The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00178

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJewish IFIIariidliiai in
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 7Number 17
Friday, August 26,1977
Price 35 Cents
Local Leaders Attend Palm-Aire Conference
Local leaders and staff of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward devoted the entire
weekend of Aug. 19, 20 and 21 to
an in depth examination of the
Federation and the 1978 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund campaign.
After brief opening remarks by
President Lewis E. Cohn, Rabbi
Klihu Jack Steinhorn of Temple
Agudath Shalom, Stamford,
Conn., discussed 'What it means
to be a Jew' by explaining, "the
ultimate test of a Jew is one of
behavior and not of attitude. To
be a Jew is to want to redeem
history. If there is a pluralism in
which this dream can be brought
about, then there can be a
redemption of history."
THE EVENING culminated
with spirited singing of Israeli
songs.
The Saturday sessions began
with the Federation assessment
by Donald H. Klein, executive
director. Covering Federation's
progress from 1975 and plans for
the coming year, Klein discussed
many subjects, including: the
areas campaign, allocations,
community planning, community
relations. Women's Division,
Jewish education, legacies and
endowments, missions,
chaplaincy service, and
leadership development.
Scholar-in-Residence, Bernard
Olshansky, executive director of
the Combined Jewish Philan-
Leading the workgroup on community and public relations is R.
Joel Weiss as facilitator (center) and Herbert Katz (left) and
Joel Schneider, M.D. (right) as resource people.
PLEASE NOTE. .
The Jewish Community Centers of South Florida-
Hollywood Extension, 2838 Hollywood Blvd., will be
closed on the following dates: Sept. 13, 14 for Rosh
Hashonah; Sept. 22 for Yom Kippur; Sept. 27, 28 for
Succoth; and Oct. 4-5 for Simchat Torah. NO MEALS
WILL BE SERVED AT THE JCC ON THESE DAYS.
Regular programming of all classes will resume at the
Center immediately after the Jewish Holidays. For more
information contact Elaine Goldstein, program director.
thropies of Greater Boston
commenting on the presentation,
"we are not a people of in-
dividuals, we are a people of
community. Because of our value
system, we as a people will
survive and maintain our sense of
community."
WORKGROUP summaries
were given by each group
facilitator. Reporting on the
budgeting and planning
workgroup, Joyce Newman,
Women's Division immediate
past president, said, "The
Federation should educate the
community to the local needs and
then plan for services to fit these
needs."
Reporting on the public and
community relations workgroup,
R. Joel Weiss, Leadership
Development Committee
chairman, said, "Jewish citizens
need to be enlightened to the
problems we are facing. Better
educated Jews will act and not
just react. The 35th anniversary
of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward will be a perfect tool to
develop Federation's image.
Reporting on Jewish
education, Ellie Katz said,
"Education and information
about Israel is essential. For this,
we have the very successful High
School in Israel program, the
state II it It-1 and the addition of a
community Shaliach to the
Federation. Parents and
teenagers must be motivated and
there should be an increase in
adult education. Federation is the
catalyst to deal with these
problems."
WHILE SPEAKING on the
Jewish World Committment,
Gordon Zacks, vice chairman of
the United Jewish Appeal said,
"We have a duty and respon-
sibility to redeem the Jews of
Israel, but we need helpfrom
the United States. The dollars
that we Jews give are being
monitored. Giving less is a sure
way to get less out of Congress in
Foreign Aid. The dollars raised is
an index to our solidarity." Zacks
added, "Nation building is a
lifetime committment."
The Sunday session was
concerned with the 1978 CJA-
IEF campaign, legacies and
endowments, community
missions, Women's Division and
public relations.
Stanley Margulies, M.D., 1978
campaign chairman, pointed out
that "the needs in South
Broward and in Israel are much
greater now and we must raise
the funds to support these needs.
We must reach more non-givers
and raise the levels of giving of
those already giving to the CJA-
IEF."
Preparing to discuss 'What it is to be a Jew' is Rabbi Elihu
Jack Steinhorn (left) and Federation President, Lewis E. Cohn.
Jewish education was the topic of workgroup C, with Ellie Katz
(left) as facilitator and Moses Horn stein (right) as resource
person. (More photos on Page 2)
^mmmm Prime Minister's Mission to Israel Aug. 28Sept. 2 iiSiHi|
Moses Horn-
represent the
Stanley Margulies, M.D.,
stein and Herbert Katz will
Jewish Federation of South Broward at the
Prime Minister's Mission to Israel, Aug. 28
through Sept. 2.
The Prime Minister's Mission will bring
Jewish leaders from across the country
together for intensive meetings with Israel's
Prime Minister, Menachem Begin.
PARTICIPANTS of this "vitally im-
portant mission," will work together for five
days trying to understand the problems and
needs facing Israel's people, according to
Stanley Margulies, M.D., Federation vice
president and campaign chairman.
"The theme of the Mission," Dr.
Margulies explained, "will be 'the new
government and how it will affect education,
military and the economy of Israel.'
"The five-day Mission will culminate with
a private dinner with Prime Minister Begin,
at which time those in attendance will an-
nounce their gifts for the 1978 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
campaign. This will mark the official opening
of the 1978 campaign."
Donald H. Klein, Federation executive
director will also attend the Mission to serve
as a staff consultant to various committees.
I
f
SeptemBeR Community Calendar on page 8
i

Inspired by the events of the 1976 Prime Minister's Mission,
Moses Hornstein takes time to pray at the Western Wall.


Pi
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater HoUyivood
Friday, August 26,1977
JFSB Chaplaincy Schedules Holiday
Services in Area Hospitals, Homes
Dr. Meron J. Levitate, chair-
man of the Chaplaincy Com-
mittee of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward, has an-
nounced that pre-High Holiday
services will be conducted under
the aegis of the Chaplaincy
Service, at nine local institutions.
The following services have
been scheduled for area nursing
homes: Golfcrest, Sept. 6; Holly-
wood Hills Nursing Home, Sept.
7; Dania Nursing Home, Sept. 8;
Hallandale Rehabilitation
Center, Sept. 8; and Washington
Manor Nursing Home, Sept. 9.
The following services have
been scheduled tor the area's hos-
pitals: Community Hospital of
South Broward, Sept. 9; Bis-
cayne Medical Center, Sept. 12,
and Hollywood Medical Center,
Sept. 12.
Three separate services will be
held at the South Florida State
Hospital on Monday, Sept. 19 (a
pre-Yom Kippur Service), one for
general patients, one for geriatric
patients and one for children.
All of the scheduled services
will be conducted by Rabbi
Harold Richter, chaplain of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
Rabbi Richter will be assisted
by Wendy Benjamin of A viva
Chapter of B'nai B'rith, Leon
Ehrlich, Hyman Cohen, Jacob
Green, Phillip Rosenberg and
Jack Kamen of the Hillcresters.
Also assisting will be Dr. Lester
Brodie and Abe Grossman.
Refreshments for the South
Florida State Hospital's general
patient service will be provided
by Hillcrest Chapter of Women's
B'nai B'rith and Intercoastal
Chapter of Women's B'nai B'rith.
Edna Goldstein of the Hillcrest
Chapter is chairperson of that
event.
Abridged High Holiday prayer
books will be distributed to all
patients in all hospitals and
nursing homes of the area.
Dietary supervisors have been
apprised of traditional Rosh
Hashanah meals and are being
encouraged by the Chaplaincy to
serve foods associated with the
holiday season.
JEWISH
Jews Going Home To Egypt
In the past few months, over a thousand Jews
now living in France have obtained visas and
visited their former homelandEgypt, according
to a London Jewish Chronicle report.
Some have spent up to a month revisiting the
once familiar streets of Cairo, lined with fashion
boutiques and internationally known stores that
still bear the nnames of their former Jewish
owners such as Cicurel, Chemla and Gattegno.
WHEN THE State of Israel was established in
1948 there were some 64,600 Jews in Egypt
today there are perhaps 160 remaining Jews,
all of them elderly and many of them sick, ac-
cording to the report.
One long-time Paris resident revisited Egypt
for the first time in 22 years. When he left in 1956,
Cairo had a population of three million. Today,
the Egyptian capital is residence to eight million
inhabitants.
He visited the Shaar Hashamayim Synagogue
in Cairo. In the old days, the late Chief Rabbi of
Egypt, Rabbi Haim Nahum, had officiated. On
Holydays and festivals every seat was occupied
and overflow services were organized in other
nearby buildings.
AS THE VISITOR walked from his hotel to
Shaar Hashamayim, he remembered Rosh
Hashanah of 1952. Gen. Mohammed Neguib,
head of the military junta which toppled King
Farouk, paid an official visit to the synagogue
and kissed Rabbi Nahum's cheek before the whole
congregation. Twenty-five years later, Shaar
Hashamayim was closed.
He walked on to the old Jewish Quarter, Haret
el-Yahoud, where seven synagogues were once
always open. All that remains of those seven
houses of worship is the Rav Moshe Synagogue,
which is closed, decrepit and decaying into ruins.
The visitor left Cairo to visit Mansoura, where
his family came from. During the 19th century
this Nile delta town was famous for its large
Jewish community. There had once been a
synagogue in Mansoura that bore the visitor's
family's name, but it was no longer there.
MANSOURA'S MAIN synagogue was still
there, only it now serves as a mosque. On the
building's facade, left intact is the inscription:
"Kahal kodesh (holy congregation) of Maklouf
Cohen and his wife, Simcha Cohen."
In the visitor's birth city of Alexandria, he saw
Eliahu Hanavi Synagoguestill maintained as it
was 25 years ago. He met the rabbi, an 80-year-
old man called Haham Chemata Hadida. The
rabbi told him that services were still held if a
minyan could be gathered. There had not been a
wedding in the synagogue for 10 years.
There are only about 100 Jews left in
Alexandria. Their average age is 60, but there was
one 38-year-old man there who was in charge of
the home for the aged at Moharrem Bey. Most of
Alexandria's Jews lived there or in other homes.
SOME JEWISH tourists walked by while the
visitor was talking to Haham Hadida and he
asked them to help make up a minyan to hold a
service. He was able to pray once again where he
had prayed regularly with his parents.
Eliahu Hanavi is the only surviving synagogue
in Alexandria. There is a yeshiva, a bet
hamidrash and numerous schools.
International Jewish News
Women's UJA Plans Overseas Mission
Women from the Jewish
Federation of South Broward can
participate in "A Woman's
Way," the National Women's
Division of the United Jewish
Appeal, 1978 Mission to Eastern
Europe and Israel, Sept. 26
through Oct. 9.
"These very special 14 days
will be filled with excitement,
adventure, sharing, involvement
and above all, connection to out
roots and heritage and to other
women in Israel and the United
States who share our
dedication," said Karen
Margulies, National Women's
Division mission chairman.
"Our experiences on this fall
mission will strengthen our
growth as individuals and com-
munity leaders. We will celebrate
Succot in Bucharest, Romania
and Simchat Torah in Jerusalem,
Israel," she said.
"The cost of the mission is
$1,596 per person double oc-
cupancy and includes round trip
air fare, all breakfasts and Contact the Women's Division
lunches, major dinners, sight- of the Jewish Federation of South
seeing and many extras.'' Broward for further information
IFHutton
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Phone 961 -0998
Making plans for the Federation assessment are from left:
Donald H. Klein, Federation executive director; Lewis E. Cohn,
Federation president; and Bernard Olshansky, Scholar in
Residence for the Conference.
Planning and budgeting were among the topics discussed in
workgroup A with Joyce Newman (left) as facilitator and Allen
Gordon (right) as resource person.
wiwx'x'vSxKiJK'ffi
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It is for this reason Riverside is not
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Today, each of Riverside's chapels
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counties is exclusively a Riverside Chapel,
staffed only by Riverside people who
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Friday, August 26,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Student Life Getting Rough
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) -
The City of York is in-
famous in Jewish history
because it was there in
1190, that the entire Jewish
community committed
suicide in the castle,
Massada-style, rather than
be massacred by a howling
mob.
In 1977, York once more
became a source of anxiety
for English Jewry when an
incredulous community
heard that the small Jewish
Students Society at the
city's university was being
expelled by the main
students union because of
the claim that Zionism was
racist.
The affair caused concern in
the Board of Deputies of British
Jews and, while aware that this
was "only" a matter of student
politics, and that life and limb
were not at stake, one or two
speakers referred to the earlier
painful Jewish associations with
| that northern city.
HOWEVER, communal and
student leaders have drawn
comfort from the steadfast and
' energetic manner in which
committed Jewish students are
standing up for themselves.
There is a feeling, too, that the
anti-Zionist campaigners have
overplayed their hands and are
alienating growing numbers of
non-Jewish students.
The affair hit the national
headlines, and the York Students
Union was quickly shamed into
reversing its expulsion of the
Jewish society, but not before the
vice-chancellor of the university
had threatened to intervene.
However, the events at York
were only one episode in a wave
of anti-Zionist agitation, which
has swept British campuses over
the past year, and which
threatens to grow stronger.
IN A RESEARCH report
issued here, the Institute for
Jewish Affairs notes that only
about 20 percent of Britain's
660,000 university and college
students are politically active
and of these only a minority have
a special interest in the Middle
East. The debate about the
Middle East in the universities
has boiled down mainly to a pro-
Palestine Liberation
Organization and anti-PLO
confrontation, thus giving rise to
the extreme statements about
Israel and Zionism.
There are some 16,000 Arab
and between 9,000 and 12,000
Jewish students on the cam-
puses. While moat Arabs are
members of an Arab student
society, only about 3,000 of the
Jews belong to the Union of
Jewish Students.
Thus in general the ratio of
organized Arab and Jewish
students is 16 to 3. But in a large
number of vocational training
placeswhere Arabs are heavily
concentratedthe Jews are out-
numbered by Arab and Third
World students by 400 to 1 or
even more.
FOR SOME years now, anti-
Zionist groups, such as the
British Anti-Zionist Organization
(BAZO) and the General Union of
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Palestinian Students (GUPS> March, the students union tried
have been agitating for an anti- to prevent the Jewish society
Zionist resolution through the from staging an Israel week.
IN BRITAIN
national conference of the
generally moderate National
Union of Students (NUS).
NUS is currently the only
national students union in
Europe without any policy on the
Middle East and at a meeting of
all the European unions in
Nicosia in January, 1977, the
NUS used its veto to prevent a
pro-Palestinian motion from
being carried. In the last year,
however, the anti-Zionist
campaign has gathered
momentum, to the growing
discomfiture of the NUS
leadership.
In the last two terms alone,
anti-Zionist resolutions were
debated in 21 student unions
throughout the country. The
anti-Zionist move was successful
at 11 campuses, and failed at
seven. At two universities,
Jewish societies took out writs
against the local student unions
after attempts to deny them
access to the unions' normal
facilities.
IN THEIR anti-Zionist
crusade, the PLO supporters
exploit a resolution carried at the
National Union of Students
annual conference three years
ago, enabling unions to refuse
assistance of any kind to "openly
racist and fascist organizations."
Citing the 1975 United Nations
resolution, equating Zionism
with racism, they have sought
with considerable success to
censure or expel Jewish and
Israel societies.
It was on the basis of this
policy that the students union at
York decided to expel the Jewish
society from its register on June
15. Another bitter struggle
during the same term was at
Salford, in the Greater Man-
chester area. Although a
Palestine Week was held there in
DESPITE TAKING legal
action, the Jewish society only
partly succeeded in carrying out
its program on the campus. As in
York, the university ad-
ministration and the NUS
Executive tried to intervene on
behalf of the beleaguered Jewish
students.
When the new academic year
starts in October, the Middle
East battle of the campuses will
be resumed. It is expected, too,
that Zionism will be debated at
the next national conference of
the NUS in December, and that
finally some form of official NUS
policy on the Middle East will
emerge.
The fact that some Jewish
societies have invoked the
support of the Chancellors of
their universities will not,
however, stand them in good
stead, since students in Britain
as elsewhere resent the pressures
of "the establishment."
THE JEWISH students will
have to count primarily on
themselves and on their student
sympathizers. Besides con-
servative supporters, these in-
clude the followers of what is
termed "the broad left," (as
opposed to the Trotskyite and
Anarchist elements). The broad
left embraces not only Labor
Party supporters but even or-
thodox Communists, such as Sue
Slipman, president of the NUS.
In an article in The Morning
Star, the Communist Party daily,
'Ms. Slipman, who is Jewish,
wrote: "It is all very well for
sections of the left to argue that
their intention is to see justice
done to the democratic cause of
the Palestinians: but if a result of
their good intentions is to deny
rights to Jewish students then a
re-examination of their methods
is necessary."
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NEAR MLWD FASHION SQUARE
Holiday Cards Available
for Russian Jews
The Community Relations
Committee of the Jewish Feder-
ation of South Broward now has
available New Year's cards for
the Jews of Russia.
The holiday cards can be used
for greetings to specific families,
as well as sending a five-year
Jewish calendar and the Hebrew-
Russian alphabet for the benefit
of the., families, according to
Elaine Pittell, chairman of the
Soviet Jewry committee of the
CRC.
"Each card will let a Russian
Jewish family know that we are
thinking of them," said Mrs.
Pittell. "Each packet contains
four cards with four different
addresses and the background of
the individual families."
The CRC New Year's cards are
available through the Federation
office or Toby Lipton at 961-2934.
Just one of the holiday
Russian New Year's cards
available through the Fed-
eration office.
Refuseniks' Health Impared By
Soviet Policy, Report Says
A study by a group of Soviet
Jewish doctors of health con-
ditions of fellow refuseniks in
Russia indicates that many are
suffering from serious ailments.
The denial of their requests for
exit visas was reported to have
intensified various physical con-
ditions, especially among older
persons and to have triggered
other ailments.
A report from Moscow received
by the Washington Committee
for Soviet Jewry dealt with
refuseniks in Moscow, Byelorus-
sia, Moldavia, the Baltic States
and the Ukraine. The study team
was headed by Dr. Ernest
Axelrod, a psychiatrist.
FATALITIES were said to be
increasing as the result of strain
and anxiet of those futilely
awaiting word from the
authorities that they will be per-
mitted to leave the country.
Last year's victims included
Yefim Davidovich of Minsk,
Anna Begun (mother of Joseph
Begun) of Moscow, Dmitri Shtei-
man, father-in-law of Vladimir
Raiz, in Vilnius. Among those
presently in especially dangerous
physical condition are Veniamin
Lifshitz of Vilnius; Loifman,
Gersheni and Ahronson of
Kaunas; Mosey Liberman and
Mark Genin of Kiev.
The report states "The life of
refuseniks is especially hard in
small towns as a result of social
isolation, unemployment and
separation from families. The
decision to apply for emigration
visa is associated with a painful
reshaping of the personality."
DR. AXELROD says the only
way to help the patients is to
insure their prompt release from
the USSR.
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I
Page*
Tht Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater HoUywood
Friday, August 26,1977
Editorial
The Quixotic Fedorenko
There can be nothing more quixotic than the Feodore
Fedorenko experience. Perhaps there is a moral in it like
an Aesop's fable. How much more allegorical can you get
than to uncover a tale involving an alleged Nazi butcher
who is spending his latter years basking in the sunshine of
Miami Beach?
And not LaGorce Island Miami Beach, let's say, but
South Miami Beach, the haven for retired old Jewish men
and women living out their last years, many of them, in
the quiet desperation of economic privation and just plain
human neglect.
Some of them may have, themselves, escaped the
clutches of the Fedorenkos of the Hitler era and still wake
screaming gripped in the entrails of nightmares from
which they will never be unravelled.
A Fedorenko they do not need in their midst.
Why Fedorenko chose to live in their midst is entirely
another story. In that lies the quixotic quality of the
Aesop's fable that the entire experience implies.
One thing for sure: It sets an even more jaundiced light
on the activities of the Immigration and Naturalization
Service, which for some 30 years has dragged its heels in
the matter of hunting down Nazis in our midst living in
the lap of American luxury whether it be Fedorenko or
Artukovic. Butter than any of the other harrowing INS
indifferences, it shouts the question for ail the world to
hear: As Americans, do we believe in the dignity of in-
dividual human beings?
If we do, a Fedorenko living in South Beach certainly,
doesn't help us believe that
BBW's Anniversary
Last week, B'nai B'rith Women, an international
Jewish women's service organization, marked its 80th
anniversary. Founded on Aug. 18,1897, in San Francisco,
by a group of 34 women, BBW has grown into a volunteer
organization of over 150,000 members worldwide.
Organized originally as a social organization, B'nai
B'rith Women has enlarged its purpose and scope over the
years, shifting to the more serious job of perpetuating the
culture and traditions of Judaism, supporting Israel, and
providing needed community service programs.
One of BBW's major permanent projects, the Children's
Home in Israel, is also marking an anniversary this month
its 25th. A modern residential treatment center for the
rehabilitation of emotionally disturbed boys, it is the only
privately established institution of its kind for this age
group in Israel.
The Home has received attention in the mental health
field abroad as well as in Israel for its unusual success
rate. Seventy percent of these boys, who enter the Home
severely disturbed, go on to public schools and become
productive citizens of Israel.
A Multitude of Programs
Community service is an integral part of the work of
BBW volunteers, who initiate and participate in a variety
of activities that serve the needs of their individual com-
munities. Local hospitals, schools, prisons and centers for
the mentally retarded are all served by local BBW volun-
teers.
Its older adult program helps to locate the isolated
elderly and poor and connect them with sources of assis-
tance so that they can continue to live in dignity in their
own homes. Constantly meeting new, contemporary chal-
lenges with added energy and ideas, B'nai B'rith Women
has initiated programs, in cooperation with local agencies,
for the prevention of child abuse, drug abuse and rape.
On the occasion of this 80th anniversary, we hail B'nai
B'rith Women as one of the Jewish community's truly
outstanding organizations.
The New Anti-Semitism
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Ol The Merchandise Advertised la Iti Columns
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JewUh Federation of South Broward, Inc. SHOrAR EDITORIAL
ADVISORY CXJIOCTTEE-NathanPrltcher, Chairman: LewleE. Conn
Melvln H. Baer: Samuel afellne. D. M.D.
The Jewish FtarMian has ItllrtK Ma Jewish Unrry and Ma Jewish Weekly.
Member af the Jewish Teleyaahlc Aeency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. World-
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Numb* 17
IS rrpoosiblelto be anti-Israel
without being anti-Semitic?
On its face, the answer to the
question ought to be yes. In
practice, it is becoming in-
creasingly no. Where Jews are
concerned, objectivity goes out
the window.
In this context, anti-Semitism
must be redefined. The new anti-
Semitism, which is to say the new
sentiment against Israel, is not to
be conceived of in Holocaustic
terms.
IN FACT, the permissiveness
toward Jews, which has
characterized western civilization
for the last three decades, was the
child of the Hitlerian genocidal
realpolitik. The permissiveness
was a kind of Gentile nausea in
reaction against the Hitlerian
excesses which Gentilism, in its
most hideous form, had never
managed to approach.
I am not sure that there were
ideals at work in the Gentile
restraint pre-Hitler. It was more
a matter of a lack of know-how on
the grand scale. Hitler's genius
lay in his application of
technology to the kind of anti-
Semitism of which Gentiles
before him could, in the name of
their God, only dream.
It is an absolute certainty,
however, that it was historic anti-
Semitism generally that gave
Hitler both the inspiration and
the encouragement to let loose
upon the world his own particular
brandand that gave the world
its remarkable capacity to
tolerate it so dispassionately.
UNPREDICTABLY, the
triumph of technology unhinged
even the best of the anti-Semites.
Dwight Eisenhower, a typical
Gentile with typical attitudes
toward Jews spawned in the pews
of a dozen sanctimonious
churches, is now enshrined in
history because of a Life
Magazine photo of him, his face
torn, his eyes straining with
tears, on his emergence from the
first of the Nazi concentration
camps that the American forces
liberated
He could, indeed, ask: "What
hath God wrought?" Any Gentile
could ask the same question.
Israel, and the Golden Age of
Jewry post-World War II
generally, were the beneficiaries
of the short-lived Gentile shock of
recognition that they had per-
mitted a madman to carry their
own prejudices so for. Still, three
decades are a long time to say
mea culpa. The season of guilt is
over in the land.
THIS IS particularly true
because of the Israeli success
story. Israel has been too good
for the Jews. It is one thing for a
Gentile to feel guilty about his
prejudices gone amok and to
throw his victim a bone. It is
quite another to see that his guilt
has bred a powerful and suc-
cessful nation.
I am not at all sure that this
reversal of fortune in Israel's
destiny would not have occurred
were there no oil crunch. I rather
tend to recall that, even in the
infamous era of the Rogers Plan,
strong resentment toward Israel
was already beginning to be
manifested. That was only three
years after the vaunted 1967
War.
Nevertheless, oil has fed the
flames of the old anti-Semitism.
Increasingly, there is the feeling
that Israel is simply too good for
the Jews. Further, Israel exists
because things are too good for
Jews generally. They own this
They control that. They are
behind every secret intrigue or
other. The reason for the change
in attitude is simple: it is costing
the Gentile, and he doesn't care
to pay. His thirty-year sentence
has been commuted.
AND SO, the old anti-Semitic
vocabulary, the classk anti-
Semitic attitudes emerge willy-
nilly. They make their sounds
cross the land no matter how
strongly the propagandists who
Mindlin
manipulate the anti-Semitic
claque insist that they are not
anti-Semitic, that they are merely
1 observing new sociological
phenomena.
The truth is that times have
changed. From World War II
until perhaps 1970, it was a
political liability to be anti-
Semitic. The Soviets, for
example, who could never un-
derstand this hiatus in the
general anti-Semitic tide of
human events, suffered the
consequences of their peculiar
peasant insensitivity as clear
proof of their failing. They would
hardly have done so poorly in the
human rights crunch if they were
more enlightened about the latest
in anti-Semitic fashion.
But today, it is a liability if you
are nor anti-Semitic, as for
example the British are rapidly
learning from the French, who
were long ago infected with it,
much like the Soviets, all on their
own.
AND SO Soviet anti-Semitic
propaganda finds its way into the
best journals, the slickest
newspapers, as if it were hard
copy. So does the British variety,
incidentally, as witness the
recent Sunday Times expose on
alleged Israeli brutality in
prisoner of war camps.
The upshot is that the Soviets,
the barometer in this sort of
thing, are doing very much better
these days thank you in their
human rights violations, not
because of any adjustments they
have made in their inherent anti-
Semitism, but because the times
are changing in their animalistic
favor.
Or take the case of Cyrus
Vance. Vance has just returned
from the Mideast, and whose
fault is it that he has failed? Why
Menachem Begins, and Begin is
never to be forgotten as the
leader of "his terrorist
organization, the Irgun Zvi
Lsumi. ..(which).. .bombed
civilian targets and on one oc-
casion wiped out an entire
village." (Oswald Johnston in the
Los Angeles Times).
NEVER BOND the Deir
Yasain canard, or its utter
irrelevancy to the issue at hand.
Repeat it over and over again.
Show the Jews, once as victims,
now in their new role as brutes.
Furthermore, present the PLO as
the quintessence of moderation
in its decision "to accept UN
Resolution 242," whose main
purpose is to amputate Israel
into non-existence. Dress up
Yasir Arafat in a Pierre Cardin
tie, the great French
achievement. Show all these
stooges of the new western anti-
Semitism to be absolute pussy
cats.
And finally, publish a tired,
astigmatic piece entitled "How to
Save Israel in Spite of Herself"
by a tired, astigmatic former
undersecretary of state, George
Ball, a prescription for Israel's
ultimate annihilation through
geopolitical process such as rivals
the Rogers Plan itself in skillful
revisionist history. Do all of this
in the name of peace, meaning: If
only there were no Israel; if only
there were no Jews.
Under the circumstances, the
new anti-Semitism is as remote
from the Hitler Holocaust
technology as it is possible to
bebut the results can be
assured to be the same: an
essentially Judenrein Middle
East.
And where are we? Why, we
have returned to the
Torquemadas and the
Chrysostomes, but with
fingernails that are polished. The
blood washes more easily away.
WITH ONE exception:
Suddenly, it is clear that the
Jews won't lie down so easily,
that they will not participate in
their own amputation, in the
dismemberment of their nation as
readily as in the past. Vance and
Carter may agree that "we are
down to bedrock."
But for the first time, that may
not be Begins view. A Jew may
not agree. And, since suddenly
these stalwart patriots, who have
pledged their lives, their fortune,
their sacred honor to their
survival as a people, will not go
gently into that anti-Semitic
night, they are terrorists. They
are intransigent. And so the
response to this new Jewish
arrogance is to be anti-Israel, to
be anti-Semitic.
Equalization of Service
Extends Freedoms
JERUSALEM- Prime
Minister Menachem Begin said
Monday there was no political
significance to the cabinet's
declaration of Sunday of
equalization of services for
inhabitants of the West Bank
and the Gaza Strip.
Speaking to newsmen at Ben
Gurion Airport, where he saw off
Rabbi Alexander Schiadler,
chairman of the President's
Conference, Begin denied that it
was the first step in the an-
nexation of the occupied
territories, adding quickly that
he had said in the past those
territories need not to be
nexed.
(The
an-
Likud policy is that no
legal annexation is needed, in
that Judea, Samaria and the
Gaza Strip are anyway an in-
tegral part of Eretz Yisraal.)
He described the decision as
purely humanitarian, and
therefore, he said, he did not
expect any negative American
reaction. He said, "What did we
do wrong? Every man should
praise this decision."
Whether or not the motives of
the new policy are political, the
reactions certainly areboth
wnong Jews and Arabs. A PLO
spokesman was quoted to say
that the government decision to
extend equal services to Israeli
citizens and West Bank and Gaza
Strip inhabitants alike was "but
one more step toward an-
nexation." He added that it
proved Israel's intention to move
toward a fifth Israeli-Arab war.
Gasa Mayor Rashad A-Shawa
also condemned the decision,
describing it as a rejection of
Palestinian rights and a move
toward annexation. But Hebron
Mayor, Fahed Kawasante, was
more cautious in his reaction. He
said it was a positive decision, "if
it really intended to improve
services provided to West Bank
and Gaza inhabitants."
JERUSALEM- Prime
Minister Begin Monday invited
the Labor Alignment opposition
to give its support to his
government if and when it is
need with the demand to accept
PLO participation in the peace
process.
"There is a national consensus
rejecting this demand," Begin
declared. "A responsible op-
position" should therefore back
the government over so central
and caudal an issue/' he said.


Friday, August 26,1977
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
a Romantic View of WeahneR Von BRaun
4
By JURGEN KRAMER
Hannoveris her Algemeine
No era produces more than a
handful of people who, due to
their unique qualities, become a
legend during their lifetime. And
who can doubt that in our
technological age the late
Wernher von Braun assumed this
position when the first men
landed on the moon on Jury 20,
1969?
To do justice to a man like him
is anything but easy. What
comes to mind is Peenemunde
and the V-2 rocket, the years in
Huntsville, Ala., and the many
rocket projects during that time
and, of course, "Saturn V" which
was to carry the astronauts
Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins on
man's first visit to the moon.
WERNHER VON BRAUN
was instrumental in man's first
steps on the moon, having helped
to realize this age-old dream, not
only as a scientist, but also as the
forerunner of space philosophy,
since the space researcher von
Braun was also a humanist.
Space research was for him the
great hope of mankind, and he
believed that it would help to do
away with wars, providing man
with a "new cosmic awareness."
I This was the Utopian
I dimension of his thoughts
throughout his lifeeven when
space enthusiasm had passed its
zenith in the seventies and he and
his colleagues had to devote
themselves once more to earthly
problems.
Von Braun never deviated
from his principle of hope. Space
research remained for him a one-
way road.
AS HE put it in 1971, "I
believe that space travel will find
a bread-and-butter basis, as they
say in America, in the seventies
and that it will prove so useful as
to make it impossible for man to
imagine how he could ever have
lived without it.
"After all, we can hardly
imagine today how man managed
to Uve without a telephone... but
then Goethe never knew what a
telephone was. I am convinced
that in the year 2000 people will
ask themselves how their
forebears ever managed without
telecommunications satellites."
Modern communications and
computer technology is the
bread-and-butter basis which von
Braun meant and on which his
optimism that man would land on
Mars in the not-too-distant
future rested.
HE WAS born a German
citizen on March 23, 1912.
Following his high school
graduation at the age of 18, he
enrolled at the Technical
University in Berlin and began
delving into rockets.
Prof. Hermann Oberth
provided him with the op-
portunity to engage in his
research. Two years later, von
Braun was commissioned by the
Wehrmacht to carry out a
research project.
Together with his assistants he
began to tinker. The first success
came in 1934 when his small
research group fired the A-2, a
liquid propulsion rocket which
achieved an altitude of 2.5
kilometers.
By 1937 Wernher von Braun
had a research staff of 80. He and
his team moved to Peenemunde,
developing the famous rocket
centera joint project of the
Wehrmacht and the Luftwaffe.
BY THE time war broke out,
the rocket development had
progressed to Project A-5.
Starting from 1939, the main
objective was to develop a long-
range ballistic missile which was
officially dubbed A-4 and which
later achieved fame under the
name of V-2.
The first successful V-2 test
took place on October 3,1942.
Shortly before the capitulation
of Germany, von Braun and his
team placed themselves at the
disposal of the Americans.
HE FIRST stepped onto
American soil in September,
1945, having previously complied
with an American request to
carry out further tests with the
V-2. In America he was ap-
pointed director of a rocket
development department in Fort
Bliss, Tex.
The V-2 which he developed
further in Fort Bliss achieved an
altitude of 400 kilometers.
Hermes II, the first supersonic
aircraft was also developed in
Fort Bliss.
But the actual breakthrough to
applied space research took place
in Huntsville, where von Braun's
team had moved in 1950.
The Redstone rocket, which
was developed there at the labs of
the U.S. Army, was the United
States' first major rocket system.
It was not until after this success
that von Braun, then aged 43,
became an American citizen on
April 14,1955.
THE JUPITER and Pershing
rockets followed. Jupiter carried
the first American Satellite,
Explorer I, into space.
Work on the Saturn VI, the
forerunner of Saturn V, began in
September 1958.
Von Braun worked in Hunt-
sville for 15 yearssince 1970 on
behalf of NASA as director of the
Marshall Space Flight Center.
This is where the Skylab
project, the first manned space
station of the United States, was
evolved. It was also at the
Marshall Center that Wernher
von Braun carried out his first
research into the "Space Shuttle"
system.
IN MARCH, 1970 he became
the deputy director of NASA in
Washingtona position in which
ie had to devote himself
primarily to planning tasks. This
job was unable to hold him for
very long, and industry, which
had long been wooing him,
finally got its man.
Fairchild Industries, one of
America's major space cor-
porations, employed him as vice
president in 1972. He held this
job until his death. In between,
he served on the board of
Daimler-Benz in Stuttgart.
As president of the National
Space Travel Institute of the
United States, von Braun
remained faithful to the Utopia of
the conquest of space by mana
Utopia partially realized in the
twentieth century even during
his time as industry executive.
Lv *.
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Most low tar cigarettes are a tasteless version
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1 Winston Lights have low tar. But they also have
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OourtMyNASA


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 26,1977

I
Shoter is New Rabbi fanSy"young has Set Up ,
At Temple in the Pines j ftls OBjectives With Cape j
Justin Weininger, president of
the Temple in the Pines, Pem-
broke Pines, has announced the
election of Rabbi Bernard P.
Shoter as the Temple's new
spiritual leader.
Rabbi Shoter,
who was ordain-
ed from the Isaac
Elchanan Theo-
logical Seminary,
pursued grad-
uate work at the
Jewish Theolog-
ical Seminary of
America in New
York City. He is
a member of the Shoter
Rabbinical Assembly-Inter-
national Body of Conservative
Rabbis and holds a master's
degree in social graduate work
from the Graduate School of
Yeshiva University.
RABBI SHOTER has saved
congregations in Florida for
many years. In the early 1960's
he was the spiritual leader of
Flagler Granada Jewish Center in
Miami and served for 12 years at
Temple Beth Shalom in Sarasota,
Fla. He also was rabbi for Temple
Israel in Daytona Beach, Fla., his
most recent post.
Both in Sarasota and Daytona
Beach, Rabbi Shoter was active
in the local Jewish community
councils and was chairman of the
United Jewish Appeal Campaign
in 1965-66. He also established
Israel Bond campaigns in these
two communities and is a
member of the National Board of
Shaare Zedek Hospital in
Jerusalem.
Rabbi and Mrs. Shoter, the
former Dolores Keusch of West
Miami, were officially welcomed
at a reception at the Temple
recently. Officer installation was
another feature of the eveing and
new officers include, in addition
to President Justin Weininger,
Executive Vice President Sidney
Schreidel, Vice President Julius
Kaufman, Vice President William
Brandt, Secretary Myra
Schreidel and Treasurer Samuel
Marcus.
Jewish Military Personnel
To Observe High Holidays
American Jewish military
personnel in such far-flung
locales as Germany, Greece,
Turkey, Italy and the Far East
will again observe the High Holy
Days and attend special services
this year, thanks to Jewish
chaplains and the Jewish Welfare
Board's (JWB) Commission on
Jewish Chaplaincy (CJC).
"The needs of the Jewish
serviceman are unique," says
Rabbi Eric Friedland, chairman
of the CJC. "While there are
several hundred military bases in
the United States alone, and
countless others at overseas
points and aboard seagoing Navy
vessels throughout the world,
there are barely 60 full-time
Jewish chaplains." But a corps of
civilian and reserve rabbis and
military lay leaders will conduct
Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur
services at every base where
there are Jews. This year Rosh
Hashanah will last from sun-
down, on Sept. 12, through sun-
down Sept. 14. Yom Kippur will
begin on the evening of Sept. 21
and end at nightfall the following
day.
AS IN previous years, both
JWB's Commission on Jewish
Chaplaincy and JWB's Women's
Organizations' Services have
sent shipments of kosher foods,
prr.yer books and prayer shawls,
yarmulkes, Torah scrolls, shofars
(ram's horns), Jewish calendars
and inspirational literature for
use not only during Rosh
Hashanah and Yom Kippur, but
during Sukkot, Shemini Atzeret
and Simhat Torah as well.
Special shipments are also ear-
marked for Peace Corps
volunteers and United
embassy personnel.
Rabbis who will conduct
services at military bases this
year include CJC Deputy
Director Rabbi Gilbert Kollin, an
Air Force Reservist who will visit
Ft. Wainwright, in Fairbanks,
Alaska, and Reserve Chaplain
Jack Sable, who will officiate at
Malmstrom Air Force Base,
Mont. Chaplain Joseph Messing,
Western Area director of the
JWB Commission, will once
again lead services at Fort
Huachuca, Ariz., and Air Force
Reservist Louis Engelstein of
Jerusalem will visit bases in
Greece and Turkey.
In addition, the Chaplaincy
Commission will work with the
placement services of the Central
Conference of American Rabbis,
the Rabbinical Assembly, and
the Rabbinical Council ,of
America in helping to arrange
civilian rabbinical coverage at the
many military bases and VA
||Baa|HB|akMMH
Jewish chaplains.
TRADITIONAL Selihot
prayers and liturgical melodies of
the High Holy Days and Sukkot
are available on three CJC-pro-
duced tape cassettes. "While
ambulatory patients generally
attend hospital services," Rabbi
Friedland notes, "the cassettes
are often played over VA hospital
networks so that bedridden
Jewish patients can participate
as well." In some cases, Jewish
chaplains arrange special "break-
the-fast" suppers for those
patients who fast on Yom
Kippur.
Holiday leave policy for Jewish
servicemen is typically liberal.
Rabbi Friedland points out, and
those servicemen who can't get
home for the holidays are offered
some hospitality by local Jewish
families. Single men and women
are often guests of military
families on their bases.
Cooperating in holiday
arrangements with the Jewish
chaplains, the CJC, and JWB's
Women's Organizations' Services
are local Armed Forces and
Veterans Services Committees,
Jewish Community Centers affil-
iated with JWB, synagogues,
and other local Jewish
organizations.
JWB, THE agency accredited
by the U.S. government to
provide religious, morale, and
welfare services to Jews in the
U.S. Armed Forces, their
families, and hospitalized
veterans on behalf of the
American Jewish community, is
funded in part by the Jewish
Federation of South Broward'a
States ', Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund campaign.
Headlines
WASHINGTON- President
Carter has embarked on a face-to-
face dialogue with the American
people to win popular support
and bi-partisan political backing
in Congress for his course of
action in the Middle East.
In rejecting the advice of
congressional leaders in his own
party, as well as among
Republicans, the President also
appeared to be going back on a
previous pledge that the ad-
ministration would eschew public
remarks on the political process.
In effect, the President has
committed himself to bringing
the PLO into the Geneva con-
ference, leaning toward Arab
terms and in opposition to Israeli
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin'* government refusal to
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
When you ship weak fish a
long distance over the ocean, it's
a good idea to drop a kipper or
two in the keg to shake the
lethargic finny animals out of
their apathy.
So perhaps our much-criticized
UN Ambassador Andrew Young
is the kipper in the worldwide fish
bowl now and will quicken the
thought and understanding of
millions who have long trembled
at the direct approach to
diplomacy.
OF COURSE, Andy Young
has been wrong on several
counts. He's admitted as much.
He has apologized to the British
government for saying Britain
was "a little chicken" on racial
questions and had in-
stitutionalized racism more than
any others in the history of the
world.
He has called Presidents
Lincoln, Kennedy, Johnson,
Nixon, and Ford racists, then
backed off from the use of that
fighting word with the
disclaimer, hard to grasp: "I
certainly didn't mean anything
derogatory about the personal
lives of these men." To help pull
himself out of the rhetorical trap,
he has referred to his own supply
of racist opinions.
One sharp newspaper observer
has, with good reason, asked why
Ambassador Young defended
Jimmy Carter when the
President, as candidate slipped
and fell over his defense of
"ethnic purity" in our American
neighborhoods. It is Young's
sloppy habit of speech, this critic
said, which leads him into such
verbal traps.
HIS DETRACTORS label the
Ambassador a "scold without
portfolio" who has gone ad-
venturing into "unshackled
thinking." He's been termed
"naive," "very immature,"
"rash," "inexperienced" and a
fellow who puts both feet in his
mouth. His do-it-yourself
diplomacy hurts the nation he
represents, his foes assert. And
perhaps, worst of all, he fancies
himself State Secretary Cyrus
Vance instead of UN
Ambassador Andrew Young. ,
But whether he endures as
appointed diplomat or flunks on
the assignment, it can never be
truthfully said that he did not set
up his objective with care. Nor
will he fail to force people to think
differently on the cardinal issue
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1-53M114 or 531-1744
AMBASSADOR YOUNG
of racial differences, racial biases,
and racial injustices.
In retreating from his tendency
to brand the highly placed as
racists, he dropped back to the
second line. There, with more
assurance, he substituted the
term, lack of sensitivity, for
racism. This is a healthy turn.
FOR THE anthropologists
true to the disciplinary
requirements of their craft have
long since made it clear that
racial differential is primarily a
matter of physical variations,
having to do with limb and skull
structure, hair texture, and
pigmentation. The distinctions
are biological; nor are the
Caucasoids (whites), Mongoloids
(yellow) or Negroids (blacks)
today racially pure. Inter-
mingline in all so-called civilized
nations has produced) profound
change.
If racism means anything
today, it is the notion that one's
own stock is superior. The
pseudo-intellectuals of the late
19th century tried to prove a
superior (Nordic) race does exist;
and out of that fantasy the world
got Adolf Hitler
If Racism means any-
thing today, it is the notion
that one's own stock is su-
perior. The pseudo-intellec-
tuals of the late 19th centu-
ry tried to prove a superior
(Nordic) race does exist;
and out of that fantasy the
world got Adolf Hitler.
LEST WE ruminate on that
dire result too snugly, let us
recall Earnest Hooton's keen
advice: "Our treatment of
minorities is something like a
poker game: the white man not
only feels he has an ace up his
sleeve but also the smug con-
viction that God has put it
there."
And while we're at it. we may
find that Andrew Young, a.'
ambassador with unique
qualifications, is succeeding in
regaining for America the af-
fections of nations burdened with
poverty; nations targeted for
conquest by the USSR; nations
possessed of the power to
establish and maintain the tenets
of democracy we cherish.
A little more patience with the
ambassador from Georgia may
pay off far better than we can
now imagine.
Physicist Given Okay to Emigrate
NEW YORK (JTA) Former physicist, Leonid
Kovner, from the town of Gorky, has received permission
to emigrate to Israel, according to reports reaching the
National Conference on Soviet Jewry. Kovner's parents,
soon after his application to emigrate, were publicly
rebuked. His mother was dismissed as a lecturer in Gorky
Univeristy's radio faculty and his father was severely
reprimanded for being without "public awareness."
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Friday, August 26,1977
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
BRiqhteninq the twilight yeaRs op the ei&eply, Inf irtti in ISRael
By Steven MHcheJl ScUffman
I "To serve the aged in Israel as
well as we can" this is how
ghmuel Prodovsky, director of
the Talpiot-Malben Home for the
Aged, located in southeast
Jerusalem, sums up his job.
The American Jewish Joint
tistribution Committee (JDC),
rhich is funded in part by the
levpsh Federation of South
^Njvard's Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
campaign, founded the home in
1952. It was designed exclusively
for aged immigrants.
IN 1974, JDC opened it to all
infirm aged, not only im-
migrants. In keeping with its
Jong standing policy of in-
novating projects with a view to
later handing over control to a
governmental body, JDC-Israel
transferred administrative
control of the home to the local
juniorities in January, 1976 with
HC continuing to contribute to
ts operating costs.
The average age of people
entering the home is over 80,
nost of them requiring special
are. The ratio of staff to patients
b 7'/i:10. Considering the
iltemative job possibilities,
ogether with the built-in dif-
iculties of the work, it is clear
hat the nurses and supporting
itaff at the home are there for
nore than just a salary. The
visitor senses a strong atmo-
iphere of love and a sense of
:aring.
No Change
inPLO
^Policy-Eban
$
NEW YORK (JTA) For-
mer Israeli Foreign Minister
Abba Eban believes that "there
las been no change in the PLO's
xilicy towards Israel." He
further told an Israel Bonds show
ndustry reception at the Essex
House that "I have nothing to
ndicate that they (the PLO) will
wfept UN Resolution 242."
He termed this year "crucial
for peace negotiations" and ex-
pressed "cautious optimism"
egarding the present mission by
Becretary of State Cyrus Vance.
ADDRESSING himself to
xwsible future American pres-
lure on Israel, Eban said, "We all
inderstand that negotiations
pan compromise. We want to
fet the best deal that we can and
iot to have this bargained in
idvance."
A farter Arms
Sale Rapped
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Carter Administration's pro-
jected billion dollar sale of 60 F-
15 warplanes and related equip-
ment to Saudi Arabia drew a
strong protest to the President
from two Congressmen who said
the, transfer of this "moat ad-
tfneed jet fighter" would
tnreaten the "fragile balance of
power" in the Middle East.
..T_!je planes, manufactured by
McDonnell-Douglas, cost $14.6
fnulion each. They are twin-en-
pned planes that carry four
lussiles. Israel is to get 25 of the
"rcraft, Congressional sources
"id, and Canada, Australia,
Japan and West Germany are
also seeking to buy them.
REPS. ROBERT F. Drinan
u-, Mass.) and Benjamin S.
enthal (D., N.Y.) said in their
er to President Carter that the
fc-agles," as the aircraft are
2JW, "can only serve to de-
stabilize tho military balance.
"Since most of the patients are ;
invalids or semi-invalids, it
usually means that the staff must
bathe the aged, dress them, in
some cases feed them, and assist
them with their bodily functions.
Our staff is extremely loyal, and
hard working," notes Prodovsky.
"We need more people of this
high caliber. We are under-
staffed. We have vacancies for
five more nurses but that is
not our problem alone: there is a
shortage of qualified nurses all
over the country."
JDC PROVIDES IL 500,000
(about $50,000) of the yearly five
million-pound ($500,000) budget
required by the Home. With the
exception of one couple, all
residents are single, most of them
originating from North Africa
and Iran. All 65 beds are oc-
cupied 10 by men, and 55 by
women and there is a waiting
list of 80 people who represent
the most urgent cases as
determined by a Ministry of
Health screening and selection
committee.
"Since our conversion in 1974,
we have had an average replace-
ment of 12 to 15 residents a year.
When a person is admitted, it is
usually because no other home is
prepared to accept someone with
a physical disability."
Even though the home is
designed for the chronically
handicapped, social con-
siderations play a role in the
criteria for admission. According
to Prodovsky, the patients who
come to the home are physically
infirm. Social adjustment prob-
lems account for the other half.
IN MANY cases the children
of residents don't have enough
money to support their invalid
parents, or do not have time to
provide adequate care. Most of
the children have large families
and low incomes.
"We are the only home in Jeru-
salem that admits infirm aged,"
emphasizes Prodovsky. "Most
won't be bothered caring for the
handicapped, and when a
healthy resident becomes infirm
he is often asked to leave. That
doesn't happen here."
For many residents, par-
ticularly those whose mobility is
limited, the biggest problem is
the passing of time. For 86-year-
old Marian Katz, a retired dentist
who arrived in Israel this year
from Russia, it is the absence of
her son that she misses most. For
another woman invalid, time is
just a waiting game. Suffering
from heart disease, she is sure she
is going to die this week or
next and according to Pro-
dovsky, feels extremely
depressed. "She retains her
mental facilities," he says. "She's
able to see and read various
medications she takes, and
understands what they are for.
We try to cheer her up but it's
difficult."
JDC BELIEVES that in-
situtionalization in a home
should be a last resort, and
supports a wide range of com-
munity services to enable the
elderly to remain in their com-
munities. These services include
nursing care, periodic medical
check-ups, home care, "meals on
wheels," sheltered housing,
employment, social and cultural
activities in community centers,
etc.
In 1969, in cooperation with
the Government of Israel, it
established ESHEL, the As-
sociation for the Planning and
Development of Services for the
Aged which is now engaged in
the development of a network of
homes for the aged, the
establishment of geriatric wards
in general hospitals, the ex-
pansion of community services,
and the training of personnel in
many fields relating to the aged.
JDC-supported homes,
geriatric wards and services care
for more than 10,000 elderly in
Israel.
IN ADDITION to its work
with the aged, JDC-Israel
initiates, develops and supports,
in cooperation with local
agencies, a wide range of health,
educational and social services
for the handicapped, the
chronically and mentally HI, the
disadvantaged, and the training
of professional personnel.
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 26,1977
Jacob and Luba Gurdus of New York broke ground for the
Robert Michael Gurdus Pre-Kindergarten School in
Netanya in memory of their son, killed in the Holocaust at
the age of four. Their Israeli relatives, officials of the UJA
Israel Education Fund and residents of the city look on.
"This is our first school," stated Gurdus, "but not the
last." The facility will be opened this fall.
Uja-ief facility in natayna
Will Seiave immiQRant Chilfcpen
Robert Michael Gurdus never had a chance to live out
his life. At the age of four, he was one of a million Jewish
children murdered during the Nazi Holocaust. Jacob and
Luba Gurdus, of New York, recently extended their only
son's lifeline by establishing a pre-kindergarten school in
his memory in Netanya through the Israel Education
Fund of the United Jewish Appeal, funded in part by the
Jewish Federation of South Broward's Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund campaign.
"This facility will live as a monument for all children
who perished in the Holocaust," declared Gurdus during
groundbreaking ceremonies in Israel. "In it will grow a
new generation of Jewish children to fill this nation.
LOCATED ALONG the Mediterranean Coast between
Tel Aviv and Haifa, Netanya has received many waves of
immigrants since Israel's founding some 30 years ago. In
keeping with the Gurdus' wishes to contribute to a school
facility which would nurture the lives of children of
Russian immigrants, the Robert Michael Gurdus Pre-
Kindergarten School is being built in the Kiryat Nordau
settlement area. Construction will be completed this fall.
Thanking the benefactors, Netanya Mayor Benzion
Rubin called the pre-kindergarten years the most vital in
the development of an immigrant child in Israel. "Today,
more than ever, as the people of Israel struggle for sur-
vival and a better way of life," he said, "our future and the
future of all Jewish people, depends on the effective
education of our children. We are deeply moved by the
generous action by Mr. and Mrs. Gurdus in establishing
this living memorial in Netanya The Robert Michael
Gurdus Pre-Kindergarten School will testify to the in-
destructibility of the Jewish spirit."
Jacob Gurdus, a retired businessman, is active in
many facets of Jewish and Zionist life. Dr. Luba Gurdus is
a painter whose works have been exhibited in Israel and
other countries abroad. An art historian as well, she works
for the Frick Art Reference Library of the Frick Collec-
tion. She is president of the Netzer Foundation of New
York, a sister branch of the Haifa association of parents of
children with emotional difficulties in Israel.
THE ISRAEL Education Fund has established more
than 250 pre-kindergarten facilities since 1964. Other IEF
projects include pre-kindergarten/ nurseries; com-
prehensive, vocational and agricultural high schools;
teachers seminaries; libraries, community, youth and
sports centers and physical education facilities.
Tht unok0 fU In hit
Synagogue Mobilization Month Underway
In a community-wide effort to
increase memberships in area
synagogues, the Broward Board
of Rabbis has proclaimed "Syna-
gogue Mobilization Month"
which began Aug. 15 and will end
with Rosh Hashanah on Sept. 12.
The announcement was made by
the Board's President Rabbi
Samuel Z. Jaffe of Temple Beth
El, Hollywood.
"Synagogues have always
been the traditional center of
continuity in Jewish life in every
community," Rabbi Jaffe said in
his announcement. "It is the
house of assembly and learning,
as well as the house of prayer.
"During Mobilization Month,
we urge all people who are not
presently affiliated with a syna-
gogue, to participate actively in
the richness and beauty that
synagogues offer."
The Broward Board of Rabbis
is offering information on
Orthodox, Conservative and
Reform synagogues throughout
Broward County to help guide
residents in their selection. For
information please contact a local
synagogue.
Zimriah Singers Set Fall Musical Program
The Zimriah Choral Society,
under the leadership of Helen
Schwartz (formerly of the
Hallandale Jewish Center), is in
the process of preparing new
musical programs for the 1977
season.
The Society is composed of 30
men and women. This year the
group will add Israeli and inter-
national dances to its programs,
which are performed for area
organizations. f
Mary Wolfe of Hollywood can
provide more information on the
group and its performance
scheduling.
I
community
calendar i
SepterrrceR
All organization and congregational
publicity must be mailed to: "Com-
munity Calendar," Jewish Federation
of South Broward, 2838 Hollywood
Blvd., Hollywood, Florida, 33020.
Deadline for receiving news is noon,
Sept. 12, for the October calendar.
"Community Calendar" forms and
deadline schedules may be obatined
by calling the Jewish Federation at
921-8810.
5MONDAY
Labor Day
Federation Office closed.
6 TUESDAY
Hollywood Chapter of Hadassah,
Hi Merest Group, Film, "It I Forget
Thee, O Jerusalem," noon, Hlllcrest
Playdium, Hlllcrest Drive,
Hollywood.
Temple Beth El Brotherhood, Board
Meeting, "Special Declaration of
Principles" presented by Owen
Wyman, president, 8 p.m., 1351 S.
14th Ave., Hollywood. Call 925-2612.
7 WEDNESDAY
Hollywood Hills W.A. ORT, Opening
meeting, Film, "L'Chaim," 9:30 a.m.,
Washington Federal Bank, 450 N.
Park Road, Hollywood. Call Faith
Brotman, 962-8250. Public invited.
Sabra Group of Hadassah, Gala
breakfast and program, 10 a.m.,
Pumpernlk's, 917 E. Hallandale
Beach Blvd. Call Roz Ostrow, 962-
3999.
I
14 WEDNESDAY
2nd day ROSH HASHANAH
Federation Off ice closed.
15THURSDAY
Women's Division, Board Meeting, 9
a.m., Temple Beth El, 1351 S. 14th
Ave., Hollywood. Call 921-8810.
18 SUNDAY
Lauderdale Lodge 2923, B'nal B'rith,
Al Golden, Commissioner of ADL will
speak on all facets of B'nal B'rith,
9:30 a.m. Arts and Crafts Room,
Castle Gardens Recreation Center,
4850 N.W. 22nd Ct., Lauderdale. Call
735-6355 or 735-8751.
19 MONDAY
B'nal B'rith Women of Hlllcrest,
meeting, "Criteria, The Attempts to
Define a Jew," guest speaker, Mrs.
Helen E. Schwartz, noon, Playdium,
1100 Hlllcrest Drive, Hollywood. Call
Mrs. Donald Gravenmier, 962-0629.
22 THURSDAY
YOM KIPPUR
Federation Office closed.
2325 FRIDAY-
SUNDAY
i
i
j
I
I
j
i
j
i
-
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i

i
Entebbe
Hlllcrest
opening
program
medical
medical
11:30 a
Center,
Emerald
Chapter, Emerald Hills-
American Jewish Congress,
meeting, mini-luncheon and
Discussion on quality of
care and payments for
services, nursing homes,
i.m., Apartment Recreation
3800 North Hills Drive,
Hills.
Jewish Community Center
Hollywood Extension, 2838
Hollywood Blvd., (comedy) film,
"Never Too Late," 1 p.m.
UJA Florida Regional
Conference, Orlando.
27 TUESDAY
IstdaySUCCOTH
Federation Office closed.
28 WEDNESDAY
2nd day SUCCOTH
Federation Office closed.
29THURSDAY
Leadership I
I
i
I
i
i
i
13 TUESDAY
1st Day ROSH HASHANAH
Federation Office closed.
In?Pie ??lel Sisterhood, Luncheon ;
and Fashion Show, 11 a.m., Gait I
u*p MmS H?tel' Fort Lauderdale. !
L.chty:e96H2-02T792' "W748 E'a'ne
!
31
C%umu.lli:!f.?a,endar Sponsored by
THE JEWISH FEDERATION OF
J^JHnWMjO. .vHKa5X Save!


, August 26,1977
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
i Floridian Newt Feature
|the wake of Secretary
te Cyrus Vance's less-
fsuccessful peace-
mission to the
|le East, Egypt's
ient Anwar Sadat is
many threatening
i'about the future.
a situation on his
I eastern border with
I he, himself, has called
ladman" Libyan Col.
fi suggests that his
sound like the purrs
assy cat.
LAND had seen battle
and heard the rumble of
|and the dull, flat thump of
the whine of aircraft,
atter of machine guns and
touting of men seeking
amidst the noise and
(ion.
last month, along the
strip where the tanks of
el and Montgomery had
I in the great desert battles
Second World War, the
liana and the Libyans, after
^ears of increasingly bitter
went for each other in a
clash that dismayed the
arid.
; traded insults for long
jh with Libya's Col.
oar Qaddafi, Egypt's
ent Sadat unleashed his
across the border against
i's outgunned Libyan
claiming that the volatile
had ordered incursions
Egyptian territory. "The
ptian forces," Sadat said,
ven Qaddafi "a lesson he
ver forget."
that was the possibility
concerned Arab League
als as they worked fran-
to end the fighting and
both sides to the
ating table. The military
bling Sadat's forces had
in a brief six-day
^aign, was not going to be
otten by the Libyan
nan and that could not
well for future relations
teen the two countries in
r the short or the long term.
LEAGUE Secretary
aoud Riad called the
a "setback for Arab
rity" and sent Palestinian
ation Organization leader
Arafat shuttling between
oli and Cairo in a bid to end
bloodshed. But Arafat's role
cemaker proved futile and
Jtually it was Sadat who
his troops to withdraw,
ung that he would, if
repeat "the lesson
i and again."
ut whether Qaddafi had
Dt a "lesson" remained to be
and though, with the
ation of Arafat and Algeria's
ari Boumedienne, a ceasefire
eement was eventually
i the odds were going on as
tow long it would last even
i the ink was dry.
ddafi and Sadat had been
drawn since 1973 when
lul-conceived Qaddafi plan to
^ the two nations fall apart
mifceast Wars are not All IsRaelHnspmefc
and each began badmouthing the
other. Sadat regularly denounced
Qaddafi as "insane" and at one
time Qaddafi was offering a price
Mafia-style for Sadat's bead.
BUT SADAT also blamed
Qaddafi for many of the internal
problems he faces in Egypt,
claiming that the Libyan leader
was deliberately fomenting
discontent among the Egyptians
with paid agents provocateurs
and saboteurs. And again, when
an Egypt Airlines plane was
hijacked last autumn, Sadat
accused Qaddafi of instigating
the action and when food rioting
broke out in Cairo Sadat said
their origins were in Tripoli.
The Egyptians later accused
the Libyans of masterminding a
terrorist plot with the Moslem
fanatics who kidnapped and
murdered a former Egyptian
government minister early in
July.
But what was worrying Sadat
was not so much the "alleged"
involvement but the reasoning
behind it.
THE EGYPTIAN leader,
currently engaged in developing
his own ties with the U.S. has
been adopting an ever
strengthening anti-Soviet stance
and an increasingly moderate
viewpoint on the Middle East
situation. But this is being offset
by Qaddafi's growing links with
the Soviet Union and at the
Libreville OAU summit in early
July, Sadat accused Libya of
encouraging Soviet expansionism
in neighboring Chad
But, given the hostility bet-
ween the two men andin
Sadat's view Qaddafi's
determination to topple the
Egyptian leadership, the
Egyptian President's real
concern centers upon the ever-
growing massive arsenal of
sophisticated Soviet weaponry
being stockpiled in the Libyan
military centers.
In four years Qaddafi has
spent an estimated $2
millionmoney earned from its
immense oil sourceson arms
and boasts almost 1,400 modern
tanks, combat aircraft and
missile systems.
But compared with the
Egyptian army, Qaddafi's forces
are decidedly lightweight. The
man-to-man comparison is 10-1 in
favor of Cairo and many of
Sadat's 300,000 troops have
combat experience against Israel.
And it is not just in numbers but
also in quality that the balance is
heavily weighed in Sadat's favor.
Qaddafi may have sophisticated
equipment but is unable to use
the bulk of it owing to a lack of
trained manpower. At least 1,000
of his tanks are without crews
and there are few pilots to fly his
French and Soviet fighters.
And it was on the ground that
the Egyptian fighters bombers
found Qaddafi's planes as they
swept over the Libyan airbase at
El Adem near Tobruk as the
fighting escalated Just as the
Israeli's had smashed Egypt's
airpower in the 1967 Six Day War
so the Egyptians trapped the
Libyans on the ground and in a
aeries of raids spread out between
WILLIAM RICHMAN, M.D.
Wishes to announce that as of August 15,1977
he will return to the
Active practice of Family Medicine
with offices at
EMERALD HILLS MEDICAL SQUARE
4460 Sheridan Street
Hollywood, Florida 33021
July 22-24 knocked out a radar
station and smashed many of
Qaddafi's fighter aircraft
The air strikes were only part
of the Egyptian effort. Tanks,
mechanized infantry,
paratroopers and commandos
went into action along the border
between the two countries.
Even allowing for normal
exaggeration, both sides suffered
considerable losses, although
who had provided the spark to
ignite Sadat's ire was still un-
certain. As far as Cairo was
concerned it was Libya's
provocation that had caused the
six-day action. The Egyptian
military command claimed that
prior to the outbreak of the major
hostilities, Libyan troops,
supported by helicopter gun-
ships, attacked several Egyptian
border posts, killing Egyptian
troops. After that, the Egyptians
said, a Libyan armored column
crossed the border and attacked
Sallum. Egyptian despatches
claimed that after six hours
fighting they had repulsed the
attack and rolled the Libyans
back to Musaid in Libya.
THE LIBYAN story was
different. Said Tripoli: "It was
Egyptian aggression, nothing
else." They claimed that
Egyptian troops had shelled
Musaid, killing women and
children before moving in to
capture the town.
It certainly seemed that the
Libyans had suffered the greater
losses. In one battle, the
Egyptians said, they destroyed
some 40 Libyan tanks and other
i ground vehicles while themselves
losing only one truck and suf-
fering one casualty.
The Libyans claimed that they
sent planes in against the
Egyptians at Musaid and that
they raided across the border into
the Sallum area. According to
some sources in the Egyptian
military command it was the air
strike against Sallum that
decided Sadat to "give Qaddafi a
lesson."
THE EXTENT of that
"lesson," Sadat said, had been
reached when the Egyptiar's
bomb-laden fighters whirled
across Tobruk's airfield, but the
Libyans claimed that there had
been other attacks deep inside
Libyan territory indicating a
forthcoming "major offensive"
i Continued on Page 10
'
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We surround an 18-hole cham-
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At Holiday Springs you can play
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There are already over 500 happy
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Financing Example: I bedroom/I bath
apartment that sells for $18,990. 30%
down payment of IS .697 leaves a balance
of $13,293 to be financed for 25 years.
Term is 300 payments of $107.00 for
principal and 8fc% interest. APR: 8.94%
I








Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Ortater Hollywood
Friday, August 26,1977
AskaBe
ByAeehalpean
ADDENDA:
Immediately following the publication of the
answer to the question, "Is there any historical
evidence indicating the occurrence of the
bondage in, and exodus from, Egypt?" (ASK
ABE, The Jewish Floridian and Shofar, July 29,
page 11), Mr. Murray Feuerstein who asked the
question followed up with another question:
"What ie the actual date of the Exodus?"
Answer:
There is a division of opinion among scholars.
Some say that the Exodus took place in the 15th
century B.C.E., while others maintain that it took
place in the 13th century B.C.E.
The Encyclopedia Judaica. in a long article
citing various historical references and in-
formation based on archaeological excavations
reaches the following conclusion:
"The conclusions of archaeological research on
the date of the Israel conquest support the theory
that the Exodus took place in the first half of the
13th century.
"Archaeological excavations of various sites,
such as Hazor in the north and Lachish in the
south, reveal that many settlements were
destroyed in the course of the 13th century
B.C.E., especially in the last third of the 13th
century. The destruction of the settlements is
apparently related to the conquest of the land by
the Israelites (vol. 6, pp.1047,1048).
There is, however, another source which is
unequivocal and gives the exact date of the
departure of the Israelites from Egypt as the 15th
day of the month of Aviv (the Biblical name for
the month of Nisan) in the year 2524 according to
the Hebrew calendar, the year one being the year
of Creation. This corresponds to the year 1236
B.C.E.
This source is an Israeli publication called
Chronicles-News of the Past, presenting Jewish
history in the modern style. The news is
published in four-page tabloid newspapers,
written by scholars as though they were
published at the particular time of the events.
Although published in the modern journalistic
medium, these newspapers are based on authentic
Biblical accounts, the Midrash, and other
historical sources, including the latest findings of
archaeological explorations and research. The
issues also contain the pepper and salt
ingredients of every newspaper.
Following are a few excerpts from page one of
the special extra edition, dateline-Rameees, 16
Aviv, 2624 (vol. 1, no 9):
A banner headline across the top of the page
reads: "WE QUIT EGYPT TODAY." The sub-
head of this story reads: "Pharaoh Gives in to
Moses aa 10th Plague Wipes Out Kingdom's
:
First-Born. Rameses, 15 Aviv Moses' oft
repeated plea to Pharaoh Merneptah, to 'Let My
People Go' was finally heard today, just after
midnight, when the King of Egypt, badly shaken
by the death of his eldest son, not only agreed to
Moses' request but actually insisted that the
Israelites leave the country immediately. Pharaoh
had sent for the Israelite leaders as soon as word
had reached him that all of Egypt's first-born,
including Pharaoh's, had been mysteriously
struck down at midnight ."
Another story on page one reads: "600,000
GATHERING AT SUCCOTH. Rameses, 15
Aviv, 2524 (since the Creation) and 490 (since the
founding of Zion).
The Children of Israel 600,000 strong,
not counting the women and children are on
the move. Under the leadership of Moses, the
Man of God, we are preparing to leave Egypt
after a stay there of over 200 years, the last 86
years of which were spent in bitter slavery.
"The 12 tribes are moving in military order
toward Succoth, the point of departure, each man
with his own tribe, and each tribe under its own
standard. The heads of the tribes are keeping in
close touch with Moses, ready at a moment's
notice to help launch the long-awaited
exodus ."
A box in bold face type reads:
BULLETIN!
"The Israelites will not use the coastal route to
Cadaan, it was announced tonight by Moses. This
route is regarded as too dangerous.
"For security reasons Moses refused to divulge
the course to be taken!"
Another box reads:
ORDER OF THE DAY:
"Sons of Jacob tribes of Israel! This month
shall be unto you the beginning of months. This
day shall be unto you the first day of all days till
the end of time. For today you have been
delivered from slavery unto freedom. Today you
have become a nation .
"Hear O Israel: The Lord our God is one Lord!
Moses the son ofAmram."
The issue also contains an editorial on page
two, a profile of Moses, letters to the editor, a
map of the area, a picture of Moses, a picture of
Pharaoh Merneptah, and additional stories and
features relating to the Exodus.
Editor's note Please send all questions to:
ASKABE
c / o The Jewish Federation of
South Broward
2838 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, Florida 33020
.
m.6-east wars aae not ail isRaeiHnspiRefc
CoatthMMd from Page 9
against Libya.
Cairo scoffed at the Libyan
claim but, aa Qsddafi complained
to the United Nations about
Egyptian "aggression," Sadat
ordered his troops to stop
fighting. Obviously relieved, the
Libyans also stopped hostilities,
enabling Arafat and
Boumedienne to mediate the
peace
But while Sadat was broad-
casting to the world the Egyptian
reasoning behind the strike into
Libya, Qaddafi was keeping an
uncharacteristic low profile. But
the Libyans were talking as our
Malta correspondent Godfrey
Grima found in a battle-long
contact with the Libyan military
SAID ONE military
spokesman: "We knew that in
May Egypt had drawn up plans
for an attack on Libya that would
take place aa soon as conditions
were right. Once the Chad
question was raised
simultaneously by Egypt and
Sudan we realised it was only a
question of time before the
campiagn was launched."
The Libyans admitted the
Egyptian air strike across the El
Adexn airbase and spoke of
"scores" of aircraft being
destroyed. The day of the El
Adem raid was clearly Libya's
blackest. They also claimed that
the Egyptians took advantage of
a Libyan decision to end fighting
while Arafat was in Tripoli
talking with Qaddafi.
While Sadat may have wished
to have administered an even
fiercer "lesson" to Qaddafi his
actions were inevitably limited
by the presence in Libya of
200,000 Egyptians who would
become Qaddafi hostages in any
all-out war.
Mizrachi Gives
Mrs. Shane
Another Term
Mrs. Sarah Shane, president of
American Mizrachi Women since
October, 1975, has been
unanimously reelected for
another two-year term. AMW is
the major religious women's
Zionist organization in the
United States with members in
37 states and the District of
Columbia.
In her acceptance remarks,
Mrs. Shane committed herself
"to bringing even greater success
to AMW efforts." "Right now in
Israel," she said, "there are some
serious social problems which
must be overcomeespecially as
they effect children from un-
derprivileged and economically
deprived homes. It is AMW's job
to help."
The Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith has urged French
Prime Minister Raymond Barre
to reconsider his executive
directive which subjects Israel to
Arab boycott discrimination in
France.
In a cablegram to the Prime
Minister, Burton M. Joseph,
ADL's national chairman, said
that excluding Israel from a
French law directed against
discrimination in commerce
makes the law itself
MRS. SARAH SHANE -
"Leadership for Life: Jewish
Enrichment Through Physical
Activity" is the theme of JWB's
1977 National Health, Physical
Education and Recreation
Institute, to be conducted Sept. 6
to 9 at West End, N.J. More than
125 health and physical
educators of Jewish Community
Centers and YM & YWHA's are
expected to attend.
Keynote speaker will be Prof,
fiprald B. Bubis, of the School of
Jewish Communal Service. HUC-
ORGANIZATIONAL SCENE
discriminatory. He expressed
"sorrow and deep regret that
France, a country that
traditionally holds a place of high
honor in the world as a strong
defender of human rights, seems
to be placing expediency before
principle."
In a symposium chaired by
Norman Podhoretz, editor of
Commentary, noted writers,
academicians and editors
commemorated the 25th an-
niversary of the execution of
noted Soviet Yiddish writers,
poets and intellectuals in
Moscow's Lubianka prison on
August 12,1962.
Sponsored by the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry
(NCSJ), the half-day program,
including authors Herbert Gold,
Jerxy Kosinski, and Simon
Weber, editor of the Jewish Daily
Forward, also featured David
Markish, son of noted Soviet
Yiddish writer Perete Markish,
who was among those executed
on August 12, 1952, and Prof.
Thomas Bird of Queens College.
JIR, Los Angeles.
There will be 32 sessions.^
including 20 workshops, ,
plenary sessions and
demonstration programs.
two
Representatives of Jewish
Federations throughout the
United States and Canada are
currently participating in the
annual Small Cities Executive
Institute and the 1977 Practicum
for professional staff members
being held at Tamarack Lodge. '.
Charles Epstein, executive
director of the Jewish Com-
munity Council of Austin, Tex.,
is serving as chairman of the
Small Cities Institute which
opened Aug. 14 and runs through
Aug. 21. Sponsored jointly by the
Council of Jewish Federations
and the Jewish Welfare Board,
the meetings feature sessions on
fiscal management, budgeting,
Federation-Center cooperation,
pension and retirement programs
and CJF services to com-
munities.

((((IHIHIBIB|H|B|B|B|B|Hiriliaia|B|
FISH l-HIC A TIOM TOM IV Y
i In a world of radically changing ethics and morality,
j Thoro it on even greater need for Jewish values and traditions_____
! DONT DEPRIVE YOUR CHILD OF HIS HERITAGE!
ENROLL YOUR CHILD IN A JEWISH SCHOOL OF YOUR CHOICE.
! TODAY!
I
j FOR INFORMATION ON JEWISH SCHOOLS IN DADE AND BROWARD
j CALL THE CENTRAL AGENCY FOR JEWISH EDUCATION
576-4030


August 26,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Sho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
hrocco's Jewish Minister Dead
, EDWIN EYTAN
IS (JTA) -
[Moroccan ministers,
pll as a personal
Jsntative of the King,
|ed the funeral service
he burial in Casa-
of Morocco's first
Cabinet Minister,
on Benzaquen.
ministers and the
Is representative,
Advisor Ahmed
ida, came from the
Rabat, to Casa-
to honor the Jewish
who served as
r Minister in two
fccan governments and
until his death Aug. 7
j, was the Jewish
|unity's "elder states-
VQUEN, a lung disease
st, was asked by the
The Moroccan government said it was ready to help
organize talks between Israel and the Palestinians on its
soil. The Morocco press said these talks could be held in
Casablanca "where Jews and Arabs have lived together in
peace and understanding for over a thousand years."
Moroccan Istiklal Party to
become a member of its
delegation to the talks with
France held in Aix les Bains in
1965, which paved the way to
Morocco's independence.
After the country's indepen-
dence and the return of King Mo-
hammed V from exile in Dec.,
1955, Benzaquen was appointed
Postmaster General. He was
reappointed to a ministerial post
the following year and left the
government three years later to
devote himself to his medical
practice.
Benzaquen remained, even
after he left the government, a
close advisor to King Mohammed
V and to his son, Hassan II. He
was also active in communal
affairs, believing that the Jews
can and should play an important
role in Morocco's political,
economic and social life.
THE GOVERNMENT went
out of its way to honor the late
Jewish doctor. A Moroccan
spokesman told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that the official
funeral was organized "to honor
the man but also to show that
Jews and Arabs can live like
brothers united by a common
purposa"
The Moroccan government
said it was ready to help organize
talks between Israel and the
Palestinians on its soil. The
Morocco press said these talks
could be held in Casablanca
"where Jews and Arabs have
lived together in peace and
understanding for over a
thousand years."
THE PRESS also recalled the
King's "invitation" to Morocco's
Jews who have emigrated to
"return to their former homes."
King Hassan issued this in-
vitation to "return" last year and
reiterated it again this spring.
How to Save Israel
In Spite of George Ball
[ROBERT E.SEGAL
5 marked the 10th an-
ry of the opening round of
c-Day War, a lightning
tesuccessful for
-unquestionably provoked
ptian President Nasser's
at sniping at the Jewish
I years later, we are wit-
the projection of
Is for peace efforts in the
i East, some warmed over
pse willing to give ex-
fcy primacy over justice
Ime reflecting the mature
\g of strategists armed
vealth of knowledge about
nplex issue.
DECENT weeks, George
tail, who was Under
of State during the
|y and Johnson years, has
1 headlines with his April
Affairs essay. Some
^he title, "How to Save
in Spite of Herself,"
George Ball's conclusion
k, rather than Cyrus Vance,
1 now be Jimmy Carter's
kry of State had not Jewish
i influenced the selection.
ainly, the cast of the ar-
land its expression im-
^ce with those who support
on 90 percent of the thorny
L mirrors Ball's pique.
were up to George Ball,
IS. would impose a set-
pt on both warring sides.
|ick for such an enterprise
jbe an American threat to
ge itself from further
aking effort if imposition
pncan terms is resisted.
1TRARY TO well-
I ented evidence, it is
. that Yaair Arafat's
>tine Liberation
zation wfll recognize
sovereignty if Israel
territory picked up in
Jlor the sake of Israel's
defense.
proposed Ball settlement
I would be merchandised
fne USSR and Western
an powers, then banged
pn Jews and Arabs alike in
gashing blow. One can
fe the goodies for the Arab
I the Soviet Union would
I"* before accepting such a
" deal while France, so
no* to Israel and so
tty with Israel's an-
would be inserting its
k> nations rich in oil.
d must be made to un-
d that a continuance of
~~ant stalemate is man
GEORGE W. BALL
dangerous than the concessions
required for peace," Ball pon-
tificates. Israel, of course, has
invited an examination of the
concessions it is willing to make.
AND THE Jewish state has
been attacked enough and
badgered enough to know well
that dealing with forces not yet
recovered from the shock of an
internecine war in Lebanon,
bargaining with Arab leaders
who have played games with
three generations of Arab
refugees, demands close at-
tention to the details of con-
cessions.
The Ball proposal will serve a
good purpose if it sends well-
intentioned Americans back to a
new reading of the 1975 Report of
a Study Group sponsored by the
Krookings Institute. While that
plan seriously questioned
whether step-by-step diplomacy
could effect a satisfactory set-
tlement and favored joint U.S.-
Soviet Union conferences on the
issues over which opinion is so
fiercely divided, the clear con-
sensus was that any lasting peace
would have to be negotiated face-
to-face, by Israelis and Arabs,
free of threat of political or
economic retaliation by outside
powers.
It might take the time span of
another generation to effect
settlement, the Brookings group
maintained, but bridges to peace
could be constructed in the period
of the long effort.
JOSEPH CHURBA, former
U.S. Air Force Senior Middle
East intelligence analyst, has
similarly advocated settlement
by negotiators for the principals
in the dispute, leaving the U.S.
and the Soviet Union far off on
the sidelines. He has warned that
if more pressure is exerted by
dominant power structures, we
shall see Arab lines harden and
Arab expectations grow.
So we approach the 10-year-
point since the Six-Day-War with
mixed feelings: The year, 1976,
passed with no Israeli youth dead
in combat; public opinion polls
show continuing strong support
for Israel; Arab propagandists'
efforts to misrepresent the past
have been deflated; and Israel's
insistence on defensible borders
as only a long-beleaguered nation
can conceive them is well un-
derstood and accepted by those
who long for peace in their harts
as well as their minds.
ICVITT
memorial chapara
11 Pimbroki Rd
Hollywood. Fla
S144447
Sonny Levitt, F.O.
UMJW.WmoMwy
Nerth Miami, FU
Mf-aSIS
BOULEVARD CHAPELS
100 SOUTH DIXII MIOHW A T
iutt OH H.M.f,L OMCfc 01*4
HAUANOAU. 'UMNO* S0O
The Only Family Owned
Jewish Funaral Hem* In
reward County
Wet_
tnttlttoaof
Ckevra. *to* Haraet
TBL: aja-tJMMI
a,i.r.D.
AJCong. Hails Decision
To Aid Abortion-Poor
NEW YORK The American
Jewish Congress has hailed the
action of Federal Judge John F.
Dooling, Jr., in ordering the
Department of Health,
Education and Welfare to
continue making Medicaid funds
available to states that wanted to
use them for elective abortions.
Mrs. Leona Chanin,
cochairman of the Congress'
national governing council, said
the judge's order was a "sensitive
and sensible recognition of the
serious harm that would follow
the sudden termination of
Federal funding of abortions for
poor women"
AT THE same time, Mrs.
Chanin made public the text of a
telegram to the White House
calling on President Carter "to
examine your conscience and to
have the courage to change your
mind" on the issue of Medicaid
reimbursement for voluntary
abortions.
On July 12, President Carter
conceded that denial of Federal
aid for abortions would
discriminate against poor womer
by said that "there are many
things in life that are not fair"
and that the Government should
not attempt to make op-
portunities precisely equal when
morality was at issue......_
In her message, Mrs. Chanin
said the President's position was
"so contrary to every public
position you have taken in the
past, so inconsistent with the
compassion you have demon-
strated for the victims of
economic and racial injustice,
that we are at a loss to un-
derstand your recent
statements."
The American Jewish
Congress leader continued:
"By denying federal aid for
abortions performed for indigent
women, the Government places
itself in the position of coun-
tenancing and participating in a
cruel act of discrimination
against the weakest segment of
our society. By imposing the
religious beliefs of a minority of
Americans on all the people, the
Government impairs the basic
rights of the poor and the
powerless to religious freedom, to
privacy and to equality.
"YOU HAVE said in defense
of your posture on this issue,"
Mrs. Chanin wrote, "that there
are many things in life that are
not fair. But that is no reason to
support legislation which will
make life even more unfair, more
bitter, more ugly for the poor.
Religious Directory
NORTHBROWARO
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 21 SI.Riverside
Drive. Reform (44).
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. (44A)
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 6920 SW 3Sttl St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Draiin.
Cantor Abraham Kester. (41)
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9139 Taft St.
Conservative. Rabbi Bernard I.
Shoter. (63)
' PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi
Sheldon J. Harr. (64)
*ECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA-
GOGUE. 7473 NW 4th St. (49)
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 414
NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Carl Klein, PhD. Cantor Jacob
Damiger. (12)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
1SS01 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kings ley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. (37)
HOLLYWOOD
BETH AHM TEMPLE'. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max
Landman. (47B)
BETH EL TEMPLE. 13S1 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. As-
sistant Rabbi Jonathan Won (45)
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601 Arthur
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi Paul M. Kati,
Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro.
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun. (45)
TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.,
Hollywood, Fla. 33021. Rabbi Robert
P. Fraiin. Cantor Bruce Malln. (C-47)
"OUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
3291 Stirling Road, Oaks Condomin-
ium. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe Bom
ler.(52)
ASK YOUR
RABBI ABOUT US
JOHNSON FOSTER
FUNERAL HOME, INC.
1650 HARRISON ST. HOLLYWOOD. FLA PHONE: 922-7511
Paul J- Houlihan
L.F.D.
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
temple 3etk 6
CjaicUns
The all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beau-
tifully landscaped, perpetual care, rea-
sonably priced.
For information call: 920-8225 or writ**
~TEMFLEBETM"eL /?/!3Sr$
13S1 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Pteitt und me literature on tot above.
NAME.- ___
ADDRESS*
PHONE:
J"I


p
* ;
Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday,
TO OffT YOUR... _
PRESTO
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Lots O'
Chicken
WE REDEEM FEDERAL FOOD STAMPS!
HOW FRESH
IS OUR VALLEY
EVERY CUT OF OUR FRESH VALLEY BRAND BEEF IS DATED.
SO YOU KNOW ITS FRESH WHEN YOU BUY IT. AND THAT
IT WILL STAY FRESH FOR DAYS AFTER YOU GET IT HOME.
LOOK FOR THE DATING CHART IN OUR STORE AND
ENJOY TENDER. JUICY BEEF THAT'S REALLY FRESH.
fe
- EACHPKG CONTAINS 3 BREAST am
tW^WV WITH BACKS. 3 KG QTBS WITH
"-- RACKS \ r.lHl ( T Pur.i.
BACKS 3 GlBLlT PKGS
cPtide
PRICES GOOD SUN. AUG. 21 THRU
SAT.. AUG. 27 AT ALL STORES
FROM FT. PIERCE TO KEY WEST
* CUSTOMER MAY PURCHASE ONE OR ALL
STARRED ITEMS WITH A $7.00 ORDER OR MORE
OF OTHER ITEMS EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
FRESH VALLEY BtEF ROUND
Btm.Rd.Roast
WHOLE
FRESH VALLEY USDA CHOICE SMALL END BNLS.
Beef Rib Steak
FRESH VALLEY USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK
BEEF CHUCK
Beef Chuck
7-Bone
Steak

Shoulder Boneless
Pot Roast
Blade Roast
III5M VAllIT USDA CMOICI > ICMN
Sirloin Steak *1
FIISM VALLIT USDA CHOKI
Beef Brisket
X**A
*
CHOICE
99
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SAVE 54
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WIT TWO TuAfl WITH f PURCHASI
. Of MORI OF OTHlt iT|Ml
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SAVE 80
Chock Full ()* Nuts
I Coffee
BLUE PRUNE FREESTONE
Plums
TOP
QUALITY
29
c
LB.
PICK
YOUR
OWN
FULL OF JUICE AND FLAVOR
Nectarines
C
LB.
PICK
YOUR
OWN
39:
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Corned Beef
USOA CHOKI III! IONIUM __
Shldr. Steak .,lw
IOUHPIIM USOA CHOICI Ml* tOTlOM
Round Steak ,.*149
SIKID
Beef Liver 59*
Beef Chuck
99c.
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM
Fresh Frye
49c.
!2
69
IIA bMIXIO MINIUM IIISH
Fryer Quarters .5'
FLA. SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH |
Fryer Parts
89c,
THIQHS
DRUMSTICKS
BREASTS
W RIBS
FRESH
VALLEY
DELI DEPARTMENT
AMERICAN KOSHER MIDGET
Salami or
Bologna $129
iror
CHI*
69
<
iNutadF*
^Wj
GOlOIN IIP I OIL MONTI
Bananas 3 .59'
SUNKIST
Lemons 10,:, 89*
A SATISFYING VIGITAIl I
Eggplant u. 29*
US NO. 1 ALL PMWOit WHUI
Potatoes5
CIUNCHT AND GOOD
Carrots 2 & 49*
MMN CIISH Ct ISP- tID
Radishes 2 tS!i 29*
U.S. NO. 1 ALL FUtPOSI VIUOW
Onions ... 19*
All VAIM1IIS IIAKSTONI SA1AO
J55 59*
LARGE 5 SIZE
Western
Honeydews
01 $1
"0 I
01.
Ml I

Dressings
^5
VII* PAilT SNACKS Of CIIAMIO
Herring ')"*
IKH'l IUMIV
Breast Slices
VLASIC KOSHER
Deli Dills
1UMS "111 OI
Beef Franks 5ff.
KAMN S SANDWICH
Spread 49
DIRRS MEAT OR BEEF
Grill Franks 2 pkg. 1
PANTRY PRIDE ( LR qqJB-
Sliced Bologna pkg. "
DAIRY DEPARTMENT
IIMH ONI CANWVITM S' PUtCMASI
Ot WOff O* OTMtl 'IMS
IICluDiNCCiCARiniV
SAVE 26
PLAIN SELF P.ISING
UNBLEACHED
Pillsbury
Flour
k
GROCERY DEPT.
Slender 3 2,99*
IYNI lASn SIIAWMMV
Preserves 2 A 99*
P ANTt MIDI
Trash Bags io? 79*
CANADA DRY CLUB SODA OR
SEALTESTMILK
Ginger Ale 4 99c Acidophiius
85
SCHAIMI Ot SCHMIDT S 13 OZ
Beer 6.Z*\39
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SAVE63<0aVs
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3r99c
vmm
* limit one pkg with $7 purchase
vor more of other items excluding cigarette1
PANTRY PRIDE FROZEN m -_ -^
Pot Pies :Er........4 fig-99c
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NAIISCO CHIISI
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SACIAAIINIO PACK
Tomato Plot 6'c.2,185*
SACIAMINIO S'iOI. CANS
Tomato Juice6 -<- 95 *
nil' PIAS 4
Carrots 'C\V 39*
LIBBY'S
Sliced Beete 'can'35*
MAXWIll HOUSI INSIANI
Coffee !5ff-*6"
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Margarine
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Milk Shakes .
AXIIIOO'S ILAIN
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791
991


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