The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00172

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJewish Floridian
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
.7-Number 11
Friday, June 3, 1977
Price 25 Cents
Likud Hails Victory As 'Turning Point'
tvs 'No'
Second Heart
Attack Fells
\egin Again?
MENACHEM BEGIN
TEL AVIV A second heart attack seems to have
Jled Likud Party leader Menachem Begin earlier this
?k. He was entered into the intensive care unit of a
^spital here Monday after complaining of exhaustion and
tensive fatigue.
Begins physicians denied he had suffered another
ick, and Dr. Sholomo Laniado, head of Ichilov Hos-
cardiac section, siad that "There is not any
bdence of a heart attack. He said Begin's condition was
food, very good."
BUT HE would make no prognosis, and Begin was to
| kept under observation for several days.
Meanwhile, Simcha Ehrlich, the No. 2 man behind
kgin, saw the leader in the hospital and began to discuss
rmation of a coalition with him. Doctors cautioned it
^s premature to speculate when he would return to
vernment.
IN MARCH, in the intensive heat of the campaign,
|gin suffered his first heart attack.
If the 63-year-old leader cannot continue, another
jntial Prime Minister, presumably Ehrlich, would take
i place.
......MitTflirrori.....nr rmiriTi r.......mi i .........".....".......---------------------"""
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Likud hailed its apparent
election victory as "an his-
toric turning point in the
annals of the Jewish nation
and the Zionist move-
ment." Those were the
words of its leader, Mena-
chem Begin as he addressed
thousands of supporters,
red-eyed and nearly hys-
terical with joy, who be-
sieged the party headquar-
ters here at 3:30 a.m., May
18.
The early projections of a
Likud upset victory with 41
seats in the next Knesset
over the Labor Alignment
which was pared down to 33
seats, were confirmed by
that hour.
Throngs poured into the
normally empty pre-dawn
streets, shouting, dancing,
embracing and chanting
"Am Israel Chai." Begin,
64, and only recently re-
covered from a heart at-
tack, was up to the oc-
casion.
FOR HIM, as he said, it was
the dream of a lifetime come true.
Begin leads the Herut wing of
Likud, an opposition alignment
formed with the Liberal Party
and other smaller factions in 1973
after the Yom KippurWar. Herut
is the political heir of the
Revisionist of New Zionist Move-
ment, founded by Vladimir
Jabotinsky at the 17th World
Zionist Congress 46 years ago.
Begin referred several times to
Jabotinsky. a fiery militant in his
day. He freely acknowledged that
the victory of Jabotinsky "s
disciples in the voting was
achieved through an alliance with
the disciples of such Zionist
giants as the late Chaim
Wei/.mann. who was apolitical,
Menachem Ussishkin, a Labor
Zionist, and the late American
Zionist leader Ahba Hillel Silver,
whose political following in Israel
is represented by the Liberal
Party.
Begin, a spell-binding orator
and shrewd politician, read a
passage from Lincoln's second
inaugural address "With mal-
ice toward none" intimating
that Likud boN no grudges and
sought only national unity. In
fact. Begins first political state-
ment after his victory was a call
of Israel to form a national unity
government," he said.
On peace negotiations. Begin
staled: "I hope that after we get
the Knesset's confirmation of the
new government we shall present
to it. we shall be able to call on
President (Anwar) Sadat (of
Egypt). President (Hafez) Assad
(of Syria) and King Hussein (of
Jordan) to open negotiations,
whether in the respective capitals
or on neutral ground like
Geneva."
Begin told newsmen at a pre-
dawn conference that he would
Continued on Page 7
'ft38

' k iW \ ^ *4 ^
Wi -A V<5
..--
rful reunions are commonplace when HIAS (Hebrew
[migrant Aid Society), the world-wide Jewish migration
Vncy, arranges meetings between families who have been
pa rated for many years. The Combined Jewish Appeal of the
Wish Federation of South Broward helps support HIAS and
I work.
Federation
SOUTH BROWARD IS MY
FEDERATION' is a familiar sight on
hundreds of automobiles in South Broward
County since the Jewish Federation of South
Broward produced this slogan on a blue and
white bumper sticker. Thousands of the
bumper slickers have been distributed
throughout Ihe area and according to Fed-
eration President Lewis E. Cohn, "there are
thousunds more available for anyone who
wants them." Bumper stickers may be
acquired by contacting the Federation.
Where Your CJA-IEF Dollars Go
HIAS. .Helps Find Jewish Roots
The telephone call comes at the
same time each month. An
elderly man always makes the
same request. He is hoping to
find his wife and two sons the
family he has not seen since they
got out of a railroad car at a con-
centration camp 35 years ago. He
was sent to one line: the woman
and children to another. Kach
month the staff of HIAS'
(Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society)
Search and Location Department
takes down the information. The
search never ends.
Upon arrival in Chicago from
Odessa, Mrs. Ita Kroin almost
immediately filed a "location
form" at the local HIAS office.
She was looking for her sister
whom she had not seen for 54
years. Mrs. Kroin is 77 years old;
her sister, 82.
THE FORM was passed on to
HIAS headquarters in New York
City, and after months of careful
investigation, Mrs. Kroin's sister
was "discovered" in Sao Paulo.
Brazil. Thrilled at learning her
"long lost" relative was alive, the
sister sent two round-trip tickets
to Sao Paulo one for Mrs.
Kroin and one for her grandson.
During the course of a year
HIAS Search and Location
handles 2,000 to 3,000 requests
from Jews throughout the world
to locate friends and relatives,
sometimes involving separations
of up to half a century. Often
working with mere shreds of
information, the multi-lingual
staff has been able to locate
about two-thirds of the missing
relatives during each of the last
few years, according to Nathan
I'rilcher, a Hollywood resident
who is a member of the HIAS
board of directors.
HIAS Search and Location
works through a network of
international contacts estab-
lished over nearly a century of
rescue and resettlement work. On
the average, it takes about a year
to make a connection, par-
ticularly if the separation has
l>een a long one.
IF THE missing relative is
l>elieved to be in the United
States, the first step is a check
through Central Files at HIAS.
The case history of every refugee
brought to this country with
HIAS' help since 1948 is housed
here. Earlier records are kept at
YIVO, the Jewish historical and
Continued on Page 7


Pg*2
The Jeuish Floridian amd Skafar of Greater HoBywood
Friday. June 3.
1977
Shauuotii Celebrated In | The Jewish Genealogy Craze
S. Broicard Institutions
The message of Shavuot was spread to area hospitals and
nursing homes by the Chaplaincy Service of the Jewish
Federation of South Breward
Dr Meron J Levitats. chairman of the Chaplaincy Com-
mittee, said that in each of the hospitals serviced by the JFSB
Chaplaincy Service, each patient received holiday treats such as
blinues. cake, fnrit and candy The food was supplied bv the
respective hospitals
Rabbi Harold Renter. Chaplain, distributed a letter with
the holiday packages which explained the meaning of the
Shavuot holiday and gave greetings from JFSB and the
hospitals
The area nursing homes received cartons of assorted fruks
which were collected by the children of Temple Beth Shalom s
Day School These fruits were districted by the JFSB Chap-
laincy Service
This chaplaincy activity was important, commented Dr
Levies:* We hope that we are reaching the patients in the
various institutions They should be aware that the Jewish com-
munity remembers them and shows an expression of concern
By MINDY KLEIN
Jewish F1nci.fi Staff Writer
Family Mission to Israel
*R?aUu Turned Children On9
By GREER FAY CASHMAH
JERUSALEM A United
Jewish Appeal family mission to
Israel is a voyage of discovery.
Parents see new depths in their
children, children find common
ground with their parents: both
discover or rediscover a
land a people themserv es
. each other
The most recent UJA family
mission from North Pascack
Valley. N.J spanned three
generations There were adults
and 33 children, whose ages
ranged from 10 to 19
Mission Chairman Bernard
Kasten and his wife brought their
sons Jeffrey Andrew and
Michael Kasten was over-
whelmed by the emotional
response of all the youngsters
"They ve been really turned on
by Israel." he said, "a lot more
than their parents expected
They all thought they were
coming on a vacation, but
they ve been deeply touched by
what they ve seen and heard
They've really learned what it
means to be Jewish
THE MISSION was in Jeru-
salem on Holocaust Memorial
Day and participated m a special
national commemoration
ceremony attended by the Presi-
dent and the Prune Minister of
Israel. Holocaust survivors and
members of the Israel Defense
Forces- On the previous day. they
had been to Yad Yasfaem. the
BajacI Ibaai mkmn -.be
children took part in a Yuhor
service in the stark chapel The
experience was an rlnrrarnt
preparation for Memorial Day
Asked whether any of the
d ha had at the idea of
the* chidren to the
of the Holocaust as
depicted at Yad Yasfaem. Kasten
replied. Of course not We all
wawtd oar chMtexi to go to Yad
Yasfaem. It's important for tfaem
to know about that period of
Jewish history, to share not only
the brightness of life in Israel
today but also the shadows that
still linger
The prevailing feeling on the
mission, however, was one of
exuberance The city-bred
youngsters were delighted, when
visiting a lubbutz on the Golan
Heights, to witness the birth of a
calf They were impressed with
the Israeli youngsters they en-
countered, with the vigorous life
on the settlements, in the
development towns and along the
borders and perhaps more
significantly, with the UJA-
funded programs they saw in
actvn It made them, perhaps for
the first time, understand and
take pride in then- parents
fund-raising activities back in
their home communities.
FOR KASTEN. this particular
mission will always carry a very-
special personal memory: the Bar
Mitrvah of his youngest son,
Jeffrey, at the Western WaD in
Jerusalem. It was so much more
meaningful here than k would
have been back home. said
Kasten Jeffrey loved k. It was
his choice to have tt in IsraeL
Jeffrey s grandparents travelled
with the mission to jotn in the
Stmcha. Two other families on
the missn celebrated a Bar
Mitzvah and Bat Mkzvah.
respectively, atop the majestic
glory of Masada Seventy percent
of the families had never been to
Israel before AD said they would
return
This was Kasten s thud UJA-
sponsored visit to Israel, bat his
first family mission. The re-
actions of the kids would make
me do k this way agam. he
enthused- They re the ones who
are going to carry on what we
have started. I look forward to
the day they bring tfaesr raiih.
here and I'm part of the third
Amin: Stay Out of Britain,
Or Block Family Will Sue
rusaiem and who was trav-
eling with her at the time.
LONDON UTAl If
Uganda's President Idi
Amin comes to Britain for
next month's Common-
wealth "Prime Ministers
Conference, he wUJ be sued
in connection with the
death of Mrs. Dora Blocb,
the elderly captive who dis-
appeared after the Entebbe
hijack rescue.
Legal action was an-
nounced here on behalf of
Dan Hartuv. Mrs. Bloch s
eldest son. who lives in Je-
GUTYILLE JANNER
saad that a writ to be served on
Amin also Danes Maj- Far*
Mam the ilhcad mkiw of
Mrs Bloch.
Hartav. 50. claims the writ
that ha mother's death was
owd "by the neghgeoce or
deaherate act or acts of the
their
H
"A" they _
the truth, and her body back.'
Jaoaaraaid. n tin
Climbing your family
tree can turn up embarrass-
ments as well as cocktail
party brags, as Dan
Rottenberg. author of the
recently released book for
the would-be Jewish
genealogist. Finding Our
Fathers, has discovered.
Rottenberg uncovered
one Rabbi Abraham Minz.
of Padua. Italy, who in
1508 was first in line
bearing gifts for plundering
German conquerors on be-
half of the Jewish com-
munity.
When the conquerors aban-
doned Padua a scant six months
later the Rabbi's perhaps over-
zealous overture was first on the
townspeople s minds and Rabbi
M :nz was consequently banished
ON THE OTHER hand.
Rottenberg s personal search has
uncovered links with a major
league baseball player, a woman
Soviet roh >f I who served in
World War II. actress Hope
Lange. movie director Alan
Pakula and even comedian Don
Rickks
What started out as a hobby,
one fraught with numerous dead
ends and miles of red tape, has
become a one-of-a-kind and the
first of as kind book which
sold 20.000 copies before its
scheduled publication date. Mav
2 The timing has been great.'
Rottenberg said Alex Haley
has made everybody Roots-crazy.
"It never occurred to me that it
would be a commercially viable
enterprise. Rottenberg said, but
frustrated by the lack of material
dealing with the special problems
of Jews obliterated records,
destroyed synagogues and ceme-
teries and familiar with the
snags from his own search, he
assembled a how-to book
specially geared to Jews.
ROTTENBERG. a free-lance
magnrme writer who. with one
or two exceptions never wrote
anything "Jewish. found
hJMnHf anxious to assert his
Jewh identity' upon settling in
a small Indiana town with a
numscule Jewish populaton.
Finding himself and his famirv
inalin of a novekv. local
I National Hebrew
'S*ai. gft cpviree kc
Bar **.;. 3- Se'i
Seo^ous Af. 4? wiihiiilii Avt
LUmmJ
KIG0, MC
tfipw Gea-$, GHls,
Mfaitccsr*
sy whs tm ai
NOKSB
C0HTMBITA1
JAMTOtUL COtf
le7h**trfeonofa
OoThejob-
rtOM0A>*NG
P-G SHAMPOOING
WCOWQiAMNG
aooawAXJNG
switiiJ" BooOeo* Be*erecw
17Mfl
*
DAN ROTTENBERG
church and civic groups invited
him to speak to them on
Judaism, and. in Rottenberg s
"fords: When people treat you
hke an expert you start acting
like one."
His Judaism research for
speaking engagements set the
framework for the family tree he
had started a few years previous.
The rest is his histroy.
Knowing from whence he came
has given Rottenberg a great
sense of satisfaction He
describes genealogy as do-it-
yourself analysis" because "you
can understand yourself through
the traits of your ancestors "
DAILY PROBLEMS shrink
back into proportion when the
hardships of relatives chasing
from country to country are con-
sidered too. he said.
Rottenberg encourages people
to search out their roots. "I hope
people will do more than buv my
book." he said, because, he main-
tains. T think were all related."
For generations
a symbol of
Jewish tradition.
At Riverside, our reputation is based
upon our assurance of service that fulfil Is
the high standards evoked by Jewish
tradition.
It is for this reason Riverside is not
represented by any other funeral director
in Florida.
Today, each of Riverside's chapels
serving Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
counties is exclusively a Riverside Chapel,
staffed only by Riverside people who
understand Jewish tradition and honor it.
And in that tradition we serve every
family, regardless of financial
circumstance.
HOLLYWOOD:
2230 Holfwood Boulevard/920-1010
SUNRISE^
1171 Northwest 61st AvenueJSunset Strip)/584-6060
Nortn Miami Beacn Miami Beach Miami ann
west Palm Beach. oeacn.naiam, and
F.c chapels serving the New York Metropolitan area.
h-*-rr
o" inc Funeral [Vectors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.


Friday, June 3, 1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar ofGreater Hollywood
Page 3
Suslensky Told To Get
Out of Soviet Union
BONN (JTA) Yaacov
Suslensky, a Soviet Jewish dis-
sident who recently completed a
seven-year sentence at "strict
regime" labor camps, has been
warned by Soviet authorities to
be out of the Soviet Union by
June 8 or face "unpleasant
consequences."
But Suslensky refuses to leave
I without his 20-year-old daughter,
Aya, who is seriously ill and has
been denied permission to emi-
grate with him to Israel.
Suslensky, who is in his fifties
and was an English teacher,
related his case by telephone last
week to a representative of
Amnesty International here. He
appealed for help to the world-
wide organization that aids
political prisoners.
SUSLENSKY said his daugh-
ter suffered from a form of
diabetes that renders the victim
susceptible to various infections.
She was recently in a coma. Sus-
lensky is divorced but his former
wife gave permission for their
daughter to emigrate. Suslen-
sky's 87-year-old mother plans to
leave with them.
He was arrested in 1970 in
Bendery in the Moldavia region
near the Rumanian border and
was sentenced to seven years for
alleged "anti-Soviet activities."
davian strict regime camp, in the
Perm camp in northern Russia
and at the notorious Vladimir
prison near Moscow. During his
incarceration in Moscow he
suffered a stroke which paralyzed
him temporarily with loss of
speech. He was released Jan. 29
after serving the full seven years.
Azores to Stay
Open to U.S.
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The government of Portugal,
which recently established diplo-
matic relations with Israel, has
given the United States assur-
ances that it will allow the U.S.
Air Force to remain at its base in
the Azores and use it to resupply
its allies.
This information was received
from State Department sources
after vice president Walter
Mondale met with Prime
Minister Mario Soares in Por-
tugal earlier.
THE ASSURANCES were
said to have been given at the
meeting. Afterwards, Soares said
'The base (Lajes Air Force Base)
s not being put into doubt at all
by us."
The U.S. airlift to Israel during
the Yom Kippur War used the
facilities there as a refueling base.
The Arab nations strongly
assailed Portugal for that
authorization.
"The government of Portugal
has not told us that we could not
use the base to help Israel again
in that way if the need arises," a
State Department source told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
Hike I Program Prompts Praise
This is one of the many letters received at the Federation office
praising the efforts of the Federation in bringing Theodore Bike I to the
community in "The Night Shall Shine As The Day."
Mr. Lewis E. Cohn, President
Jewish Federation of So. Broward
Hollywood, Fla.
Dear Mr. Cohn:
Dr. Esterson and I and a group of our friends attended your
"Night Shall Shine As The Day" show last night. Throughout the
entire evening, we were actually enthralled by it all! It's been many a
year since we were such lucky theatre-goers as we were last night.
You, Mr. Cohn, were seated up front and saw the audience from
that angle, but we, seated in the upper last row, saw the back view of
the vast audience.
THE PEOPLE were gleefully seated for way over an hour,
waiting patiently, and surprisingly in good humor and awaiting a
show which certainly proved well worth waiting for. Everybody, but
positively everyone, was enthusiastic.
The response was spontaneous and terrific! The program was
outstanding and you, truly, outdid yourselves. We were proud to be
counted as a part of you yes, we all felt that "We Are One."
We just wanted you to know how a few of the participating
audience felt about your outstanding event.
WE. AND I AM sure all the others are fortunate to have people
like you, Dr. Margulies, and the others working for you. and with us,
at the Federation.
With all good wishes for future successes in your every under-
taking. -
ROSE A. ESTERSON
Hallandale
IBIHIBIBIBIHIHIHIBIBIBIHIHIHIBIHIHIHIHIHU
Rising foRtunes of AlqeRia I
The last month has seen
Algeria renew President Houari
Boumedienne's mandate and
approve a constitution providing
for the first parliament since the
overthrow of Ahmed Ben Bella in
a bloodless coup in 1965.
In real power terms, the dual
polling exercjse means little.
Boumedienne ran unopposed,
stands impervious to censure by
the national assembly, and is not
constitutionally obliged even to
appoint a prime minister. As with
so many Third World countries,
Algeria is a one-party state and
only candidates from the
National Liberation Front (FNL)
were permitted to stand.
BUT A metamorphosis is
under way. Earlier in the year,
Houmedienne did invite public
comment on a gamut of national
issues, and the felaghin were not
slow or reticent in providing it.
Nor were their city cousins, and
Algiers alone polled half the "no"
votes in the constitutional
referendum. Likewise its ab-
stention rate was more than 25
percent higher than elsewhere.
There is. of course, a substantial
element of opposition or coolness
I<> the government among
Algerians working abroad.
Nonetheless, the FNL is
confident that the endorsement
tfiven Boumedienne at the Dec.
10 presidential poll is a vote of
confidence too for its policies
since the mid-Sixties a petrol-
lum-boosted experiment in Arab
socialism. If endorsement it was.
it was needed.
In the crucible of the war of
independence, a whole generation
"I hard-headed military and
political leaders was molded; in
the years of revolutionary con-
solidation, the voices of those
outside the power structure have
been muted but never silenced.
EARLY THIS year, four
leading personalities were placed
under house arrest for dis-
tributing a mimeographed mani-
festo criticizing Boumedienne for
authoritarian rule and developing
a personality cult. But the
rumblings were too persistent to
stifle, and Boumedienne threw
the whole philosophical question
of development versus personal
freedom open to a debate that
was conducted in homes and
public places throughout the
nation.
It was a striking example of
direct democracy in Third World
terms and a heady experience for
a people bred initially on the dis-
ciplines of the independence
struggle and subsequently on
those of nation-building. Out of
these discussions the con-
stitutional propositions were
wrought.
The role of women in this
evolution excites attention. Their
contribution in the independence
war was capital; the constitution
guarantees them "all political,
economic, social and cultural
rights "; but all the figures
pointed to a poor turnout of
women at both polling sessions,
particularly in the poorer
districts. Clearly the cloistered
tradition of Islam dies hard, even
in the face of the revolutionary
dynamic.
-SO WHITHER Algeria now?
Boumedienne can scarcely have
been in a stronger position since
he won political control after the
Ben Bella ouster. The oil
resources provide a comfortable
financial cushion for planned
industrial development.
Perhaps the most crucial of his
preoccupations in the coming
year is to keep his country out of
a potentially ruinous war with
neighboring Morocco over the
Western Sahara issue. There is
no question that the Polisario
guerillas will be permitted to
remain in Algiers and operate out
of Algerian territory where
necessary. But both Rabat and
Algiers and indeed all the Arab
world realize it is vital that the
two Maghreb neighbors should
not be drawn into armed con-
frontation. Relations are almost
invariably strained, and in the
post-independence period shots
were fired in earnest.
IF BOUMEDIENNE can bury
his differences with King Hassan,
or at least keep the matter in
relatively low key, while main-
taining cordial relations with the
passionate and volatile Moamar
Gaddafi to the east, he should
have little difficulty maintaining
his position at home. In such a
context the perspectives for
develoDment are promising.
Dog Grooming
IN YOUR HOME AT YOUR
CONVENIENCE (Allbreeds)
Personal- Professional
JO ELLEN
For Appt
925-21S6
u
STANLEY S. and NAOMI R. KURASH
REALTORS
We are pleased to announce that we are now doing
business as Town Crier Ltd., Realtors; Paul McRae,
Realtor, President; Stanley S. Kurash, Vice President;
and Naomi R. Kurash, Vice President.
We now have two locations, our main office at 2450
Hollywood Boulevard and our branch office at 2029
Hollywood Boulevard. As usual you will all have our
personal service. The only thing different is ex-
pansion!!
TOWN CRIER LTD., Inc., Realtors
2450 Hollywood Boulevard 947-5654 921-2902
JCC Senior
Adult Picnic Set
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter-Hollywood Extension is
holding a picnic for its members
,at T-Y Park (PaviUion 9) in
Hollywood, Thursday, June 9
r">m 11a.m. to 3 p.m.
Marion
Nevins
Sailer's
Now Availoble
"To Jerusale
Soul Bellows
REGISTRATION FOR 1977-78
PRIVATE EDUCATION-KINDERGARTEN
THROUGH 'SIXTH GRADE
AT ITS VERY FINEST
4601 Arthur Street, Hollywood,
Florida 33021
966-2200
Individualized instruction
Small Classes
Certified Teachers
latest Methods
Specialty Teachers
Finest Facilities
Dual Program
Lunches Provided
Transportation Available
Structured Program within
Open Classrooms
Mr. Leon Weissberg,
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofdr of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 3.
1977
The Bitter Fruit'
It is interesting to note that as President Carter's top
adviser Zbiegnew Brzezinski was meeting in Washington
with Jewish leaders to assure them on U.S.-Israeli ties, the
President himself was preparing a speech for delivery at
Notre Dame University Sunday in which he warned that
he would expect Israel to abide by the United Nations
decisions in the Israel-Arab dispute.
Which United Nations decisions? To commit suicide?
There is an increasing duality in the Carter per-
sonality which bespeaks more than the fertile mind of a
man who refuses to be pinned down on a specific issue
because he sees too many alternative possibilities as
answers.
The duality spells a singular portrait: Carter is
capable of saying many attractive things attractive to
the American Jewish community, which he instructed
Brzezinski to tell the Jewish leaders. At the same time, he
emerges as a man potentially more conservative in his
view of possible Middle Eastern solutions that are far
narrower in terms of Israeli interests than either of his
Republican predecessors entertained at their worst.
What is so appalling about this is that we knew it all
at the outset and said so in these columns. If one voted
for President Carter back in November, it was not because
he would be especially friendly to Israel, we opined.
The vote would be for a man with a new guiding
moral spirit only so far as domestic American affairs are
concerned. In foreign affairs, he could be even more
pragmatic than most.
W hat we said then is now bearing fruit. It may be too
early to tell, but already the fruit seems bitter.
Through Back Door
David I.andau, our man in Jerusalem, opines that if
the elections were held again May 18, it is fair to assume
that the results would be substantially different. Labor
though doubtless it would still emerge weakened, would
very probably not come out losing a massive 18 seats out
of 51, and the Democratic Movement For Change (DMC).
which took most of these votes from Labor, would very
likely Ix? significantly reduced.
For what happened in the elections was. basically,
that erstwhile Labor supporters, anxious to punish Labor
for what they felt were its failures particularly in internal
affairs, swung over to the newly-created and moderately
based DMC and thereby enabled Menachem Begin to
fulfill his lifelong ambition: lead his rightist Likud Party
to relative victory as the new Knesset's largest faction.
For Likud, despite Begins historic victory address at
3 a.m.. only gained two seats more than it had in the
previous Knesset. Labor's huge defeat was almost entirely
at the hands of the DMC which thereby, as some analysts
noted, "let in Begin through the back door." This was
particularly apparent when the voting was broken down
by expert analysts into areas and types of population.
Our Jewish Commitment
Whatever the speculation on the reasoning behind the
Begin victory, we note with interest the comment of Rabbi
Arthur Hertzberg. president of the American Jewish
Congress.
The Israeli decision 'was taken freely and peace-
fully," he said, "in sharp contrast to the purges and coups
that have marked political changes among Israel's Arab
neighbors. The process underscores the strength and
stability of Israel's democratic system."
In this sense "American Jews will bring their deep
love of Israel and their unflinching commitment to the
right of Israel's peace to live in security, dignity and
peace."
For. in the end. "The essence of this love and this
commitment is that it is given not to any political party or
any political leader, but rather to the State and the
citizens of that State, creating a parntership that will meet
whatever tests confront it and that will endure."
We heartily agree.
Likud to World: Buzz Off
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IT IS not good practice for a
columnist to promise to continue
pursuing a theme in his very next
column that he has not finished
in his previous one as I did
here last week in an analysis of
the dangers involved in U.S.
withdrawal from maximum mil-
itary commitments abroad and
particularly as this withdrawal
would affect the rise of the ex-
treme-right in Germany and
elsewhere in Europe.
I wrote, "For more on this,
next week." I should have
written, "For more on this,
another time," for in between, the
Likud victory has occurred
which, in a very particular way,
requires comment now or not at
all. and so I find myself on the
Mindlin
limb of a choice I must make and,
having made it, saw the limb off
behind me, so that both of us go
crashing to the ground in a sea of
NeSTUr^TERWlSM
bruises called, were this an el
cheapo painting, Broker,
Promises.
IN ANY event, the rise of the
extreme-right in Germany is
certainly sufficiently terrifying a
prospect as to make a commit-
ment to have my say about it as
soon as I can get back to it.
For the moment, there is
Menachem Begin.
What I find most interesting
about his victory is that it has
caught the so-called political
savants fiatfooted. This includes I
not only presidents and kings,
but pundits who earn their keep
by telling people what they are
going to do in the near future -
or, as is more often the case, what
is going to be done to them by
presidents and kings.
IN AN editorial in The Jewish
Floridian of May 13, it was
opined that the West Bank would'
play a more important role in the
outcome of the May 17 election
than was popularly imagined.
The editorial suggested that
the West Bank is not only a
burning commitment in the
hearts of what had come to bell
called the religious zealots, that
small band of supposedly]]
unrealistic Jews who lay claim to
the. West Bank as an integral
part of Israeli and Biblical
historicity, many of whom have
gone there to found settlements
either legally-sanctioned or else
deplored in Jerusalem and torn
down by the Labor government
even before they could get off the
ground.
The West Bank, the editorial
noted, is symbolic to Israel at
large. It is an answer to the
Jimmy Carters of the world who
were already sharpening their-,
knives to cut the country back
down to a sliver more satisfying
in proportion to the petrobil-
lionaires anrl the phony pur-
Continued on Page 9
A Case of Legislative Courage
Friday, June 3,1977
Volume 7
17 SI VAN 5737
Number 11
Unlike the Congressional
Record, which reveals the debate
as well as the vote on bills, the
Journal of the Florida Senate
tells little but the vote. And that,
often, is on amendments which
offer language like "Amendment
7 On page 1 in title, line 28.
after appeals'; insert: adding
subsection 215.47(2)(e), Florida
Statutes."
A few pages of that, and one's
desire to follow legislation
hundreds of miles from Talla-
hassee is greatly reduced.
WHAT IS obvious and
comes as no surprise is that
there are. sadly, far more char-
latans than we deserve up there.
Or maybe we do deserve them,
for both the bad and the few good
have been chosen in what passes
for fair elections.
We, the people, ultimately are
responsible for the unfair taxes,
the chaotic auto insurance
system, the poor education and
so many of the other ills that
beset us.
It may be that the solutions to
these problems would evade the
best of people but it can be said
that in Tallahassee we haven't
given that probability a chance.
There are some minor conso-
lations all losers, of course.
Seven Senators had the courage
to stand up for the First Amend-
ment in voting against an ob-
\ iously unconstitutional bill that
would permit school boards to
provide a daily period of silent
meditation in public schools.
IT COMES as no surprise that
two of them were Dade County's
Jack Gordon and Ken Myers,
while our other six Senators took
the easy way out. After all, the
1972 straw vote on prayer in the
to 80 percent of the voters
favored suspending the First
Amendment in this instance.
On issue after issue of con-
science. Myers and Gordon play
almost solitary roles Gordon
all alone on the death penalty and
allied legislation often,
however, joined by the two ladies
in the Senate. Betty Castor and
Lori Wilson, whose instincts, by
my standards, are invariably
good.
There was one bill on which the
quartet was joined by a fifth.
Sen. Don Chamberlin of Clear-
water. Because his remarks
during debate were printed an
unusual occurrence some
excerpts are worth repeating in
view of the June 7 election on
repeal of the amendment to the
Human Rights ordinance.
CASTOR, Gordon, Myers and
Wilson stood with Chamberlin in
opposition to a bill which would
prohibit a homosexual from
adopting "another person." The
heart of this bill, said Cham-
berlin, is not the subject matter
of adoptions 'it is dis-
crimination.
"The popularity of Archie
Bunker seems to tell us that
individuals in society need a relief
valve. They need to express their
prejudices and sometimes even to
act upon them. The defeat of this
bill will not rob anyone of their
begins a state policy selective,
deliberate discrimination ...
there will be other instances
(then) where you may also want
to express your moral outrage or
your irritation against homo-
sexuals.
"IN NAZI Germany, the first
act of discrimination against
Jews was to forbid them to own
property. The last act was
murder. To kill the human spirit
was the first step toward killing
the human Anita Bryant may
not recognize the issue of the
human spirit. She apparently
feels homosexuality is a sickness,
an intolerable deviation But
the issue is not whether homo-
sexuality is normal: it is whither
we understand the behavior
sufficiently to stigmatize and
discriminate through public
policy.
"Is there a fundamental, soci-
etal decency which will tolerate
what we. as individuals, cannot
approve? (The citizens at
home) would want, in theit
grander moments, for you to votd *
for: love, and tolerance, and dig-
nity for all human beings.'
There were only five who were
willing to subscribe to that in
public.
HOWEVER one feels about
the issue personally, as Cham-
berlin states, it is good to know
that there are some people in
public office who have the
courage t. stand for principles
and are m/.her swayed nor inti-
midated current hysteria
This first term freshma: from
a conservative district it used
to elect ultra-conservative \^
Richard Deeb regularly has sefl]
an example that we commend Wj
our owp legislative detestation.
ig
1


Friday, June 3, 1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
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The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 3,1977
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Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 3, 1977
How Germany Reacted to Punishing
the Baader-Meinhof Terrorists
By HANS SCHUELER
After a two-year trial,
three members of the
Baader-Meinhof group
accused of terrorism have
been sentenced to life im-
prisonment in Stuttgart.
They are Andreas Baader,
Gudrun Ensslin, and Jan-
Carl Raspe.
A fourth member, Ulrike
Meinhof, committed suicide
a year ago in prison. The
three accused were not in
court when sentence was
pronounced on the 192nd
day of the trial.
The two-year Baader-Meinhof trial which began on
May 21, 1975, cost the state 20 million deutschmarks of
which 12 million alone went on a specially constructed
courthouse at Stuttgart. Security arrangements for the
judges and lawyers cost 500,000 deutschmarks, while a
further two million marks was spent on protecting defense
counsel and experts and witnesses. About 20,000 people
visited the public gallery while security guards spent a
total of 200,000 hours on duty. The trial record comprises
15,000 pages, containing statements by 400 witnesses and
experts, 95 depositions alleging prejudice, as well as
numerous applications for a stay in the proceedings.
NEWSPAPERS which, at the
beginning of the Baader-Meinhof
trial in Stuttgart -Stammheim,
spoke of the "trial of the cen-
tury" were wrong. Criminal trials
rarely make history.
And this century has, after all,
seen the acquittal of Capt.
Dreyfus in France, the kangaroo
trials of the Weimar Republic,
the sentencing of Hitler for high
treason to confinement in a
fortress, the trial surrounding the
Reichstag Fire and, finally, the
belated attempt at coping
judicially with million-fold
murder, culminating in the
Auschwitz Trial.
Compared with all these trials,
the bank robberies and mur-
derous bomb attacks in Frank-
furt and Heidelberg attributed to
the "Red Army Faction" will be
forgotten just as soon as will the
mammoth trial which is now
nearing its end in Stuttgart-
Stammheim.
THERE IS NOT a shred of
hope left for the terrorists of the
seventies to hang on to that they
will ever come to power in this
country. Their bloody tracks lead
nowhere.
And yet they above all the
hard core of the Baader-Meinhof
group achieved something
rather important: Their crimes
and the trial pertaining to them
have made legal history and
they did so to an extent rarely
achieved by so few people in such
a short time and so relatively
simply.
Criminal trial proceedings, the
rights of counsel and laws
governing penal procedures were
amended for Andreas Baader,
Ulrike Meinhof, Gudrun Ensslin
and Jan-Carl Raspe.
The accused were also in-
strumental in bringing about
amendments of the Criminal
Code and inclusions in it of
several crimes (although these
amendments cannot be applied to
the people on trial in Stam-
mheim).
THEY WERE, moreover, re-
sponsible for_ the fact that an
inalienable principle as set down
in the Human Rights Convention
(the principle whereby everybody
is to be deemed innocent until
proven guilty in a court of law,
and hence the absolute ban on
public anticipation of the guilty
verdict) was violated without
objection on the part of the
tribunal not only by the
boulevard press, but also by
prominent members of the
Bundestag.
It was certain beyond the
shadow of a doubt long before the
trial began that the crimes at-
tributed to the Baader-Meinhof
group were in fact committed by
that circle. Subsequently, the
accused themselves said in a
statement which could not go on
record as an admission of guilt in
legal terms that they accepted
"responsibility" for the bomb
attacks.
THE ACCUSED have *ne
and again and from the very
beginning denied that this tri-
bunal and the judicial system as
a whole have any jurisdiction
over them and have thus refused
to participate in the trial as
required by criminal court pro-
cedures.
They attempted to continue
their criminal activities from
their cells and, in doing so, they
made use at times of sympathetic
and in some instances accessory
defense counsellors.
Even those defense lawyers
retained by the accused them-
selves who can be deemed ab-
solutely innocent of conspiring
with them and this innocence
can be assumed of all lawyers
who were not excluded from the
proceedings before or shortly
after the trial began have
found it extremely difficult to
adequately defend their clients.
HAS THE Baader-Meinhof
trial been conducted with the
necessary circumspection and
regard for fair play? This
question is as justified here as it
is in any trial involving capital
crimes especially in view of
other pending or concurrent trials
of terrorists.
The creditibility of a con-
stitutional democratic state and
the confidence in its ability to
cope with extremism in a just
manner contributes more toward
making young people abandon
the idea of changing our system
by means of violence than does
the deterrent effect of punish-
ment.
The Stammheim trial began
with a sin of omission. Theodor
Prinzing, the presiding judge,
was not appointed to try this case
in keeping with normal and
"legal" court procedures; he was
hand-picked and promoted
specifically for the purpose of this
trial by those who bore the
political responsibility.
THIS WAS well meant, and it
was in no way done with the
objective of making the sentence
a foregone conclusion. State High
Court Panels deal in the normal
course with complicated legal
questions but rarely with accused
who are themselves complex.
As a result it was considered
necessary to appoint an ex-
perienced man as the presiding
judge. Prinzing had proved
himself in post-war Nazi trials
where he had to deal with ex-
tremely forgetful albeit co-
operative accused.
But this did not help him in his
new task, and he was clearly the
wrong man for the job. Much of
the trouble he got into during the
trial was of his own making. He
forced the other four judges of
the panel (in a phalanx of spite
and self-preservation) to reject
x>tk>ns of bias by the defense
even when their justification was
self-evident.
ON ONE occasion. Judge
Prinzing altered a taped record of
the proceedings by falsifying his
threatening remark to the
defense: "If you continu* this
way, we shall get on with the trial
at a tune that will be impossible
for you."
He subsequently added to the
transcript in his own writing,
falsifying the record, "... we
shall no t get on with the trial at a
time that will be impossible for
you." This was clearly done as a
precaution against a motion of
bias.
Prinzing admitted to journal-
ists in strictest confidence that he
always consulted the appeals
court judges who would have to
deal with an appeal before
making any major decisions.
THERE HAVE always been
tried and proven legal techniques
of making rulings "appeal-
proof." But until the Stammheim
trial it had been considered
unthinkable that individual
decisions in the course of the pro-
ceedings would also be subject to
"reinsurance" with the court of
appeals.
The fact that Prinzing was
fully aware of being in the wrong
was borne out by his insisting
that this revelation be handled in
confidence by the journalists.
Court insiders explain the fact
that Judge Prinzing revealed
such irregularities in the first
place with his love-hate relation-
ship with the media.
Prinzing's discussion partner
at the Third Panel of the appeals
court was Federal Judge
Albrecht Mayer. But Judge
Mayer is burdened by a trauma.
IT WAS HE who presided over
the Third Panel of the Federal
Court which, as far back as 1972,
wanted to exclude Attorney Otto
Schily, the chosen (as opposed to
court-appointed) defense coun-
sellor of Gudrun Ensslin. from all
further participation in the
proceedings.
The reason for this was that
Ulrike Meinhof had a letter on
her from Frau Ensslin at the time
of her arrest in June, 1972, and
that Attorney Schily had only
just visited his client in prison.
But such suspicions have re-
mained unsubstantiated to this
day. As a result, the Federal
Court ruling barring Otto Schily
from the trial was subsequently
reversed by the Federal Con-
stitutional Court as legally
unfounded.
An artist's impression of the three defendants in court, Jan-
CarlRaspe, Andreas Baader and Gudrun Ensslin.
the use to which they were in-
tended to be put.
Can all these details, which
could be greatly augmented, be
termed bagatelles without effect
on the body of the law
especially in a case where the
guilt of the accused was virtually
established from the very
beginning?
The realization that justice can
be unjust not only in its rulings,
but also in the manner in which it
arrives at such rulings, has never
been very widespread in Ger-
many. To the people in this
country it is almost inconceivable
that miscarried justice can be
meted out even to a guilty party
because only God knows that
he is guilty, but not the judges.
CAN ANYBODY conceive of a
judge who thinks nothing of
reversing the meaning of a
sentence in court records and who
is unperturbed by the fact that he
has made the court of appeals
which at one point might have to
handle an appeal by the accused
an accessory to his rulings and
thus rendered that court useless
to the accused?
Does no one fear a judge who is
so biased as to ask the press to
continue persecuting a man
whom he can no longer reach
through the arm of the law'' How
does anyone with such a men-
tality become a Federal Judge in
the first place?
The sum total of violations of
the law in the Stammheim trial,
which climaxed in the electronic
snooping on the conversations
between "accused and defense
attorneys, induced the chosen
defense counsellors to absent
themselves from the last phase of
the trial and to forego closing
pleas on behalf of their clients.
THIS IS something between
them and their own consciences.
What they left at Stammheim in
the wake of such action was a
grim spectacle: empty benches
where the accused and their
chosen lawyers should have sat.
And what the court-appointed
lawyers had to say was in no way
Iwtter.
They, who had never ex-_
changed a single word with the
accused, unanimously called for a
mistrial. If their plea were
granted it would mean the release
of the still-remaining three
terrorists of the early days of
terrorism.
Hut this will not come to pass.
Mill, was the demand for a
m.stnal as voiced by the court-
appointed lawyers, who can
certainly not be suspected of
Personal sympahties with the
accused, entirely unfounded?
Our judicial system has only
inadequately passed the test to
which it was put in the Stamm-
heim trial.
ALTHOUGH the legal frame-
work for the barring of lawyers
from trials has meanwhile been
created, it can still only be ap-
plied in cases where it can be
proven that the defense coun-
sellor has abused his privileged
position.
It seems evident that Judge
Mayer never quite managed to
get over his defeat in trying to
bar Attorney Schily from the
proceedings.
Last summer he forwarded the
record of a police interrogation of
a Stammheim prosecution
witness and an excerpt of
Stammheim court records to his
close friend Herbert Kremp.
editor-in-chief of the daily Die
Welt, asking him to continue the
attack on Schily through the
media.
THESE PAPERS, which
should at best have been made
available only to those involved
in the trial, were sent to Judge
Mayer by Prinzing, who claims to
have been completely unaware of
THE
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June 3, 1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofarof Greater Hollywood
Page 11
askABe
ByABehalpeRn
fction: Who is Rashi? What is his con-
lion to the clarification of the ideas and
I in the Torah, Talmud and other Scriptures?
Milton Kite
Hollywood, Fla.
Lwer: Rashi is an acronym of three Hebrew
rs: Reish, Shin, Yod. They represent three
pjev. words: Rabbi Shlomo Itzhaki (Rabbi
pon the son of Isaac).
Chi (1040-1105 C.E.), French Rabbinical
U and leading commentator on the Bible
be Talmud, was born in Troyes, the capital
f Champagne, France.
m facts are known about his early life.
jgh many legends are told about this period.
end tells that his father cast a precious gem
he sea rather than surrender it to Christians
I desired it for idolatrous purposes. A
Inly voice then foretold the birth of a son
vould enlighten the world with his wisdom.
ilso related that his mother was imperiled in
frow street during her pregnancy. She
against a wall which formed a niche to
her." (Encyclopaedia Judaica vol. 13,
I
.LOWING HIS original education in
Rashi studied at the academies of Mainz
korms in Germany.
pbout the age of twenty-five he returned to
and founded his own academy which
(ted many students. His fame spread and
inquiries about Halacha were addressed to
le then set about writing his Commentaries
Bible and the Babylonian Talmud.
of the most interesting publications to
|out of Israel is a three-volume publication
\('hronieles News of the Past, presenting
history in the modern style. The three
|es contain 73 four-page tabloid news-
written as though they were published in
alem at the particular time of the events as
happened. They contain many features, i.e.
ievents. editorials, letters to the editor,
Using, etc.. the pepper and salt ingredients
|ry newspaper.
FOLLOWING feature appears in volume
11, page 3, dateline Haifa. Sunday 25
Lu/.4859. 17 July 1099 (C.E.):
RASHI AT SIXTY
he letter reproduced here was dispatched to
m Troyes. France, on the occasion of
HOth birthday, by one of his students who
harently fearing the Master's wrath upon
H of this unwanted publicity has asked
\ain unonymous./"
lowing are a few brief excerpts:
fir two outstanding works of Rashi's life are
nentary on Scriptures and the as yet un-
fed body of explanatory notes on the 63-
ate Talmud .
ndoubtedly, Rabbenu Shlomo's explanation
[Talmud for the modern lay reader has filled
Owingly urgent need. The Jew's wide
Tsion among many lands and their pre-
ation with the myriad problems of existence
Ibeset them, as individuals and as corn-
lies, have rendered the Talmud virtually
inaccessible to all but the trained scholar. To
begin with, the language of the Talmud the so-
called Oral Law is mostly Aramaic, a tongue
that is little understood by most of contemporary
Jewry, certainly the Jewry of Europe .
"WHAT RASHI has done is to write a highly
concise and, at the same time, extremely simple
interpretation cum commentary to enable the
ordinary reader to navigate this immense literary
ocean safely and without undue difficulty. It is a
contribution to the preservation of Israel's
spiritual heritage whose importance it is difficult
to overestimate, and for which many a future
generation will have cause to be deeply
grateful .
"The material appears to be written especially
for the child, the pupil in school, and the aim
would seem to be to lead the reader to knowledge
of the Torah through love of the Torah ."
It is interesting to note that Rashi's com-
mentaries contain about ten thousand glosses of
French words. He explained many difficult words
in the text by giving their equivalent in the Ever-
nacular language, transliterating them into
Hebrew script. Kashi identifies these glosses as
being in the language of Laaz.
AS A YOUNG boy in the small shtetle in the
Ukraine, the USSR, studying in the Yeshiva. we
always studied Chumosh (the Pentateuch) with
Rashi's Commentary. The Talmud was also
studied with Rashi's Commentary. We always
translated the Hebrew and the Aramaic of the
Oemarah into Yiddish.
Brother-Sister Team
Will Become Rabbis
first woman in the
States to serve as a
Sally J. Priesand,
>rdained by Hebrew
College in 1972. The
oman invested as a
, Barbara O. Her-
an alumna of HUC,
|of1975.
year, upon the in-
as cantor of Mimi
in, the country had
It official husband-
ibbi-cantor couple.
Frishman's hus-
>uis, is the rabbi of
Beth El in Spring
IN.Y.
THE time is nearing
i college will have grad-
i first brother-sister team
Two such family corn-
are preparing for the
i at the college.
pairing consists of the
fgs of Chicago. Ellen
J is a third year student
INew York School. Her
brother, Michael, is a second year
student at Cincinnati.
The others are Karen ana
Steven Fox of Fullerton, Calif.
Karen, who is enrolled at the New
York School, is in the fourth year
of her studies; Steven, in
residence at the Los Angeles
School, is a second year student.
ELLEN WEINBERG is des-
tined not only to be a fellow
member of the rabbinate with her
brother but also with a father-in-
law to-be. Her marriage to
James N. Dreyfus is to take place
in September.
He is the son of Dr. A. Stanley
Dreyfus, rabbi of Brooklyn's
Union Temple. James, the pros-
pective bridegroom, is a medical
student at Yale University.
All four students said Reform
summer camp experience in their
younger days spurred their in-
terest in becoming rabbis. Ellen
and Karen said they found sig-
nificant the flexibility of a career
as a rabbi, since opportunities
exist not only in the pulpit but in
organizational and youth work,
as well.
IEVITT
memorial chapals
1*11 Pembroke Rtf.
Hollywood, Fla.
S144M7
Sonny Levitt. F D
MMW.OtxtoMwy.
Ntrth Miami, Fla
44*41)5
Religious Directory
NORTH BROWARD
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive. Reform (44).
I
It is almost sixty years since then but I
distinctly remember asking the Rabbi at the
Yeshiva, "What does Rashi mean by Laaz?" The :
Rabbi explained that this word consisting of three
Hebrew letters Lamed, Ayin, Zayin is an
acronym of three Hebrew words Lashon, Ahm,
Zar (language of a foreign people).
However, some authorities hold that this in-
terpretation is recent and erroneous. They claim
that this term is derived from the following
phrase: "When Israel went out of Egypt, the
house of Jacob from a people of strange
language:" (Psalms 114:1). The Hebrew word is
spelled with a Lamed, Ayin, Zayin, but the
nekkudot (the vowel signs) in the printed text
indicate the word to be pronounced Loaz.
BE THAT AS it may, these glosses of Rashi
have proven invaluable for the study of Old
French vocabulary.
"Rashi's last years were aggrieved by the mas-
sacres committed at the outset of the First
Crusade (1095-96), in which he lost relatives and
friends. Tradition relates that he foretold the
defeat of the expedition of Godfrey of Bouillon,
correctly predicting that Godfrey would return to
his native city with only three horses remaining
from his entire massive army His burial place
is not known."(Encyclopaedia Judaica, vol.13,
p. 1559)
Editor's note: Please send questions to
ASK ABE
c/ o Jewish Federation of
South Broward
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
Carnival Fashion
Cruise Set
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 910*
S7th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. (44A)
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Orazin.
Cantor Abraham Kester. (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 13 Tail St.
Conservative. Rabbi Sidney I. Lobin.
(43)
A MESSAGE OF IMPORTANCE
TO MEMBERS OF
ALL FRATERNAL
ORGANIZATIONS IN AREAS
ALL OVER THE COUNTRY
In time e< need why should you
LOSE Benevolence privileges that
you paid tor, when BOULEVARD,
the most beautiful Jewish Chapel In
South Florida WILL HONOR THEM
LOCALLY.
For tree information with no obliga
tion. call:
BOULEVARD CHAPELS
100 SOUTH OIXII MIGMWAT
JM> OH m.ii.*i. ...? >i.
HAUAMDAll. 'lOBIDA 33000
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE
GATION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi
Sheldon J. Harr. (44)
RECONSTRUCTIONS SYNA
GOGUE. 7473 NW 4th St. (49)
HALLANOALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 414
NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Carl Klein, PhD. Cantor Jacob
Danziger. (12)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. (37)
HOLLYWOOD
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 42nd
Ave. Conservative.
Landman. (47B)
Rabbi
Max
BETH EL TEMPLE. 13S1 S. 14th Ave.
Relorm. Rabbi Samuel Jalfe. As-
sistant Rabbi Jonathan Woll. (4S)
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4401 Arthur
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (44)
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Cantor Yehuda Heiloraun. (45)
SOLEL TEMPLE. 5100 Sheridan St.
Liberal. Rabbi Robert Frazin. (47C)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
32*1 Stirling Road, Oaks Condomin-
ium. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe Bom-
zer. (52)
Bar Mitzvah
TODD YEBER
Todd, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Sergio Yeber, will be Bar Mitz-
vah at Temple Sinai of Holly-
wood on Saturday, June 4.
BENJAMIN JACOB LUSSKIN
Benjamin Jacob, son of Dr.
and Mrs. Bret Lusskin, will be
called to the Torah as a Bar Mitz-
vah on Saturday morning, June
11, at Temple Sinai of Holly-
wood.
Four Florida fashion designers
have pooled their collections to
present the first annual "Focus
on Florida" fashion show and
seminar to be held aboard the
TSS Mardi Gras for a one-week
Caribbean cruise, June 5.
The designers who will host the
seminar as well as present the
newest of their styles aboard the
Carnival Cruise Lines' ship will
be:
Lilly of Lilly Pulitzer, Inc.,
known for her colorful cotton
prints of Key West Fabrics: Jay
Anderson of Posh, Inc.. who will
explain fabric and silhouette: Soli
Moustaki of Moustaki, Inc., the
originator of jersey disco dresses
and creator of the Moustaki gow.i
that can be worn fifty different
ways; Jackie and Jill of The
Twins Bikini. Inc.. known for
sporty bikinis. ...
Highlight of the cruise will be a
multimedia Choreo-Musical
Show with the designers
presenting their fashions against
a film background of Miami ajid
South Florida locations. '
Regular rates will prevail for
the fashion cruise in which, all
passengers will be able to parti-
cipate. The ship will sail, to
Nassau. San Juan and 9fc.
Thomas. '^
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORlD A
7empge Betkl
WemoiaC
(jatdeiu
The all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beau-
tifully landscaped, perpetual care, rea-
sonably priced.
For information call: 920-8225 or writ**
TEMr^EBETM'Ell""' ~~"" &&$&&
13SI S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
fleas* sand mi literature on the abovo.
NAME: _______^_____________
AODWESS:
FHONE:


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Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 3,1977
Lovely Crystal Tableware ...
FOLLOW THIS WEEKLY SCHEDULE
MA' ) JUHI 4 MOIUH'VATI it
JUNIS 11 O: Cul 4 SAUCIR it
I OISWT MIADAAumr 1 S.
s salad sour to*. 3 St
THE ENTERTAINER'S COLLECTION
k'f Foturi T%
This Wk s l-oturi i i ^^
Hostess Plate .59
C
PRSCIS EFFECTIVE SUNDAY
MAY Wtti THRU SAT. JUNE 4 AT All
PANTRY PRKXS FROM FT. PIERCE TO Y WHT
USDA CHOICE BEEF
RIB STEAK
This W. ^^
racr)
e^* ^R^ ^RR^ J3pu'choi*
IN ADDITION Along wM thm Mfiwi /'.mi ,i> II 6. .81. lo JMirchail
diHfmn' tISSJRR mi for only 5' any week diu-tof fhi'i i. pr.mo'ion pfe. 6.uTiTvl e.mpxjni.n pi.c. i pried from St" *o 9*
SAVE 36
HELLMANN'S
MAYONNAISE
99
32-OZ.
JAR
LIMIT ONE JAR PIEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF S7 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
3
)
SWA..
ErO
i..<.:.
S
2
29
LB.
USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK
SHLDR. POT ROAST
BONELESS
$109
1
IB.
Drumsticks .. 39
KA CM WPW GRAN A Fryer Quarters u 59c
'l A OC SMIMIO G ADf A PM SM MIMiu" _^
Fryer Parts .. 89*
SAVE 40
ALL TEMPERATURE DETERGENT
CHEER
99c
49-OZ.
BOX
ONE BOX PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF S' 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH GRADE A
LOTS o' CHICKEN
$f 29
89<
45
AC" *Oi CONTAaNS
)Mf ASTQTtS IAC,
1 ilGQ'RS N SACKS
lOHtllNCS
J WINGS _^_
3 NICKS
USOA CMOKI MID Cmu'k IMIS
Shoulder Steak
IIUl CHCHCI Mir CHUCK
Blade Steak
SliCID
Beef Liver ,. 59*
GROUND
Beef Chuck ,. 99c
USDA CHOICE BEEF
Round Bottom
ROUND STEAK
$<29
1
IB.
SAVE 29
PANTRY PRIDE PLAIN OR SELF-RISING
FLOUR
s 39*
* -LB. BAG %B*f^P^
LIMIT ONE SAG PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF S' 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
MAMA*
FISH CAKES
$109
P*G
FANCY SMELTS
1 $129
BTM.ROUND BEEF ROUND
RUMP ROAST I EYE ROUND ROAST | CUBED STEAKS SAVE 60
YOU MAY PURCHASE ONI OR All STARRfD ITEMS ON THE RIGHT WITH A 7 ORDER OR MORI EXCl CIGARITTIS
FIEBY RED CUTS I WHOLE
GARDEN FRESH
GOLDEN TOP DUTCH APPLE OR
APPLE PIE
79
M-OZ
PKG
PANTRY PRIDE OLYMPIC
MEAL BREAD
55
20-OZ
LOAF
WATERMELON YELLOW CORN
9C. &10.9
&
PANTRY PRIDE FLA. FRESH
GR. 'A' -EGGS
39c
3o.$l
CAI04N >tt.M CIIIM lAKCI II J :
SAiAOSiZC
Firm, Ripe Tomatoes
CAR* SAtNNf 0 l ARGI 60 SHI C All*
_ WS 'aUlOSlKl-OuiOrVN
Avocados 3 o. 1 Yellow Onions
US -- I All fUtrOSI HAINI
Potatoes 5 ..'o 79c
GAR DIN f IISH tOMAiNI f"Bk AtKa.
Lettuce mm 39c
TO. OUAUl* k A.r.l I? Sill HAITIAN ^^
iach b9
Mangoes
Peppers
'ISM IAIGI jo IU
Artichokes
MAUIrlUl 'OTTIO
Begonias
ItlSM lARGI JO Si21 WIS'ltS
PANTRY PRIDE
LIQUID DISH
DETERGENT
All
VARIETIES
ANTI PllOf
PANTRY PRIOI DELICIOUS
GOO FER KIES
VANIllA SUGAR I PEANUT SUITER 1 DELUXE SUGAR IJ-OZ PKG. < 1 591
PANTRY PRIDE
MIX N' MATCH
14-OZ. STL TOMATO CATSUP
14-OZ. CAN WHOII KERNEL OR
CREAM STYLE CORN
3$1
Cottage
Cheese
____ MEDIUMS
* ^KaF ^BT DOZEN
LIMIT TWO DOZEN PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF S7 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
J
SAVE 27c zs
IN QUARTERS MRS. FILBERTS
MARGARINE <
2.u-79c
IMITTWOPKGS PLEASE WITH OIHER PURCHASES!
OF $7 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES 1
PANTRY PRIDE CREAMED
24-OZ
CUP
PANTRY PRIDE MIDGET
Beef
Salami
CHUB
99
BlUl lONNtt
Aluminum Foil "?.c"79c
All iiavois rantit run
Sodas 8 c.S,$l00
r amu t r.ioi POIAIO Owl ot
Dip 'n Chips \.c59e
RANT!' RIlCH RIG OR MINI
Marshmallows 3 S $1
Vanilla Wafers '.^ 49c
(ANTIT PR ID*.
I4-OI
TUG
59*
Pretzel Sticks
R ANTI Y PllOt
Mac. A Cheese 4'..,-V 88c
'iNin riidi PII till
Dog Food 6 ^99'
PANTRY PRIOI All FLAVORS
Nil I PBIDI OATAUAl
Cookies Sg 49'
(ANTIT RUM ALMOND
Crescents
Margar;ne Qtrs ..o' 55c
KING SOUl NON lUTIIIf AT
Dressing .33.43*
IIODi WIP
Topping
Biscuits
CAN
S OI
CAN
IO-OZ .
PG
Preserves
PANTIT RUDI HIAVT DUTT llOUID LAUNOlT
Detergent ^'*
PANTRY PRIDE
49c
2 ;:.99t
1
N<
COS!
Sour Cream
ULSIUlT
Crescent Rolls
SI All! SI CIIAUID
Cottage Cheese j 55c
79c
29*
59<
2n39*
Braunschweiger c'-?.69c
OSCAI MATH WIINIIS OI
Beef Franks Mt,l"
OSCAt MATH S1ICID MIAI OI
Beef Bologna r.G"99<
ClAUSSINS WHOll OI SMAIS
Kosher Pickles ?..99c
AMIItCAN KOSHII
Salads
BO10GNA
so: KUC
CUP
PARTY SNACK
59'
u-oi $59
Drink
Mixes
24-OZ.
CAN
89
99
GAL iO
juc iV
69
All VAIWIIIS OII MOUNTAIN
Wines
rANTIT riKM
Cleanser 2 ^',29'
R ANTIT RRiOl
Apple Juice 2
3 J OI S '
JAIS I
Frozen 5
Waffles PKcs
'"'' i : I R t Cut
French Fries 2 ..'c 59c
394
>M STTll OI
57c
THKK TASTY t HEAITHY
SEALTEST
BUTTERMILK
PANTRY PtIOE COLOREO
CHEESE SINGLES
RANTIT FtlOl IO:iS "i:
Topping \tl
giiin Giant nous mio MM mas ciiam sttli or
HALF
GALLON
PROCESS
CHEESE
FOOD
'O-OI
PKG
Tcisters
Choice
100*. FfM-0rWdCDTM
I OJ 1AI
R.gulor >4"
Dcoinold '4"

10% Off Your
Grocery Bill.
Niblets Corn
Mil PAUL S IIOIIS light IAITII
Fish Miniatures \l 99c
MRS RAUISFIOZIN
Fish *n Chips tS $1
PANTRY PRIDE FROZEN MACARONI < CHEESE
TURKEY CHICKEN OR BEEF POT PIES
IN OUR SERVICE APPETIZER OEPT.
.. .1.1 :s. a-s'o.is-a. nosh. :i--..-,.-
All .SCxmia-i t C-IISI s. CIO -OOtOH
Danish
Cheese T
CONVENIENT I TIDY I PANTRY PRIDE
BALLPARK 1
FRANKS, KNOCKS
OR BRATWURST
$J19
I LB
PKG
'CHS OILICIOUS
Chicken Roll
IISMiv SLiCID .Ox Ot
Nova Salmon
MUINSTIR CHEESE
All Ot MIOIUM
Roast Beef
-:; 89c
ot. $2>9
89*
r:89c
Mixnf
Match 4
99
Trash Can
Liners
PANTNV PRIDE SUGAR FROSTEO FLAKES Ot
TOCl Crispy Rice
#9 Cereal
69
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES NONE SOLD TO DEALERS NOT RESPONSHLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS


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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 3, 1977
/
The Bitter Fruit!
It is interesting to note that as President Carter's top
adviser Zbiegnew Brzezinski was meeting in Washington
with Jewish leaders to assure them on U.S.-Israeli ties, the1
President himself was preparing a speech for delivery at
Notre Dame University Sunday in which he warned that
he would expect Israel to abide by the United Nations
decisions in the Israel-Arab dispute.
Which United Nations decisions? To commit suicide?
There is an increasing duality in the Carter per-
sonality which bespeaks more than the fertile mind of a
man who refuses to be pinned down on a specific issue
because he sees too many alternative possibilities as
answers.
The duality spells a singular portrait: Carter is
capable of saying many attractive things attractive to
the American Jewish community, which he instructed
Brzezinski to tell the Jewish leaders. At the same time, he
emerges as a man potentially more conservative in his
view of possible Middle Eastern solutions that are far
narrower in terms of Israeli interests than either of his
Republican predecessors entertained at their worst.
What is so appalling about this is that we knew it all
at the outset and said so in these columns. If one voted
for President Carter back in November, it was not because
he would be especially friendly to Israel, we opined.
The vote would be for a man with a new guiding
moral spirit only so far as domestic American affairs are
concerned. In foreign affairs, he could be even more
pragmatic than most.
What we said then is now bearing fruit. It may be too
early to tell, but already the fruit seems bitter.
Through Back Door
David Landau, our man in Jerusalem, opines that if
the elections were held again May 18, it is fair to assume
that the results would be substantially different. Labor
though doubtless it would still emerge weakened, would
very probably not come out losing a massive 18 seats out
of 51. and the Democratic Movement For Change (DMC).
which took most of these votes from Labor, would very
likely be significantly reduced.
For what happened in the elections was, basically,
that erstwhile Labor supporters, anxious to punish Labor
for what they felt were its failures particularly in internal
affairs, swung over to the newly-created and moderately
based DMC and thereby enabled Menachem Begin to
fulfill his lifelong ambition: lead his rightist Likud Party
to relative victory as the new Knesset's largest faction.
For Likud, despite Begins historic victory address at
3 a.m., only gained two seats more than it had in the
previous Knesset. Labor's huge defeat was almost entirely
at the hands of the DMC which thereby, as some analysts
noted, "let in Begin through the back door." This was
particularly apparent when the voting was broken down
by expert analysts into areas and types of population.
Our Jewish Commitment
Whatever the speculation on the reasoning behind the
Begin victory, we note with interest the comment of Rabbi
Arthur Hertzberg, president of the American Jewish
Congress.
The Israeli decision "was taken freely and peace-
fully," he said, "in sharp contrast to the purges and coups
that have marked political changes among Israel's Arab
neighbors. The process underscores the strength and
stability of Israel's democratic system."
In this sense "American Jews will bring their deep
love of Israel and their unflinching commitment to the
right of Israel's peace to live in security, dignity and
peace."
For, in the end, "The essence of this love and this
commitment is that it is given not to any political party or
any political leader, but rather to the State and the
citizens of that State, creating a parntership that will meet
whatever tests confront it and that will endure."
We heartily agree.
Likud to World: Buzz Off
Jewish JFlorxdian.
and SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Suite 206 12BS Federal Hwy. Danla Fla 3300*
MAIN OFFICE iand P^ANT^ONE 6th St.. Miami. Fla 33132 Phone 373-4606
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone (1) -373-4606 ^^^
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FRED K SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SELMA M THOMPSON
Editor and Publlaher Executive Editor I Mlto&topJSSS
A" P-O. 3578 returns are to be forwarded to
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Jh* i^l*h Flor,d'n Not Guarantee Tht Kashruth
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17 SI VAN 5737
Number 11
IT IS not good practice for a
columnist to promise to continue
pursuing a theme in his very next
column that he has not finished
in his previous one as I did
here last week in an analysis of
the dangers involved in U.S.
withdrawal from maximum mil-
itary commitments abroad and
particularly as this withdrawal
would affect the rise of the ex-
treme-right in Germany and
elsewhere in Europe.
I wrote, "For more on this,
next week." I should have
written, "For more on this,
another time,'' for in between, the
Likud victory has occurred
which, in a very particular way,
requires comment now or not at
all, and so I find myself on the
Mindlin
limb of a choice I must make and.
having made it, saw the limb off
behind me, so that both of us go
crashing to the ground in a sea of
Nesn-ir^tER^pKjSM
bruises called, were this an el
cheapo painting, Broken
Promises.
IN ANY event, the rise of the
extreme-right in Germany is
certainly sufficiently terrifying a
prospect as to make a commit-
ment to have my say about it as
soon as I can get back to it.
For the moment, there is
Menachem Begin.
What I find most interesting
about his victory is that it has
caught the so-called political
savants flatfooted. This includes
not only presidents and kings,
but pundits who earn their keep
by telling people what they are
going to do in the near future
or, as is more often the case, what
is going to be done to them by
presidents and kings.
IN AN editorial in The Jewish
Floridian of May 13, it was
opined that the West Bank would
play a more important role in the
outcome of the May 17 election
than was popularly imagined.
The editorial suggested that
the West Bank is not only a
burning commitment in the
hearts of what had come to be
called the religious tealots. that
small hand of supposedly,
unrealistic Jews who lay claim to
the.West Bank as an integral
part of Israeli and Biblical
historicity, many of whom have
gone there to found settlements
either legally-sanctioned or else
deplored in Jerusalem and torn
down by the Labor government
even before they could get off the
ground.
The West Bank, the editorial
noted, is symbolic to Israel ai
large. It is an answer to the
Jimmy Carters of the world who
were already sharpening their
knives to cut the country back
down to a sliver more satisfying
in proportion to the petrobil-
lionaires and the phony pur-
Continued on Page 9
A Case of Legislative Courage
Unlike the Congressional
Record, which reveals the debate
as well as the vote on bills, the
Journal of the Florida Senate
tells little but the vote. And that,
often, is on amendments which
offer language like "Amendment
7 On page 1 in title, line 28,
after appeals'; insert: adding
subsection 215.47(2)(e), Florida
Statutes."
A few pages of that, and one's
desire to follow legislation
hundreds of miles from Talla-
hassee is greatly reduced.
WHAT IS obvious and
comes as no surprise is that
there are, sadly, far more char-
latans than we deserve up there.
Or maybe we do deserve them,
for both the bad and the few good
have been chosen in what passes
for fair elections.
We, the people, ultimately are
responsible for the unfair taxes,
the chaotic auto insurance
system, the poor education and
so many of the other ills that
beset us.
It may be that the solutions to
these problems would evade the
best of people but it can be said
that in Tallahassee we haven't
given that probability a chance.
There are some minor conso-
lations all losers, of course.
Seven Senators had the courage
to stand up for the First Amend-
ment in voting against an ob-
\iously unconstitutional bill that
would permit school boards to
provide a daily period of silent
meditation in public schools.
IT COMES as no surprise that
two of them were Dade County's
Jack Gordon and Ken Myers,
while our other six Senators took
the easy way out. After all, the
1972 straw vote on prayer in the
t<~
Edward
Cohen
to 80 percent of the voters
favored suspending the First
Amendment in this instance.
On issue after issue of con-
science, Myers and Gordon play
almost solitary roles Gordon
all alone on the death penalty and
allied legislation often,
however, joined by the two ladies
in the Senate. Betty Castor and
Lori Wilson, whose instincts, by
my standards, are invariably
good.
There was one bill on which the
quartet was joined by a fifth,
Sen. Don Chamberlin of Clear-
water. Because his remarks
during debate were printed an
unusual occurrence some
excerpts are worth repeating in
view of the June 7 election on
repeal of the amendment to the
Human Rights ordinance.
CASTOR. Gordon, Myers and
Wilson stood with Chamberlin in
opposition to a bill which would
prohibit a homosexual from
adopting "another person." The
heart of this bill, said Cham-
berlin, is not the subject matter
of adoptions "it js dis-
crimination.
"The popularity of Archie
Bunker seems to tell us that
individuals in society need a relief
valve. They need to express their
prejudices and sometimes even to
act upon them. The defeat of this
bill will not rob anyone of their
begins a state policy selective,
deliberate discrimination .
there will be other instances
(then) where you may also want
to express your moral outrage or
your irritation against homo-
sexuals.
"IN NAZI Germany, the first
act of discrimination against
Jews was to forbid them to own
property. The last act was
murder. To kill the human spirit
was the first step toward killing
the human Anita Bryant may
not recognize the issue of the
human spirit. She apparently
feels homosexuality is a sickness,
an intolerable deviation But
the issue is not whether homo
sexuality is normal; it is whether
we understand the behavior
sufficiently to stigmatize and
discriminate through public
policy.
"Is there a fundamental, soci-
etal decency which will tolerate
what we, as individuals, cannot
approve? (The citizens at
home) would want, in their
grander moments, for you to vote'
for: love, and tolerance, and dig-
nity for all human beings."
There were only five who were
willing to subscribe to that in
public.
HOWEVER one feels about
the issue personally, as Cham-
berlin states, it is good to know
that there are some people in
public office who have the
courage t< stand for principles
and are neither swayed nor inti-
midated I >; currant hysteria.
This first term freshman from
a conservative district it used
to elect ultra-conservative
Richard Deeb regularly has set
an example that we commend to
J>ur_ownjegJ3lative delegation.
V.i