The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00188

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewish IFlaridliai m
Volume 8 Number 1
umd Sfcofor of Of of t Holly wood
Hollywood. Florida Friday, January 13. 1978
Price 35 Cents
VIEW FROM ABROAD
EEC Still in World of its Own
So Far as Middle East is Concerned
7
By HERMANN BOHLE
Der Tagesspiegel
Every six months, delegations
of the nine EEC countries and of
the 20 Arab League nations meet
alternately in Europe and in the
Middle East for a European-Arab
dialogue.
Last year's second meeting
which began in Brussels on Oct.
26 I the previous meeting took
place in Tunis), will bring the
first decisions on model projects
on a modern economy to be
financed through an already
established Euro-Arab fund. The
EEC provides DM8 million and
the Arab League DM 35 million.
AMONG THE recipients is
above all Somalia whose govern-
ment r*>cently authorized the raid
on the skyjacked Lufthansa
Boeing 737 in Mogadishu, in the
course of which the hostages were
freed by the GSG-9, a special
anti-terrorist unit of the German
border police.
Only a few weeks earlier, the
EEC Commissioner for Third
World issues, the Frenchman, M.
Cheysson, had spent two hours in
discussions with Somalia's head
of state, Maj. Gen. Barre, in
Mogadishu.
The representative of the 13-
niember Brussels Commission
was the first prominent West
Kuropean ever to be received by
Gen. Barre. It is an open secret
among EEC pundits that the
climate between Europeans and
Arabs has changed.
THIS COULD have been a
contributing factor in facilitating
cooperation with the Arabs in
connection with the skyjacking
incident (including South
Yemen's refusal to harbor the
terrorists whose release was to be
coerced in exchange for the
hostages).
The Arabs continue to exert
pressure on the EEC to lend the
European-Arab dialogue, which
centers around economic co-
operation, a political dimension.
The Brussels talks will again
revolve around the establishment
of a "political concertation com-
mittee." The Arab objective in
this connection is to achieve
closer coordination in the policy
vis-a-vis the PLO. The EEC has
already embraced the following
fundamental principles in a
number of official statements:
It recognizes Israel's right to
live with its neighbors in peace
and within "secure and recog-
nized borders";
The settlement policy where-
Continued on Page 12
Joseoh Sisco Featured Speaker
CJA-IEF Pacesetters
Dinner Set for Feb. 4
Ambivalent Feelings
Stress Evaluaior
Sensed Tensions
In Sadat Vows
By THOMAS PARKER
Human minds were not
the only instruments
evaluating President
Sadat's momentous speech
to the Knesset on Sunday,
Nov. 20, 1977. For the first
uator, to uncover the
degree of mental tension
and strain in the Presi-
dent's voice.
This same machine
the PSE has been in
ISRAEL SCENE
time, the Israeli press used
an American machine, the
Psychological Stress Eval-
i\ew York Mayor:
lie's Charismatic
extensive use for several
years in the United States
by insurance companies,
private detective firms and
university research teams.
It measure electronically
human voice waves with a
precision and frequency
much higher than the capa-
Continued on Page 12
The Pacesetters Dinner
of the 1978 Combined Jew-
ish Appeal Israel Emer-
gency Fund campaign,
sponsored by the Jewish
Federation of South Brow-
ard, will be held at 6:30
p.m. Saturday, Feb. 4 at
Hollywood's Diplomat
Hotel.
The $1,000 minimum
family commitment annual
dinner is expected to bring
more than 700 South Brow-
ard Jewish communal
leaders together to pledge
both moral and financial
support for Israel in its
search for peace, and to
hear Joseph Sisco, former
Undersecretary of State for
Middle Eastern Affairs,
discuss the latest situation
in that part of the world.
DR. STANLEY Margulies,
1978 CJA-IEF general campaign
chairman, explained that even
though Israel is on the threshold
of peace, "it will be quite awhile
before we expect to see concrete
results of the current talks. In the
meantime, the Jews of the world
must unite to back Israel at this
important time. If we come
together as one, the Jewish State
will fare better in the current
peace talks," he noted.
Federation President Lewis E.
Cohn said that the Pacesetters
Dinner is an important beginning
to the 1978 effort to benefit world
Jewry, including the Jewish com-
munity in South Broward.
"At the Pacesetters Dinner we
JOSEPH SISCO
have total community involve-
ment, at every level, dealing with
Jewish life around the world. We
will not only raise record
amounts for Israel, but also for
Jews in this area who depend on
us to support Jewish agencies
which oversee educational,
cultural and community relations
programs.
n i
I
I
Following is the Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel Emer-
_ gency Fund calendar of
events:
. Jan. 19-
Women's Division Galahad
J South luncheon
Jan. 22 -
Park Place Brunch
Wellington Towers Brunch
I Jan. 24-
Fairways Riviera Brunch _
L.-.-.-.-.-.J
CJA-IEF
Calendar
i
i
i
By BERNARD POSTAL
Back in the 1960s, before
Fdward Koch began to think of
running for mayor of New York
City, he was asked why the
world's greatest Jewish city had
never had a Jewish mayor. To
which Koch quipped, "Why
should we torture a nice Jewish
hoy like that?"
What he meant was that the
mayoralty of the nation's biggest
city is not only the fourth most
important elective political office
in the land (topped only by the
presidency, the vice presidency
and the governorship of New
York), but also one of the
toughest, often the most thank-
less, and, historically, the elective
office so full of economic and
social pitfalls and problems that
it has become a political dead end
for everyone who ever held it.
MARIO CUOMO, the man
Koch beat for the Democratic
mayoralty nomination last
September and again in the
election, was not really being
anti-Semitic but just clumsy
when he said during the primary
campaign that if Jewish voters
chose a candidate on the basis of
religion rather than merit, "I
Lou and Rose Koch, resi-
dents of Sunrise Lakes in
Broward County, are the
parents of New York City
Mayor Ed Koch.____________
think it will be bad for the Jews,
because everything that goes
wrong with the city, they'll say.
Continued on Page 6
Kraemer To
Address Women
Phyllis Kraemer, president
of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward's Women's
Division, will speak to the
hostesses of the Hillcrest
Women's Division CJA-IEF
luncheon, on the latest situ-
ation in the Middle East, and
her recent experiences
visiting Israel, Rumania and
the USSR.
She will address the
gathering at the home of
Elaine Gaines on Monday,
Jan. 23, in preparation for
the Hillcrest WD. CJA-IEF
luncheon on Jan. 30.
Hillcrest Women to Launch 78 CJA-IEF
The Women's Division of Hillcrest will of-
ficially launch their 1978 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund campaign at a
luncheon celebrating the 30th birthday of the
State of Israel at noon, Monday, Jan. 30 at
Hillcrest Country Club. The multi-million dollar
CJA-IEF humanitarian campaign is sponsored.
The Jewish Lifeline
30 tearsof Partnership
in part, by the Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
"The women of Hillcrest have traditionally
been strong supporters of Israel and the needs of
world Jewry and we are confident that this, our
fourth annual CJA-IEF effort, will set all
previous attendance records," noted Hillcrest
Women's Division Co-chairmen Alice Berezin and
Eleanor I.erner.
LERNER EXPLAINED that Israel will
have stronger negotiating power in her quest for
peace if world Jewry stands firmly behind her.
"Now is the true time for testing." she said, "to
see if we can raise more money in a peace search,
than we did while fighting wars in the Middle
East. American Jewry, especially the large
number of Jewish women in Hillcrest, must
support world Jewry in her greatest hour."
"In addition to the great needs in Israel and
for Jews around the world, we must remember
that the needs are also great right here in South
Broward." explained Berezin. "We must continue
to support the many Jewish agencies and their
educational, cultural and community relations
programs so important to our precious Jewish
heritage."
Guest speaker at the luncheon will be Jeanne
Daman, a World War II heroine who rescued
thousands of Jewish children from the Nazis.
i


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 13,1978
Son of Soviet Activist To Speak Be fore CRC
Alexander Slepak. son of
Soviet Jewish refuseniks
Vladimir and Maria Slepak, will
speak to a full meeting of the
Jewish Federation of South
Browards Community Relations
Committee at noon, Thursday.
Jan. 19.
Slepak arrived in Israel in early
November and is now in the
United States to speak on behalf
of his family and other Jewish
activists still detained in the
Soviet Union.
DR. JOEL Schneider, chair-
man, and Joyce Newman, co-
chairman of the CRC, stressed
the importance of this meeting
and urged all committee mem-
bers to make a special effort to
attend.
Slepak has served various
prison sentences in the USSR for
emigration-related activities
along with his father. He was
permitted to leave the country in
October. 1977 to rejoin his
Vladimir Slepak
Panel Discussion
For Chai Lodge
The Chai Lodge of B'nai
B'rith will hold a general
meeting at 8 p.m. Thursday,
Jan. 26 at Washington
Federal Savings and Loan.
According to Dr. Steven
Schachter, president, the
program will include a panel
discussion with the topic,
"Do We Really Understand
Our Teenagers?"
Panel moderator will be
Dr. Rosalyn Horowitz, a
psychologist; with panelists
Dr. Paul Winik, Mrs. Shirley
Cohen, youth director of
Temple Beth Shalom, and
Rabbi Casreal Brusowankin.
"Wives are inv.ted to
attend the meeting," noted
Dr. Schachter.
RELGO, INC.
Religious Goods, Gifts,
Boohs i Records
1507 WASHINGTON
AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH
532-5912
Attention Mstectomee Women:
Visit "New Woman of Florida, a
Mastectomee Boutique" Largest
collection of full coverage swim
suits (852) Sleepwear
Loungewear with our exclusive
new Bra less Prosthesis. 16752
N.E.4thCt.,N.M.B. (305)651 7885
CONTINENTAL
JANITORIAL CORP.
"let The Professionals
Do The Job"
home cleaning,
rug shampooing,
window cleaning,
floor waxing.
Insured* Bonded* References
Offices Homes
Condominiums
Free Estimates:
987-9498
*-.
American wife Elaine. At the
same time, his younger brother
Leonid refused induction in the
Soviet Army in Moscow and
faces a possible trial and prison
sentence.
Alexander Slepak (right), with brother Leonid and mother
Maria.
Dr. Weiss-Rosmarin To
Appear for Annual Lecture
Dr. Trude Weiss-Rosmarin.
editor of The Jewish Spectator.
author and lecturer, will appear
at the fifth annual Charles
Doppelt Memorial Lecture on
Sunday. Jan. 29 at Temple Beth
El in Hollywood, at 8 p.m.
Dr. Weiss-Rosmarin was born
and educated in Germany. She
holds a Ph.D. in Semitics with
philosophy and psychology as
minors. Her thesis on the earliest
history of the Arabs, as recorded
in the Cuneiform Texts, was pub-
lished by The Society for
Oriental Research." Among her
books are Judaism and Chris-
tianity: The Differences; Jewish
Survival; Religion of Reason;
The Hebrew Moses, and the
Jewish Expressions on Jesus.
Chapters of her books and many
of her essays are printed in
anthologies and in translation.
AS EDITOR of The Jewish
Spectator, she has made a unique
impact and continues to influence
and shape Jewish thought and
life. Her editorials are widely
quoted and the Rabbinical
Assembly of America, at its 75th
Annual Convention, adopted a
resolution referring to Dr. Weiss-
Rosmarin as the "only
responsible voice" and con-
cluding that "the American
Jewish community owes Dr.
Kosmarin a vote of thanks for her
warnings" on the damage in-
flicted on Israeli-Diaspora
relations by an absence of ac-
countability.
She is a consistent exponent of
Jewish survival. She participates
in cultural programs at colleges
and universities, and is a Scholar-
in-Residence under Jewish
auspices. I>ong before women
were ordained as rabbis, she
spoke from the pulpits of Con-
servative and Reform congre-
gations at Friday evening and
Sabbath morning services.
She is the only layperson who
has lectured for the Jewish
military communities of the U.S.
Army upon the invitation of the
Chaplain of the Seventh U.S.
Army.
ALTHOUGH there is no
charge, admission will be by
ticket only, which is available
through the Temple office. The
public is invited.
i Congressman Burke Honored
Florida Congressman J.
Herbert Burke of Hollywood has
been presented the Distinguished
Citizenship Award by Pinecrest
Preparatory School's Institute
for Civic Involvement in Fort
Lauderdale. Mindy MacCauley,
chairperson for the Institute's
Board of Advisors, presented a
plaque to Congressman Burke
during a ceremony in the ICI
auditorium.
Burke told the gathering of
students that civic involvement
is the most important thing you
can do in your lifetime" and that
the most important involve-
ment you can get into is helping
your neighbor help himself.
BURKE is a veteran
Congressman and was a former
Broward County Commissioner
before going to the Congress.
Florida Congressman J. Herbert Burke of Hollywood (left)
receiving award from Mindy MacCauley.
Post Haste Shopping Center
4525 Shendon St., Hollywood, Flo
Phone 961 -6998
Personal Service Book Store
Since first applying in 1970,
the entire Slepak family has been
under watch of the Soviet KGB
(secret police). Both parents, dis-
missed from their jobs, have
signed numerous petitions on
behalf of Jewish activists
Refused emigration permits
because of alleged secret work,
Vladimir Slepak has admitted
that his work has long ago
become obsolete.
Women's Vanguard Lunch
To Launch 1978 Campaign
The Jewish Federation of South Broward Women's
Division will launch their 1978 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund campaign with the $500 minimum com-
mitment Vanguard Luncheon at noon. Wednesday, Jan. 18,
according to Phyllis Kraemer, Women's Division president.
Kraemer said that the guest speaker at the fund-raising
event will be Jeanne Daman, who is a World War II heroine who
personally rescued thousands of Jewish children from Nazi
terror.
RUTH RODENSKY and Bobbe Schlesinger are co-
chairmen of the Vanguard Luncheon. They are looking forward
to a record attendance of women who realize their moral and
financial commitment to the Jewish people.
Anyone who has not yet made a reservation for the
Vanguard Luncheon may do so by contacting Reva Wexler at
the Jewish Federation of South Broward.
**
TORT LAUDERDALE 776-6272
TAPES BUSINESS FORMS
CARTONS .TAGS-LABELS
HANGERS BAGS -BOXES
WIPES POLYETHYLENE
HROWARD 1201 N E 4SlhST
APER 4 F0RT LAUDtROALE
ACKAGING Fl0RIDA 33334
For generations
a symbol of
Jewish tradition.
At Riverside, our reputation is based
upon our assurance of service that f ulf i I Is
the high standards evoked by Jewish
tradition.
It is for this reason Riverside is not
represented by any other funeral director
in Florida.
Today, each of Riverside's chapels
serving Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
counties is exclusively a Riverside Chapel,
staffed only by Riverside people who
understand Jewish tradition and honor it.
And in that tradition we serve every
family, regardless of financial
circumstance.
HOLLYWOOD:
2230 Hollwood Boulevard/920-1010
SUNRISE:
1171 Northwest 61st Avenue(Sunset Strip)/584-6060
North Miami Beach,Miami Beach,Miami and
West Palm Beach.
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan area.
Riverside
Memorial Chapel. Inc./Funeral Directors.
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
* Ml.t*J Hr-1 !*? H1-13-71.


Friday, January 13, 1978
The Jewish Floridian and Sho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
college Youth in Support of Israel Sharansky to Remain in Jail
i
Joyce Newman (rear), co-chairman of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward's Community Relations Committee, listens as
Morris Amitay (left) discusses the rise of Arab propaganda on
college campuses when local university youth gathered at the
Federation sponsored seminar during the holiday vacation.
4!***.
%
^OFStf^
&
'
i*
I

U \
In a move believed to be
almost without precedent, the
Soviet authorities have extended
by six months the pre-trial deten-
tion of Anatoly Sharansky, the
29-year-old Jewish mathe-
matician arrested in March.
Under Soviet law, the max-
imum period of pre-trial deten-
tion is nine months. However,
when Ida Milgrom, Sharansky's
mother, went to Moscow's
Lefortovo prison to seek his
release as provided in the
statutes, she was informed of the
extension by the polite.
ON THAT day. the Supreme
Soviet of the Russian Federation
approved a six-month extension
of Sharansky's pre-trial detention
on the application of the public
prosecutor.
Last March, Sharansky was
accused by the Soviet govern-
ment newspaper Izvestia of
spying for the Central Intel-
ligence Agency. He is being
investigated on charges which
cover treason under Article 64 of
the penal code. These carry a
maximum penalty of death on
conviction.
After Sharansky's arrest.
President Carter said that an
inquiry had not revealed any link
between Sharansky and the CIA.
BY THEIR move, the Soviet
authorities can delay a trial of
Sharansky until after the end of
Kibbutz Experience
Offered by IID
A family kibbutz living ex-
perience in I srael is being offered
by the Israel Information Desk of
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward. in celebration of the
30th anniversary of the founding
of the Jewish State.
According to Yossi Netz, IID
director, the program is unique
because it enables an entire
family to live on a Kibbutz and
become part of the whole kibbutz
experience.
THE kibbutz program begins
in July and is planned for 35
days, which includes 21 days of
kibbutz living and working,
seven days traveling, two days of
an Israel seminar and four free
day9.
Further information can be
obtained by contacting Yossi
Netz at the Jewi>h Federation of
South Broward.
r*
"Politics of the Middle East"
at Temple Beth Shalom, Jan. 19, 7 9 p.m.
TEAAPLE AFFILIATION IS NOT A REQUIREMENT. Z
| FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT DR. REISMAN AT THE JEWISH
- FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD, 921-8810. =
1 SPONSORED BY THE JEWISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD, |
i CENTRAL AGENCY FOR JEWISH EDUCATION OF MIAMI AND THE =
5 COOPERATING TEMPLES: TEMPLE BETH EL, TEMPLE BETH EMET, TEMPLE s
| BETH SHALOM, TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIRAMAR, TEMPLE IN THE PINES, i
a TEMPLE SINAI AND TEMPLE SOLEl. |
" III I IIJI III I III I I III I II I III II I I I III II lllllllll Hr
the Belgrade conference
reviewing the 1975 Helsinki
agreement.
With the change in timing, the
Soviet authorities evidently hope
to minimize the damage which a
trial of Sharansky might do to
American-Soviet relations.
His arrest represented a Soviet
reply to President Carter's
emphasis on human rights,
thereby showing that the Soviet
authorities regard such concern
as interference in their internal
affairs.
PRESIDENT Carter is re-
ported to have told Andrei
Cromyko. the Soviet Foreign
Minister, that a trial of
Sharansky could harm U.S.-
Soviet relations. Cyrus Vance.
Secretary of State, spoke in
similar terms to Anatoly
Dobrynin, the Soviet Ambas-
sador in Washington.
Some observers believe that a
trial of Sharansky at this stage
could jeopardize ratification of a
strategic arms limitation agree-
ment between Washington and
Moscow. They think that is why
the Russians wanted to postpone
legal proceedings against him.
arnett
anK
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
Marine Supplies
Hardware 1 Paint, Inc.
Housewares & Gifts
Home Decor
Patio A Dinette Furniture Bath Closet Shop
BEADED WINDOWS ROOM DIVIDFRS
WINDOW SHADES ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS
DRAPERY RODS FOLI AGE
WALLPAPER PLA"NTS
KEYS LOCK WORK PATIO FURNITURE
Store Hours: 7:30 o.m. 6 p.m. Closed Sunday
100 East Beach Boulevard
HaHandalt, Florida 33009
Phone 456-0566
\T
MK
^iC===^><===^i<====*KZ===Xt<===> At a second evening gathering sponsored by the Jewish
Federation of South Broward, nearly 70 students met Yuvall
Netzer (left), the consul of Israel at Atlanta, to discuss the
latest Mideast situation. The young people sang, danced, ate
Israeli food and viewed a film on the Palestinians in the Jewish
State. Yossi Netz, JFSB Shaliach, is at right. ___
- nm i mi i in mi mil in......111 in i.......iiiiii i c
10TH, 11TH AND 12TH GRADERS HAVE ANOTHER
| OPPORTUNITY TO ACQUIRE COLLEGE CREDITS WHILE
| STILL IN HIGH SCHOOL!
On Jan. 17 and 19 two courses will be offered:
"Literature of the Holocaust"
at Temple Beth El, Jan. 17, 7-9 p.m.

SADAT VISITS ISRAEL!
WHY NOT YOU?
DO IT THE RIGHT WAY-- THE EXCITING WAY-
THE PERSON-TO-PERSON WAY WITH THE
AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS
Learn how from BETTY WEIR ALDERSON
"THE LADY OF THE TOURS-
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 18-4:00P.M. THURSDAY, JAN. 19-7:30P.M.
HOLIDAY INN WEST TEMPLE SINAI OF NORTH DADE
5100 N. State Rd. 7 18801 N.E. 22nd Ave.
Fort Lauderdale N.M.B.,Fla.
Help us celebrote 'he 20th Anniversory of our Overseos Tour Program
Join us for Birthday Cake & Coffee
Reservations required, write or call 576 4330 (Oade)
(Free admission) 763 81 77 (Broward |
Mrs. Terry FeMman
c/o AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS 4200 BISCATNE BLVD., MIAMI, FIA. 33137
(I) (We) will be delighted to attend the discussion of the American
'j Jewish Congress Overseos Program
"1
X
YES,
NAME
ADDRESS.
CITT____
_ STATE.
TELEPHONE NO:
THERE WILL BE.
.MEETING PUCE.
ZIP
X
i
______________________________Of US (NUMBfl)
..^P I ll|fr';< II I I I fl
HH WH'i'",MW- MW MM WN Hh UK tJ


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 13, 1978
The New Settlement
The Begin government's decision to establish eight
new settlements in the northwestern Sinai peninsula will
certainly have an unsettling effect in Washington and the
Arab capitals on the peace negotiations currently un-
derway between Israel and Egypt.
These Jewish National Fund settlements follow on
the heels of other such JNF-engineered para-military
settlements on the West Bank and. from a U.S.-Arab, let
alone Egyptian point of view, raise questions with respect
to just what Prime Minister Begin means when he talks
about vacating the Sinai or bringing the West Bank into
the framework of a Palestinian entity as steps toward the
achievement of peace.
Actually, these questions are gratuitous. The fact is
that Egypt's President Sadat has been raising the ante on
his Mideast peace package ever since his historic
presentation before the Knesset in Jerusalem last
November not in the sense that he has been adding
demands for concessions, but in the sense that he has
become increasingly inflexible as a spokesman for
Palestinian interests.
During his appearance in Jerusalem, while he no
doubt made pointed reference to these interests. President
Sadat's major emphasis was on resolving the conflict
between Israel and Egypt as a primary and fundamental
building block for peace in the Middle East.
On the other hand. Prime Minister Begin's response
to Sadat's Knesset talk was predicated on principles he
has enunciated for years principles that finally gave
him the Prime Ministership in his stunning victory last
May: Judea and Samaria [Biblical, not West Bank, which
is contemporary Palestinian jargon) are not expendable.
Neither are certain areas of the Sinai peninsula.
The reasons for Sadat's growing intractability are
obvious: his desire to reestablish himself as leader of the
moderate Arab camp hence his hedging on the more
modest scope of his intentions in Jerusalem last
November.
But the new Sinai and Judea-Samaria settlements
should startle no one. They are consistent with what
Menachem Begin has stood for all along.
Report from Histadrut
The Israel Histadrut Foundation gathering on Miami
Beach only hours after the historic Dec. 25 meeting
between President Sadat and Prime Minister Begin in
Ismailia was an inspiring occasion.
In the form of a Solidarity Festival, the gathering
gave added impetus to the American Jewish community's
determination to be united with Israel in this, the most
fateful hour of her history, when every concession she
makes toward peace must be weighed in the balance
against a future security liability.
Israel Ambassador Simcha Dinitz" presence gave
added significance to the function, and his ringing
declaration that "We are prepared to sign peace
agreements with each and every one of the Arab countries
neighboring Israel right now" brought deserved applause
from the gathering and reiteration of its solidarity with
Israel's decisions in the search for a Mideast peace.
South Florida is especially fortunate that Dr. Leon
Kronish, national board chairman of Histadrut, is also one
of its distinguished spiritual leaders. Through his report
to the community, the distance events on the shores of the
Mediterranean were made as clear as if they were oc-
curring right here on the shores of Biscayne Bay.
Passing of Miriam Sirkin
The loss of Mrs. Miriam Sirkin on the eve of the New
Year impoverishes all of our merriment. Not only was
Mrs. Sirkin active in a broad range of civic and Jewish
communal causes, but her efforts extended to national and
international endeavor, as well.
The community will remember her as a great and
good friend even in areas where her major activities, one
would have thought, would leave her little time to par-
ticipate.
To list them all here would be fruitless. It would, in
fact, take the faciUties of a telephone directory to do that.
As well, the specifics could not possibly add to Mrs.
Sirkin's distinction.
For it was the enthusiasm of her talented leadership
that will make us all miss her, not simply the names of
causes or the multiplicity of her interest.
Jewish Floridian
and SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood Office -128 8. Federal Hwy.,1 Suite208 Oanla, Fla. 33004
Telephone 020-9018
MAIN OFFICE and PLANT .120 NE 6th St.. Miami. FU J3132 Phone STS-0B
FRED K. SHOCH SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
Executive Editor
The Jewish Floridian Don Not Guarantee The Kashrut*
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Ita Column*
Published Bl-Weekly
Second Class Postage Paid at Danla, Fla. 861600
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly
Met..ber of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate, World
wide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association o
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (local area) One Yeart7.S0.Otit of Town Upon Request,
Books?They're for Burning
JEWS ARE known as the
Nation of the Book, no doubt
because of our relationship to the
Bible and our nurturing of that
relationship through many mil-
lennia of torturous stewardship.
Out of this unique role has
come another the Jewish pre-
dilection for books generally, and
for education generally, although
our stunning successes in the
non-theological word, in the fields
of non-theological literature and
academic scholarship, are
relatively recent, in fact as recent
as the Haskalah itself.
And for good religious reasons:
we have been enjoined from
making graven images and from
using our sacred language for
profane purposes. It took us a
long time to get around these
prohibitions to move from the
world of the Yeshuvnik to. say.
the world of Franz Kafka.
IIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIII
Leo
Mindlin
SsiMI N
ALL OF which is germane to
my own childhood memories of a
house chock-full of books in many
languages Hebrew. Yiddish.
Russian. English. German and
of the reverence I was taught to
hold for them.
Over the years, in my own
home, our library has grown by
leaps and bounds. It is nowhere
near as exotic as was my father's,
being mainly in English and. as
the Haskalah has ordained,
mainly non-theological, but it is
far more voluminous.
What is worse, books are
space-consuming, and the more
of them you get, a member of the
Nation of the Book or not, the
more you begin being plagued by
perverse dreams about how
relieving it would be if only you
could make a gift of them to some
worthy institution.
No, not all of your books, of
course. Just some of them.
A FEW years ago, in just this
selfless spirit of wanting to share
our heritage with others. 1
packed up a dozen or so cartons
and dropped in at the college
library. Would they send a truck
around to pick them up? There
was in those cartons, I assured
them, some very valuable stuff.
It would be a boon to everybody,
including the Foreign Language
Department.
The librarian, a fellow pro-
fessor and old curmudgeon,
shrugged. Bring 'em by. if you
care to. and we'll take a look-see.
Generally, we don't care for gifts
of books."
But 1 don't have a truck." I
complained, shocked at his indif-
ference. "How can I bring them
by? It's not just a few paper-
backs I'm talking about. And
what do you mean, you don't care
for gifts of books? What's your
stock-in-trade here anyway,
vacuum cleaners?"
THE HELL with him. I
thought. What can you expect
from goyim anyway?
I promptly made a rapid
mental survey of the Jewish
institutions that wquld jump at
my books thrift shops, aged
homes whose residents were
simply dying for something
worthwhile to read, hospitals
with libraries for their patients,
synagogues, youth centers. The
possibilities were endless.
My first call was to a thrift
Continued on Page 11
m
Problem of Single Jewish Parents
Friday, January 13,1978
Volume 8
5 SHEVAT5738
Number 1
Last September I found a New
York Times editorial stating that
one-third of the. nation's children
are being raised by only one
parent difficult to believe. But I
also had problems accepting the
astonishing statistic of Jewish
poverty when that was first
revealed several years ago and
events have proved how accurate
that was.
L^termined to discover for
myself how real this was among
American Jews I have been
convinced by investigation, as
well as by colleagues in syna-
gogue administration and other
knowledgable people, that there
is indeed a problem of no small
dimension for us as Jews and as
human beings. I do not have the
resources for a statistical study
so I am pleased that the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation has
developed a questionnaire on
single parent families in the
synagogues of the area which
indicates a determination not to
avoid this problem any longer.
BUT IT is an uncomfortable
fact that only about 30 percent of
Miami's Jews are affiliated with a
synagogue. A goodly percentage
of them are older persons without
dependent children which is
really what the Federation's
and the synagogue's present
concern is all about. How does
one reach the unaffiliated, those
who for many reasons, but too
often economics (the report of the
Carnegie Council on Children
shows that one-fourth to one-
third of all children live under
conditions of poverty) do not
belong to a synagogue? This is a
Edward
Cohen
problem that the Jewish com-
munity must address itself to if it
is to survive Jewishly. And
without too much delay.
In those areas where children
are to be found in statistically
viable numbers, there is little
question that Greater Miami has
a substantial number of single
parent families. One congre-
gation with a mixed urban-sub-
urban membership accounts for
20 percent of its substantial
Religious School enrollment in
that category while others range
from 10 to 15 percent. Admit-
tedly, many of these children
represent a financial burden on
congregations which are finding
themselves less able than for-
merly to handle the cost of
educating even those Jewish
children who come to their doors.
How many are turned away can
only be guesswork, for no syna-
gogue will admit to such a harsh
procedure while at the same time
setting up psychological barriers
of rejection.
Some Federations throughout
the country have begun, in a
small way, to recognize that,
since most Jewish education
takes place in the synagogue,
there is a responsibility for the
community to assume some of
the burden represented by those
unable to pay their way. More
pertinently, it is a matter of com-
munity self-interest and survival
as a Chicago Federation poster
headlines: "Jewish Education
It's For Life."
LAST September the Chicago
Federation through its Syna-
gogue-Federation Relations
Committee (whatever did happen
to Miami's?), announced the
creation of the "Federation Edu-
cation Encouragement Fund." It
is a modest fund, beginning with
815,000 to be made available to
families, based on their financial
need, in stipends of up to $200,
toward Jewish educational fees.
"The program," according to the
announcement, "is aimed at
involving families with syna-
gogue life through the intro-
duction of their children to
Jewish education in the syna-
gogue of their choice" (italics
mine).
I am convinced that, at this
time, those who need the most
help in this area are single
parents (nearly all of them
women) whose incomes do not
permit them the "luxury" of
paying even a small amount for
the Jewish education of their
children. Granting that some
synagogues could do better than
they are, the over-riding fact is
that this must be a total com-
munity commitment if it is to
succeed in the mitzvah of helping
these women in their search for
Jewish roots through, the Jewish
education of their children.


Friday. January 13. 1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
1\
Bakke Case Pros and Cons
Topic of Forum at Beth El
ORGANIZATIONAL SCENE
"The Bakke Case" will be the
subject of a forum to be held
Thursday, Jan. 26 at 8:30 p.m.
under the sponsorship of the
American Jewish Committee.
The no-admission forum will take
place at Temple Beth El in
Hollywood.
Judge Morton L. Abram, who
has served on the Broward
County Court since its inception,
and is presently completing his
second term as the president of
the Conference of County Court
Judges of Florida, will be the
moderator for this program.
Judge Abram also is a past
president of the American Jewish
Committee, Broward chapter.
PRESENTING the pros and
cons of the Bakke case are two
Fort Lauderdale attorneys.
W.George Allen and Andrew 1\
Mavrides. Both men are Doctors
(it Jurisprudence. Allen has
received the Meritorious Award
from Florida A\ M University
and has been in Who's Who in
Black America. Mavrides has
been the chairman of the Brow-
ard County School Board and
serves on the Human Rights
Council at the South Florida
Slate Hospital.
Joseph Kleinnian. president of
the American Jewish Committee,
said We are most fortunate to
have such outstanding gentlemen
present the opposing views of
i Ins (ontroversial case to the
people of Broward County. We
hope that by presenting this
forum the public will gain a
greater understanding of a most
complex situation."
This is an open meeting and
i he public is invited without
charge For further information
call the American Jewish Com-
mittee office in Broward.
Beth El Men's Club
Named to Receive
Achievement Award
The Beth Kl Men's Club of
Hollywood has been named
recipient of the Jewish
< hautauqua Society's annual
\( hievement Award for 1976-77.
The Men's Club also will
receive the Achievement Award
ol the National Federation of
Temple Brotherhoods INFTB)
for 1976-77 for service to the
temple, adult education, youth
activities. membership, con-
tributions to regional brother-
hood activities and community
relations and activities.
Owen L. Wyman, president of
the Men's Club, will accept the
DeWald Baum plaque, given to
the Jewish Chautauqua Society
Achievement Award-winner in
the large club category, and the
Ixniis Fein plaque, given to the
NFTB Achievement Award-
winner in the large club category.
in addition to the NFTB
Programming Award for 1976-77.
Judge Morton L.
Abram
W. George
Allen
*
EXPERT SOFER
WSI1ING COMKCTING AND CMCKMGSill*
TOBAH "UIN Mf 2UZA ANO AISO ANV
Htufwjanra
Wl BUY AM) Sill NIW ANO USO
SIFfl lOtAH
Rabbi Yakov Gurin
540 WASHINGTON AVE, MB.
672-4223
NCJW Spotlights Tie to Israel
More than 100,000 members of the National
Council of Jewish Women in 200 cities nationwide
will celebrate NCJW Week Jan. 8 to 14. Theme of
the celebration is "Hand-in-Hand in Israel,"
announced Esther R. Landa, national president.
Meanwhile, more than 400 delegates to NC-
JW's Joint Program Institute will meet in
Washington from Jan. 16 to 19 for a session on
"Social Policy and the Changing Family." The
function will culminate with the presentation of a
major award to Congresswoman Millicent
Fenwick (R., N.J.) and Elizabeth Holtzman (D.,
N.Y.) for their achievements in the field of
women's rights.
The American Jewish Congress has urged the
Civil Service Commission to scrap a plan to
require federal employees and job applicants to
supply data about their race, ethnic background
and sex.
Naomi Levine, executive director of the
Congress, in a letter to Alan K. Campbell,
chairman of the Civil Service Commission, said:
Such information on application forms facil-
itates deliberate, unintentional discrimination.
We are by no means persuaded that such dis-
crimination is no longer a problem."
Unbeatable Rates!
On Savings Certificates
8.06%
7.79'/'
6.98/-
6.72/,
5.92%
Annual Yield
U Minimum term 6 yrs. Per Annum
Minimum deposit SL.000
Annual Yield
U Minimum term 4 yrs. Per Annum
Minimum deposit SL.000
Annual Meld
U Minimum term 30 mos. Per Annum
Minimum deposit S1.000
Annual Meld
II Minimum term 12 mos.
Minimum deposit $1,000
Per Annum
Annual Meld
U Minimum term 3 mos.
Minimum deposit $1,000
Per \nnum
7.75%
7.50%
6.75%
6.50%
5.75%
A .ub-.tantial interest penall\ is required lor early withdrawals from
all certificates of deposit. Interest compounded daily.
Ask us about special rates for
certificates of $100,000 and over.
5.25
Savings Accounts
today
per annum, interest compounded from day of deposit
of withdrawal. (5.39% Annual Yield) Minimum deposit of $50 to
earn interest. Withdrawals can be made any day without loss of interest.
ASSETS EXCEED Sm.OW.OOO
LOW RATE FIRST MORTGAGE LOANS
Main owe*
1701 M1di*n Avonua
Phone 674-6612
CORAL OABIES
520BiMmoreWay
Phone- 444-6071
HOLLYWOOD
450 North Park Road
Prior*: 9S1-9192
AVaw*
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SSHBW
and
2321 NE W*tt SttMt
Pr*oo 940-3975
WEST PALM BEACH
47e60k*hoooel.
Phono: 686-7779
(Oponmg Soon)
Morton Towr
1S0Q Bay Road
Phon: 673-8308
1133 Normandy Oriva
Phona: 674-6663
BAY HARBOR ISLANDS
1160KahConcowrM
Phona: 889-4344
BOCA RATON
899 E. PatmaQo Park Road
Phono: 391-6903

Www at tfla**


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 13, 1978
i
New Mayor's Charismatic Competence
Continued from Page 1
yeah, there's that Jewish
mayor.' "
Lots went wrong in New York
City during the administration of
Abe Beame, the Big Apple's first
Jewish chief executive. He got
lots of blame and plenty of brick-
bats but not because he was
Jewish.
So Ed Koch went after the
mayoralty, fully aware of the
political headaches that went
with the job. and he won it
against three opponents, Cuomo,
the Liberal Catholic, who had
been beaten in the first primary
and again in the runoff for the
Democratic nomination; Roy
Goodman, the Republican, and
Barry Farber, the Conservative,
the latter two of whom are both
Jewish.
FOUR YEARS ago when Koch
made his first tentative stab at
the mayoralty, he said that if
nominated and elected, the Jews
of the city "are not going to get
more because I'm Jewish, but
they are not going to get less
either. I'm not going to take a
back seat because I'm a Jew." He
meant it then and he means it
now that he's become the second
Reform Jews Campaign
For Full Rights in Israel
board of trustees to enable an ap-
plication to be filed in sufficient
time to appoint delegates for the
1978 World Zionist Congress
being held in February in Jeru-
salem.
IN THE discussion prior to the
adoption of ARZA, a number of
people including Rabbi Alvan
Rubin of Temple Israel, St.
Louis, and Morey L. Sear of New
Orleans, led the opposition to the
establishment of the Zionist af-
filiate.
They introduced a substitute
resolution which would have
urged the UAHC Assembly to
intensify its campaign for reli-
gious rights in Israel, but not
through the creation of the Zion-
ist affiliate. Ther substitute
resolution was defeated.
SAN FRANCISCO (JTA)
Reform Judaism launched a
major drive aimed at achieving
its full rights and recognition in
Israel by establishing a Zionist-
affiliated body through which
Reform Jews in the United States
and Canada may participate
directly in the policy-making
process of the World Zionist Or-
ganization.
The action overwhelmingly
adopted by a "jubilant" 54th
biennial General Assembly of the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations (UAHC) establishes
the Association of Reform Zion-
ists of America (ARZA) and
Kadima the Canadian Council
of Reform Zionists.
LEADERS here indicated that
the Reform movement will now
for the first time have an effective
voice within world Zionism, thus
challenging the dominance en-
joyed by Orthodox Judaism since
the inception of Zionism 80 years
ago. Heretofore. Reform Jews
have participated only as mem-
bers of other Zionist organiza-
tions.
Commenting on this. Rabbi
Roland B. Gittelsohn of Boston.
ARZA chairman, noted that
while Reform Jews have played a
leading role in building the main-
taining Israel, the voice of
Reform Judaism has never been
present in an organized fashion;
while the decision of the WZO
does not directly affect Israel's
internal policy, its deliberations
are regarded with extreme sen-
sitivity by Israeli policy-makers.
Rabbi Alexander M. Schindler,
UAHC president, told the 3,500
delegates, "We want to have an
impact on the quality of life in
Israel and to intensify its Jewish-
ness. We seek not to politicize
Reform Judaism, but to spir-
itualize Zionism.
HE THEN firmly declared,
"We will fight an altered Law of
Return as if there were no prob-
lems in Washington; and we will
fight for Israel in Washington as
if there were no efforts to change
the Law of Return."
The principles that motivated
the establishment of the Reform
Zionist-affiliated bodies were
adopted last June by UAHC's
(blNEINFRANCI-!!
Save iIr ,ik tare
COMPLETE DINNERS From S5.95
'IKo'-c of appetucr Hoye oloj.
Mem Course 'ith vegetable 4 po-
loto Desert and CoMec.
OPEN 5:30 PM 7 DAYS A WEEK
Jew elected mayor of New York.
Son of Polish immigrants,
Koch was born in the Bronx in
1924, was raised in Brooklyn and
now lives in a rent controlled
apartment in Manhattan's
Greenwich Village section. When
his father's modest fur business
failed during the Depression, the
family kept going by running a
cloakroom concession in a
Newark catering hall.
Ed rose before dawn to travel
to City College from Brooklyn,
worked nights as a delicatessen
counter man and helped out
weekends at his family's Newark
business. An NYU Law School
graduate, he was a combat in-
fantry rifleman in Europe during
World War II. His first elective
office was as president of the
Young Israel of Flatbush Center
in 1948.
IN 1963 Koch created his first
political stir by defeating Car-
mine de Sapio, then leader of
Tammany Hall, for the Green-
wich Village Democratic district
leadership. To show it was no
fluke he did it again in 1964 and
1965 as one of the two heads of
the Village Independent Demo-
crats. In 1966, Koch was elected
to the City Council, the first
Democrat to win in the 2nd
Councilmanic District in 38
years.
Two years later, Koch was
elected to Congress from what
was then the 17th Congressional
District of New York (the so-
called Silk Stocking district
formerly represented by John V.
Lindsay who gave up the seat to
run for mayor, the first Democrat
to win that seat in 31 years.
When he entered Congress, he
gave up his law practice and has
never accepted fees or honoraria.
In Congress, he lined up with the
anti-war forces and earned a
reputation as one of the hardest
working liberal freshmen. He won
reelection easily in 1970, 1972,
1974 and 1976.
KOCH IS NOT the kind of
liberal who tilts at windmills but
one who succeeded in making
alliances with the House leader-
ship to translate his causes, such
as. mass transit aid, privacy and
home health care, into law.
He was a vigorous foe of the
Arab boycott of Israel before it
became a popular issue. Years
before the big rush of Soviet
Jewish immigrants to the United
States. Koch was involved in per-
suading the Attorney General
and the Secretary of State to
agree to allow substantial
numbers of Soviet Jews to enter
the country under the Attorney
General's parole authority.
The Jewish Week
VMMWMM/fMm
v/amwsn
SfWba/tcfo's
(xhWl selection oj trie jinest to 3iadm opeciafttes
Qucfecn ^tsfc Q^ad
cfo/t fjiose uio p/tGfJc/t steafe oj coutee
iM. wiwetteg oj tome made pasta
cAfla carte take out onftj
Compete dinne/ts onftj (dining /loom)
^DtiweAs: Sun.-9W 4-10 9T. fi Sat 4-11 Cfosed gTues. 987-6626 JXvomk. Sffowda 39029
I
i
N ^^>-^V^M^K^V^X^K^H^K^^^^?V<^V^^t^K^K^ \^i
fttvtia'o ReoUuwucl
& Cocktail JftuiKge
(Kiwi sf OiotioH Fud... Sine* 1946)
(COMPLIMENTARY GLASS OF WINE FOR EACH
MEMBER OF YOUR PARTY WITH THIS AD!)
FEATURING FAMILY DINNERS
WITH A VARIETY OF SPECIAL ENTREES
SEAFOOD-STEAK-VEAL'CHICKEN
WITH THE FINEST PASTA OF YOUR CHOICE
Owned & Opwded luj tke. Vwum Tamik
37 S Ffde.al Hw, HALUMMIi
Fm RuemuUtaju 456-4369
" STAGECOACH
i
For Dancing & Listening Pleasure
In The Coachman's Lounge
^e VESUYIANS
4 Fm;
0PCN 4 PM M 1 Ml
TNtsiay thru Sunday mmmmmm
4520 W. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Broward 961-0679 Dade 621-3020
| Come in end say Hello to Babetle' at om Friendly Bar
* OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK *
FEATURING EARLY BIRD SPECIALS
IN THE CARRIAGE ROOM
COCKTAIL
HOUR
DAILY 4-7 Ml.
Private
Parlies
Ua T. 100
Lunch r Dinner
Cuisine prepared by master chefs at a
sensible price ... opposite the Gull-
stream Racetrack on U.S. I.
Reservations (305) fl|S Federal Hwy. Hallandale
Anifi H an Kxpri's> V ih* Itmik
Ami'i'M .inl. Mtfiti'M'hiirK*'. ai-i r|H*-'l
Eat Like the Dickens.
A Tureen of Soup
Pickwick Salad
14 oz. Roasted Prime Ribs of Beef
Yorkshire Pudding
Baked Potato
Spinach Souffle or
Creamed Corn
Coconut & Cheese Bread
$8.95
also featuring
Ye Olde Confectionary Shoppe
English Tea & Curiousities Called Coffee
Seafood Bar* Pub
Oliver's is an I850's happening
lhai brings the London of
,. /> I Charles Dickens back to life.
ty'3 From the moment the Artful
Dodger parks your car and
starts you wondering whether
^r he'll sell it while you're eating.
you enter the immortal world of
Bo/. You'll be greeted and
seated by Nancy Sikes. Littfe
Nell or Kate Nickelby. served by the likes of Rosa
Dartle. Martha Cratchit. Lucie Mancttc. With Fagin
likely to be coming over to your table and niching a
watch or necklace; Ebenezer Scrooge admonishing
you not to leave too big a tip. At Oliver's, you dine in
the Fine tradition of Dickens' world, surrounded* by
his marvelous characters. And unlike Oliver himself,
you'll never feel you have to ask for more.
OL1VE.VS1
5^| HOJSIorl>IMI jrffi
Restaurant, Seafood Bar & Pub, at Runaway Bay 79th St. Causeway. Miami Beach, Fla. Rea: 865-1511
)
t



Friday, January 13, 1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
I
Federation Youth Tour a Success
A two-week college-age tour to Israel, sponsored by the
Jewish Federation of South Broward, has returned and was a
resounding success according to group leader, Dr. Richard
Corseri of Broward Community College.
The students were able to see the Jewish State through a
subsidy arranged by the American Zionist Youth Foundation
and the Israel Aliyah Center. They visited Tel Aviv, Jerusalem,
the Negev, the Golan Heights and Galilee areas.
They also climbed Masada, visited Jericho and Beer Sheva.
ISRAEL!!
from
Pictured are delegates who attended the Torah Seminar in New York.
Beth Shalom Youth Relate Bible to Present
.*
Temple Beth Shalom, Holly-
wood, has sent a delegation of 16
teen-agers under the supervision
of Shirley M. Cohen, youth co-
ordinator, assisted by Leslie
Wasserman, to a Torah Seminar
in New York.
The Seminarians are Marcie
Herman, Janet Bernstein, Jill
Bochakoff, Robin Haber, Leslie
Herzog, Douglas Kleiner, Roger
Robert, David Levitats, Laura
Matalon, Marcia Matalon, David
Meline, Debbie Meline, David
Sabra, Jodi Sabra, Wendy Rosen,
and Sabrina Wachtel.
THE TORAH Leadership
Seminar is an all-encompassing
encounter comprising sessions of
study and in-depth exploration of
the various Biblical sources and
resources. All this is then related
to relevant and present day
happenings. The Torah Seminar
is sponsored by Yeshiva
University.
The seminar leader is Richard
Joel. He is a graduate of Yeshiva
Quadonuun to Honor
Schors at Breakfast
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Schor will
be the recipients of the State of
Israel Solidarity Award at a
Salute for Israel breakfast to be
sponsored by the U'nai IVrilh
(Juadomain Chapter and B'nai
It'rith King David Lodge in the
Quadomain Social Hall on
Sunday. Jan. 22 at 10:30 a.m.
Heading preparations for the
event are Mr. and Mrs. Morris
Hollander, chairpersons. Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Allentuck and Mr.
and Mrs. Nat Sedley, co-chair-
persons, and Mrs. I-eah Frankle.
associate chairperson. Larry
Horn, American Jewish humor-
ist, will be guest entertainer.
University and is presently
assistant district attorney. The
staff of educators, counselors,
and directors consists of Rabbis,
professors, graduate and under-
graduate students.
Beth Shalom Youth is af-
filiated with the National Con-
ference of Synagogue Youth.
Many of the seminarians whc
have been sent this year attended
last year's seminar.
Ft. Lauderdale $1097.00
January 30, 1978 Departure
ESCORTED by Dr. Morton Malavsky
For Reservations & Information
call
Trans Olympia Tours Shalom Tours
1800 S. Young Circle
Hollywood, Florida
Miami 944-4879
*
Hollywood 925-8220
(DOME TO THE
BILLION DOLLAR
SOWINGS AND LOAN STARS
IN HOLLYWOOD.
I 1 / AMERICA* SAVWGS HOLLYWOOD BLVD. HOLLYWOOD FASHION CENTER d cc 1AJ 1 West Hollywood s
ff
HOllYWOOD
YOUNG
CIRCLE
iykust
5
9 ..
'\
XAHR1S0* ST
AMEMCM SAVINGS
AND RECEIVE A FREE GIFT
We've got a lot to celebrate.
American Savings recently passed the billion dollar
mark in assets making us one of the largest savings and
loan associations in the United States.
What's more we've just finished remodeling our offices
at Young Circle and in West Hollywood. So we'll lx'
able to offer you the same outstanding service m even
more pleasant surroundings.
Just stop by at either office and you'll receive a free
gift. A handsome collection of Americana
Documents, suitable for framing. These include
The Declaration of Independence. The Constitution.
The Monroe Doctrine, and others.
It's our way of celebrating. Also a way of saying.
"Hello. It's good to see you."
And while you're here, you can choose from a wide
selection of beautiful gifts if you open a certificate
account for $1,000 or more.
The American Savings offices in HollywcxxJ.
Where your savings have always earned the hjghesl
interest rales allowed by law. And these days, that's
Something to celebrate.
One gift per family, please.
ANNUAL YIELD
8.06%
7.79%
6.98%
6.72%
5.92%
5.39%
6 10 YEAR-
CERTIFICATE
4 YEAR
CERTIFICATE
2/3 YEAR
CERTIFICATE
1-2 YEAR
CERTIFICATE
90 DAY
CERTIFICATE
REGULAR
SAVINGS
$10 MINIMUM
INTEREST RATES
7.75%
7.50%
6.75%
6.50%
5.75%
5.25%
MINIMUM CERTIFICATE DEPOSIT $1000
\ll i iirniiiii.Hi..iis h.srd on Vi5 dail* uimpoundrd ini.mi
Mr. and Mrs. Abe Adler will
be recipients of the Israel
Solidarity Award at the
Carriage Hills Night for Israel
on Sunday, Jan. 29, 7:30 p.m.
in the Carriage Hills
Clubhouse. Harold Silensky is
chairman of the Carriage Hills
Israel Bonds Committee,
sponsors of the Night for
Israel. Eddie Schaffer, Amer-
ican Jewish folk humorist, and
soloist Eddie Klein will en
in.
AMERICAN W*
SAVINGS*
Whore people keep coming back for more.
Hollywood Office: 113 S. 17th Avenue, HoDywood 33020 Phone: 920-6085
West Hollywood Office: 100 S. State Road 7. W. Hollywood 33023 Phone: 981-8700
18 additional k>cations in South Florida
\... I exceeding one billion dollars.
By Federal Krgulanonv a substantial inlcml peaalls is rruiumf tof eari) ilMraal from an> sasinfs ctrtmcatc.
Your savinip. insured lo $40 IWObv an A||en.\ nlihe Federal (.memmenl Amen, an Saving Loan Aswhuihui ol Florida
....
fsiic
EBSH


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 13,1978
Jewish Side of Refugee
Problem Exposed
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) In an
effort to inform the American
public that the Middle East
refugee problem also has a
"Jewish side," the World Or-
ganization of Jews from Arab
Countries (WOJAC) is under-
taking a major campaign here to
mobilize activity for the cause of
Jewish refugees from Arab lands.
WOJAC's chairman, Morde-
chai Ben Porat, who is currently
a member of the Israeli Mission
to the United Nations General
Assembly, said in an interview
with the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that the issue of Jewish
refugees from Arab countries is
being discussed with American
officials, Congressmen, Jewish
leaders and representatives of the
media.
"WE WANT to reach a maxi-
mum number of Americans to let
them know that there are not
only Arab refugees as a result of
the Mideast conflict, but also
Jewish refugees. The only differ-
ence is that the Jewish refugees
were absorbed and integrated in
Israeli society, while the Arab
refugees were left to live in
misery by their Arab brothers,"
Ben Porat said.
According to Ben Porat, who is
a former Labor MK in the Israeli
Knesset, the issue of Jewish
refugees from Arab countries will
soon be discussed by the Confer-
ence of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations.
The issue also will be brought
before the United Nations during
this session of the Assembly.
"*I intend to present the sub-
ject myself based on my personal
experience," said the Iraqi-born
Ben Porat, who immigrated to
Israel in 1944 at the age of 21.
THE IMMEDIATE goal of
WOJAC here, Ben Porat said, is
to establish a public committee
on behalf of the organization that
will include well-known persons
Jews and non-Jews "who
are sensitive to the issue of
human rights."
The committee, he added, will
be responsible for informing the
American public about the exis-
tence of Jewish refugees from
Arab countries.
WOJAC represents more than
1,760,000 Jews from Arab
countries and their descendants
living in Israel today and other
countries around the world, Ben
Porat said. He pointed out, "Of
more than 850,000 Jews living in
Arab countries in 1948, only a
few tens of thousands now
remain in Arab lands," while as a
result of the 1948 war, 590,000
Arab residents of Israel departed
to Arab countries.
"Therefore," Ben Porat said,
"what has actually taken place in
the Mideast in this generation is
a de facto exchange of population
of the same order and mag-
nitude."
WOJAC'S major goals, Ben
Porat said, are: "that no nego-
tiations towards any settlement
in the area take place without
consideration of the rights and
claims of Jews from Arab
countries"; "that compensation
and reparations be granted to
Jews from Arab countries for
their suffering, loss of life, dis-
crimination and confiscation, ex-
propriation and destruction of
private and communal proper-
ty"; and "that the Arab coun-
tries restore all assets of spiri-
tual, cultural or religious signifi-
cance to their Jewish owners."
An international WOJAC con-
vention will be held in Washing-
ton next May, Ben Porat said,
adding that well-known Ameri-
can public figures had already
given their consent to participate
in the event.
WOJAC was established on
Nov. 24, 1975 in Paris. It is non-
governmental, non-profit and an
independent organization.
Jews in German City Complain Of
Increase in Neo-Nazi Activities
BONN (JTA) The Jewish
community in the north German
city of Hanover has officially
complained in a letter to the
District Attorney about a major
increase in neo-Nazi activity.
The incidents complained
about included regular Saturday
meetings of members of extreme
right-wing organizations in the
city's shopping center for
"agitation and distributing
provocative literature";
"disturbing" telephone calls to
members of the Jewish com-
munity; and repeated ap-
pearances of a group of men
dressed in black clothes with a
skull emblem which has created a
"state of fear."
A JEWISH businesswoman
was recently visited by such a
group which threatened her. In
another incident, a similar group
assaulted a Jewish student. The
letter also referred to incidents
earlier this year in which more
than 200 Jewish tombstones were
desecrated and anti-Semitic
slogans painted on the walls of
public buildings.
The letter disputed the
repeated assertion by Roetger
Groess, Interior Minister of the
state of Lower Saxony that such
activities are the work of a small
group of outsiders and are
politically irrelevant. The letter
said that because of the dangers
of left-wing extremism in Ger-
many, the danger from right-
wing extremists is being "played
down."
Free Concert, Art Exhibit to be Held
At Jewish Community Center
in cooperation with the Metro-
politan Museum and Art Center,
from the private collection of
Mark Steingard.
The "Premiere Event Concerts
and Art Exhibit" will be the first
in a rotating series of events to be
called "Sunday Nite At The
JCC." Starting Jan. 22 and con-
tinuing throughout the spring,
there will be a different Sunday
night feature at the Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community Cen-
ter each week, open to the com-
munity. The programs will rotate
between jazz, public affairs, per-
forming arts, and film.
For more information about
the "Premiere Event," Jan. 22, or
about future "Sunday Nite At
The JCC" programs, contact
Cultural Arts Director Myrna
, Loman.
The Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center in
North Miami Beach, will
inaugurate its new cultural and
educational programs for adults,
Sunday, Jan. 22 at 7:30 p.m..
with a free "Premiere Event
Concert and Art Exhibit" open to
the entire community.
The program, to be held in the
Center's Wise Gymnasium, will
include a concert of classical
music by the Greater Miami
Light Concert Orchestra, a jazz
concert with Ira Sullivan and
Friends, and an art exhibit
featuring "The Graphic Art of
Chagall and Miro."
THE CONCERTS are spon-
sored in cooperation with
P.A.C.E. (Performing Arts for
Community and Education, Inc),
while the art exhibit is sponsored
Have Sadat and Hussein
Come to Secret Agreement?
Zionist Information Service
CAIRO There are reports that President Sadat and King
Hussein concluded a secret pact during the King's visit to Cairo and
will discreetly coordinate policies during the next round of Middle
East diplomacy. While Jordan will not be formally represented at the
Cairo talks, Sadat will maintain direct contact with Hussein as the
conference gets under way.
According to reliable sources, Sadat and Hussein reached agree-
ment aa to what should be demanded of the Israelis with respect to the
West Bank and Gaza Strip.
HUSSEIN WAS assured in Cairo that Sadat has some degree of
backing from the Saudis and the Gulf States. The same discovery may
have bees made the hard way by Syria's President Assad as he toured
Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, QuaUr and the United Arab
Emirates.
They found no sympathy for Syria's decision to join the
rejectionists" of Libya and (he extremist Palestinians in a front
against Sadat. Instead, King Khalid is said to have rebuked Assad for
his continuing military dependence on Russia.
SO ASSAD now finds a formidable line-up of raised eyebrows
directed at him: Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Kuwait, Bahrain, Quatar,
Oman and the rest of the Gulf States, Morocco, Tunisia, Sudan, North
Yemen and Somalia.
Syria's only certain allies are Libya, Algeria, South Yemen, the
PLO and the Soviet Union. And although the Iraquis take the most
radical line of all. they are no friends of Assad, and have been deeply
implicated in plots to overthrow his regime.
If you're Jewish and under 40. happily married
or blessedly single, youi be interested in our
brand-new and deddedy different-ACCENT
ON-YOUTH tours to Israel. Africa. Europe and
Mexico! CH or write at once for details to
AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS
4300 BocOyn* Blvd.
Miami. Florida 33137
Phone (305) 576-4330 Dad*
7634177 Broward
6M-AM4 We* Palm Beach
t)

Hello Mellow Roast..:
Goodbye bitter taste.
Certified Kosher -Par ve by Rabbi Bernard Levy
With new Mellow Roast, you get delicious full-flavored
coffee ta'am. Rich body without the bitterness. Mellow Roast Coffee and
Grain Beverage starts with three kinds of rich, roasted coffees; then blends
in roasted grain to take away the bitter edge. Mellow Roast
is so smooth, you and your family can enjoy cup after cup. Get new
Mellow Roast Ground or Instant and say
Hello to a mellow mechaieh. New
from
General Foods.
General Foods Corporation 1077 Mellow Roast is a trademark ol General Foods Corporation
)


p
riday, January 13,1978
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
\New Film Depicts Life of Auschwitz ChiefRudolfHoess
no
By BRIGITTE JEREMI AS
Frankfurter Allgemeine
"As time went by I lost all
sense of feeling, thinking of Jews
as units rather than as human
beings." Franz Lang, alias
Rudolf Hoess, the commanding
officer of Auschwitz, is on record
as saying.
These were his actual words,
noted during interrogation by a
ritish intelligence officer in
chleswig-Hostein in 1946 before
> was extradited to Poland.
Theodor Kotulla's film, Aus
einem deutschen Leben (From a
German Life Story), shows how a
run-of-mill German was trained
to act on orders, to become the
perfect automaton without whom
a fascist system cannot function.
I BARE scenes interrupted only
ftiy explanatory subtitles outline
*Tfce life story of a German born at
the turn of the century.
* Hoess served in the Great War,
^eing taught by his captain that
** j*' am German by denom-
ination." Then he worked in a
factory, followed by a spell with a
Freikorps as a soldier of fortune
and a jail sentence for murder in
uniform.
He then worked on the land
and proved a successful fanner,
joining first the SA, then the
mounted SS, finally serving as a
guard officer at Dachau and com-
manding officer at Auschwitz.
THIS, then, is the life story of
Rudolf Hoess, a story that has
interested director Theodor
Kotulla for the past twenty
years.
In 1957, he read Robert Merle's
Der Tod ist mein Metier (Death is
My Business), followed a year
later by Hoess's autobiography
(Hoess was extradited to Poland
and executed in Auschwitz on
April 16, 1947).
Kotulla tells his life story in a
low-key, unimpassioned manner
well suited to explaining how a
been telling him, Hoess, the
truth.
What Himmler had told him
was that unless the Germans
exterminated the Jews the Jews
would exterminate the Germans.
In 1942, when the "final solu-
tion" was embarked on, this was
an utterly absurd claim.
YET BY that time. Rudolf
Hoess had been trained to accept
and carry out orders without
question. As a tenant farmer he
had married when told to do so
by his Junker landlord.
He had married and fathered
children because, as he put it, a
Bare scenes interrupted only by explanatory su
outline the life story of a German born at the turn
century. Hoess served in the Great War, being tau:
his captain that "I am a German by denomination
he worked in a factory, followed by a spell v
Freikorps as a soldier of fortune and a jail sentei
murder in uniform.
WORLD OF ART
man can become an unthinking
subject, happy merely to serve
his Fuehrer.
UNDER ARREST Hoess was
asked whether he would do it all
again and help to exterminate
four million "units'* Jews,
Poles, gypsies, and rep-
resentatives of other sub-
humans.
Would he subject them to
"special treatment" in the gas
chamber again, given the oppor-
tunity? Hoess was not sure.
Heinrich Himmler, his superior
officer, had committed suicide
and could conceivably not have
White House Mum on Letters
fe To Carter from Sadat

By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The White House has refused to
discuss the secret handwritten
letters from President Carter that
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat
said prompted him to initiate
peace moves with Israel. Neither
[Would the White House comment
ti Egypt's severance of dip-
matic relations with five Arab
countries that assailed his peace
initiative at the Tripoli, Libya
meeting.
"We best serve at this point,"
by not going into the Carter
letters to Sadat, Deputy Presi-
dential News Secretary Rex
Granum said.
He replied, "certainly" when
he was asked whether Secretary
of State Cyrus Vance and
National Security Affairs Ad-
viser Zbigniew Brzezinski had
been informed of the President's
l.tters.
Sadat said he got the idea for his
Jerusalem trip about two months
ago after corresponding with
Carter. "He didn't propose it
all," Sadat said.
"At the precise moment when I
received his personal letter in his
own handwriting that no one
knew except me and him, then I
started thinking" about the trip.
SADAT SAID the hand-
written letters were sealed with
wax and delivered outside normal
diplomatic channels by a special
envoy, according to the AP
dispatch from Cairo.
Carter may have been referring
to the letters when in an inter-
view published in the New York
Times, he told columnist James
Reston in reply to whether he
knew about the Sadat trip to
Jerusalem in advance: "Sadat
and I exchange communications
frequently."
w <]
ASKED WHETHER Carter
had by-passed diplomatic
channels for a period of weeks in
his letuts to Sadat, Granum did
not reply directly. He pointed out
the purpose was to continue dis-
cussion of Middle East settle-
ment discussions.
An Associated Press dispatch
Jrom Cairo had reported earlier
that in an interview with the AP,
SUMMER IN LONDON
American Jewish Teenagers
Spend summer 19'8 with London's
Jewish youth. Tours, sightseeing,
theatre. LIVE IN JEWISH HOMES.
Meet British youth in social, cultural,
sporting activities.
Sxtk Great Season
Miami Departures
Brochure: Mrs. Carol Jacobs
Receive-A Guest of London
41 N. 35 St.
Hollywood, Fla. 33021
Tel. evenings (305)983-0437
MIRAMAR BAGELS &BIALYS
nan. 962-3544
shotting aura)
HOT BAGELS & BIALYS FRESH
ROM THE OVBil
7 VARIETYS OF BAGELS
INCLUDING
OWON I GARLIC WW YORK STYLE HALTS
LOX, CREAM CHEESE & SALADS
mmimmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
good German has to sire a new
family.
One hardly need emphasize
how important a film of this
nature is, voicing views that
everyone in the appropriate age
bracket heard often enough at the
time.
Germans who experienced the
Nazi era at first hand will all have
been familiar with sentiments of
this kind, and although they may
not have given them much
thought the ideas were certainly
drummed into an entire
generation.
GOTZ GEORGE, starring as
Franz Lang, alias Rudolf Hoess,
makes the leading role a man
with whom we can almost
sympathize.
Director Kotulla arranges
everything around Hoess, his
butcher of a male lead, for whom
the victims 9,446 a day at the
height of operations are no
more than figures entered into his
secret files and smoke rising from
the crematorium chimneys the
following day.
Kotulla dispenses with doc-
umentary material, no doubt
assuming that we have all seen
the relevant newsreel footage.
This approach is perhaps too
abstract in view of the medium.
DOCUMENTARY material as
shown in Alain Resnais' Bei
Nacht and Nebel or Requiem fur
100,000, which used footage
taken by the SS in the Warsaw
ghetto, is much more impressive
in the long run.
Images make a more lasting
mark on the subconscious than
either words or figures. A reality
that is beyond comprehension
and, whether or not younger gen-
erations believe it, was unknown
to the overwhelming majority of
Germans who were not pro-Hitler
at the time is a fact that cannot
be outdone by fiction, no matter
how deadpan, educational or well-
meant.
This is why, sad to say, Theo-
dor Kotulla's serious and major
film will not have the mass
appeal it deserves.
HE MISCALCULATED inas
much as the documentary ap-
proach he tried to avoid can only
be outdone by satire, or possibly
by surrealistic means.
Take, for instance. Wolfgang
Staudte's 1951 film version of
Heinrich Mann's novel Der
Untertan (The Loyal Subject) or
Walerian Borowezyk's Engel-
spiele (Angel's Games).
The Jewish Floridian apologizes
to JIMMY'S FAMOUS
ITALIAN RESTAURANT. In
the December 30, 1977 issue we
incorrectly listed the address
and phone number. The correct
address and phone number are:
6080 MIRAMAR PARKWAY.
PHONE 987-0828
VISIT ISRAEL NOW! $758.00 (RT)
m
Group Flights from Miami to Israel and Back
9 Nights accommodation at Hotel in Tel Aviv
Transfers on Arrival and Departure Included
I S IMPORTS TRAVEL
60S Lincoln Rd.. Suite SOS
ISRAEL AIRLINES MU"T'ef(a3) s^33139
Who has the
Fresh Kosher
Yellow Bird?
Empire, of course...
Look for the fresh Empire
Kosher Chicken with the
healthy yellow color and,
to be sure, look for this
red, white and blue metal
tag on each whole chicken
and on all chicken parts.
KOSHER
&
Empire
POULTRY
w
tun, \%
The Most Trusted Name in Kosher Poultry
At better quality Kosher Butcher Shops, Food Stores and Dellys, Coast-:o-Coast.
DISTRIBUTED BY:
AAENDELSONS', INC. 672-5800


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 13, 1978
Ailing Hubert Inspires All Our Prayers
By HELENS. SILVER
A gaunt and ailing Sen
Hubert Horatio Humphrey Jr.
(D., Minn) returned to Washing-
ton in late October and was
greeted with an emotional out-
pouring of welcome and ap-
preciation.
gradually gained public support.
Successful Humphrey-spon-
sored legislation led to organiza-
tion of the Peace Corps, Medi-
care, Project Headstart, the
Department of Housing and
Urban Development, U.S. Dis-
armament Agency, Federal
Profile
The old Humphrey spirit that
has earned the title of "the happy
warrior" of American politics
responded with wit and courage.
"Where were you when I needed
you in 1968?" he quipped to
reporters.
MANY SPECIAL tributes
have been given Humphrey since
he began his heartbreaking bout
with terminal cancer. On Nov. 2,
the new Health, Education and i
Welfare Building in Washington
was named in his honor by Con-
gress. Many tributes have also
come from Jewish organizations,
for HHH has been a strong
defender of Jewish causes for
many years.
Last month, at the recent bien-
nial convention of Pioneer
Women, the Women's Labor
Zionist group presented their
first Golda Meir Human Rights
Award to Humphrey.
In his acceptance message,
Humphrey reiterated his con-
tinuing dedication to the survival
of a strong State of Israel.
THIS ATTITUDE is char-
acteristic of Sen. Humphrey's
distinguished career.
In his first political post as
mayor of Minneapolis in 1945,
Humphrey fought entrenched
anti-Semitism in that city by
establishing one of the first coun-
cils on human relations in the
U.S.
In his present key role as
chairman of the Foreign Aid
Subcommittee of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee.
Humphrey is a passionate
spokesman in behalf of Israel's
economic and military needs.
DURING HIS years in the
Senate, 1949-1964, Humphrey
introduced many bills of
sweeping social and economic
reforms considerably ahead of the
nation's readiness for them.
UNDAUNTED, he ai d a small
group of liberals introduced these
bills year after year until they
stored. Occasionally, a carton at
a time seems suddenly to "dis-
appear." I suspect thrown out
surreptitiously one by one with
the trash if only to make room for
more cartons.
Scholarship Program, Council of
Youth Opportunity, Vista and
Job Corps.
Legislation on the inter-
national level included creation of
Alliance for Progress, Food for
Peace, Foreign Relations Sub-
committee on Disarmament and
passage of the Nuclear Test Ban
Treaty of 1963.
OF ALL those accomplish-
ments, Humphrey recently said
he considers his efforts in the
civil rights field, culminating in
the passage of the Civil Rights
Act of 1964, to be his single
greatest achievement in public
life.
Humphrey's first unsuccessful
try as a presidential contender
was against John F. Kennedy in
the 1960 primaries; afterwards he
campaigned intensively for Ken-
nedy throughout the upper Mid-
west. He was then reelected to
the Senate and became Senate
Majority Whip in the Kennedy
and Johnson administrations.
Humphrey was the popular
choice to be Johnson's running
mate in the 1964 presidential
election and together they won a
smashing victory.
AS PRESIDENT of the
Senate, he worked behind the
scenes to push through domestic
and foreign legislation. He
headed many advisory councils
and undertook overseas missions
for the President, including
assignments on the Nuclear Pro-
liferation Treaty and NATO.
When Lyndon Johnson with-
drew from the race for the 1968
presidential nomination, the
Democrats selected Humphrey
and Sen. Edmund Muskie of
Maine to carry their party to
victory.
In spite of the traumatic
events of early 1968 and the
chaotic convention in Chicago,
victory was almost within reach.
Richard M. Nixon defeated
Humphrey by almost as narrow a
margin as Kennedy's victory
over Nixon four years previously,
less than one-half of one percent
of the vote.
IN ASSESSING this mans
remarkable public service, one
constant thread stands out his
great humanity, his overriding
concern for the rights and welfare
of the individual and for world
disarmament and peace.
It's certain that whatever time
is left for Hubert H. Humphrey,
he's going to work every moment
possible to leave this world a
better place and would expect no
special thank-you's.
Cleveland Jewish News
Coca-Cola $ to
Preserve Thebes
MEYER
AIR CONDITIONING
-Ask Your Neighbor About Meyer"
SINCE 1952
CUT YOUR ELECTRIC BILL
Have your system tuned up by a professional
923-4710 -PHONES 925-0112
Frankly. I have been unable to
place a single book since those
first memorable efforts of mine.
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Coca-Cola Company will provide
the $340,000 to $400,000 needed
to cover the expenses for the first
two years of a Brooklyn Museum
project to conserve and record
the monuments of ancient Thebes
in Egypt, it was announced here.
But Sam Ayoub. president of
Coca-Cola's Middle East group,
denied to the Jewish Telegraphic-
Agency that the involvement of
the Atlanta. Georgia-based firm
was an effort to get Egypt to help
get Coca-Cola off the Arab boy-
cott list.
AYOUB, who is also a vice
president of the parent Coca-Cola
Company, said that he signed an
agreement in Egypt in Sep-
tember to develop 15-.000 acres of
orange groves in Egypt which the
soft drink company hopes will
lead to its removal from the
boycott list.
He said this was done before
Coca-Cola was approached about
the Brooklyn Museum project,
which he said his company was
contributing to only for
"humanitarian" reasons.
Ayoub s statements to the
JTA came after the project,
called the Theban Expedition,
was announced at a press con-
ference at the museum.
THE COCA-COLA official told
the conference his company
hoped that projects such as this
would help "bring the world
closer together."
Dr. Lillian Berkman, chairman
of the International Advisory
Committee for the project, said
Coca-Cola was approached
because a sponsor was needed
and she was familiar with the
company's recent efforts in
mounting an exhibition of
Japanese art.
John Q. Blodgett, of the State
Department's Bureau of Edu-
cational and Cultural Affairs,
said the project "represented
another joint venture between
Egypt and the United States."
HE NOTED that the U.S. was
now working with Egypt in
seeking a Middle East peace but
that 200 years from now, the
Theban Expedition might be
viewed as of "equal importance."
Michael Botwinick. the
Brooklyn Museum's director,
said the project will involve the
conservation and recording of the
monuments in the Valley of the
Kings on the west bank of the
Nile, many of which are in danger
of collapsing, and continuing
excavations on the east bank of
the Nile near the major tourist
city of Luxor.
tAntomotiV% Co.
EXPERT COLOR
MATCHING *
FIBERGLASS REPAIRS *
MECHANICAL REPAIRS *
BODY RESTORATION *
TOodV^Repairs
CustoiiiTOtiitftag
981-9928
2101S.W. 56 TERR.
'*S*SSS*/St/SSS/SSS/"///"SS>""SS//"/s/', >.',<,',.->, ',//,//>/>>-//'>" '""-'-""/" "'/"'/"/f'////S^
FRIGIDAIRE
FACTORY AUTHORIZED SERVICE
COMPLETE INVENTORY OF TOP QUALITY
FRIGIDAIRE APPLIANCES ON DISPLAY NOW
I JACKSON'S
305 W. HALLANDALE BLVD.
454-5977
7///////////////////////^^^^^
Smss Qhmm
"QWs no substitute (oft quaftty"
cfinished S&und/ty fiew&e
5904 QhWotdak 791-0121

. fc V.w .
FERTILIZE
YOUR LAWN
And get rid of bugs $ O C 50
for one low price Q
Mighty National will completely rid your lawn of pests, and
fertilize up to 5,000 square feet for just $26.50 (regularly
$32.50) if you subscribe to our annual lawn care program.
Serving Florida since 1939
MIGHTY NATIONAL EXTERMINATORS
MIAMI
264-7500
FT. LAUDERDALE
791-3600
WEST PALM BEACH BOCA RATON
686-2110 391-3100
1
:bbbc


[lay. January 13.1978
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
o MiimII.ii
Books?~They're for Burning
Nathan Pritcher to Receive
A ward from Israel Bonds
Continued from Page 4
p, I made a most eloquent
sentation: Nation of the Book.
askalah. torturous stewardship
rough many millennia.
"Cot any dresses?" I was
ked. "Or men's clothing?
ayhe some furniture in good
idition wood pieces, fine
sd pieces?"
THE BOOKS." I said, are
ainly in English novels.
mmentaries, histories, studies
Israel. There are even some." I
ologized. in Yiddish and
brew. too. but I am sure there
plenty of people around who'd
glad to buy things like that."
Maybe a good kitchen ap-
ance?" the voice came back,
r a radio? Kadios are coming
ck big. People don't see so
od no more. They want radios.
ho's got time for books even if
y had the eyes? Listen, in our
siness, books are a junk item, a
isance."
On the phone to a convalescent
me. I was told. We'll pick up
othing If you have plenty
billing. I mean plenty, maybe
e ran come by and pick it up."
A LONG pause followed
Uring which neither of us hung
p \nd then: Or a color TV."
he voice suggested in excited
ntii ijiiiliiin. and before I could
ay there wasn't any TV. the
lUggrslimi was repeated with a
Kit noic in the form of a pro-
bit inn: Km ihi hlack-and-
hite. they're a dime a dozen.
til\ color
Mioiii the books." I said.
We il lakt them, but just as a
ourtesv I" gel them off your
anil- Bui you got to have
lenly clot lung, or a color TV, or
e en n 'I lie I ioi hered
I wa* elated and went through
rack >>l old suits in my mind I
ilId wrap up the cartons of
took* in and lie done with them
nine and for all
"I CAN help gel the hooks into
jralalngueshape." I volunteered.
Catalogue shape?" the phone
Icackled in laughter I told you.
[we'll lake them off your hands
[just as a courtesy. You know
|wh:ii we do with books? We burn
hooks when we're forced to take
I hem Books are a fire hazard."
Not mine you don't burn." I
[said, and so I guess ybu don't
I need any suits either."
All of this was several years
[ago Since then. I have had
I visions in my mind of the
Warsaw Ghetto uprising, the
Kristalsnacht pogrom, the
puniing pyres of Jewish works
kroughout Nazi Germany, the
Ji Bllennia of our torturous
Itewardship back to the building
Mine Bible itself.
ALSO SINCE then, dozens of
more cartons of books we cast off
[from our library have piled up in
[our garage where they are now
I Men Zvi study on Israel in the
polled ion." my high, cracking
| voice, plagued by nervousness.
managed. It's in Yiddish. '.
think, or maybe Hebrew. And
I there are matched sets of Tolstoy
in Russian. Agnon in
English ."
The other week, however. I
tried again, this time with a truly
august Jewish institution
boasting a fine library.
Only for you." thev said
grudgingly. We don't really like
tc accept gifts of books."
BY NOW steeled to such
indifference. I refused to philoso-
phize over the disgrace of why
they would rather not bother or
even to insist that they send a
truck to pick the cartons up.
Instead. I jammed as many into
my car as the trunk and back seat
would hold and drove them
downtown.
The librarian greeted me.
sniffing and sneering at the same
time I'll go through every
single one of them." she warned
me. to see if maybe there's
something worthwhile "
Suddenly. I fell a luhrkious
coal of perspiration spreading all
over my body. I wasn't giving
something away free: I was a
thief trying to gel rid of stolen or
worthless items, or perhaps a
pusher of marijuana or cocaine
delected by the scrutinizing eye
ot a sharp librarian bent on pro-
tecting ihe community from the
Motirgc of an underworld
operation. My heart pounded,
and a sense ot embarrassment
and depression seized me.
THE CUSTODIAN, who was
wheeling the cartons into the
library from outside, sniffing
suspiciously, stopped short and
shouted: A roach Then-sag
Utilli roach Let's get this filth out
III here The stutt ought to be
burned, il you ask me."
I could manage no more
defense and escaped before some-
one cornered me. maybe the cus-
todian behind his dolly, to
demand that I take the books
back with me. On the way home,
the perspiration matted more
heavily beneath my clothes, and
my embarrassment became
uncontrollable.
THE ROACH. I a sured
myself, got into the c rtons
because they had been stou in
the garage all those years. The
sense of revulsion everyone fel' in
varying degrees at being given
books seemed now to be feizing
me, loo. When I got he
sprayed my car thoroughly.
Yesterday, as I was bringing
out a new carton of books to the
garage, sad to set' the wide open
space there ineluctably being
filled up again. I wondered
whether there is a difference
between spraying and burning.
I n eit her case, that's what you do
to prevent contamination. At
Dachau, to members of the
Nation of the Book, they did
both
Community leader Nathan
Pritcher, who serves on the
boards of the Jewish Eederation
of South Broward, HI AS and the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida, and on behalf of
State of Israel Bonds, will be
honored at the annual Hillcrest
Country Club Israel Dinner of
State, Sunday evening, Jan. 15.
He will be the recipient of the
United Jerusalem Award which
will be presented on behalf of the
Israel Bond Organization by
foreign correspondent, author
and lecturer, David Schoenbrun.
William G. Rabins is chairman
and Joseph Raymond is co-
chairman.
NATHAN PRITCHER
How Press Sees Middle East
By PHILIP KLEINMAN
London Chronicle Feature
LONDON Though Fleet
Street now devotes an enormous
amount of space to the Middle
East, its comments tend to run in
predictable grooves. Thus there
was nothing in the least sur-
prising in the fact that most
national papers hailed President
Sadat's visit to Jerusalem as a
momentous step towards peace,
nor in their urging Prime Min-
ister Begin to make some im-
mediate concession to match.
It was unfortunately also not
surprising that no paper
managed to give the impression
that it really understood what
was going on in the Middle East.
Behind all the rhetoric, who has
been doing what to whom?
THE FIRST plausible answer
to that question that I have seen
is in the latest issue of Jon
Kimche's Afro-Asian Affairs
newsletter. I f I rarely quote from
this publication, it is not because
it is less interesting on the
Middle East than the national
newspapers the opposite is
usually the case but because
ihe main task of this column is to
monitor general press attitudes.
For once, however, let us forget
Fleet Street, and concentrate on
Kimche's remarkable report. As
usual, he quotes no sources, and I
cannot vouch for its accuracy.
But it does make sense.
According to Kimche, the
events which triggered Sadat's
mission took place not in Egypt
but in Syria, which in October
began to move 30,000 of its
42,000 troops in Lebanon
YACHT CLUBrestaumutI!
at the Hemispheres Formerly of Israel
HAS REOPENED UNDER NEW MAN AGfMfNT
CLOSED
SERVING BREAKFAST
LUNCH-REGULAR DINNERS
MONDAYS
EARLYBIRD DINNERS m**m
%A2b SSay
*? MCIUMS: fm*
ENTSft SO UP. SAIAO IAS I MVMAOf
wfcri.v.
Mfari
Spci>litEKhDi7 0fWMkrt
IMwit* Prtck
Traditional Friday NH* Dinnar.
SPECIAITIES-MmimmS.
KISHIE-PtrCIM
BlIRTZES CHOUSI.
CHOPPED LIVER tHNf.it, MM*!.
I 975 S. Ocoon Drivo, Hoilandat* taySrtW
FREE VALET PARKING FOR DINNER
458'350 4S8 4489
Quality
Food
Excellent
Service
OHM ffVftr DAY 6080 MIRAMAR PARKWAY (Jwt Wtst of 441) |
987-0828 BEER-WINE------------COMPLETE DINNERS J
rmalfl Daily Dinner Specials *3 I
^il j INCLUDING SOUP-SALAD* DESSERT
Jimmy's Famous
Early Bird Italian Restaurant
Specials
LfromSlM.
WE MAINTAIN
OUR SPECIAL
LOW PRICES
ALL YEAR AROUND
(Kimche's figures) to the Golan
front. Others were sent to
Southern Lebanon to pose as
Palestinian guerrillas.
TOWARDS the end of
October, President Assad in-
formed Sadat that Israel was
reinforcing its positions in the
north and clearly preparing for a
preemptive strike into Lebanon
or Syria. Assad also told Sadat of
his own troop movements and
requested parallel action by
Kgyplian forces in Sinai.
Sadat responded by ordering
large-scale military exercises. On
the other side. Israel altered her
forces to the dangers in both
south and north. Meanwhile.
Russia resumed delayed arms
deliveries to Syria, and Yasir
Arafat delivered at the beginning
of November a speech which
appeared to cancel the PLO's
previous agreement to withdraw
its men from Southern Lebanon.
Alarmed at the way things
were shaping up, and remem-
bering how Syria and Russia and
maneuvered Nasser into the
measures which led to the Six-
Day War. Sadat decided to
preempt any step taken by
either the Syrians or the Pales-
tinians which might have pro-
voked the Israelis into an action
similar to that of June. 1967." In
other words, the object of his
Jerusale.n mission was not pri-
marily to make peace but to save
Egypt." To save Egypt,
however, he needed peace.
SADAT, says Kimche. told his
hosts that he was not in Jeru-
salem to negotiate. He and they
agreed that negotiations should
be conducted in Cairo. The Presi-
dent did not, unlike many leader
writers, believe that complicated
issues could be resolved on the
spur of the moment.
Former Prime Minister Go/da
Meir was in Beilenson
Hospital in Tel Aviv this week
for tests following a sudden
illness brought on by a
stomach disorder. Israeli news
reports said Meir had been
brought to the hospital in
shock following the loss of
blood caused by a burst ulcer.
Beilinson physicians insist
there is no indication of
cardiac difficulties.
no wax VINYL
OPEN 7 DAYS-4 to 11 PM-Sun. 1 to 10 PM
Quality Food...STEAKS-VEAL
At The Lowest Price*
WARM Continental ATMOSPHEREl
For THE ENTIRE FAMILY l ll sauci s
TAKE OUT On All Dinner! & Pizza I "OMBAor.
I
P
INSTALLED $C99
UjP SQ. YD.
SHAG CARPET........*7.29
PLUSH....................8.29*
COMMERCIAL TWEED.$8.29^0
100*. Nylon installed over Rubber Cushion.
FREE
|SH0P-AT-H0ME SERVICE'
981-4885
ICALL TODAY
I Your Local Man

aH


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 13,1978
Adult Cultural, Educational Programs
i
Begin at Jewish Community Center
The Academy, a new concept
in Adult Cultural and Edu-
cational Programming, begins
this month at the Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community
Center in North Miami Beach.
Open to the entire community.
The Academy will offer 23 dif
ferent courses, a number of
special events, and a unique
rotating series of programs to be
called Sunday Nite at the JCC.
Among the courses being
offered during the first seven-
week semester, which begins the
week of Jan. 23, are classes and
workshops in the fine arts, dance,
personal awareness, Jewish
studies, film history, foreign
affairs, calligraphy, cooking,
bridge and guitar. Registration
for these and other courses will be
held the week of Jan. 16.
to place increased emphasis on
adult programming," says JCC
executive director Myron A.
Berezen, describing how The
Academy came about. "The
JCC's children's programs and
senior adult programs are well
established, and we feel now is
the time to establish solid
programs for adults as well."
The community got a taste of
adult programming this past fall,
when the Michael-Ann Russell
JCC, the Central Agency for
Jewish Education, and two syna-
gogues jointly sponsored the
North Dade Midrasha (Institute
for Jewish Studies). The JCC is
continuing its sponsorship of
that venture, while The Academy
allows the JCC to expand its
adult programs in additional
areas.
"THE TIME has come for us According to Myrna Loman,
cultural arts director at the JCC,
"No one else in North Dade or
South Broward will be doing
many of the things we have
planned for this spring. We have
several courses and workshops
that are unique," she adds,
referring to the "Great Decisions
'78," "Journey Through Film."
"Women's Workshop," and "Art
Safari" offerings.
"GREAT Decisions '78" will
examine American foreign policy
with Prof. George Katzman of
Florida International University.
In the "Journey Through
Film" course. University of
Miami Profs. George Capewell
and Dr. Steven Bowles will take
the class through seven decades
in the evolution of world cinema,
from 1900 to the present.
The "Women's Workshop"
:
Institute Offers 19 Jewish Courses
Nineteen course offerings in
almost every aspect of Judaism
will highlight the winter semester
of the North Dade Midrasha
Institute of Jewish Studies to
begin during the week of Jan. 9 to
12. for eight weeks at three North
Dade locations.
The Institute, co-sponsored by
two synagogues, Beth Torah
Congregation and Temple Sinai
of North Dade. and two bene-
ficiary agencies of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center (JCC) and the
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation (CAJE), is part of a com-
munity adult education program.
CLASSES will be offered at
the JCC on Monday evenings, on
Tuesday evenings at Temple
Sinai and on Thursday evenings
at Beth Torah.
Rabbi Ralph Kingsley. mem-
ber of the planning committee
and faculty of the Midrasha
explained. We are delighted
that over 190 people participated
in the lull semester classes, some
of then attending two. three and
even four nights a week. This
indicates a great thirst for
learning and a seeking for greater
Jewish knowledge as vital for the
strengthening of personal Jewish
identity."
Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz, also
on the planning committee and
faculty, remarked, "An exciting
aspect of the winter semester is
the offering of courses that deal
with contemporary issues such as
"Coping with the Cults,"
Medical Issues in the Light of
Jewish Tradition." "Con-
temporary Religious Movements
in Judaism." and the "Middle
East Today and Tomorrow,"
together with basis courses in
Jewish throught. ritual and
practice that provide the foun-
dation for a greater under-
standing and commitment to
Jewish life."
A MAJOR feature of the
Midrasha is the Haver" Fellow
in Jewish Studies Certificate
Program. On the completion of a
48-credit program, the Midrasha
will award a certificate to those
individuals who will have com-
pleted required studies in such
major areas as Bible, Jewish
history, Jewish thought and
philosophy. Rabbinic literature.
Jewish law and lore. Hebrew, and
contemporary Jewish life.
Courses being offered in the
winter semester include "The
Image of the American Jew in the
Eyes of the American Jewish
Author," "Israel Folk Dancing."
"Origins of Modern Jewish
History," "Issues in the Middle
East." "The Jewish Catalogue."
Coping with the Culls."
"Towards Becoming a More
Effective Parent," "Methods of
Teaching for the New and
Veteran Religious School
Teacher," "Message of the
Prophets," "Religious Move-
ments in Contemporary Jewish
Life," "Hebrew for Reading and
Ulpan Hebrew," "The World of
the Mishna," "Yiddish," "Basic
Jewish Concepts." The Biblical
Heroes,.....Fhe Biblical Books of
Kohelet and T'hilim," "Jewish
Prayer." and Medicine and
Jewish Law."
Serving on the Midrasha
faculty will be Lillian Fine, in-
structor in American Jewish lit-
erature; Rita Trilling, Israeli
dance instructor; Roslyn Z.
Seidel. educational and youth
director of Temple Sinai of Holly-
wood; Elizabeth Zipkin, in-
structor in the Jewish Cata-
logue"; Rabbi David Gray,
instructor in the course on the
cults; Dr. Ann Ruben, associated
with Nova. Barry and Florida
International University.
IN ADDITION. Rabbi Julian
Cook, educational director of
Temple Sinai; Rabbi Ralph P.
Kingsley. spiritual leader of
Temple Sinai; Sidney Grossman,
instructor in Hebrew: Rabbi
Kneseth Israel Congregation;
Rabbi Max Lipschitz. spiritual
leader of Congregation Beth
Torah; and Dr. Robert E. Lewis,
local physician.
Administrating the Midrasha
program will be Abraham J.
(littelson. associate director of
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education; Dr. Eli Ross, pro-
gram coordinator; and Myrna
Loman. cultural arts director at
the JCC. They served on the
planning committee together
with the rabbis and Gene Green-
zweig, CAJE executive director.
More information can be
obtained at any of the three
teaching locations or at the
CAJE in Miami.
CAMP
WOHELO
FOR GIRLS
Direct*: Morpa livy
Quality 8 Week Camps Completely Separate Facilities
COMET TRAILS For Teenage Boys
19 lighted Tennis Courts Transportation, Linens,
Laundry included in tuition
South Florida Reunion Saturday, January 28,1978
Costa del Sol Racquet Club-10:00 A.M. 3:00 P.M.
Exit Palmetto Expressway 36 Street West... 2 Miles
Everyone Welcome Call 264-6389 for R.S.V.P.
Owned a) Directed by a Miami Family for 50 years.
Morgan I. Levy, C.C.D 1531 S.W. 82nd Court
Miami, Fla. 33144 Phone: 264-6389
STAFF INQUIRIES IN VITE DMINIMUM AGE '?
ODUotK'rriQoocwaooppooooQoococjocQQOoeooo^ooo^coyM
ACCREDITED
CAMP
AMERICAN CAMPING
ASSOCIATION
..>'
QQCinnQooai
will be conducted by Margie
Willensky, former assistant dean
at Brandeis University, and will
deal with career alternatives for
women asking the question:
"Where do I go from here with
my life?"
"ART SAFARI" will include
visits to museums and galleries
in the South Florida area, as Well
as a three-day journey elsewhere,
all led by artist llise Greenstein.
While The Academy will
provide numerous opportunities-
for adults to learn and be enter-
tained, it is not intended to serve
simply as another college ex-
tension or local entertainment '
center. "Our purpose is to intro-
duce as many participatory
programs as possible, where
people develop skills and aware-
ness," explains Stanley
Greenstein, chairman of the JCC
Cultural Arts Committee "We
want people involved. We want-
them to interrelate. We want the
JCC to be the place where people
can get together as a com-
munity."
One way Greenstein believes
this will happen is through
Sunday Nite at the JCC. a
rotating series of events in jazz,
public affairs, performing arts.,
and film. "Eventually." Green-
stein predicts, "when people
think of Sunday nights, they'll
automatically think of the JCC
The purpose of Sunday Nite at
the JCC is to bring people
together to learn, socialize, and
have fun."
THE FIRST two Sunday Nite
at the JCC programs will take
place this month, and both will he
free, and open to the community
On Jan. 22, a special Premiere
. Event will feature two concerts
and an art exhibit in the Center's
Wise Gymnasium, beginning at
7^30 p.m. The following Sunday
Nite at the JCC program, set for
7:30 p.m.. Jan. 29, in the Center's
Katz Assembly Hall, will be a
public affairs Update on the
Middle Bast," featuring the
Consul (ieneral of the State ot -
Israel.
January is just the beginning
of The Academy program. In th^
coming months. The Acadenn
will sponsor a week-long Yiddish
cultural festival, a Yiddish film
festival, a modern film series, and
other special events, as the JCC
expands its cultural and edu-
cational programs for adults.
For additional information
about The Academy programs or
Sunday Nite at the JCC events,
contact Myrna Loman.
JCC Schedule
Monday
Basic Spanish Conversation 10 a.m.
Sewing for Beginners-Easy Alterations 10 a. m
Hebrew for Beginners 10 a.m.
Presently closed to new students
Sketching and Painting 1 p.m.
Learn to do original art work
Canasta 1 p.m.
Tuesday
Collective Crafts 9:30 a.m.
JCC Singers Choral Club 10 a.m.
JCC Social Club Meet the nicest people 1 p.m.
Join a friendly game or kibbitz
Growing Old Gracefully Class starts Jan. 10- 1 p.m.
Blood Pressure Testing 10 a.m. to Noon (Jan. 10)
Wednesday
Hebrew (Intermediate level)
Yiddish 10a.m.
Self-Discovery through the Humanities 10 a.m.
Class closed to new registrants
Movie Specials See Program
Thursday
Lecture Series- 10:30a.m. See Program
Needlepoint. Crewel & Other Stitchery 1 p.m
Transactional Analysis 1 p.m
Class begins Jan. 12
Friday
Discussion Club-10:30 a.m.
Share topics of interest to all senior adults
Folk and Line Dancing 1 p.m. '
Intermediate level
Oneg Shabbat -3 p.m.
Join us as we light candles, make Kiddush
REGULAR PROGRAM: Monday thru Friday -9a.m. to3 p.m.
Lounge is open dai ly ... Play checkers or scrabble
Well stocked library of books and magazines for
browsing or borrowing. Color TV.
Movie Schedule
JAN. 4
Israel Reports. A series of films which depict various aspects of
Israel culture, religion, places and people, science, etc.
JAN. 11
N/notchka with Greta Garbo and Melvyn Douglas, satirical comedy.
New Found Land: Documentaries narrated by Al.stair Cooke explain
how white man got to North America and what he was seeking.
Sports Films: Clips from famous sports events.
Lecture Schedule
JAN. 5
Israel Slides Presented by Albin Eisler, active participant in Detroit
Jewish Community Center.
JAN. 12
?mski*eV'eW Jeanne"e *"*, MSW "Stepps" by Jerzy Rod-
JAN. 19
Im.,vnd /Ur ST* : Lrry Wiedr"'n. branch manager.
American Savings 8, Loan Assn., Hollywood
JMIN. ^O
king Care of Your Feet Dr. David Olinsky, Podiatrist


[day. January 13. 1978
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far ofGreater Hollywood
Page 15
Ask Abe
By Abe Halpern

Question: On a recent trip to |
irael I visited the city of Safed
,i,l I was told that the Shulchan
Lruch was created there. Can you
ill me more about the Shulchan
.ruch?
H. Cornfeld
Hollywood
" Answer: Shulchan Aruch is a
[ebrew phrase meaning prepared
able. It is the name of a Code of
[ewish Law. collected, compiled
id codified by Joseph Caro
488-1575 C.E.).
Joseph Caro was born in
taledo. Spain. After the expul-
ion from Spain (1492). the
>:' settled in Constantinople,
.i 1625 he went to Palestine and
Minded a Yeshiva in Safed.
IN SAFED he wrote his Code
let Yoscph (House of Joseph).
lis was a commentary on Jacob
n Asher's (1270-1343) Arhah
,urim (four rows). The name
Arhah Turim is based on the four
rows of stone on Aaron's breast-
plate (Kxodus 39:10). Jacob hen
Aslur collected the decisions of
the Talmud the Babylonian
Lint! the Jerusalem, as well as
Commentaries by many previous
icholare, commentators and
modifiers.
Joseph Caro compiled and
Modified the Classical Shulchan
IXnich. collecting the views of
previous codifiera and giving his
li)wii decision on disputed points.
The Shulchan Aruch is a
.-nopsis of Cam's commentary
el Yoscph on the Arhah Turim
(nil is divided into the same four
minor sections: Orah Hayyim,
Concerning the daily command-
ments, Sabbaths, and the
festivals; Yoreh De'ah. dealing
L'ith various subjects, such as
llietary laws, interest, purity, and
mourning; Even ha-Ezer, on
marriage, divorce, and related
topics; and Hoshen Mishpat.
?ligious Directory
NORTH BROWARD
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100W. Oak
land Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Phillip A. Labowitz. Cantor Maurice
A.Neu.
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive. Reform (44)
|TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. (44 A)
MIRAMAR
|ISRAEL TEMPLE. 69J0 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Orazin.
Cantor Abraham Kester. (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE BETH EMET. 200 NW
Douglas Rd. Liberal Reform. David
Goldstein, ed. dir.
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9139 Taft St.
Conservative. Rabbi Bernard I.
Shoter. (63)
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi
SheONJ.Harr. (64)
IRECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA-
GOGUE. 7473 NW 4th St. (69)
HALLANDALE
[ HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
NE eth Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Carl Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob Dan
ziger. (12)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph p. Kongsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. (37)
HOLLYWOOD
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max Land
man. (47B)
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. Assis
tant Rabbi Jonathan Woll. (45)
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601 Arthur
Jt. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi Paul M. Katz.
Kabbi Emeritus David Shapiro.
Cantor Yehuda Hellbraun. (65)
TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.,
Hollywood, Fla. 33021. Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Robert P. Frazln.
Cantor Bruce Malln. (47C)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
3291 Stirling Road, Oaks Condomlni
om. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe Bomzer.
Synagogues May Find
Advantage in Filing with IRS
dealing with civil and criminal
law (Encyclopaedia Judaica,
vol.14, p.1475).
GREETED with sharp op-
position at first, the Shulchan
Aruch nevertheless became the
authoritative Code and is to this
day recognized by Orthodox
Jews throughout the world as the
framework and guide for Jewish-
practices.
Rabbi Solomon Ganzfried
(1804-1886 C.K.), Hungarian
Rabbinic scholar, compiled an
abridged version of Cam's
Shulchan Aruch, known as
KltZUT (abridged) Shulchan
Aruch. It achieved wide popular-
ity and became the Orthodox lay-
man's indispensable guide. This
abridged version was translated
into several languages. There are
two English translations, by
Michael Eriedlander (1915) and
Hyman E. Goldin (1928).
In the foreword to his English
translation. Goldin states. "In
the Jewish system of juris-
prudence, there exists no distinc-
tion between one group of laws
and another. All laws, whether
criminal or civil, are regarded as
equally obligatory and sacred.
because they are all considered as
the command of God ...
"JEWISH law. as such,
regulates and controls every act
and every movement of a man.
from the day he saw the light of
day. to the very end of his life.
There are laws, for instance,
which prescribe the manner in
which one should eat. drink, talk,
think, walk, do business, etc.
etc."
Editor's note: Please send all
questions to:
ASK ABE
C o Jewish Federation of
South Hroward
2H38 Hollywood Mlvd.
Hollywood. Kb. 33020
B'nai B'rith VP To
Get Bonds Honor
JACKSONVILLE In the
past, there has not been
much reason for churches, syna-
gogues and general religious or-
ganizations to contact the Inter-
nal Revenue Service. They were
exempt from tax and not required
to file returns. While churches
and synagogues themselves still
are exempt from tax, there are
some new rules which the tax
agency says administrators
should get to know. 1
It is true that churches, syna-
gogues and certain religious or-
ganizations are not required to
apply for recognition of their
exempt status with the IRS.
However, they may find it ad-
vantageous to do so.
A SYNAGOGUE which
receives a favorable ruling is in-
cluded in IRS's "Cumulative List
of Organizations" (Publication
78). Inclusion in this listing pro-
vides prospective donors with
advance assurance that their
contributions will be deductible.
Church and synagogue or-
ganizations often apply for a
KAI.MAN RADO
Kalman Rado, vice president,
Hemispheres B'nai B'rith Lodge
2861, and active on behalf of
many community services, will
be honored at the Hemispheres
B'nai B'rith Night for Israel on
Thursday. Jan. 19 at 8 p.m. in the
Hemispheres Auditorium.
Featured special guest will be
Kmil Cohen.
William Littman. chairman of
the Israel Bonds Broward
County Board of Governors, is
chairman of the event.
group exemption letter. The
letter covers the many individual
churches within the larger
denominational grouping. No
matter what type of exemption
letter is requested, the IRS must
respond within 270 days of
receipt of the request.
IF THE IRS fails to meet this
deadline, the church or syna-
gogue may seek a declaratory
judgment in the courts. In-
terested organizations can get
more detailed application infor-
mation by ordering from IRS the
free publication 557, "How to
Apply for Recognition of Exemp-
tion for an Organization."
While churches, synagogues
and their "integrated" aux-
iliaries, such as theological
seminaries or religious youth or-
ganizations, do not have to file an
annual information return, Form
990, "Return of Organization
Exempt from Income Tax," with
the IRS, their "non-integrated"
auxiliaries do.
THE GENERAL test for iden-
tifying a non-integrated auxiliary
PLO Claims Credit For
Execution of Arab
BEIKI T. Lebanon The
Palestinian Liberal ion Organiza-
tion s official information agency
\\ nla has warned i lial I he PLO is
hrgii 11111 >> a campaign to
liquidate' \rabs who
i ollnlmratc w ii h Israel
The wurning comes in light ol
the assassination ol an Arab
official in the occupied West
Bank ol Jordan, lor which the
PI.' > claims credit The official, a
Palestinian \rab, wax shot as be
Ii li home fur work one morning.
I'lii I'M) has warned Arabs
again*-) collaborating with Israeli
Cfbttuaries
COHEN, Matilda. 69. of Hollywood, on
Dec. 28. Riverside.
GOODMAN. Adolph. 75. of Hollywood,
on Dec. 26. Levitt. Interment
Lakeside.
LEWIS. Milton. 85. of Hallandale. on
Dec. 26. Levitt.
GRAND. Joseph. 74. of Hallandale. on
Dec. 28. Levitt.
W1CHICK, Marilyn. 55. of Hallandale,
on Dec. 28.
FABRIKANT. Herman, 73. of
Hallandale. Riverside.
LURIE, Rose. 82, of Hallandale, on Jan.
1. Levitt.
REHFELD. Jack Jacob, 67. of Hallan-
dale. on Jan. 2. Levitt.
RESENBERG. Frances. 45. of Holly-
wood, on Jan. 1. Levitt. Interment
Lakeside.
military authorities and has
issued orders lo liquidate a
number ol agents who ignore
those warnings."
Wufa said the orders to kill
llamdi nl-vjadi came alter the
revolution had given them
several warnings to stop dealing
with the enemy's intelligence
service and endangering the
security ol our people.''
The assassination followed a
PLO statement rejecting Israel's
proposal lor limited Palestinian
\iab sell-rule in the West Bunk.
Khaled al-l'ahoum. chairman
of the PLOs 291-member
National Council said in
Damascus that no Israeli-
Egyptian solution to the Pales-
tinian question would be ac-
cepted by the Pl.t).
is whether the entity has a
secular counterpart. For
example, colleges, hospitals, and
orphanages are examples of non
integrated auxiliaries.
A church or synagogue or-
ganization which is otherwise
tax-exempt must file an "Exempt
Organization Business Income
Tax Return," Form 990-T, and
pay tax on income derived from
carrying on a business or trade
which is substantially unrelated
to the organization's exempt
status.
The IRS examines exempt or-
ganizations, including churches
and synagogues, to determine
their compliance with the tax
laws affecting their activities and
financial operations.
FAILURE to comply with the
legal requirements may result in
IRS action to deny or revoke the
organization's tax-exempt
status. However, the IRS does
provide appeals procedures to re-
solve disputed issues.
Additional information on the
tax-exempt status of religious or-
ganizations may be found in the
free IRS Publication 598, "Tax
on Unrelated Business income of
r^xempt Organizations," and
Publication 1018, "Tax on Un
related Business Income of Chur-
ches." available from the Internal
Revenue Service.
JEFFER
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
DIRECTORS
IrannJetlei Mednn Jettei AlmnJetlet
IN NCW YORK:
188-11 mil SIDE AVE. HOLDS 11. N Y
1283 CONEY ISLAND AVE BKIYN. NY
212/776-8100
IN rtOMCM
0A0E COUNTY 13385 W DIXIE HWY
9*17-1 185 Reo by Somiv levin FO
BROWARO COUNTY 1921 PEMBROKE RO
925-2743 Hep DvSonnylevm EO
PAIM BEACH COUNTY okcecmobee blvd
1-925-2743 ReoDyPWemslein ID
Services available in all com
mumties in New York and Ihtouqhoul
the Oealei Miami aiea j
IEVITT
memorial chapels
1*31 Pembroke Rd
Hollywood, fla.
S24-Mt7
Sonny Levitt, F.D.
13M5W. Dixie Hwy
North Miami, Fla.
Mt-4)!S
ASK YOUR
RABBI ABOUT US
C
D
JOHNSON-FOSTER
FUNERAL HOME, INC.
1650 HARRISON ST. HOLLYWOOD, FLA. PHONE: 922-7511
Paul J. Houlihan,
L.F.D.
5:30
5 -SHEVAT-5738 4

^tUoOlF
ItOI I.K\ IRU CHAPELS
100 SOUTH DIXII HIGHWAY
],.. OH M.n.nrf.l. **ch !<
MAUANDALf. FLOMOA 3300*
The Only Family Owned
Jtwlah Funeral Homo in
reward County.
We observe the complete
tradition of
Chevra Kavod Hamet
TEL: JOS4M-WT?
Douglas Laaarua, I..F.D.
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
tTflMgriSr Beth 6
Wemotial
(jatden*
The all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beau-
tifully landscaped, perpetual care, rea-
sonably priced.
For information call: 920-8225 or writ*: ,V?JS'.'r \
TCM^eSeTh"!!""' ~~ /ft&W*
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Fleas* *nd mt littratur* on the above
HAMEr _________________.__________,
ADDRESS:
FHONE:
_i


Pmgel6
tPtide
FHESH VALLEY U S CHOICE
BEEF ROUND
Eye Round
Roast
SAVE 17'
I PANTRY PRIDE
.largarine
^oA^QuartersI
LiMiTJPnGS AI1H|7PU*CMAM
ORMO*f O' O'Hlt ii|M%
KClUDiNCClGAtlltiS ,
/
SAVE 60'
SUNSHINE PIAIN
r SALTED
k^ l1 IV1
trackers
1 IB
PKG.
IMlTTWOPKGS WITH!' 'UICMASI
Ot MOII O* OTMft (TIMS
HC1UDINO ClCMI'M'
SAVE 80
C ON TWO'
ACS

Fries
French
Fries
5*89c
I* limit two IAGS with S'PUICHASJ
QtMOII Ot O'Hlt "CMS
( 'CiUOINC OGAItTTtS
SAVE 42c
FOR YOUR LAUNDRY
Wisk
rV/xA
C LIQUID
320Z
BTl
UMIIONIiTl A>ITH|> fOiCMASf
OIMOII Ol OIhiiiiims
(ClUDiNO CiGAIIT'lS
ABSORBENT
.oronet
(nirt \ Towels
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 13,1970
JUMBO
PKG
I 'WO PKGS WITH %f tUtCMAil
OtMOif 0 O'.Mlt ,MS
(ClUDiNGCiGAHITTls
* YOU MAY PURCHASE ONE OR
All STARRED ITEMS WITH A 57
ORDER OF OTHER ITEMS
EXClUDINr. CIGARETTES
W&&S&& about
FRESH VALLEY
FRESH DATED
BEEF
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT.. JAN. 14 AT All
PANTRY PRIDES FROM FT. PIERCE TO KEY WEST
FRESH VAllEY USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK
7-Bone Steak
FRESH VALLEY USDA CHOICE BEEF ROUND tH~B A ft FRESH VALLEY U.S. CHOICE F CHUCK BNIS. Btm. Round Roast.. 'I Shoulder Pot Roast......M *v
- rt^v FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH GRADE A
I39 Fryer Parts =. .. 89c
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH M M --,
Lots of Chicken 40
FRESH VAllEY US CHOICE BEEF CHUCK
P0t RoaSt UNDER
BI.ADK.....is.
FRESH VALLEY USDA CHOICE
Beef Blade
Chuck Roast
3 BREAST QTRS W BACKS 3 IIC QTRS. W BACKS ) GIMET PKGS
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH JRAB* ^"V _
Fryer Quarters D "
FRESH VALLEY USDA CHOICE BEEF ROUND tic""! ^kO
Btm. Round Steak. 15V
8159
FRESH VAllEY USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK
US NO 1 All PURPOSE WHITE
Potatoes 10 .l*'c79C
SIB. BAC 5
SWIIf IAIINC 0 ANJOU _
Pears'^." 10;:o89<
ADO ZIST TO TOUI SALAD IND.VI Ol^
Escarole hid 35*
US MO 1 MOWN ttVtt WHtTI
nc* Toua own itov a ioom oh> t*r _
Grapefruit 5 BB 1
U S NO 1 THINSKIN-JUICV iu
NCl OU OWN MOM A LOOM OVlA*
Oranges 10 ^89*
FIRM AND Ml A V Y TfltOW
Turnip...............................lr 17*
HIALTHf01 ANO GOOD HA.
Carrots 2 ..'0 45*
Ml VAIIIIIIS Ol WAIDIN S SA1A0
Dressing JgkJX 79*
IOWIUS IOSSID SALAD 0 ______.
Cole Slaw Kf 39*
IN THE BAKERY DEPT.
'" WARD M OUI OWN OMNI
AIMS oeot ITIAWMRl
Pie...................
GOIOf N TOP *mi
Shoulder Steak m> a X
Orange Juice ^ ^oV
MDCKMmi HfMINIMA
IOIDIN S All FtAVOIS
Red Grapes 49* Yogurt 14 S 99*
HAM 1 M1AO nil SI Al TI SI ACIOOPHHUS
Tomatoes 8Z. 49* Milk SB? 85*
le-OZ
cur
49*
FRESH AND TENDER
Western
Broccoli
FHNMMP
Sour Treat
MIttCO SIKI 4 AM
Cook ies...................mm 69*
ah SIZIS, All v ami m s
ANTIY PAIDI COITA&I
Cheese Sw*99*
PANTRY PIIDI CHAM
Cheese Jff 59*
' lAAPTli CBAM
Cheese......................'?V 89*
SKIDDS MAIGAIINI
Spread 2 89*
Sour Cream 'cSp2 59*
PANTIT PIIDI AMIIICAN SUCID
Singles | 99*
BUNCH
uoi S I 49
M I
Turnovers 3ft 79*
PANTrr PHOl IASM
Bread ^69*
DELI DEPARTMENT
PANTRY PRIDE MEAT OR
Beef Bologna
C I LB
PKG.
SLICED
99
mMMMI'H/VHnlE
BUITONI MUSHIOOM MIAI MAIINAtA PSI IQMANA SPAGMETTINI
Spaghetti
Sauce ......
PANTIT PIIDI MJDGI1
Liverwurst
OSCA. MAIL
-OZ.
CHUI
/!Oc ^ote'u or
Spaghetti box
MOSTACCIOU
49*
Braunschweiger 69*
69*
is oz
CANS
IVIIIIISH IIOZIN
Honey Buns JSf 79*
i*-oz. $109
1
'UISCHMANN S FIOZIN
Egg Beaters cm
I.DSI II IIOZIN All
Lima Beans 58? 63*
SOUIHtANO SPICKIID fIOZIN
UTTU
Beans.........................^.' 79*
SARA LEE FROZEN REGULAR
Ice Tea Mix SSM"
Kitchen Bags......:5ot,$l ,3
Fudge Sticks'pfo'63*
SIO.I1 T VAN CAMP IANII
Weenees 3 SSfW*
STOKUT VAN CAMP NIW O.IIANS JITU
Beans 3 'S 99*
I SSTOKUr VAN CAMP SPANISH
I Rice......................3
'"HI PPIOf
Cola..............................34?
NABIKO SANDWICH
Oreo._.........................Sff *T5
HUNTS MANWICH
Sauce.......................,.*c.-2'-59*
HUNTS TOMATO
Poste..........................Sff 59*
IOMAN MIAI riOZIN
Waffles m 69* Ketchup 3JP 45*
l.OSI.I I.O/IN i.OCCOLI "..................,,n- "
C_ ic>z :r< HUNTS SNAC PACK
ifeS2= 59* Puddings 69*
Cream Pies.....3ff 59* "
COCONUT. CKOCOl All Ol IIMON SOUCO '""" 39*
SOUtHlANO (IOZIN nil D
99*
59*
OSCAI MATH MIAI Ol .III
Bologna tSt
LUM SMIAT Ol III*
Hot Dogs F 79*
DA IMPOIIID DANISH
Salami fSt $1,9
AHN S SAN0WKH
Spread \S 49*
AMERICAN KOSHER
Franks or Koneks
$1 19
APPETIZER DEPT.
RICH'S AIL WHITE MEAT
Chicken Roll
89
HALF
II.
'.ISKl I MAOI
Salads 59*
COll tUm, POTATO Ol MACAIONI
PRANKLINMARID
Salami.................V." 69
IMPOIIID DANISH PAII SKIM
ceasw/snap. P.O. /y* Substitute .'Sf-97*
^-V ^"V. "M'CIOVl.NIGHT -,
round i^aKe,o;Kc.oz^/ ^/ Dipers............. m s? ^;-~, M
tMl AMOUNT SHOWN WHl tf .
OlDiXTfOflOMtIC PUCI '
12-OZ CAN
NORMEL
SPAM

COUOM
HI
CUSIOMII
mnmnnmmotanum^^ noniscxoto haurs. w .kpons.hi f0. TYPoc.APH,ct iR,o
'HI AMOUNT SHOWN WHl U
DflDUCUDftOMlIO Pir I
' BO* nin #WC
MUfcLLti:
!-*
ONf
COUPO
p5c- M'Mtlll
Ot VMMKIUI
COUH9M mui iMftl iai MM U
I
MOUNISMOVVNWm.il I
CHJCHDIIOMIIC PUCI I I
-OZ. CAN miAMO I I
I -
. COUPON
PM
I CUSIOMII
I I f UHNIIUIK POUSH
I I COUPON aoor ru 1AI *w
AIR
FRESHERER
AU VAJBTTMa
ONI
' COUPON
PCI
I CUSTOM!!
I
I COUPON OOOO IHtU SAT MM U
tH( AMOUNT SHOWN Will t I
OflOUCTfOflOMIIG PUCI I I
12-OZ. OX I '
i :
i i
PRICE REDUCTION
. I
GLOSS N'
TOSS
| I CUSIOMI
I
IMI AMOUNI SHOWN Will || ,
DIOUCIIOflOMIIC PUCI '
J70I CAN JOHNSON S
oni KLEAR i ONI
COUPON mm AAm ^.M | I
I 'I.SON
I I
,. FLOOR WAX
COUPON COOO THAI IAI. AUtU |
COUPON
'"< oooo nau IAI mm. i.


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EI6Q0IGMQ_MQUF0L INGEST_TIME 2013-05-24T23:38:58Z PACKAGE AA00014307_00188
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES