The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00177

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJewish fiendi&m
ami Shofar of Greater Hollywood
17 Number 16
Friday, August 12,1977
Price 35 Cents
Parlor Meetings to Offer Israel Mission Information
The community-wide mission to Israel
bnsored by the Jewish Federation of South
ward, scheduled to depart Oct. 16 for 10
d of intensive touring of the State of
jael will be discussed in detail at various
}lor meetings held during August.
I Aug. 8 meeting at Beryl Kaufman's
e and the Aug. 11 meeting at Aaron
Bme's home answered many questions and
Light in new participants to the mission,
lording to Dr. Sam Meline, mission chair-
In.
"ADDITIONAL meetings will be held on
ig. 18 at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Paul
aemer, Aug. 22 at the home of Dr. and
Phil Levin, Aug. 23 at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Theodore Newman, Aug. 29 at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Saul Levine and Aug.
30 at the home of Mr. Nathan Pritcher," ex-
plained Dr. Meline.
Dr. Meline said that the cost of the
mission is $675 per person and the par-
ticipants will be expected to make a
minimum gift to the 1978 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund campaign in
the amount of $1,200 per family, plus a $300
woman's gift to the Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation. Individual travelers will
be expected to make a $1,200 minimum com-
mitment.
For further information on the parlor
meetings, contact the Jewish Federation.
[Shalom Mat Extended By
'ederation to Newcomers
The Jewish
Federation of South
Jroward's shalom mat
as been extended to all
ew residents of South
[Jroward who are in-
rested in learning
liore about the Jewish
ommunity in which
hey are now living, in
form of a Shalom
rep t ion. Saturday,
|. 27, 8 p.m., at the
ome of Dr. and Mrs.
lam Meline.
Shalom Chairman Audrey Meline says that the
vening's informal gathering will serve to aquaint South
Jroward newcomers with the functions of the Federation,
he services of the agencies it supports and themselves.
The Shalom Committee of Wendy Benjamin, Ann
John, Edna Jacobs, Dina Kaye, Jean Kruger, Rhoda
larcus, Judi Newman and Sally Weiss will provide the
ine and cheese refreshments.
Israeli folk songs and music will be provided by
ibbi Harold Richter, Jewish Federation of South
< ard Chaplain.
A highlight of the 1976 Mission for Mrs. Lewis Cohn was
when a simple gesture of kindness was rewarded with a kiss by
an Israeli boy.
Zacks, Olshansky to Attend
Gordon Zacks of Columbus,
Ohio, vice chairman of the
national United Jewish Appeal
and Bernard Olshansky,
executive director of the Com-
bined Jewish Philanthropies of
Greater Boston, will be among
the guest luminaries to speak at
the Jewish Federation of South
H row ard s third annual Leader-
ship Retreat to be held at the
Palm-Aire Spa and Country
Chib, Aug. 19,20 and 21.
Zacks, serving on the executive
committees of the United Israel
Appeal and the American-Israel
Public Affairs Committees
(AIPAC) and one of the founders
of the UJA Young Leadership
Cabinet, will discuss the relation-
ship between South Broward and
the building of a future for the
people of Israel.
OLSHANSKY, chairman of
the Brandeis University Hom-
stein Program Advisory Com-
mittee and program chairman of
the International Conference of
Leadership Retreat
ZACKS
OLSHANSKY
Jewish Communal Service will
comment on what the Federation
has become and directions for the
future.
Lewis E. Cohn, Federation
president will be the presiding
officer during the Retreat.
Rabbi Elihu Jack Steinborn of
Stamford, Conn., will put "The
Jewish Commitment" into com-
munity and national perspective,
discussing both synagogue and
the institution of Federation.
SATURDAY sessions will in-
clude Federation assessment by
Lewis E. Cohn, a presentation by
Executive Director Donald H.
Klein and reactions from Bernard
Olshansky. The afternoon will be
filled with workgroups, the first
being "Local Community Service
and allocations, Budgeting for
Our Needs." Joyce Newman will
be the facilitator with Norman
Atkin, M.D., Alien Gordon and
Dr. Sam Meline as resources.
The second workgroup will be
"Community and Public Rela-
tions, Local, National, Interna-
tional, legislationNJCR AC
/ AIPAC." R. Joel Weiss will be
the facilitator with Herbert Katz,
Nathan Pritcher and Joel Schnei-
der as the resources.
The third workgroup will
discuss "Jewish Education,
Youth-Adult, Federation/Syna-
gogue Relations." EUie Katz will
be the facilitator with Moses
Hornstein and Robert Pittell,
Continued on Page 2
Pitell Says Federation Cash Crisis Has Increased
The recent drastic economic
iins taken by the Israeli
eminent in cutting its food
sidies and increasing con-
costs make it all the more
ent that immediate cash pay-
tits be made on all outstanding
'ges to the Combined Jewish
eal-Israel Emergency Fund
apaign."
i words are those of Robert
ell, M.D., chairman of the
i Collection Committee.
rERMING the economic
nation in Israel "more critical
ever," Pittell outlined the
sequences of the economic
actions undertaken by the new
Israeli government on the eve of
President Carter's talks with Is-
raeli Prime Minister Menachem
Begin. "Under the program an-
nounced by Israeli Finance
Minister Simcha Ehrlich," Pittell
said, "there will be an immediate
25 percent increase in prices at
the supermarkets and gasoline
pumps, for a people already over-
burdened with inflationary cost
of living realities. In addition, the
cost of transportation, electricity
and water also would rise an
average of 25 percent.
"A gallon of premium fuel will
cost $2.10, an increase from the
already high price of $1.71 per
gallon now in effect. There will
also be another 2 percent
devaluation in the Israeli pound.
One dollar is now worth 9.75
pounds.
"The reduction in Israeli price
supports means that a loaf of
bread now costs the equivalent of
18 cents rather than 16 cents as
before. The price of a liter of milk
is up 30 cents from 24, and the
prices of other essential com-
modities such as eggs and sugar
have also increased," Pittell said.
'PITTELL stressed that "these
price increases and increased cost
of living must be borne by the
citizens of Israel themselves, who
already are the most heavily
taxed people in the world. The
situation has been made even
more critical by the 38 percent
inflation which occurred over the
past year. This means that
pledges made last year which
Continued on Page 2
Reverse Discrimination Aired
By ROBERT E. 8EGAL
} n catching the brass ring on
rlitical merry-go-round that
him in the Cabinet as
?**Z of Health, Education
i Welfare, Joseph A. Califano
"1 had to deal with sticky
which well may have
nquished a less valiant and
errnined man.
Pint off he faced some
wty from pro-abortionists by
telling Congress testing his
qualifications for the post at
HEW, that he was opposed to
abortion and would strive to keep
federal health money out of the
hands of those intending to use it
for abortions.
NEXT, there was that
question about Joe's "chef." Did
the guy dealing with problems of
hunger and poverty need tax-
payers' money to place on his
staff a cook, quick-food specialist
or chef to save Joe Califano the
tough decision of what to eat and
where and when?
But abortion and culinary
issues on the Secretary's agenda
are not nearly as dramatic as Mr.
Califano's wrestling match with
quotas, preferential treatment,
and affirmative action. Behold
Continued on Page 9
U.S. SCENE
Chattanooga Bombing
Was 'Designed to Kill'
By BRIAN LIPSITZ
NEW YORK (JTA) A small Orthodox synagogue in
Chattanooga, Tenn., was completely demolished Friday
night by what Jewish leaders there believe was a bomb
explosion.
Steven Dry sdale, executive director of the Chattanooga
Jewish Welfare Federation, told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency in a phone interview that the explosion was
"apparently premeditated" as wires were found leading
from the synagogue to a motel 100 yeard away.
COMMISSIONER OF police Gene Roberts told the
JTA that local police and federal agents are conducting
Continued on Page 8



Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday. August 12,1977
A Political Whip
If memory serves us correctly, we have rarely if ever in
the past given over our editorial prerogative to guest
editorialists. But the following, which appeared originally
in The Oklahoma Eagel, the highly-regarded Blach weekly
published in Tulsa, puts the case so pointedly, that we are
happy to make an exception:
Is somebody using the Israeli elections as a political
whip to force the Israelis to accept unpalatable terms for
an Arab-Israeli peace?
The near hysterical outburst over the election of a right-
of-center politician by the Israeli voters has not been
matched by such concern over election returns in any
other country since Allende won election in Chile.
We have no way to gage such concern over Arab
elections since they are practically non-existent.
The overturn of the Israeli labor government should
have been foreseen or at least anticipated, what with all of
the charges of corruption, some of which were proven to be
more than charges; the resignation of the Prime Minister,
the trial of his wife; the rising cost of living in a country
where it is already astronomical, and other internal
problems which had no direct bearing on foreign policy
but which were gut issues for the people.
The boys who read the signs should not have been as
surprised as they have pretended to be over the outcome,
that is if they are the "experts" that they claim to be.
A Propaganda Device
Even us country yokels would have been surprised if the
labor party had not lost. Which makes us wonder if this
change of government by the Israelis is not being used as
a propaganda device to weaken world opinion favorable
toward Israel by painting her as an arrogant war-
mongering people who are determined to resist peace
initiatives except on their terms.
Such a world view of Israel could so weaken her in-
fluence that she could be bludgeoned into accepting a
peace which would be detrimental to her interests.
The Israeli haters are not above using such propaganda
to further their own interests but we are surprised at the
Carter administration joining the yapping dogs.
Quite obviously a country like the United States, where
free elections make sometimes for strange bedfellows
because of overriding domestic concerns, should be much
more sophisticated in assessing the true situation in Israel
than we appear to have been in recent weeks.
The Carter administration especially should know
better since they rode into office strictly on domestic
concerns, not foreign policy.
When inflation is high and employment is low, it should
not be surprising if the voters look around for somebody
else to mind the store.
The 1967 ceasefire line would mean that Israel would
once again have to abandon the Golan Heights, the West
Bank and the Gaza Strip. She would also have to pull her
troops out of the Sinai Peninsula. Hence, she would be at
the mercy of the uncertain diplomatic whims of the UN
whose bias already favors the Arabs and the erratic
whims, dreams and hatred of Arab nations who have
vowed to drive her into the sea.
Oil in Our Spine
This is like having the Russians take over California,
New England, and Texas, all under UN approval and
trusting the Russians not to try for the rest of the country
or if they did, trusting the UN to stop them.
All of which makes us wonder if the U.S. is using this
election as an excuse to join the rest of the western allies
(who are cowed by the Arabs), into demanding a ceasefire
line which would put Israel at the mercy of her enemies
once again. If so it would mean that we are tired of the
problem and we have decided that the best way to solve it
is by the extinction of Israel.
That oily path from Riydh to Houston seems to have
traveled right up our national spine leaving a yellow
streak.
Jewish Floridian
nd SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood Office-Suite 30*136 S. Federal Hwy.. Danla. Fla. 33004
Telephone 920-9018
MAIN OFFICE and PLANT -130 NE 6th St.. Miami, Fla. 83132 Phone 873-4606
FREDK SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SELMA M. THOMPSON
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Assistant to Publlaher
The Jewish Floridian Den Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Publlahed Bi-Weekly
Second Claaa Postage Paid at Danla, Fla. 864600
Jewish Federation of South Broward, Inc. SHOFAR EDITORIAL
ADVISORY COMMITTEE Nathan Pritcher, Chairman; LewU E. Cohn;
Melvln H. Baer. Samuel Mel We. D.M.D.
The Jewish Fioridi-n has absorbed Hie Jewish Unity end the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate, World-
wide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association of
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (local area) One Year-u.so. Out of Town Upon Request.
A Crisis in Journalism Here
A not-eo-eubtle shift in at-
titude if not policy suggests the
insidious development of a major
journalistic crisis here. The shift
is in South Florida's snarling
morning daily.
We are back into the tem-
perament of the mid-1960s and
early '60's once again, when chief
cook and hatcbetman George
Weller was The Miami Herald-s
doyen on Middle East matters.
IN THOSE days, as seen
through Weller's microscopic
intellect, it was difficult for the
columns of the Herald to find a
Mindlin
single redeeming value in Israeli
existence as a nation.
Add to this the uncomfortably
close proximity to the "no Jewi
and dogs" era in facilities per-
vading the area, and the esteem
for things Jewish could hardly
have been lower.
WE HAVE seen better times
since then, much better, and it is
an incontrovertible fact that the
morning daily here took a leading
hand in reporting and even oc-
casionally applauding them.
Whether for Israel or for the
South Florida Jewish com-
munity, a good deal of progress
was made in matters of in-
tergroup understanding,
progressive community relations
and international amity.
The post-Yom Kippur War
years and the oil crunch have
changed all that. They have bred
the journalistic crisis now
beginning to plague us. Why not?
when the pressure is on. hate
a Jew.
ONCE AGAIN, neither Israel
in particular nor Jews in general
can do anything worthwhile in
the columns of the Herald, except
perhaps to emigrate from Syria,
leaving at least me with the
uncomfortable feeling that in the
Ivory Tower of One Herald Plaza
there is the growing hope these
days that a similar pattern may
yet develop in South Florida.
All one has to do is to study
the Herald's reporting of Prime
Minister Begins visit to
Washington July 19 and 20 to see
that its editors have gone out of
remission and back into their old
malignant ways.
The Begin visit rated hardly a
Page One mention, if at all,
appearing instead on Page Two.
(The story on the Syrian Jewish
Continued on Page 9
Log of a Trip to Italy
Friday, August 12,1977
Volume'/
Jet-lag is no problem for me on
a return from Europeforget
daylight and five hours difference
and go to bed. It's the news-lag
which puts types like me in a
confused haze for days. Until five
weeks of the local dailies and
weeklies have been devoured and
digested, I am a lost soul trying
to make sense again. Or,
cynically, the same non-sense I
left behind the last week in June.
This is not to say that I was
without American information.
In Milan, Rome, Florence,
Munich, Vienna, Venice, not to
say Spoleto, Orvieto and
Bellaggio and London, the
International Herald Tribune is
available every day but Sunday,
as axe Newsweek, Time and
others. I was shocked in Rome to
read of the death of Dr. Bernard
Halpern ("Jackie Gleason's
personal physician"), having
attended the Bar Mitzvah of his
son at Temple Israel only a few
weeks before.
JUST A few days before
leaving London I also read in the
IHT the story which began with
the foreboding headline, "Florida
Takes Lead in U.S. Pay Phone
Cost," and also detailed the
increases in basic home rates,
including the charges for
directory assistance calls and
long distance calls within the
state.
It was particularly poignant in
view of the indignant news
stories in the London press the
following day describing the
large profits reported by the
nationalized postal and
telecommunications services and
the demand that they be reduced.
The only difference that comes
to mind between the two systems
is that in England the socialism
is for the poor and here it's for the
rich.
28 AB 5737
Number 16
BUT I had left before
the
Florida budget and the auto
insurance questions had been
resolved; as a matter of fact, the
Legislature was still in session
and I would gather, hopefully,
that it finally left Tallahassee.
The International Herald
Tribune is understandably lax on
Miami and Florida news, except
for those with international
implications like the capture of
two "spies" in Fort Lauderdale,
but it is also weak on American
domestic reports except for the
baseball scores.
In recent years I have pretty
much ignored them here as a
daily diet but in Europe the game
is again the "national pastime "
FIVE WEEKS of the IHT
which is owned jointly by the
New York Times, Washington
rost and the last owner of the old
Herald Tribune, is enough to
make one an expert on foreign
affairs and finances.
The weakness of the dollar
against Germany's deutsche
mark fortunately was not
reflected in the favorable rate in
Italy where we spent most of our
tune and money, I am pleased to
say.
As attractive as Munich is, I
carried with me a Jewish
prejudice I know I shall never
lose. And when a young guide in
a museum had the chutzpah to
point to a darkened spot on the
floor where "the nice Americans
bombed," I gave him forcefully a
short lesson in German World
War II history that I doubt he'll
forget much as he might like to.
I HAD at least two Jewish
experiences that I will always
treasure. On entering the portal
on the left in Rome's Colosseum,
I was offered a copy of the large
Rome guide for 3500 lira, but
before I had a chance to say yes
or no, a younger partner moved
in and said "He's Jewish, for him
it's 3,000." (I am no longer
astonished by this type of
recognition; I do look Jewish).
Our animated conversation in
English and Italianhe knew no
Yiddish: "I'm Sephardic"was
a pleasing one. How long in
Italy? Well, his family was
brought there by Titus and, as
slaves, helped build the famous
Arch of Titus around the year 81
of the common era. Well, a good
story to tell on the way to the
Forum or inside the Colosseum.
The other found us without the
precious 100 lira coin (only an
undesirable paper facsimile) on i
bus from the Tivoli to Rome, to
be helped out by a young man
who, sitting next to his mother
and alongside two older women,
had arrived in Rome just two
months before from the Soviet
Union.
THEY WERE all on their way
to the United States thanks, as
they told us. to HI AS and "The
Joint." One of them was headed
for relatives in Boston who spent
their winters in Miami Beach.
This time, the animated
conversation was in Yiddish
which, while mine suffers from
lack of use, proved again to be
the universality of that neglected
language and its value, even yet
today, to the traveling Jew.
With which my travelogue for
1977 is completed. For further
details you'll have to engage me
in conversation.


Friday, August 12,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
r
Sen. Stone Very Much at Home in President's Room
By NORMA A. OROVITZ
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Not one to break an
engagement, U.S. Sen. Richard
(Dick) Stone conducted our
appointed Washington interview
in the Senate President's Room
between roll call votes on the
Senate floor.
The President's Room is large
by home standards and small for
the grandeur of the Capitol. Its
entrance was guarded by two
suited aides who moved aside
deferentially as Stone escorted
me inside. Obviously very much
at home, Stone headed straight
away to a far corner where over-
stuffed leather furniture helped
resurrect the Senate private club
mystique.
As I plopped into a club chair,
propped notebook in lap. Stone
lounged comfortably on a settee
and talked easily of his ac-
ceptance into the most exclusive
of fraternities.
"THE TEST of acceptance,"
he explained, "is a simple one.
Can you pass bills you espouse
and kill bills you oppose." That
in answer to my question of
whether being young (not quite
49), being new (a senator since
January, 1975) and being Jewish
affected his pledging the Senate.
There is, it seems, upon elec-
tion, an immediate fraternal bond
which binds members of the
Senate. While cliques may exist,
their edges blur depending upon
the Senate committee at hand. If
the Senate yardstick for ac-
ceptance has nothing to do with
newness or Jewishness. it must
be Stone's effectiveness that has
won him ready respect.
In the 94th Congress, Stone's
98 percent voting record won him
top Freshman Senator slot.
ONE SLOT Stone has yet to
fill is that of active member in the
policy-making Democratic
caucus. And that is by choice.
Long an advocate of government
in the sunshine, he absents
himself from closed-door
meetings to make a stand for
opening them to public scrutiny.
Until such time that his absence
proves ineffective as a wedge, he
will refuse to participate.
His non-participation on a
point of honor has "not hurt
(him) substantially" nor
alienated other senators. He has,
in fact, gathered about a dozen
signatures of senators who agree
with him in spirit though not in
practice.
Practicing politics in the
Senate is an art which, Stone
explained, is different than in the
House. While "advancing in-
terests of constituents,"
cognizance must be taken of the
need to balance those concerns
with national priorities. If the
balancing act is not difficult
enough, a senator, unlike a
congressman, must rise above
sectionalism.
THE ONLY place that special
sectional interests has in a
senator's frame of reference is the
responsibility to "communicate
special knowledge" of a par-
ticular problem or area.
So, if Stone is committed to the
Cuban population in South
Florida, it is by virtue of his
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee seat as well as his long-
lime awareness. The locale is not
the ostensible rationale for his
concerns.
What is of major concern to
Stone is the Commission on
Security and Cooperation in
Europe, the joint House, Senate
and Executive organ charged
with monitoring Helsinki Accord
signators.
As a member of the Com-
mission, of which Dante Fascell
is chairman, Stone is anxious
about Basket Three (Final Act)
accommodations. Stone will not
State Dep't. Mum
On MIG Assist
WASHINGTON The State
Department is maintaining strict
silence on reports that the Carter
administration has agreed
secretly to help Egypt refurbish
its fleet of some 200 MIG combat
aircraft so that they will not have
to rely on spare parts which the
Soviet Union no longer supplies
to Egypt. Department
spokesman John Trattner
response of the public without
prior knowledge. A harmless
explosive which sounded like a
bomb was detonated by police
after a vendor spotted it in the
market place.
PARIS The French
government has decided that the
recent antibovcott law will not be
refused to confirm or deny the
,_ reports and would make no
> comments when questioned by
reporters.
JERUSALEM The Israeli
pound has been devalued for the
third time in a month and now
stands at IL 9.83-one dollar. This
latest devaluation brought to 6
percent the total depreciation of
the pound during the four-month
period ended early this week
TEL AVIV A bomb alert in
the Haifa market place this week
was an exercise ordered by the
police high command to teat the
efficiencv of the police and the
applicable to Arab-imposed
restrictions on trade with Israel.
The government managed to
overturn the practical ap-
plications of the law, approved by
Parliament in June, by issuing an
"executive directive" instructing
the state-controlled Foreign
Trade Insurance Commission
that the law does not cover
French trade in the Middle East.
MEXICO CITY Delegates
from 19 nations participating in
the Third Assembly of
Parliaments from Latin America
and Western Europe passed a
strong resolution condemning
international terrorism as a crime
against mankind.
I Riverside Gets Award
I. Tb* Hollywood Chamber of Commerce has presented a
- bewtifi-award to the Riverside Memorial Chapel in Hollywood.
I r Alfred Golden, vice president of Riverside, and Arthur
p?MberB*- manager in Hollywood, received the certificate from
I rTlber officials in honor of extensive new landscaping and
, m building design. Riverside Chapels, based in Miami Beach,
I ^ erv*d the Hollywood community for many years, and the
i new Chapel in Hollywood ha. been open about a yasx.
I
-
I
j
i
i
travel to the Belgrade update
conference just for the ride,
however. His appearance
"depends on whether there is an
opportunity to come to grips with
Basket Three" and human rights
issues.
ON THE issue of President
Carter and the so-called call for a
Palestinian homeland, Stone was
careful. Acknowledging that the
President has made "varied"
statements, Stone felt Carter was
"probing both sides for move-
ment" instead of merely waffling.
Our interview took place
during the time of the Menachem
Begin Jimmy Carter talks, and
Stone interpreted those talks as
"good but not decisive." What
would be "crucial," he said, was
Secretary of State Vance's "next
move" to meet with Arab leaders.
On the subject of the Mideast,
Stone cautioned against leaping
to immediately attack extremely
hawkish Arabs and their pro-
vocative statements.
"Wait a day wait a week,"
he said, and listen for a
moderation of tone by the Arab
doves.
We must, he said, "exert self-
restraint in the United States"
and not add verbal fuel to the
international fire. Since there is
"no tradition of trust" in the
Middle East, Stone suggested
Stone and Orovitz meet at the Capitol
Americans rely on Prime Min-
ister Begin's innate good sense in
preventing "another Munich."
ON POSSIBLE appeasement.
Stone offered that "I don't think
there are going to be concessions
based on words."
Those words, coming from a
senator in a position to know,
should be marginally reassuring.
Stone was with Begin at the
White House "working dinner,"
a small private breakfast at the
Blair House, a Senate Foreign
Relations Committee meeting
and the Israeli Embassy dinner.
If those activities kept Stone
abreast of issues important to
American Jews, he suggests that
The Jewish Floridian reader keep
abreast by reading critical ac-
counts of critical issues.
"To be informed without
smoke is the ability to act or
react." Appropriate advice
coming from the senator who
removed his office door to accent
accessibility to himself and
governmental affairs without
smoke and in the sunshine.
IF YOU LIKED US
IN MIAMI,
YOU'LL LOVE US
IN HALLANDALE.
We are pleased to announce the opening for our new Thrift Shop
at 3149 West Hallandale Beach Boulevard.
This new 10,000 square foot store is a wonderful place to buy
or to donate used furniture, appliances, clothing, antiques and
a variety of other quality household items at competitive prices.
The money we take in from selling this merchandise is used to
buy vital drugs and medical supplies for the indigent residents
of the Miami Jewish Home & Hospital For The Aged at Douglas
Gardens, which is supported by the Hollywood Auxiliary.
There is no better place to purchase or to donate your
resalable items. For free pick-up call 981-8245. All donations
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DOUGLAS GARDENS-HALLANDALE
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(2 blocks west of 1-95)/Phone 981-8245
Miami Thrift Shop, 7300 NW 27th Avenue/Phone 696-2101
The Miami Jewish Home & Hospital For The Aged
Aaron Kravitz, President


1 '
Page 6
The Jewish Fbridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 12,1977
Toning Down Crown Heights Heat
By NANCY CHAININ
And BRIAN LIPSITZ
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The Hasid, "tsitsis"
hanging at his side, and the
young man, a Black clad in
a bright blue gym suit,
could be seen gesturing and
talking to each other as
they faced the maroon store
front. A closer look re-
vealed they were reading a
flier which portrayed a
Hasidic Jew beating up a
young Black.
The flier charged the
Crown Heights Community
Patrol, a civilian anti-crime
patrol sponsored by the
Crown Heights Jewish
Community Council, with
harassing Blacks and said:
"Are we willing to be put
into a Concentration Camp
without raising our
voices?"
ACROSS THE street, at this
seemingly innocuous corner of
Troy Avenue and Montgomery
Street, in the Crown Heights
section of Brooklyn, stood the
solitary telephone booth where,
on June 4, 17-year-old yeshiva
student Abraham Goldman was
stabbed to death
Ther is an air of tension in the
tree-shaded Crown Heights area.
And the damage to stores in this
area during the power blackout
July 13 and 14 is, perhaps, not
entirely unrelated to the sim-
mering feelings of suspicion and
distrust between the Hasidic and
Black communities here. Crown
Heights, the center for the
Lubavitcher Hasidim, is now
about 60 percent Black and 35
percent Hasidic.
SINCE THE Goldman
murder, the Jewish community
has been tense and angry. The
Jewish crime prevention patrol
has intensified its duties.
According to the Jewish Com-
munity Council, these duties are
The patrol is "necessary"
because "people are aware that
the area is not being protected,
said a rabbi who would not
identify himself but was present
at the press conference.
HE SAID that the July 9
demonstration was "purely
political," involving "people who
were running for something."
People were "imported" to at-
tend the demonstration, the rabbi
said. Classes at Medgar Evers
College in the Crown Heights
area were "interrupted" and
people were told to attend the
rally, according to the rabbi.
Yudal Zalmenson, a worker at
the Crown Cuisine restaurant,
said he disagreed with charges
that the patrol was a terrorizing
influence. He said it "takes guts"
to belong to the patrol. An
employee of a local fish market
praised the patrol for "protecting
young girls," while Leon
Blesofsky, a cantor, said it was a
"wonderful thing." The police are
good, "but they can't be at every
corner," Blesofsky added.
DURING THE blackout,
Utica Avenue, a major thorough-
fare in Crown Heights, was
severely looted and damaged.
However, Kingston Avenue,
another thoroughfare, was
virtually untouched. Rabbi
Yehuda Krinsky, a spokesman
for the Lubavitcher Hasidim,
attributed this to the fact that
the patrol is centered in the
Kingston area.
He said: "It was a tremendous
thing (the patrol). There is no
question in my mind it was a
deterrent" to the looting.
The Blacks readily accept the
claims of various fliers, posted
and distributed to Blacks in the
area, which accuse the Hasidim
c aeauni uuc iiLiafK on ine movement Against
and Anti-Semitism" (MRAP) and three of its at- Blacks say "they themselvw have
its own hands by harassing and
assaulting Blacks. To the Black
community, the patrol is little
more than a "vigilante" group
not in the least concerned with
the welfare of Blacks. These
feelings culminated in the July 9
demonstration by about 500
Blacks to protest the alleged
actions of the patrol.
In random interviews with
lews and Blacks in Crown
Heights, many Black residents
told the JTA they thought the
patrol was a good idea, but that
some of its members occasionally
abused their power. Some Blacks
said the patrol should not exist,
but if it had to exist it should also
include Blacks.
TAYLOR HAMP, a Crown
Heights resident for 20 years,
said he was recently "pulled"
from his car while sitting in a no-
parking zone by members of the
patrol. He said he decided not to
press charges because of what he
termed the political power pos-
sessed by the Hasidic com-
munity.
"They have the officers under
their thumb," he said. Hamps
said the existence of the patrol
had created a "teaser" at-
mosphere. "The idea is great but
not the methods." he said.
Bernard and Larry, two young
men who attended the July 9
demonstration, thought the
patrol "looks pretty good but
was kind of unfair." Larry said he
had been approached by patrol
members and "hassled."
VERBAL harrassment is the
key issue. Both complained that
patrol members were "limiting
themselves" by not protecting
everyone in Crown Heights.
Bernard said that if someone was
being robbed just outside the
precinct where they were being
interviewed, the patrol "wouldn't
get involved. If the patrol
protected everyone, we would
have a lot more community
cooperation."
At a recent press conference,
members of the Hasidic com-
munity would not say how ex-
tensive an area their patrol
covers.
However, Scholom Gansburg,
a Crown Heights resident, said
the patrol was "necessary" and
that it was doing a "fair job." A
few months ago Gansburg said
he was held up by Blacks and the
patrol appeared immediately,
caught his assailants and took
him to the hospital.
KiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiuiiiiiimtNiiiiiiiiiii
I Demonstrate Against ]
I Attack on Pro-Left {
I GroupinParis
PARIS (JTA) Several hundred demonstrator
Racism and Anti-Sem.t.sm" (MRAP) and three of its at- Blacks say they themselveVfc
torneys. Representatives of the French Bar Association, the seen such incidents. The Jw
Union ol Magistrates and the Association for Civic Liberties de"y any such actions asserting
were among the demonstrators who gathered in front of the tnat in instances where the patrol
MRAP offices. members may have acted too
forcefully, it was only in self-
THE ORGANIZATION'S Paris headquarters were ^ rRnwN H fc( r
damaged by an explosion July 14. The following night, July 15 nJnVrv r ? 1 Heights Com-
MP^J^&SSZfir attornVworking & SKJSSl SS2M
to protect both the Jewish and S^ ^Tul uHSS. W* '"m th.e P!,Ce.hfLV.e_no known with Black '^ers to resolve the
Black residents of the area by
serving as a deterrent to crime.
But according to many Blacks,
the patrol has taken the law into
Aviva BBW to Hold
Membership Coffee
The Aviva Chapter of B'nai
B'rith Women will hold its sum-
mer membership coffee on Wed-
nesday evening, Aug. 17, at the
home of Mrs. Gary Ginsburg.
All new and prospective mem-
bers are invited to attend.
President of the organization is
Mackie Stein. For more infor-
mation, contact cochairmen Bar-
bara Stein and Edie Rubenstein.
clues as to the identity of the assailants. The MRAP is
left organization active in the fight against anti-Semitism and
racism. Far to the left of the better known League Against
Racism and Anti-Semitism (LICA), it is especially detested bv
extreme-right wing and neo-Nazi groups.
tensions, and said that Blacks
have been invited to join the
patrol. However, the process is
slow, said Rabbi Mendel
Shemtov, chairman of the
Council.
The Council is trying to find
responsible Black leaders to help
design a framework by which
Blacks could join the patrol,
Shemtov told the JTA, but added
that they are having a problem
finding them.
A rather talkative man known
as Hanks said that having Blacks
join the patrol was a good idea
According to Hamp, "A lot
would like to join who are con-
cerned with the community and
want to share the responsibility.
People on blocks will form their
own groups if they don't work
something out."
GANSBURG SAID he found
it "hard to comment" on whether
or not Blacks should join the
patrol. He said it is "hard to deal
with people you are not close to
and that it was hard to know who
was (qualified) for the job."
Zalmenson opined: "Blacks
might not think another Black
person was doing anything
wrong. There are differences
between Jews and Blacks."
Counter-charges of racism and
latent anti-Semitism have passed
back and forth between the two
communities in an effort to
explain the current tensions. But
the Hasid and the young Black
man who were arguing over the
truth of the flier taped to the
window of "Kelly Candy Store,"
see things otherwise.
To 17-year-old Earl Arlington,
the Hasidim are "all right neigh-
bors." He didn't feel the current
situation was caused by the
Goldman murder. He said he was
uncertain about the roots of the
problem, but suspected it has
something to do with the influx
of Blacks and the lack of jobs.
VINSON JONES, a burly
Black man with specks of gray in
his beard, came out of the candy
store where he works and joined
the conversation. "I haven't
found them (the Hasidim) to be
bad neighbors."
Jones senses an air of Jewish
animosity towards Blacks and
recalled a recent incident where
Jews complained of loud music
being played by Blacks.
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fi


Friday, August 12,1977
The Jewish Floridian andShofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7

Much Ado About Three Settlements on West Bank
By DAVID ETTINGER
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The State Department continues
to express "deep disappoint-
ment" over an announcement in
Jerusalem that Israel has
legalized three settlements in the
West Bank. According to
Department spokesman Hodding
jCarter, Assistant Secretary of
Estate for Near Eastern and South
Asian Affairs Alfred Atherton
telephoned Israeli Ambassador
Simcha Dinitz to convey the
Department's "disappointment."
"We have consistently made
clear, including in our recent
talks here in Washington, our
President Carter not to establish
any settlements on the West
Bank or other occupied areas
until after Oct. 10, the date Begin
has suggested for reconvening
the Geneva Conference.
HOWEVER, he did not
specifically say that he would
plan new settlements. Begin
made his statements to reporters
after he met with President
Ephraim Katzir to apprise him of
his trip to the United States.
(At the same time government
officials in Jerusalem defended
the "Ministerial Settlement's
Committee" decision to formally
I
AT THE STATE DEP'T.
view that the establishment of
settlements in the occupied
territories is not only contrary to
the Fourth Geneva Convention,
but also continues an obstacle to
the peace-making process,"
Carter told reporters.
ACCORDING to Carter, the
State Department "has been in
touch with the Israeli govern-
ment" which "has informed us it
s taking action to give legal
status to three existing settle-
ments in the West Bank." Carter
identified the settlements as
Maale Edumim, east of Jeru-
salem. Ofra, near Ramallah. and
F.ilon Moreh (Kadum). near
*. Nablus.
Our understanding is that the
former Israeli government had
refused to legalize at least one of
the settlements." the spokesman
said He confirmed that the
question of Israeli settlement in
the occupied territories was
discussed during Prime Minister
Menachem Begin's visit here last
week, but was unable to say
whether Begin had informed the
resident of his intention to
legalize the settlements.
In Jerusalem. Begin denied
reports in Israeli and Americai
newspapers that he had promised
It
legalize the three West Bank
settlements as "not a new
departure." The officials, con-
scious of the immediate negative
reactions the decision was likely
to provoke, sought to stress that
all three sites were already extant
settlements which had won at
least the tacit consent of the
previous government and
whose positions were now being
merely "regularized.")
Although Hodding Carter
would not go as far as to say that
the effect of the legalization
would be to "endanger the hope
for peace." he voiced the hope
that "prior to the new round of
discussions in the Middle East
there will be no steps to make
the search for peace more dif-
ficult." He said the U.S. was dis-
appointed by the Israeli action
"because it runs contrary to our
long-standing belief on what
should be done in the occupied
territories."
THE DEPARTMENT spokes-
man said his statement was
"officially relayed" to the Israeli
government and had been ap-
proved by Secretary of State
('vrus Vance.
CJF Sets Record In Endowment Funds
f,y
NEW YORK Forty-seven
Jewish Federations in the United
Suite* and Canada reported ncl
holdings of 8223 million in en-
dowment funds in 1970. setting a
Word in endowment fund
Towth.
The 47 communities re-
sponding to the annual survey
on the status of Federation
r.ndowment Funds compiled by
the Council of Jewish Federation
ICJFI, showed total receipts of
approximately $44 million by
their funds since 1975.
THE CJF survey also notes
at the responding communities
1 allocated $20 million in grants
last year from their endowment
funds.
Intermediate and small cities,
the report continues, showed the
Sreatest percentage growth in
W76. Comparable data for 21
cities in these categories reveals a
n*t increase of 42 percent in
endowment funds last year over
1975 totals.
Almost half of the 1976 total of
3 million reported to CJF by
tn* 47 federated communities
"nsists of unrestricted funds.
Of the grants made from
j^dowment funds during 1976,
almost half went to the annual
Federation campaigns and M
percent went to various agencies
of the Federations.
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mon* 1-53M114 or 531-1744
By DAVID HOROWITZ
UNITED NATIONS -
(WUP) UN Chief Kurt
Waldheim may term it "most un-
fortunate," the Arabs and
Soviets may be dismayed and the
State Department "deeply dis-
appointed" over Israel's
legalization of the three little
settlements on the West Bank
Ofra, Kadum and Maale
Adumim
But the facts remain:
Menachem Begin, by this action,
has done what a vacillating
Labor Government should have
done long ago. The big mistake of
Labor was that its leaders failed
to annex both the West Bank and
The Gaza Strip immediately after
the Israeli victory in the 1967
war.
Instead, they acquiesced to the
opinions of their enemies and
friends in accepting the areas of
Samaria and Judea as "occupied
territories" when in reality, as
the new Prime Minister has
noted, they were "liberated."
IN REPLY to the State De-
partment criticism. Begin told
the Knesset in a lengthy debate
dealing with his American visit
that Israel could never be termed
an occupying power in the We9t
Bank in the legal sense because
King Hussein's Jordan, which
had earlier held the territory, had
occupied it by aggression in the
1948 war.
Begin further declared that no
one, with the exception of Britain
and Pakistan, had recognized the
late King Abdullah's annexation
of the West Bank in 1950.
By legalizing the three West
Bank settlements. Begin has
served notice to Yasir Arafat and
the PLO as also to the United
Nations that Israel will never
allow Samaria and Judea within
the historic Third Hebrew Com-
monwealth to become a Soviet-
supported third Arafatian Arab
state.
DURING HIS two private
meetings with Jimmy Carter,
Begin had made this fact crystal
SEEN AT THE
UNITED NATIONS
clear, and the President had
expressed his deep under-
standing for the case put to him.
This may explain the following
comment sent to The New York
Times by Moshe Brilliant from
Jerusalem the day of the Knesset
debate:
"Politcal sources here and
well-placed officials, speaking
privately, asserted that the
seeming clash of the last 48 hours
was in accordance with a scenario
devised dur Mr. Begin's vis-
it to Washington. 'I don't think
Washington was surprised by our
legalizing the settlements
yesterday and the response was
expected here,' a Member of the
Parliament said in the
cloakroom."
Surely, what Begin and Carter
discussed in private during their
long talks in the President's
secluded chamber had not been
revealed to anyone else, not to
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance
and not to anyone in the State
Department. Thus we can under-
stand why Begin said that he had
"slept like a child" following one
of those intimate talks.
DURING HIS press con-
ference last week, the President
was asked about the latest action
in Israel. Although he agreed
that the legalization of the settle-
ments "diminished" the quest for
peace, it did not "pose an insur-
mountable problem. My own
concern," he added, "is the
establishments of new set-
tlements."
Carter went on to say that "it
is not fair to overly criticize
Begin," noting that during
"previous governments settle-
ments were established" in the
West Bank. "This is not a new
thing," he emphasized. "It is a
mistake to exaggerate the
situation."
President Carter also took tht
occasion to praise Begin. "He is
in a position of great strength in
Israel, and his voice is honored
there," he stated. "His con-
tinuing policies have been ex-
cellent."
The President made it clear
once again that any peace settle-
ment must "be approved by the
Arabs and the Israelis them-
selves," and he said he was
optimistic about the reconvening
of the Geneva Conference where
they "can search for common
grounds and minimize their
differences."
The major stumbling-block, he
admitted, was "the question of
the Palestinians." He could not
see how they could be repre-
sented at a conference so long as
they "do not forego their com-
mitment that Israel be destroyed.
Until then we see no way."
CARTER WAS right when he
said that Begin "is in a position
of great strength in Israel" and
that "his voice is honored there."
He might have added that he has
also given a new hope to the
Israelis and the Jewish people
around the world.
The day of kowtowing, of
begging, pleading for peace, is
over. Israel's enemies have inter-
preted such pleading as signs of
weakness. Let the Arabs, who
had threatened Israel with
destruction four times and lost,
let them sue for peace. And this
they must do under the new
Israeli regime which will un-
doubtedly show magnaminity in
negotiations for a final, definitive
settlement with them.
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<
Pge 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, Auguat 12,1977
AskAB
ByaeehalpeRn
Question: The Jewish calendar consists of
twelve months in some years and thirteen in
others. Why is this so? Also, this year the
Jewish calendar is listed as being the year
5737. What is the basis for this designation?
Jacob Kaplan
Oakhurst, N.J.
Answer: The Jewish year is reckoned from
the creation of the world, the year one being
the year of creation. It is based on infor-
mation derived from Biblical data, and coin-
cides with the year 3760 B.C.E.
The present Jewish calendar (Heb. Luach)
is very complicated because it is lunisolar.
The months are calculated according to the
moon, the years and days according to the
sun.
A day ends at sunset and a new day begins
immediately. Thus the Sabbath begins with
the setting of the sun on Friday and ends
with the setting of the sun on Saturday. The
same is true of all Festivals and all days
throughout the year.
In the lunar year, some months consist of
29 days and others consist of 30 days.
Since the Jewish Festivals are fixed ac-
cording to dates in months, they must also
be in specific agricultural seasons of the year
which depend on the tropical solar year. The
difference between the twelve month lunar
year and the solar year is made up by in-
serting a full month between the month of
Adar and the month of Nissan. This month is
called Adar Sheni the second month of Adar.
Thus the Hebrew leap year consists of thir-
teen lunar months.
This occurs on the third, sixth, eighth,
eleventh, fourteenth, seventeenth and nine-
teenth year of each nineteen-year cycle.
There are additional complicated adjust-
ments because Yom Kippur the Day of
Atonement must not fall on Friday or
Sunday, nor can Hoshana Rabba, the
seventh day of the Festival of Succot
(Tabernacles) fall on a Saturday.
The year begins on the first of Tishri
(September-October). It never falls on a
Sunday, Wednesday or Friday.
Because the month begins on the new
moon, in Temple times witnesses had to
report the appearance of the new moon to the
Sanhedrin which announced the date by fire
signals and later by messengers.
However the present Jewish calendar with
all the intricate calculations has been in-
troduced by the Patriarch Hillel 11 in the
fourth century of the common era. Although
all of these calculations are very complicated
the calendar is so accurate that it never had
to be adjusted.
ADDENDA: In researching an entirely
different subject, I came across some very
interesting additional information about the
number three in our Scriptures. Although I
previously wrote three columns about
number three often appearing in our Scrip-
tures, I am pleased to share the following
additional information.
"The third month (Sivan) was chosen for
the revelation because everything that is
closely connected with the Torah and with
Israel is triple in number.
"The Torah consists of three parts, the
Pentateuch, the Prophets, and the
Hagiographa; similarly the oral law consists
of Midrash, Halakah, and Haggadah.
"The communications between God and
Israel were carried on by three; Moses,
Aaron and Miriam.
"Israel also is divided into three divisions,
priests, Levites, and laymen; and they are,
furthermore, the descendants of the three
Patriarchs; Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.
"For God has a preference for 'the third.'
It was the third of Adam's sons, Seth, who
became the ancestor of humanity; and so,
too, it was the third among Noah's sons,
Shem, who attained high station. Among the
Jewish kings, too, it was the third, Solomon,
whom God distinguished before all others.
"The number three plays a particularly
important part in the life of Moses. He
belonged to the tribe of Levi, which is not
only the third of the tribes, but has a name
consisting of three letters (in Hebrew). He
himself was the third of the children of the
family; his own name consists of three
letters; in his infancy he had been concealed
by his mother throughout three months; and
in the third month of the year (Sivan), after a
preparation of three days, did he receive the
Torah on a mountain, the name of which
consists of three letters. (Sinai)" (The
Legends of the Jews by Louis Ginzberg, vol.
3, pp. 79,80).
SO SORRY! Immediately upon pub-
lication of my column about Sir Moses
Montefiore, my attention was called to an
error of fact. (ASK ABE, Jewish Floridian
and Shofar, July 15, 1977, p. 10)
Both Jerome Gevirman of Hallandale and
Arthur Marcus of Hollywood pointed out to
me that Leghorn is in Italy not in England as
it inadvertently appeared in my column.
They are of course correct. I regret the error.
The fact is that Sir Moses Montefiore was
born in Leghorn, Italy. I appreciate your
calling this to my attention. Many thanks.
Editor's Note: Please send all questions
ASK ABE
c/o Jewish Federation or
South Broward
2838 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, Florida 33020
Women's ORT Convenes on Beach
Two hundred delegates from
nine southern states representing
18,000 members of Women's
American ORT in District VI,
attended the semi-annual Board
meeting at the Konover Hotel,
Miami Beach, earlier this month.
Mrs. Leonard Pechenik is
president and Mrs. Dave Roth-
farb. chairman of the Executive
Committee of District VI.
Delegates from Broward
Region were Mrs. Herbert
Wormser, president, Mrs.
Samuel Press, Executive Com-
mittee Chairman Mrs. Lawrence
Chait, Mrs. Jay Rosen, Li]
Farber, Mrs. Henry Woldman,
Mrs. Al Gateman, Mrs. William
Sutter, Mrs. Bert Stem, Mrs.
Saul Gold, Mrs. Mike Yoekwn,
Mrs. Bernard Goldman and Ruth
Leff.
mittees and Chapters-at-Large
attended seminars, workshops
and plenary sessions.
WILLIAM RICHMAN, M.D.
Wishes to announce that as of August 15,1977
he will return to the
Active practice of Family Medicine
with offices at
Con
Delegates from Regions, Ana
Hindis. Coordinating Com-
EMERALD HILLS MEDICAL SQUARE
4460 Sheridan Street
Hollywood, Florida 33021
Chattanooga Bombing
Was 'Designed to KHT
Continued from Page 1
laboratory tests to ascertain the cause of the explosion.
Asked if the explosion could have possibly been caused by
a gas leak, he said it was very unlikely, but declined to
confirm that a bomb caused it. There are currently no
leads, he said.
The explosion, which was "heard all over town," ac-
cording to Drysdale, destroyed a converted house which
was the home of the 55 family Beth Shalom Synagogue.
Congregants who had gathered there for the Friday
Evening Shabbat services reportedly left early because
there were two people short of a minyan, Drysdale said.
HE ADDED that normally they would still have been
there at about 8:50 p.m. when the explosion took place.
Although the building was leveled, the synagogues two
Torahs and about 50 prayer books were reportedly un-
damaged, Drysdale said.
Carles Wittenstein, Southern counsel and civil rights
director for the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'riths
regional office in Atlanta, told the JTA he was on his way
to Chattanooga to meet with local officials about the
explosion.
He said he would discuss potential suspects and
security precautions for the city's other Jewish in-
stitutions. Wittenstein said he believed the bombing was
"a professional job." He added: "I would be inclined to
think that... it was designed to injure and kill.
ACCORDING TO Drysdale, there has never been an
anti-semitic incident in Chattanooga, a city with a
population of 2,250 Jews. However, he said there is a Ku
Klux Klan movement in the area which, in the past two
months, has "tried to be more active" by placing ads in
newspapers and having spokesmen on radio shows.
Meanwhile, local police and federal agents are con-
tinuing their investigation. Roberts said federal agencies
are involved, because the bombing of a church or
synagogue is a federal offence.
Chautauqua Society Endows
Courses In Judaism
taught by Rabbi Herbert
Baumgard, Temple Beth Am,
Miami. The lectureships, at the
College of Boca Raton, instructed
by Rabbi Norman Mendel,
spiritual leader of Temple Beth
El, Boca Raton and at Bethune-
Cookman College, Daytona
Beach are two of eight new
courses established this year.
This brings to 206 the cumulative
number of courses in Judaic
studies the Society has endowed
throughout the United States,
Canada and Israel.
Four resident lectureships,
accredited college courses in
Judaism, have been endowed by
the Jewish Chautauqua Society
for the 1977-78 academic year in
Florida.
Three of the lectureships are in
the Miami area: Barry College,
located in Miami Shores, is
endowed in honor of Shepard
Broad, and is instructed by
Rabbi Samuel Jaffe of Temple
Beth El, Hollywood; the
University of Miami, being
KARL M. MORGENSTEIN, M.D.
Takes Pleasure in Announcing the Association of
MYLESK. KRIEGER, M.D.
For the Practice of
OTOLARYNGOLOGYAND
FACIAL PLASTIC SURGERY
Medical Arts Building
1131 North 35th Avenue, Hollywood, Florida 33021
By Appointment (305) 957^753
r'MlLIPWEINS^hlN.JR.,M.D.,,
AND
EDWARD S. KLOT2. M.D..
F.C.C.P.
Taka Pleasure In Announcing The Association Of
ARON NEUHAUS, M.D
Dip*.. A^-n^OtJn,^ MeO.cln. And
.rr..,N THE PRACTICE OF
INTERNAL MEDICINE AND PULMONARY
DISEASE HT
MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
OF SOUTH BROWARD. PA
3700 WASHINGTON STREET
HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33021
^405 TELEPHONE: Ml.^nn
i
I
Ull


y, August 111977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
A Crisis in Journalism Here
Jewish Residents Hit
By Flood in Johnstown
ntinued from Pag* 4
||us" July 30 did rate Page
I On neither day was there so
J as a single photo of Begin
[President Carter together,
I lonely one-column mug shot
> Prime Minister instead.
bMPARE THIS with the
ting of the occasion in major
papers across the world,
ding the Arab and Soviet
and the contrast is
ding.
I thorough, in fact, was the
|ing of the visit by the
, that they published a
i anti-Semitic sidebar
Iy" of "American Jewish
"nee" on U.S. foreign policy,
with alleged statistics on
inordinate incidence of
millionaires among the
il population of American
naires, and concluding that
irorld can not possibly hope
[break between Washington
the Israelis because of this
ace. (Too bad, eh?)
|ying on the typically un-
seated cliches and canards
"Zionist" millions and
"Zionist" intrigues that
the mainstays of political
ISemitism, the Soviet
iy" could hardly raise an
ow of surprise as it ap-
1 in the Soviet press.
ON July 23 came The
m Herald to reproduce its
nt features in detailin far
! detail, for example, than it
Ihed on the Begin visit itself.
[this does raise an eyebrow.
|we can not rely on the Soviet
i for accuracy, why devote so
space to a Soviet anti-
litic panegyric? What, in the
] was the point of the Herald
nt other, perhaps, than to
lit more circulationto feed
laters here with more grist
heir mill?
| a time when American Jews
Bpecially vulnerable because
growing impatience with
il's refusal to cooperate in its
amputation, is not the
ation of such ethnically
Iging propaganda sheer
CAN, in fact, make a
case for the supposition
)omeone up at the morning
responded to the Soviet
Iy" with a sense of sym-
\ for its point of view.
this seems outlandish
ilation, consider the
Id's new doyen in these
fers, James McCartney, of its
[lington Bureau. A July 30
of his entitled "U.S.
ny on Prospects for Mideast
" (Page One, of course)
Is the disparity between
Went Carter's optimism and
|tary of State Cyrus Vance's
Tiism about the Israel-Arab
?se.
nub of the report is that
| top levels of the State
irtment" there is no reason
lhare the President's op-
Im. And who is at fault for all
Washington gloom? Why
nasty Israelis because (a)
wont sit down with the
fy PLO at Geneva; and (b)
ack of agreement on the
le of the Israeli-occupied
I Bank of the Jordan."
pMEONE OUGHT to tell
Mr. McCartney and the
U that only "at top levels of
Mate Department" is there
J> over the lack of an
jement.
Jmeone ought to tell them
J. m 1948, Palestine was
Ptioned into Jewish and Arab
F8 and that an Arab-inspired
I rejecting the partition and
*">& to destroy the Jewish
m effect destroyed the
1 state and, hence, partition
wneone ought to tell Mr.
^artney and the Herald that
Miniater Begin a
legitimization of three Jewish
settlements on the West Bank
the other week is prima facie
evidence that there is no lack of
agreement such as agonizes
theman agony they failed to
show when the Arabs destroyed
the act of partition in the first
place.
IT IS they, along with the
State Department, who are the
pessimists and, of course, the
Arabs themselves, who would
like to reverse the outcome of the
1948 and 1987 wars through the
good offices of such dutiful
propagandists as they have
always had among State
Department deskmen and the
Kremlin, and as they are now
managing to pick up in the
editorial offices of South Florida
and other newspapers of that
Ok.
Until they understand the
painful obviousness of their
revisionist journalism, they'll go
along publishing it with a sanc-
timoniousness that is sickening,
for example, that the President's
ill-conceived optimism can only
derive from something sinister:
"Some officials believe Carter's
optimistic attitude fits into a
highly politicized White House
strategy."
Opined McCartney and the
Herald July 30: "As they see it,
Carter changed tactics on the
Mideast before Israeli Prime
Minister Begins recent visit." *
The reason: "...the White
House was concerned that Carter
might alienate large numbers of
Jews."
CLEARLY, the Herald doesn't
have to find anti-Semitic copy in
the official Soviet news agency.
Toss, to fit its new mood. They
can produce their own right here.
One final example:
If Begins trip to Washington
did not make Page One in the
Herald his legitimization of the
West Bank settlements did. It
was all a trick, according to the
Herald. President Carter, by his
own confession to Newsday
newsman Marty Schram, forgot
to warn him against it, and Begin
struck secretly, deviously,
insidiouslyas only Jews can,
according to the Soviet press
report on Jews courtesy of the
Herald.
It takes a heap of naivete to
conclude that a Carter warning
would have changed Begin's
national policy. But naivete is
not the journalistic crisis here
these days. What is the crisis is a
return of the benighted, of
bigotry going berserk.
By BRIAN LIPSITZ
NEW YORK (JTAi Ap-
proximately one-third of the
Jewish residents in flood ravaged
Johnstown, Pa., have either been
displaced from their homes or
had their buesinesses damaged,
according to Jim young,
assistant director of the Council
of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds (CJF), who has
just returned from Johnstown
where he spent days assessing
the flood's affect on the Jewish
community. Fortunately, Young
said, no Jewish lives were lost.
The death toll has risen to 59,
with up to 60 people still missing
as a result of the savage flooding
from the overflowing Conemaugh
River valley.
As it continued to rain, civil
defense officials warned of the
possibility of more flooding. Gov.
Milton J. Shapp has estimated
total damage in the area at $200
million.
YOUNG WAS scheduled to
return to Johnstown today to
meet with local Jewish com-
munity leaders to determine
specific needs and to finalize
plans for assisting the
businessmen and displaced
persons affected by the flood.
Over 25 Jewish businesses have
Reverse Discrimination Aired
Continued from Page 1
Reduce Bias In Jobs and
Schools;" Mar. 31: "Califano
Wants Minority Preference In
Colleges;" Apr. 1: "Califano
Concedes Error In Advocating
Job Quotas;" June 6: "Califano
Asks 'Goals' Not 'Quotas' On
Minority Students In Colleges."
THIS RECAPITULATION is
not intended to poke fun at a
brilliant, honorable, and hard-
working Cabinet officer. Rather,
the intention is to illustrate, by
the Califano experience, how
thick with brambles and hurdles
is the path to undoing the wrongs
visited minority group people by
the sins and meaness of the past.
Anyone now taking the trouble
to read Secretary Califano's
commencement address at the
City College of New York will
perforce have to sympathize with
Joe in his dilemma and will have
to admire the sincerity expressed
at that event by his words:
"I know the dangers and
potential for injustice that are
inherent in any system of rigid,
arbitrary, long-term quotas. For
in the effort to eliminate dif-
ferences and inequalities, quotas
may actually aggravate them.
Arbitrary quotas will not be part
of our enforcement program. We
want to rely on the good faith and
special effort of all who join in the
final march against
discrimination. But we will also
relybecause we must relyon
numerical goals as benchmarks of
progress."
WE COME then to the
gigantic battle shaping up in the
Supreme Court of the United
States this Fall when the case of
the University of California v,
Bakke will be on the docket.
History related to the painful and
protracted battle to give Jews
and Christians, Blacks and
Whites. Asians and Americans
the final assurance of equality of
opportunity seems certain to be
profoundly affected by this court
battle.
For the few who may be un-
familiar with the case, the facts
follow: Allan Bakke, white, 36,
civil engineer, applied in 1973 and
again in 1974 for admission to the
comparatively new medical
school on the Davis campus of
the University of California.
The special admissions
program at Davis had reserved
16 out of the 100 openings in the
medical school for "minorities."
This left only 84 positions for
Bakke's eligibility efforts. In
1973 and again in 1974, Bakke
was turned down by Davis.
NO ONE now argues that
Bakke was less qualified than
many accepted. In September,
1976, California's liberal Supreme
Court, ruled 6-to-l that the
medical school's admissions
program, designed to facilitate
the admission of minority ap-
plicants, violated the Equal
Protection Clause of the 14th
Amendment.
The important ruling echoes a
trenchant observation by Mr.
Justice William O. Douglas (now
retired) in his opinion in the
celebrated DeFundis case: "The
Equal Protection Clause com-
mands the elimination of racial
barriers, not their creation.
THE OVERWHELMING
opinion in the American Jewish
community, long familiar with
the successful fight to smash
anti-Jewish quotas in medical
and other professional schools, is
that Bakke was discriminated
against.
sustained severe structural
damage and loss of stock due to
the mud and water. Young told
theJTA.
Since most of the Jewish
community lives in the suburbs
on higher ground than the city
proper, their homes were not
damaged, Young said.
But he added that about 35
elderly Jews who live in the city
itself, mainly in apartments, have
been forced to find temporary
shelter with other Jews in the
suburbs or in emergency shelters.
The two synagogue buildings of
Beth Sholom Congregation were
not damaged, Young said.
THERE IS still no electricity,
water, or phone service for the
Johnstown area and it may take a
month before things return to
normal, he said. Unable to
contact the Jewish community
by phone because the flood
disrupted communications,
Young went there in a private
plane and after receiving a pass
from the National Guard, was
driven into the central city by
jeep where he met with Jewish
leaders.
Young is familiar with
emergency relief of this nature
after having spent several weeks
in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., when it was
flooded in 1972. The flooding in
Wilkes-Barre was "much more
severe," Young said, as about 90
percent of the Jews there lost
their homes and businesses, and
all the Jewish institutions were
damaged. Young said the CJF is
still helping in Wilkes-Barre and
intends to do what is necessary
for the Johnstown Jewish
Community.
A MEMO issued by the CJF
on efforts to help the flood-
ravaged city said the following
actions were designed:
"The community is contacting
the people displaced from their
homes in the central city, to
determine their needs.
"The community will ascertain
the needs of the businessmen. We
will help them obtain the full
assistance of the Small Business
Administration and other
government aid, and to organize
any special help required beyond
that.
arnett
anK
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
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Member of B.B.B. &Hwd.C.otC.__________



Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 12, 1977
*

;
Israel: Sergeant Irit instructs her unit in handling submachine I guns at a training camp inJudean hills
Women BReakinq Old mold of male dominance
Women form the majority in
moot societies, but their role has
traditionally been decided by the
minoritymen. Male dominance
has been sustained both by law
and by custom, and it is only in
the twentieth century that legal
barriers have begun to disappear.
By next year, all EEC coun-
tries should have equal pay
legislation and improved
maternity leave schemes. In the
U.S., the move to have equal
rights for women written into the
constitution is "M>rg progress,
though with occasional setbacks.
But there are enormous dif-
ferences among nations: Spain,
where women are still crushed
under a massive social and sexual
code; Japan, where feminism
fails to gat votes; and Israel,
where the army is the last
placards through city streets
proclaiming "No more rape!"
"Give us free abortions and
contraceptives" and "I too am an
adulteress." Unmarried mothers
AS A young woman lay in a
. Madrid hospital recovering after
the birth of bar first child, a
doctor drew aside the husband.
"Your son needs immediate
treatment if he is to have a
chance of developing into a
normal child," said the doctor,
"but your permission is
required."
Far from agreeing, the
husband flew into a rage, denying
that a son of his could possibly be
physically or mentally impaired.
He refused all treatment. Only
much later did his wife learn of
his decision and her son's con-
dition. Now living apart from her
husband divorce is illegal in
Spain she is left with a residue
of bitterness and a permanently-
handicapped child, victim of her
husband's blind adherence to
"Machismo" (the masculinity
cult, at its strongest in Latin
countries).
Such cases explain why the
women's liberation movement is
growing fast in Spain and why its
militants demonstrate such
angry determination. More than
most countries, Spain has always
been a place where women are
expected to accept passively their
role as housewives and mothers.
THOUGH THEY were given a
measure of equality in the
Thirties when civil marriage,
divorce and abortion were briefly
permitted, discrimination has
been the rule. General Franco,
allied with a sternly traditional
church, believed a woman's place
was in the home though in his
home it is generally held that his
wife Carmen Polo wore the
trousers. Since Franco's death,
however, Spanish women have
leapt to the barricades. Dozens of
organizations have been spawned
to assert their rights, arousing a
mixture of scorn, irritation and
bewilderment among Spanish
males so long accustomed to
unchallenged supremacy.
Protesting against what they
see as unjust laws and social
customs, women have carried
tercourse before she is 21 can be
denounced by her father and sent
to a reform school.
Adultery and cohabitation are
illegal and to prove adultery a
Feminism Fulfilled
have formed associations to
campaign against discrimination.
SPANISH WOMEN have
much to protest about. The laws
are riddled with double stan-
dards. While it is expected that a
young man will have amatory
adventures, a girl who has in-
man only needs two witnesses to
swear to his wife's infidelity but a
woman must produce witnesses
to testify that her husband was
seen in the act of making love.
Early this year the case of Maria
Angeles Munoz roused the
feminists of Barcelona, where the
movement is at its strongest.
After separating from her
alcoholic, homosexual husband,
Maria lived with another man for
some years.
Then the husband took legal
action, claiming his daughter.
The court ruled that she was not
fit to look after the child who was
handed over to the husband's
parents. But the woman escaped
lightly for her immorality she
could also have been jailed for six
years.
THE FEMINIST stand on
divorce wins considerable
support from Spanish men. An
estimated half a million couples
have split up but cannot marry
again because of the ban on
divorce. Even so, those with
money and influence are able to
have their marriages "annulled,"
though they may have children
rom their allegedly non-
consummated union.
Family planning is still taboo
the editor of the dairy
newspaper El Pais was charged
in 1 larch for publishing an article
about contraceptives. At least
800,100 women take the pill, but
a S'ville woman explained:
"Officially you can't buy the pill
wit hot a note from your doctor.
Con t uued on Following Page
H is possiBle to oepile life
an6 Cpeation an6
feel no RemoRse
Susan
Panoff
The Legacy of Malthus:The Social Costs of the New Scientific
Racism. By Allan Chase. New York.: Alfred Knopf, 704p.,
"SPRING 1945: emerging from the nightmare, the world
discovers the camps, the death factories... Yes, it is possible to
defile life and creation and feel no remorse. To experiment with
monstrous mutations and still believe in the soul and immor-
tality... There was, then, a technique, a science of murder,
complete with specialized laboratories, business meeting and
progress charts."
Elie Wiesel's words from One Generation After bespoke the
blessings which pseudobiology and pseudoscientists gave to "the
most baseless fears, the meanest prejudices, and the most nig-
gardly impulses of men who made laws, values and history."
IN A remarkably comprehensive and lengthy account of the
scope and history of scientific racism, Allan Chase discusses its
origins in the Industrial Revolution, its theorists and propagan-
dists and its effects on past and present American life.
Chase reveals the sad truth that the work of several
American pseudoscientists strongly influenced Hitler's racist
eugenic theories. Madison Grant, graduate of Yale and Columbia
Law School, was a rabid anti-Semite, anti-Catholic, who made
p.ain his fervent cause of total annihilation of the Jews. His
Passing of the Great Race written in 1916 was the basis for sig-
nificant racist writings such as those by Lothrop Stoddard.
Dr. Stoddard, who held a Harvard law degree and a Harvard
doctorate in history, visited Nazi Germany, sitting as a guest on
the Eugenics High Court of Appeals. He completely identified
with and accepted the Nazi race doctrines and the racial writings
of the Nazi state's leading scientific spokesmen, as can be seen in
his writing:
'INSIDE GERMANY, the Jewish problem is regarded as a
passing phenomenon, already settled in principle and soon to be
settled in fact by the Physical elimination of the Jews themselves
from the Third Reich. It is the regeneration of the Germanic stock
with which public opinion is most concerned.
m-V"US, fSS^S. put to U8 wbther we have the courage to
S^SSauy."tUre generatioM "* <**e laKK*
. Chase credits Arthur Morse in While Six Million Died with
haying told how Harry Laughlin, director of the Carnegie In-
stitute s Eugenics Record Office (which in the 1930s anxiously
changed its name to something less offensive), and Expert
Eugenics Agent of the House Committee on Immigration and
Naturalization, succeeded in warning Congress to tigh. 'y control
immigration. He asked the classic question, "Would ,ou have
stock^U many 8 JeW? ImmiKrants *"* essentially i reeding
MmtSU IT WAS.not i"t the Congress which accepte this
blatent racism as scientific truth. So did President Rooseve. He
ZLk""*< Th the a"tiSemitfs ^ther than with the conce.ned
STo,? h'S 0W" ablnet and fami'y who saw ^e human cc Us
After all, Chase continues, Roosevelt was a creature of h. i
S, \lUCatln' a?d .hJ formative ^cial contacts, most o.
thev hJ tu e,r^'entlflC 'deaS fr0m the ^ diversities where
show, h a thC T* f their ^"cations. And Chase clearly
shows that academic figures and institutions were eager to accent
the elitist concepts of eugenics. g P
This brings us to the issues of eugenics in contemnorarv
BKahav:fem Ay unuderdog ?* s?8 ST3SS
rf. a mVed Up *? threaten the status of the power elite
5. *%Mssra& srtttsrst
and cannot be simply brushed nff ,7? are indeed very real
contemporary mSSS&SS^ gamb,tS d foU8 of
il


ly, August 12,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
Women BReakinG 016 mol6
boatinued from Preceding Page
ct, it depends on which
1st you go to. And my
r is always ready to give me
cription."
hut 400,000 women have
Ions every year from
(pstine. often dangerously
rienic practitioners. Anyone
, practicing abortion can be
r up to 12 years.
JER FRANCO it was
[isable to discuss publicly
matters as abortion,
Itution and venereal disease.
[were not supposed to exist.
i regarded as unpatriotic to
on the "machismo" cult
Jie Catholic church's rigid
Somehow always seemed to
t>st heavily on woman.
women were commonly
J against indecency, riding
lycle, and wearing short
Is or dresses that "are too
in those places which
Ike the passions of men."
f, however, girls are no
content to hide coyly
I their fluttering fans.
church too is changing.
I of young men have left the
hood rather than remain
fee and the number of young
pntering convents has been
reduced. Some moderate
bs back the feminists"
hd for equal rights and even
I need to revise the divorce
while standing firm on such
lions as abortion and
faceptives. Rec_0njzing
6n's voting strength they
[52 percent of Spain's
Ration the political parties
i been pledging support for
cause, but many feminists
his as sheer opportunism.
feminist Sylvia Atienza
"Political parties are
ting the movement.
we put women's problems
em. the first thing they do is
Hut our greatest obstacle
en the woman rather than
nen in Spain because they
have been "brainwashed to
n in machismo."
tAEL COULD make some
ks to leading the world in
prizing the rights of women.
passed legislation
Iwinx sex discrimination as
?ligious Directory
NORTH BROWARD
l_E BETH ORR. 31 SI .Riverside
Ye. Reform (44).
long ago as 1961. All jobs are
open to men and women, with
equal pay, the only exception
being a career as a rabbi.
Perhaps the best known
symbol of women's equal role in
Israeli society is the oft-
published scene of women in
army uniform marching
alongside men. But
paradoxically, it is in Israel's
armed forces that the most
significant job discrimination has
existed. Women are forbidden to
serve in front line positions. Most
have found themselves with desk
jobs.
But two recent changes show
the march to equality has af-
fected the military. Women have
begun serving as weapon in-
structors in male army camps,
and as technical officers on board
warships operating in the
Mediterranean or the Red Sea.
THE FIRST four female in-
structors recently began work at
a male training camp in the
Judean hills, after previously
working only in female camps.
They teach new recruits how to
handle arms and dismantle sub-
machine guns and rifles, target
shooting, marching drill and
physical exercise. According to
the camp commander, it has been
strikingly successful: "There has
always been strong competition
between instructors and
recruits," he says.
Ipulati
ONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA-
UE.7473NW4th$t. (if)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
h. 1MPLE OF NOkTH OAOE.
RL "nd Ave- Rrform. RabM
K* P. Kmgsiey. Cantor Irving
'*. (37)
HOLLYWOOD
AHM TEMPLE; 310 SW 2nd
Conservative. RabM Max
man. (7B)
Mr T^MPLE '' s m* *
. m r,?'*' SUtl JH. As
I "abol Jonathan Wall. (45)
1 SHALOM TEMPLE. 4*01 Arthur
Coniarvntiv,. RabM Morton
V. Cantor Irving Gold. (44)
l*EMPLB U01 Johnson St.
BTK&S *"*' D*W Shair.
Pr Y*U4la H.llor.un. (as)
P* *> *_ St.,
BSS-iF,a- "" ** i
'pwila. CaMarJraca Maim. (C-4T)
Jfijft OF HOLLYWOOD
| (SlP*-*- "** m-
"But can you imagine a man
who is taught by a female in-
structor how to dismantle a FN
rifle within three seconds? He will
do his utmost to match the girl's
speed and try to do it even faster.
Or when the instructor takes her
platoon for a 15 mile march with
full equipment can any male
fail when the girl makes it?"
The navy is anticipating
similar success with its scheme
whereby small groups of women
volunteers will work aboard
warships as telecommunications
or radar officers, with the aim of
freeing men for direct combat
duties. There are still strict rules:
women must be a minority of the
crew, they must have separate
quarters, and there must be no
"lapse from discipline" in in-
terpersonal relations.
AT THE same time, the
woman must participate in
exercises involving fire drill and
jumping into the sea. But that
seems about as dangerous as
military life is likely to get for
Israeli women for the forseeable
future.
The officer responsible for
selecting the women for warships
concluded firmly: "No girl will
participate in warfare and no girl
will be kept in zones of hostilities,
if shooting starts."
To the Point International
! Belgrade Talks See Antagonists
Warilg Circling One Another :
often obscure, but the broad
position adopted by the East at
Belgrade is for a "forward
looking" approach to the talks
with an emphasis on new accords
between the 35 signatory nations.
kRAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
merman, i ma
MIRAMAR
lEL TEMPLE. 69J0 SW 35th St.
liservative. Rabbi Avrom Drazin.
fitor Abraham Kester. (48)
More than a month after talks
opened in Belgrade to prepare
ground for a review there of the
Helsinki accords later his year.
the key protagonists, the Soviet
Bloc and the NATO alliance
countries, were still warily cir-
cling each other, unable to agree
on even on an agenda.
And as paper work at the new
Sava conference center mounted,
reflecting proposal and counter
proposal, a new element entered
the talks the role of the neutral
and non-aligned nations INN A).
The NNA nations led by
Switzerland are pushing a
proposal which observers hope
will break the deadlock. Fears are
being voiced that if it does not,
then the talks proper could be
postponed or even wrecked.
THE SOVIET UNION has
certainly issued enough warnings
along these lines, declaring that
repeated U.S. pronouncements
on the controversial human
rights issues threaten detente as
a whole. Debate on forming an
agenda has been convoluted and
In the West the East's position
is generally regarded as an at-
tempt to avoid being called to
task for its non-implementation
of many of the agreements signed
at Helsinki in 1975.
As a pre-requisite to progress
on other fronts, the U.S. and
EEC want a full review of how
the various accords have been
implemented over the last two
years. The U.S. particularly
wants to see this as a completely
separate item on the agenda.
BUT NOW the NNA nations,
led by Switzerland. are
promoting a compromise
proposal which it is hoped will
satisfy all the parties. All
delegates accepted the proposal
as a basis for further discussion
which lasted most of last week.
PEMBROKE PINES
JLE IN THE PINES. 1J* Tft St.
nservative. Rabbi Bernard I.
l>ter. (63)
PLANTATION
STATION JEWISH CONGRE-
fJON 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi
fldon J. Harr. (44)
HALLANDALE
LANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 414
I th Ave Conservative. RabM Dr.
p Klein. PhD. Cantor Jacob
nuger. (lj)
BOULEVARD CHAPELS
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TEL: 305-454-9999
DOUGLAS LAZARUS, L.F.D.
Police Continue Investigation
OfAmitay Home Bombing
By DAVID ETTINGER
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The FBI and Montgomery
County (Maryland) police are
continuing the investigation
into the bomb explosion which
ripped through the Rockville,
Md., home of Morris J.
Amitay, executive director of
the American-Israel Public
Affairs Committee (AIPAC).
According to police, whoever
set off the blast must have
been "sophisticated" in the
use of explosives.
The bomb was detonated by an
electrical device not far from the
house, according to police
reports. About 400 feet of electric
cord was found leading from the
site of the blast. The explosion
caused an estimated $50,000 in
damages, punching out the door
on the ground floor along with an
adjacent window and making a
hole 10 feet wide in the side of the
house.
NEITHER AMITAY, his wife
Sybil nor their three children,
who were asleep at the time of the
explosion around 3 a.m. were
hurt but the explosion killed the
family dog.
Police theorized that Amitay's
"highly visible" position as a
leading advocate for Israel's
cause in Washington made him a
likely target. So far no individual
or group has claimed respon-
sibility for the bombing.
Speculation, however, about
who may have been responsible
ranged from pro-Palestinian
terrorists to members of the
Hanafi Moslem sect whose leader
IEVITT
memorial chapols
U31 Pembroke Rd
Hollywood. Fla.
S24-MT7
Sonny Levitt, F.D.
133SSW. DiHioHwy.
North Miami, Fla.
4 431S
along with other members were
convicted last Saturday in
connection with the armed
takeover last March of three
buildings in Washington, in-
cluding the B'nai B'rith
headquarters.
POLICE SO far have
discounted a Hanafi role in the
bombing. Representatives of
some of the major pro-Palestinian
groups have denied any in-
volvement.
Dr. M. T. Mehdi, president of
the American-Arab Relations
Committee, said in a statement
released in Chicago where he was
visiting that the "terrorist at-
tack. .even if it might have been
the work of a Palestinian or a pro-
Palestinian organization" should
be condemned. "Violence to
settle political issues has no place
here (in the United States)."
Amitay, 41, has long been
considered one of the most ef-
fective spokesmen for Israel on
Capitol HOI
A FORMER State Depart-
ment official, he had been a
legislative assistant to Rep.
Robert W. Kastenmeir (D., Wis.)
and Sen. Abraham Ribicoff (D.,
Conn.) before joining AIPAC in
December. 1374
JEFFER
FUNERAL HOMES, INC.
DIRECTORS
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BROWAHO COUNTY I92I PEMBROKE RO
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1 -925-2743 "ep b,Pn*msie.n FD
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1650 HARRISON ST. HOLLYWOOD, FLA. PHONE: 922-7511
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PC 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Wdaj^AngjMt 12
1IIJ
3 WEEKS LEFT TO GET YOUR.
Kf PMSTO
lIEEl APPLIANCE*
POSITIVELY NO REDEMPTIONS WILL BE
HONORED AFTER AUGUST 27th! SHOP NOW
IN ORDER TO REDEEM YOUR CASH REGISTER
TAPES FOR THE PRESTO ITEMS
OF YOUR CHOICE
NMIf
Hot Dogger
With $200 in Topes
nfff
Fry Baby
With $500 in Top
rain
Presto Burger
With $300 in Top.,
cpfide
PRICES GOOD SUN.. AUG. 7 THRU
SAT.. AUG. 13 AT All STORES FIOM
FT. PIERCE TO KIT WIST
Fresh
Dated Beef
FRESH CAUEY-USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK
7 Bone Steak .79c
*
FIA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM
^ FRESH GRADE A
Lots O'
/Chicken
QUICK FROZEN NON BASTED U.S. COVT.
Grade 'A'-Young
Turkeys
Round Roast
IISM VAlllV U S CMOKI ill' CMUCB
Underbade &' ,.*1 ,9
'111- VAUII V i ("OKI llll CHUCK (MIS
Shldr.Pot Roast ,. $1**
IS" Vllli u S CHCHCI Mil IOUNO
Round Steak .,. sl49
Shi dr. Steak Bnls..l49
m**"* -
Beef Chuck it 99*
Beef Liver
"Mm VA1IIT u i CHOK1
Beef Brisket
WMCXI Ot rONT MALI IMtS
59*
M29
Dilir l Dill DIPT!....
PANTRY PRIDE CREAMED
Cottage
Cheese
89c
KWI n M( CU$I CWION
Margarine HI 69'
CMUtM LONOMOIN
Borden Cheesed 99'
39<
95*
J4-OZ
CUP
MIIICO INCIISH
Muffins..................5X1
'(CO CMtIM
Mr.
no
FRESH VAllEY USDA CHOICE SMAll END BONELESS
Beef Rib Steak $2^
SAVE 52*
LAUNDRY DETERGENT
, Cold
mm Power
4?OZ
PKG
" UMIT ONI PKG WITH j;
pD( (XC1 C'OABdKS '
R1USAYE40
L ON 'WO BOXES
Ritz
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM
Fresh
Fryer Parts
THIGHS i\g\
DRUMSTICKS }{Uii
BREAST W /RIBS %J S\s
>i. mult niam inia
Fryer Qtrs. ..59*
HMM
Beef Round u. $139
tlS" VlllT u t CHO.CI Hit lOtH,
Sirloin Steaks,. *1"
r*oztn surooo...
IM out (.OZIN SIAFOOO CAMS
'OIIN hiohiinii MMIIM
Sole Fillet .'VSM55
U.S. NO. I All PURPOSE
FIRST OF THE SEASON
^^Grapes
Mozzarella
Crea'm Cheese'^ 59'
CHI MlKMfl CMIH
Spread 2 AwM"
MAVFAM iMVOfltie MIAMO CIUTIII
Cheese .*.'49*
NA >M1" SMAll
Grade A' EggsS& 39*
IAND O FROST SlICED
Smoked Meats
au QQc
VARIETIES rnm^W 3Z
OKA. MATH UKIO MAI Ol
Beef Bologna ',"79*
OSCAR MATH Si KID OliVt l OA' Ol
Cotto Salami'- 89'
Breast Slices m? 89'
lACa rotfllt
(41
U.S. NO. I All PURPOSE -m ^-j, ^
Potatoes 10ii89c
iWllt TINOCI
Yellow Corn9,c.99*
CAIUCHMIA SUNUT
Lemons 10.O.79*
wiin.N
Scallions 2 mm 39'
79*
MMCNI
WAIMNS LO < AlCXNI SALAD
H-OZ
Crackers
* UMlT TifVO BOXES *VlTH S'
k ORDER ixri CIGARETTE*
Dressinqs
All ARU Till **
MIX OR MATCH! UUV'S
Vegetables
3^*1
GARDEN SWttT PEAS
SLICED PICKLED METS IN JAI
Ftf MCN STYLE CHEN MANS
-35*
,13
,29*
REFRESHING BEER
o<
*JT Old
^Milwaukee
83'
79*
89*
Fr uYt~Dri nk s "Si 49*
Tomato Paste "27*
Peanut Butter
AllIOM nINA
Bran Chex
NAWADAH
Rod Punch
UllltVHIHK
s-n ia<. sr
U S NO I All ui'OM
Yellow Onions ,.19'
CAtDfN FtlSH wi S'llN
Endive?* mmtim
'MM MADS
Green Cabbage ,.13*
CA.DtN HI 1- ., U-.
Eggplants
KEEBLER VANIUA
Wafers
59c
U* -^ IOX
mm
Club Crackers'^. 79*
ONUS ( MFTT
Trash Bags 5ft l"
LOW CAl 1I.IT IOOO iSlAN
Dressing 49*
Morrs
Clomato Juice"?.! 67*
WUCMAM
Grape Drink ".i. 59*
* YOU MAY PURCHASE ONE
OR AU STARRED ITEMS
WITH A $7 ORDER OR
MORE EXCLUDING
CIGARETTES
Kielbasi Rings",?i$l
CAiiO UKIO il AuAN NT t At AMI 01
Pepperoni JUS 69'
Will If S
Sauerkraut .1' 43'
SEASHORES BARREL CURED
hOxhrr I'i. Llr. OT,MR 79<'
SAVE 39
ON THREE CANS
Pantry Pride Frozen
V UMIT THREE CANS WITH A S7 ORDER
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
.. IUC. Ml> o* AK
^ uoz
PAC* CANS
Plum Tomato "t?i69*
NiblletsCorn 70.'h27*
ioimion mmmmm team T~"chimm
Diapers.. J5S1" Grope Jolly
'""'" CtlN.ll CUI P.OIIN
French Fries 4.V.'.*1
'oMt )cid nou.
Strawberries "''39*
Maxwell House \i:H* 7* i*0" "S *""" -.
uM'tuncoctAiio. oread Dough S3 *1 *
Bartlott Poors ^ 45* MOB uooof..
MWTT XIICMN ANttt rtlM
Tall Can Bags ^*1n Raisin Bread 53:69*
S3* ^m""" HAIMU.O.,0, HOT MM
THi SUM tO UMH OUAMm. HON. MXO TO 0MLH. NOT MSTOHSMU FO. TYPOCCAPHKAL K
Rolls
3 W*l
Rt 0M ArnmiK COVNTtf ...
IEAN. COOKED
Corned Beef
2??
I.IMHT MAM ACAtO1
Salads-*^. ,.59*
"'l* -
Pepperoni___S:69
Turkey Roll "99*
AVAA AMI MI At .TOM HAVMO COUMIHn
All 1UMCH MIAtt t CHUU UKIO IO CUi
.
=
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