The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00173

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
I Sharansky
Faces Death
For 'Treason9
Anatoly Sharansky, a leading Moscow Jewish ac-
tivist who has been held by Soviet police since March 15
has been officially charged with treason, an offense that
carries the death penalty, according to Elaine Pittell,
chairman of the Soviet Jewry Committee of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
Mrs. Pittell also reported that Dr. Josif Begun,
recently tried in Moscow for "parasitism" has been
sentenced to two years in exile, within the Soviet Union.
Begun is a prominent activist. Before news of his sen-
tencing was received, a protest demonstration against his
"trial was conducted by members of the Student Struggle
for Soviet Jewry, the Pioneer Women and the Long Island
division of the American Jewish Congress outside the
offices of Aeroflot, the Soviet airline in New York.
ACCORDING to reports from Moscow, Sharansky's
mother was notified of the charge in a letter from the
Soviet prosecutor's office. Mrs. Yelena Bonner, wife of
Soviet dissident Andrei Sakharov, told Western reporters
of the charge.
Sharansky was refused an emigration visa in 1973 on
the grounds that his computer training was of a secret
nature. His wife, Natalya, was allowed to leave for Israel
Continued on Page 2
wJewish Floridan
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 7 Number 12
Friday. June 17.1977
Price 35 Cents
#
IBIBIHIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIP^
Pittell
Stresses j
Cash Need
"As the Jewish people celebrate the tenth anniversary of
the unity of Jerusalem, our eternal capital is once again the
center of attention. Jerusalem the hope, the promise, the city
of David, whose very name signifies peace cries out for
response," declared Robert Pittell, M.D.. chairman of the Cash
Collection Committee of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
Dr. Pittell urged the community to celebrate, and at the
same time to pause and reflect. "for our most meaningful re-
sponse to that ancient pledge remembered is to convert our per-
sonal and community pledge of support for Jews around
the corner, around the world, and especially in Israel. where
expectations await fulfillment. into cash."
DR. PITTELL stressed that the 1977 Combined Jewish
\ppeal-Israel Emergency Fund campaign pledge created hope
and promise; "today, your cash payment can help build life,
providing services in education, housing and community
development; essential ingredients for creating strength and
stability for Israel's people," he added.
Hot Kosher Meal Program
Begins at S. Broward JCC
We Are One
According to Dr. Pittell. cash is badly needed in 1977,
when the Jewish Agency's Budget of Desperation has lieen cut
to a bare minimum. A massive outpouring of cash can accom-
plish wonders, as it has in the past, he noted.
"As the people of Israel begin their thirtieth year, we can
lake great pride in our partnership and in what we have accom-
plished together," Dr. Pittell said. "But there's so much more
to be done; and unless we, American Jewry, fill the gap, the
years of pride and accomplishment will be jeopardized.
"SO WHILE we proclaim our allegiance to united Jeru-
salem and everything it symbolizes for the Jewish people, let us
remember that for the people of Jerusalem, indeed for all Israel,
the hope and the promise are unfulfilled. They need our support
now your 1977 pledges must be redeemed now. Dr. I lttell
urged.
A Kosher hot meal program,
funded through Federal Title
VII. under the Older American's
Act, began Wednesday at the
South Florida Jewish Com-
munity Center-Hollywood Ex-
tension.
The program is under the
auspices of the Jewish Com-
munity Centers of South Florida,
a constituent of the Jewish Fed-
eration of South Broward. The
luncheon meals are being served
Monday through Friday, under
strict Rabbinic supervision,
according to Dr. Sam Meline,
chairman of the Federation's
Community Planning Com-
mittee, which was instrumental
in obtaining the federal funds
necessary to bring the hot meal
program to South Broward.
DR. MELINE said that a
typical meal may consist of meat,
vegetables, kugel and fruit. He
stressed that the Kosher lunches
will be provided at no cost to any
senior adult above the age of 60,
and that the JCC will be able to
accommodate only 100 diners per
day. He stressed that the meal
program will be part of an entire
set of programming designed to
meet the total needs of in-
dividuals, with all Jewish
agencies cooperating together.
Lewis E. Cohn, Federation
president said. "It is a great
accomplishment to have a
program of this type in our area.
It shows once again, that the
Jewish community in South
Broward is recognizing the needs
of all its residents, particularly
senior adults. There can be no
doubt that the advent of the Ko-
sher hot meal program in South
Broward elevates our Federation
and all its agencies to a top level
among social welfare organiza-
tions in the nation." he added.
Cohn praised members of Fed-
eration's Community Planning
Committee and South Broward
members of the Jewish Com-
munity Center Coordinating
Council who were responsible for
many months of research and
planning for the hot meal
program. JCCCC members are:
Esther Cordon, vice president of
the Jewish Community Centers
of South Florida; and Mr. and
Mrs. Eugene White, Nathan
Prilcher, Dr. Sam Meline, Gerald
Raticoff, Lewis E. Cohn, Mr. and
Mrs. Herbert Katz, Mr. and Mrs.
Martin Fleischer, Stuart
Kallman, Mr. and Mrs. Herman
Goodman, Rabbi Robert Frazin,
Paul Koenig. Karen Margulies
and Moses Hornslein.
Transportation to the Jewish
Community Center will be
provided by the Broward County
Social Services Transportation
Corps.
It is suggested that all persons
interested in the hot meal
program contact the Jewish
Community Center. According to
Dr. Meline, certain forms must be
filled out before the meals can be
provided. He added that all meals
will be on a reservation basis only
and that if a person is unable to
come to the JCC to be inter-
viewed, special home visits can
be arranged. Dr. Meline said that
donations of money for meals will
be accepted and that volunteers
are needed to help serve the meal
recipients.
! Kosher Meal Program Information!
Any questions pertaining
to the Kosher Hot Meal pro-
gram now beginning at the
.Jewish Community Center of
South Florida Hollywood
Extension can be obtained
by calling the Center office.
Persons may not be served
meals until proper Federal
forms are completed. Phone
921-6511.
Fears Grow Over Fate Of Jerusalem
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON
(JTA) Mayor Teddy
Kollek of Jerusalem said
here that there is growing
doubt in Israel regarding
U.S. intentions toward the
Middle East "but there is
determination you can't
push us around too much."
Kollek spoke in response
to questions from foreign
and American correspon-
dents at a luncheon hosted
by the Overseas Writers at
the Capital Hilton Hotel.
Continued on Page 3
f
S. Broward Federation Constituent Agency
Multi-Million Dollar JCC Complex Dedicated Sunday
The new multi-million-dollar,
dltra-modern Health and Phys-
ical Education Complex on the
grounds of the Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community
i enter. North Miami Beach, was
dedicated Sunday amidst a 24-
liour sports marathon which
l)egan Saturday evening. The
new facility is a constituent
agency of the Jewish Federation
ot South Broward.
Located at 18900 NE 25th
Ave., the complex adds a gym-
nasium, indoor handball courts:
exercise room, gy^Bastics
facility, indoor and outdfbr pools
and an indoor runnin^track to
the existing recreational facilities
making the center "the largest of
its kind in the South," according
to Robert Russell, general
chairman of the Building Fund
campaign.
The kick-off featured a relav
event from Miami Internation.
Airport on Saturday evenin:
when the JCC received a mar;
thon torch from Israel. Joggei
from the JCC. accompanied by a
police escort, carried the torci.
through the city and arrived at
the center at about 11p.m.
Congressman William Lehman
kevnoted the formal dedication
ceremony. Building Committee
Chairman Stanley Gilbert
delivered opening remarks and
Rabbi Solomon Schiff. head of
the Chaplaincy Service of the
Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration, gave the invocation.
Lewis E. Cohn. president of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward. spoke at the ceremonies
along with Mrs. Robert Russell.
Morton Silberman, president of
the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration, and
spokesman.
a United Way
A co
educal i<
off thi
additioi
family
lete health and physical
program is set to take
summer utilizing the
o the center. Classes in
itness. senior citizens
fitness, .wimming for the elderly,
private swimming lessons, men's
basket ball. team basketball,
gymnastics, scuba diving, ladies
fitness, karate and yoga, among
others, are scheduled. In ad-
dition, a record enrollment of
some 1.300 children are signed up
for the JCC's Day Camp this
summer.
Later in the week, on June 19,
the Latin Jewish community will
take over the facilities for an
afternoon and evening festival to
celebrate the occasion. A
swimming party wil1 followed
by a dinner and dancing as the
evening approaches.
The recently completed com-
plex. Phase IB of the Michael-
Ann Russell center was realized
through the support and co-
operation of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and the Jew-
ish Federation of South Broward
in conjunction with the Jewish
Community Centers of South
Florida.
The next phase estimated at
SI.4 million and requiring eight
months of construction, will
house a large auditorium, per-
manent administrative offices,
community assembly rooms, arts
and crafts studios, a memorial
court-skylight art gallery, the
main entry lobby, the JCC Board
Room and a Judaic library and
gift shop.
The expansion of the Jewish
Community ("enter's physical
structure will be paralleled by an
enlargement of the program
offerings.
The Early Childhood Develop-
ment program is expected to
double its size as is the Ele-
mentary School program. The
pre-teen and teen program will be
based on a dual-scale model
one for small group activities and
the other for large mass events.
SPECIAL emphasis will be
placed on singles in three age
groups. 18 to 30. 25 to 40. and 40
to 60. in the areas of education
and socialization, and services
and programs in the area of
Jewish cultural and educational
programs will expand for all age
groups. See photos page 14.


Page 2
The Jewish Fkmdian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 17,1977
Profile: Menachem Begin
BtLZIBENZIMAN
JERUSALEM (JTAl -
Menachem Begin, who is ex-
pected to be Israel's next Prime
Minister, is a mixture of the
prophet and the soldier. He is a
man of profound. almost mystical
beliefs and tough determination
to achieve his goals. He is an
authoritative personality who
has become used to being obeyed
in his own close circle but who at
the same time, believes in the role
of the parliamentary democratic
process.
By achieving the leadership of
the State. Menachem Begin has
at last fulfilled the dream of his
life. He will move from his tiny,
modest apartment in an old Tel
Aviv suburb to an official
residence in Jerusalem. After 40
years of being virtually ostra-
cized by the ruling establishment
controlled by the Labor political
machine. Begin now becomes
himself controller of a new
machine. It is against this back-
ground that one should consider
Begin's recent declarations.
BEGIN WAS born in 1913 in
Poland. He received a classical
Polish education combined with
broad-based Jewish studies. He
grew up in a warm Zionist home
where he absorbed his zealous
devotion to the idea of an inde-
pendent and strong Jewish State.
At the age of 16. be joined the
rightist Revisionist youth move-
ment. Betar (acronym for Brit
Trumpeldor) His outstanding
eloquence, his profound devotion
to the ideas of Betar and his
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dominant personality- brought
him quite soon to the leadership
of the Betar movement in Poland
He quickly grew close to the
Revisionist leader. Zeev Jabo-
tinsky. whom he admired without
reservation.
In his autobiography White
Xights, Begin, describing his ex-
periences as a prisoner under the
Soviet regime, tells emotionally
of his sorrow and desperation
after Jabotinsky's death. Begin
was arrested by the Soviet secret
services (the NKVDi after the
Russians invaded Poland. He
was sentenced to eight years of
hard labor in a camp in Siberia.
He survived the exhausting
interrogations of the NKVD
officers and the conditions of the
Russian camp.
FOLLOWING the pact signed
between Poland and Russia the
Polish prisoners were released
and Begin returned to the Polish
army of Gen. Anders with which
he arrived in Palestine in 1942.
Demobilized a year later he was
appointed commander of the
Etzel Ithe Military'-National Or-
ganization or Irgun Zvai Leumil
which was the military branch of
the Revisionist movement in
Palestine.
The Etzel's leadership and
fighters believed in an activist
policy aiming at liberating Israel
from the British Mandatory
regime Its concept and
operations were sharply criticized
by the then-Jewish establish-
ment The Jewish ruling circle
banned the Etzel. called its mem-
bers the 'deserters" and even
took an active part, at one stage.
in the British efforts to ap-
prehend them.
Begin was hunted by the
British intelligence service. He
directed his fighters from mobile
headquarters staffed by a few of
his enthusiastic and loyal sup-
porters (known later as "the
fighting family").
THE ETZEL military
operations against the British
Mandatory regime are still a
subject of controversy in Israeli
politics Most leading historians
tend to ascribe only a minor
effect to Etzers militant ap-
proach on Britain's final decision
to leave Palestine. However, at
the end of the British Mandatory
regime, the established military
organization Hagana and Etzel
acted in collaboration.
Etzel and the Revisionist
Movement were transformed into
a purely political body after the
establishment of the State when
Begin emerged from the under-
ground to become the head of the
Sharansky Faces Death for Treason
Continued from Page 1
the day after the couple was married. She was in the
United States earlier this year to campaign for her hus-
band's release and a Human Rights Rally was held locally
in North Miami Beach.
Mrs. Pittell called the charge "absurd and abhorrent"
and "a challenge to President Carter's resolve on human
rights.-' She said it "must be met with the strongest
reaction from the Administration and the American
people."
SHARANSKY was seized March 15 by eight secret
policemen while in the company of two American news-
men. Prior to that. Sharansky and fellow activist Vladimir
Slepak had been accused in an Inestia article of working
for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIAl.
The 29-year-old computer specialist is a member of a
group monitoring Soviet implementation of human rights
sections of the Helsinki agreement. Two other members of
the group, its chairman Yuri Orlov and Alexander Gins-
burg are also in prison on undisclosed charges.
MRS. PITTELL called the charge against Sharansky
"the latest indicator of the tightening attitude of Soviet
authorities toward the issue of free emigration and human
rights for Soviet Jews." Whe said that "should Soviet
authorities put Sharansky on trial it would represent a
trampling of human dignity and fundamental human
rights.
"It is a challenge to President Carter's resolve on
human rights and must be met with the strongest reaction,"
she said.
Herut Party. Yet Begin and his
friends remained "deserters" in
the eyes of the Israel public at
large, due in some measure to
David Ben Gurion's political
tactics.
The veteran Mapai leader
openly despised Begin and for
many years he succeeded in
impressing his feelings about
Begin upon the majority of the
Israeli people. Ben Gurion never
called Begin by his full name. In
Knesset debates he would call
him "the person who sits next to
Dr. Bader" (one of the Herut
leaders). Ben Gurion coined the
slogan "Without Herut and the
Communisits." whenever he
referred to potential com-
binations for forming coalition
governments.
FOR MANY years Ben
Gurion's policy prevailed. Begin
and his party were a relatively
minor political power, never con-
sidered a possible Cabinet
partner Begin's political views
served Ben Gurion's aims. Herut
has always been a strictly ideo-
logical party holding steadfastly
to its doctrines. Against the
background of a pragmatic and
flexible government, led by the
Labor leaders. Herut has been
portrayed as a fruitless devotee
to some esoteric ideas. Thus,
Herut objected to the German
reparations agreement as well as
to several political moves in the
Middle East initiated by Amer-
ican Administrations.
Though Begin and his move-
ment were isolated and banned,
this stubborn leader strove to
increase his political power. Con-
sistently and devotedly he either
initiated or gave his approval to
political parties that gradually
broadened his following and
changed the image of his party.
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MENACHEM BEGIN
Herut established a political
alignment with the Liberal Party
which was later incorporated into
Likud. By assenting to such
maneuvers, Begin demonstrated
devotion to his goals and political
realism. His inner strength, his
undeviating belief in his own
truth the stubbornness that had
enabled him to survive the Soviet
camps and the British manhunt,
finally brought him to the
Premiership.
BEGIN WILL be a different
kind of Prime Minister than his
predecessors. He will be a more
"Jewish" leader, a person who
unselfconsciously quotes the
Bible, the Talmud and traditional
Jewish proverbs. He will be a
Prime Minister of wide education
who speaks several foreign
languages fluently and whose
interests encompass the histories
and the cultures of many nations.
Begin may be the most eloquent
leader that Israel ever had.
He will be a Prime Minister of
courtly manners and politeness.
Yet. he remains a zealous and
dogmatic leader who has had no
experience in bringing his views
face-to-face with reality. He will
also be the same Menachem
Begin whose word was law in his
close political circle for 40 years.
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Unlike many other Jewish funeral
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Each Riverside Chapel serving Dade,
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the largest Jewish staff avai table in the
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Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan area.
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For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
H-i-UJT


The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Hornstein to Jewish Agency Assembly
New York City's Mayor Abraham I). Beame (center) addresses
United Jewish Appeal leaders while General Chairman Leonard
R. Strelitz (left! and Jerusalem's Mayor Teddy Kollek (right)
look on. Beame greeted UJA representatives prior to the
National Campaign Closing luncheon.
Kollek, Strelitz Stress
Solidarity as Campaign
For UJA Comes to End
The 1977 United Jewish
Appeal campaign of which South
Broward's Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
was a part the most successful
fund-raising drive since the Yom
Kippur War campaign came to
a close last .veek with a vigorous
statement of American Jewish
solidarity with reunified Jeru-
salem.
UJA Cieneral Chairman
Leonard R. Strelitz. of Norfolk.
Va.. declared at a UJA National
Campaign meeting honoring
Jerusalem's Mayor Teddy
Kollek. that: "We pray that
Jerusalem will be a light unto the
nations. For the Jewish people, it
is a light in our soul, the symbol
and bedrock of our faith. We
number 13 million in the world
today. If we are united as
' Jerusalem is and must lie united
there need be no limit to our
accomplishments." More than
500 campaign leaders from
throughout the United States
attended the meeting.
MAYOR Kollek termed Jeru-
salem a city that "pulls on very
deep strings in the Jewish soul.
For centuries, the return to Jeru-
salem meant independence for
our people, a chance to decide our
own fate." Kollek praised the
UJA as "the one organization
that cuts across all areas of life to
enable American Jewry to
present a unified expression of
solidarity with the people of
f Israel."
Describing Jerusalem as "a
mosaic," Kollek noted that the
city has "all the problems of all
cities plus some more and
all the problems of Israel plus
some more."
He stressed the increased
humanitarian needs there,
brought about by the great
number of new immigrants who
have settled in the city, the sharp
social gap between the poor and
the middle class, and the need to
build bridges between the Jewish
and Arab communities. "We are
still far from achieving all we set
out to achieve," Kollek said.
STRELITZ, making his first
public appearance since his
election as general chairman
three weeks ago, said: "As we
fulfill our pledge to the people of
Israel, we must fight for the
human values important to all
people. For too many, human
values have today been forsaken
for the open valve of oil flowing
bom the feudal states of Middle
East. We Jews remember, how-
ever, when a tiny flask of olive oil
kept the lamp of freedom lit for
eight days. We must not let the
world forget that the fuel of
freedom is not oil, but the spirit
and courage of men and women
devoted to basic human values.
"Our task is to keep alive the
old dream the dream that has
spanned 4,000 years of Jewish life
and found continuity, strength
and direction in this century in
the United Jewish Appeal. For
we are united in our commitment.
Jewish in our outlook and our
appeal is for funds to help build a
world of dignity, honor and
peace."
Frank K. I.autenberg. who
served as general chairman
during the past three UJA cam-
paigns and who is now president
of the organization, reported
that, with 80 percent of the 1977
campaign completed, a final total
ol 8475 million in pledges is
projected. He stressed, "If UJA
represents anything, it is excel-
lence in Jewish life leadership
and the will to persevere for
Jewish ideals in the face of ad-
versity."
MAYOR Kollek presented
participating American mayors
with awards on behalf of the
UJA, and Mayor Beame re-
sponded for the group noting
that he had been "thrilled to visit
Jerusalem last year for the first
time. The work we do in UJA is
of tremendous importance and
gives each of us the opportunity
to help the people of Israel."
Moses Hornstein, vice presi-
dent of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward. will attend next
week, the annual Jewish Agency
Asembly in Jerusalem.
The Jewish Agency Assembly
brings world Jewish leaders to-
gether to meet with heads of JA
departments responsible for the
execution of Assembly decisions.
Through its eight major com-
mittees devoted to such fields as
immigration, absorption,
education, rural development.
housing, closing the social gap,
etc., the Jewish Agency
Assembly will decide upon its
program for the coming year and
the budget needed to implement
it.
The sessions will bring to-
gether more than 400 leaders
from more than 40 contries.
representing all the Jewish com-
munities and organizations
around the world.
Hornstein is no stranger to
Israel, having visited the Jewish
Hillel Elects Pittell
To Serve as President
State often. He is a former vice
president of the Synagogue
Council of America and the
American Friends of the Boys
Town of Jerusalem. He served as
a director of the American
Friends of the Hebrew University
and the America-Israel Cultural
Foundation. In the 1977 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund campaign of
the JFSB, Hornstein served as
Big (lifts chairman.
Donald H. Klein. Federation
executive director, has been
invited by the Jewish Agency
and will attend the Assembly to
serve as a staff consultant to
various committees.
The Hillel Foundations of
Florida have elected Dr. Robert
Fit tell president for the 1977-78
academic year.
Pittell serves as secretary of
the .Jewish Federation of South
Broward. and was Upgrade
chairman of the 1977 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fear
Continued from Page 1
HE SAID. There is very
serious, gnawing doubt about
what the American position is."
He emphasized, however, that
"so far there are no hard facts,
only opinion and feelings, not
facts, on the oil question, the
pressures of Russia and the Third
World and how America will
stand up to them."
Kollek, a member of the Labor
Party, said the rise to political
power in Israel of Menachem
Begins Likud coalition which
has caused dismay in the Carter
Administration on prospects for
a Middle East settlement, was
due to "a very great extent" to
the "poor internal management,"
inflation, strikes and scandals
under the Labor regime.
He added that "Foreign affairs
had a good deal to do" with the
election outcome because "people
were uncertain what concessions
the present (Labor) government
would be forced to make."
HE SAID some thought a
stronger voice would be better in
defining our interests. But a
majority of the people (in Israel)
do not stand on Begin's election
campaign statements.
Kollek said Israel's situation
would be "better" if it were less
dependent on the U.S. but "it
would make no basic difference."
He conceded that "small
countries must take into account
global affairs.
"But we have the right to
make decisions so we can live and
continue to live. In the end we
shall have to defend Jerusalem
and Israel and we cannot allow
this to be an impossible task," he
said.
I
id
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Fund campaign. He is a member
of the board of governors of
Temple Sinai and a mcmlwr of
the Medical and Pediatric
Societies of Broward County.
Hillel pro-
grams are cur-
rently extended
to Jewish stu-
dents on the Flo-
rida State Uni-
versity. Univer-
sity of South
Florida and Uni-
versity of Florida
campuses, ac-
cording to Pit-
PITTELL tell.
"We are looking forward to
incorporating Florida Atlantic
University and Broward Com-
munity College in our plan of
reaching the maximum number
of Jewish students and providing
to them a variety of social and
cultural programs," explained
Pittell.
During a visit to Israel last
summer, Moses Hornstein
(left), vice president of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward, met with then Prime
Minister Yitzhak Rabin.
Posi Haste Shopping Center
4525 Sheridan St Hollywood Fla
Phone 961 6998
arnett
anK.
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
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Pag*<
The Jatisk Flondiax and Skofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. Jane 17,1977
Diminishing U.S. Presence Magnifies Danger on Right
WHEN President Carter
to order t he Pentagon to
coy H*
lets kit preat aecn-ary. Jody
PowefL inane a no yc-written
aenaocandnm to the
-.-.a: uaaj nUa kaach .:
off before Carter reeky gets
angry about those ueofbgat*
kanta '.f :.*_-
Carter mmmanrer- n-chef of
aU IS armed force* b it h iear
to take them on ts otrvious
hence tbe Powell mcmos and
other bits of trickery to avoid a
bead-on coUnaon.
WHAT THE President k-
knmmg very quickly is that, ix
mam- ways, he isn't President at
ai. The njrht-wisg milrtansts.
flanked by the mdustnahsts who
feed and sustain them, illustrate
tbe point well, and tbe
illustration tells us somethinfr
about why Carter s finest hour,
his human rights campaign
bunched within the first hundred
days of his admuustration. is now
falling flat on at face
Tbe fact is that there are mil-
rtarsts and their industrialist
keepers in other countries, too. If
Carter has difficulty holding onto
the reins in his own domain,
where presumably be is tbe baas,
bow can he possibly hope for
success elsewhere0
This explains why Carter s de-
teranauoc to make the NATO
a greater
role as guardians of
European safety is so f 1 gin
wkk aneikwy danger Ei
the nse of new mihtary:
Aarj -_ree.:-kdm t->z
also encr arage the emergence of a
IT IS rust these ih.-rg*
mihtary r-achae* bureaucracies
and right-wing ehtism that
have been the bane of European
.-.- ..- .-.:--.:.-..
Europe stabthty since World
War 11 ha.* m large meas-r* 'jeez.
a consequence of America s
mihtary presence there, which
r^* precluded tae neec for cocv
p*".-- Z -'- -" :- --- -- -:.--- .
is the American mihtary pieaema
in Europe and elsewhere m the
world that gave meaning to Car-
ter s human rights fwp^
The new Carter strategy
which has been a long time
coming in administrations
previous to his own. is under-
standable We are told that our
diminishing presence on tbe con-
tinent will have a positive effect
on our economy, as well as on the
economies of the NATO nations
involved We wfl] be spending
jess abroad, more at home: ditto
for the NATO nations them-
selves, if not in quite the same
Jerusalem Reunited
E a sir.ce reunification, the world has felt it as
a thorn in its side that, after KM years in alien
hands. Jerusalem is once again the capital city of
Israel reborn Except for the Crusades, which the
lish staged in medieval iirr.^ to A.-e". the city
b m Saladin. we note no such anguish that
Mad anywhere in Christendom about the fa:~ .:'
Jerusalem.
Particularly in modern times, the world stood
mutely by as Old Jerusalem under Jordanian
hegemony, its holy places both Jewish and
Christian, was literally destroyed stone by stone
Why rben the anguish now? Why did President
Carter refuse, from the moment of his nomination.
to supt-ort the Democratic Party platform plank
supposing unified Jerusalem as the capital of
Israel' Why is there such anxiety today about his
contir. oing ambiguity on the subject?
Never mind. World JewTy is accustomed to this
indifference to 2.000 years of their travail Now.
Jerusalem is united. Now. Jerusalem is the capital
city of Israel, whether the United States or anyone
else likes it or not.
With the change-over in leadership in Israel to
the Likud Party, there is much international dis-
cussion about Menachem Begin s "intractibility"
that he will not idly allow Israel to be am-
putated step-by-step as per Arab demand.
We will not speculate upon that here. But we
will take note of the fact that regardless of who
was the victor, there will be no change in Israeli
policy on Jerusalem.
Not Yitzhak Rabin, not Shimon Peres, not
Yigal Yadin. not Menachem Begin will accede to
the dismemberment of Jerusalem. On the tenth
anniversary of a reunited Jerusalem, all Jews, in
Israel and abroad, are dedicated to the retention of
the Jewish city as the capital of its spiritual heri-
tage and its agonizing history.
11
y.-y.
i
m
I
I
:::::::
.'.V.
:::
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::::
1
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m
wmmmmmmmmmm
Jewish Floridiarif
im* SHOFAR OF OKEATEP. HOLLYWOOD
-_...___.___2th1* ** 1 S Federal Hwy Danla FU SMC*
MAIN "^%Tot**nu. fu "^ trumt
._ *E*\ J57 return* are to be forwarded to
TneJewiah Flortdian. P O Box 01 3*73. Miami FU Ml 01
oi tm MtrckMCu MwarflaM to its mm
PubUahed Bl Weekly
Second ClaaaPoetage Paid at Danla FT* W4S00
Jewun r deration of South Browmrd. Inc SHOFAR EniTORl*!
advisory ""Ejra-^thTprttW g^'SSSZ^,
MelvinH Baer Samuel Melloe. D M D "
The Jawtth f
n
MM Jwh* T
(lacal arva) One Y*af .. Owt f Taws Upon'
way
Partacularh- Getiuau* and
Japan, say proponents' of the
Carter plan, anil have to devote
more of their eueigiea to then-
mihtary needs and perhaps
leas oa gkaring our
rsarkets wuh their
I
i
5
experts
VERY LAI DABLE But we d
better know the price for this
saving m terms of the right-
wingers who wil
necorne more unpmant. more
ekiqpent the ehtists who will
rise to become as arrogant
toward their own governments as
the Pentagon is now toward ours,
who wfl] in fact challenge their
government? for the right to rule
for the extremists here at horr I
follow if they have not already
themselves taken the lead
Germany is a case in point Tbe
Minister of tbe Interior of tbe
Federal Republic of West Ger-
many noted last Spring At no
time since the collapse of 1&45
has National Socialism been
glorified so openly in speeches,
pamphlets and activities or
the democrat r law-based Mate
- : ... --.---.
as today
The A nti- Defamation League
of B'nai B rith. in a study on the
reemergence of the German right-
wing I :t that it is not an
isolated phenomenon. It oc-
curs ."' declares the study,
within the context of a broad
public interest in aD asp*-
Third Reich
STL DENTS OF :he phe-
nomenon call it tbe new Hitler
and the ADL ;ugges;
that it is fed '
phonograph records, films.
memorabilia, and now opes
parties and movement? h
one way or another touch on the
Nazi yean
- the Hitler wave unique
to West Germany Its prod
are also evident in all
countries of Western Europe and
in the US."'
Primarily, the right-wings
purpose is to reestablish its
respectability. and it
blatantly seeks to exculpate the
Nazis of their war guilt and. more
particularly, denies that the
Holocaust had ever taken place
THE TITLES of some new
Hitler wave works speak for
themselves: Why Are We
Germans Lied To>. The Ausch-
uitz Lie. and Did Six-Million
Really Die' "The propagation of
this revisionist view has become
an imporant part of the programs
of neo-Nazi groups in West
Germany and elsewhere." the
study declares.
But books merely reflect the
Mindlin
action attendant to them. Old SS
urita suddenly these days meet
openly and without fear of official
harassment
For example, on Sept. 19.
19T6. the Horst Wessel and
Charlemagne Divisions of the SS
met for an open reunion in
Wuerzburg. The Chariemagne
Division is French and demon-
strates the international charac-
ter that the resurgence has
already taken on.
For example, the municipal
council of Altkirchen recently
moved to allow the erection of a
monument honoring the IX SS
Tank Division Hohenstaufen
Tbe council later reversed the
decision in the face of protests it
preferred not to handle at the
time, but the matter is far from
td.
For example, in January of
this year, a tablet dedicated to
the Adolf Hitler and Hitler Youth
~~ Tank Divisions was dis-
-red in the cemetery of
-au-on-Lahn. There is a uni-
-.! denial of knowledge as to
-rected the tablet.
IN ADDITION, there were the
memorative march for SS
Col Jochen Peiper in Mannheim
Peiper having allegedly been
killed in a shoot-out in southern
France last summer, which led to
retaliatory"' bombings of
French Jewish institutions: and
the case of Hans I lrich Kudel.
Nazi Germany's most decorated
public appearances
last year, one of them at an air
base, led to the dismissal of two
.or generals.
Rudel is perhaps the most
immediately frightening of all
these personalities. At the same
time that the German generals
were being kicked out of the
service for permitting him to
speak at the air base. Rudel was
visiting a United States Air
Force installation in Texas, and
in December he returned to
Germany to address some 1.000
right-wingers in the verv same
Munich beer hall at which Hitler
himself used to appear.
ONE CAN go on and on. The
fact is that in Bavaria alone
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
as
raSKOTBE)
Friday. June 17,1977
Volume 7
1 TAMUZ5737
Number 11
JW.
today there are 49 radical right
organizations. According to the
ADL study, tbe news magazine.
Der Spiegel estimates that
schools and universities through-
out the Federal Republic harbor
some 1.000 members of these
organizations to spread their
gospel.
Then there is the right-wing
press, which includes 102
weeklies with a combined cir-
culation of 244.000. The largest of
the extremist publications is
Deutsche Sational Zeitung.
which is an organ of the
Satujnaldemohratische Partie
Deutschlands published by Dr.
Gerhard Frey. a member of the
NPD. and appears in editions of
upward of 100.000.
But loosely-structured in-
dividual right-wing organizations
and newspapers do not tell the
whole story. The French Charle-
magne Division of the old SS is
only fragmentary evidence that
Germany's new Hitler wave is
going international
TO BRING all this activity
together under one umbrella,
there was a meeting in Frankfurt
in 1975. where the National
Forum of the Peoples Socialist
Movement of Germany was
formed. Its goals:
The separation of races.
German reunification, the union
of all Europe's national socialists
and the fight against all forms of
imperialism, which is defined as
American. Soviet and Zionist
a~ if they were all one and the
same thing.
To make its goals tangible, the
extremists keep up a barrage ol
ne\ er-ending printed propa-
ganda, swastika-daubings and
hit-and-run night raids against
Jewish cemeteries. It organizes
street demonstrations against
nations payments to Israel.
detente and Communism as if
they. too. were all one and the
same It brings to mind the
horrors of the formati\ S
when the street was the back
Stage to their future world.
DEMONSTRATORS have as
their core the U'lAiitg ./:..
(Viking Vouthi which, according
to reports, uses the Hitler
greeting and specializes in the
glorification of violence for young
people. Their clandestine training
camps are attended by youths
from France and Belgium."" in
addition to Germany.
The Jew remains a primary
target. Wolf-Dieter Eckart. born
in 1939. complains that "not
enough Jews were gasseed" in his
Hamburg-based Friends Circle of
the XSDAP Says the ADL
study: "In Bavaria. Karl-Heinz
Hoffman. 38. leader of a sports
club, marches young people with
pistols and carbines, and uses
camouflage-colored trucks with
skulls painted on the doors."
The case for a rising tide of the
right-wing is a strong one. It
would be difficult to downgrade
the evidence. The leaders and
their adherents are the heirs
apparent to the coming
militarism in Germany and else-
where in Europe should the
United States give up the last
vestige of our victory in World
War II by departing the con-
tinent.
RESURGENT Naziism vould
then be free to point to ex-
pansionist Bolshevism in I"'y.
Greece. Spain and Portug to
move from the street to the
government. The script is all
ready. Nothing much has
changed since the writing of Mein
Kampf. The parts have been
handed out and the players
picked. It remains only for the
curtain to rise.
Yet that is what the Carter
administration proposes not
only in Europe but in South
Korea, as well with nary a
thought to the consequences of
releasing the militarists now at
bay to return to their former
positions of power. Of all people,
with his own difficulties with the
Pentagon, it would seem that the
President ought to know better.


Friday, June 17,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
On the Occasion of the Tenth Anni
of Reunification
From Jerusalem Press
"After the Temple and
the City of Jerusalem had
been destroyed by Rome (in
the year 70 CE), the exile
and dispersion of the Jews
resulted in a phenomenon
which, like that of the
'spiritualization' of Jeru-
salem, is not always ana-
lyzed in terms of the
national alienation of the
Jewish people. On the other
hand, it is usual to contem-
plate only one of the
aspects of such a pheno-
menon: the link between
the Jewish people exiled
and dispersed and Jeru-
salem a symbol of Zion."
Jerusalem was transformed
into a symbol by the idealization
of the city in which David settled
his people and where they fought
tooth and nail to keep their
: political and spiritual sover-
eignty. Time after time, removed
further and further from i< over
80 generations were urn!, .nined,
weakened, sometimes decimated
by those peoples and cultures
which they served the world over
and, simultaneously, the symbol
of Jerusalem acquired the
characteristic of the nation's
spirit its soul.
As a result of its trans-
formation into something
unattainable, it ceased to exist
within the various frameworks of
Jewish thought as a concrete city
of stone and sky.
Beyond its intrinsic value and
spiritual and emotive dimension,
the transformation of Jerusalem
into an ethereal symbol is one
manifestation among others
of the national alienation of
the Jewish people, forced to view
history from afar, and survive,
swimming with the tide of other
nations.
TWENTY-NINE years after
the restoration of the Jewish
State, with the City of Jerusalem
'as its Capital, that same
phenomenon of "spirtualizalion"
reveals its Achilles' heel. Only
three out of 15 million Jews live
and exercise their national rights
in the City of Zion.
Jerusalem, ringed by symbols
and myths, underwent multiple
interpretations (as per the
historical situation and the
degree of oppression to which
Jewish minorities were sub-
jected). The traditional ex-
pression "Next Year in Jeru-
salem" became a near liturgical
formula, a fervently declared
ritual phrase.
The devotion which had been
"the body" of the symbolic Jeru-
salem, and has so existed in the
hearts and minds of the op-
pressed, ended up by becoming a
, formality, the phrase we hur-
riedly pronounce before rushing
to the cakes and liqueur to break
the fast of Atonement.
MEANWHILE, Jerusalem
was being broken up into pieces
like its dispersed people; the
atomized and thousand-times
reinterpreted city was being
gathered together within the
framework of the national idea
that strove to take it out of its
spiritual cage.
Today earthly and celestial
Jerusalem exist intertwined like
'* the grapevines on its hills. More-
over, the symbolism and the
mythology of the city are
meaningless nowadays if the
of being a Jew by "reaction"
rather than by action.
We, the Jews who are living in
it and those who live far from it.
are witnessing the eve of reunifi-
cation of Jerusalem. The city was
divided (and annexed) by the
Kingdom of Jordan between 1949
and 1967.
One dares say that more
important than the political,
social and geographical reunifica-
tion of the city is its reunification
with the symbol of Jerusalem:
this rejoining of the city of stone
and sky with the idea of Jeru-
salem, a city existing ever open
and integral for the Jewish
Nation and for all mankind.
Soldier at the wall in Jerusalem
city, is not taken into account as
point of reference.
Jerusalem was placed at such a
high level that it became
alienated, practically cut off from
the daily life of the Diaspors
Jewry which then proclaimed and
still proclaims its oath of alle-
giance. Today, it is Jerusalem
that cries out for the Jews of the
world and invites them to free
their nation.
THE PFRIOD of oaths is over.
Jerusalem and Zion are not
"everywhere" but in Jerusalem
and Zion. Neither Jerusalem nor
Zion exist everywhere, but the
ritual, the crisis of the Jewish
national identity, the old
ideology of survival, the anguish
Anti-Semite in Quebec
Defeated in By-Election
By BEN KAYFETZ
TORONTO (JTA) Roger Delorme, a 42-year-old
radio and television broadcaster who has alleged that the
Ann Frank story is a hoax and that "Zionism and racism
are identical" was defeated in the by-election held in
Terr;bonne County, Quebec, where he was running as a
candidate for the Progressive Conservative Party.
Delorme's candidacy was protested by the Canadian
Jewish Congress and other Jewish agencies as well as by
non-Jewish MPs and others belonging to the Progressive
Conservative Party. However, party leader Joe Clark
refused to repudiate him, producing a letter from Delorme
where he committed himself to abide by party policy on
Zionist questions and on anti-Semitism.
The Liberal Party candidate. Roland Comtois, won
handily with a majority of more than 8,000.
was looking for a cigarette with low tar. But the low
tar cigarettes I tried had no taste. Now I
smoke Winston Lights. I get the low tar I.wanC
But mote important, WinstonTfghts are all taste.
Winston Lights are for real.

Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.


Pe6
77k Jeicish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 17,1977
Arrives
The long journey of forme
Soviet Jewish Prisoner of Con
science Lazar Liubarsky. froc
the provincial town of Beltsv in
Moldavia, to Odessa and Mos-
cow, four years in a Soviet prison
camp and finally his long awaited
visa to Israel in December. 1976.
will be one of the topics he will
discuss on his United States tour
being sponsored by the National
Conference on Soviet Jewrv
(NCSA.
In 1970. I first applied to
emigrate to Israel. Liubarsky
recalled upon his arrival in the
United States several days ago.
but was refused an exit visa for
two years."
IN 1972. be continued. "I was
accused of disseminating
slanderous fabrications' about
Soviet life. The conviction based
on my letters to Soviet
authorities, complaining about
the lack of Jewish cultural,
religious and communal insti-
tutions, was followed by a four-
year prison sentence, four years
of my life in which mv wife.
\
the
SILENT NO MORE
family and friends around
world appealed on my behalf.''
Liubarsky 9 trial was held
behind closed doors, with all exits
guarded by the local militia. The
defense request for witnesses on
his behalf was denied, and it
became clear that he had been
singled out for being one of the
most prominent Jewish activists
in the city of Rostov.
Shortly after the four-year
sentence had been confirmed by
the court. Liubarsky shouted
"Am Yiarad Chai" iThe people of
Israel live!.
RECALLING his four years
imprisonment. Liubarsky said:
"During the entire time, my
morale was kept high by the
knowledge that there were people
abroad who knew and cared
about my struggle. I would
therefore urge people to continue
writing to those Soviet Jews still
imprisoned. The fact that one has
friends who care and support him
is of immense importance to
those held in Soviet prisons."
Among Liubarsky s ap-
pearances was an addrees at the
national Solidarity Sunday
program on June 12 in Washing-
ton. The event, at Constitution
Hall, was co-sponsored by the
NCSJ and the Jewish Com-
munity Council of Greater
Washington. Liubarsky's U.S.
tour is being coordinated with the
National Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council.
Soviet Style Kangaroo Court
Witnessed by Local Activist
MirkeV arvi Ini Krm inl mm ^___________
Xo w. .
Mickey and Lois Krop went on
holiday
Instead of a stay at Gros-
singer's or Greenbrier. they
opted for a vacation in the Soviet
Union.
And instead of dining, dan-
cing, tennis and golf, they spent
their time compiling information
for a report on Russian refusniks.
Mickey Krop. you will recall,
was one of five area dentists who
arranged and attended a "picnic"
in a forest outside of Moscow
three years ago. Not just any
ordinary Haulover Beach affair,
this vernal get-together attracted
100 Soviet Jews anxious to leave
the motherland. It also attracted
the attention of the world. It was.
by Krop s estimation, the "first
big noise" involving American
support for the Jewish activists.
AT THE time. June 1974.
refusnik Joseph Begun was not a
"consequential" activist. Other
names were more prominent
within the Jewish underground.
Vladimir Slepak was one of those
leaders and the Krops "adopted"
the Slepak family.
(Adopt-a-Family is one of the
ongoing projects of the South
Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry. More than merely writing
a pen-pal. adopting a family
entails a commitment of constant
communication, frequently and
unfortunately one-way)
Since the Krops' original trip,
however. Joseph Begun has
become more visible and a new
Jewish movement more viable.
The initial effort among Soviet
dissidents was to expedite and
facilitate emigration. There is
another, newer, movement afoot
which calls for a renaissance of
Hebrew culture within the Soviet
Union. Joseph Begun is a leader
in that effort.
AN ELECTRONICS engineer
and former senior scientist in a
research institute. 45-year-old
Begun lost his position as a
consequence of an exit visa
application. He has since taken to
tutoring Jewish students in the
areas of mathematics and foreign
languages. To do so legally.
Begun had applied for official
sanction to tutor on four separate
occasions. He has not received a
reply but he has been arrested
and tried and convicted. And,
now, sentenced. The charge?
Vagrancy and parasitism.
Because, officially, he has no job.
This catch-22. Soviet style.
was played out in spades for
Joseph Begun while the Krops
visited with Vladimir Slepak just
three weeks ago. Begun was
arrested in March The state
appointed a female attorney. not+
With
Norma A
Orovitz
case. The trial, originally slated
for the end of May. was arbi-
trarily rescheduled for May 18 as
of May 16.
With so many dissidents'
phones being disconnected, com-
munication within the Jewish
community is difficult. In spite of
that difficulty. Slepak. the
Krops. activist Benjamin Fain.
Begun's wife, his 12-year-old son
and many friends were notified
and were at the courthouse hours
before the trial was scheduled to
begin.
THEY HAD hoped to catch
sight of Begun entering the
courthouse. The prisoner has not
been seen since his arrest, except
by his attorney. The defendent.
however, was brought to the
courthouse during the night.
About a half an hour after the
Krops arrived with Slepak at
8:30 a.m.. a truckload of Soviet
citizens filed into the courthouse.
At 10 a.m.. when the court
opened. Begun's wife and son and
friends were informed they would
not be admitted because there
was no room "
The trial of the prisoner, who
had been on a hunger strike for
six weeks until being force-fed
through a nasal tube, was
abruptly postponed two and a
half hours later to consider a new
defense attorney. The trial was
supposedly continued to June 8.
As the counselor was an-
nouncing this news to the crowd.
Krop became aware of activity at
the back of the building. A van
had backed up to a small door-
way. Above the van's roof, the
txv of the doorway was visible
and the Jewish activitis strained
to see Begun being taken away.
SOMEONE lifted Begun's son
who glimpsed a mili-second sight
of his father. "Papa. papa, papa
. ." the boy cried in the inter-
national tongue.
Just then, the Jews, realizing
Begun was in the van. began to
pound on the truck panels.
Begun's sympathizers had not
been permitted to witness the
trial. They needed no permission
to let their supportive feelings be
known.
Slepak motioned for Krop to
unfolded Backing away from the
group and reaching for his
camera case. Krop was brushed
up against by an unidentified
Soviet ihlub Pulling away. Krop
again reached for the camera only
to find the man's elbow wedged in
the case.
WHEREVER Krop moved, so
did his shadow. When Krop
asked do you speak English."
the Soviet distinctly answered
no."
Krop was neither questioned
nor further hassled. But his
efforts were clearly frowned
upon.
Joseph Begun's trial was
hastily continued on June 1
despite the June 8 rescheduled
date. He was found guilty of vag-
rancy and parasitism, ft is not
known where he will spend the
next three years.
KOSHER
Empire
POODS
Camps
A thirty-minute documentary
filmed clandestinely under con-
ditions of great danger in Soviet
prisons and labor camps, which
depicts the life of terror led by
political prisoners, has been
smuggled to the West and will be
distributed throughout the
world, according to Avraham
Shifrin. an aliva activist now in
Israel.
Release of the film was timed
to coincide with the Belgrade
conference, where among other
topics. the liberalization
promised by the Soviets at the
Helsinki conference will be
examined by the Western
countries.
According to Shifrin. there are
at least 700 prisons and labor
camps which hold political
prisoners from various countries,
including the U.S., France.
England. Spain. West Germany!
Iran. Syria, Egypt, Greece,
Turkey and Japan. Shifrin said
that only pressure from the free
world can improve the prisoner s
situation.
Sen. Stone Wings Begin
Message Back to Carter
TEL AVIV (JTA) A messenger from Likud
leader Menachem Begin delivered a manila envelope to
Sen. Richard Stone (D.. Fla.) just before he boarded a U.S.
Air Force plane at Ben Gurion Airport Sunday at the end
of his four-day visit to Israel. The envelope is believed to
have contained a message from Begin to President Carter.
Stone, on a Mideast fact-finding mission, met twice
with Begin during his stay in Israel. He was reportedly
given to understand that there will be no significant
changes in Israel's approach to the Geneva Conference
under a Likud-led government.
LIKE THE outgoing Labor Alignment regime, the
government headed by Begin will be ready to attend the
Geneva Conference on the invitation of the co-chairmen,
the U.S. and the USSR, on the basis of Securitv Councii
Resolutions 242 and 338 and without the participation of
the PLO. Stone was told.
He was also reportedly told that while the new
government would be ready to negotiate territorial con-
cessions in Sinai and on the Golan Heights. Begin made it
clear that there was no readiness to withdraw from the
W est Bank.
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*


Friday, June 17,1977
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
JCC Seniors Attend Picnic
The Jewish Community
Center-Hollywood Extension
held a picnic for their senior adult
members last week at T-Y Park
in Hollywood.
Donning aprons, the chefs were
assisted by Paul Isaac, Louis
Cantor, Bob Gorelick, Mr. and
Mrs. Sam Brower and Mr. and
Mrs. Joe Berks.
Over 120 people enjoyed the
hot dogs, soft drinks, potato
chips and watermelon.
Lewis E. Cohn, president of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward, said he was "delighted
to see such a wonderful turnout"
for the event.
"Some of the folks here have
never even had the opportunity
to come to a picnic. I'm glad we
can show them new experiences,"
said Cohn.
Jewish Community Center Senior Adults participate in food
and festivities at their T-Y Park picnic.
Federation President Lewis E. Cohn (center) enjoys Jewish
Community Center picnic with volunteer cooks Lou Cantor
(left) and Paul Isaac.
^((((((IBIBIHIBIBIBIHIBIHIBIHIHIHIHIHIHIHIHIH^
Some Joy Here Despite Soviet Tragedy
By MINDY KLEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Grigory Vigdorov had a bir-
thday party in Miami's Temple
Bet Breira recently, but Grigory,
his wife, Mariana, and his two
children were not there to
celebrate.
In Israel, Aleksander and
Sarra Vigdorov observed their
son Grigory's 30th birthday, too,
but in a more dramatic way
with a hunger strike at the
Western Wall.
ALTHOUGH the birthday
was celebrated on two continents
in strikingly dissimilar ways, the
place of honor was empty at both.
Grigory, a Soviet Jew who has
been denied exit from Russia, has
not acknowledged any communi-
cations attempts either from
Israel or the United States.
The Vigdorovs were separated
four years ago when Aleksander
and his wife were granted exit
visas from Soviet Russia to Israel
but Grigory and his family were
left behind.
A local couple Shirley and
Jerry Pollak adopted Grigory
and his family through the South
Florida Conference of Soviet
Jewry in February. Shirley, a
first-grade teacher at Colonial
Drive Elementary School, and
Jerry, a pharmacist, have tried
repeatedly to contact him and
have as yet received no reply.
MORE successfully the
Pollaks have contacted Grigory's
parents in Israel, but Aleksander
and Sarra have also failed to
establish contact with their son.
Not easily discouraged, the
Pollaks have started a mini-cam-
paign to get their fifth adopted
Soviet family out of Russia. Until
now their success rate has been
100 percent their other four
adopted Soviet Jewish families
have all left the USSR.
They have written to senators
and congressmen who in turn
have contacted Secretary of State
Cyrus Vance and Soviet Ambas-
sador Anatoly F. Dobrynin.
Shirley appeared on the "Jewish
Worship Hour" television
program a few weeks ago, and
Temple Bet Breira, under the
leadership of Rabbi Barry
Tabachnikoff, dovoted its confir-
mation service, which was
shortly before Grigory's bir-
thday, to the theme of "Human
Rights and Soviet Jewry."
A GIANT birthday card was
Family Picnic Set
For Chai Lodge BB
Chai Lodge of B'nai B'rith,
Hollywood, will hold a Family
Picnic 10 a.m. Sunday, June 19,
at T-Y Park's pavillion 9.
For additional information,
contact. .Owip Gl*
mailed to Grigory with "several
hundred signatures" in an overt
ploy to garner public attention
for Soviet Jewry's human rights
in general and the plight of
Grigory Vigdorov in particular.
The Pollaks are puzzled by the
Soviet government's denial of
exit visas to the second and third
generation Vigdorovs. They are
Russian Front
even more puzzled as to why
Grigory hasn't replied to letters.
Grigory, a former university
_ student, presently works in a
button factory, so there "can be
no security reasons for not letting
him out." Shirley said.
BOTH JERRY and Shirley are
firm in their belief, however, that
pressure on the Russian govern-
ment is beneficial. If the Vig-
dorov dilemma is publicized, the
government "will not harass or
bother him."
The Pollaks are appealing for
others to write not only on
Grigory Vigdorov's behalf but for
other Soviet Jews in the same
situation as well. For as Alek-
sander and Sarra Vigdorov have
written: "With a united effort,
we may be able to break away
from the brutal claws of the
persecutors of the Jewish
people."
Pan Am to Brazil:
More non-stops than
any other airline.
Every Monday. Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, we fly non-stop to Rio.
From Rio. if you'd like, you can go on to Sao Paulo? (We also have a Wednesday flight to Rio
via Brasilia.)
Starting June 19. well have a non-stop flight to Brazil every single day.
All our flights to Brazil have the comforts you'd expect on our long flights. And some
unexpected things, too. .
For example: Eyeshades. for when you want to get some sleep. Hot towels and overnight kits
to make you look even more rested.
We won't let you go hungry either. You can choose from 4 entrees in first class and from
3 in economy.
Try the Cafezinho after dinner. It's a Brazilian coffee served strong, hot. and sweet. (With
regular coffee for the less adventurous.)
To make the flights seem even shorter, you can take in a movie. (There's a nominal charge of
S2.50 per headset in economy.) -^--r >r%. 1%. >W
With the service and the schedules we offer when you're y^f^l i^fl^rE
planning to go to Brazil. Miami is a great place to start. America's airline to the world.
Pan Am flights from Ri toCongon
. Sao Paulo, operated by \ ASP on behalf of Pan Am.
Sec your travel am-m.
nvt&*l
Phone 431-8000
BY APPOINTMENT |
966-8100


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Sho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 17,1977
, *
Your South Broward Neighbors. .
Max Landow's Animated World
By MARCY GROSS
Humphrey Bogart, Greer Garson.
Maureen O'Sullivan and Walter Pidgeon.
These stars have many movies to their credit,
but there is more to movies than actors.
There is the movie house, sound, lights,
cameras, cameramen, coming attractions,
credits and titles, and that is where we meet
Maxwell Landow, projectionist for the
Jewish Community Center Hollywood
Extension.
Originally from Brooklyn, N.Y., Landow
got his start in the photography field when
he was a young man, working for Alynlu
Studio. As Landow grew, so did Alynlu
Studio, and the firm merged with National
Screen Service.
NATIONAL screen Service was respon-
sible for producing trailers (previews) for
such great studios as: Metro Gold win Mayer,
Paramount and Twentieth Century Fox.
"My position as cameraman and
animation special effects photographer
developed into an enlightened and gratifying
career," Landow said.
"My job," he continued, "was to make
titles and special effects which would be
incorporated with scenes from the picture
with the end result being a three-minute
advertisement of a forthcoming movie.
"I WAS sent to Hollywood, California, in
1932. It was there that I had my brief en-
counter with the wonderfully creative Walt
Disney. We gave life to two Disney creations,
"The Big Bad Wolf and the "Three Little
Pigs."
"I guess I was lucky," siad Landow, "the
war did not take me away from my work. In
fact, it probably brought us closer together.
The War Department assigned me to Wright
Field in Ohio. I worked in the training film
production laboratory as a photographer.
Our lab was charged with the production of
training films for the entire Army Air Forces.
"I left the animation division of the Jab
with two years of service and the title of head
photogrpher."
LANDOW returned to National Screen
Service's employ following his release from
the service. Various business transactions
with WTVJ brought Landow to the Miami
area. He returned to New York after com-
pleting his Miami commitments.
"By 1955," Landow explained, "the in-
dustry had become so fragmented, that I
decided to move to the Miami area with my
wife, Blanche, and daughter, Bonnie Ruth.
Shortly after settling, I had the opportunity
to be a part of the camera crew for the movie
"Eternal Summer" which was produced
completely in Miami.
"My hobbies have always been motion pic-
tures and slide photography. I've been for-
tunate to have been able to actively pursue
these hobbies. Movies are my favorite, not
stage shows. They take me all over the world
stage shows don't.
"NOW THAT I look back over my
career," Landow said, "I would have to say
that the highlight of my career was in 1932-
33 when I created and produced the main
title and credits for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's
"Grand Hotel." That was quite an honor!
Since his retirement in 1975, Landow has
been active with the Jewish Community
Center Hollywood Extension. He is a
volunteer projectionist for the JCC movies.
1
M
The Executive Steering Committee of Federation's Allocations
Committee met to review the allocations process for the coming
year. Seated (from left) are Joyce Newman, R. Joel Weiss and
Abraham Halpern. Standing (from left) are Paul Koenig and
Dr. Norman Atkin, Allocations Committee chairman.
Federation Allocations
At the controls of the movie projector,,
Max Landow feels at home while
showing films to members of the Jewish
Community Center-Hollywood
Extension.
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward's 1977 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund monies are now in the
hands of the Allocations Com-
mittee.
Allocations Committee Chair-
man Dr. Norman Atkin said he is
pleased with the progress the
three study subcommittees have
made in reviewing the financial
requests of about 45 various
agencies.
"All of the study committees
have met." said Atkin. "Paul
Koenig and his committee have
studied the needs of the local and
regional agencies. R. Joel Weiss
and his committee have studied
the needs of the national and
overseas service agencies and
Arnold Rosenthal and his com-
mittee have reviewed the needs of
the national and overseas com-
munity relations and cultural
agencies.
"With this information now in
the hands of the Allocations
Committee." Atkin continued,
"we are prepared to make our
proposal to Federation's Board of
Directors at the June 28 meeting.
"With the success of the 1977
("J A-I EF campaign, we were able
to allocate more money to Israel
and still meet the needs of our
South Broward Jewish Com-
munity." Dr. Atkin noted.
More than 35 years ago Max Landow
brought animated drawings to life as car-
toons on the "silver screen." Here he
operates an animation machine and creates a
cartoon.
Mrs. Rabin
In Court
To Pay
Stiff Fine
TEL AVIV (JTA) Mrs.
Leah Rabin appeared in District
Court here June 1 to pay the
IL 250,000 fine imposed on her
for retaining a bank account in
the United States in violation of
Israel's currency law* The wile
of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin
made the payment by personal
check one day before the dwSel
set by the judge was due to
expire. She was accompanied by
her lawyer. Shimon Alexandra.
Disclosure of the joint account
in a Washington, D.C., bank {
which the Prime Minister and
Mrs. Rabin had failed to close
when Rabin's term as Ambas-
sador to the U.S. ended four
years ago precipitated Rabin'.*
resignation as leader of the Laboi
Party. Mrs. Rabin was found
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FULL AMERICAN PLAN 3 MEALS DAILY
1


Friday, June 17,1977
The Jewish Ftoridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
Strelitz Named NeW UJA Chairman Mitchell Klein Caps Nova Honors
Leonard R. Strelitz of Norfolk,
Va., has been elected general
chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal for 1978. His election
took place at a UJA executive
committee retreat in Glen Cove,
NY.
Frank R. Lautenberg, out-
going general chairman, was
named president of the United
Jewish Appeal, Inc.
' Speaking before 150 national
and community leaders, Strelitz
said: "UJA's success is not
measured by yesterday's accom-
plishments but by what we do
today and plan for tomorrow
especially in 1978. which marks
our thirtieth year of partnership
with the people of Israel."
He told the assembled leaders
that American Jewry's solidarity
with the people of Israel tran-
> scends all personalities and
^ governments. "It is an enduring
bond that cannot, and will not, be
broken by circumstances, for the
Jewish lifeline is global. Our con-
tinuity as one Jewish people
depends on our continual re-
dedication. We must demand the
best of ourselves as we face head-
on the shifting winds of change.
One of Strelitz's first acts as
general chairman was the ap-
pointment of Gordon Zacks of
Columbus, Ohio, to be vice chair-
man of the UJA.
Strelitz has played a leading
role in Jewish communal life for
over a decade. He served lor
several years as a UJA national
chairman. Before that, he was
president and chairman of the
, jfr| Unifarf .Jewish Fund of Norfolk.
" Va., and a member of its board
and executive committee.
-----------------------------------------------------------1
! Kfir Fighter On j
i
He is past chairman of the
Building Fund of the Norfolk and
Virginia Beach Jewish Com-
munity Center, a director of the
United Israel Appeal, and a
member of the Board of Gover-
nors of Tel Aviv University.
Also in Norfolk, he serves on
the Executive Committee of
DePaul Hospital and is cochair-
man of the Building Fund of
Eastern Virginia Medical
College.
He was the 1971 recipient of
the Annual Award of the
National Conference of Chris-
tians and Jews.
Strelitz is president of Haynes
Furniture Company and Sydnor
& Hundley, with retail furniture
stores in Virginia. He is also a
director of the Virginia National
Bank.
I
View At Paris
% Air Show
PARIS (JTA) Two
Israeli Kfir planes landed
here to attend the Inter-
national Air Show at Le
Bourget Airfield. This is
the first time the Israeli-
made supersonic fighter-
bomber was being publicly
shown outside Israel.
The two Kfirs landed at 3
p.m. sharp in bright sun-
shine. Painted in camou-
flage colors with the Israeli
Air Force markings, a full,
f^i. blue star of David and with
"the words "Israel Aircraft
Industry" painted on their
fuselage, they taxied to the
Israeli pavilion over which
flew the Israeli flag.
ONE OF the Kfir pUota, Col.
Danny Shapiro, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that they
had a perfect flight in spite of
100-knot winds practically all the
way. The Israeli formation, which
also included a modern version of
the STOL transport "Arava,"
made a technical stopover at
Brindisi, Italy, for refueling.
The two planes were on display
at Le Bourget and will also
engage in flight exercises with
their full stores which include
missiles and guns. Several
countries have been negotiating
with Israel for the purchase of
Kfirs and military attaches from
over 50 countries have reportedly
' asked to be allowed to inspect the
planes which are believed to fly at
l mach 2.3 and are rated among the
t
A graduate of Greenbrier
Military Academy and Virginia
Polytechnic Institute, Strelitz
lives with his wife, Joyce, and
their three children in Virginia
Beach.
Mrs. Strelitz is a national vice
chairman of the UJA Women's
Division, as well as a regional
vice chairman. She has been a
member of the National Board of
the Women's Division since 1966.
Zacks, the new vice chairman,
is former chairman of the UJA
Young Leadership Cabinet, a
national chairman of the UJA,
and a member of its Executive
Committee. A widely sought
after speaker, he is a member of
the Executive Committee of the
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee.
Zacks is president of R. G.
Barry Company, manufacturers
of leisure footwear.
Israel Ambassador Simcha Dinitz (center) meets with the
newly elected United Jewish Appeal General Chairman
Leonard R. Strelitz (right) and Frank R. Lautenberg. outgoing
general chairman, at the UJA Executive Committee Retreat in
(Hen Core, N. V.. late last month.
M8
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Mitchell Alan Klein, 18, grad-
uated as Valedictorian of Nova
High Schools Class of 1977 on
June 5 in ceremonies at Dania Jai
Alai. It was the first time in the
history of Nova, in Fort Lauder-
dale, that the Valedictorian spoke
at the commencement exercises.
At award ceremonies last
week, Mitchell, the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Myer Klein of Hallan-
dale, was awarded Nova's
Awards of Excellence in Spanish,
science and math. He was the
recipient of a scholarship from
the National Junior Honor
Society and a National Merit
Scholarship Letter of Com-
mendation.
Mitchell was also awarded a
four-year honorary Chancellor's
Scholarship from Washington
University in St. Louis, Mo.,
where he plans to begin his
college studies in August.
An avid tennis player, Mitchell
was the No. 2 player and captain
of the Nova Tennis Team, a team
which placed as runner-up in
district and Broward County
Athletic Conference competitions
for two years running.
His elected offices include
treasurer and chairman of fund-
raising for the National Senior
Honor Society and a board mem-
ber and chairman on the Tutoring
Committee of the Spanish Honor
Society.
MITCHELL KLEIN
Mitchell was named to Who's
Who Among American High
School Students for two con-
secutive years and was also
named to the Society of Dis-
tinguished American High
School Students.
He intends to major in Biology
or Chemistry in the Fall leading
to a career in medicine or medical
research.
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Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 17,1977


{
'*
As the Jewish people cele-
brate the 10th anniversary of the
unity of Jerusalem, our eternal
capital is once again the center
of attention. Jerusalem the
hope, the promise, the city of
David, whose very name signifies
peace ... cries out for response.
As we celebrate, let us pause
and reflect ... for our most
meaningful response to that an-
cient pledge remembered is to
convert our personal and com-
munity pledge of support for
Jews in need around the corner,
around the world, and especially
in Israel where expectations
await fulfillment into cash.
We have much more to do. We
have much more to give.
Not only to our fellow Jews in
Israel and around the world
but right here in our own com-
munity, around the corner.
Please pay your pledge today.
We Are One
1977 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Jewish Federation of South Broward
2838 Hollywood Blvd. Hollywood, Fla. 33020 Telephone 921-8810


Friday, June 17,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
J'-IBIVIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIHIBIBIBIBIBIB
Queen Elizabeth's Jewish Subjects
By PAMELA MELNIKOFF
Reprinted from London Jewish Chronicle
Last week H.M. Queen Elizabeth II
celebrated her Silver Jubilee, and many
of her Jewish subjects joined the crowds
that gathered to cheer her as she drove
through the streets of London.
Today there are over 400,000 Jews in
Britain, and it never occurs to us that we
should not enjoy perfect equality with
non-Jews. But it was not so in the days
when other great Queens sat on the
throne of England.
THINGS WERE very different, for
example, when Elizabeth I celebrated her
Silver Jubilee in 1583. Those of her
Jewish subjects who waved and cheered
as she drove in glittering procession
through the cobbled streets of the still-
walled City would have been very
anxious not to be recognized as Jews.
Officially, there were no Jews in Good
Queen Bess's England they had all
been expelled in 1290. But in fact there
was a Jewish community in the Parish of
St. Olave's Hart Street, not far from the
Tower of London, and another in Bristol.
These Jews were Marranos, born in
Spain and Portugal, who had fled to
England to escape the Inquisition.
Though their neighbors knew them as
New Christians, converts to Catholicism
who appeared to practice the rites of the
Church, they observed Judaism in
secret. Behind their heavy shutters and
locked doors they kept the Sabbath and
Festivals, baked matzot for Pesach, and
even held synagogue services all the
time fearful that a chance word might
betray them and send them back to the
torture-chambers of the Inquisition.
THESE NEW Christians enjoyed a
life that was prosperous, if not exactly
safe, and some held important positions
at Court. Among them was Dr. Rodrigo
Lopez, chief physician to the Queen and
house physician at St. Bartholomew's
Hospital. Unfortunately, Dr. Lopez fell
victim to a plot devised by the Earl of
Essex, and was accused of trying to
poison the Queen, convicted of high
treason, and hanged at Tyburn. His
execution was followed by a wave of anti-
Semitism which mainly expressed itself
in ballads and plays in which Jews were
presented as horrid villains. Among
these were Marlowe's "The Jew of
Malta" and Shakespeare's "The Mer-
chant of Venice" although in the
second play the Jew was somewhat
humanized by the writer's genius.
By the time Queen Anne came to the
throne in 1702 (she only reigned for
twelve years and so could not celebrate
her Silver Jubilee) life was very different
for the Jews of England. They no longer
lived in fear and secrecy, for they had
/*** .
QUEEN ELIZABETH II
been formally recognized by Oliver
Cromwell half a century earlier. The
London Jews, dressed in lace ruffles and
curled periwigs like their fellow-country-
men, now had two splendid synagogues,
the Sephardim worshipping at Bevis
Marks, which is still standing today, and
the Ashkenazim at the Great Synagogue
in Duke's Place, which was later to be
destroyed by one of Hitler's bombs.
These Jews included people of wealth
and influence but, for all that, they
still did not enjoy equality with their
non-Jewish neighbors.
The Silver Jubilee of Queen Victoria in
1862 saw many great changes in the
status of the Jewish community. For the
first time in history Jews were allowed to
become members of livery companies,
mayors and aldermen and Members of
Parliament. And in 1868 Benjamin Dis-
raeli even became Prime Minister.
Though born a Jew he had been baptized
as a child, but in earlier times no one of
Jewish birth would have been allowed to
hold the office.
THE JEWS who inhabited the
teeming streets of Victoria's London now
led an active Jewish communal life. They
had their synagogues and Hebrew
classes, their Jewish school (the Jews'
Free School, which still exists in a dif-
ferent form today) and their charitable
organizations and they even read the
Jewish Chronicle every Friday. What is
more, they were beginning to play a
prominent role outside the community,
with famous Jewish bankers and philan-
thropists, lawyers and politicians
making their contribution as Jews to the
country's prosperity.
But though some Jews were rich and
successful, others lived in dreadful
poverty. These were mainly immigrants
who had fled from persecution in Russia
and Poland. In the slums and dark
tenements of Victorian Stepney, saved
from starvation by the Jewish Board of
Guardians, the Soup Kitchen and other
charitable organizations they worked
hard and dreamed of better times.
These happier times are with us now,
and we had great reason to be thankful
as we watched our Queen drive through
the streets to celebrate her Silver
Jubilee.
PEDIATRICS ASSOCIATES, P.A.
Wishes to announce a new Pembroke Lakes Plaza
Office for the care of infants, children and
adolescents.
Edward J. Saltzman, M.D. Philip A. Levin, M.D.
Arnold L. Tanis, M.D. Jed J. Jacobson, M.D.
Robert S. Pittell, M.D. William E. Bruno Jr., M.D.
Peter J. Shulman, M.D.
10454 Taft Street, Pembroke Pines, Fla. 33026
Phone 431-8000
Malin New Cantor at Solel
Dr. Peter Keller, president of
Temple Solel in Hollywood, an-
nounces that Cantor Bruce Malin
has been engaged as cantor and
director of music for the
congregation.
Joining Temple Solel's spir-
itual leader, Rabbi Robert P.
Frazin, on the Bima, Cantor
Malin's baritone voice will bring
an additional dimension to the
Worship Services.
Cantor Malin received his
bachelor of music degree from
Ithaca College in New York. In
1973 he was invested and com-
missioned as a cantor at Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute of
Religion, School of Sacred Music,
where he received his degree of
bachelor of sacred music.
He has served congregations in
Needham, Mass., and for the past
three years has been the cantor
and vice principal of Temple
Emanu-El of Long Beach, N.Y.,
and the Adult Choir at Temple
Emanu-El. Cantor Malin is a
member of the Executive Board
of the American Conference of
Cantors.
His professional credits are
many including New York
School of the Opera and a soloist
in the First International Jewish
Music Festival held at Con-
necticut's Fairfield University.
Cantor Malin and his wife,
Deborah, will take up residence in
the Hollywood area.
New Hadassah Chapter
Holds First Installation
The first installation of the
newly formed Southwest Brow-
ard Chapter of Hadassah was
held on Wednesday, June 15 at
Temple Israel of Miramar. A
mini-luncheon was served with
the women of the Henrietta Szold
Group serving as hostesses.
Mrs. Abner Lewis, regional
advisor to the new chapter,
served as installing officer.
"Creation" was the luncheon
theme.
The groups comprising the
chapter are Eleanor Roosevelt
Group of Carriage Hills, H'Atid
Group of Miramar, Henrietta
Szold Group of Miramar and Tel
Chai of Holly brook.
New officers include Mrs. Alex
Packer, president; Mrs. Samuel
Cukell, education vice president;
Mrs. Bernard Gould, fund-raising
vice president; Mrs. Sidney
Fields, membership vice presi-
dent; Mrs. Jack Sherman, pro-
gram vice president; Mrs. Phillip
Bernstein, treasurer; Mrs. Morris
Kaltonovsky, financial secretary;
Mrs. Neil Lebin, recording sec-
retary; and Lillian Litt, cor-
responding secretary.
Each officer signed the charter
of the new chapter.
The following board members
were also called on to sign the
charter: Mrs. Charles Fine, life
membership chairman; Mrs.
Albert Sabo, youth aliyah chair-
man; Mrs. Herman Klorman,
parliamentarian and leadership
training chairman; Mrs. Jack
Sherman, bulletin and publicity
chairman; Mrs. Paul Cohen,
awards chairman; Mrs. Reuben
Kolinsky, Hadassah associates
chairman; Matilde Kaufman,
cards-certificates-Jewish Na-
tional Fund chairman; Mrs.
Franz Offsey, transfer chairman;
Mrs. Bernard Gould, ami
chairman.
Group presidents, Mrs. Paul
Cohen, Eleanor Roosevelt Group;
Mrs. Edward Shankman, H'Atid
Group; Mrs. Emma Rosen, Hen-
rietta Szold Group; and Mrs.
Smauel Levenson. Tel Chai
Group; also affixed their sig-
natures to the charter.
Mrs. Jack Eisenstat, Mrs.
Bernard Gould and Mrs. Paul
Cohen participated in the
program. Mrs. Jack Sherman
served as chairman of the day.
The New Horizons Choral Group
entertained. ______
STEVEN RIEVMAN, Ed. D.
CounselingTestingDiabetes Education
Announces His Association With The
BIOFEEDBACK
TRAINING CENTER
From The Practice Of
Biofeedback Education And Therapy
3939 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Fla. 33021
(305)963-7403
By Appointment
IBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIB^ -
Clinical Institute of Hypnotherapy
and SELF-IMPROVEMENT
C.G. Weisberg-Executive Director
Lose Weight Easily
Through HYPNOSIS and
BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION
Learn Self Hypnosis
All programs are individualized and administered by
Licensed-Certified Hypnotherapists
2640 Hollywood Blvd. 920-6206
CALL FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
i
m
I
j
I
j
i
r
'Z*****^^
THE
DIABETES LIFE CENTER
education counseling research
is pleased to announce its re-opening in a new location
5100 West Hallandale Boulevard
(within COMMUNITY HOSPITAL
OF SOUTH BROWARD)
again under the direction of Dr. Steven Rievman.
The Center invites all its friends, old and new,
to call or visit us in our new, modern setting.'
BY APPOINTMENT*
966-8100


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 17,1977
an]
Panoffl
howe andWiesel
SuRe Winner
foR Rea&eps
World of Our Fathers by Irving Howe. N.Y.: Simon &
Schuster, 714pp., $6.95, paperback.
Messengers of God: Biblical Portraits and Legends by
Elie Wiesel. N.Y.: Pocket Books, 249pp., $1.95,
paperback.
Two of the most popular and outstanding books
written over the past year have finally been released in
paperback. World of Our Fathers, winner of this year's
National Book Award for history, is available in a large
format paperbound edition with the same type size and
photographs, and at half the price of the hardbound
edition.
This paperback should stand up well, but Howes
excellent portrayal of the life of Eastern European Jews in
America is one of the few hardbound books for which this
reviewer would happily pay $14.95.
LEGENDS AND stories of Biblical personalities are
explored and masterfully told by Wiesel in Messengers of
God. His psychological and often disturbing insights into
the lives of our forefathers make fascinating reading.
Both the Howe and Wiesel books have been success-
fully offered as courses through the Central Agency for
Jewish Education this season. Now that these fine works
are available in less expensive editions, more readers will
have the opportunity to read and study them .
Rifka Grows Up by Chaya Burstein. N.Y.: Hebrew Pub-
lishing Co. (Bonim Books), 184pp., $6.95.
Stories My Grandfather Should Have Told Me edited by
Deborah Brodie. Illustrated by Carmela Tal Baron.
N.Y.: Hebrew Publishing Co. (Bonim Books), 107pp.,
$6.95.
Twelve-year-old Rifka, the only girl in her little
Jewish town in Russia who had learned to read and write
both Hebrew and Russian, wants to further her education
and see the world. She earns money to buy her own books,
and for fun she ice-skates in the winter.
ALL OF Rifka s thoughts and dreams take place in
czarist Russia, so she must also worry about quotas for
Jewish students as well as her Jewish teacher's trouble-
some political activities. Rifka Grows Up is the sequel to
Rifka Bangs The Teakettle. In words and illustrations,
Chaya Burstein vividly recreates for young children life in.
a Russian village in the early 1900s.
The real-life Rifka is Burstein's mother, who told the
young Chaya, growing up in Brooklyn, of her Russian
childhood.
Deborah Brodie has put together episodes in juvenile
fiction which reflect the richness and variety of twentieth
century Jewish life.
THERE ARE selections which deal with the small
Jewish town in Europe; the early days of pioneering in the
land of Israel and in modern Israel as well; and the
America of a few generations ago and today.
The twelve Stories are excerpted from children's
books written by Jewish authors who appeal to young
readers such as Chaya Burstein, Marietta Moskin
Marilyn. Hirsh, Molly Cone, Sydney Taylor and David
Adler.
Reminiscences by Lillian C. Simonhoff. Miami Beach:
Circle Blue Printing Co., 87pp.
Lillian Simonhoff, resident of Miami Beach since
1924. writes Reminiscences "to delve into the recesses of
my mind to recall the experiences that have had a real
meaning for me ... I give this book especially to (my
children) with the hope that they will not forget me."
Her autobiography includes some interesting per-
spectives on Harry Simonhoff, her brother-in-law, the
American Jewish historian. In addition, the author writes
about some of the dignitaries in Miami, around the
country, and abroad whom she has met in her travels and
through her Jewish organizational activities.
The Arab sheikhs would have the West over a barrel but
for the North Sea oil.
how eneRQy has Changed
face of Woal6's economy
'/ stiff say thumbing lifts to Capitol Hill it taking our new White House image too let''
Peering into the future is a
notoriously chancy business,
especially in the field of economic
affairs. This is why we pay our
stock and commodity brokers
such large commissions to get it
right, and roundly curse them
when they judge the market
wrong. But in more global terms,
someone has to be responsible for
planning state economies and
hence the world economy.
The luckless politicians who
put forward the projections of
how a given economy
will progress over, say a five-
year period, are nearly always
condemned with hindsight by
their opposition.
IN THE relatively stable
economic times of the late 1950s
anil early 1960s, for example,
most Western countries
projected their populations would
continue to grow and accordingly
made massive investment in
overspill towns and new cities to
take the expected increase.
Who could have foreseen then
that many of the new towns and
cities would become concrete
ghost towns?
Or that where large population
outflows from city centers have
taken place, new economic
problems would arise. New York
is one such city where the general
scramble to get out by the high
wage earners has lowered the
city's tax base to such an extent
that it can no longer provide for
those who need the city's social
services most the poor, the
elderly and unemployed.
MORE THAN any other single
factor, predicting the cost of
energy as part of any manufac-
turing process takes up an awful
lot of executives' time these days.
Could anyone making a five-year
projection in 1972 have dreamed
that a single act by a small group
of predominantly Middle Eastern
countries would have thrown the
world economy into such turmoil
for so long?
However, economic surveys
and projections on their results
do have an important role as the
vast amounts spent on research
by governments, private enter-
prise, banks and brokerage firms
demonstrates To The Point
invited a group of prominent
economists in the OECD
countries to give their views on
how the world economy will alter,
and why, during the next five
years.
Probably chastened by the
i events leading up to 1977, most
took a very conservative line on
any major economic develop-
ments taking piece in the next
five years. .
THE GENERAL view was
that given energy as the single
most important factor, the
Middle Eastern states have over-
estimated Western dependence
on them and the massive invest-
ment plans they have embarked
upon based on projected incomes
over the next 10 years have put
thm in n nnnitinn w"
unlikely to make any more rash
moves in the next five years.
Most participants agreed that
government intervention in
Western economies will increase,
mainly due to the nature of
democracies and the way that
political parties have to be seen
the EEC. the increased flow of
North Sea oil should improve
Britain's situation although Italy
will remain weak and France will
slide down to meet them. West
Germany will still remain the
strongest of the Nine.
Of the non-EEC European
COMMENT
"controlling" the power of the
private sector, especially multi-
national companies.
However, some of the experts
pointed to the growth of
separatist movements and
deyolutionists and opined that
voices calling for less government
intervention in private and
business matters will become
increasingly important in the
next five years.
ASKED whether they thought
the international monetary
system has been managed ef-
ficiently or whether it could be
streamlined, the majority felt
that the changeover from the
Bretton Woods system to
floating parities had been
handled reasonably adequately,
but that currency blocs like the
European "snake" can only
survive if adjustments to the
rates are made to keep the rates
in touch with economic reality.
Everyone agreed that inflation
will still be a major threat in five
years, probably prompted by
increased economic activity in
the currently depressed levels.
Some countries, particularly
West Germany, Switzerland and
the U.S. will have contained it to
within 5 percent. But most
countries will have become used
to rates as high as 10 percent.
The most common forms of
controls will be tight monetary
policy in the more affluent
countries while the poorer
countries will still maintain wage
and price controls.
ON THE general economic
outlook for the world, pessimism
was the order of the day. Within
countries, Switzerland is
naturally expected to remain
strong while Spain. Greece and
Turkey are expected to improve
their economic situation
depending on Common Market
acceptance, which seems
unlikely, in the next five years.
As for the energy- problem
around which most of the
economic problems revolve, it
seems likely that the more
militant OPEC members will re-
align themselves with Saudi
Arabia on the price issue as oil
becomes a buyer's market. The
effect of the oil crises has thrown
new impetus into research into
more efficient use of other energy
forms.
ALREADY the U.S., Soviet
Union and Japan are conducting
major research into solar energy,
and coal has once again become
competitive with oil, leading to
increased investment by govern-
ments, energy companies and oil
companies into developing new or
previously uneconomic seams.
Oil apart, raw materials will
play an increasingly important
role in the politics and economic
climate between the developed
and developing world. The
supply of commodities to the
Western industrial machine will
become more uncertain while the
politics of confrontation con-
tinue. This makes it highly
unlikely that a New Economic
Order will emerge within five
years.
What of the Third World? The
general view is that the poor
countries will get even poorer.
hope Voiced foR still
WateRs with Bonn
By HORST A. SIEBERT
In German Tribune
After his first talks recently
with the Carter Administration
the FDP's economic affairs
spokesman Graf Otto Lambs-
dorff said that he had gained the
impression that the economic
controversy between Washington
and Bonn would gradually be
settled and that future dis-
cussions would be marked by a
more conciliatory atmosphere.
Let us hope that he will be
proved right. In any event, the
impression he gained during his
brief visit to Washington cannot
the relations between the two
countries.
PRESIDENT CARTER and
his team never miss an oppor-
tunity to exert pressure on Bonn
and the other few nations with a
trade surplus outside OPEC.
The call for a coordinated
growth policy is only part of
Washington's new campaign.
The fact that the U.S. Treasury is
constantly drawing attention to
West Germany's trade surplus
and pointing out that this is out
of keeping with the international
economic landscape and that it
prevents the return to an inter-


riday, June 17,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
hope Voiced f or Still Wateps With Ronn
Fromberg to Take BB Presidency

Continued from Page 12
.aiinnal economic equilibrium,
nust be taken seriously.
It is immaterial in this context
hat the Federal Republic's trade
lurplus has been diminishing
lonstantly over the past two
Vears.
BONN IS under pressure to
nake use of its excellent inter-
ational credit rating and to put
|p with deficits. Despite dis-
Irepancies in the Carter Admin-
stration's concept, the new U.S.
Bovernment nevertheless calls
or a massive re-evaluation of the
leutschmark and other strong
lurrencies.
There can be little doubt that
J.S. pressure on Bonn to abolish
|ts restrictive course will be
stepped up after the recent visit
Jto the White House of Britain's
|Prime Minister James Callaghan.
Callaghan and Carter are
|evidently in full accord in their
assessment of the present global
economic situation. It might not
.have been a bad idea if Chancellor
[Schmidt had decided to pay an
|early visit to Washington.
CALLAGHAN, who is at
Ipresent engaged in a struggle for
Ithe survival of his government,
Ipredicted a worsening of the in-
ternational recession for 1978.
According to him, unemploy-
I men! in most industrialized
[nations excepting only the
United States and Japan will
increase.
Moreover, he does not exclude
the possibility of politcal unrest
in the deeply indebted developing
nations. Similar views can also be
heard in the U.S. Treasury and in
the Slate Department.
It is quite conceivable thai
Carter and Callaghan have
harted the course for a kind of
Marshall Plan for the Third
World, to be passed at the forth-
coming economic summit in
London in May.
THIS WOULD entail foreign
So What's New?
exchange credits rather than a
moratorium on debts to those
countries whose foreign exchange
more support because it would
create demand which the in-
dustrialized nations cannot
engender on their own.
In other words. Third World
imports would boost production
in the industrialized nations and
this, in turn, would bring new
investments, thus creating jobs.
EVEN IF the theory that such
stimuli have no effect on inflation
is not quite tenable, Bonn cannot
reject such a pro|x>sal. The Fed-
eral Republic has considerable
foreign exchange reserves which
could be used for a good purpose.
On the other hand, the Bonn
(iovernment must remain stead-
fast where national economic
policy is concerned. Its recipe is
clearly the better one. and the
accusation that the Federal
Republic has done nothing to
Ixiost the economy on a world-
wide scale goes against better
knowledge.
BONN SHOULD work
towards a common alliance vis-a-
vis Japan which is more and more
riding on the backs of the other
industrialized nations.
If studies which are making
the rounds in the United States
are anything to go by. Japan has
been deliberately blocking the
recovery efforts of its trading
partners. It is quite obvious that
Tokyo has for fifteen months
delayed stepping up imports.
Its government spending rose
by a mere 2.4 percent (in real
terms) in 1976. compared with 9.1
percent in 1975. For political
reasons. Washington is evidently
reluctant to show more muscle
towards Japan and Bonn
should not put up with this.
Prominent Miami attorney and
active civic leader Malcolm H.
Fromberg will be installed as
president of B'nai B'rith District
Five at its annual convention
Tuesday, June 21, at the
Americana Hotel.
Delegates representing nearly
25,000 members from some 200
lodges in B'nai B'rith District
Five, which covers seven
southeastern states, will be in
attendance at the four-day
conclave which begins Sunday.
FROMBERG, a cochairman of
the B'nai B'rith International
Legacy Develop-
m en t md
Deferred Giving
Programs, is a
member of the
I nternational
Board of Gover-
nors of B'nai
B'rith and serves
as a member of
its National
Fund- Raising
Cabinet. FROMBERG
Fromberg has been a member
of and active participant in a
variety of District committees,
including budget, personnel,
administrative and convention
committees. He has been a
member of the District Five
Board of Governors for eight
consecutive years.
His dedication in the area of
fund-raising resulted in the
formation of the first local
metropolitan Fund-Raising
Cabinet, a format which is being
introduced in other urban areas
throughout the country to aid
We Won't Accept U.S. View-Peres
By GIL SEDAN
JKRUSALEM (JTA) -
Defense Minister Shimon Peres
said that Israel will not accept
the American interpretation of
Security Council resolutions
which holds that Israel must
return to its 1967 borders with
only minor changes.
"We have a serious debate
with the U.S. and there is no
reason to cover it, above and
beyond party differences," Peres
declared at a meeting of the
Labor Party's Ben Gurion Circle
in Tel Aviv.
BUT THE Defense Chief, who
heads the Labor Party, was
severely critical of the political
methods of Likud which defeated
Labor in the May 17 elections.
Asserting that he did not want
to be identified with personal
criticism of Likud leader Mena-
chem Begin that has appeared in
overseas news media recently,
Peres contrasted the diplomatic
methods of the Labor govern-
ment with those espoused by
Likud, the party that is expected
to head the next Israeli govern-
ment.
He said the "two conceptions"
were evident as early as 1947
when Begin opposed the United
Nations General Assembly
resolution to partition Palestine,
the resolution that gave inter-
national sanction to Israel's
creation.
THE DEBATE between Labor
and Likud, he said, is between
vision and realism. It was the
realism of the Labor Alignment
that brought Israel some of her
greatest achievements, Peres
declared. And it is that road that
Israel should continue to follow
"no matter how many mandates
the Labor Party had," he said.
Peres spoke sardonically of
Begin's post-election statements
on the West Bank and other
matters as examples of the gap
between realist and visionary.
"One can change the Finance
Minister but one cannot change
the price of oil in the world," he
said. "One can make heart-rend-
ing speeches in Kaddum (the
illegal Gush F.munim settlement
in Samaria where Begin spoke
after the elections promising
additional Jewish settlements in
the region) but there are still
American interests. And I am
sure they will not be looked after
according to the books of Jere-
miah and Isaiah."
THE LATTER was a reference
to Begin's remark that he would
convince President Carter of
Israel's right to the West Bank
by virtue of the Bible.
Referring to the election
results, Peres said, "The people
are sovereign to decide and it is
good that, for a change, they will
taste the alternative party. I am
not at all sure they will order
another similar meal. Let us see if
all the problems will be solved.
One can change a government
but one cannot change the world.
One can change the regime but
one cannot change the situation."
Peres did not refer directly to
former Defense Minister Moshe
Dayan's shift from the Labor
Party to Likud.
British Urged to Counter Arab Boycott
LONDON (JTA) The
I British government was urged to
I take effective action against the
I Arab boycott by leaders of three
[major Anglo-Jewish organiza-
tions. In a memorandum to
Prime Minister James Callaghan,
Ithey called for an immediate end
Ito Foreign Office complicity in
Ithe boycott and for a change in
the advice the Department of
Trade gives to businessmen
[threatened by the boycott.
The three leaders were Lord
'Fisher of Camden, president of
Pthe Board of Deputies of British
[Jews, Eric Moonman MP, chair-
[man of the British Zionist Fed-
eration and Fred Worms, presi-
dent of B'nai B'rith in the United
Kingdom.
'I HE MEMORANDUM, re-
leased at a press conference at the
House of Commons Monday, also
asked for a ten-point legislative
program and cited anti-boycott
legislation in the U.S. and
Canada as examples of what
could be undertaken here.
The government was urged,
among other things, to prohibit
the furnishing of information of
hniiness relationships with Is
B'nai B'rith in its fund-raising for
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foun-
dations, B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization and Career and
Counseling Services.
FROMBERG DRAFTED and
introduced at last year's
International Convention a
resolution which was adopted as
the official statement of B'nai
B'rith fund-raising policy.
Prior to becoming a District
officer, Fromberg was president
of the B'nai B'rith Council of
South Florida Ixniges and
president-elect of the Florida
State Association of B'nai B'rith
Lodges. He is a member of the
executive committee of the
Florida Regional Board of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith and is treasurer of the
B'nai B'rith Senior Citbens
Housing Committee of South
Florida.
In addition to his B'nai B'rith
activities, Fromberg is a director
of Temple Emanu-El, Miami
Beach and serves as a member of
the Advisory Committee and
Committee on Non-Local
Allocation of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
A graduate of Northwestern
University with a bachelor of
science degree in business ad-
ministration, he received his juris
doctor degree from the
University of Michigan Law
School. He is a senior partner in
the law firm of Fromberg.
Fromberg and Roth, with offices
in Miami and Hallandale.
Fromberg and his wife. Arlene.
are residents of North Miami and
are the parents of two daughters.
Begin Won't Unilaterally
Annex West Bank-Day an
or with non-Israeli blacklisted
companies; and to forbid the
issuance of negative certificates
of origin as at present practiced
by the Foreign Office in con-
nection with goods destined for
Iraq.
The memorandum bitterly
criticized the government for
failing to protect British com-
panies from the boycott. It was
also estimated that as a result of
the boycott, British companies
were losing up to 10 million
Pounds a year of exports to
Israel, one of this country's
leading trading partners.
LONDON (JTA) Moshe
Dayan said here that he had
received a double assurance that
an Israeli government led by
Menachem Begin would not uni-
laterally annex the West Bank.
Interviewed on BBC television's
Panorama program, Dayan said
Begin had agreed that there
would be no annexation by Israel
as long as negotiations went on.
Nor would it happen auto-
matically if negotiations broke
down, if that happened, he said,
"then we shall sit together and
see where do we go from there."
DAYAN SAID Begin had also
agreed "completely" to his in-
sistence that the people of the
West Bank should retain the
right to send their rep-
resentatives to Amman as mem-
bers of Jordan's Parliament.
He defended his readiness to
serve as Begin's Foreign Minister
on grounds that he was closer to
the Likud leader than to the
Labor Party in believing that no
part of the West Bank should
ever be given up.
He said he and Begin agreed,
however, that Israel should set
no prior conditions to
negotiations.
ON PRESIDENT Carter's
suggestion that Israel should
withdraw approximately to the
1967 lines, Dayan said: "I just
don't believe that there is any
reasonable line of partition of the
West Bank and whoever talks
about it should just show me
what the line will look like."
DAYAN WAS optimistic that
the Geneva conference could take
place and about its outcome.
However, he put more emphasis
on the current diplomatic con-
tacts, adding that it would be
necessary to go to Geneva only
for the final signing of an
agreement.
The parties should aim initially
at an all-out peace. But since that
appeared unattainable, they
should also work towards an
ending of the state of war, he
said. Although Israel must be
very careful not to fall into a trap,
he believed that President Sadat
did not want a wi
Dayan denied that he had
betrayed the Labor Party and
justified his agreement with
Likud claiming it was made
under "very special cir-
cumstances."
VOA Airs
Possibilities
Of War
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Voice of America, in a world-
wide broadcast on the tenth
anniversary of the Six-Day War,
said that "The question that
haunts the Middle East today is
will there be another war
and when will it come?"
The broadcast said that Presi-
dent Carter "obviously realizes
that time is not on the side of
peace and that, if another Middle
East war is to be avoided, the
hard decisions that need to be
made must be made without
much more delay."
THE ENGLISH-Ianguage
version of the broadcast, a copy
of which was obtained by the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency, did
not indicate who might start a
new war in the Middle East, nor
did it refer to Security Council
Resolutions 242 and 338 which
call for negotiations between
Israel and the Arab states and on
which the U.S. government says
it bases its Middle East policy.
The VOA, an arm of the U.S.
Information Agency (USIA)
receives its policy from the State
Department and its broadcasts
are cleared by State Department
officials directly concerned with
the issues discussed.
THE TENTH anniversary
broadcast said the Six-Day War
"did nothing to settle" the
Middle East dispute, and "in fact
there are those who maintain that
it made the conflict worse." It
said that "prospects for a settle-
ment are better than they have
been at any time in the past


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 17,1977
JCC Health, Physical Education Complex Dedicated
Dedication ceremonies for the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Com-
munity Center Health and Physical Education Complex, a constituent
of the Jewish Federation of South Broward, took place Sunday, June
12, in the recently completed gymnasium. Pictured are some of the
people involved in the realization of the Center which has been
described as "the largest of its kind in the South."
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Lewis E. Cohn, president of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.

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From left, Myron Berezin, executive director
of the Jewish Community Centers of South
Florida; and Nathan Pritcher, of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward, chat with
President Jimmy Carter when he visited the
Center last summer.
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Eager gymnasts line up to try out the new
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gymnasium.
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Muriel and Robert Russell. Mrs. Russell was
installed as president of the Jewish Com-
munity Centers of South Florida. Robert
Russell is general chairman of the Building
Fund Campaign.
:::
4
The JCC's Health and Physical Education
Complex is complete with a basketball court.
!
Swimmers test the water while others gather
around to view the completed indoor swim-
ming pool in the physical education complex


. June 17,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 15
ByABehalpeRn
Question: Why do we eat dairy dishes on the
Itival of Shavuot?
Dr. Charles Friedman
Hollywood, Florida
Lnswer: Shavuot is a Hebrew word meaning
eks. It is one of the three Pilgrim Festivals,
other two are Pesach (Passover) and Sukkot
Ibernacles, the Feast of Booths).
Shavuot is celebrated on the sixth day of the
fcith of Sivan. Orthodox and Conservative Jews
Europe and the United States celebrate it for
days, the sixth and seventh of Sivan. In
ael, as well as by Reform Jewry, the Shavuot
|liday is celebrated for only one day, the sixth
Sivan.
THE BIBLICAL names for this Festival are:
ag Shavuot, the Feast of Weeks (Exodus
t22; Deut.l6:10), Yom Ha-Bikkurim, the Day
[the First Fruits (Numbers 28:26), and Chag
i-Katzir, the Harvest Feast (Exodus 23:16).
Rabbis of the Mishna refer to this holiday as
zeret meaning termination. This holiday is also
lerred to as Pentecost, a Greek word meaning
ly. It occurs on the fiftieth day after the begin-
ag of the counting of the Omer (the first sheaf
during the barley harvest, which was offered
Ithe Temple as a sacrifice on the second day of
lssover(Lev.23:15).
)n Shavuot during the Temple period it was
stomary to bring two Challah loaves as an
Ifering of the first fruits of the wheat harvest.
[Although the Biblical and Mishnaic names for
is Festival indicate it to be an agricultural
festival, following the destruction of the Temple
adition emphasized that Shavuot com-
emorates the giving of the Torah on Mt. Sinai,
our liturgy and prayers the holiday is referred
as Z'man Matan Torateynu (the season of
pving of our Torah).
ACCORDING to the Encyclopedia of the
?wish Religion, nowhere in the Bible is this date
tplicitly given and it is deduced by calculation
ased upon the narrative in Exodus 19:1-16.
Because of the agricultural aspect of the
festival it is customary to adorn the Synagogue
fnd the home with plants and flowers.
On Shavuot among Jews everywhere it is
Customary to serve milchigs (dairy dishes),
loney should also be eaten. Some authorities say
Ihat they are eaten because the Torah is corn-
tared to milk and honey. 'Honey and milk are
linder your tongue" (Song of Songs, 4:11).
Other authorities say that dairy dishes should
(he eaten because the Law of the First Fruit is
[placed in juxtaposition to a Law concerning milk.
The choice first fruit of your soil you shall bring
to the house of the Lord your God. You shall not
poil a kid in its mother's milk" (Exodus 23:19).
SOME OF the dishes served on Shavuot are
blintzes filled with meat or cheese and sour cream,
trudels, cheese cakes, cheese pies, knishes, yeast
Hough filled with meat and / or potatoes, cheese
kf fruit and baked, and kreplach, a three-cornered
Loss
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Jin, we repeat, there is no cost,
I certainly no obligation. Thou-
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pocket of dough filled with meat or cheese. The
three-cornered cake is a reminder that the Torah
is of three parts, Torah, Neviyim, and Ketuvim,
(Pentateuch, Prophets and Hagiographa), and
was given to a people of three classes (Priests,
Levites, and Israelites), on the third month
(Sivan) through Moses, who was the third child of
his parents.
Other dairy dishes are beet borsht with sour
cream, chlodnik, a cucumber soup, and shtshav, a
cold sorrel soup.
Some Sephardim bake a seven heavens cake to
symbolize the Seven Heavens which God rent at
the giving of the Torah. Cottage cheese, popular
everywhere, is associated with legends such as
the Israelites' late return to the camp after
receiving the commandments from Mt. Sinai
when the milk had already soured.
ACCORDING TO the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch
(The Code of Jewish Law-abridged) in order to
have joy on every Festival it is a mitzvah to eat
meat. Because on Shavuot dairy dishes are eaten
in addition to meat, "Great care should be ob-
served in order not to violate a prohibition" (vol.
3,p.l2).
It is interesting to note that the Code of Jewish
Law-abridged, in the above mentioned chapter,
points out that although by eating and drinking
on a Festival one fulfills a mandatory command-
ment one should not be a glutton and spend the
entire day in eating and drinking. It is also
necessary to enjoy the study of the Torah as well
as to perform the duty to feed the orphan, the
widow, and others who are in poverty.
"In the synagogue it is customary to read the
Book of Ruth on Shavuot. Among the reasons
given are: that the events recorded in Ruth took
place at harvest time (Ruth 2:23): that Ruth was
the ancestor of David (Ruth4-17) who,
traditionally, died on Shavuot; that Ruth's
'conversion' to Judaism is appropriate reading for
the festival which commemorates the giving of
the Torah: and that Ruth's loyalty is symbolic of
Israel's loyalty to the Torah" (Encyclopaedia
Judaica, vol.14, p.1321).
REFORM JEWRY has introduced the rite of
Confirmation on this holiday. Unlike the Bar
Mitzvah ceremony for boys and the Bat Mitzvah
ceremony for girls, the rite of Confirmation
initiated girls as well as boys into the religious life
of Israel at the same time. Because the Torah was
revealed on Shavuot, this holiday was selected for
the ceremony of Confirmation.
Albert L. Shulman, in Gateway to Judaism,
says that the significance of Shavuot is as
follows:
"It reminds us of the Jewish contribution
of the Torah or Moral Law to the World.
It reminds Israel of her obligation to be a
'Kingdom of Priests' and a 'Holy Nation.'
It commemorates the agricultural nature
of the existence of Israel in ancient times"
(vol.1, p.379).
Editor's note:
" Please send all questions to:
ASK ABE
C o The Jewish Federation of
of South Broward
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
id.....****
Candtelite
Time
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FO
Alexandrovich to Cantillate Here
For Fall High Holy Day Services
A world-famous cantor will
make his first appearance in this
area conducting High Holy Day
services, sponsored by Temple
Beth Israel, at the new Sunrise
Musical Theatre. It will be the
"first" time religious services will
be held at the theater.
Misha Alexandrovich, the
great Russian Jewish tenor,
holds some of the highest honors
ever accorded a performing artist
by the Soviet Union during his 30
years before the Soviet public.
His recordings sold over a
million annually in the USSR and
he has' given an estimated 6,000
concerts, appearing before live
audiences of several million
people.
He appeared at Carnegie Hall
twice and in concert at the Miami
Beach Theatre of the Performing
Arts. For such programs, he
combines cantorial music with
Yiddish, Russian, Polish, English
and folk songs.
Alexandrovich will be joined
by Rabbi Emanuel Schenk at the
theater. Rabbi Schenk served a
Brooklyn congregation for many
years and now is rabbi emeritus.
Active in religious and civic
affairs in the Fort Lauderdale
area. Rabbi Schenk has con-
ducted services for Temple Beth
Israel for the past four years.
This will be one of four services
conducted in the Conservative
tradition. The full complement of
morning and evening services for
the duration of the holidays at all
locations will be under the
personal supervision of Temple
Beth Israels Rabbi Phillip
Labowitz.
Another high holy day service
will be held at Phase III Sunrise
Lakes Condominium, conducted
by Rabbi Harri E. Schwartz and
Cantor Sol Schwartz. Rabbi Sch-
wartz has served as part-time
rabbi at the Hallandale Jewish
Center for the last four years.
Services at the Inverrary
Country Club in Lauderhill will
be conducted by Rabbi Robert
Chazan and Cantor David
Golinken. Rabbi Chasen grad-
uated from the Jewish Theo-
logical Seminary, has a master's
and Ph.D. degree from Columbia
University, and has published
numerous scholarly articles in
American and European jour-
nals.
Services at Temple Beth Israel
will be conducted by Rabbi
Phillip Labowitz and Cantor
Maurice Neu, and will be for
members only.
For further information
contact Temple Beth Israel.
Religious Directory
NORTH BROWARD
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 21S1 Riverside
Drive. Reform (44).
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 104
57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. (44A)
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 4920 SW 3Sttl St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Drazin.
Cantor Abraham Kester. (481
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 13t Tatt St.
Conservative. Rabbi Sidney I. Lubin.
(63)
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi
Sheldon J. Harr. 144)
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA-
GOGUE. 7473 NW 4th St. ()
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Carl Klein, PhD. Cantor Jacob
1 Daniiger. (12)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
ltsoi NE 32nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kmgsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. (37)
HOLLYWOOD
BETH AHM TEMPLE.
Ave. Conservative.
Landman. (47B)
310 SW 42nd
Rabbi Max
BETH EL TEMPLE. 13S1 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel JaHe. As-
sistant Rabbi Jonathan Woll. (45)
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601 Arthur
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (44)
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Cantor Yehuda Heiloraun. (65)
SOLEL TEMPLE. 5100 Sheridan St.
Liberal. Rabbi Robert Frazin. (47C)
rOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
3291 Stirling Road. Oaks Condomin-
ium. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe Bom
zer. (5?)
JOHNSON-FOSTER
FUNERAL HOME, INC.
1650 HARRISON ST. HOLLYWOOD, FLA. PHONE: 922-7511
Paul J. Houlihan,
L.F.D.
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
Temple 3etkl
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tjazdetu
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For information call: 920-8225 or writ*
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Finn I aw literature on tee
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NAME.- ___
ADDRESS:
PHONE:


Pa** 16
The Jewish Floridian and Shofdr of Greater HoUywood
Frkky, Juo17,l977
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