The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00180

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJewish IFIIoiriidliiai m
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 7Number 19
Friday, September 23,1977
Price 35 Cents
Margulies Reports on UJA Prime Minister's Mission
Five days of traveling,
working, meetings and all
types of stress but it was
the most inspiring five days of
my life," declared Stanley
Margulies, M.D., 1978 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund campaign
chairman.
Dr. Margulies, along with
Herbert D. Katz, immediate
past Federation president;
Moses Hornstein, vice presi-
dent and Donald H. Klein,
executive director, joined over
300 American Jewish com-
munity leaders for the United
Jewish Appeal Prime Minis-
ter'* Mission to Israel.
THE INTENSIVE first
dav of the four-day mission,"
explained Dr. Margulies,
"brought the leadership group
to the Western Wall to hear
Mrs. Anatoly Sharansky
speak, in Hebrew, of her
husband still imprisoned in
the Soviet Union.
"There was a moving
prayer reading at the Wall.
This celebrated the tenth An-
niversary of the Reunification
of Jerusalem. While at the
Wall, the group also met with
two recent immigrants from
the Soviet Union now living in
Israel.
"We continued our tour by
visiting both families and
facilities in five of the 27
development towns built in
DR. STANLEY
MARGULIES
the last 29 years with the aid
of the Jewish Agency. The
development towns visited,
including Dimona, Ofakim,
Arad, Beersheba and Sderot,
house many of the Russian
Olim arriving in Israel since
1970.
"THE CULMINATION of
the trip was an invitation to
the Knesset to have dinner
with Israel's Prime Minister
Menachem Begin, who, in a
moving speech called,
'American Jewry the greatest
asset to the people of Israel.'
He stressed the need to help
solve the severe housing prob-
lems affecting 45,000 im-
migrant families in Israel.
'Let's make a common effort
to solve these problems,'
Begin said.
I "How can the Jewish people
| live with social injustice?"
i Begin asked the 300 com-
munity leaders of this largest
ever leadership mission.
"Poverty in our midst is in-
tolerable at a time when we
must be strong," Margulies
reported Begin said.
A fund-raising caucus to
kick off the 1978 campaign,
nationally, followed the Prime
Minister's address. Re-
sponding to Begin's challenge
that American Jewry
celebrate 30 years of partner-
ship with Israel, by creating a
special effort to overcome
social problems, $23.2 million
was pledged for the 1978 cam-
paign.
;:::->::-:-:-:-:':*:::-:

Women's Division President To rJFSB Joins Large City
Depart for Israel, East Europe
Phyllis Kraemer, president of
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Women's Division,
will depart Sunday for a two-
week journey to Israel and Ru-
mania.
AS PART of "A Woman's
Way.'' the special Mission
sponsored by the Women's
Division of the National United
Jewish Appeal, Mrs. Kraemer
will experience what it is like to
be a Jewish woman behind the
Iron Curtain and in the Jewish
State.
Top women leaders of Jewish
communities around the United
States will take part in the trip
to Bucharest and Israel,
visiting, as a highlight,
operations of the Joint Dis-
tribution Committee in
Rumania.
MRS. KRAEMER said that
the Mission is called "A Woan's
Way" because "women have a
special way of doing things...a
special way of seeing, a special
way of explaining, a special way
of caring and sharing." She
noted that Mission participants
will be meeting and speaking
with their counterparts in Israel
and will learn of their interests
and concerns.
PHYLLIS KRAEMER
Budgeting Conference
The Jewish Federation of South Broward has become the
twenty-eighth community in the United States to become a
member of the Large City Budgeting Conference (LCBC) of the
Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds, according to
Federation President Lewis E. Cohn.
"The LCBC is a cooperative process of research, consultation
and recommendation on the budgets of 32 national agencies in
order to improve the budgeting of these communities for
national and overseas needs," explained Cohn.
"The Federation will benefit from the LCBC," added Cohn,
"by receiving annual reports plus special reports on national
agencies which would be helpful to our allocations to these agen-
cies. LCBC at times does special studies of the budgeting of
communities for national agencies. They visit and meet with
local committees such as ours to discuss and provide consul-
tation and guidance. One of the major advantages of member-
ship is community input into budgetary and procedural matters
of major national and overseas agencies through representatives
on LCBC committees."
Neutralize Arab Security Risks
Federation Israel Mission
Set to Leave Oct. 16
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A new
plan for settlements on the'West
I Bank is being proposed by
[Agriculture Minister Ariel
1 Sharon, head of the ministerial
settlement committee, which
would establish urban and
I agricultural settlements to
prevent the existing Arab
population centers from
spreading in such a way that they
would become security risks for
; If
plan, reportedly in the
I'ina! stages of preparation, would
lincn-;i the Jewish population
larouiui Jerusalem, establish a
[network of Jewish settlements
Iwest of the Arab population
[centers of Nablus, Jenin and
[Kamallah and build a series of
Iroads from the Mediterranean
|oea to the Jordan River.
ACCORDING TO the proposal
iwhich was revealed by Maariv,
there will be three new Jewish
urban centers in the Jerusalem
?ion. at Givon, west of the
*1. Maaleh Adumim east of
city, and Efrath to the south.
* will become a civilian
"tense line for Jerusalem.
In Samaria, an eastern strip of
[ewish settlements will be built
~ a region where few Arabs live
Provide a continuation of
Jewish settlements trom the
coast.
The plan calls for an east-west
road from the sea to the Jordan
CHIEF OF Staff Gen. Mor-
dechai Gur told the settlers that
the Israeli army had been part-
ners with them in creating the
THE SETTLEMENT DERBY
River in the southern Samaria
region along which will be
establshed industrial centers,
army installation and civilian
settlements.
THERE WILL be two north
south roads from Meggido to
Latrun and from Afula to Arad.
both of which will pass through
Samaria. There are also plans for
a series of settlements south of
Hebron that will use the Kifyat
Arba settlement as its urban
center.
Meanwhile, at a ceremony on
the Golan Heights marking the
10th anniversary of Jewish
settlements there, Sharon said
that the Syrian conquest of
Lebanon, through United States
aid, had totally worsened the
situation for Israel in the north.
He said there can be no with-
drawal from the Golan.
Sharon told the large rally at
Merom Hagolan that Israel must
set up a target to settle two-
million Jews during the next 20
years in a strip from the Golan
Heights to Sharm el-Sheikh.
settlements. He said security was
never the central consideration in
the fulfillment of Zionism.
He said the settlements do not
create security problems since
settlements are the policy while
defense is only the means of
securing that policy. Israel Galili,
who headed the ministerial
settlement committee under the
Labor government, said the
Golan settlements were not
established to be torn down.
Making final plans for the Federation Israel Mission which will
leave in three weeks are (seated from left) Jo Ann Katz, past
Women's Division campaign vice president; Joyce Newman,
immediate past Women's Division president; Dr. Sam Meline,
Mission chairman, and Lewis E. Cohn, Federation president.
Standing is Dr. Stanley Margulies, Federation vice president
and general campaign chairman of the 1978 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
Nearly 125 men and women will be par-
ticipating in the upcoming Mission to Israel
sponsored by the Jewish Federation of South
Broward, Oct. 16-26. Chairman Dr. Sam
Meline briefed the group, discussing
itinerary, and the many special meetings
with Israelis and government officials which
will take place.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, September
23,1977
UJA: A Stepping Stone to Jewish Identity
By MIRIAM CANTOR
"We do well raising money
here," the distingi ished white-
haired community It ader told his
audience of 200 Jews from small
and medium-sized towns nestled
in the rich farming country of
America's Midwest. "We do
better than some big cities
because we know everybody."
"But we have a serious prob-
lem. We are not militant enough.
We are quietists, we are pietists.
We say a prayer on Friday night
and hope all's going to be for the
best. We must become more
affirmable Jews. We've got to
make Jewishness, our relation to
the people of Israel something
that is as close to our souls as our
children and our homes."
JIM MYERS' public soul-
searching at a bagel-and-lox
breakfast in Springfield, 111., past
of a three-day UJA regional
Leadership Conference preparing
for Campaign '78 echoes ques-
tions being asked in thousands of
Jewish communities, in countless
meetings across the length and
breadth of the United States: "I
am Jewish but I don't know how
to live creatively as a Jew. How
can I express my Jewish feeling
for my fellow Jews around the
world? Where can I find sus-
tencance and direction?"
The same questions are asked
repeatedly during UJA Missions
to Israel. During one such en-
counter. President Ephraim Kat-
zir mused: "Who would have
belived a generation ago, that
this was possible?"
But for them, and thousands of
other American Jews, there are
Jewish time bombs ticking away.
They are Jews in search of direc-
tion, Jews looking for new ways
to build Jewish life. "Just how
important is this learning
process.. .and the eventual
realization that being Jewish
means being an active part of a
community of Jews that has no
boundaries?
FOR JEWS living in Middle
America in small towns tucked
away, insulated in cocoon-like
existence the learning process
is sometimes very personal and
very painful. Jim Myers
reminded his audience the
youngest a 19-year-old college
student, the oldest an 81-year-old
grandmother of a spine-
chilling incident:
"Some years ago in this small
town we had a swastika painted
on one of the synagogues and no-
body knew about it...it was
quieted. Some years ago, one of
our families was hounded from a
neighborhood by anti-Semitic
neighbors and forced to
move...and nobody knew about
it. I don't think this would
happen today because we're
beginning to understand that
what happens to one Jew in
Springfield, 111., happens to all
Jews.
"We have to become more
affirmable... we've got to come to
grips with the fact that the future
of the Jews in Israel, Jews in
South America, Jews in Spring-
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destiny."
THE LEARNING process is
important, too, for the generation
of American Jews in the 25-35
age group, the "future" Jews.
Their profile is light years away
from the bubbas and zeydahs
who came to America, clinging to
the tradition of the stetl. Today
the young Jewish adult doesn't
have much use for affili-
ation... she/he is an individual,
mobile, changing jobs, changing
communities and postponing
marriage.
They are, in the words of Rabbi
Gerald Bubis of the Hebrew
Union College in Los Angeles, "a
group running in search of direc-
tion, of purpose, of new models."
Surprisingly, the United Jew-
ish Appeal is. for many American
Jews, young, old, and middle-
aged, a first step in discovering
Jewish "roots." It is a national
consciousness-raising organize
tion, a stepping-stone to Jewish
identity.
WHY? BECAUSE, as UJA
General Chairman, Leonard R.
Strelitz says, UJA is more than a
campaign for dollars." True, in
its 39-year history this vast net-
work of caring has pumped
almost $4 billion through the
Jewish "lifeline." But, as Irving
Bernstein, UJA Executive vice
chairman, reaches out to Jews, as
he moves aroung the United
States with a fervor that could be
described as evangelical, he
explains, "UJA the Jewish
lifeline is a concept for living."
"It is the end of that pitiful
period of the voyages of the
damned," Bernstein declares.
"UJA says 'We are One in
mind, one in body, one in spirit."
Is it just another slogan or is it
reality?
WHAT UJA says is "come, be
part of us, be part of our com-
munity... help us build for the
future. Look at what is possible.
From the aloneness of each in-
dividual dream comes collective
will and strength. Out of will and
strength comes com-
munity ... and community makes
"We Are One" not a slogan, but a
Jewish way of life.
Are American Jews becoming
more affirmable? Is UJA a
stepping stone to Jewish iden-
tity? As Campaign 78 "30
Years of Partnership" begins,
the question will be put to its
most severe test, for American
Jewry and all Israel.
HIAS (Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society), which is supported in
part by the Combined Jewish Appeal of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward, is actively resettling Syrian Jewish women
who have recently arrived from Damascus, according to Holly-
wood resident Nathan Pritcher, a board member of HIAS With
HIAS President Carl Bernstein (left) are a recently arrived
Syrian famdy and Gaynor Jacobson (right), HIAS executive
director.
Israel Claims Terrorists Building
Fortifications in Southern Lebanon
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israeli circles claimed that
terrorists in southern Lebanon are constructing a system of
military positions and fortifications near the Israeli border for
eventual occupation by Syrian forces. The circles said there was
no doubt that the work is being supervised and directed by the
Syrians.
According to these circles, the terrorists, using mechanized
equipment, are building tank and artillery positions and in-
fantry strongholds, mainly in the central and eastern sections
of the border area directly opposite Israeli settlements such as
Misgav Am and Avivim.
THEY ARE also claimed to have rehabilitated the air strip
near Nabatiyeh village that would enable planes to take off only
20 kilometers north of the Israeli border.
The Israelis said the purpose was to prepare a military
infrastructure for use by Syrian forces should they be moved
southward toward Israel or in the event of a flare-up of fighting
in the Lebanese border region. So far, however, Syrian forces
have not penetrated southern Lebanon.
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Explore 'Roots' For College Credit
High school students
can explore their Jewish
Roots and receive college
credits through the South
Broward Judaica High
School, according to Moses
Homstein, vice president of
the Jewish Federation of
South Borward and chair-
man of its Jewish Education
Committee.
"The students in South
Broward should not deprive
themselves of their Jewish
heritage. The courses will be
both educational and en-
lightening," Hornstein ex-
plained.
"Some of the topics to
be studied are, The Jewish
:#:
Short Story, 20th Century
Jewish Literature, Famous
Jews in American History
and Jewish Mysticism."
For further information,
contact the Federation office!
South Africa's Botha
Was Visitor in Israel
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM-(JTA)-Gov-
ernment officials confirmed here
reports from Johannesburg that
South African Foreign Minister
Roel of Botha spent the weekend
in Israel on his way to Europe.
They declined to confirm that
he had met with Israel Foreign
Minister Moshe Dayan, but a
South African Embassy spokes-
man in Tel Aviv confirmed that
Botha had paid "a courtesy call"
on Dayan. The spokesman said
the South African official had
also toured the fortress of
Masada.
BOTHA apparently arrived in
Israel late Friday night and then
left for Geneva where he
reportedly was scheduled to meet
with Felix Houphouet-Boigny.
President of the Ivory Coast and
Black African elder statesman.
It was clear that Israeli of-
ficials would have preferred to
keep Botha's stopover here a
secret and were disconcerted
when word of it leaked out in
Johannesburg.
The Israeli reaction was due to
the fact that Israel has come
under incessant criticism in
international forums from Third
World and "progressive"
countries for its ties with South
Africa, even though its diplomats
demonstrate time and again that
these ties are no broader nor
deeper than those which it has
with other countries.
IN A related development, the
Israeli Foreign Ministry office
"emphatically'' denied a claim in
the latest issue of Newsweek of
Israeli-South African arms
cooperation.
There was no truth in the
claim, the spokesman asserted.
He also denied a CBS-TV report
that Dayan did indeed meet with
King Hussein of Jordan during
his trip to London two weeks ago.
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Friday, September 23, 1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page;
CJF Study Finds American
Jewry Raised $6.9 Billion
Over Last 38 Years
In the 38-year period from 1939
through 1976, some $6.9 billion
was raised by the central Jewish
community organizations in the
United States in their annual
campaigns, including $3.7 billion
raised between 1967-76.
The Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund cam-
paign of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward has been a part of
this humanitarian effort for 35
years.
ACCORDING to data con-
tained in the new study of
Programs and Finances of
Jewish Communal Services, pub-
lished by the Council of Jewish
Federations (CJF), 1974 was the
peak fund-raising year, when
Federations-UJA in the United
States raised about $660 million,
with some $360 million of the in-
crease since 1970 directed
towards the Israel Emrgency
Fund.
This is the eighteenth edition
of the CJF study on Jewish Com-
munal Services prepared by S. P.
Goldberg, assistant director of
CJF. It notes a $3 million in-
crease in grants from general
community United Funds for
local Jewish services from 1971-
75; a doubling of $35 million
from 1970 to 1974 in income for
care for the elderly.
Other significant data include
a total of $29 million raised in
1975 for Federation Endowment
Funds: and 1972 income totals of
SI50 million for Synagogues and
over $150 million for Jewish
ducation.
THE STUDY also indicates
that total income of Jewish com-
munal services from all sources
was $2.8 billion in 1976.
The study also reveals that:
United Fund grants
al-
located to local Jewish services
totalled$26.5 million in 1975:
Costs of administration f"r
'federations. covering fund-
ik. budgeting, planning,
central costs and other functions,
iveraged 11 percent of total cam-
n results, excluding New
City, in 1976 a drop from
l prior level of 14 percent:
In 1973, Welfare Fund bud-
i I allocatit na for overseas needs
vent: an additional
* i cent vent to national
agencies and 23 percent to local
ii r\ ii es respectively;
U.I As share rose to 88
int in 1974. but decreased to
~'l percent in 1975:
Federations provided some
$95 million in 1975 for local
services, excluding refugee care,
an increase of $33 million since
1971. The Consumer Price Index
had risen by about one-third in
this period.
Welfare Fund support for ser-
vices in Israel from 1948-76
enabled UJA to provide the
Jewish Agency with some $2.8
million.
The CJF study also notes that:
The Israel Education Fund
of UJA received $45 million from
1964-76;
JDC use of UJA funds for
its programs in Israel amounted
to some $250 million from 1948
until 1976;
Israel Bond sales since 1951
in North America total $2.9
billion;
Immigration to Israel has
declined from 56,000 annually in
1972 to 20,000 in 1976.
The study indicates that
Federation support of local
services has increased since 1971
in the areas of refugee care.
Jewish education and community
relations, homes for the aged,
centers and employment services,
and family and child care, but
decreased for hospitals.
DURING 1974, 57 family
agencies with more than 700 pro-
fessional staff members, reported
some 82,500 cases on their rolls.
Thirty-one percent of the total
were elderly people.
Statistics also show that
Federation and United Way
support of centers and youth
services rose 148 percent in the
last decade.
Federation support of Jewish
education in the United States
totalled $18.5 million in 1975.
Federations provided $17 million
in grants (excluding New York
City) for Jewish education during
the same year, or some 25 percent
of the total amount for local
services under Federation
support.
THE STUDY also reveals in-
creases in support from Federa-
tion and United Funds for local
Jewish services in the last
decade, as follows:
Recreation services, $17.2
million:
Jewish education. $11.1
million:
Family-child care services.
S8.3 million:
Aged care. S6.4 million:
Local community relations.
82 million:
Employment-vocational
ices, 81.8 million.
The Council of Jewish Federa-
tions is the association of central
community organizations
Federations. Welfare Funds.
Community Councils serving
800 Jewish communities in North
America. It aids these com-
munities to mobilize maximum
support for major overseas,
national and local services in-
volving financing, planning and
operating health, welfare, cul-
tural, educational, community
relations and other programs
benefit ting all residents.
Dayan Calls for Understanding
In Israels Search for Peace

Foreign Minister Moshe
Dayan called for increased under-
standing by both the Carter Ad-
ministration and by the Jews of
America in his address to the
United Jewish Appeal's Prime
Minister's Mission in Jerusalem.
"At this time, the most impor-
tant cause is for American Jewry
to understand us," Dayan said.
"When it comes to the problems
of peace today, there may be dif-
ferences of views, but we are not
hardliners. We are responsible for
the peace of the people of Israel."
"THERE IS a better chance
for a peace agreement today than
in the 30-year history of the
modern state. It will be a heavy
task which cannot be accom-
plished without pain. However,
we are optimistic about peace,"
Dayan told the 300 Jewish com-
munity leaders who were in Israel
at the invitation of Prime Minis-
ter Menachem Begin.
The UJA-Federation leaders
completed their intensive four-
day program which launched the
1978 campaign. UJA Gen. Chair-
man Leonard R. Strelitz declared
that this will be the largest cam-
paign in the history of the UJA.
Visiting recently established
communities, the Mission par-
ticipants witnessed the spirit of
the first settlers of the state a
spirit of strength and vitality,
which still exists and is felt as
Israel celebrates its 30 Years of
Partnership with American
Jewry.
44 New Precincts Created in Broward
Supervisor of Elections Jane
Carroll announced recently that
44 new precincts have been
created in Broward County.
"This was done," Mrs. Carroll
said, "in order to better serve the
voters of Broward County on
election day."
THE 44 precincts divided
existing precincts in Broward
that had over 1,700 registered
voters. "This is the last oppor-
tunity we will have to divide
precincts until after the 1980 cen-
sus," Mrs. Carroll added.
"The Supervisor of Elections
office will take over the hiring
and direct supervision of precinct
workers as of the first of the year.
We will be manning these 44 new
precincts in order to better serve
the voters of Broward on election
day,'' Mrs. Carroll said.
"Precinct 8A in the Palmaire
division of Pompano Beach was
one of the largest changes made
because the fast growth in that
area required an additional four
precincts in that area. Precinct
IB in Deerfield's Century Village
area also required to be divided
into four precincts," Mrs. Carroll
added.
"We strive to eliminate
waiting lines on election day.
World-Wide Solidarity Week For
Soviet Jews Slated for December
By EDWIN EYTAN
The Presidium of the Brussels
Conference for Soviet Jewry
ended a two-day meeting with a
decision to hold a world-wide
"solidarity week" for Soviet Jews
from Dec. 5-12. The occasion will
be used for siminars, demon-
strations, exhibitions and a
public information campaign.
YOSEF ALMOGI. chairman
of the Jewish Agency and World
Zionist Organizat'on Executives
who opened the conference, said
the solidarity gesture and other
efforts on behalf of Jews in the
USSR were needed because the
Soviet Union has become "a
world center for anti-Semitic
propaganda" and responds only
to world public pressure.
Philip Klutznick. chairman of
the World Jewish Congress
Executive Hoard, said Soviet
anti-Semitism was state-or-
ganized and manipulated. He
t he Soviet Academy, a
government-controlled body, as
one of the main disseminators of
hate material in the Soviet Union
and abroad. He said the Soviets
no longer even try to use anti-
Zionism as a pretext for their
open anti-Semitism.
THE CONFERENCE here
examined the consequences of
the Helsinki accords and
evaluated the prospects of the
forthcoming Belgrade conference.
It also dealth with the issues of
Jewish prisoners in the Soviet
Union, anti-Jewish measures and
Jewish culture inside the USSR.
Participants at the meeting in-
cluded Jewish Agency Treasurer
Leon Dulzin and Rabbi Alex-
ander Schindler. chairman of the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Or-
ganizations.
Supervisor of Elections Jane
Carroll reviews voting pre-
cincts recently split in Brow-
ard County.
This is something that many
voters are used to in the North
but it is our attempt in Broward
County to see that lines are
limted as much as possible so
that every registered voter has
the opportunity to participate in
the system."
"THE POLLING places for
the new precincts will be listed in
the daily newspapers the
weekend before the next general
election, and I encourage all of
you to check that listing at that
time. Those voters in the new
precincts will be getting new
voter registration cards in the
mail in the near future." Mrs.
Carroll added.
Other precincts were divided in
the county from Hollywood to
Deerfield Beach.
arnett
anK
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
IF YOU'RE 50 OR OVER,
I CAN SIMPLIFY YOUR LIFE.
I can combine all your auto and property
insurance policies into onethe Reserve Key 50 Program
You'll get even more protection,
and you'll have only one low premium to pay.
Sound good? Call me for details.
Jack Berman Insurance Agency, Inc.
2739 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, Florida 33020
Phone: 921-7744
Automobile Insurance For Senior Drivers
Tenants Form Homeowners Policy Tor
Apartment or Condominimum Owners
A Happy
and Healthy
New Year
from the Barnetts


Pages
The Jewish Floridian and Shofdr of QrtaUr Hollywood
Friday, September 23,1977
Sadat Teaching Qaddafi a Lesson?
By NISISIM RE JWAN
Exactly two weeks after the
flare-up of active hostilities on
the Egyptian-Libyan border,
President Anwar el Sadat
reiterated his original statement
that the real aim of the action
which hia army took against
Libya was simply "to teach
Qaddafi a lesson," not to topple
hia regime.
If the Libyan leader shows that
he has indeed learned hie lesson.
Sadat said in an interview on the
American TV network NBC, well
and good; if not, then more such
lessons will be forthcoming.
THIS ALL seems to boil down
to the conclusion that Sadat's
four-day war against Qaddafi was
essentially a punitive action.
However, though there had
indeed been plenty of reasons for
Sadat's loss of patience with hia
youthful and rather hot-headed
neighbor, the timing of the action
inevitably gave rise to
speculation.
Sadat himself has on more
than one occasion dismissed as
"black propaganda" all attempts
to place the mini-war with Libya
in the larger framework of the
current situation in the Middle
East, the close relations between
Cairo and Washington, his
worsening relations with
Moscow, and so on.
Nevertheless, even for those of
us who do not believe in the
conspiracy theory of history
there remain a few curious
coincidences which at times seem
to be rather more than just that.
It may be best to start by
speculating on what the clashes
were not or not exactly.
THEY WERE notat least
not quite a war by proxy which
Egypt waa conducting on
Washington's behalf and which
Libya waa waging for Moscow's
benefit.
They were notor not
wholly concerned with the
Arab-Israeli conflict and the
subject of if and how to settle it
peacefully. It must be assumed
that Sadat's decision to attack
Libya did not represent an at-
tempt on his part to eliminate,
weaken or put to shame hia
leading "Rejection Front" op
ponent. Likewise, the crisis could
not have been an attempt on
Qaddafi's part to foil Sadat's
current campaign for a peace
settlement with Israel.
They were not. finally, merely
Editor's Corner
Double Presidential Standard
With the opening of the 32nd session of the General
Assembly next Tuesday, the spotlight of the world is
being focused on our nation. In particular, the Israel-
haters are out in force.
It was therefore doubly disappointing that President
Carter chose the eve of the occasion to brand Israel's
continuing establishment of new settlements on the West
Bank as "illegal."
Only a month ago, his position was that the settle-
ments are "regrettable," but that he did not see them as a
deterrent to the pursuit of peace.
Why has he suddenly changed his tack?
The new Carter position may not be sufficiently sig-
nificant to alter overnight his 17-point decline in
popularity according to a national public opinion poll last
week. But it should certainly do so among the Arabs, who
have been expressing increasing disappointment with the
Carter administration's liberal Israeli policy.
Meanwhile, Carter has offered no similar shootings
from the hip about the Palestine Liberation
Organization's reaffirmation the other week of its
determination to destroy Israel.
It is this sort of Carter double standard that will
make the Israel-haters' job easier when the UN gets going
for its new season's performance.
Discussing his 17-point decline in popularity the
other day, the President blamed it on unemployment,
inflation, the anger of the Black community one can
go on and on.
Now we give him another reason.
Passion Play Changes
If it is true, then it is good news that the Passion Play
due for Oberammergau in 1980 will have gone through
some judicious editing. All one has to do is to have seen
this performance just once in order to understand, first-
hand, the root source of anti-Semitism in Europe these
last 2,000 years. It is a hope devoutly to be consummated.
Frankly, we doubt that it will.
a ploy of Sadat's to prove that as
far as Africa was concernedand
the undercover struggle now
going on in the Horn of Africa
between the two Super-
powershe was on the side of the
angels.
IT IS far-fetched, too, to see in
the move an attempt by Cairo to
show that it is too preoccupied
with African affairs to be in a
position to play a leading role in
the Middle East conflictor that
Egypt's African concerns are
such that her desire for peace on
' the eastern front cannot be put
into question.
There is every reason to
believe, therefore, that the short
frontier war between the armies
of Egypt and Libya was a local
Qaddafi over the years has a lot
in common both with Islamic
fundamentalism and Nassenat
socialism. The result has been
that Libya is en-
couragingmaterially and
verballyall those elements
inside Egypt which are disen-
chanted with Sadat and his new
policies both at home and abroad.
It is thus probably no coin-
cidence that the clashes on the
Egypt-Libya borders occurred on
the eve of the celebrations of the
25th anniversary of the Free
Officers revolution of 1962.
THE FACT is that for a
number of years now July 23 has
been feted with far more pomp in
Libya than in Egypt. Nasser's
memory lives on in broadcasts
The Arab Scwe
affair, first and foremost, to be
viewed in the context of relations
between the two countries.
The broadest possible in-
terpretation that can be put on it
would be that it has some
bearing, too, on the respective
stands of the two countries vis-a-
vis recent events in Arab North
Africa and the Horn of Africa.
FOR SOME time now, Sadat
has been having trouble on the
home front with two kinds of
activistsMoslem fanatics on
the right and Nasserists and
Marxists on the left. The
ideological stand expounded by
from Tripoli which daily carries
recorded speeches and
pronouncements of the leader
whose policies and postures
Qaddafi has been trying to
emulate and whose legacy he has
openly claimed.
Moreover, though no concrete
evidence seems to have been
produced so far, Cairo has
consistently accused Qaddafi of
planning and financing recent
terrorist operations by the ex-
tremist Moslem group calling
itself "Atonement and
Migration," operations alleged to
have been part of a plan to
overthrow Sadat.
But Libya is being accused,
not only of planning Sadat's
overthrow but also of trying to
topple the pro-Western regimes
of Sudan and Chad. Here, in fact,
is where Sadat's worse fears seem
to reside.
HE HAS reason to see Libya's
steadily improving relations with
the Soviet Union and the supply
of Soviet arms to Qaddafiand
to Ethiopiaas part of a wider
Soviet design for Africa which
includes the encirclement of
Egypt and the Sudan. Qaddafi's
alliance with Algeria's
Boumediennewho is currently
helping a resistance movement in
the Western Sahara against
Morocco and Mauritaniacould
only have added to Sadat's fears
in this respect.
That the Egypt-Libya clashes
have some bearing on wider
African and world affairs is
suggested, too, by a number of
pronouncements which came
from Cairo almost two weeks
after the flare-up. For instance,
Egyptian Prime Minister
Mamdouh Salem told parliament
that Egypt would not tolerate the
presence of "a major power" on
her border with Libya, and that
hia country will defend the Sudan
and the Nile River against any
"foreign aggression."
Thus, while active hostilities
have ceased the war of words
continued unabated. For once,
Sadat's famous dictum that the
Arabs can quarrel today and
embrace tomorrow does not seem
to be entirely valid.
Advanced Weapons Build-Up
andTMOFAt^FGREATEl* WU^K^oV
HoUywood Ofnce-SultaSOB-iaeS. Federal Hwy.. DanU, Fla. SS004
Telephone M0-901S
' 2K5SL?d PLAT 130 NE eth 8t., Miami. FU. UU Phone S7I-4S05
FRKD K SHOCHCT SUZANNE SHOCHBT SELMA1C THOMPSON
Editor and PubUaher Ex.cuUve Editor Assistant to PubUaber
The Jewish Florldlan Dee* Nat Oue ra n tee The Kashmth
Of The Met chsaaue AnvsrHiee la t* Cehnmii
Published Bl-Weekly
Second Claae Poetare Paid at Dan la, FTa. 864600
Jewish Federation of South Broward. Inc. SHOFAR EDITORIAL
ADVISORY COMMITTEE-Nathan Prttcher, Chairman; LewU E. Oohn;
Kelvin H. Bur; Samuel Heine, D.M.D.
The Jewish FterMian has ahaerhie the Jewish Unto/ and (he Jewish Weekly.
Mswhir ef Mai Jewish Telenrtnhlc Agency, Seven Am Feature Syndicate, WerteV
wMe News Service, Nettensl SHerlal AssaciaNea, American AjseclaMea ef
aaNsh-Jewtsh Newaseera, end the Merles Press Aisdatten.
SUBSCRIFTIONRATBSflecalarea) One Year7.M Out etTewn Ueen Renuest
Friday, September 28,1977 11TISHRI6738
Volume 7 Number 19
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) With
new weapons continuing to flow
into the Middle East, mainly
from Western nations, advanced
aircraft, tanks and missiles,
including battlefield surface-to-
surface rockets, are now com-
monplace in the region. The
extent of the build-up emerges in
a report by the International
Institute for Strategic Studies,
"The Military Balance 1977-78."
It shows that virtually every
Middle East country signed a
major arms agreement in the
course of 1976 and the beginning
of 1977. In two separate deals,
Egypt is buying from France
unspecified quantities of Crotale
surface-to-air missiles (SAM) and
two Agosta-class submarines.
The SAMs are due to be delivered
this year.
SYRIA'S ARMS agreements
were with Austria, France and
Italy. Austria is selling her 2,000
trucks; France, 2,000 Milan anti-
tank guided weapons and a
quantity of Gazelle helicopters;
Italy is supplying six helicopters.
Jordan will receive 14 batteries of
improved Hawk SAMs from the
United States as well as 100
Vulcan anti-aircraft guns.
Israel's six arms deals, all with
the United States, were for 125
medium tanks, guns, self-
propelled guns, Sidewinder air-to-
air missiles, six batteries of
improved Hawk anti-aircraft
missiles and 400 Maverick
missiles.
Britain agreed to sell her 11
Strikemaater training aircraft.
Iran contracted the biggest
number of separate arms deals in
the year under review no lees
than 12 with Britain supplying
Rapier SAMs and Scorpion
tanks; Italy, helicopters; and the
United States a wide range of
miaailea, aircraft and helicopters.
A SEPARATE section of the
report shows the array of forces
which Middle East countries
deploy. Israel's medium tank
force had reached 3,000 compared
with 2,700 last year. They include
1,000 Centurion tanks, 66(
American-made tanks, as well at
converted Soviet tanks anc
Israeli-developed Chariots.
But there was only a slight
increase in the number of combat
aircraft now put at 549.
Syria, which has doubled the
size of her armed forces to
227,500 men in the past five
years, has also increased her
slight gross increase over last
year, the proportion of the GNP
spent on defense 36.3 percent
was considerably lower than
the 40.8 percent of the GNP in
1973.
Israel's defense burden is,
IN BRITAIN
number of tanks to 2,600,
compared with 2,000 in 1975.
THE SYRIAN navy has also
taken possession of two Petya
class frigates. No significant
change was shown in her air force
but some aircraft are believed to
be in storage.
Egypt's arsenal, hampered by
lack of substantial new supplies
from the Soviet Union as well as
spare parts difficulties, appears
to have dwindled in some items,
such as tanks a decline of 750
while she waita for deliveries
from the West. Nevertheless,
Egypt's tank force still has 1,930
heavy and light tanks.
East states, according to the
report. Israel's expenditure in
1976 is put at $4.27 billion out of
an estimated Gross National
Product of $12.6 billion.
ALTHOUGH THIS was a
nowever, at least partially offset
by her emergence as an arms
exporter as well as purchaser.
The report noted that she is listed
as a primary supplier to no less
than five Latin American
countries Chile, Ecuador,
Guatemala, Honduras and
Mexico.
Egypt's defense expenditure in
1976 was $4.36 billion. As a
proportion of her GNP it had
risen to 37 percent from 31
percent in 1973.
THIS WAS the first time that
the proportion of the GNP was
greater than in Israel.
Saudi Arabia's 1976 defense
bill was given in the report as
$7.64 billion, compared with $9
billion in 1975, $6.7 billion in 1974
and $1.8 billion in 1973.
|American Delegation Visite|
Synagogue in Budapest
BUDAPEST (JTA) An American Congressional
delegation headed by Rep. Joshua Eilberg (D., Pa.), chairman
of the House judiciary subcommittee on immigration, citizen-
ship and international law, visited Budapest's main synagogue
and conferred at length with leaders and members of the local
Jewish community. It is believed to be the first such visit in
post-war years.
THE CONGRESSIONAL delegation first visited the com-
munity building where they met with a large Hungarian dele-
gation led by Prof. Sandor Scheiber. Then they visited the Maiz
Synagogue where they met with the Chief Rabbi and members
of the Jewish Religious Council.
.j* ** |fo visited the old Jewish cemetery, the
Jewish Museum and various communal installations. In the
njjtmgs. the Congressional delegation inquired about the
situation of Jews in Hungary.


Friday, September 23,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
1%
U of MScene: Single Men Fear Wrong* JAP Values
By DON ALTSHULER
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
The saying goes that when you
have six Jews in p room you'll
end up with at least 12 different
opinions on any given subject.
University of Miami Jewish
students are no exception to that
saying especially when it
comes to talking about their
Jewishness in terms of dating
and single life.
Admittedly, few college-age
Jews have the burning desire to
recite kiddish and sip Mogen
David wine on Friday nights
when other desirables are bur-
ning and Liebfraumilch white
wine is around. They remember
hearing that college years are
supposed to be the best ones of
your life religious maturation
certainly can wait until after
graduation.
WHILE secular Jews on cam-
pus traditionally shun places like
Hillel or Chabad House (they
describe them as too religious),
they remain tacitly interested in
meeting other Jews like them-
selves Jews who share similar
likes and dislikes indigenous to
i suburbia where many of them
grew up.
These Jews may find each
other by chance, such as meeting
at singles bars. Usually, the at-
mosphere is more casual and no
one is forced to advertise that
they are Jewish. Usually, also,
such chance meetings never
materialize.
Along comes the Jewish
Singles Club to the rescue. This
all-in-one coterie is designed to
mix yarmulkas and JAPs
(Jewish American Prince.
Princess) in a secular ambiance.
The only thing Jewish about the
club is that its members are
Jewish. For some, that's more
than enough reference to religion;
for others, it's abominable.
ON THE UM campus, Russell
Galbut and Ronalee Eisenberg
are organizing the first dance for
the new Singles Club.
"Singles really is to give kids
something tangible," Russell ex-
plained. "Jews are rediscovering
their essence; they want roots
and value systems and that's the
reason for the popularity in
Jewish singles clubs, especially
for secular Jews who don't fit in
the Hillel scene.
"If you bring these Jews (secu-
lar) in on a social level with other
Jews, it could be a stepping stone
to their taking interest in being
'People like me won't come to singles. I'm scared off
by JAPs, and I don't want anything to do with them.
They are just Jewish by birth and most of them don't
know who they are."
Former editor of Hurricane
Jewish. It could open avenues for
certain types of activities that
don't go on at Hillel or Chabad."
RUSSELL and Ronalee are
traditional Jews themselves, but
their club caters to secular Jews.
They are cautious not to adver-
tise the Jewishness of the club.
"The reason we don't advertise
Jewish or kosher is that we don't
want people to be afraid that
we're going to push them into
religion or that we are religion-
oriented. We would never serve
kosher food because it would turn
off everybody no question
about it. The only way to do it is
not to allow any food or beverage
to be served. It we do serve wine,
it would be kosher, but we would
never advertise it as kosher.''
Even with such precautions, in
fact because of such precautions,
the Singles Club idea has come
under attack from both religious
and non-religious campus Jews.
Many singles are turned off by
the idea of a club that ostensibly
seeks members with no particular
religious motivation.
BRUCE LEHR, UM law
school student and former editor
of the campus newspaper, the
Hurricane, said he would be
reluctant to go to a singles social
event.
"Singles will have a big turn-
out of JAPs because they can
come and get something for
nothing. People like me won't
come to singles. I 'm scared off by
JAPs, and I don't want anything
to do with them. They are just
Jewish by birth and most of them
don't know who they are. Why
would I want to meet someone
like that?"
Bruce's definition of a JAP is
someone "whose values are off,
self-worth is off and obligations
are all wrong."
HE EXPLAINED that even
though he does not consider him-
self to be religious, he feels that
when someone goes to a club they
are making some kind of commit-
ment to what the club stands for.
"A singles club isn't going to
bring them any bit closer toward
being Jewish if all they go for is
to meet other Jews," he said.
"They'll come, have a good time
and go home."
No Problem Posed By
Israel, Egypt at N-Talks
WASHINGTON (JTA) The United States "sees no
problem" for the attendance of Israel and Egypt at the inter-
national conference next year in Washington that will deal with
the spread of nuclear power that may be used for military
purposes.
A State Department authority on the conference, which
will have some 35 nations participating, made the point in
responding to a question during his discussion of U.S. dif-
ferences with Brazil over nuclear power in Brazil. He indicated,
however, that South Africa may not be invited to the meeting.
Israel refuses to allow foreign inspection of its atomic plant
at Dimona while Egypt is pressing the United States not to
provide additional nuclear equipment to Israel pending Israel's
acquiescence in such inspection. U.S. government pledges to
provide nuclear plants for Egypt and Israel are awaiting
Congressional action.
Meanwhile, Bruce is dating a
non-Jewish girl. He said that
when he was editor of the paper
and playing in tennis tourna-
ments, of all the girls he met,
"the nicest by far wasn't
Jewish."
BRUCE doesn't feel he's being
hypocritical about not wanting to
go to singles events.
"Im just being more honest.
I 'd rather spend my time with my
Christian girlfriend than someone
who fits what I call a JAP and
happens to be Jewish," he said.
Russell pointed out to Bruce
that "you'll never get out of that
relationship. You won't allow
yourself enough time to grow to
love someone else. Every JAP
has the possibility to change. I
went out with a JAP, married
her, and afterwards she wasn't a
JAP."
HELEN, a traditional Jew
since she's been in college, comes
from a family she describes as
"so assimilated you wouldn't
believe it." She admits that the
club will draw JAPs but that
some of its members will be in-
terested in more than just who
looks good to pick up.
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"It's good for Jews to get to-
gether. You have to go out and
search for people who are like
yourself," she said.
Helen cites herself as an
example of how someone with
little religious background prior
to college can become interested
in her religion by involving her-
self with Jewish people.
RUSSELL believes that if the
club continues to attract the
same secular Jews at each event,
then that will mean that they do
take an interest in being Jewish.
"It's a chance we have to take.
They come to us not because we
might have a better band, but
because they're going to meet
other Jews, and if that's the only
reason they come, then it's worth
it to have the club."
Rabbi David Eliezrie, director
of UM's campus Chabad House,
said the Singles Club idea is good
even though he believes that
Jewish values are diluted in it.
"WE MUST have Jewish
values, or we lose tangible ways
to identify with being Jewish,"
he said. "We live in a physical
world, and we need physical, tan-
gible ways to relate.
"Singles is a longer, harder
process of doing the same thing
that Chabad does. Chabad is the
most right-wing Jewish group on
campus, yet we're getting people
coming in here for social reasons,
just like the Singles Club.
"A lot of kids have misconcep-
tions about Judaism in general
they think it's a drag. But there
is a renaissance of traditional
Jewish values among young
people on this campus. Singles is
branded a Jewish single. With
that comes the stereotype of the
social misfit or outcast whose
only hope to meet Jews of the
opposite sex is by getting lost
with them in a crowd.
Yet, singles events do bring
out the crowds. Russell noted
that a New Year's party at the
Algiers Hotel last year pulled in
over 1,000 Jewish singles.
Most of the singles interviewed
expressed a desire to meet some-
one who is intellectually stimu-
lating and possessed basic
Jewish values, yet was not a reli-
gious fanatic.
THEY WANT to be with
groups of people they can relate
to and become involved with in
meaningful activities on a regular
basis.
To a great extent, it is up to
the Jewish singles themselves to
make their own social life. They
cannot rely on synagogues or
local Jewish agencies to provide
them entertainment.
Perhaps this means that some
Jews will have to take an interest
in finding out about what kind of
Jews they are, if they hope to find
their perfect mate.
Celebrate 5738
with a taste of tradition!
.*:*?&^^'$%m
v. *
Manischewitz
QUALITY JEWISH FOODS SINCE 5649
Produced under Uriel Rabbinical aupervision. B Certificate on request
ll ll( I I Ml1? I M
^T^HC^^ST?


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, September 23,1977
Registration Now Open For
JCC After School Programs
Registration for "Children's
After School Programs" spon-
sored by the Hollywood Exten-
sion of the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida is now
being held, and will continue
through Sept. 30.
The programs, designed for
kindergarten through fifth
graders, will begin the week of
Oct. 10, and run for ten weeks.
There will be classes in cooking,
drama, karate, athletics, rocketry
and arts and crafts. All programs
in Hollywood are open to JCC
members and non-members, but
members receive priority in the
limited enrollment classes and a
reduced fee.
IN ADDITION to the
programs offered at the Holly-
wood Jewish Community Center
Building, the Center also spon-
sors programs at the Nova-
Blanche Forma n Elementary
School on Thursdays and an ath-
letics program in cooperation
with the Hollywood Recreation
Deapartment at the Hollywood
Hills Elementary School on
Firdays.
On Tuesdays and Wednesdays,
transportation will be provided
(for JCC members only) to the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center in North
Miami Beach, for children who
wish to participate in programs
there. There is an additional fee
for the transportation service.
For more information on the
programs and how to register,
visit or call the Hollywood
Jewish Community Center office.
Israeli Exhibit at Moscow
Book Fair Proves Popular
One of the most popular ex-
hibits at Moscow's first inter-
national book fair which opened
recently is the Israeli exhibit,
according to reports from the
Soviet capital.
Yair Shepon, the Israeli ex-
hibit's director, reportedly told
reporters that he had no customs
problems with the 500 books
from three Israeli publishers.
There are 1,500 publishing firms,
from 63 countries, including 900
from the West at the fair. Some
American concerns did not par-
ticipate because of concern about
censorship.
BUT MYRNA Shinbaum of
the Association of Jewish Book
Publishers said there was a
rigorous check on books brought
in by the Association but that
nothing was removed. However,
the American companies reported
having some of their books
seized.
The Lerner Publications of
Minneapolis had a monograph,
The Jews in America, confiscated
along with two others in its eth-
nic series, The Ukrainians in
America, and The Czechs and
Slovaks in America.
Canner Names Hillel Day
School Ball Chairpersons
Irving Canner, vice president
of finance of The Samuel Scheck
Hillel Community Day School
has appointed the chairpersons of
the school's eighth annual
scholarship ball.
Judge Arthur Winton, presi-
dent of Beth Torah Congregation
and vice president in charge of
grant-in-aid at Hillel, has been
appointed general chairman
along with his wife, Florence, Dr.
and Mrs. Lee Duffner, and Mr.
and Mrs. Morton Zemel.
THE THREE couples are
founders of Hillel and have
served on the executive board
since the school's inception in
1970.
Florence Winton serves as vice
president of the Beth Torah Sis-
terhood in charge of the gift shop.
Dr. Lee Duffner, a Hollywood
Opthalmologist, is currently vice
president of Hillel and served for
many years as education vice
president. His wife, Alvina, has
been an officer of Hillel PTA for
many years. Together, they
served as chairmen of the dedica-
tion of the new school facilities
this past year.
MORTON ZEMEL, the
school's vice president of legal
affairs is an attorney in the North
Dade area. His wife, Judy, has
been active in the public relations
and education committees at
Hillel.
Assisting the chairmen is
Roberta Seinfeld, special
arrangements chairperson.
Proceeds of the function which
will take place on Saturday
evening, Nove. 19, at the Diplo-
mat Hotel in Hollywood, will be
used to defray the costs of
scholarships for needy students.
now Ke SUKKOTH HOLIDAYS
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11 day* 410 nights Sept. 26 lo Oct.?
$220 PPon
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155
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Sep.26-Sept.29 4 Oct.3-Oct.6
From
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Your Host trw GOODMAN Family
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SAM WALDAAAN, DAVID DIAMOND AND GARY SHER OF
WALDMAN'S,
Miami Beach's FiiMft Gktt Kosher Hotel ^
WiihAMTMrFriatidsA Happy md Prosperous Ufa* 1W
RE OPENING NOV. II FOR THE 1*77-1*7aSEASON.
SPECIAL 4 DAY, 3 NIGHT THANKSGIVING PACKAGE
GROUPS INVITED
PHONE 534-3330 FOR FULL INFORMATION
ON THE OCEAN AY 43rd STREET MIAMI BEACH
jcc Announces jjre^j Consider W. Bank
Senior Activities
Free Lecture Series for Senior
Adults are given every Thursday
' at 10:30 a.m. at the Jewish Com-
munity Center for Senior Adults,
Hollywood.
Scheduled lectures include:
Oct. 6, "Introduction to Poetry"
with Simon Berezin; Oct. 13,
"Sing Along with Bob Borwn";
Oct. 20, "The Slides of Russia"
with Norman Zlatin, retired en-
gineer who has traveled exten-
sively; Oct. 27, "Wills and
Trusts" with Ed Mitchell, First
National Bank representative.
Movies for Senior Adults are
being shown every Wednesday at
the Jewish Community Center
from 1 to 3 p.m.
On Oct. 12, "The Great
Caruso"; Oct. 19, "Israel 20th
Century Miracle"; and Oct. 26,
"Queen of the Stardust Ball-
room."
JCC Seniors
Classes to Begin
On "Extra Special Wednes-
days" Senior Adults can partici-
pate in the following classes and
activities at the Jewish Com-
munity Center, Hollywood ex-
tension:
Beginning Wednesday, Oct.
12, from 10 to 11:30 a.m., Inter-
mediate Hebrew will be taught
by Mayer Hirsch. Also beginning
Oct. 12 at the same time is
Momoloshen Yiddish" with
Lorna Tomkin.
The JCC Comedy Players
directed by Saul Levine will
begin its new season on Thurs-
day, Oct. 6, at 1 p.m.
Blood pressure testing by the
American Red Cross at the JCC
Senior Adult Center will be held
on Tuesday, Oct. 18, from 10 a.m.
until noon. The service is free.
Elaine Goldstein, program di-
rector, can provide additional in-
formation.
DivisionDayan
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel has launched an in-
formation campaign designed to
improve its image in Western
public opinion in preparation for
this month's foreign ministers
talks in New York, according to
political observers here.
The first move in this drive,
according to the observers, was
the speech by Foreign Minister
Moshe Dayan last Thursday in
the Knesset in which he went as
far as saying that Israel would
"consider" Arab proposals to
divide the West Bank. So far the
Thus, Dayan stressed the need
to obtain freedom of navigation
in the Gulf of Eilat, but did not
mention any Israeli demand to
hold Sharm el Sheikh. He did not
speak of the Golan Heights in
territorial terms, but rather of
Israel's need to secure access to
the sources of the Jordan River in
the North.
ON THE West Bank, he did
not repeat previous statements
on the need to see the Jordan
River as the border between
Israel and any other Arab state,
or Israel's opposition to a third
ISRAEL SCENE
Israeli official view has simply
been that the West Bank would
never be returned to "foreign
rule."
IN HIS speech, Dayan said he
would present in New York a
comprehensive Israeli peace plan
a step so far avoided by both
the former Labor Alignment
government and the present
Likud government.
Dayan refrained from stating a
definite Israeli position on the
future of the occupied territories.
He preferred to speak of other
options for a settlement, not
necessarily territorial options.
Arab state between Israel and
Jordan. Dayan did mention
Israel's historical and national
ties with the West Bank; but at
the same time he did not reject a
priori an Arab offer to discuss
division of the West Bank.
However, opposition
Knesseters said Dayan's speech
was different only in outward
appearance, but there was no
change in the rigid substance of
the Israeli stand, which the
opposition said could not be
accepted by the Arab states and
the U.S.
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v, September 23,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
Organized Crime in Israel
ByTUVIA MENDELSON
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The special police committee
appointed to investigate whether
organized crime exists in Israel
said it does not. Meanwhile,
Inspector General Haim Tavori,
who heads the police department,
revealed here he has asked
Attorney General Aharon Barak
to study the possibility of suing
Utarelz and its police reporter,
%i Valentin, for libel for the
accusation the newspaper has
printed against the police.
THE POLICE committee,
headed by Michael Buchner, chief
of the Police Department's
special operational unit, was
appointed following a public
outcry over the issue of organized
crime after a series of articles
appeared in Haaretz claiming
there is a well-organized group
which controls all major crimes in
AkMr! including drugs,
Restitution and the protection
PI
Buchner's committee con-
cluded that there are no
organized crime bosses operating
in Israel similar to the system
believed existing in the crime
syndicate in the United States.
Bui the committee said there are
regional bosses in Israel. Tavori
and Interior Minister Yosef Burg
are studying the report.
But there is already public
criticism over how the committee
reached its conclusions in less
than two weeks.
TAVORI REVEALED that he
asked the Attorney General tr,
look into libel charges against
Haarvi; while testifying before
the Knesset Interior Committee.
He Baid the libel suit would be
id on a charge by Valentin in
mretz that police officers have
revealed information to the
Buchner s committee concluded that there are no
organiied crime bosses operating in Israel similar to the
323 lelfved existing in the crime syndicate in the
United States. But the committee said there are regional
bosses in Israel,
Chaplaincy SponsoRs
1 holiday Services
underworld and that there is a
double agent" within the
department. Tavori said that an
investigation by Moshe Tiomkin,
commander of the Tel Aviv
Police District, found there was
no basis for Haaretz's ac-
cusations.
In his article, Valentin wrote
that Police Sgt. Maj. Shlomo
Vaknin, acting as an undercover
operative, had been authorized to
pretend to accept an offer from
one Yosef Harushka, whom he
was interrogating on suspicion of
extortion.
THE LATTER allegedly
offered him IL 50,000 if he would
doctor the testimony so that
there would be no basis for
charges, and additional large
sums if he would cooperate in the
future.
Eight senior officers knew
about the arrangement made
with Vaknin, Valentin wrote and
gave their names. A few days
later, it became clear that one of
them had revealed the in-
formation to the underworld that
Vaknin was an undercover police
Aviva BBW to Meet
Aviva Chapter, B'nai B'rith
Women will hold its monthly
meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 28,
at 8 p.m. at the Washington
Federal Building.
Dr. Cameron of the Papanico-
laou Center Research Iastitute of
Miami, will discuss "The Truth
About Cancer. Laetril, Food Ad-
ditives, Plus the Saccharine Ban
andTris."
agent, the Haaretz correspondent
wrote.
Tavori told the Knesset
committee that Vaknin had
reported the offer to two officers,
but they did not even consider it
worth referring to their superiors,
and Vaknin was told to reject the
offer.
THERE WAS nothing the
eight senior officers could have
known, or revealed to the un-
derworld, he said. Commenting
on Israel television about the
libel suit, Gideon Samet, deputy
editor of Haaretz, said that the
paper had additional testimony
and documents to back up its
reports on the "double agent"
affair.
Asked if Haaretz still claims
that there is a senior officer in the
police who is a double agent,
Samet answered that he does.
Symposium Set
The Sisterhood and Men's
Club of Temple Beth Shalom,
Hollywood, will present a sym-
posium based on Simon Wiesen-
thal's book, The Sunflower, on
Sunday, Oct. 30, at 7:30 p.m. in
the Temple Ballroom. The sym-
posium will benefit the Library
Fund.
The panel of speakers will in-
clude Rabbi Morton Malavsky,
speaker and moderator; Leon
Weissberg, educator; Dr. Tamara
Cohen, psycologist, and Jae
Ruderman. reviewer.
Dr. Phillip and Betty Homans
are ticket chairmen.
High Holy Day services were conducted at area hospitals and
nursing homes by the Chaplaincy Committee of the Jewish
r ederation of South Broward, under the supervision of Chap-
ain Rabbi Harold Richter. With Rabbi Richter (second from
leftr are (from left) Leon Ehrlich, Hy Conn, Jack Rutkin and
Jack Green.
Conducting High Holy Day services at Washington Manor
Nursing Home, Rabbi Harold Richter (with Shofar) is assisted
by (seated from left) Cheryl Beitler, Wendy Benjamin and Ran-
dee Lefkow. Standing (from left) are Leon Ehrlich, Judy Adel-
stein and Yardena Brooks.
NINO CERRUTI BRINGS
RUE ROYALE FIRST TO JM
Man of fashion, man of the world and premier member of the
Paris Couture Group, Nino Cerruti proudly introduces "Rue Royale
sport clothing for the American male. Merino wool sweater,
patch pocket, black and camel, S XL. $40. JM's best selling
slack in spun polyester, belt-looped, navy, grey, black,
chocolate, beige and slate, 28-38. $30
Lamb suede blouson jacket with knitted
collar and cuffs, chocolate, 36-42, $150
Pleated self-belted worsted wool
slacks with on-seam side pockets,
navy, grey and camel, $45
Connections, at all jm stores except lauderhill
Shopping is a breeze with your /m credit card
lordani
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A Mn,t 0* Alt^d S're
omni dadeland
163rd street hoMywood lauderhill mall tort lauderdale pompano west palm beach orlando altamonte springs merritt island


Page8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, September 23,1977
Miami to Madrid.
There's no st<
iii
us now
Now we've made it easier for you to get to Madrid. We've added
a new non-stop flight every Wednesday.
More flights to Madrid than any other airline.
There're five flights each week. All our flights depart from Miami International
Airport. Wednesday through Sunday at 6:00 p.m.. and arrive in Madrid the following
morning.
While you're awaiting your departure to Madrid, we invite you to relax with some
refreshments and live music in our popular "El Criollo" lounge.
And here's a little (or rather a lot) of food for thought. On all our flights you'll be
given a special menu. You can choose between Cuban and Spanish specialties or good
old American steak (which happens to be filet mignon).
After dinner you can sit back and take in a movie ($2.50 extra per headset in
economy).
And when it comes to air fare, we don't even stop you from saving some money.
Save up to $422 on air fare.
There's up to a 46% savings on air fare available to you with Pan Am's APEX fare.
While all year round trip economy air fare to Madrid is $922. our round trip APEX
fare to Madrid is only $500. ($3 U.S. departure tax is not included.)
Of course, at this price there are certain conditions and restrictions. For instance:
you must book 30 days in advance and stay in Europe from 2 weeks to 45 davs. (All
conditions and restrictions should be that easy to meet.) For reservations, see your
travel agent.
If you have to cancel or change your reservations before you start your trip (after
the trip has begun, no change in reservations is permitted), the most you can lose is
10% or $50. whichever is higher. In limited circumstances you'll get all your money back
America s airline to the world.
g

See your travel agent.

1S\ S UW.fi <'.,,.,,
II U< l..... .


ptember 23,1977
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
ie Cast at General Assembly
n > inn unnramr?.
r DAVID HOROWITZ
Ited NATIONS -
_ The 32nd session of
Lneral Assembly opens here
\ the High Holy Day season
Tuesday, Sept. 20, between
lashanah and Yom Kippur
J once again as in recent
tome of the major items on
enda focus on a series oi
sly-drafted anti-Israeli
"their game" versus the Jewish
State.
THE CUNNING Arafat
himself ever shuttling between
both the "moderate" and the
radical Arab states has not
been too happy about the con-
flicting views the Arab leaders
hold on PLO's role in any future
Medeast talks the latest being
the suggestion that the Arab
UNITED NATIONS
tions aimed at replacing
338 in compliance with
hes of the PLO whose
|ship this past week
President Carter by
[icing its rejection of the
(solutions which alone can
i the basis of a reconvened
I Conference.
i the die appears cast, and
lute House will have to
other look at the whole
involving PLO par-
on in Middle East talks.
PLO rejection of the
utions may well turn out to
Essing in disguise for Israel
position on the Arafat
Bt gang is well-known.
' THINGS here at the UN
|t change very much. What
bound to witness is a
It-Arafat conspiracy
pting a renewed anti- Israeli
ght during the debates on
ddle East.
dw appears clear that the
fn leaders, unhappy and
disturbed over the ever-
kg pro-U.S.-Western stance
[by Egypt, Saudi Arabia
Jordan, are planning to
| Yasir Arafat and the PLO
rs in exerting pressure on
ab world as a whole.
Jfat was feted in Moscow
week, and the Soviets, aware
Arabs' "support" of the
isee in him the one ex-
card with which they can
heir sinister game in off-
rising American
parity" among the
ate Mideast states who are
pg on Washington to play
League represent his
organization. To counteract this
div isionism, he decided to go over
their heads and turn to Moscow
where he knew he would find full
support for his radical anti-Israeli
stand.
Reporting on this latest
conspiratorial visit, the Christian
Science Monitor correspondent in
Moscow, David K. Willis, noted
that "Soviet anxiety is spurred
by the realization that it has lost
influence in the Arab world
recently" and that "efforts to
mend fences with Egypt have
failed," wherefore "the Kremlin
is using the four-day visit by
Arafat to underscore its com-
mitment to a Palestinian state
separate from any links to
Jordan" as a jab against the
U.S., Egypt, Saudi Arabia and
Jordan who favor such a link.
That the Kremlin has gone on
record as being the chief
champion of the PLO, whose
avowed aim is the destruction of
the Jewish State, can only prove
to the world that Moscow is unfit
to serve as an impartial
cochairman with the United
States at a resumed Geneva
peace conference and shows that
the Soviets will go to any lengths
in this case, embrace a
murderer of women and children
and innocents of other nations
to besmirch and belittle the
Jewish people.
THERE CAN be no doubt that
the latest PLO-directed
Palestinian National Council
declaration, released in
Damascus, was inspired by and
had the blessing of the Soviets. It
consisted of the following three
clauses which can only be un-
derstood and interpreted as a
warning to Sadat and other Arab
leaders not to come to any kind of
a negotiated settlement with
Israel that would preclude PLO
aims:
"Condemnation of all the U.S.
and Zionist maneuvers.. .the
Council reiterates its rejection of
[Bomb Explodes Outside
Israel Bank in Milan
PARIS (JTA) A small bomb exploded outside
Italian-Israel bank in Milan, according to reports
ching here. The explosion, which caused no casualties,
Ittered windows and damaged a car parked near the
The Milan police said the explosion might have been
work of right-wing sympathizers of Nazi war criminal
then Kappler who recently escaped to West Germany
i a prison hospital in Rome.
According to Milan police, an anonymous caller
fcphoned the Milan office of the Italian news agency
ISA, and claimed that the bombing was in retaliation
linst protests in the wake of Kappler's escape.
labbinical Court Rules Artificial
Insemination Is Not Adultery
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Haifa Rabbinical Court
. ruled that artificial insemination with sperm from an
Dnymous donor is not adultery if the woman's husband
J, consented in writing for the procedure to take place.
i same court had ruled a few years ago that a woman was
emitting adultery by receiving artificial insemination
ss the donor was her husband.
THE NEW ruling involved a divorce case in which the
Iband claimed his wife had committed adultery by
ug a child through artificial insemination. He said that
. ) the child was not his he should not have to support
I child.
The court ruled that his wife did not commit adultery
* he had consented to the procedure after he found out
4M was sterile and ordered him to pay IL6.000 a year
I the upkeep of the child.
any attempt aimed at liquidating
the resolutions of the Palestine
National Council and to change
the Arab attitude, as deckled
during the Arab summit con-
ferences of Rabat and Cairo;
"The Council opposes UN
resolution 242 which ignores the
national rights of our
people.. .and appeals to the Arab
nations on both the official and
popular levels to live up to the
national responsibility and
confront the plot forged by those
powers that are the enemy of our
people, such as Zionism and
American imperialism, and to
extricate themselves from the
confines of hesitation into
confrontation;
"The Council also insisted on
the importance of increasing our
continuous armed struggle
against Zionist usurpation."
In essence, we have here a
declaration of war against Israel.
President Carter must now
realize that Prime Minister
Menachem Begin has been right
all along in his adamant refusal
to have any dealings at all with
the Palestine Liberation
Organization whether or not it
accepts or rejects 242.
::S&*:*:S:S:^^
S
I
1
il
8
5S;
!
calendar
OCtOBGR
All organization and congregational
publicity must be mailed to: "Com-
munity Calendar," Jewish Federation
of South Broward, 2838 Hollywood
Blvd., Hollywood, Florida, 33020.
Saturday Oct. 1
Hollywood Hills W.A. ORT, Art
Auction presented by Art America.
Wine and Cheese Preview 7:30 p.m.-
8:30 p.m. Auction begins at 8:30
p.m., Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center, 18900 NE 25th
Avenue, North Miami Beach. Call
Florence Mayper, 963-0467.
Shalom Reception, 8:30 p.m., 4800
Madison Street.
Monday, Oct. 3
Women's American ORT, The Estates
Chapter, monthly meeting, 7:30
p.m., DeAnza Estates, 3300 N. State
Rd. 7, Hollywood. Call 966-0978.
Tuesday,Wednesday,
Oct. 45
SUCCOTH, Federation Office Closed
Saturday, Oct. 8
Temple Solel, Art Auction, 8 p.m.
5100 Sheridan St., Hollywood. Call
Temple Office, 989-0205.
Young Leadership, Group A,
Federation Building.
Monday, Oct. 10
National Council of Jewish Women,
Hollywood Section, General Meeting.
Guest Speaker, Dr. Edith Lord,
Psychologist will speak on "Living
with Realty." 12:30 p.m., Temple
Sinai, 1201 Johnson St., Hollywood.
Call 923-4286.
Tuesday, Oct. 11
Jewish War Veterans, Robert K.
Franzblau Post 177, Induction of New
Members, 8 p.m., North Perry
Recreation Center, 75th Ave. &
Hollywood Blvd., Pembroke Pines.
Cal I 431 -5515 or 961 -0857.
Executive Committee Meeting, 7:30
p.m., Federation Building
Deadline for receiving news is noon,
Oct. 11. for the November calendar.
"Community Calendar" forms and
deadline schedules may be obtained
by calling the Jewish Federation at
921-8810.
Wednesday, Oct. 12
Jewish Education Committee
Meeting, 8 p.m., Federation Building
Sunday-Wednesday,
Oct. 16-26
South Broward Community Mission
to Israel
Thursday, Oct. 20
Henrietta Szoid Group of Hadassah,
Southwest Broward Chapter. Youth
Aliyah Program, 12:30 p.m., Miramar
Recreation Center, 6700 Miramar
Parkway, Miramar. Call Rose
Kranser, 987-6210.
Monday, Oct. 24
Zimriah Choral Society, Concert,
presented in English and Hebrew,
Call 962-9637.
Wednesday, Oct. 26
B'nai B'rith Women, Aviva Chapter.
General Meeting, 8 p.m., Washington
Federation Bank, 450 N. Park Road,
Hollywood. Call 962-3138 or 961-
3738.
Thursday, Oct. 27
Hollywood Chapter of Hadassah,
Shalom Group, Seventh Annual
Hadassah Medical Organization
luncheon and fashion show by Nat
Allen, noon, Williamsons Restaurant,
1401 Federal Highway, Fort
Lauderdale. Call Mildred Goldberg,
927-4815 or Rose Gross, 927-6327.
Monday, Oct. 31
B'nai B'rith Women, Aviva Chapter,
National UNICEF Day Collection and
Return Party, 6:30-9 p.m., 3925
Arthur Street, Hollywood. Call 981-
3738.
8
S
8
1
1

Si
SPONSORED BY THE
JEWISH FEDERATION OF SO. BROWARD
SjgSJSBBW^^


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, September 23. 1977


.
Panovs Make
Israel Festival
Stellar Occasion
By DORA SOWDEN
IF BEETHOVEN'S Ninth
Symphony made the music
opening of the Israel Festival, the
Panovs and the Bathsheva Dance
Company provided another
was the star, for he created two
ballets for the wonderful
beginning and the triumphant
ending.
Rainbow Round My Shoulder
had an impact like a punch. Six
WORLD OF ART
"first. And what an evening of
dance that was on July 18 in
Jerusalem.
The Convention Center stage
wasn't designed for dance and
the performance may have been
even better in Tel Aviv (though
the Mann Auditorium isn't ideal
either): but nothing could mar
the marvelous program and if
anyone needed confirmation still
that Valery Panov is a great
dancer, there it was.
Actually, the American
choreographer, Donald McKayle,
men of the Bathsheva company
who came out in the first scene
gave it a kick-off that nobody
afterwards let down.
Though based on work
movements that a "chain gang"
might do, there was more to it
than that. Donald McKayle
afterwards said to me: "I didn't
want the men to use pick and
spade. I wanted them to be pick
and spade."
That best describes it and so
they were. Debi Smulian as the
STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP. MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION
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THE NEW YORK HAIR SALON
Extends To The Entire Jewish Community
BEST WISHES FOR THE NEW YEAR.
Richard
x*:*:::x*>>^^
The Zionist Organization
of America
ttron xtsto m*
TO ALL OUR MEMBERS AND FRIENDS
Grant Us. O Lord, Our God,
A Good Year, A Sweeter Year,
A Happy Healthy New Year
BROWARD ZIONIST DISTRICT
TEMPLE SINAI
1201 Johnson Street, Hollywood
personification of the men's
dreams of woman filled her role
well too. The climax, while the
voice sang Another Man Done
Gone (for the ballet was set to
traditional song), was tremen-
dous.
THE SLOW subtlety of the
Jerome Robbins choreography
for Debussy's L'apres-midi d'un
faune seemed to escape the
audience after the stunning effect
of the Rainbow. Yet from the first
lift of his right leg, Valery Panov
created the unselfconscious
animal concentration.
His black tights, white socks
and bare torso might have been
the very skin of a faun, even
when he raised his Galina in the
air or held her, seemingly
weightless, on his arms, even
when he planted a detached kiss
on her cheek.
Disappointingly Galina Panov
didn't match this great character
dancing. Where she should have
been utterly narcissistic, sen-
suously self-involved, she was
colorless. Her movementsleg
stretch, straight backwere of
the best Russian school, but she
was merely doll-like.
YET IN Mountain of Spices
which Donald McKayle
especially designed for the
Panovs together with the
Bathsheva Company, Galina
Panov was deliciousa butterfly
in swift, soft-shoe footwork, gay
and gleaming, a dancing elf.
Valery Panov did a
magnificent solo entitled
Discovery for this was a series
of variations, even though they
hung together. Dressed in
dramatic red, he conveyed the
sense of power and strength in
miraculous turns, leaps, back-
ward curves and forward springs.
Together in Innocence, the
Panovs flited in jazzy fashion,
Galina with brio, Valery brilliant.
THE SURPRISE was ar
unannounced guest, Israeli-born
Lea Vivante (McKayle's wife),
who in solo and in company had
that jerk of hip and twist of wrist
that suggested a Spanish climate
but remained individual in pulse
and impulse.
The Panovs came again to
heighten the excitement, and the
finale brought the whole com-
pany to a pinnacle. To the noisy
Moondog music, the ballet so
mingled styles of dance that they
had a life together.
Yair Vardi's duet with Tamar
Tzafrir. As I Wish.
choreographed by Vardi himself,
was a remarkable first work. An
indication of its quality was that
it held its own in the program.
Israel Digest
Nazi Booklet
Banned In
Buenos Aires
BUENOS AIRES (JTA) -
The sale and distribution of a
Nazi booklet, Shulchan Arukh
("The Sacred Code of the Jews"),
which appeared here recently and
was being sold on newsstands,
has been banned by a govern-
ment executive decree. The
federal police have been ordered
to ensure enforcement of the
decree.
::
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EXTENDS TO THE ENTIRE JEWISH COMMUNITY
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>
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Extends To The Entire Jewish Community
Best Wishes for a very Happy New Year.
'>



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SOUTHERN PHOTO SERVICE
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eptember 23,1977
askABe
ByABehalpepn
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
uestion: What is the significance of the
rhot Services? Why are they held late at
Ruth Berger
Lawrence, Kansas
nswer: S'lichot is a Hebrew word and is the
al of S'lichah. In the singular, S'lichah means
Lveness. In the plural, it is used to designate a
fcial service of Penitential Prayers whose
ect is a plea for forgiveness for sins. In the
kenazi, it is pronounced S'lichos and in Yid-
\$'liches.
^iginally these prayers were composed and
ted on all Fast Days and during the Peniten-
season, which begins before Rosh Hashanah
(concludes on Yom Kippur, the Day of Atone-
K
EARLY times, the special prayers and
Rework of the Eighteen Benedictions. Fast
including the Day of Atonement were
xially dedicated to supplication and prayer.
rial S'lichot were written for such occasions.
uring the Middle Ages, the S'lichot Services
me particularly associated with the Peniten-
period. They constituted a special service of
own, without any connection to the regular
See.
he content of most S'lichot is similar. The
erate plight of the Jews during the Middle
i is looked upon as punishment for transgres-
L and they call for repentence in the hope that
T will have mercy upon his people. Some of
S'lichot are written in poetical form and some
rose.
THE KERNEL of all S'lichot consists of the
neration of the thirteen divine attributes
ndus 34:6, 7) traditionally given to Israel as a
oula with which to beg divine forgiveness
Widdui (confession), and appropriate biblical
According to subject matter, S'lichot are
ded into:
1) Tokhahah, admonition in which the wor-
shipper is called upon to consider his ultimate
destiny; 2) Bakkashah, petition dealing with the
suffering of Israel and a request for God's mercy;
3) Gezerah, evil decree describing persecutions
and suffering, particularly those of the Crusades
in the eleventh and twelfth centuries; 4) Akeda,
the binding of Isaac telling of martyrdom;
5) Tehinnah, supplication on the theme of
relationship of God and Israel; and 6) Viddui,
confession." (The Encyclopedia of the Jewish Re-
ligion, p. 347)
There is a great number of differences in the
rites depending on the individual community.
Among Sephardim these services are recited from
the first day of the month of Elul; among Ash-
kenazim from the Sunday before Rosh Hashanah.
In the United States in traditional synagogues,
the special S'lichot Services are usually recited
approximately at midnight, on the Saturuday
preceeding Rosh Hashanah.
In the United States in traditional synagogues,
the special S'lichot Services are usually recited
approximately at midnight, on the Saturday
preceeding Rosh Hashanah.
FROM PERSONAL experience, I know that in
the villages of Eastern Europe the S'lichot Ser-
vices were recited just before dawn. I remember
that we were awakened early before dawn in order
to go to the synagogue for these special services.
Just why these services are held either at mid-
night or before dawn I have not been able to dis-
cover. If any one of the readers of this column
knows the reason for this, please communicate
with me and I will share the information in a
future column.
Editor's note: Please send all question to:
ASK ABE
c o The Jewish Federation of
South Broward
2838 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, Fla. 33020
Tea Bond Leaders Speak in Atlanta
?mi Israel Bond leaders
Bsed several important
ns of the 1977 International
Leadership Conference of
of I srael Bonds attended by
khan 1,000 key leaders from
Inked States and Canada
eekend in Atlanta.
three-day conference
td the fall and winter
lign activities of the Israel
Organization and heard
is new Minister of Finance,
pa Ehrlich, report on the
nic policies of the new
nment and urged in-
fied Israel Bond support at
1 levels.
LEON Kronish, national
Bonds campaign
|irman and rabbi of Temple
Sholom, Miami Beach,
psed the delegates on the
of "Synagogues and
onal Campaign Planning."
fy R Gerson, general
ign chairman of the
er Miami Israel Bond
lization, spoke on pension
to delegates from major
lunities and Joel Reinstein,
VO County chairman of
on Funds, Fiduciaries and
p, spoke on the same subject
egates from medium sized
luniiies.
nard Luria, chairman of the
lory Committee, led a panel
sion on commerce and
[ry and Robert L. Siegel,
W" of the Executive
Nttee, spoke on Capital for
Inald KRONGOLD,
Pan of New Leadership for
putheastern United States,
[sed the session on the role
Leadership in the Israel
fganization.
Other South Florida par-
ticipants in the International Fall
Leadership Conference were
Milton M. Parson, executive
director of the South Florida
Israel Bond Organization, Diane
Cooperman, an active committee
member of the Greater Miami
New Leadership; Joseph Drexler,
Synagogues Chairman; Larry
Gotlieb, chairman of North Dade
New Leadership, and Gerald
Schwartz, Cash Collections
chairman. From South Broward:
Moses Hornstein, president of
the Prime Minister's Club,
Broward County; Arthur Kail,
chairman of South Broward New
Leadership; William Littman,
chairman of Broward County
Board of Governors, and Irma
Rochlin, chairman of the
Women's Division, South
Broward. From North Broward:
Seymour Gerson and Harris
Reibel, cochairman of New
Leadership, North Broward.
The economic policies of the
new Israel Government headed
by Prime Minister Menachem
Begin were presented to the
Atlanta conference by Israel's
new Finance Minister, Simcha
Ehrlich, in his first appearance in
the United States in that
capacity. Israel's major economic
problems at the present time
stem from a double-digit rate of
inflation and a balance of
payments deficit in excess of S3
billion.
ANOTHER principal speaker
at the Israel Bond conference was
Simcha Dinitz, Israel's am-
bassador to the United States,
who addressed a dinner session
on Saturday evening, Sept. 10.
The Fall campaign, which was
launched at the Atlanta con-
ference, will consist of the most
intensive activity of the year
embracing not only the Jewish
community, but also many
elements in banking, industry
and labor which have been
participating in the Israel Bond
program on an increasing scale in
recent years.
Among other speakers at the
conference were Sam Rothberg
general chairman of the Israel
Bond Organization, and Michael
Arnon, president.
Rabin,
Hostility
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The hostility between former
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin
and Shimon Peres, the leader of
the Labor Alignment, has
reached a new peak, informed
sources told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency.
The growing tension between
the two Labor leaders is causing
the party great damage and is
one of the major reasons the
party is unable to recover from
the devastating defeat it suffered
in the last general elections,
observers and politicians here
believe.
THE NEW source of tension
between Rabin and Peres stems
from an interview given by the
former Prime Minister last week
to Haaretz in which he attacked
Peres. Although he did not
mention Peres by name, Rabin
talked throughout the interview
of the "powers" within the Labor
Party which constantly schemed
against him.
Rabin told his interviewer that
his chances to succeed as Prime
Minister were slim because of the
constant actions against him and
his policy.
In the view of political circles
here, Rabin's interview indicated
that he is haunted by his former
Defense Minister. Those circles
note that Rabin's answers
throughout the interview in-
dicated that he was absolutely
convinced during his term as
Prime Minister that the
"powers" in the party were
moving to bring about his failure.
ALTHOUGH Peres has
refrained so far from any public
response in the wake of the Rabin
interview, a few of his aides have
already charged that Rabin's
statements are damaging to the
party and a barrier to the party's
effort to rehabilitate itself. Some
Labor Party members expressed
concern during the last few days
that the Rabin-Peres split and
the prominent space given to it in
the Israeli media could harm any
efforts to restore the party to
what it once was.
Some observers here regard the
"war" between Rabin and Peres,
IEVITT
lniFwmhrakaKt).
Heiiywoed. fi
U44W7
Seamy Levitt, F.D.
UHSW. WxUHwy.
Narth Miami, Fla.
M9-611S

Candlettte
Time
6:57
11TISHRI-5738
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100 SOUTH DIXII HIGHWAY
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We observe the complete
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Chevra Kavod Hamet
TL: *4S4-tm
UouglM Laaam, ur.D.
Peres
Rising
as well as other phenomena
within the party, as symptoms of
the ongoing trauma the Labor
Party suffered as a result of its
defeat in the recent election.
"There is no attempt as yet to
rehabilitate the party," one
Labor official told the JTA.
Religious Directory
NORTHBROWARD
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100 W. Oak
land Park Blvd. Conservative. Raf>i
Phillip A. Labowltz. Cantor Maurice
A.Neu.
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive. Reform (44)
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9104
57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. (44-A)
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Drazin.
Cantor Abraham Kester. (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9139 Taft St.
Conservative. Rabbi Bernard I.
Shoter. (63)
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION. 400 S. Nob HIM Rd. Rabbi
SheON J.Harr. (64)
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA
GOGUE.7473NW4thSt. (69)
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Carl Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob Dan
ziger.(12>
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kongslev. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. (37)
HOLLYWOOD
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max Land-
man. (47B)
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. Assis
tant Rabbi Jonathan Woll. (45)
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601 Arthur
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi Paul M. Katz,
Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro.
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun. (65)
TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.,
Hollywood, Fla. 33021 Rabbi Robert
P. Frazin. Cantor Bruce Malin. (47C)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
3291 Stirling Road. Oaks Condomini-
um. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe Bomzer.
(52)
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
7mpte BetkCt
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(jatdeiu
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For information call: 920-8225 or writoi &*. 1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Picas* tend ma literature on the above.
NAME: -----------------------------------------------------------------.
ADDRESS:
, PHONE:


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Friday, September 2a i




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TO YOl'R DINING TABLE AT A PRICK YOU CAN AFFORD!
Porcelain
3fftn?lptut
20 Piece Service for 4
for only 30 China Stamps
I S. < HOH K-* llnl.KI M KIMMI |i
Beef Loin
Tenderloin
5-7 LB. AVG.
IN CRY
< VAC
Ilr.
M1^ FRESH VALLEY
l-~' >3_^>----- FRESH DATED BEEF
cPtide
PRICES EFFECTIVE FROM SUN.. SEPT. UTH
THRU SAT.. SEPT. 24TH AT ALl PANTRY PRIDES
FROM FT. PIERCE TO KEY WEST
FRESH VAUEY USOA CHOICE BEEF ROUND
Bottom Round Roast.
*r>
FRESH VAUEY USOA CHOICE
EEF CHUCK SHOULDER
Pot Roast
W I tMW BONELESS
FRESH VALLEY USOA CHOICE
BEEF CHUCK BNIS,
Shldr. Steak
VLMfla.
SAVE 26
NORTHERN
R.
FRESH VALLEY USDA CHOICE $MAU -9*
Beef Rib Steak .^ArZ
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
LotsO' Grade
Chicken
FRESH VAUEY USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK ^ f\
Seven Bone Steak......u. Z7
en.
Beef Liver...............u. >?
39
C
Bath Tissue
,.4/69-
PACKPKG!%Jr ^
WHITE OR ASSORTED
? UMir ONI lOUIPAC" V(IM
I" O.DC*fl OIMOII 0 O'MI. ITIMS
flQUO*NGCIGA.ITm
EACH PKG CONTAINS:
3 BREAST QTRS.W BACKS
3LEGQTRS W BACKS
3GIBIET PKGS
(PICK YOUR OWN) FIRM RIPE SLICING
Tomatoes...................lB 4rT^7
MM vauit us choici hit ouno itm
Round Steak .. '1
HUM VAUIT US CMOICI >
CHUCK UNOIIHAM
Pot Roast i.91
MOM VAIUY US CHOtCI S ~1 20
Beef Brisket I *^
WHOII Ot POINT HAL* INtS -- *
FKOZtNStAFOODDtPJ.
OOTH'S III AOID flOMN
Fishburgers i." 99*
OOTH'S IIIADC0 PROZIN
Shrimpburgerso$lw
HELLMANNS
'Mayonnaise
LIMIT ONI JAR WlfH S' ORDER
OR MORE Of OTHER IIIMS
HCIUDING OGARHTFS
SAVE 30
Comet
CLEANSER
Comet
"I" ~ VltAMIN ACI0 HICMIGAN
Carrots 2 ..'.49*
ut 'i All puiposi ina toui own)
Yellow Onions 1 9*
GAt DIN PUSH HIS. 110
Radishes 2 .Vc',29*
FROM THI OAtOIN
Fresh Okra i.59*
GAROIN PUSH UTTIRNUT OR
Acorn Squash .. I 9*
war tow own |
TOP QUALITY (MID. 3O0 SIZI) CALM. SUNK lit '
Lemons 10 &M9*
lAuiirui ronio t.ish. nvi
Shrimp Plant. ..ch*59*
PANTtY HIM HAND OXNCI
Juice MAi..Ml$r7
US NO. I. QUALITY
MM
Beef Chuck 99*
HUM VAllIT US CMOICI HIT loin
Sirloin Steaks i.$l"
B.R. Eye Rnd. Steak ..*2
B.R. Eye Rnd. Roam..*! "
HA. o. SMIPPID PIIMIUM HUM OUAIIIII
Pryor-JSil__u. 59*
HA. O. IHSfPIO PIIMIUM (MAM A IIISM
Fryer Parts............ 89*
THKUJs MUMSTKHS, UlASTW/iat
DELI DEPARTMENT
PANTRY PRIDE SLICED MEAT OR
Beef Bologna
99
jrXDelieiously Refreshing
il A,I AN inCIO OAllO
Varieties......
LB
PKG
o; $149
....mo. I
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Ped Grapes
H.N. Salami/BoL*..........09<
PJ. Midnel Bf. Salami 99c
1
NO.
K ANN'S
Beef Franks
VLASK HOSHIR Mil WMOtU-HALVM
Dill Pickles""" S. 79*
RKH I UICIO C Hie- IN
Breast Mi 89*
1^15
USNU. I. QUALITY I
Baking 5/A-/Q,
Potatoes.. bag 4 ^^
m omrctocfRy department
Ml
"1M ORDER
OR WORE OF OTHER ITEMS
IRClUDtNGCICAIintS
SAVE 24' Ki
HEINZ
\ Ketchup
FRESH BAKED GOODS
'uirrnunmium
Rolls 3"f?'$l
(iovn,i., .wm ...,, fl4M,
CAKIMASTER
Pound Cakes "^99*
'OUR CNCNa Of OlAMM MAt.,, LI MO* Ot PtAM
PAMTtV PRIDI CRACKED WHEAT
Bread...........................S35<
PANTRY PRIDE
Instant Iced Tea Mix ^ l29
GOIMN CROWN
Lemon Juice
KM TOMATO
Paste...........................
59*
25*
BUY 1
GET 1
FREE!
PANTRY PRIDI WAffll
Syrup 'lS'69*
All F, A .OH PANTIT 'tIDI
Drink Mixes 'cVn' 99*
All VAIIITIISPUII
Cat Food 5 c.n', $1
PANTRY MIDI PIT ||T|
k Dog Food 6 iiS,' 99* Margarine
VITA CIIAM1D MH.INO 0
Party Snacks'?.'. 79
DAIRY DEPARTMENT
POWER 99
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$169
GAL.
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tioz.
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14-OZ.
BTL.
* UAAIT TWO "US "VITH %J ORDER
8 PACK 16-OZ. BOTTLES PLUS DEPOSIT,
Seven-Up
REGULAR ONLY
* LIMIT TWO DEALS WITH S7 ORDER OR MORE
OF OTHER ITEMS EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
4 7S02
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19*
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Glory...................
JI.CIN S IOTION MUD
^Bar Soap
lUPIIfTIINCTM ClEANIt
Miracle White';,1;'M09
PANTtY PRiDI AIL TIMPIIATUII liUI
Detergent "? 89*
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Pepper 4?N 69*
Ml H.VO.S f.NTIT PH0I lOWC.l
Sodas 3??-89<
SHINC DUN. S |] OI
Beer 6M?,i',"$lw
Cheese
IPJMMM
65*
Spread 2 & 99*
flO-SUN OBANOI .
Juice ..................2 cms 85
CINNAMON WITH ICING MIIICO ^^ .
Biscuits 'c.n39*
SAIOINTO DOMESTIC IDAM Oi *-k-JQ
Gouda Cheese it 2
I ? P1ICI
INLAND IMPOtflD (PLAIN) OtUUII ^ .
Cheese %.' 49'
SERVICE APPETIZER DEPT
SARA LEE FROZEN
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0 Nestles Candy 5S 79*
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Strawberries 3iX$l mST 5 1 99< STT
I.OIIN..OWNM..TSTIA.MOUSI iI2-l2S72Z=lS "'0- W ^nipS--------------
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Beef Burgers nSt Topping... :.^0,69* r"""R,M,"Al"^'o
fANTir f>.IM IIOZIN Kl C.IAM
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6=^75* Cheese Pizza-.' *1" Baked Bean. '^63*
ORMOM Of OTHW ITEMSIXCIUOINC CKJAMTTB.
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AVAHAiLI Only At WORM WITH IIIVKI COUN'ltt
ALl tUMCH Ml A it AMD CHilll HICK TO YOUR ORMR
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Roast $099
Beef il d^
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Bologna0*^"'3Z. 79*
SWtfT > AN.IM. .
Hard Salami T. 69*
tin.si Noaii iwn c* uxotui
m TOUMTT MM ^o^^,, IO ^^ ^ mm)^mus, ^^.^A,
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NACHO OI TACO TO.liu A
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PRICE REDUCTION 11 5 PRICE REDUCTION
TNJjAMOUNT SHOWN WUM ,
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DioocnonsoiAMO nsa
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AVOCADO. SHI
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