FRESH VALLEY USDA CHOICE
Beef Loin
Sirloin Steak
GROUND
99
k CHOICE!
Beef Chuck
7-Bone Steak
FRESH VALLEY
USDA
CHOICE
89
INDIAN RIVER SEEDLESS
White Honey
EASY TO PEEL SWEET EATING
AICI 110 till!
Beef Chuck *$109
FRESH VALLEY USDA CHOICE BEEF ROUND
Rump Roast *169
GRADE A QUICK FROZEN NON- BASTED (10-20-LB. AVG.) -.
Young Turkeys lb o9c
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Lots O'Chicken ,.45c
3 BREAST Q1RS. W BACKS 3 LEG QTRS. W BACKS 3 GIBIET PKGS
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH ^
~ c
Grapefruit 5 i'.49e Tan|erine810-89c Fryer Quarters lb
PICB *OUt OWN MOV A lOO.I DlSPlA'
GARDIN fRISM CUSP IID
Radishes 2.3,29*
HRM. MM salad StZI .*,
Tomatoes O Jowt
CRUNCHT I, MSM GtllN
Peppers......................... 39*
"nc 'OUI OWN no- loom o.%> >
ACOINOI lUtTHNUT ill
Squash..........................t. 1 5^
-Oirt OWN GARDEN IRISH
Fla. Carrots 2 mg45*
BEAUtlf UllY ARRA*
Bouquet
U AvOt'Ul A NUII
Carolina Yams 3 sl
SUN ClANI o:
Raisins 1 3 Sill 79*
iiiilllni.,
HUM REFRESHINGS^ (gj, j
BlatzCfr
Beef ar
BEAUtlf ULIY ARRANGID IRISH fLOIAL
$1 39
UNCH I
HAvOtlul A NUTRIIIOUS
IS 01 $1
CANS
Cherry ^ I Yellow
Tomatoes n49c Onions 3tfo49c
Beans 3
.'OKI VAN CAMP
SPANISH
Rice 3 ass M
PANTRY PAID! INStAN! BRIAKIAST
IN THE BAKERY
HIT i IACMI WHtAT Ol
PANTRY PRIOE SLICED MEAT OR 1 -IB. PKG.
Rye Bread 5ft 39*
1
J4-OJ $ I 49
Peach Pie
"Nil- PR 101 OAINTT
Dinner Rolls 3 5w*l
BeefBologna99
Orange Drink ',"..' 89*
PANIRV 'IIDf G.APIF.UM PACK
Juice O c.ns # ?
Tomato Sauce5/ 9 5
NI 'AMI WNOU MRNIl
. i m i Jg i6o; $1
T cans
Corn
FiNllY PRlOt mi* ir
Meat"?ranks 7A'69* Vegetables 3 .'iXM
AMERICAN KOSHIR MIDGET
OR
PANIRT PRIDI COFFII
Creamer Tff*!19
0/\ T jT_J MrM! ON TWO PKGS
Pantry Pride Lightly Salted
Gr. AA' Butter
S.i_m; w" uoz$129
UlQml BOlOGNA RKG I 'TNI TASTI STRA WRIRR
BRIAHSIONI S FRINCH
Onion Dip
IN
QUARTERS ^ ^ KKli
* LIMIT TWO PKGS WITH OTHER PURCHASES OF
$7 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES.
IN OUR DAIRY CASE
Tropicana Pure
Orange Juice ?8&\
HALF
ION
99
M Preserves 2 % 99
* *OAMT LIQUID DISH
Detergent ".,?' 49{
Franks or Knocks *119 mwwiioiiiiioh miii
miMHMANN>mi io oi cun^ t Light Bulbs 2o. 79*
Margarine S OD'
PAMTIT rilOl COlOltO AA1IIICAN
Singles !S?.r99<
OSCAI MATH ,.oi CHU.
Braunschweiger 59*
SIA SNACK Shrimp
Cocktail 3S-59*
IAND OriOST StlCIO SMOIID
Meats..?!.2 Jio\95*
All "... II1IWUISI I It. G
J
p anir y PRIM HAL CHAM
Topping
"Nil > MIDI CINNAMON
7-OZ.
..CAN
69*
Loaf tS.99*
SERVICE appetizers
, ,, AVAIIAHI ONI Y A I SlOtIS HAVING IHVICI
m r-t m^tl eOc AUIUNCMMIAI1CHHH1|ICI010 00
Cream Cheese-,?o' 59* DONSF|RST
Cookie Break VJ? 99*
FROZEN-SARA LEE
Pound Cake
99c a
BRAD* 'aim. PROIBN
Fruit Medley
1 INDUS FROZEN IN A
Bagels 6*39*
voz.
PKG.
95*
SIABROOK PROZIN INTIRNATIONAL
1BOZ QQ(
'"osHinRiootro'/.-oi pro) "B^ a
Biscuits w/w-aff-W" Farmer Cheese 55* IXOaSt Oeet
IIAI1I11 CHIPS DI1IOHI CHIISI _^ -^. on
Buttermilk US 79* Spread 2 S,l ^&$099
Grated Cheese *149 Sour Cream
pumi MM ana Nttr nim
Half & Half &.451 Cream
59*
SLICED
IO OU '
OIDII
RICH'S ALL WMUI MIA1
Vegetables...........
PARISIAN FAR IASI TAMiTIAN
Crumb Cake _5S 89*
BRAOT 'AIM1 'IOIIN
Rhubarb '^ 59*
LB.
MORION FROZEN
RANfRT RRIDI WHIRRING
Turkey Roll r.'99*
Fried Chicken2.lo'.$2
29
IN OUI FIOZIN SIAFOOD CASI
CO( SWWT S FAANKIIN HIONUHII AII|ICBIP>
58 Hard Salami 52 69* Fish Portions St*!"
J"Vt^HIIGHMOllMII QUANTITIES NONE SOLD TO DIALUS NOT MSPONSIUE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
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W**m WDUCIID'ROMRIG RRlCI |
12-02 BOX AUVARIITIIS I
TENDER
cou.'.ON VITTLES
C ON EITHER ITEM
PRICE REDUCTION
CUSIOMM
CAT FOOD
I
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| COUPON
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15-11. IAC
ALSTON PURINA
DOG CHOW
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