The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00175

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
^Jewish Florid fan
and Shofar of Creator Hollywood
Volume 7 Number 14
Friday, July 15,1977
Price 35 Cents
Federation Allocates 1977 CJA-IEF Monies
Here's Where Your Dollars Go:
UNITED JEWISH APPEAL-ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
$2,817,090.50
LOCAL & REGIONAL AGENCIES
B'nai B'rith Women of Hollywood
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization
Douglas Gardens
Jewish Family Service of
Broward Co.
(Resettlement of Soviet Jews)
South Florida Jewish Community
Centers
(Hollywood Extension!
(Michael-Ann Russell)
Jewish Federation of South
Broward
Jewish Education
Jewish Federation of South
Broward
Chaplaincy Program
NATIONAL & OVERSEAS
SERVICE AGENCIES
American Association for
Jewish Education
Council of Jewish Federations
& Welfare Funds
Dropsie University
Federated Council of Israel
Institutions
I nternational Conference of
Jewish Communal Serv.
Jewish Braille Institute
Nal ional Conference of Jewish
Communal Service
National Jewish Welfare Board
North American Jewish Students
Appeal
United Hias
NATIONAL & OVERSEAS
C.R.&C. AGENCIES
American Academic Assoc. For
Peace in the Middle East
America Israel Cultural
Foundation
American Jewish Committee
American Jewish Congress
\nli-Defamalion League
B'nai B'rith N't'l Youth
Jewish Labor Committee
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Jewish War Veterans
Joint Cultural Appeal
National Jewish Communiu
Relations Advisory Council
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry
EMERGENCY RESERVE FUND
750.00
7,792.00
42,984.00
78.016.00
25.000.00
96.180.00
69.700.00
178,900.00
4.500.00
503.822.00
2.000.00
11.470.00
600.00
650.00
100.00
400.00
100.00
3.250.00
1.000.00
7,500.00
27.070.00
750(H)
1.000.00
9.000.00
2.812.50
9,000.00
500.00
1.100.00
1,060.00
850.00
3.500.00
3.705(H)
1.250(H)
34.517.50
2,500.00
$3,385,000.00
Over $3 Million to be Distributed
Now that the 1977 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund campaign is near con-
clusion, proceeds, which totaled
more than $4 million, have been
allocated by the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward, sponsor
of the humanitarian drive.
"These funds will be distri-
buted to Federation agencies in
South Broward County, in ad-
dition to those agencies in other
areas which serve j
South Broward
residents, na-
tional agencies
and in numerous
countries around |
the world, in-
cluding Israel." |
according to Dr.
Norman Atkin.
chairman of the
Federation's Al-
locations Com-
mittee and a Fe-
deration past
president.
DR. ATKIN
DESCRIBING the allocations
process, Dr. Atkin explained that
"it involves a long period of
intensive analysis of budget
materials and deliberations on
requirements of various agencies.
Detailed fiscal and other infor-
mation from local beneficiaries,
and Council of Jewish Federa-
tions and Welfare Funds budget
digests are made available to
each committee member.
"During the process we had
various hearings on local and
regional agencies, in addition to
reviewing budget requests for
other CJA supported agencies for
which no hearings were held."
added Dr. Atkin.
Dr. Atkin noted that monies
are being appropriated for relief
and rescue, cultural and educa-
tional programs, community
relations and service projects.
FEDERATION President
Lewis V.. Cohn praised the com-
mittee's final report and com-
mended the participants for dis-
playing such "an outstanding
example of our local Jewish com-
munity working together to
ensure Jewish existence, whether
it be right here in South Broward,
in Israel or anywhere else in the
world where a fellow Jew cries
out for our aid."
The largest portion of the 1977
CJA-IEF campaign allocations
was earmarked for the United
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund in the amount of
$2,817,090.50. This sum will be
used in Israel to help new im-
migrants to become absorbed, to
provide housing and vocational
training and to maintain all vital
social and educational services.
The field of Jewish education
continues to be the largest local
beneficiary of the CJA campaign.
It received $178,000 to support
day schools and Jewish education
courses in the Mouth Broward
community.
SOME 15 Russian Jews
arrived in South Broward
recently, and in the near future
more are expected as the
County's share of the total
numlier of refugees who entered
the United Slates. The chief
responsibility for their local re-
settlement rests with the Jewish
Family Service of Broward
County. That agency received
$25,000 for resettlement of Soviet
Jews and $78,016 for their work
in counseling and aid to the com-
munity.
Limited Space Left On
JFSB Israel Mission
Then- is still space available on the Oct. 16-26 community-
wide mission to Israel sponsored by the Jewish Federation of
South Broward. according to Dr. Sam Meline. Mission chair-
man.
"The response has been very good," said Dr. Meline, "the
seats available will be on a first come, first serve basis, with an
Aug. 15 deadline for reservations with deposit."
The cost of the Mission will be $675 per person, inclusive of
meals. In addition, all participants will be expected to make a
minimum gift to the 1978 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund campaign in the amount of $1,200 per family,
plus a $300 woman's gift to the Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation. Individual travelers will be expected to make a
$ 1,2(H) minimum commitment.
-CLIP MERE-
MAIL TO:
Mission
Jewish Federation of South Broward
28.18 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, Florida 33020
I We would like additional information on the community
mission to Israel.
NAME.
ADDRESS.
PHONE.
I

Soviet Jews
Aided By
Adopt-a-Family
i
I
i
The Adopt-a-F"amily program of the
Jewish Federation of South Broward's Soviet
Jewry Committee, is a nation-wide person-to-
person project to help Soviet Jews get out of
Russia and to sustain them intil they obtain
their exit visas.
The families that are adopted are
"refuseniks." they have applied for
emigration visas to leave their country, and
their requests have been denied. Many have
been waiting for years, living under trying
conditions, according to Roberta Karch,
Adopt-a-Family chairman.
"THE ADOPT-A-FAMILY program can
supply names of adoptable families to in-
dividuals, groups or synagogues who are
willing to devote some of their time and
efforts through letter writing, to help with
the plight of these oppressed people," ex-
plained Mrs. Karch.
"There are about 100 Russian families
currently being aided by the program in
South Florida." Mrs. Karch added, "with
many more waiting to be adopted.
"The first step with adoption is to
establish contact with the Soviet family. This
is not always as easy as it might seem. After
regular contact has been established, and in
some cases, financial assistance offered,
letters of protest can then be written. These
letters go to Soviet and U.S. top govern-
mental officials in hopes that they can use
their persuasive powers to help the family get
out of the USSR.
"GETTING FRIENDS and relatives to
help write letters of protest is also quite
effective. Greeting cards on Jewish holidays
and birthdays sent to the family will indicate
to Soviet authorities that the family is known
to Americans, as well as offering them some
protection. The local media can do their part
by offering the community some insight to
the problems in other parts of the world.
"After much time has passed," noted Mrs.
Karch, "and many hours have been spent
writing letters, going to the post office and
really feeling' what these families have been
going through, maybe the next letter that is
received from the family will be post marked
from Israel or an ORT School in Rome."
I
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I
i
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Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
S. Broward Youths Study in Jewish State
The growing popularity of The
High School in Israel peaked this
month when a record number of
students registered for the sum-
mer quinmester which left on
July 3. Eighty young men and
women, four from South
Broward, the rest from around
the country, will be the latest to
share a unique and exciting
academic and personal experience
in Israel.
The High School in Israel,
which is a beneficiary of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward, is in its fourth year of
operation and offers an intense
inter-disciplinary curriculum
which is a proved by school
boards in Florida and around the
country. Each qualified student
receives full credit for a quin-
mester, the same as if he stayed
at home.
WHY, THEN, have a total of
221 students attended The High
School this year alone?
IButz Book
| Rapped
m
"The answer is that both
parents and students recognize
this opportunity as much more
than a school room, credit-
oriented experience," says Ellie
Katz, High School in Israel
program chairman.
Mrs. Katz points to the total
immersion in a culture through
intensive study course work on
the history of Israel in a formal
classroom setting, coupled with
field instructions by use of visits
to sites discussed in the
classroom.
"LIVING history" she calls it.
Almost half the study days of
the eight-week term are used for
educational field trips through
Israel, elements of social studies,
language arts, Hebrew language
and physical education, as well as
independent study and small
group instruction in sequential
mathematics and science courses,
if they are needed for the
student's regular high school
program.
The High School in Israel is
situated at Beit Berl. Beit Berl,
an established center for study,
research and education, is located
15 miles northeast of Tel Aviv.
The campus includes many
educational and recreational
facilities, including an olympic-
size swimming pool, tennis courts
and other athletic facilities. High
School students have their own
living and learning area within
the larger campus, including
classrooms, library, dormitories
and offices.
DURING its four years of
operation, the High School has
built a network of alumnus across
the United States.
But, yet there is still more to
this school than credits and
friendships and personal growth.
"The High School program
provides an important educa-
tional and psychological input in
a young person's life," said Mrs.
Katz. "The post-Bar Mitzvah
years are a critical stage >f
development. The growth of
students enrolled in our program,
religiously, educationally and
socially is immeasurable.
"We are building the young
leaders of the future. These are
the men and women who will one
day lead our Jewish communities
in Hollywood, in New York, in
I srael and everywhere on earth."
:*::
CHICAGO (JTA)
Northwestern University
President Robert H. Strotz,
in a letter to Raymond Ep-
stein, chairman of the
Public Affairs Committee
(PAC) of the Jewish United
Fund, strongly deplored
the thesis advanced in a
book by Northwestern Uni-
versity associate professor,
Arthur R. Butz, which
claims that the planned
extermination of Jews by
the Nazis was a Zionist
inspired myth.
Strotz said in his letter
that "as a matter of general
policy" he does not com-
ment on the substance of
publications of faculty
members and that "in the
ordinary case" correction of
erroneous views is best left
to scholars in the particular
field.
CONTINUING, the letter
staled "This is not an ordinary
rase. The associate professor
published a conclusion which is
an insult and affront not only to
the living survivors of the Holo-
caust and to their families,
triends and others with religious
or ethnic ties, but to all of us who
share their deep feelings of moral
outrage.
"Once the publication did
receive notoriety, this became an
extraordinary situation in which
officers of the university did
express their personal in-
dignation.
Recent returnees from the High School in Israel campus in Beit
Berl are (from left, seated) Debbie Bruno and June Eichner,
(standing) Jason Saver and David Lefkowitz.
impromptu gtttattafomGttt
A collection of Humorous Monologues, Jokes, Skits
and Pantomimes in English and in Yiddish for groups
where a minimum of rehearsals are required to stage a
variety show. NOW AVAILABLE AT
MARION NEVINS SALTER'S
Book Bazaar
POST HASTE SHOPPING CENTER
4525 Sheridan St., Hollywood Fl. 33021
"First Amendment and other
rights of faculty members raise
complex questions which warrant
lengthy discussions. But I do not
want such discussions to obscure
my personal strongly held view. PHONF Qfi1 fiQQB
wh.ch ,s shared by Thomas (i. ***************************************
Avers, chairman of our Board
deploring the thesis advanced by
Mr. Butz and the notoriety and
pain which has resulted."
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

The letter was a follow-up to an
earlier meeting between Strotz
and NU Provost Raymond Mack
RELQO, INC.
Religious Goods, Gifts,
Books s) Records
1507 WASHINGTON
AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH
532-5912
STANLEY and NAOMI KURASH,
REALTORS,
now doing business as
Town Crier Ltd., Inc.
Lakes Section, Hollywood Hills
Emerald Hills, Golden Isles, Condos,
Commercial, Investment Property
.9?1!.118 for "Personal Service."
2450 Hollywood Blvd. 921-8868
Hollywood, Fla. 947-5654
At a meeting prior to their July 3 departure for the High School
in Israel are Jeff Cornfield (left) and Wendy Spaulding.
IIBIHIHIHIHIBIHIHIHIHIBIBIBjj
i Retreat Planned for Aug. 19-21
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward will hold its third
annual Leadership Retreat Aug.
19. 20 and 21 at the Palm-Aire
Spa and Country Club in Pom-
pano Beach, according to Lewis
E. Cohn. Federation president.
"The weekend conference,"
said Cohn. "will bring together
the Federation leadership for an
in-depth study of the past,
present and most important, the
future of our Federation in South
Broward."
The cost of the retreat will be
$82 per person, which includes
three days and two nights at the
Spa Hotel, gourmet dairy meals
from the Spa Dining Room.
coffee breaks, spa pass, and
participation in the program.
Additional information may be
obtained by contacting the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
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At Riverside, our reputation is based
upon our assurance of service that fulfills
the high standards evoked by Jewish
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It is for this reason Riverside is not
represented by any other funeral director
in Florida.
Today, each of Riverside's chapels
serving Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
counties is exclusively a Riverside Chapel,
staffed only by Riverside people who
understand Jewish tradition and honor it.
And in that tradition we serve every
family, regardless of financial
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For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
H7-15-77
JS-77


~
Friday, July 15,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
The Jews of Ilyinka
r*
Traditional Jewish life is still
maintained by moat of the
inhabitants of the Jewish village
of Ilyinka in the Voronezh region
of the USSR.
The origins of this singular
settlement of 120 families com-
prising some 650 souls in the
midst of rural Russia are unclear.
Russians call these Jews "geri,"
similar to the Hebrew term of
"ger" for convert, and it is
possible they were converted
some time in the 19th Century.
There were originally three
Jewish villages in the region; two
assimilated completely and are
now Russian. The authorities are
pressuring the Ilyinka Jews to
assimilate as well. Despite this,
their dedication to Jewish
tradition is so great that at least
90 percent still are observant of
the Commandments as kashrut.
the Sabbath, circumcision,
covering of the head by men and
married women, and daily prayer
in the Ashkenazi tradition. They
have contact with the Moscow
~vnagogue from which they
receive some calendars, mezuzot
and other ritual items.
IN ILYINKA. as in all of the
nion, the rest day is
j Sunday it is .ery hard
the Sabbath on Saturdaj
he .lews retuse t" work and
isp ..: i asks
ective
and the authorities ,
Sabbath observance
.cult.
Nine -it ten Ilyinka Jews would
make aliyah. Their
.ins vsith the authorities
when Shmuel Matvee* -
emigrated with her family
Baku in 197-1 and sent
official in\ Stations to her siblings
in Ilyinka. In the next few
months, several families
managed to leave. In retaliation.
the authorities announced they
would no longer tolerate the
departure of the Ilyinkaites.
declaring they did not recogni/.e
them as Jews
Meanwhile, the KtiM sum-
'i Shmuel Matveev for a
k ut "propaganda and
11 r etters from I srael
livered. He stopped
i^' in protest; his son
iatel; rafted
- m e was

ninth
Hi;: E da Shmu

9omeon< in I
i i -
ithorities could not
lore than you. he was
inng the interrogation he
! had been imprisoned
i his lesire :> go t<>
ind understood from the
-esponse that the an-

mi i : in prison, he -
th the promise mat he
Ceh an K
e half ye
i -
ive with i'.: lina,
and daughters
md Ida, and m thi
days :*. clear
Inoti ven permitted to sell
It you are late you'll
ilowed to go," he was
'"III I Hhers have been ^i\en one
or two months to settle their
Most Ilyinka Jews are not as
Fortunate, and the invitations
from Israel are kept in the desk of
the kolhoz chairman V. Tarasov
who occasionally shows them to
the Jews saying, "Don't ever
hope to get them because you
have no business going to
Israel." Shmuel himself was
-nown 120 undelivered in-
tations and told, "We don't
wani you to go to the Zionists.
\ e hate you."
NEVERTHELESS. families
nave managed to receive the
invitations through relatives who
live in other parts of the country,
sometimes 1,000 kilometers
away. But this is not easy at all,
as the authorities seek to isolate
Ilyinka as much as possible. For
example, Grigory Efimovich
Vamavisky"s son-in-law, who
lives in Toliaty, had managed to
receive their invitations in his
name. When he set off to take
them to Ilyinka, he was caught
by the police, but managed to
escape. By the time he was recap-
tured an hour later, he had
already passed the documents to
an Ilyinka inhabitant who
delivered them to the Var-
na viskys.
But often even those with
invitations are blocked, as the
kolhoz chairman simply does not
write out the recommendations
required by OVIR, the
emigration office in Voronezh.
Since collective farm residents do
not have internal passports, the
Ilyinka .lews cannot move to a
more favorable location.
In June 1976. three Moscow
Jewish retuseniks attempted to
visit ilyinka to interview the
Jews, but wire seized by police
within three kilometers if the
village, sear 11. nterrogau i
two days and thrown oul ol the
area Soviet man V,
Leb) dc\ told h. m I hal
..t mo! phen in
strained u
rj ol
inybodj ffairs
of the village
ON JUNE 19,
newspaper, Zariya. attacked
Shmuel Matveev exit appli-
cation, declaring, "Who wants
this man to leave Russia? Only
the Zionists from Tel Aviv and
the U.S."
There are now at least sixty
"refusenik" families in Ilyinka.
The situation there is described
by Ilyinkaites now in Israel as
"like under Hitler. The Jews are
isolated, they cannot leave, and it
is near impossible to receive
invitations now." Even Shmuel"s
daughter Rivka who lives in
Dnepropetrovsk and has not
applied to leave suffered a
nervous breakdown as a result of
her parents' suffering before their
exit.
Ilvinka's existence was ac-
cidentally discovered by Soviet
Jewish emigration leaders. It is
entirely possibk 'here an- many
moil mknown irroups
.it Jews seal hroughoul
ing "t coming home
o Israel.
... nn
. .
on Helsinki i com-
mittee, and especially i inter-
ieu conducted "> I*r*icl by the
.. nt Struggle ;'nr Si I
.leu -rv.

Administration
Awaits Begin
Bj JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASH. (JTA) The
Carter Vdminisl ration.
offic ti publicly said
that il will raeli
-t,-r Menachem
Beg ishington and :-
his
l
The Stat epartment
said National
Securit Affairs i&
Zbigniew Brzezinski has
telephoned Israeli Ambas-
sador Simrha Dinitz to this
effect. Dinitz left for Jeru-
salem for a week of consul-
tations in Jerusalem in
preparation tor Begins
th I'rtsi-
dent Carter here July 19-20.
THE BRZEZINSKI
i hat the \.in.ini-
ion would e to point in
main-
taining that Judaea and Samaria.
common!} known is he West
Bank, are nans of lsrac.
However. Benin has repeatedly-
said that UN Security Council
Resolution 2 2 is negotiable in all
its parts, although he would not
say categorically that Israel will
leave the territories occupied in
the Six-Day War.
The State Department took
public dissent from this view
with a statement specifically
suggesting that Israel must
withdraw from territories as a
factor in the negotiations for a
settlement. In some U.S.
quarters there was a view that
things would go much better if
Begin and the Likud I'am
disappeared from the scene and
new elections brought more trac-
table leader- to the helm in
Isra.i
MEANWHILE, Dinitz and
cander Schindler,
chairman >: '.he Conference ol
Major Am.
both
i
I he
.; hasized
.. king to presen e har-
mony m Israeli-American
relal ions
I omments bj Dinitz and
Schindler were made at the Stat.
Department where they were met
by reporters alter they held
ati ".ait-hour meetings with
Secretarj ol State Cyrus Vance.
i-r. Dinil met with
Irzezinski at the White House
.in it i m as asked >' reporters
ire differences in
American policies
the An
B| I ed hal we
inion on some
lon't think is I
were either
igmented. I think
. ally .t was a restatement of
- American poli "n't think
en was any material change." .
DINITZ emphasized that our
government has said it is pre-
pared to negotiate on ail three
fronts with all our three neigh-
bors. This has been our policy
based on Security Council
Resolution 242.
Asked whether American and
Israeli policies are in harmony,
Dinitz replied. "Our aim and our
effort all the time is to keep it in
harmony but that does not mean
we do not have, here and there,
differences of opinion which we
\ press with candidness and with
triendship. the same way the U.S.
government expresses them to
us."
On the Occasion Of. .
a Bar Mitzvah, wedding or birth, or to memorialize one
who has made an outstanding contribution to his com-
munity and people, or to honor the memory of the
deceased.. .consider a gift to that person's synagogue,
Jewish organization or to the Tzedakah Fund of the
Jewish Federation of South Broward.
When a gift is made to the Tzedakah Fund, a newly
designed card with the name of the donor is sent to the
person or family of those so honored.
What better way to remember and be remembered.
When making a contribution to the Tzedakah Fund, the
donor is requested to specify that it is a gift to that Fund, the
name of the person in whose honor it is donated, the name and
address of the person to receive the gift card and the donor's
name.
All contributions to the Tzedakah Fund should be mailed to
the Jewish Federation of South Broward, 2838 Hollywood Blvd.,
Hollywood 33020.
viiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuMiiiiiiiiiiiiiirB
Never Heard Of
Israel Before, Says
Viet Refugee
L WI\ JT v \ .
il 66 tnami se refugees
were rescued
freighter in the.South China Sea
June 9 are now in Israel The
refugees, who were greeted bj
Yehuda Vvner, a special
-epresenl at ive ol Prime Minister
Menachem Begin, were happy to
be in Israel, the only country that
offered them a haven.
Hut as one of them admit ted to
reporters. The truth is I don't
really know where we are. I'd
never heard ol Israel before the
Yuvali (the Israeli freighter)
saved us."
Dr. Tran ljuanq Iloa. a 32-
\ ear-old tormer surgeon in the
South Vietnamese Ainu,
-peaking for the group, thanked
Israeli authorities in an emotion-
choked \ nice.
HE SAID thai alter the ship
on which the group had fled
ps passed t heir
vater
: i. r rescued I beni
The refugees t tided Ifi
children and several pregnant
women, were given visas and
work permits along with pocket
money, toys tor the children, and
large quantities ol tish. rice and
llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
. .after the ship on which
the uroup has fled Viet-
nam sank. fire ships
passed their raft by and
"refused even to give us
water". .
iiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
vegetables which are Vietnamese
-taples.
They were taken to an absorp-
i ion center in I Makim in -out hern
which lisuall) 'nouses
nmigranl < Officials here
i,l >! ihe rvfi
a,mi i.i go iii ihe I nited vi
ml srael.
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, July 15 1977
Nazi Threat Delayed
Skokie, 111., a predominantly Jewish suburb of
Chicago, happily avoided the prospect of a Nazi Party
march through its streets over the July 4 weekend. Such a
march would have been a travesty on the meaning of the
Independence Day celebration.
But the Nazis do not think so. They are anti-Black.
They are anti-Jewish. They are anti just about everything
except of course themselves.
What would have happened is hard to imagine if the
party leaders did not change their minds. The Jewish
Defense League had made some national utterances about
interfering in the event the Nazis carried out their original
intentions.
In any event, the delayed confrontation is simply that
delayed. Chicago Nazis vow they'll make it to Skokie
yet. We can only hope that the City of Chicago, Skokie
and their general communities have firmer plans in mind
to deal with the Nazis' intentions should they ever carry
their march plans out better, that is, than counter-
action by the JDL.
Vietnamese Refugees
American Jews are justly proud that Israel has of-
fered asylum to 66 Vietnamese refugees rescued by an
Israeli freighter in the South China Sea. It is an example
that other countries, including the United States, should
take heed.
The Vietnamese were rescued by the Israeli freighter
Yuvali after their ship had sunk, and they were floating on
a raft off the Vietnamese coast. The outgoing government
of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin said it would offer the
Vietnamese temporary haven until some government
would take them in. When no government came forth.
Menachem Begin, as his first act as Prime Minister,
announced that the Vietnamese would be granted a
permanent haven in Israel.
The plight of the Vietnamese touched a painful
reminder for Jews. Begin noted how there was a time
before and after World War II when Jewish refugees went
from port to port seeking entry.
Coincidentally, the incident occurred as the film The
Voyage of the Damned, was playing in Israel. This movie
is about German refugees from Nazi German in the 1930s
who were shunted from port to port aboard the St. Louis
after they were denied entry to Havana.
It seems that the world has not learned much since
the 1930s. The international community must be made to
take action and open its doors for these homeless people.
The United States has a special obligation in Vietnam and
Southeast Asia and should begin by granting a haven to a
group of 249 Laotian refugees living on the deck of an oil
tanker off Singapore because no country allows them to
land.
Matter of History
Who can ever forget the emotion felt by Jews
throughout the world in June, 1967. when it was learned
that Israel had regained the Old City of Jerusalem and
particularly the Western Wall?
As we celebrate the tenth anniversary of the
reunification of Jerusalem, Jews everywhere are as one in
the conviction that Jerusalem can never be divided again
and must remain the capital of Israel.
The city of Jerusalem has been central in Jewish life.
It has sustained Jews in prayers and poetry for the 2,000
years of the diaspora. Three times a day for 2,000 years
Jews faced Jerusalem and prayed to return to Jerusalem.
Jews bless each other on festivals by saying, "Next Year
in Jerusalem."
We take this opportunity to emphasize the need for a
united Jerusalem in the face of a toughening U.S. policy
toward Israel and the possibilities of a Middle East peace
settlement. If President Carter thinks that Israel will
barter Jerusalem away, we are all in for dark times, in-
deed. History militates against it.
Just what Israel may or may not barter away is, of
course, up to the Israelis. That is pretty much what the
outcome of their May 17 election was largely about.
But Jerusalem is non-negotiable, and even non-Israeli
Jews must feel free to say that.
1.
Jewish Floridian
ltdSHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
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Myth-Making Takes Time
OVER THE Independence
Day weekend, I thought of
Entebbe, and it struck me that
the coincidence of these two
events, our own revolution and
the daring Israeli raid in Uganda,
has already enshrined the raid in
the Jewish heart and mind
beyond its immediate meaning in
history.
What also struck me is the way
in which Entebbe is being im-
mortalized. Thus far, there have
been two television productions
documenting the raid.
AND NOW, I notice in the
reports of our Hollywood
correspondent, Herbert Luft,
that a film, Operation Thunder-
bolt, had its American premiere
at the Beverly Hills Pacific
Theatre on July 2, just two days
before the first anniversary of the
raid.
What makes Operation
Thunderbolt unique, according to
Luft, is that the film production
had the cooperation and at least
some official sanction of the
Government of Israel.
Mindlin
"It is the only picture dealing
with the unprecedented operation
actually photographed in the
Holy Land with Hebrew com-
mando units participating using
real equipment, airplanes and
landing gear," reports Luft.
"INSTEAD OF actors." he
adds, "Prime Minister Yitzhak
Rabin, Foreign Minister Yigal
Allon and Defense Minister
Shimon Peres appear themselves
on the screen."
Furthermore, "The Israeli Air
Force loaned (sic) to the
production Phantom fighter
planes."
All of this film world public
relations hoopla is intended to
give Operation Thunderbolt the
stamp of authenticity that
neither of its television pre-
decessors had. I have not seen
the film, and it may well be that
it does have that stamp of
authenticity, that ring of his-
toricity that so predictably
eluded the earlier TV efforts.
But I doubt it.
WHAT KILLED the tele-
vision productions was haste -
haste to cash in on a good thing.
Both tried in a pedestrian way to
recount the facts of history pre-
cisely as they occurred.
To elevate the facts to more
"distinguished" proportion, the
greedy makers paraded a bevy of
stars before us faces of leading
actors and actresses whose per-
formances were undistinguished
and wooden because it is ar-
tistically incontrovertible that
the facts of history are them-
selves undistinguished and
wooden.
What Entebbe needs is time
time and distance and an un-
wavering Jewish commitment to
Entebbe as a great national event
in the life of Israel.
Given these things. Entebbe
will at some future date emerge
out of the trivia of history and
rise to symbolic and finally
mythic proportion.
IT IS symbol and myth that
are the stuff of all great art and.
particularly, of all great national
literature. History, itself, is
merely yesterday's newspaper.
That is why the two television
productions dealing with
Kntebbe did exactly the opposite
of what was intended except, of
course, to make money for its
producers and to act as embar-
rassing propaganda for the
Israelis themselves. At least. I
hope they were embarrassed
The two television productions
could not possibly exalt Entebbe
to a plane of higher national
meaning; on the contrary, they
reduced its meaning to a level
equal to. say, some John Wayne
western, except that airplanes
Continued on Page 9
Bundeswehr Unit's Dad Turns 70
Friday, July 15,1977
Volume 7
29TAMUZ6737
Number 13
By SIEGFRIED BUTTY
From German Tribune
Gen. (Ret.) Wolf Graf
Baudissin's famous words "the
old barracks square is dead
only in totalitarian regimes is
blind obedience still the soldier's
main virtue." which clearly
demonstrate his distaste for the
"barracks tone" and a chain of
command based only on rank,
have once more become topical.
Gen. Baudissin, the father of
the Bundeswehr's Innere
Fuhrung (Inter Leadership) a
concept whereby the soldier is a
citizen in uniform and the Armed
Forces not a law unto themselves
has just turned 70.
IF GEN. BAUDISSIN were to
take stock of what has become of
his "life's work" as former
Bundeswehr Inspector-Gen
Ulrich de Maiziere called the
Innere Fuhrung idea, he would
have plenty of reasons to be
satisfied.
As the deputy head of the
Innere Fuhrung Department of
the Ministry of Defense. Gen.
Baudissin managed together
with Gen. De Maiziere and Graf
Johann Adolf von Kielmannsegg
- between 1951 and 1958 to
realize the modern image of the
soldier not only in theory, but in
fact aa well despite fierce op-
x>9ition.
IN THE Bundeswehr's every-
day life at present, the Baudissin
concept plays a much greater role
than even the optimists of the
military reformers of the fifties
would have dared to hope for.
On retiring from active
military service in 1968 Gen
Baudissin said: "Freedom and
Baudissin was not only an out-
standing military theoretician,
but also earned himself the
reputation of a great pragmatist
while serving as Deputy Chief of
Staff for Central Europe at
NATO headquarters in Fon-
tainebleau.
IN GERMANY
rSed6" Th COnStantl*
reviewed. This maxim has
governed the personal develop-
ment of and even
confirm this "the greatest
52JJ7 reformer since Scharn-
Bornon May 8, 1907, the son
of a senior civil servant in Trier
he joined the Reichswehr at the*
age of 19. He left military service
however, and served a two-year'
apprenticeship as an agronomist.
BAUDISSIN. who has been
devoted to literature, music Zd
art since his early youth
returned to active service
22k,y "> to staff officer*
rank. During World War II he
wascombat as a Major, working
Rommel.8^ f "* M^
Gen. Baudissin resumed his
military career on Jan. 30. 1956
and was from the very first day
coresponsible for the devekfp
ment of the Bundeswehr
HE WAS subsequently pro-
moted to Lt. General and became
deputy head of the planning staff
at the Supreme Headquarters of
Allied Forces in Europe
(SHAFE).
Wolf Graf Baudissin now
heads the Institute for Peace and
Conflict Research at Hamburg
University.
He once formulated the
common denominator for the
future functions of the Bundes-
wehr as follows: "Only those who
regard the preservation of peace
as the prime objective of all
politics and thus also as the
prime task of the Armed Forces
can summon the strength to take
leave from the ideology of simple
solutions and face the biting wind
that blows in today's complicated
world.
"They will realize that rational
assessment is more necessary
and indeed more manly today
than taking heroic risks."


Friday, July 15, 1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
V
Russian Jews to Attend HIAS College Program
College doors will open this fall
for 15 Russian Jewish teenagers,
all graduates of a unique bilin-
gual program offered only at
Brooklyn's South Shore High
School.
The students, who along with
their families, were assisted to
the United States by HIAS
(Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society)
the worldwide Jewish migration
agency, are part of the first
Russian bilingual bicultural
program offered on a secondary
school level in the United States,
according to Nathan Pritcher, a
Hollywood resident who is a
member of the HIAS board of
directors.
THE BRAINCHILD of Anna
Elman, herself a 1962 emigre
from the Soviet Ukraine, South
Shore's program was inaugu-
rated in 1975. It is designed to
meet the special needs of an
increasing number of Soviet
refugees emigrating to this
country and resettling in Brook-
lyn. Soviet Jews constitute 94
percent of all refugees helped to
the United States by HIAS.
Two hundred fifty students are
enrolled in South Shore's bilin-
gual program, 75 of whom are
Russian Jews. The program also
includes Hebrew, Yiddish,
French and Spanish language
components. Its Yiddish section
serves students attending six
Brooklyn-based Jewish Day
Schools.
When asked to gauge the effec-
tiveness of the program, Ms.
F.lman said that not only had all
of its 1977 graduating class been
accepted to college, but that
many were scholarship
recipients, headed for such pres-
tigious schools as Columbia and
New York University, with plans
to pursue careers in law. phar-
macy accounting and acting.
SOUTH SHORE High, located
in the tree-lined, residential
enclave of ("arsie. otters its
Russian-speaking students the
same academic program ami
college preparation taken In their
American counterparts.
In addition to academic
courses, and a native arts class
designed to reintorce then
cultural origins, they must also
attend I'nglish language courses.
('nee they have mastered the use
of English, they are transferred
into the academic mainstream.
With a faculty of 13, including
a director, six teaching assis-
tants, and Ms. Klman serving as
Russian curriculum specialist,
the program is geared to deal
with a myriad of problems at
their onset, before they've had
time ti germinate and develop
into big, unmanageable
problems." explained Ms. F.lman.
MS. ELMAN is available to
counsel both students and their
parents during school hours and,
if necessary, most any other time
of the week.
"What you must understand,"
Ms. Klman began, "is that
foreign-born students and their
parents, particularly those who
are not yet comfortable using
English, coming from a social
order as different from our own as
Russia's, are dealing with some-
thing that is a phenomenon to
them freedom.
"I've been called at home as
early as six in the morning by
parents frantic that their son or
daughter, forced to miss a class
or an exam because of illness,
would be severly punished by
school authorities."
PROBLEMS encountered in
the program are primarily of a
practical nature, or what Ms.
Elman termed "a challenge"
the location and acquisition of
Soviet textbooks.
"We tried all kinds of sources,
including my relatives in Russia.
Once the texts were finally avail-
able to me, I was faced with the
much more subtle problem of
presenting a discipline such as
history without the definite tint
of Soviet idealogy."
The bicultural part of the
program offers most, if not all,
Russian Jews their first exposure
to Jewish culture.
"OUR RUSSIAN students are
bicultural even before they arrive
in this country," Ms. Elman said.
"They are Russian Jews. In fact,
if you ask any of my students
'what are you?' they will answer
'Jewish.'
"They're often corrected by
friends who say: 'I didn't ask
what your religion is, I asked
Happy with the success of the annual
Women's Day at the Inverrary Country Club
Thursday, June 2, sponsored by the Israel
Histadrut Foundation are (standing left to
right) Anne Rosenthal, Fort Lauderdale;
F.st el le Freeman, Deer field Beach; Charlotte
Teller, coordinator, Israel Histadrut Founda-
tion, Hallandale; Minerva Kaplan, Program
chairman; Anne Ackerman, book reviewer;
Dora Frucht, Sunrise; Hilda Worman, Sun-
rise; Esther Molat, West Palm Beach; (seated
left to right) Rose Kessler, Plantation; Sally
Klein. Lauderdale Lakes; Frieda Cohen,
Deer field Beach; Mollie Falik. West Palm
Beach; Pearl Paster, West Palm Beach. A
book review of Nobel Prize quthor Saul
Bellow's "To Jerusalem and Back" was
presented by Anne Ackerman in celebration
of the tenth anniversary of the reunification of
Jerusalem.
what your nationality is.' But
when a Russian student responds
that he is Jewish, religion never
enters into the picture. He's
never had any religion. He simply
is Jewish because his parents told
him he is. becuase he has been
called a 'dirty Jew.' or because
sometime in his childhood he
remembers his grandmother
telling him some Shalom Alei-
chem stories. And now that he
has arrived in the United States
he is eager and thirst to find out
more about Jewish culture and
tradition."
A typical day for a student in
the federally funded program
might consist of science, history
and native arts classes offered in
Russian, two or three English
language classes, and a class in
gym. music or art. The latter is
taken in English and also in-
cludes American-born students.
HIAS HELPED 5,512 Soviet
Jewish refugees reach American
shores in 1976. Over 3,500 arrived
during the first five months of
1977. Additional Soviet Jewish
families were resettled in Canada,
Australia, New Zealand, Latin
America and Western Europe.
HIAS is a beneficiary of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
campaign.
w\antage is solving
a lot of my problems
about smoking."
"You sec, I really enjoy
smoking. To me, it's a pleasure.
But it was no pleasure hearing
all the things being said against
high-tar cigarettes.
"Of course, I used to kid
myself a lot about giving up the
taste oi my old high-tar cigarette
for one of those new low-tar
brands. But every one I tried
left my taste unsatisfied.
"Then someone offered
me a Vantage. Sure I'd read
about them. But I thought they
were like all the others. I was
wrong.
" Vantage was right. It satisfied
like my old brand. Yet it had nearly
half the tar.
"It's been
about a year
since I started
smoking
Vantage. And it
looks like I'm
going to be smoking
them for a long time
to come."
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
^u^vi^y^/
FILTER 10 mg "tai". 07 mg nicotine
K pei cigwillt. FTC Report DEC. 76.
Regular.Menthol. "***.
and Vantage 100 s.
MENTHOL II mg "tat". 0 7 mg. nicotine.
FILTER 100'$: II mg ler", 0.9 mg. mcotne v per cigiiene by FTC method.


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, July 15,1977
Jewish Agency Debate Rages at Confab
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By TUVIA MENDELSON
JERUSALEM-(JTA)-The
controversy over the parallel
activities of the Absorption
Ministry and the Jewish Agency
in the field of immigrant absorp-
tion dominated the sixth annual
Jewish Agency General
Assembly here.
Discussion centered around
implementation of the Horev
Commission's report last year
which recommended the estab-
lishment of a new authority
headed by the chairman of the
World Zionist Organization and
Jewish Agency Executives to
replace both the ministry and the
Agency's aliya department.
DAVID LEVI. the Absorption
Minister in the new Likud-led
government, urged the Assembly
to make no decisions regarding
his ministry's future until the
government discussed the issues
and arrived at a solution em-
bodying the best possible form of
cooperation between the ministry
and the Agency.
The Assembly endorsed his
request. It also discussed at
length the problem of drop-outs
Zim Lines to Avoid
Djibouti Port of Call
PARIS (JTA) The
Zim Lines, Israel's national
shipping company, is plan-
ning to re-route its vessels
serving East African ports
to avoid calls at Djibouti if
that newly established
Moslem state bans Israel-
flag ships.
Djibouti, formerly
French Somaliland, became
independent on Sunday and
immediately applied for
and was admitted to mem-
bership in the Arab League
which administers the boy-
cott of Israel.
ALTHOUGH there was no im-
medate notification that Djibouti
will close its harbor to Israeli
shipping, the leaders of the new
Arabic-speaking republic have
hinted strongly that they would.
Zim closed its office there and the
last Israeli personnel have
departed by sea.
A decision by Djibouti to re-
fuse docking facilities to Israeli
ships would be in line with condi-
tions set by Saudi Arabia when it
offered financial assistance to the
impoverished 9,000 square mile
former colony.
Djibouti is strategically lo-
cated near the Straits of Bab el-
Mandeb which link the Red Sea
and Indian Ocean.
UAHC Admits Affiliates
Plantation Jewish Congregation near Fort Lauderdale and
Coral Springs Hebrew Congregation of Coral Springs have been
officially admitted as the newest affiliates of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations, representative body of 740
Reform synagogues in the United States and Canada serving
1.25 million members.
Katz is Sinai's New Rabbi
Myrim Levine,
of Temple Sinai,
has announced
the election of
Rabbi Paul M.
Katz to assume
the position of
senior rabbi as of
Aug. 1, succeed-
ing Rabbi David
Shapiro who has
now become rab-
bi emeritus.
president
Jewish Theological Seminary,
Brooklyn College, James
Madison High School and the
Yeshivah of Flatbush. For many
years he was the athletic director
at the Seminary's Ramah Camps
and also attained the rank of
Eagle Scout in the Boy Scouts of
America.
Jewish emigres I from the
Soviet Union who opt to settle in
countries other than Israel.
In an address to the Assem-
bly's opening session, Max
Fisher of Detroit, chairman of the
Jewish Agency's Board of
Governors, urged depoliticization
of the Agency in order to increase
the involvement of diaspora Jews
in its activities. By this he meant
freeing the Agency from its
present political orientation to
the various political parties and
factions in Israel.
FISHER SAID that with a
new government in office in
Israel the Assembly delegates
have a chance to forge new
directions. He said the Jewish
Agency would be more account-
able through greater partici-
pation by Jews abroad in its
activities and decision-making
processes.
Yosef Almogi, chairman of the
WZO and Jewish Agency
Executives, told the 600
delegates from 90 countries that
he favored implementation of the
Horev Commission's recommen-
dations.
These have been strongly
opposed by Levi who has
asserted recently that the
Absorption Ministry's functions
were vital to Israel's national
interests and should be adminis-
tered by the government alone.
NOT ALL Assembly delegates
shared Levi's view. Jerold Hoff-
berger, an American member of
the Board of Governors, said that
too much time has passed since
the Horev report was published.
He demanded that the govern-
ment give its recommendations
"prompt attention." Rabbi
Richard Hirsch, who was a
member of the Horev panel, said
a compromise could be reached
Iwlween the rival authorities with
the State fulfilling those func-
tions it was best equipped to
handle and the Agency doing the
same under the aegis of the single
authority proposed by the Horev
Commission.
But Menachem Sherman,
director general of the Absorp-
tion Ministry, declared that a
change of organization structure
would provide no miracle cure.
Any authority in charge needs
wide powers and sufficient
resources to take care of im-
migrants, he said.
KATZ
Rabbi Katz was for the past
three years the spiritual leader of
the Merrick Jewish Centre of
Merrick, N.Y. Prior to that, he
was director of public relations
for Israel Discount Bank, Ltd., in
Tel Aviv, Israel and was a
member of the Prime Minister's
Economic Council. During his
seven years in Israel, Rabbi Katz
served in the Israel Defense
Forces, including the period of
the Yom Kippur War and helped
establish the first Conservative
congregation in Tel Aviv.
Before going on Aliyah, Rabbi
Katz served congregations in
Medford, Mass., Vineland, N.J.,
and was the associate Rabbi of
Park Synagogue in Cleveland,
Ohio, where he was responsible
for the 500-family young married
couples club. Over the years,
Rabbi Katz has instituted new
approaches to religious school
education, teenage programming
and Senior Citizens activities.
TEMPLE Sinai's new senioi
rabbi is the author of The Bible.
Myth or Reality, had a weekly
column in Israel's Jerusalen.
Post and has had articles pub-
lished in the Torch, Jewish Spec-
tator, Boston Herald, Boston
Globe, and many other
periodicals.
The rabbi is a member of the
Synagogue Council of the United
Jewish Appeal in charge of the
South Shore Region of Lone
Island. He is a graduate of thi
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million people died as a result of
Nazi rule. Out of this enormous
number slaughtered were six
million Jews murdered
because they were Jews. As one
historian has said: "no one would
claim that the Nazi exter-
mination of the Jews was greater
or more tragic than what has
been done to other persecuted
peoples. Such comparisons are
unfeeling and fruitless. What is
historically significant is its
uniqueness."
The Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai H'rith has issued a series
of exhibit posters, depicting the
holocaust, for use in religious
institutions, schools, colleges and
libraries, to commemorate this
great human tragedy. The
twenty posters provide pictorial
and text documentaion of this 12-
year period describing: Jewish
life in Europe prior to the Holo-
caust; the rise of Nazi Germany:
persecution of Jews: internment
in concentration camps: exter-
mination of Jews; Jewish resis-
tance: liberation of the death
camps and the Nuremberg trials.
EACH SET of posters may be
obtained from the Anti-Defama
tion League "It is hoped that
individuals will buy them and
give them as gifts to schools and
other institutions." an AD1.
spokesman added.
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Friday, July 15,1977
The Jewish Floridian andShofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
Hornstein Reports On Jewish Agency Assembly
The Jewish Agency's sixth an-
nual General Assembly ended a
week of deliberations in Jeru-
salem with the adoption of a $457
million budget for the next fiscal
year and affirmations of un-
swerving support for Israel by
world Jewry regardless of which
plitical party happens to head its
government, according to Moses
Hornstein. vice president of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward and a delegate to the
Assembly. But two major issues
fot were the subject of lengthy
debate by the 600 delegates from
90 countries attending the
Assembly were not resolved.
These were implementation of
the controversial Horev com-
mission report and the problem of
dropouts Jewish emigres from
the Soviet Union who opt to go to
countries other than Israel after
reaching Vienna. The Horev
commission recommended last
year that the Absorption
Ministry and the Jewish
figency's aliya department be
replaced by an independent
absorption authority responsible
directly to the Prime Minister
and headed by the chairman of
the Jewish Agency and World
Zionist Organization Executives.
Those issues apparently will be
left to the 29th World Zionist
Congress scheduled to convene
here in February.
ISRAELIS attending the Gen-
eral Assembly were heartened by
the words of Max Fisher of
Detroit, chairman of the Jewish
Agency's Board of Governors,
who addressed the closing
session in the presence of Prime
Minister Menachem Begin.
All too often we cease to won-
der at the marvel of Israel's exis-
tence." Fisher said. "We forget
j iie stress, the suffering and the
I Int^iish." His words reflected
support and understanding of
Israel's problems and were
especially reassuring when he
turned to Begin and declared,
Mr Prime Minister, go forward
with strength, with conviction
and with wisdom. And we will be
with you."
Thi- allayed fears that wide-
ipread misgivings in Israel and
^irnml over the hard-line policies
R tin Begin government might
result in an erosion of support for
. in the American Jewish
and other diaspora communities.
FISHER ALSO addressed
himself to changes in the Jewish
Agency itself. He emphasized the
need tor the Agency to be
divorced from political parties in
srael. "The Jewish Agency can
no longer be an instrument of
politics." he said. "Today the
Jewish Agency exists and
touches every facet of Jewish life
in Israel and belongs to the entire
Jewish people. The Agency must
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Reserve Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS
and SUKKOTH
12 days A 11 nights
Sept. 12 to Sept. 23
have a working relationship with
the new Israeli government. It is
only logical but whoever is
ruling must recognize the
Agency's new character," he
said.
Fisher indicated support for
the Horev proposals which he
described as a "beginning"
although "it does not have all the
answers." Addressing Begin, he
said, "We hope the essential
thrust of the Horev report will be
accepted as one of your highest
priorities."
With respect to drop-outs.
Fisher told the Assmbly that
"Something has gone wrong with
our approach to immigration and
absorption." He asked, "Why are
Russian Jews dropping out? Why
are dissatisfied immigrants
leaving? What is there about the
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system that we can correct?" He
added that "No immigrant need
encounter red tape and no im-
migrant need experience frus-
tration."
LEON DULZIN, Jewish
Agency Treasurer, observed in
his budget speech that fund-
raising compaigns at this time
seem to be unsatisfactory.
"The problem is that we have
failed to get across the basic
message of Israel's needs and
their relationship to Israels ulti-
mate security and development,"
he said. He noted that at times of
military peril, diaspora Jewry
responded with contributions two
and three times greater than the
peacetime levels.
"You are the leaders of your
communities, the leaders of your
campaigns," Dulzin said. "This
then must be your common task:
To lead your communities to the
full conviction that building
Israel requires as much of their
understanding and support in
times of peace if it can be
called peace as in times of
war."
DULZIN, a member of the
Liberal Party wing of Likud, is
virtually certain to be a candidate
for the Jewish Agency-WZO
chairmanship at the next Zionist
Congress. The Labor Party
incumbent. Yosef Almogi, will
resign at that time and Labor has
not decided whether to nominate
a candidate to oppose Dulzin.
The latter is a strong supporter of
the Horev recommendations
which has brought him into
conflict with his Likud colleague,
Absorption Minister David Levi,
who insists that his ministry be
expanded rather than dis-
mantled.
Dania Office j
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Happy with the success of the annual Women's Day celebration
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Teller. Coordinator of IHF in Hallandale; national President,
Dr. Sol Stein, IHF; Rita E. Hauser, guest speaker and former
member of the United States delegation to the UN General
Assembly; and dinner chairman, Irma Rochlin. The Women's
Day was held at the Holiday Inn in Hollywood, May 26, in
association with the Pioneer Women Council of South Florida
and marked the tenth anniversary of the reunification of
Jerusalem.
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. July 15.1977
Her son arrested, she responded with ggtg
A mother living in a well-to-do
Louisville, Ky., suburban area
whose greatest shock came when
federal officers knocked on her
door to arrest her son for selling
drugs has responded in a way
which, while she might not admit
it, comes from the old Jewish
trad'tion of providing aid for
others.
It is the chevra concept that
kept the shtetl as a vibrant insti-
tution in Europe during an era
when life seemed hopeless for
Jews.
MRS. JUDY MARKS is the
volunteer director of Family and
Friends United for Hope which
does for families of those shocked
when a member is incarcerated
everything in the way of en-
couragement, advice, and
practically leads them around all
the pitfalls that go with such a
tragic situation.
Mrs. Marks was faced with the
frustrations that went with
trying to give solace and moral
help to her son and had to work
through the maze of uncom-
prehending officialdom even for
the most insignificant aid to her
son. That was when she began to
think about all the other mothers
and wives confronted with
similar difficulties.
Family and Friends United for
Hope was the result. It is one of
three such agencies in the United
States and a national meeting is
in the offing this September
which may launch it into a
countrywide organization not too
dissimilar from Alcoholics
Anonymous or of Overeating
Anonymous.
THUS FAR Mrs. Marks and
her husband have bome with the
"families."
Now two and a half years later,
the group has an office of its own,
24-hour switchboard service, and
monthly meetings addressed by
prison officials, judges, probation
officers, etc.
Although principally a service
Saul Levine-
i
50 Years
of Humor
By BRUCE ENGLEMAN
"I believe that laughter is a cure for the ills of the world,
I believe that a dose of joy is a spiritual cure,
I believe to say something funny instead of nasty,
I believe to throw a punchline instead of a punch,
Laugh and the world laughs with you, especially if it's a good
joke."
"THIS I BELIEVE"
The philosophy of septuagenarian Saul Levine. Humorist,
raconteur, master storyteller and now author; Levine, a resident
of Emerald Hills, has written and published his first
book...Impromptu Entertainment.. a collection of humorous
monologues, jokes, skits and pantomimes in English and in Yid-
dish for groups where a minimum of rehearsals are required to
stage a variety show.
"My life has always been filled with humor and laughter."
Levine said, "from the earliest days when I.used to play hooky
from school to go to Boston"s Franklin Park Theater to see
comedy shows." A promise to his mother prevented Levine from
starting a career in professional theater. "In those days, a nice
Jewish boy went into business, which I did," he said.
A RETIRED tobacco and candy wholesaler from Massa-
chusetts, Levine has always made comedy and entertainment
his second career. "Over the last 50 years, I developed a hobby
of entertaining people on a non-professional basis," he remem-
bered, "and I've written and directed numerous plays and skits
usually performing before club groups and organization
meetings.
"As soon as I hear something funny, I write it down. You
never know when you may use it or when it will come in handy.
Sometimes, it can be years," he explained. Levine bases his
humor upon exaggeration. "When I hear a joke or story that is
funny, I try to blow it up to make a skit out of it. Of course,
brevity is still the best way to maintain humor." he said.
Levine's book demonstrates how the average person can
turn himself into a stand-up comic. The beginning pages explain
how to best deliver a joke, how to gesture effectively and how to
make the most of voice and inflection. The book continues with
various skits and sketches in both English and Yiddish. The
author declares that Yiddish as a language is not dead. "Groups
still meet and talk in Yiddish and the Yiddish theater is still
alive in several parts of the country," he said. "But Jews must
keep the language alive by teaching it to the young people," he
cautioned, "or the language and culture will surely die."
WHEN AUTHOR Levine is not busy writing new comedy
material he can usually be found at the Jewish Community
Center of South Florida Hollywood extension where he
teaches a class in comedy theater. The JCC Comedy Players,
formed from this class, have appeared many times, entertaining
the residents of South Florida nursing and retirement homes.
In addition to authoring and theater, Levine is a serious
student of caligraphy, the art of fine penmanship. He has
studied the art and busies himself addressing party invitations
for neighbors as well as donating his talent to the Jewish
Federation of South Broward, where he is an active participant
in Jewish communal affairs.
Impromptu Entertainment.. .for sale at a local book shop,
has already been a huge success. "I'm really thrilled with the
way the book has been accepted," Levine said, "and I can hardly
wait to begin volume two."
organization, Mrs. Marks has
already appeared before several
city and state committees to
present the case for or against
some projected legislation in-
volving prisons.
IT IS ONLY now, after
spending thousands of dollars of
their own funds, that Mrs. Marks
and her husband have decided
that the range of the needs is so
great that outside financial aid
should be sought from private
foundations and others who see
the providential work the group
is doing.
That the organization has been
successful in "keeping family life
intact through the confusion,
shame and depravity of incar-
ceration" is clearly evidenced.
The belief that the "family on the
outside does harder time" was no
exaggeration, and one of the
worst culprits is society which
doesn't make it all easy for the
family of an inmate. Mothers,
fathers, wives and children are
labeled and the ostracism is
almost impossible to bear for
most families.
Families and Friends United
for Hope also doesn't sign off
when the offender is released
from prison. Then all the ex-
penses, which have been con-
siderable, and by now the group,
which at first evoked suspicions
from penal and law officials, now
have their wholehearted
cooperation.
THE DAY a new arrival
reaches the LaGranage Re-
formatory or the Kentucky Cor-
rectional Institution for Women,
they receive a letter from Mrs.
Marks, describing the activities
of the group. From then on the
families are led through the maze
of bureaucracy that would
frustrate the most patient in-
dividual.
What kind of inner strength it
was that Mrs. Marks had in her
being showed when she was faced
with the cold, calloused, uncon-
cerned System.
Even the simplest support for
her son for instance getting his
medicine to him for his epilepsy
became major cases which to
others would have brought only
tears but to her awakened a
determination to do something
about the situation.
The housewife became the
reformer.
SHE CONFIDED that at first
it was difficult to persuade the
prison officials, and even the
prisoners and their families too,
that the group she was
organizing was not merely her
way of winning some concessions
for her son. "The officials
thought I was trying to win
something extra for my son," she
MRS. JUDY MARKS
said.
"Here I was, a white middle-
class Jewish woman coming out
of nowhere. But the fact that I
had a son in prison gave me
instant credibility, new problems
unemployment, cultural
adjustments, marital adjust-
ments, social stigma, all surface
as part of the return to the
street' "
Many hundreds of families,
inmates and ex-offenders are
testimony to the success of the
organization Judy Marks has
erected. What the future holds is
of course important, but already
she probably has more miticut to
her credit than any one person
could expect. The Jewish Post
Extremism Rising, Bonn Reports
By JON FEDLER
BONN (JTA) Increased
activity in Germany by
Palestinian extremist groups is
noted in the 1976 internal
security report of the West
German Interior Ministry. The
report also cites "increasing
uggri'siveni'ss" by neo-Nazi
groups, through their member-
ship is estimated at only (SIX).
The document states that
several cells of the extremist
Popular Front lor the Liberation
of Palestine IPFLP) have been
identified in Germany.
BOTH THE PFI.P and two
other Palestinian groups, the El
Fatah and the Maoist PDFI.P
active in Germany, distinguish
l>etween members involved in
"conspiratorial activity" and
those seeking public support lor
their goals, the report notes. In
1976 the Palestinian extremist
groups in Germany "made a
determined effort to consolidate
their organizational strength and
win new members from among
the approximately 8.400 Arabs of
Palestinian origin who have
applied for political asylum in the
Federal Republic."
The report says applicants
seeking membership in these
groups are subjected to a
"probationary period." In spite
of this, membership increased
from about 1.000 to 1.200 in 1976.
Statistical tables in the report
show a sharp rise in the number
of Palestinian groups represented
in Germany. The number of
organizations increased from 14
in 1974 to 21 in 1975 and 25 in
1976, while the number of "active
branches" of all groups jumped
from 57 (1973) to 83 (1974) and 95
(1976).
ANOTHER table shows in-
creases in periodical publications
circulated by such groups from
seven publications in 1974 to 10
in 1975 and 13 in 1976, including
three published in West Ger-
many.
The report says German-
language Palestinian periodicals
call for the "destruction of the
Zionist state," for the "violent
establishment of a people's'
democracy" in Jordan and the
fight against the "reactionary
systems" of other Arab states
"dependent on imperialism."
In the summer of 1976, the
report states, German "affiliate
organizations of the Palestinians
called for donations of money and
goods to aid fedayeen groups
fighting in Lebanon and for the
medical care of their fellow
countrymen living there (in
Lebanon!"
DURING THIS period about
50 to 80 Arabs of Palestinian
origin left the Federal Republic to
take part in the civil war in
Lebanon, or to undergo training
in the use of arms and explosive*,
in Libya.
The report adds laconically
that "some of them have since
returned to the Federal Rpublic."
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ay, July 15,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
o HHiidHn
Myth-Making Takes Time
Continued from Page 4
; the place of horses.
(HITHER could the acting of
abeth Taylor or the late Peter
ch or Charles Bronson or
|en Hayes or Kirk Douglas or
other stellar personality
ke up for the Entebbe pro-
ctions' abominations Holly
d-type male virility cast
urnst a mixture of Hollywood-
feminine beauty and grand-
ftherly love.
For it was precisely their fame,
tir familiarity in the public eye
t automatically barred the
iuctions from whatever faint
Knee they may have had at
Ethology in the first place.
Mythology requires
onymity. the smoothing of the
rners of fact and history, the
inscendence of events beyond
mundane, and these are
^uirements which the theatrical
zh and mighty violated, each of
horn screamed out his own
iividuality. whether Charles
onson as an unlikely Jew of
\y kind, or Elizabeth Taylor in
I of her contradictory moments
' pudginess in the life of a sex
ftnbol.
I SUSPECT that, to a great
itent. Operation Thunderbolt
lust suffer similar disabilities
lien though its producers
noved the Hollywood stars and
ut in their place, in documen-
ary form, the original political
performers, for they are no less
historic, no less anonymous than
famous actors, and therefore no
less wooden.
Why did I think of all this over
the Independence Day weekend?
It strikes me that it was not
because July 4 was the first anni-
versary of the Entebbe raid.
More likely, it was because I
also thought of last year's tall
ships the highlight of our
Bicentennial Year celebration.
THE TALL ships are mythic.
Accidentally, perhaps, in the tall
ships we touched upon a major
and hallowed symbol of the
American experience, for they
returned to television over the
weekend out of an obvious
national desire to see them again,
and somehow I suspect all of us
will be seeing them, again and
again, during Independence Day
celebrations in the years ahead.
The tall ships are beginning to
take on an equivalence with, say.
Williamsburg itself, or the Dec-
laration of Independence, which
constitutes the ideals of our
nationhood, not its realities, in
the same way that the Bible con-
stitutes the ideals of the Jewish
peoplehood, not its realities.
Myths and symbols of national
experience are not arrived at by
commission and design, as the
great Roman poet. Virgil, learned
in the Aeneid. Myths and
symbols evolve simply by the
passing of time and. in their sur-
vival, bear only a passing resem-
blance to the great realities they
enshrine.
THE JEWISH continuum is
rooted in myth and symbol, the
greatest in all western
civilization, the Bible, which was
not commissioned as a one-night
stand.
It is the Biblical force Entebbe
needs. It is the Biblical force the
State of Israel, itself, needs if its
seemingly miraculous re-
emergence in our time is ever to
be celebrated in literature.
In this sense. Exodus was an
absurdity in its chronicling of
Israel reborn in the same way
that the Entebbe productions are
an absurdity to the meaning of
Entebbe.
I SAID at the beginning that
Entebbe is already enshrined in
the Jewish heart and mind
beyond its immediate meaning in
history. That is the first step in
the evolution of Entebbe from
history to mythology. Will it ever
become our equivalent of. say.
the Maccabee strike against the
Graeco-Assyrians?
For that, needed are not op-
portunists and propagandists.
For that, needed are some tall
ships. And time.
Reburial Services Held
For 125 Victims of Nazism
AMSTERDAM(JTA)-Re
)urial services were held
Saturday near the Russian
(tillage of Uryce for more than
125 Jewish victims of Nazi mass
purders there 36 years ago.
The remains, including the
MM of children and infants,
lere exhumed last week from a
- grave in connection with
he war crimes trial here of Pieter
lenten. charged with respon-
itility for the murders on Aug.
1941 when he was an officer in
In SS unit in the Lemberg area of
what was then Polish territory.
THE SERVICES were at
tended by a four-member
delegation from the Amsterdam
Public Prosecutor's office. But
although the victims were Jews
the re-burial was without Jewish
content. It was held on Saturday
which is contrary to Jewish
religious law.
No rabbi was present and in
fact there are no longer any
Jewish inhabitants in the region
some 150 kilometers south of
I. wow.
Menashe Hirsch
formerly at the Sea Gull Hotel .
takes pride in inviting your family and friends to enioy the
traditional High Holy Days at the elegant Algiers Hotel offering
more for your money and finer facilities. Synogogue on
Premises. For further information call (305) 531-6061.
MRSCHS
HOTEL V7(Q)guii Koih
ON THE OCEAN
between 25 & 26 Streets
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
Internal Medicine
Associates of Hollywood
(Drs. Milloff, Fuerst, Silver & Goldstein, P.A.)
are pleased to announce the association of
Edward H. Greenberg, M.D
for the practice of Internal Medicine and Cardiology
at
750 South Federal Highway, Hollywood, Florida
Jewish Day Schools
Hope New Ruling
Will Help Them
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK-(JTA>-The
ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court
on state aid for parochial schools
will "hopefully" mean that
Jewish day school pupils can
receive state-funded diagnostic
and therapeutic speech and
hearing services, according to an
official of Torah Umesorah.
Rabbi Bet nard Goldenberg.
director of school organization for
Torah Umesorah. told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that the
court ruling last Friday said that
states may finance therapeutic,
remedial and guidance counseling
services to parochial school
children as long as they are on a
, neutral site. He said this neutral
site could l>e a van that is pulled
up alongside the day school.
HOWEVER. Goldenberg said
that each stale must now pass
the enubling legislation which
would provide the service to the
parochial schools. He said since
the New York State legislature is
near adjournment there is no
chance that the aid will come in
time for the 1977-78 school year
in New York which has the
largest number of Torah
Umesorah schools.
The court said on Friday that
diagnostic services such as for
speech and hearing could be
provided directly at the school.
The court also said that the
state may provide parochial
schools with standardized testy
and test scoring achievements
and reaffirmed an earlier ruling
that text Uinks may be lent to
parochial school children. Hut it
said the State cannot lend paro-
chial school children such
standard classroom equipment us
wall charts and slide projectors.
(iOLDENBERC. stressed the
hearing and speech service
hvcaiuw a 1978 ruling by the
Supreme Court invalidated a
Pennsylvania program providing
diagnostic hearing and speech
service for parochial school
children. At that time, Golden-
lWg said, the ruling was a
disaster" for Jewish day
schools. He said since then only
the schools which had enough
money were able to continue
therapeutic service.
IF WU LIKED US
IN MIAMI,
YOU'LL LOVE US
IN HALLANDALE
We are pleased to announce the opening for our new Thrift Shop
at 3149 West Hallandale Beach Boulevard.
This new 10,000 square foot store is a wonderful place to buy
or to donate used furniture, appliances, clothing, antiques and
a variety of other quality household items at competitive prices.
The money we take in from selling this merchandise is used to
buy vital drugs and medical supplies for the indigent residents
of the Miami Jewish Home & Hospital For The Aged at Douglas
Gardens, which is supported by the Hollywtxxi Auxiliary.
There is no better place to purchase or to donate your
resalable items. For free pick-up call 981-8245. All donations
are tax deductible.
Licensed appraiser on-premises. Completely air-conditioned.
Ample parking. Open 10 am to 8 pm, seven days a week.
DOUGLAS GARDENS-HALLANDALE
THRIFT SHOP
3149 W. Hallandale Beach Boulevard
(2 blocks west of 1-95)/ Phone 981-8245
Miami Thrift Shop, 7300 NW 27th Avenue/Phone 696-2101
The Miami Jewish Home & Hospital For The Aged
Aaron Kravitz, President


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, July 15,1977
i Meet Carter's Burl Lance
By PETER HOBDAY
"Patience," says Burt Lance
who runs the Office of Manage-
ment and Budget, "is what you
need in politics." Yet Lance less
than anyone in Washington these
days is likely to be as frustrated
by the slow pace of government
because he has the ear of the
President.
Twice a week on Tuesday
afternoons and over lunch on
Thursdays he spends time with
Jimmy Carter. The Thursday
lunch, in fact, has no formal
agenda and it is said that Lance
is one of the very few people in
the administration who can raise
any issue with the Chief
Executive.
As Jimmy Carter has said of
Burt Lance, "He's my closest
friend in the world."
YET LANCE. 45. is no
friendly appointment, nor is he a
political lightweight.
Lance served under Carter
when the President was governor
it their home slate. Georgia. He
was running the highway depart-
ment, and his term is remem-
bered as the one that got rid of
the deep-rooted corruption that
had prompted local people to
refer to highways as the "depart-
ment of politics and paving."
After Carter stepped down as
governor, Lance ran for the office
but was defeated. He then went
back into banking, joining the
National Bank of Georgia as its
president, nearly doubling its
assets in two years and
making himself some money as
well. When he was given the job
at the office of management and
budget he declared assets of just
over $3 million.
LANCE HAS given all that up
now and there is some
speculation in Washington as to
whether his salary in government
will be enough to sustain the
standard of living to which the
former Georgian banker has
become accustomed.
He now has a key job in the
administration. As director of the
Office of Management and Bud-
get he is responsible for coor-
dinating all the government's
budget targets and programs.
"Every government knows how
much it spends but it doesn't
know how effectively it spends it.
We at OBM aim to change all
that."
The budget director is very
keen on a technique called "zero
based budgeting" which in
simple terms means that every
department has to account for
every penny it spends in its
annual budget not just for the
increase it might get. "It makes
everyone at every level more
involved in the decision-making
process," Lance told me in his
highceilinged office on the
second floor of the "old building"
of the office on Pennsylvania
Avenue, almost next door to the
White House.
LANCE aims to balance the
budget. "There's nothing in the
OBM numbers that I have seen
in the first few months in this
office that leads me to think that
we wont be able to carryout our
commitment to a balanced
'(^'ifl!BIBB'fllBIHlBIHiB!HIBIHIHIIBJH
I ___________________
I

I
j
i
ask Abg
By aee halpepn
I Question: Who was Sir Moses Montefiore?
.What was his contribution to the Jewish people,
Judaism and Israel?
. Milton S. Kite
Hollywood. Florida
m Answer: Sir Moses Chaim Montefiore (1784-
1886) is one of the most famous Jewish philan-
thropists of the nineteenth century. He was born
in Leghorn, England on the 24th of October, 1784.
m He is the eldest son of Joseph Eliaa Montefiore
and ni Rachel, daughter of Abraham Lumbroso
*de Mattos Vtocatta.His paternal ancestor'-were
Jewish merchants who settled at Ancona and
Leghorn in the seventeenth century. His grand-
"father migrated from Leghorn to London in
1177s her was a London merchant.
.
I
I
VI' FIRST HE was apprenticed i fim ol
nd tea merchants. He entered
the 11 unge when his uncle pui
ghim I
Jewi |on,
| I: hi married Judith l inch made
.him a i aw to Nathan Mayer Rothschild
for w: ; irm acted as stockl
Al I if forty, having amassed a fortune,
the slock exchange He was sherifi
"ol i. 7-1838 and was knighted by
Qui ei i
m "CONIKARY TO accepted opinion, he was
Iappai mewhat lax in religious observance
in earliei life; but from 1827, after his firs) visit to
"Kre/ Israel, until the end of his life, he was a
strictl ervant Jew, Montefiore maintained
J his i agogue on his estate al Ramsgate
from id in later years traveled with his own
mshohi il slaughterer). His determined
|<'PP" leched the growth ol the Reform
England. Though a patron ol
d to pretensions olarehip
m himsi e' en isil iel, the
1138 his scheme |uiringland
_ t" ei ivs m Kre/ i irael I tie self-
suppo mgh agriculture strated
when i el \li. viceroy ol Egypt, who had
-shown m pa thy for the ii Forced by the
iKrci" to give up his conqi i n the
.Turk'- He later attempted to being industry to
the country, introducing a printing press and a
'textile factory, and inspired the founding ol
I sever.ii agricultural colonies. The Veniin Moshe
quarter outside the Old City of Jerusalem was due
"to his endeavors and named after him."
I (Encyclopaedia Judaics, vol. 12, p. 271)
From his forty-third year. Sir Montefiore
devoted all his energies, time and fortune to
ameliorating the lot of his co-religionists.
He traveled to St. Petersburg and in a personal
interview with the Czar convinced the Czar to
| rescind an Imperiel Ukase (edict I, first
promulgated in 1844. This Ukase ordered the
J withdrawal of all Jews from within fifty versts of
German and Austrian frontiers.
!
Portrait of Sir Moses Montefiore. on the oc
casion of his one hundredth birthday.
1
1
UPON HIS return from St. Petersburg. Queen
^Victoria made him a baronet.
BIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIB
Sir Montefiore also interceded personally on
hehall ol the Jews ol Morocco, Kumar...
Syria
His seventh and last pilgrimage to Eretz
was ;; n he was ninety. He wrote
count nl his iournel in his Narratt Forty
Days Sojourn in the Holy Land publish
HIS COMMANDING personality, his pi
presence, (he was s feel three inches tall) and his
philanthropj made him highly respected and
admired bol h in England and obroad
Vfter having received general congratulations
on the completion of his hundredth year he died
on the 28th ol July. 1885.
The support of the British government for his
activities-consanant with british policies
overseas-and the personal regard shown him by
Queen Victoria added to his reputation His one
hundredth birthday was celebrated as a public
holiday by Jewish communities the world over "
tibia p. 272)
Editor's note:
Please send all questions to:
ASK ABE
c o The Jewish Federation of
of South Broward
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood. Florida 33020
:BlBlB 977
Lance: Carter's friend but no political lightweight
budget by the fiscal year 1981."
he says.
Equally important is his
relationship with the man who
sits in the Oval Office just a block
dodges the question the most
respected central banker in the
world. Dr. Arthur Burns, who
looks set to serve President
Carter at the Federal Reserve

Pf
f
ol
I*
nd
i*
*v be
he
th
rw aj I ..mi e is generally ci i
with being the man who per
. led President (larter to drop
u- con) n '. ersial I ebate
it took him. .t s 98
A ashington, about three hours ol
tough talking
BUT THEN Lance is the man
who can get to see the President
for three hours and talk tough if
the occasion warrants it. Lance
himself will not be drawn on his
power to influence the President;
all he says with a slow smile and
an even slower Georgian drawl is
that, "we do all right."
But having the President's ear
is one thing. He also has to get
Congress on his side. Here, too,
he seems to have found the infal-
lible knack of talking to the right
people at the right time. He
reckons he is just I country
banker." but his easy and relaxed
style masks a mind that's sharp
ml lough.
He's going aki
some tough I
already trying to persuadi
t 'ongress to cut ba < on
major water pi nd this in
ar when a oast
drought is causing increasing
'oncern.
YET LANCE has one great
asset going tor him. and that is a
Fear ol inflation. The lessons of
the great American recession
have been learned. Even the
merest dicker of an increase >
enough to -end the Dow average
plunging on Wall Street and
'Mien I was then ast month
everyone I -poke to was scared al
the chance- ol double digit in-
flation by the end ol the year
when Lance told the
banki i
should hold ising the
prime rate the rati ol mi.
that they charge their :.(Mired
customers
inflationary, even Wall Street
agreed with him. It means that
Lance is taking on though he
Board .,. two
ion- Presidents
It Burns is the gnat survivor
|Uite a character
and someone more than "just a
country banker to take him on.
Lance is convinced that he -
right that high interest rates do
not curb inflation.

There are those, he tells you.
"who think that tight money
policies are the best. I just don't
happen to be one of them. As
one headline put it: 'When Lance ^
speaks. Carter means it."
MEANWHILE, apart from
the problem of inflation. Lance is
convinced that the econom) is .it
la-t moving along the right lines
Unemployment is coming down,
growth is looking more assured,
and investment, he reckons, will
tart soon The onlj problem we
havi
stayed
thought >
w inter in our I
the econoi

Dcrats wi
when the story con*
written ol the great war against
inflation he will be remembered
as the man who balanced
budget: \s we saj town in
Georgia, you can write this on the
wall, spit on it. antt walk awaj
from it: we are going to balance
the budget by 1981
HUSBANDING the U.S.
vealth' erican -W
00, according
ol seem
tit. But I you
have,
in do it, it will be
nis-playing Georgian
r who i- President Carter's
very good friend.
To the Point International. _.
Republicans Assail Carter
Commi^,INfrTN 1 ,JTA' The Republican National
Committee said in a statement that President Carter "has now
dictated the terms of a Middle East settlement and ha"
seriously undermined the negotiating position of the Israeli
government with its neighbors."
^SSS^SSSL? thC mSt Promise he has
f I


Ly. July 15.1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
Iflwish Vatican'?
Jewish
Philip Roth can complain
jit his mother where is
Enoy's sister's voice?" That's
[of the questions raised by
aist Dr. Phyllis Chesler.
psychologist, college pro-
or, author of "Women and
Jness" and co-author of
omen, Money and Power,"
received a Yiddish and
rew education at a Talmud
kh where she was "the
ftest boy."
ASSUMED I would be a
\>i. Of course, I did not become
bbi. I was not Bar Mitzvar
['turned off.'
tut the 37-year-old feminist
ares that she has a "divine
ession with the Book, with
Ids ... with justice. The reason
i a feminist has very much to
|with the passion for justice
the irrational belief that
Bon can prevail, that I learned
f Jew."
Ihe declares, however, that
vish women are caught up (like
fr non-Jewish counterparts)
Tthe myths perpetrated and
jM-tualed by a patriarchal
Bety. Further, women in Israel
certainly not feminist."
[TRADITIONAL women
Inn on the edge of survival
iv all they can handle being
MS and mothers. Having full-
he 'careers' is both a luxury
a ton to break the camel's
i'k The Israeli women who do
|\e careers' are superwomen.
key have to be. At the end of
hnj; day of incredibly hard
teruork (job and housework I
ley have to climb up panting to
V top of the pedestal and pose
a gervret la lady)."
|She points out t hat Jewish and
imiriiMiiiiimiHimmmw
< amllili.t:
Timer
T
4i
7:56
**' H
29TAMUZ-5737
teligious Directory
NORTH BROWARD
IMPLF BETH ORB 2151 Riverside
Vie Kvtoi it (4-1)
iMAKfiC JEWISH CENTER 910*
I'm Si Conservative Rabbi Israel
."unit man (4JAI
MIRAMAR
AEL TEMPLE 6920 SW 35th St
Conservative Rabbi Avrom Dunn
Cantor Abraham Hester (41)
PEMBROKE PINES
IMPLE IN THE PINES. *1J Taft St.
Conservative. Rabbi Bernard I.
"oter (63)
PLANTATION
LANTATION JEWISH CONGRE
NATION 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi
Tieldon J Harr. ()
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
**' TEMPLE OF NORTH OAOE.
E h ,2nd Av* **". Rabbi
m P K,n9'*V Cantor Irving
M, (J7)
HOLLYWOOD
l *?M TEMPLE. 110 SW .2nd
L Consrv*''ve. Rabbi Max
"man. (47B)
faLl TEMPLE WH $ MWl Ava.
"'nt Rabbi Jonathan Woll (45)
TH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4*01 Arthur
Afmerwllva, Rsboi Morton
Pnvky. Cantor Irving Gold. (44)
*' TEMPLE "01 Johnson St.
bSTSS**: "*btoi D,vl* Shapiro.
p"or Yehuda Hoilbraun. (S)
fcj*KML IHrWtj st.
r r*' "*' Wobort Fraiin. (4C>
?l"si,"AEL 0F HOLLYWOOD.
*n flSSS RMd- *ki Condomin-
. orthodox. Rabbi Motht kern-
Women Caught Up In Ancient Myths
Feminism Fulfilled
"their
CONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA-
GOGUE 747] NW 4th St. (4*)
HALLANDALE
lL,LAlNOALE JEWISH CENTER. 414
P.* A* Conservative Rabbi Dr.
H" Klein, PhD. Cantor Jacob
P""'9er.(ll)
Arab women share oppression by
patriarchy.
"Both are forced to send their
sons to die, to become killers in
fratricidal wars. The main bene-
ficiaries of these wars are multi-
national corporations, oil
profiteers, more often Christian
men than Moslem or Jewish
men."
She added, "War is a direct hit
on the fruits of women's labor
their children."
A ZIONIST since she was
eight and a member of Hashomer
Hatiair, at one point she packed
machine gun parts for Israel. She
made a "long overdue" visit to
Israel in 1973 where she felt
"alive ... vibrant ... lighter" but
says she was disappointed to find
"I was living in a Jewish version
of the Vatican, a theocratic state
which is unalterably opposed to
some of the deepest values I
cherish as a Jew. as a feminist ...
a state in which I am effectively
excluded from religious life, dis-
criminated against politically and
economically."
At one time, she even made an
abortive effort to "integrate" the
Western Wall with some Haifa
feminists.
"I FIND it the greatest sin
imaginable that my spiritual
access to ritual, to elevation is
denied me arbitrarily through
male injustice.
"There's nothing funny about
the pain felt and caused when
women are consigned to power-
lessness. Women do not become
the chiel rabbis ot Jerusalem;
women do not own and control
Wall Street, or even t he
Itolhschild empire; women
cannot become the chief com-
mander ot I he American or Israeli
lories.
Women do not control the
American Congress or the Israeli
Knesset no matter how much
l Ins may seem to have psy-
chological posser as mothers ol
individual children lor a limited
number ol years
MS. CHESLER charged that
nil hers, having sired children.
I ben abandon them and consign
I heir upbringing to mothers
"nobody likes mothers every-
body blames (hem. There is a
grvnl silence maintained about
lathers nobody wanted to look
too closely at them until the
feminist movement.'"
(This look." she says, in-
bituariefi
ROSEN. Hattie. 85. of Hollywood, on
June 20. Riverside
WILLNER. Norbert. 82. of Hallandale.
on July 4 Levitt.
BERG. William B 82. of Hollywood, on
July 2 Interment Beth El Riverside
WALDMAN. William. 80. of Hollywood.
on July 4. Riverside.
BYHOEF. Diane, on July 2 Levitt.
GOLDMAN, Sara I nee Katii, of Hallan
dale, on July 1. Services In
Massachusetts
BROWER, Meyer. 60, of Pembroke
Park, on July 20. Levitt.
LEHMAN. Jules, of Hallandale. on June
30. Boulevard.
ACKERMAN. Lily. 55. of Hollywood, on
June 22. Interment Beth El Memorial
Riverside
BRODER. Meyer. 68. of Pembroke
Park, on June 29 Levitt
POLSTER, Anna. 78. of Hollywood, on
June 24. Riverside
iivrrr
1*11 PombrefceRd.
Hallywood. Fla
JJ44*f7
Sonny Ldvltl. P".D.
IMMW.DlMktHwY.
North Miami. Fla
M9-4J1S
eludes the rape of wives and
battered children.)
"I'm often asked, 'Are you a
man-hater?- No. what I'm
against is male separatism. I
don't like being locked out of the
'boys clubs,' said she, citing
the Vatican. Pentagon, Congress,
Senate and Wall Street as
examples.
SHE POINTED to religion as
the first "takeover" of men.
stating that "God is always a
tall, white man with a beard."
"Women have been taught to
treat men like gods. Feminism is
psychologically a statement by
some women that man. as "God
on earth' is dead. None of us. by
dint of biology, is a god to
another."
This premise, she said, is a
threatening concept to many
women certainly Jewish
women who regard patriarchy
as a "safe shelter.
"Increasingly. Jewish-Amer-
ican women are suffering from
depression, anxiety. apathy,
guilt, or a sense of pur|M>scless-
ness. Many 'privileged' women
are isolated. divorced and
abandoned in the suburbs
without alimony, child support,
friends or meaningful work...
most Jewish American women
are one generation removed from
our Biblical Koromolhers,
namely, from their own mothers
or grandmothers, who preferred
sons to daughters, who had no
secular higher education and very
lit tU- Hebrew education, who
experienced swoatship working
conditions in the New Land.
YOUNGER Jewish women
may be "forced into college." but
mainly to meet a tetter or equal
class nl husband or to have some-
thing n-s/H't-lahli' on the side,
something lor alter the children
are grown a 'little
something-
Ms. (besler finds it "ap-
palling that some Jewish
women in organi/.ation work are
indifferent to where the con-
siderable monies they raise
aciually go They don't want to
know," she said. She also
deplores the jockeying for
power" in organizations where
women jealously protect
own little fiefdoms."
"Where is the sisterhood'?"
she asked, "why are women con-
temptuous of one another? We
cannot protect ourselves, our
daughters. let alone other
women, from patriarch."
YET. the dynamic, expressive,
extremely verbal ("the best parts
of me are Jewish") champion of
women's rights, is hopeful about
the future, envisioning a
"feminist state" analogous in
function to what the State of
Israel is for Jews, as ultimately
necessary for women.
"We will first have to find this
shelter, this space, psychically.
Nothing can exist too well or loo
long in a vacuum. Hut." she
warned, "'before we can talk
about a feminist state, we also
have to talk as feminists about
money, and about learning how
to fly planes, how to defend our-
selves and each other. As women
and as feminists, we have just
been Ixtrn in terms of a world
movement.
DR. CHESLER was married in
1973 to an Israeli student she met
on her first trip to Israel. The
marriage ceremony was per-
formed by the first woman rabbi.
Sally I'riesand, a former Clcve-
lander.
The couple lives in New York
where Dr. Chesler is prolessor at
Itichmond College at the City
University of New York. She is
now expecting a child.
(levoLutd J-wlsh News
Vorster Says Carter Wrong;
He Fears for the West
South African Prime Minister
John Vorster told British tele-
vision viewers that if President
Jimmy Carter claimed that com-
munism was no longer the enemy
of the West, then he feared for
the Western world and
democracy.
Vorster was being interviewed
on the BBC news background
program, Tonight, by Lord
Chalfont, reports the Ixindon
Bureau of the Pretoria News.
LORD Chalfont is a former
Cabinet Minister and an expert
on defense and foreign affairs.
It was Soviet grand strategy,
he added, to control the southern
tip of Africa.
Lord Chalfont asked Vorster
how he would react if the U.S.
were to impose sanctions on
South Africa.
"I would l>e very sorry if this
happened, but I cannot envisage
that the U.S. will meddle in the
internal affairs of South Africa."
said Vorster.
"IT IS a fool who does not
listen to what others have to say,
but a greater fool who governs
according to the dictates of the
outside world. My policy is not
intended for export.
South Africa Digest
REMEMBER FEDERATION
IN YOUR WILL
In discussing your estate with
your lawyer or accountant, remember
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward, so that your children's
future in this world will be ensured.
For further information, please call
the Jewish Federation.
r
JEFFER
INC.
FUNERAL HOMES.
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Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
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MORE. EXCLUDING
CIGARETTES
FtlftH VAUIT USDA CMOICI INIS 1111 CHUCK
Shldr.Pot Roast ,.$1"
FIISH VAUIT USD* CMOICI Mil CHUCK
Shoulder Steak '"" $139
fl* OR SHieriO MfMiuu GiAQI A 'HI Sh
Fryer Quarters 59*
CANKO* 0*1 WINK. ClUt SODA Ol ,,(,
Gingerale 6 55! 99*
ll.'ON-UIIN* tllNA
Cat Food *c.n 26*
KIAFf IOW CM HAIIAN Ol FIINCH ,.
Dressing "'49*
ANttV Dl
Black Pepper 69*
UH IOOIIIIII TUNAOICHICMN
Moist Meals !K8 64'
IN WATIB GliiMA
White Tuna !3& 89*
noiihiin WHIM Ol ASSOIIIO
Bath Tissue 4 8S 89*
CMOCOlAII
Hershey Syrup !22i 49*
IN OUR FROItN FOOD CASH
STOUT Fits FtOZIN MACARONI I IIIF Ol
Tuna-Noodle
Casserole' Im* OAc
I'VOI.
FUG
Ol CHAMID CNICKIN
It Ol CMICIIN .11 .
MINUtl MAIO IIOZIN
89
FIERY RED-SWEET EATING (Avg WEIGHT 22 Lbs. to 28-Lbi.)
Whole Watermelons.........
H
Oil MONTI OOIHN IFI
_ m0%. 'Ol OUAlltr CAIH UNKUT
Bananas 3.... 59* Lemons X&
59
EA.
79*
Orange Juice 'I" 69'
Oil IDA IIOZIN e\t\l
Tater Tots 2 Ac 89*
89
UIIONI IIOIIN MIAI
Ravioli.................
Ol lOCnANI PAAMICIANA
ii-oi ROl
no
Deli Dept.
MNM tlSM MM HIAO 'IISH 'lAVOIfUl ANO NUTIitlOUl
Green Cabbage u, 13* Mushrooms i." 99*
it.
PKG
99
SAVE*P
MR. PIBB REG OR DIET. TAB. SPRITE OR
Fresca or
Coca Cola
a. i a*r
5 /^ i
* UMITTWO PHASE WITH AS' 00 ORDER OR MORE
IXCIUDING ClGAKEMIS
PANIIT PIIM
Skim Milk *1 TO< ""ton.1auty,,ici.a...
ZTJSL ^ 79 Cottooe Ch*69*
Longhorn Cheesed 99* KSSr^ki 95*
PANTKPIIMILA I.I1M ,,. ._, ... u ...........*" **
Grade A' Egg. m 39* RgBIS* 3 99*
OIRR THIN OR THICK
Sliced
Bologna J
AMIKKAN > O.HII %*\99
Torpedo Salami ...; a
MM i _. ,
Leaner Wieners JSS 59*
Cliu$*n Whol* Of SfMart OT _,,
Kosher Pickles jar "
OAllO UICIO IIAIIAN IAIAMI Ol ,j
Pepperoni........................l Ot
AMERICAN KOSHER ,2^,,
Franks or Knocks pko. I
Service Appetizers
v aii 1,1 OMIT A1 IIOIII WITH IIIVKI COUMII**
Alt 1UNCM Ml 11 ANO CMlltl UICIO TO VOU* OfOH
RARE OR MEDIUM
Roast
Beef otr. lb.
IWHT1 lltwIM
Hard Salami........
0ANI1H llll HIM IMIII
Jagersborg.............-"'
FMimr whiiiowni
u
89c
^r 69*
89*
Baby Whitefish W$1"


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