The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00171

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJewish Florid far
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 7 Number 10
Friday. May 20, 1977
Price 25 Cents
JFSB Re-elects Lewis Cohn President
Lewis E. Cohn has been
elected to a second term as
president of the Jewish Feder-
ation of South Broward. At
the Federation annual
meeting, held May 15, Cohn
was elected unanimously
along with the following other
officers: Stanley I. Margulies,
M.D. and Moses Hornstein,
vice presidents; Allen Gordon,
treasurer, and Robert S.
Pittell. secretary.
Long active in Jewish com-
munal affairs, Cohn is a past
president of Temple Beth El and
serves on the board of directors
of various local Jewish agencies.
He has been honored by the
American Jewish Committee
State of Israel Bonds and the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Kmergency Fund campaign
which he served as chairman.
Dr. Margulies served the CJA-
IEF campaign this past year as
general campaign chairman. He
Other New Officers..
MARGULIES HORNSTEIN
Vice President*
was president of Federation's
Young Leadership Council and
chairman of Operation Upgrade.
He also received the Young
Leadership Award.
HORNSTEIN IS a former vice
president of the Synagogue
Council of America and the
American Friends of the Boys
Town of Jerusalem. He served as
GORDON
Treasurer
PITTELL
Secretary
Dr. Pittell served as chairman
of the Federation^ Education
Committee and this past year
was chairman of Operation Up-
grade. He is a member of the
boards of Temple Sinai, Broward
County Pediatric Society and
Broward County Medical
Society.
ELECTED TO the board of
directors for a three-year term
were: Melvin H. Baer, Dr. Sam
Meline, James Fox Miller, Mrs.
Theodore Newman, Nathan
Pritcher and Ben Salter.
Elected to the board of trustees
for a term of one vear were:
Continued on Page 2
LEWIS E. COHEN
a director of the American
Friends of the Hebrew University
and the America-Israel Cultural
Foundation. He was Big Gifts
chairman of the 1977 CJ A-IEF.
Gordon has been active in Fed-
eration and community affairs for
many years. He is currently
JFSB Administrative Committee
chairman.
Women's Division Installs
Kraemer President
i
I
i
Phyllis Kraemer was installed
as president of the Women's
Division of t he Jewish Federation
of South Broward at the annual
installation of officers and
awards luncheon held at the
Kmerald Hills Country Club.
Mrs. Kraemer has been active
in Federation affairs for many
years. A member of Women's
Division Board of Directors since
1973, she has also served as
Parliamentarian and nominating
committee chairwoman. She has
been a member of the Federation
Allocations Committee and has
been active in the Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund campaign, devoting her
time during a 10-week period,
serving as both speaker and
solicitor. In her effort to develop
Jewish communal living in our
area, Mrs. Kraemer is currently
serving as an executive member
of the Community Relations
Committee.
Her most recent involvement
has been as coordinator of the
May 15, Teodore Bikel gala
event.
MRS. KRAEMER said that
she sees nothing but continued
success in the upcoming year for
the Women's Division. "Not only
in our traditional roles as
educators and women's fund-
raisers, but we will work coopera-
tively as a true and integral part
of the Federation community."
Other officers installed in-
clude: Nancy Brizel, vice
president of education: Esther
Gordon, vice president in service:
Elaine Fleisher, vice president
campaign education; Delia
Rosenberg, vice president cam-
paign east; Brenda Greenman,
vice president campaign central;
Gloria Hess, secretary; Jo Ann
Katz, nominating committee
chairman: and Sylvia Abram,
parliamentarian.
1977 CJA-IEF
Surpasses Record
Of $4 Million
The 1977 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund campaign of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward officially closed with more than $4 million raised
to aid Jews in Israel, behind the Iron Curtain, and here in
the South Broward community.
In announcing figures at Federation's annual
meeting, General Campaign Chairman Dr. Stanley Mar-
gulies thanked the entire community for "participation
and financial support of our most important efforts." He
said that Israel is approaching a 40 percent inflation rate
and the pound continues to be devalued.
"Our dollars will go to aid the much needed humani-
tarian projects, such as education, care for older adults
and housing for new immigrants. Naturally, a portion of
your dollars stay in this community to further our social
service, cultural, educational and community relations
programs," he said.
Dr. Margulies noted that the record amount of money
raised this year puts the Federation among the top 18
Federal ions in the country. "It also indicates a 10 percent
increase over last year, which also is one of the highest
percentage increases in the nation." He added that "with
the continued help and financial support of the South
Broward community, we will move even further forward
next year. Our work is never done and we cannot relax and
rest on our laurels."
Ann Cohn and Paul Kramer acted as installing officers of the
day as they installed the officers of the Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of South Broward. The 1977-78 Women's
Division officers include (seated, left to right) Delia Rosenberg,
vice president campaign east; Gloria Hess, secretary; Phyllis
Kraemer, president; Nancy Brizel, vice president education;
(standing, left to right) Brenda Greenman, vice president
campaign central; Esther Gordon, vice president in service;
Sylvia Abram, parliamentarian; Elaine Fleisher, vice president
campaign education, and Jo Ann Katz, nominating committee
chairman.
Division chairmen honored at the Jewish Federation of South
Broward Women's Division installation and awards luncheon
held at the Emerald Hills Country Club are (seated, left to
right) Marge Saltzman, Shoshana; Barbara Buchwald,
Suburban; Gloria Hess, Hillcrest; Jo Ann Katz, vice president
of campaign; (standing, left to right) Brenda Greenman, Lakes;
Sylvia Abram, Lakes; Elaine Pittell, Pacesetters; Rochelle
Koenig, Pacesetters; Elaine Fleisher, Hallandale A, and Nancy
Brizel, Phon-a-thon. Drazia Berman was also a suburban
division leader.
Orthodox Prisoner
Was Beaten
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
An Orthodox Jew is one of
15 inmates in a state prison
who has joined in a class
action suit demanding un-
specified damages for
repeated abuses and beat-
ings allegedly committed
against them for their race
it religion by prison
guards, a civil rights group
official said.
According to the 45-page
complaint, filed by Prison-
ers Legal Service in federal
district court in Utica,
N.Y., because the alleged
mistreatment could be a
violation of the prisoners'
civil rights, a federal crime,
Continued on Page 12
The UHght Shall Shine as the Day9. Page is


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, My 20,1977
Meline to Lead Mission to Israel
Dr. Sam Meline has been
appointed chairman of the South
Broward Community Mission to
Israel. Oct. 16-26. announced
Missions Chairman Paul
Kraemer.
Active in all facets of the com-
munity. Meline has served as
Federation vice president and as
chairman of the Metropolitan
Division of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign. In addition." Meline
has received the Hy & Belle
Schlafer Young Leadership, the
Community Leadership and the
Knesset Awards.
The Com-
munity Mission
differs from a
trip that a travel
agent plans."
Meline explain-
ed, "we will have
the opportunity
to meet with top
Israeli leaders
and explore our
Jewish roots and MELINE
ancestry.
CASH
is what counts. Pledges and
promises must be met so
that Jews everywhere will
live a better life.
1977 COMBINED-
JEWISH APPEAL-
ISRAEL EMERGENCY
FUND
Jewish Federation of
South Broward
Cohn
Continued from Page 1
Morton L. Abram. Herman
Barnett. Ross P. Beckerman.
Jack Berman. Mrs. Frances
Briefer. Dr. Herbert Brizel. Dr.
Alex Buchwald and Mrs. Carolyn
Davis.
Also. Mrs. Morton Diamond.
Edward Dincin. Dr. Fred Ehren-
stein. Sol Entin. Morse Epstein.
Mrs. Martin Fleisher. Dr. Charles
Friedman. Dr. Victor Glazer.
Mrs. Allen Gordon. Jules B.
Gordon. Robert W. Gordon.
David M. Harris. Alvin Hess.
Mrs. Herbert Katz. Mrs. Beryl
Kaufman and Dr. Stanley Kessel.
Herbert Kravitz. Dr. Philip
Levin. Mrs. Meron Levitats.
Mrs. Ina Linda. William Litt-
man. Jacob Mogilowitz. Dr.
Harry B. Orringer and Sam J.
Perry were also named one-year
trustees, as were Mrs. Robert
Pittell. David Posnack. Ham-
Rosen. Ben Rosenberg. Mrs. Ben
Rosenberg. Mrs. Ben Salter and
Jack Saltzman.
Also. Dr. Steven Schachter.
Dr. Allan Scheinblum. H. G.
Schlafer. Joseph Schwartz. Jack
Shapiro. Gerald Siegel. Max
Sloane. Lawrence Weiner. Mrs.
Steven Weisberg. Milton
Winograd and Mrs. Mary Zinn
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
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SI 5 '4Ave Hollywood 33020
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Religious Goods, Gifts,
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HOME CLEANING
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WINDOW CLEANING.
FLOOR WAXING.
insured* Bonded* References
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Free Estimates:
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I
"We know that the Mission
will be well attended this year,"
Meline added. "This is a unique
opportunity for our community
members to get a first-hand view
of Israel as she begins her 30th
year. The knowledge that is
gained in this 10-day trip will
help build a stronger, more
united, better informed Jewish
Federation and Jewish com-
munity."
Anyone interested in joining
the community mission, please
contact the Jewish Federation of
South Broward. Further details
will be forthcoming.
m
JCC Sets Sarasota Bus Trip
K
The Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida
Hollywood Branch is spon-
soring an overnight bus trip to
Sarasota and Fort Myers
Wednesday. June 15.
The tour will depart Hollywood
at 9 a.m. and travel to the Sara-
sota area with scheduled stops at
the Ringling home, gardens, art
and circus museums. Also in-
cluded is a live performance of
"Cyrano De Bergerac" at the
Asolo Theater.
While in Fort Myers, the group
will visit the home of Thomas
Edison and tour his laboratory.
The cost of the tour for JCC
members is $42.50 (single) and
$36.50 (double) per person: and
for non-members. $50.00 (single)
and $44.00 (double). This price
includes round trip bus trans-
portation, one night at the
Golden Host Motel (Sarasota).
all admissions, an after-theater
party, and the bus driver's tip.
Meals are not included in the tour
price.
For further information,
contact Elaine or Herb at the
JCC. Hollywood.
The Women's Division of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward presented the third in the series of Jewish Family
Institute programs, the "Problems of Aging." Speaking to a
full house of 250 people at Temple Sinai, Hollywood, the psy-
chology of aging, pleasures of aging, legalities of aging, and
projections for the future were among the topics discussed by
the panel (from left) Reva Wexler, director of the Women's
Division JFSB; Melvin Weinstein, tax attorney; Dr. Tamara
Cohen, psychologist; and Miriam Zatinsky, director of the
South Beach Community Center.

Why we say faddish.
The Kaodish is one of the oldest prayers in
Jewish liturgy.lt has been recited countless
numbers of times since Biblical days. In
ancient times the Kaddish was the prayer that
concluded a session of Torah study.However.
in the Middle Ages it assumed special
; g 'icanceasamourner'sprayer.Yet.ina
real sense it is not a prayer for the dead.
Rather, : Is a prayer fc g Amoving
statement in praise of God and a plea for the
ate redemption and salvation of all
mark nd
For the bereaved, the Kaddish is a very
per; -ession honoring the scul of a
deceased parent or close relative. But at the
same time, it is a celebration of life, a pledge
to live on in the tradition of the parents and
the Jewish people.
In a time of grief .when the feeling of loss
is most acute, it becomes a true act of faith
ind devotion to stand and say the words of
trust and praise expressed so beautifullv
in the Kaddish. '
Throughout our history, these words have
been the bond that has held us together
through times of joy and sadness as a PeoDle
and a Faith.
It's what makes us Jews.
HOLLYWOOD: 223C Hollywood Boulevard
, wood locat.on 5801 Hollywood Boulev.ro
S20-10i0
SUNRISE: 1171 Northwest 61st Averse (Sunset SI
NorthMiam, Beach Miami Beach. Miami and West Palm Beach
Fl .c cnape's serving the New YorK City Wetropc^tanTrea
ERiverside
MIM -.31 Chapel.inc ,'Funeral Directors
for generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
Hs-Ji-77
tt-m-n


f, May 20,1977
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
JFSB Sends Largest Delegation Jjig EgteHfehfiB LoWCTlthal Award
\To Women's Division Conference
^umbering 23, the Women's
Jvision of the Jewish Federation
ISouth Broward was the largest
Instituency attending the
.omen's Division Regional Con-
fence at Palm Aire, Pompano,
linsored by the National
lomen's Division of the United
*ish Appeal.
There were 78 persons repre-
nting South Broward, Miami,
kit Lauderdale, Palm Beach,
kmpa, Pinellas County, Sara-
la and Orlando.
|The JFSB women who at-
nded were: Hannah Adel,
ancy Brizel, Barbara Buchwald.
Ann Cohn, Elaine Fleisher,
Esther Gordon, Brenda Green-
man and Marcy Gross.
Also, Gloria Hess, Ellie Katz,
Jo Ann Katz, Beryl Kaufman,
Phyllis Kraemer, Marian
Levitats, Rhoda Marcus, Karen
Margulies, Joyce Newman,
Elaine Pittell, Delia Rosenberg,
Marge Saltzman, Evelyn Stieber,
Eleanor Weiner and Reva
Wexler.
Campaign training for trainers,
speaker training, missions, tax
and legacy, the Middle East and
leadership development were
among the topics covered.
Upon her retirement as
executive director of the Jewish
Family Service of Broward
County, the constituent agency
of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward has established the
Esther Lowenthal Community
Award, to be bestowed yearly
upon an individual who has
demonstrated unusual and out-
standing service to Broward
County and to the Jewish
community.
At the annual meeting of the
Jewish Family Service, President
Mark Fried paid tribute to Miss
Lowenthal saying that "she is an
outstanding example of profes-
LOWENTHAL
sionalism at its peak, a stalwart
of this agency and a revered
member of the community.''
In addition to Fried, Miss
Lowenthal received tributes from
Hollywood Mayor David
Keating; Douglas Endsley,
xecutive director of the United
A'ay; Commissioner Ken Jenne,
chairman of the Broward County
Board of Commissioners; Lewis
E. Cohn, president of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward;
Irving Geisser, executive director
of the Jewish Federation of Fort
Lauderdale and Mrs. Maria Gale,
representing the JFS staff.
Dr. Settg Accepts Post at Hillel Day School Cahm to T THF Prom-am
Mirhnel Scheck. Dresident of South Florida. Amone the counties, is now acceDtinir retris- V/VlBwM lV A V |# J.J.J.X JL ft vgl C**l
|Michael Scheck, president of
Samuel Scheck Hillel Corn-
unity Day School, North Miami
ach, has announced that Dr.
ney Selig has been engaged as
ncipal of the school.
)r. Sidney Selig who will
ve as principal
|d rabbi of the
Ulel School was
and edu-
ked in F.ng-
pd. He was a
[idem at the
ngleton Hill
achers Insti-
te, Manchester
Ihhinical Col-
Yeshivah,
Jews' Col-
University SELIG
ondon. Rabbi Selig is a diplo-
|t in social casework from the
liversity of Toronto, Extension
iision, holds a M.A. in Clinical
penology from the University
I Detroit and a doctorate of
(cation from Wayne State
iversity, Mich.
)r. Selig is the president of the
krlsh Educators Council of
South Florida. Among the
national profession organizations
in which Rabbi Selig is associated
is the American Psychological
Association, the National Council
for Jewish Education, the Jewish
Educators Assembly, the
Yeshivah Principals Association,
and the Education Council of
America (Yeshivah University).
Dr. Selig holds and has held
important national, regional and
local professional offices in these
organizations.
Rabbi Selig's most recent posi-
tion was director of education at
the Palm Beach Jewish Com-
munity Day School where, during
his tenure of office, the school
grew by more than 300 percent.
He previsouly served as a head-
master, principal, director of
education and superintendent in
day schools, yeshivot in England,
Canada, and the United States.
Dr. Sidney Selig is a frequent
contributor to a variety of profes-
sional jounals.
The Samuel Scheck Hillel
Community Day School, which
serves Dade and Broward
fund Allocations Begins As
IJA-IEF Campaign Ends
The Jewish Federation of
nth Broward's 1977 Combined
rish Appeal-Israel Emergency
nd campaign is in its closing
rs and it is now time for the
bcations process to begin,
erein the Allocations Com-
It tee studies all agencies
guesting funds from the pro-
is of the campaign.
The general Allocations Com-
^tee, headed by Dr. Norman
kin, is divided into three study
committees. Paul Koenig is
chairman of the Local and
rional Agencies Study Com-
f tee. R. Joel Weiss is chairman
1 the National and Overseas
vice Agencies Study Com-
Itee, and Arnold Rosenthal is
lirman of the National and
erseas Community Relations
Cultural Agencies Study
nmittee.
We are
kdying the re-
psts of about
I various agen-
explained
Atkin.
Here are 120
pple on our
nmittees who
netting dur-
[the month of
ry with final
orts to the
fixation board
directors
Muled for
he.
[When constituent agencies
m their requests, they are
"'red to submit budget and
{Kground information. This
prmation is then channeled to
study committees who make
huI considerations based on
'I supplied to them. In
bs, as with the United
"h Appeal," -Dr. Atkin
a representative was
'-o address the committee.''
On May 17, Stanley Sloane,
national chairman of the United
Jewish Appeal, spoke to the
Allocations Committee, the
Federation board of directors,
and the Women's Division of-
ficers. He discussed a concern
with the needs of Israel's people,
continued support of UJA, and
explained their increased alloca-
tions needs.
"Mr. Sloane's requests are
currently under consideration,"
said Dr. Atkin.
counties, is now accepting regis-
trations for enrollment for the
1977-78 school year according to
Educational Vice President, Dr.
Walter Fingerer.
Hillel, which will begin its
eighth year in September, offers
Hebraic Secular Education and
provides transportation from
North Broward County to Miami
Lakes and Hialeah in the Sout,
reported Marshall Baltuch,
executive director.
Handler Foundation
Donates Ambulance
To Israel's MDA
Members of the board of
trustees of the Handler Foun-
dation, headed by President
Maurice S. Handler of Holly-
wood, Fla., and New York City,
have presented an ambulance to
the people of Israel in honor of
the heroes of Entebbe.
The ambulance led the UJA-
Federation Walkathon last
Sunday from Chappaqua North
Westchester to the Sons of Israel
Congregation in Briarcliff Manor
in New York where it was
dedicated by Rabbi Elliott Rosen
and a representative of American
Red Magen David for Israel
(ARMDI).
Maurice Handler, Jerry
Handler and Shirley Handler
Ho rod as were presented with the
Pikuach Nefesh Award in recog-
nition of their support of Magen
David Adorn (MDA) Israel's
National Emergency Medical
Health and Blood Services.
Samuel Rein hard of Miami
Beach, who served as Florida
state chairman of the ARMDI
was instrumental in obtaining
this donation.
ATKIN
Camp hiqhlanfceR
Horse Shoe, North Carolina Near Asheville
IA Residential Camp for Boys and Girls Ages 7-16 offering a
wide selection of activities and times to fit every vacation
plan with 3-6-9 week sessions beginning June 19 and one
week of popular Family Camping Aug. 21-27.
Program Offerings:
Wi Iderness Camping
River Canoeing
Rock Climbing
Birling
Hiking
Gymnastics & Dance
Tennis
Land Sports
River Rafting
Horseback Riding
Bicycle Moto-X
Archery & Riflery
Swimming
Arts & Crafts
For further information contact:
Mr. Tim T. Harris
PINE CREST SCHOOL
1501 N.E. 62 St., Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33334
Phone (305) 772-6550
NW-DISCRIMINATORY ADMISSIONS_______
American-Jewish humorist
Kmil Cohen will perform at the
annual Women's Day of the
Israel Histadrut Foundation
(IHF) Thursday, May 26, at the
Holiday Inn, 4000 So. Ocean
Drive, Hollywood, according to
dinner chairman Mrs. Inna
Rochlin.
The Women's Day event, an
annual expression of solidarity
with the women of Israel, marks
the tenth anniversary of the re-
unification of the city of
Jerusalem.
IN CELEBRATION of
Israel's victory in the Six Day
War, there will be a special
musical tribute featuring
renowned soprano soloist Lois
Yavnieli of the Israel Phil-
harmonic, "who will be accom-
panied by Israeli composer
Shmuel Fershko at the piano.
Rita E. Huser, a former
member of the American dele-
gation to the United Nat ions, will
be the guest speaker at the
dinner, which is cosponsored by
the Pioneer Women Council of
South Florida.
The Israel Histadrut Founda-
tion provides financial support
for the network of Histadrut
social service institutions in
Israel.
Tickets for the May 26
Women's Day are available
through the Histadrut Founda-
tion office in Hallandale.
12 NIGHTS ISRAEL, 1 NIGHT ATHENS, 3 NIGHTS
SAILING ESCORTED BY RABBI and MRS. DAVID
SHAPIRO Aug. 15 Five Star Hotels EIAI
LOST HORIZONS TRAVEL
Brow. 920-9002Dade 945-5366
arnett
Sank
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19lh Avenue Phone: 925-8200
Marion
Nevins
Sailer's
Now Available
"To Jerusalem'
Saul Bellows
Post Haste Shopping Center
4525 Sheridan St.. Hollywood, Flo.
Phone 961 -6998
Personal Service Book Store
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4540566


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 20,1JT
The Jewish Lifeline: Setting Priorities
For the Jewish people, the
Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward
is our Jewish lifeline our
means of translating
on into action
into prai I
into h
It is a definition of oui
shared values anc
community which shapes our
work. For what is it that
- meaning to our work in
CJ A and our Federations but
our distinctive peoplehood.'
In a voluntary society such
as ours, our giving is an ex-
pression of faith of con-
science and action.
THIS SPRING, as we
examine our pledges for the
19T7 CJA-IEF. and convert
those commitments to cash,
we are acting with the
knowledge that in Jerusalem
hard, cruel decisions con-
front the people of Israel.
The Jewish Agency con-
templates a 1977-78 budget
of $457 million and unless
American Jewry produces
MORE the Agency might
have to borrow as much as
$150 million to even reach
that level of barest
minimums.
ITS A RESPONSIBIL
ITY THAT WEIGHS
HEAVILY ON US1 The
ancient precept "Thou
THE JEWISH AGENCY FOB ISRAEL
PROPOSED BUDGET 1977 78
Shalt Not Stand Idly By" -
is a code for American
Jewish action this Spring.
For as the people of Israel
have their responsibilities to
fulfill, we fully understand
OURS. It is a challenge we
accept.
LEON DULZIN, the Jew-
ish Agency treasurer, is now-
preparing the Agency's 1977-
"8 budget. This is his
message to us:
What you in the American
Jewish Community do in
terms of campaign pledges
and cash commitments
will help us decide about
services and assistance in
areas which are basic to the
gth of the people of
Israel.
I h .- cut support of our
institutions of higher
learn.
Do we cut high school
scholarships or pre-school
education?
Do we cut back on the
settlement of the Galilee and
the Arava?
Do we cut our capacity to
absorb more immigrants
from places in the world
where we already see in-
creasing danger of Jewish
extinction?
You will help provide the
answers. I hope you will give
us the possibility of doing
much more.
The Lifeline continues to
expand reflecting our
interdependence with the
people of Israel. On the eve
of the Jewish State's thir-
tieth year, it is a respon-
sibility we carry proudly
full of purpose life and
promise which we will indeed
honor!
In Anticipation of New Young Trip
S. Africa Hits Hypocrisy
Minister of Foreign Affairs.
Pik Botha, has made a further
protest to the United States
Government about Andrew
Young's allegation that the
South African Government is
illegitimate.
The U.S. State Department
ha- since repudiated Young's
statement.
IN AN interview with the Cape
Times. Botha said. "A further
communication will be addressed
to the U.S. State Department in
this connection.''
He was satisfied with the affir-
mation by the U.S. Government
of the legality of the South
African Government. But tht
question remained of the effec-
Young's comment could have on
South Africa's position and on
the delicate negotiations under
way in southern Africa.
The formal diplomatic com-
munication with the U.S.
Government would set out South
Africa's attitude in this regaro
and should be seen as "clearing
the atmosphere "
BOTHA'S FIRM handling of
the potentially explosive issue led
to a swift repudiation of Young's
claim by the State Department.
After summoning the U.S.
Ambassador. William Bowdler.
in Cape Town. Botha extracted a
clear policy commitment from the
U.S. recognizing the South
African Government's legality.
The Note from the Sta
Department read: Although v .
"Jewish Floridian
M SHOP Alt O* C XKATB* HOLLYWOOO
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MAIN OFFICE and PLANT 130 NE h St. Miami Fla M1SJ Phone 371-
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone (1 i 37 J-4KW
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FRED K SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SELMA M THOMPSON
Editor and Publlaher ExecuUve Editor Aaalatant to Publlaher
All P.O. Ml return* are to be forwarded to
The Jewlah Floridian P O Box 01-am. Miami. FU 33101
TIM Jewlj* FtorttMl Dni Net Guarantee The KaWirvth
Of The Marcha* Atfvartta** In in CMn at
Published a-Weekly
Second Claaa Postage Paid at DejUa Fla
Jewlan Federation of South Broward. Inc. SHOFAR EDITORIAL
ADVISORY COMMITTEE-Nathan Prltcher Chairman Lewla E Conn
Melvtn H Baer Saaiuei atline. D M D
do not agree with a number of
policies and practices in South
Africa, it is incorrect to say that
the South African Government is
illegitimate."
IN AN interview with the
Sunday Times. Botha made a
scathing attack on the credibility
of the American Ambassador to
the UN. and warned that South
Opinion
Africa would reconsider its
relations with the U.S. mission at
the UN after Young's "insulting
remarks."
Botha said, "We cannot insist
that Mr. Young retract his
remark. We cannot prescribe to
the U.S. But the U.S. will have to
decide to what extent it can
retain his usefulness as a
spokesman."
The threatened crisis in
relations between the U.S. and
South Africa blew up when
Young, in an interview with
Associated Press, was asked,
"Do you think the South African
Government is illegitimate?"
He replied, "Yeah."
IT WAS the third time in two
weeks that the State Department
had dissociated itself from views
expressed by Young.
Meanwhile, Both welcomed
President Carter's surprise
UN Jawtth Unity aa* tfce-iewi.K weekly
Telegraphic Afaacy. Save* Art* Feature Syndicate
caathMfa
The Jewish FtorMiaN- has
Membe- o< Mm Jaw!*
Warhtwida Mewl Service MltHaal Ed'tenai A wee utter American A
Enf iistvjtwun "itiperi end the Fienai P-rats AsMCiatMr
suascaiFTiOK
r riday. May 20. 197T
Volume 7
RATE; (K.cei area' Owe Yea- _|7.j|lO' af Tawr. Une-
3 SI VAN 5737
Number 10
admission that South Africa is a
"stabilizing force" in southern
Africa, writes Aida Parker in The
Citizen.
He was less well-pleased with
Carter's follow-up statement that
"What America needs is to
pursue our own commitment to
ending apartheid and realizing
eventual majority rule."
Aida Parker continues:
SPEAKING from his sons
home in Pretarioa Botha told me.
The basic problem is that
Americans simply cannot and
will not understand that in
Africa, and southern Africa in
particular. non-Whites are not
simply one homogeneous mass.
"I encountered this total lack
of understanding very often while
in America.
"Most American non-Whites
are descendents of people who
were unceremoniously uprooted
from their African homelands,
and the Black American had to
fight for his liberation for cen-
turies, a process which is not yet
complete.
"AMERICANS. therefore,
tend to view all Black peoples as
belonging to one nation, and they
also suffer from a pronounced
guilt complex.
Similarly, Black Americans
are today more conscious than
ever before of their own hard-
ships and sufferings, and ap-
parently wish to take revenge."
"I have candidly told
Americans again and again that
we are not prepared to relieve
them of their guilt complex or act
as sacrificial lambs for Black
Americans wishing to take their
revenge."
"APART FROM this, it is the
height of immorality to demand
from someone else something one
is not prepared to accept for
oneself."
"1 nave often invited
.-\mericans to inaicate u rr.
wmen governmental systei.
Africa tney would be prepared to
accept for America itaelf. I am
still waiting for a reply.
Israel: Soviet Jewry Rallies Held
I
Rallies in support of Soviet Jewry were held throughout
Israel the end of March with two major events at the Western j
Wall in Jerusalem's Old City and in Tel Aviv's Harnedina '
Square. The rallies were called to mark the deterioration in the !
situation of Soviet Jews and to highlight their inability to I
observe Passover, the festival of freedom, in freedom. Observers 1
believed the timing was also intended to coincide with I" s |
frus Vane.-- visit to Moscow where the
general human rights issue, and lewithrifd l
I to come up.
V the Western Wall. AshkenaziChief Rabbi Shlomo I
obean ^d I hat one-quarter of the Jewish nation could noi
on seder night "this year we are b'nei horin free men."
Foreign Minister Yigal Allon said "80 years of Bolshevik op-
pression had not stilled the Jewish spirit. The Jews of the Sovfct
Union were still throbbing with Jewish life and faith."
I

|
Soviet I'
Hebrew University President Abraham Harman read a*
letter from seven aliya activists asking men of good will every- *
where to plead with the Kremlin for free exit for Jews. Recent I
immigrant and former Jewish activist Prof. Alexander Luntz"
also spoke to the crowd of some 2.000, mainly young Orthodox I
people. In Tel Aviv a crowd of 2,000 heard Likud Knesset
member Benzion Keshet say that I sraelis were not doing enough I
to help their Jewish brethren in the USSR.
Shtern Leaves, Salansky Readies
"It had become a nightmare, even private letters from my
mother were interpreted as subversive material,' said activist
Naum Salansky (Vilnius), reflecting on a four-month in-
vestigation which almost ended in a trial. However, soon after
charges were dropped, Salansky was informed he must leave the
country, but is now encountering bureaucratic harassment
Former Prisoner of Conscience Dr. Mikhail Shtern left the
USSR on April 12.
Begun Trial Looms, Sharansky Held
Dr. Iosif Begun (Moscow) is expected to go on trial for
being without a job. though in fact he had earned a living giving
private Hebrew and mathematics lessons Soviet authorities
consistently refused to certify Begun, though two Leningrad
activists did receive permission to teach Hebrew. He was one Of
two Jewish activists detained while attempting to enter the
American Kmbassy in Moscow, in Februarv. 1977
Anatoly Sharansky (Moscowl is still being heid in
Moscow's I^efortovo prison, pending the completion of an in-
vestigation. Sharansky's mother. Ida Milgrim. wrote a letter to
the chairman of the Soviet KGB. Yuri Andropov, asking for the ,
basis of her son's detention. In a subsequent meeting with the
head of the investigation department on April 1, she was told I
that her son could be charged with "disseminating anti-Soviet
I
barged
propaganda" or "betraying his homeland.
Status of Prisoner of Conscience
Prisoner of Conscience Israel Zalmanson has been trans-
ferred to the infamous Vladimir Prison POC Amner
Zavurov was allowed a three-minute visit with his father prior to
his transfer from a prison in Karshi to Tashkent. Zavurovs
brother Amnon is under constant surveillance by the KGB
POC Sender Levinson was transferred to another camp. His new
address is 433510 Ulanovskaya Oblast. Gorod Dir.iitrovgrad,
U.I. 78 5-1 RSFSR, USSR ... POC Yakov Vinarov is confined
to hard labor in the northern part of Donetsk, as part of his
sentence. He is subjected to constant harassment and
provocations which threaten to worsen his condition. There are
frequent searches of his belongings and he has been accused of
not working well." He is not yet in a hard-labor-camp, yet the
possibility remains he could be placed back in a camp for the
remainder of his sentence, while authorities disregard the period
he served in forced labor.
Florida's Boycott Law
Florida should be proud of Gov. Reubin Askew's
approval of an anti-boycott law which is already being
characterized as probably one of the toughest in the
nation.
The new law will make it virtually impossible for
corporations to operate in the State of Florida if they
cooperate, in any form or fashion, with the Arab boycott
against Israel. "
It brings Chapter 542 of the Florida Penal Code into
play by making it possible to revoke the corporate charter
of any cooperating corporation sub rosa.
R- Wr- co"ratu,a* th* Anti-Defamation League of
B nai B nth for ite four-year-long battle to see this new
law mto being. We also congratulate Gov. Askew for
signing it.
of rSZhSSllrS!* ,f PIaise is S- John maa


Lay, May 20.1977
The Jewish Fbridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
Gate Closed to Women Applicants at Seminary
By AMY STONE
Ever since she was a rabbi (or
junior congregation, Sandy
evine had her heart set on
coming a rabbi. As a young-
the family synagogue was
r home away from home, and it
fas perfectly normal for women
the congregation to wear
lises and read from the Torah.
It wasn't until much later that
li found out that this upstate
York synagogue wa;
sual among Conservative
igregntions. And it was not
. attempted to apply to
ibbinical School of the
Theological Seminary of
I i thai she found oul that
impossible for her to be
i epted as a rabbinical student.
|i)|{ THE past four years.
pee beginning her under-
Faduate study at Berkeley, she
- been seeking an explanation
! he llabbinical School's policy
no women rabbis. The
Iminary emphasized that it is
he present policy of the Rab-
in leal School to admit only male
Indidates," and she has been
(vised not to wait for changes.
And she isn't. Although she
la been accepted as a graduate
[udent at the Seminary, she has
[insen to begin studies this fall
Hebrew Union College-Jewish
tistitute of Religion leading to
Hination as a Reform rabbi.
She wonders how many other
[omen around the country have
|so been disappointed in ther
pmmitment to Conservative
udaism. She said, "My heart is
H on the Conservative move-
em because I 'm a Conservative
i'w. This movement has molded
nd shaped me into wanting to be
| rabbi and this same movement
dosing the door to me."
FOR WOMEN who want to
bconw Conservative rabbis
Mrs is not other place to be
plained. The Jewish Theological
eminary is the Conservative
lovement's academic arm. In its
estimation and that of
lonservative Judaism's other
fcsiilutions the Rabbinical
issembly, which is the inter-
ational organization of Conser-
klive rabbis, the United Syna-
bgue of America, the congre-
Btional organization the
fcminary is "the fountainhead"
(Conservative Judaism.
Kven those most critical of the
eminary consider it the out-
tanding institution for studying
|ewish texts.
And. as the struggle for equal
Ights for women becomes an
Isue of increasing concern, the
Jeminary's decision on whether
not women can be ordained
rill be extremely important
rnce, unlike Reform Judaism,
he Conservative movement's
ktions are based on halacha
Jewish law).
THE DECISION is also
nportant because Conservative
lews are the largest Jewish
group in America, with 1.5
nillion congregants in 830 syna-
goues compared with 1.1 million
Heform congregants in 720 syna-
gogues at last count.
Surprisingly, many of the
seminary faculty members
|>pposed to admitting women to
Jie Rabbinical School consider
falachic reasons less important
Jhan sociological and psyco-
jogical barriers. For one thing, a
fabbi is essentially a teacher and
arbiter, rather than a person
nth ritual responsibilities.
According to Seminary Profes-
of Rabbinics David Weiss
laLvni, "The only real halachic
problems would be marriage and
Siverce since women cannot be
witnesses in ritual matters."
EVEN MEN sympathetic tr
^omen's frustration at not being
ermitted to become Conser
rabbis are concerned about
actions from Orthodox Jews.
tabbi David Kogen, chairperson
lie department of practical
and director of th.
Cantors Institute-Seminary
College of Music, said, "I want as
much as possible for women to
have equal rights. They ought to
be treated like human beings.
But I don't want to rip apart the
Jewish people by not recognizing
each other's marriages and
divorces. We're a small enough
people as it is."
Opposition to ordaining
women rabbis is not restricted to
the Seminary's older faculty
members.
Rabbi Gordon Tucker, a 25-
year-old instructor in Philo-
sophies of Judaism and assistant
to the ( hancellor, spoke of "the
psychological dimen ions of the
father figure," saying, "If
present Sociological conditions
make a woman rabbi peculiar' to
most people on a subconscious
level, if society is repelled by a
matter of form, this gets in the
way nf fostering spiritual growth.
I think it's unfortunate, but 1 feel
a certain responsibility to some-
thing more than my own
proclivities."
ULTIMATELY, the Chancel-
lor of the Seminary, Gerson
Cohen, has the most power over
the rate of innovation and
change, and many see Cohen,
who held the position of
Professor of Jewish History
before becoming Chancellor in
1972, as a liberal who has become
more conservative in office.
Writing to Sandy Levine in his
position "as Chancellor of the
Seminary and spokesman for the
Conservative Movement." Cohen
said, "If ordination itself is
presently closed to women, it is
liecause of the dominant con-
viction of the faculty, the rab-
binate and much ot the laity that
this policy is necessary at the
present time in order to preserve
the integrity of our school and
community, and of their commit
menls so thai they may fulfill the
much broader goals of Judaism."
FORTUNATELY, for those
who feel then is no sound reason
to keep women from becoming
Conservative rabbis, the Rab-
binical Assembly may be moving
toward change faster than the
Seminary. In 1955, the Rab-
binical Assembly's Committee on
Jewish Law and Standards voted
that it was acceptable for women
to read from the Torah during
services, and in 1973 the Com-
mittee decided that women could
count in the minyan.
Neither of these options have
been accepted by the Seminary's
own synagogue, which is one of
the last synagogues in North
America with separate seating
for men and women.
Although the Rabbinical As-
sembly membership of some
1.000 rabbis, the majority of
whom were ordained at the
Seminary, ranges from "Conser-
vadox" to liberal, 63 percent of
the rabbis in a recent survey ol
tlie entire membership said they
favored admitting women to the
HA. The Rabbinical Assembly
does not restrict membership to
men, merely referring to "the
candidaU "
\1 THOUGH (here ,
gentlemen's agreement" that
one arm of Conservat ive ) udaism
does not tell the others what to
do. there is always a tug and pull
between the Rabbinical Assem-
bly and the Seminary, and, in the
word of one Seminary scholar,
"It would be a bit of an em-
barrassment to the Seminary if
the RA votes for women."
Even without an actual female
candidate for membership, the
debate is building in intensity,
and at least two women who will
be ordained as Reform rabbis in
two years say they are ready to
be the test case after they
complete the two years of work as
an ordained rabbi required for
applicants to the Rabbinical
Assembly.
Adding complexity to the
debate, Wolfe Kelman. Executive
Vice President of the Rabbinical
Assembly and a member of the
Seminary faculty, has agreed to
be one ol three rabbis privately
ordaining student rabbi Lynn
lottlieb if she completes her
private rabbinical si udies
GOTTLIEB, who Btudied in
Israel and at the Reform move
ment'a Hebrew Union College is
now taking courses at the
Seminary in addition to serving
as rabbi for the deal and creal ing
her own Jewish liturgical sign
language plus performing in "Bat
Kol, the Jewish feminist dance
group she founded.
So far, the possibility of
private ordination indepen-
dently ordaining someone outside
the walls of the Seminary has
created more furor than the issue
of a woman rabbi.
Pan Am to Brazil:
More non-stops than
any other airline.
Every Monday. Thursday. Friday, and Saturday, we fly non-stop to Rio.
From Rio. if you'd like, you can go on to Sao Paulo? (We also have a Wednesday flight to Rio
via Brasilia.)
Starting June 19. well have a non-stop flight to Brazil every single day.
All our flights to Brazil have the comforts you'd expect on our long flights. And some
unexpected things, too.
For example: Eyeshades. for when you want to get some sleep. I lot towels and overnight kits
to make you look even more rested.
We wont let you go hungry either. You can choose from 4 entrees in first class and from
3 in economy.
Try the Cafezinho after dinner. It's a Brazilian coffee served strong, hot. and sweet. (With
regular coffee for the less adventurous.)
To make the flights seem even shorter, you can take in a movie. (There's a nominal charge of
S2.50 per headset in economy.) ,....
With the service and the schedules we offer when you're J ;
planning to go to Brazil, Miami is a great place to start.
Americas airline to the world.
Pan Am flights from Rio to Congonhas Airport. Sao Paulo, operated by VASP on behalf of Pan Am.
Sec- your travel agent.


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 20,;
Silverstein to Head United Way Drive Temple Solel Sets
Anthony M. Sihestri. electri
cal construction consultant, has
been appointed associate general
chairman of the condominium
division for the 1977-78 United
Way campaign
A resident of
Lime Bay condo-
minium in Tam-
arac. Silvestri
will organize and
coordinate the
fund-raising
drive among con-
dominiums
throughout
Broward County
Silvestri. a
member of the
International Electrical Inspec-
tors and the United States Mil-
itary Engineer Society, was
recently appointed by Go v.
Reubin Askew to serve as vice
chairman of the Broward County-
Fire Control Commission.
At a recent organizational
meeting. Silvestri appointed the
following to serve as district
chairmen: Dr. Ralph Morgan.
Coral Springs: Nathan Fragan.
Lauderdale-bythe-Sea: Samuel
Habib. Century Village: Julius
Bronfman. Lauderhill. Lauder-
dale Lakes. Wilton Manors and
Oakland Park: Harry Liebowitz
Sunrise: Commissioner Jean
Cookt. Dania: Abe Halpern.
Hallandale: Joseph Rose. Pem-
broke Pines: Dan Cohane. Coco-
nut Creek: Irving Covner.
Sunrise Phase 1: Rocky Matteo.
Sunrise Phase 2; and Mac
Greenberg. Watergate.
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Bamidbar
"A good way off shall they pitch round about the tent of
meeting" tXum. 2.21.
BAMIDBAR And the Lord spoke unto Moses in the
wilderness of Sinai, in the tent of meeting, on the first day
of the second month, in the second year after they were
come out of the land of Egypt, saying: Take ye the sum of
all the congregation of the children of Israel, by their
families, by their fathers' houses, according to the number
of names, every male, by their polls: from twenty years
old and upward, all that are able to go forth to war in
Israel: ye shall number them by their hosts, even thou and
Aaron' I Numbers 1.1-31. Exclusive of the Levites. who
were not numbered, the total sum of men of military age
was 603.555. There follows a description of the Israelites-
encampments during their journeys through the desert:
there were four major camps, each of three tribes; one
under the flag of Judah. one under the flag of Reuben, one
under the flag of Ephraim. and one under the flag of Dan.
The Levites camped separately near the sanctuary:
among the Levites. each clan had a particular service to
render in regard to the sancturay.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion o* the Law is e>tracted and based
upon The Graphic History oi the Jewish Heritage," edited by P Wollman
Tsamir. Ill published by Shengold The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane. New York, N V 10031 Joseph Schlang is president ot the society
distributing the volume
AFHU Plans Mission to Israel
A Mission to Israel, including
participation in the convocation
exercises at the Hebrew Univer-
sity of Jerusalem is being spon-
sored by the American Friends of
the Hebrew University, accord-
ing to Harry A Hap" Lew.
chairman of the Board for the
Greater Miami Chapter of
AFHU
The mission will run from June
22 to Julv 5 and will feature visits
to Haifa". Tel Aviv. Jaffa. Golan
Heights. Masada. the Dead Sea.
Bethlehem. Safed and Jerusalem.
Florence D. Feldman at the
American Friends office. Miami
Beach, can provide further in-
formation.
Confirmation Date
Confirmation exercises at
Temp!e Solel will be held on May
22 at 8 p.m. The Erev Shavuo't
Service will be conducted by the
Confirmation Class.
The confirmands and their
parents are:
Ellyn Diane Block daughter o< Mr
ana Mrs Bernard Block. Steven j
Blutsten- son o Mr and Mrs George J
Blutstem Sheryi R Coocw. oaugner
o Mr and Mrs MarsnaM Cooper
Audrey Beth Desky. daughter o* Or ana
Mrs M.cnae' Desky. Brenaa E
DeLeon daughter ot Mr ancMrs Chve
De^ecm Barry Edward Geitand son ot
Mr and Mrs Robert Geitand Shawn
Craig GokdfarD. son o* Mr and Mrs
Ronald Goio'ars Kip Goodman, son ot
Mr ano Mrs David Goodman Mickey
isackson. son ol Mr and Mrs Jerry
isackson Susan Esther Khani.
daughter of Dr and Mrs Feraydoon
Khani. Milton Scott Kleiman. son of Mr
and Mrs Elliott Kleiman, Howard
Klem. son ot Mr and Mrs Daniel Klein.
Steven Michael Lack, son of Mr and
Mrs Arthur Lack. Eric Scott Mischel,
son of Mr and Mrs Eugene Mischel
Andrea Myerson. daughter of Mr and
Mrs Sumner Myerson. Michael
O'Mara. son of Mrs Hilde O'Mara.
Judith Beth Price, daughter ot Dr and
Mrs Abraham Price, Dwayne Simon
Melton, son of Wr and Mrs Donald
Weiton Sharai J Rosenblatt, daughter
of Mr and Mrs Shae Rosenblatt, Elyse
Diane Schwartienfeld daughter of Or
and Mrs Allen Schwartienfeld, and
Erica H Wolfson, daughter of Mr and
Mrs Robert Wolfson
Broward Teen
Tour Plans
Plans are being finalized for
the Broward Teen Tour of Israel.
Dr. Morton Malavsky. rabbi of
Temple Beth Shalom of Holly-
wood, chairman of the mission,
will acquaint the group with
Israel.
The group will later be taken
over by Hershel and Irene
Handler, educators and youth
leaders. Handler is a social
worker and former youth director
of the Laurelton Jewish Center in
New York. His wife is a graduate
of the Jewish Theological
Seminary and Columbia Uni-
versity and is presently a high
school teacher in Israel.
The Handlers will conduct
seminars, study sessions and
tours. On the return trip the
group will stop in Europe for four
days.
The tour is endorsed by the
Broward Board of Rabbis and the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
CALIFORNIA INSPIRED
It's your move shed the rent trap.
We have beautiful tall pine trees an
authentic natural setfin* at realistic prices.
youoro
All this from $31,900 and $17.00 me.
$1945.00
Down
Payment
1- wi
^iWfer
4m
fc Hcxnes E&ftS
..., jii lPaPPriir Orhn m rip I
nm numo OAO south 27
OAVIf, FLA. m-UU
^rjjjfc.VJCApFoer stpa!Ait omc
The Two Faces of Israel
A generation after the founding of Israel, 37 percent of the
adults have less than an eighth-grade education. About U
percent have less than a fourth-grade education, and close to 8
percent have never been to school.
The alarming fact is that these figures are not based only on
the generation of immigrants which came "en masse" to Israel
from the ghettos and caves of North Africa and had no time to
get an education in the ma'abarot The problem here is "here-
ditary ignorance" which like certain illnesses, is passed to
succeeding generations. We find parents and children who
cannot add a row of figures or write a simple Hebrew sentence!
Why? Avraham Zivion. head of Israel's Adult Education
Department, says: In Israel, about 37.8 percent of the women
and about 23 percent of the men of African and Asian origin
have less than a fourth-grade education or its equivalent ..
about 10-15 percent of the new recruits in the armed forces are
practically illiterate, despite having completed eight or ten years
of schooling; and there are entire communities, particularly in
the development towns, poor neighborhoods and immigrant
moshavim. where approximately one-third of the population is
illiterate.
In the mid-1960s, groups of women soldiers and individuals
were sent to development areas to teach the adults the rudi-
ments of reading, writing and arithmetic.
The attempt failed and was discontinued after two or three
years, because the young soldiers were not adequately trained to
deal with such vast cultural differences in mentality and
motivation. Nor did they have necessary equipment, such as
suitable textbooks, special teaching programs or organized
lesson plans, to solve the illiteracy problems. Indeed, they en-
countered the following obstacles: apathy, lack of qualified per-
sonnel willing to teach adults, lack of suitable teaching materials
and chronic shortage of funds.
There are favorable statistics as well: Israel has a large
number of academicians: more than 50.000 university students;
world 8 renowned scientific institutions: impressive achieve-
ments in agriculture, industry, technology, research and
development; perhaps the highest per capita rate of books pub-
lished and read; and high cinema, theatre and concert atten-
dance. Not to mention the number of people involved in the
creative arts, the resurrection of the Hebrew language and
Hebrew education.
tfxooe*'*
it
BUMP SHOP"
QUALITY
WORK
SPECIALIZING IN FOREIGN & ANTIQUE RESTORATION
^ FREE TOWING "HMWUWi
WE TO OUR SHOP
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Friday, May 20,1977
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
N. American Jewish Agencies The Festival Of ShaVUOt
Serve Over 100,000 People Yearly!
NEW YORK Fifty-seven
Jewish family and children's
agencies in North America
handle some 82,500 different
cases annually, according to data
contained in the new Yearbook of
Social Services compiled by the
Community Planning Depart-
ment of the Council of Jewish
Federations (CJF).
The actual number of cases
served, based on conservative
estimates from non-reporting
agencies, is in excess of 100,000
per year.
Financial assistance given an-
nually amounted to $1,748,624
for immigrant families as com-
pared with $1,695,431 for non-im-
migrants, or $2,022 per im-
migrant family per year and $244
per non-immigrant family.
THESE STATISTICS exclude
the number of immigrants served
by the New- York Association for
New Americans (NYANA), and
the total of Jewish elderly served
by specialized agencies such as
the Jewish elderly served by
specialized agencies such as the
Jewish Association of Services to
the Aged and the Council for
Jewish Klderly, among others.
In addition to providing com-
prehensive services for the aged
and for children, Jewish family
agendas offer group therapy and
counselling, based on ability to
pay, and a program of Jewish
Family Life Education in one -
session or recurrent groups, to
deal with a variety of family
concerns. Services to other
Jewish communal agencies and
volunteer assistance are also part
of the agencies' wide range of
programs.
Special services for the elderly
reported in the Yearbook
based on data from 47 agencies
shows that 42 agencies operate
a friendly visiting service; 31
provide transportation; 19
provide housekeeping help, and
15 offer meals on wheels
programs.
IN ADDITION, legal guar-
dianship services were provided
by 10 agencies, while seven of the
47 operated multi service walk -
in centers.
Family agencies also operate
programs to provide home help
aids, foster home and group
living arrangements, escort
services, food stamp pick-up,
shopping, holiday parties and
other services for the Jewish
elderly.
Services to children in their
own homes, as reported by seven
of the 10 Jewish child care
agencies in North America,
accounted for some 5,000 of total
of 7,600 case units served in the
twelve month period.
FULL-TIME placement ser-
vices were provided to 2,150 chil-
dren by both family and child
care agencies. A census of chil-
dren in full-time placement
showed that 43 percent were in
foster homes, 41 percent in resi-
dential centers, and 11 percent in
group homes. Residential centers
accommodate more than 16
children at one time, while group
homes house a maximum of 16.
Numerous other services
provided included day care,
scholarships, and vocational
counselling, camp programs and
group counselling programs.
Data on adoption services re-
vealed that as of Jan. 1, 1975,
there were 395 parent applicants
for 42 children in foster homes
available for adoption, and 135
other children in adoptive homes
pending completion of adoption
proceedings.
The Council of Jewish Federa-
tions is the association of central
community organizations
Federations, Welfare Funds,
Community Councils serving
800 Jewish communities in North
America.
Hadassah Group
Names Officers
New officers of the Hemi-
spheres Group of the Hallandale
Chapter of Hadassah are Mrs.
Frances Littman, president; Mrs.
Helen Rubin, membership vice
president; Mrs. Burt Levine,
fund-raising vice president;
Hassie Lichtenstein, education
and American affairs vice presi-
dent; Ethel Gould, progarm vice
president; Gertrude Dank,
treasurer; Lillian Teaser, finan-
cial secretary; Rose Pollen,
recording secretary; Helen
Johnston, corresponding secre-
tary; and Mary Lipschutz, social
secretary.
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By Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
Congregation B'nai Torah,
Boca Raton
There is a very strange passage
in the Talmud (Sab. 88a)
regarding the events leading up
to the giving of the Ten Com-
mandments at Mt. Sinai. The
rabbis speak of the reluctance on
the part of many nations to
accept the Torah. The nations of
the world refused to accept the
Ten Commandments because
they did not want to renounce
murder, envy, idolatry and such
other laws which would have
meant a change in their ways of
life. Even among the eman-
cipated Israelites there were
many who were not overly
anxious to assume the obli-
gations of the Commandments.
There was only one alternative
God "forced" the command-
ments upon our forefathers. Say
the rabbis, "The Holy One,
blessed be He, tilted the
mountain over them like a bowl
and said to them 'If you accept
the Torah it is well; if not, there
shall be your sepulcher.' '
There is more to this statement
than the mere fact that "God
just wanted to get rid of the Ten
Commandments." The statement
infers that the acceptance of the
moral law is not subject to whim,
that one can take it or leave it.
The acceptance of the moral law
is an inescapable mandate of con-
science; that the moral law is a
voice that cannot be silenced; the
moral law cannot be rejected and
that it must be accepted. For life
to have any meaning, for life to
leave earth-bound limitations and
to reach greater heights, it must
be lived in accordance with moral
laws.
NATHAN ZELIZER
BY ACCEPTANCE the Ten
Commandments, Israel became
the Priest people to mankind and
consecrated itself to serve as
God's, champions of righteous-
ness, truth and justice. For
thirty-five hundred years the
Jewish people have served as the
Champions of God in a hostile
world which knew not and which
still does not know the law 01
Holiness. What price our people
have paid in order to disseminate
the spiritual truths, designed to
illumine various civilizations
under which man lived.
Our people are called "servants
of the Lord" because we have
been God's chief instrument in
the Divine plan for the survival of
mankind. By celebrating the
festival of Shavuot, we Jews
today rededicate ourselves to the
same task which was imposed on
our forebears on that first
Shavuot at Mt. Sinai.
This is the meaning of our
struggle to remain Jews and to
help preserve our people and our
faith. It is a glorious respon-
sibility.
JEWS ARE the guardians of
nankind. The laws of the Ten
Commandments are still not
accepted by the nations of the
world today. There is so much
evidence of this refusal to accept
God's moral law.
When hundreds of thousands
of our brethren in Russia are
denied freedom and are being
persecuted; when many of our
brethren in Russia are denied
jobs; when their children are
turned out of schools; when some
of the brightest Jewish men and
women are consigned to prisons
and mental institutions God's
moral laws are at a very low ebb.
By helping them escape, we act
as champions of God's moral law.
When Jews from other
countries, especially those under
Arab denomination, appeal to us
for help, and we respond by
opening our hearts and our
pocketbooks, we act as cham-
pions of God's moral law.
When we volunteer our time
nd our efforts to lift the level of
human existence everywhere, we
are the true servants of the Lord.
New ORT Forms
In Broward
Women's American ORT, an
organization that aids in
providing education of vocational
students, has begun of a new
chapter in Hallandale.
The Broward Region of
Women's American ORT in the
Three Islands area will hold a
membership tea at the Holly-
wood Federal Bank, 2101 Hallan-
dale Beach Blvd., Hallandale, at
1 p.m. on Wednesday, May 25.
Make it known to your children
and to your children's children.'"
lb Raise
alewish
Child
A Guide for Parents
{Deuteronomy II.-9)
Many Jewish parents today encounter serious difficulty in teaching
their children to know and appreciate what it means to be Jewish.
Now, Rabbi Hayim Halevy Doninauthor of TO BE A JEW
has written a companion volume specifically for parents who
seek guidelines in helping their children find meaning and satis-
faction in their Jewish identity: TO RAISE A JEWISH CHILD.
Here is authoritative counsel on such critical areas as developing
a sensitive awareness of Jewish values creating the ideal living
environment finding and evaluating a Hebrew school planning
family observances in the home dealing with problems of peer
group pressure interdating intermarriage,
and much more. Rabbi Donin also makes
helpful suggestions on various educational
resources, ranging from books and records
to camps, youth organizations, and study
programs in Israel.
TO RAISE A JEWISH CHILD is distilled
from twenty years of Rabbi Donin's
thoughtful answers to the psychological,
social, and religious questions of Jewish
parents. Here he shares the richness of these
intimate, loving encounters.
TO RAISE A JEWISH CHILD. A prac-
tical guide. A perfect gift. A share in a price-
less tradition. "A candid, warmly written,
useful guide for Jewish parents in search of a
clear, traditional voice to direct them and
th ir children through the problems of living
fudy!'CHAIM POTOK
by Rabbi Hayim
-, Halevy Donin
"Authoritative, forthright, and earnest."
Publishers Weekly
250 pages. $10.95 hardcover
BASIC BOOKS INC.
10 East 53rd St., New York 10022


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To your Bookstore or
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Basic Books pays all shipping costs. Satisfaction guaranteed.
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NAME.
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Page 8
The Jewish Flondian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 20,1977
Right-Wing Youth Meeting
At Dachau is Opposed
By JON FEDLER
BONN IJTA l Plans by the youth wing of the extreme
right-wing National Democratic Party (NPD) to hold its annual
conference and a parade in the town of Dachau on May 7 have
met with strong protests.
Dachau's Mayor has described the planned event as "in
bad taste'' and said the local council would "do everything
legally possible'" to prevent it from being held.
THE ASSOCIATION of Victims of Nazism-League of
Anti-Fascists said this '"terrible provocation" must be
prevented. "The shadows of our terrible past still haunt the
town of Dachau today. A reappearance of Nazi elements in
Dachau would be an irreparable scandal for all democrats and
anti-fascists at home and abroad."
The Munich youth section of the ruling Social Democratic
Party called on the Bavarian State Ministry of Culture to ban
the event.
FOLLOWING THE protests, the owners of a local castle
where the meeting was scheduled withdrew their permission for
its use. The Bavarian NPD committee said it saw "no reason to
call off the event."
The NPD said it would not "bow to the dictates of the
Communist association of Nazi victims." The statement
concluded by saying that "neither the NPD nor its youth wing
were responsible for the Dachau concentration camp." For the
NPD, Dachau was "a Bavarian town like any other."
I
I Himmler Aide Escapes Trial
VIENNA I JTA) Horst Bender, the legal advisor of
Heinrich Himmler. who was the leader of the Nazi SS, will not
face trial in West Germany although he advocated the thesis
that the killing of Jews for political reasons was not a crime.
Simon Wiesenthal. head of the Jewish Documentation
Center in Vienna, said last jveek he was informed by West
German authorities they cancelled investigation measures
against Bender, who is currently a practicing lawyer in Stut-
tgart. West Germav.
SENSATIONAL
SUMMER 77
Follow your best instincts, in-
1 dulge all your senses in the pleasures
and delights of a Grossinger vacation.
27 Holes of Great Golf, Indoor & Outdoor
Tennis. Pools, Day/Night Entertain-
ment plus Summer Midweek
Seminars and Botany '500' Weekly Men's
Golf 4 Tennis Tournaments... As always,
traditional Grossinger hospitality.
WELCOME HOME.
EDDIE FISHER
SUNDAY.
JULY 3rd
>56to$47
per person per day.
' dbl occ pro-rated wkry
> rate lor wtJy ttty (end holt 1
Reft lor shorter stays avail on request
NEW:
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Also Special Midweek Packages.
SINGLES SUMMER WEEKS: 6 day July 4-10; 7 day Aug. 21-28
"Tet MMMMMM NW, Summer 77 includes full information
on all of the above. Write or call for your FREE magazine
See your travel agent or call our Reservation Office
914-292-5000 (Open 7 days a week 9 am to 11 p m.)
DIRECT NYC PHONE:212-563-3700
Or write Grossinger's. Box JF3. Grossinger, NY. 12734
For Group Outings and Conferences call
(212) 563-3704. Ext. 172
FULL AMERICAN PLAN 3 MEALS DAILY
UJA's Operation Joshua Plans Underway
The 19<< Operation Joshua
summer seminar tours to Israel
for college students, sponsored
by the United Jewish Appeal, is
currently taking reservations for
three six week packages planned
for this summer
The basic Operation Joshua
package includes a two week
seminar and four weeks of inde-
pendent travel.
DURING THE seminar,
students will meet with voung
Israelis, members of the Knesset.
Russian immigrants, educators
and students. They will visit the
Golan Heights, the West Bank,
kibbutzim and moshavin, ab-
sorption centers, development
towns and ancient cities.
Arrangements will be made for
students to choose their own
special interest programs in the
fields of medicine, education,
social work, kibbutz life and
religious life.
Hodassah Chapter Installs Officers
New officers were installed at a
luncheon held by the HaJlandale
Chapter of Hadassah late last
month at which over 100 people
attended.
New officers are Mrs. Zachary
Roosin, president; Mrs.
Lawrence J. Dank, executive vice
prsident: Belle Aaron, financial
secretary; Mrs. Hyman Rubin,
membership vice president; Mrs.
Murray Feuerstein. education
vice president; Mrs. Theodore
Marcus, program vice president:
Mrs. Sol Cooper, fund-raising
vice president: Mrs. Fannis
Nuns, treasurer; Mrs. Ben Wurt-
zer. recording secretary; and
Mrs. Casper Alman, corres-
ponding secretary.
New activities chairmen are
Mrs. Curtis Lion, awards; Mrs.
Alman, certificates; Mary Kauff
man, conference; Mrs. Feuer-
stein, community affairs; Mrs.
Ida Kimbrig, Hadassah
associates; Libby Wise, HIES;
Trip to Israel
Offered to Teens
A 40-day excursion to Israel,
an Israel Summer Happening, is
being offered to area teens
between the ages of 15-17 under
the auspices of the Jewish Com-
munity Centers of South Florida
in cooperation with the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
The trip will include visits to
Jerusalem, the Negev and Sinai.
Masada. Beersheva and Tel
Aviv, among others. The
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center in North
Miami Beach can provide further
information.
Mrs. Charles Goodman. HMO;
Helen Fromm. Israel Bonds;
Mrs. M. Robert Goldman,
journal: Mrs. Manny Rose, assis-
tant; Jennie Melnick, life
membership; Mrs. Harry Zeiger,
publicity: Mrs. Louis Rosenthal.
social secretary and Mrs. Charles
Pierson, Youth Aliyah.
After the seminar, students
will have four weeks of inde-
pendent travel in Israel. Return
flight arrangements can be
extended up to one year.
OPERATION Joshua time
table is June 19 to Aug. 2
(seminar: June 20 to July 4);
July 3 to Aug. 16 (seminar: July
4 to July 18); July 17 to Aug. 30
(seminar: July 18 to Aug. 1).
The cost for the two-week
seminar, plus independent travel,
is $950. which includes round-trip
airfare from New York and full
bed, board, transfers and taxes
during the seminar portion of the
trip only.
Participants must be full-time
college students in the United
States or Canada during the
entire school year of 1977-78. For
further information and reser-
vations, call the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward.
for Your Investment Needs Call
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Cornivol Ctu.m, l,n *A,orn


ay, May 20,1977
The Jewish Floridian and S ho farofGreater Hollywood
Page 9
Why Are Young Jews Drawn to the Moonies?
focussing luncheon plans are (left to right) Nancy Green,
bgram coordinator for the Tay-Sachs screenings; Myra Farr
the Miami Jewish Federation; Dr. Paul Tocci, program
Irector; Mrs. Eli Salnick and Mrs. Leonard Sussman.
Dade, Broward Residents
ISet Tay-Sachs Fund-Raiser
A coalition of Broward and
ade County residents who have
rmed a Tay-Sachs Disease
jsting Program will host a
ncheon on Tuesday, June 7, at
e Eden Roc, with proceeds
ing to the University of Miami
mth Florida Tay-Sachs Disease
|esting Program directed by Dr.
aul Tocci of the Mailman Center
r Child Development.
Honoree at the event will be
rs. Bernardo Batievsky whose
year-old daughter Sandra is
ing from the always fatal
netic disease.
The 24 Collection will present a
owing of its gowns.
Cochairulg the fund-raising
ncheon are Mrs. Eli Salnick and
rs. Stanford Kane.
President of the South Florida
y-Sachs Disease Testing Pro-
am is Mrs. Leonard Sussman
Hollywood.
Mrs. Sussman who, along with
Irs. Salnick, is the mother of a
till! who succumbed to Tay-
pchs, described the disease as
inherited genetic disorder
fusing destruction of the
rvoua system. "The affected
ilei. she said, "appears normal
ni il about six months, at which
|me general and rapid
I'tcrioration begins. Total
Dental retardation swiftly
ow8 the onset, and the child is
Ik ays dead by the age of five."
Tay-Sachs disease kills infants
II" times more often among
i wish children than among the
Incral population. If both
brents are carriers of the
kessive gene, there is a 25
ercent chance that they will
Induce a child with Tay-Sachs
86888,
More than 60,000 Jewish
ndividuals of child-bearing age
ive in South Florida, and one in
V' probably carries the Tay-
pachs gene. The carrier is easily
rientifiable through a blood test.
AJCongress
to Hear
Book Review
American Jewish Congress,
lollydale Chapter, will feature a
ok review by Sophie Primak
its meeting on Monday, May
p3, at noon. She will review Hop*
s My Hero by Devorah Wigebar.
The meeting r-m be held at
"alahad South.
SUMMER SPECIAL^
STRICTLY KOSHER
Although individual carriers are
normal and healthy, and may
have normal and healthy children
already, two carriers can produce
a child in whom the enzyme
necessary to break down fatty
substances in the brain is absent,
a condition that is untreatable
and fatal.
Proceeds derived from the
Eden Roc luncheon will be used
to help fund the testing of Dade
and Broward County residents
for the recessive Tay-Sachs gene.
By Rabbi Herbert M.
Baumgard, D.H.L., D.D.
It is a startling statistic that
30 percent of the young people
whom the Rev. Moon has cap-
tured by his Divine Principle
movement are Jews. We have to
ask ourselves why are so many
young Jews drawn away from the
Jewish community and why are
they so susceptible to the brain-
washing that is a part of the
Moon indoctrination? What
Moon gives his followers is a
home and a purpose. He gives
them a sense of belonging and a
mission. He says to his young
converts, "Follow me, and you
will never want again and you
will have a share in the glory that
is coming to me."
We can understand why young
Jews are drawn to a movement
that talks about a united
mankind and universalistic goals.
They learn about such goals as
part of Judaism. What is difficult
to understand is why these young
people think it necessary to
revolt against the religion of their
parents in order to accomplish
these goals.
Perhaps the answer lies in the
fact that their parents managed
to conceal these goals of
Judaism. Perhaps the parents did
riot dramatize, as does the Rev.
Moon, the mission of belonging
to a group. Perhaps the young
people were attracted by the very
fervency and enthusiasm in
Moon that was absent in their
parents' presentation of Judaism.
No doubt there are many factors
at work in the revolt of a
youngster against his parents,
many of them of a psychological
nature, but I believe that it is
worth our while to think about
the half-heartedness of the
Jewish commitment of most
Jewish parents today.
We have become so liberal and
so intellectualized, we have
become so culture-oriented and so
busy with worldly pursuits that
we have made of our Judaism
just another of many things that
claim our time and attention.
This kind of diluted and passive
concern does not challenge our
children to become involved in
our faith.
JEREMIAH spoke of his need
to speak of God's commands as
"a fire in my bones." Unless we
can fan the flames of our sput-
tering Jewish commitment we
will continue to find our children
reaching out for exotic but de-
manding faiths.
Rev.
The Lost Lambs
When we speak of the
Moon's Jewish converts, we are
not talking about tens of
thousands of people but of a few
thousand.
Nonetheless, we need to know
what kind of youngsters Moon is
capturing. Reports seem to in-
dicate that he is attracting
children who have not "made it"
in the family structure. They are
school drop-outs or hippies or
young people with obvious psy-
chological problems. What they
have in common is a feeling of
being unwanted or lost. They
think they are failures. They
revolt against their parents, but
they are really very dependent,
and they turn to the first hand
that beckons in a friendly fashion
to them.
Like Amalek, which attacked
the stragglers along the escape
route from Egypt, Moon attacks
the helpless.
He says to them, "Come to me,
and I will give you a home and
love and food and a job to do."
Suddenly the child who was last
on the totem pole of accomplish-
ment is first. He has become the
chief aide to the world's savior!
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FILTER: 10 mg.'in". 0.7 mgntcoine. MENTHOL 11 mg. "tit". 0.7 mg nicouie.avpei cigarette, FTC Report DEC. 76:
^yr-tta|ir-BBByyB


Page 10
The Jewish Flondian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 20, iw|

On Kicking Nixon Around
Based on a 30-year record of
consistency, I rise now (or maybe
bend?) to a point of personal
Erivilege for the purpose of
icking Richard Nixon around for
the last time.
I have contained myself well
these past several years, not
because I was too good a sport to
kick Nixon when he was
down basically, I am non-
violent, but 11 have had this urge
to kick him in the head for a long
timebut there have been far
more important thing to write
about since 1974.
SINCE I was trapped by the
heavy rains into watching the
first Nixon performance, and
since my own sense of history
would indicate that I should close
this long chapter in my own
writing career, let me say that I
was stirred primarily by two
portions of that 90-minute in-
terview. Not to righteous in-
dignationfollowing Nixon
around for 30 years sort of wears
out the indignation nerve but to
amazement at the consistency ol
the man as a corrupt liar o-
consummate chutzpah.
It was the partisan press"
which help' ring him down, an
old theme thai fails to stand the
test of truth
It is ie that a small
California n -paper labeled him
Tricky Dick Nixon" in 1950
when he defeated Helen Gahagan
Douglas wit h an anti-Communist
smear campaign that put him in
the U.S. Senate, and the name
stuck.
BUT IN 1972, knowing how
tricky he was, 93 percent of the
newspapers which made en
dorsements supported his
candidacy. It meant, sadly, a1
the Columbia Journalism Reviev
revealed in a post-election study,
that "Pro-Nixon papers had a
much higher tendency to sup-
press damaging Watergate
stories than papers making nc
endorsement." Partisan, indeed!,
as the survey revealed how the
American press helped cover up
for the Nixon team.
In describing how Nixon
learned to use the television to
advantage in the 1968 campaign,
Joe McGinnis (The Selling of the
President 1968), goes back to the
1960 loss to John Kennedy when
makeup and lighting were
blamed for Nixon's poor showing
in the debates.
"(But) Nixon's problem were
deeper than that. His problem
was himself. Not what he said
but the man he was. The camera
portrayed him clearly. America
took Richard Nixon straight and
did not like the taste."
Shavuoth Will
Mark Beth El
Confirmation
Shavuot services will be held at
7:30 p.m. Sunday, May 22, at
Temple Beth El, Hollywood, at
which time Confirmation cere-
mony will take place.
This year's confirmands are
Dana Sue Bennett, Carolyn Lisa
Blake, Keith Stuart Blank, Jill
Burnatine, Laura Lynn Candi-
otti, Mitchell Alan Krasne,
Stefanie Beth Lord, Debra Jean
Segal, Shari Dana Shavell, Ann
Renee Temlak.
Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffe will charge
the confirmands. A reception will
be given by the parents in honor
of the confirmand
Shavuot service* -ill be held at
10:30 a.m. Monday, at which
time Yizkor Memorial Prayers
will be recited.
THE MAKEUP was great, the
lighting divine, but there was
Nixon clear. In November of
1969, I wrote here that "I have
been amazed and appalledbut
those who viewed the Nixon
speech of Nov. 3 as a frank ex-
position of the facts when, in
truth, it was dishonest from its
beginning. ." and that goes for
that part of the Frost interview
where he dwelt on his hopes to
bring peace to the world.
That 1969 speech was an at-
tempted justification of the
continued carpet bombing of
Vietnam, to be followed by the
inexcusable Cambodian bombing
and the dragging out for five
years a war he had promised to
end.
Peace, for Tricky Dick Nixon
was the Orwellian definition not
due for another 16 years.
IF YOU remember the famous
Checkers'' speech during which
he just about forgot to mention
that he was being accused of
accepting funds for his private
use which a Senator, much of that
closing bit has a familiar taste
that undoubtedly made many of
us Nixonloathers want to
throw up. In 1952. "The Nixons
aren't quitters." In 1977, he will
not grovel. Maybe, if David Frost
boosted the ante a little?
As 1 wrote in response to some
critics in January, 1973, before
very much really had been
revealed ."Watergate is the
culmination of a career that began
with the destruction of Jerry
Voorhis (1946) through in-
nuendoes and lies, that was
fostered by similar tactics
against Helen Gahagan Douglas
(1950) and received national
reward through support of
McCarthyism. The President
nay not have had a direct hand
in the Watergate machinations
but there is no doubt in my mind
that the atmosphere in the White
House provided the sanction for
those of his associates who
planned and carried out one of the
most frightening political acts in
our history."
AND THAT was well before
the tapes and other devastating
material became available.
For 31 years, in one medium or
another, 1 have been writing of
Richard Nixon and his lies. The
fitting epitaph, of course, will be
"Here Lies Richard Nixon."
My guess is that except for a
few clowns like Rabbi Korff, no
one believes him any longer. It's
taken a long time to come around
to it, but I believe it serves no
useful social purpose to kick him
around any more.
m
m
m
B'nai B'rith Zeroes
In on Hillel Chiefs
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) A special 11-member committee
of B'nai B'rith leaders met here Monday to begin working out a
policy for the organization to take towards its Hillel directors
who are members of Breira.
The committee, appointed by B'nai B'rith President David
Blumberg, is expected to hold several more meetings before it
makes its recommendations to the fraternal organization's
Board of Governors, a B'nai B'rith spokesman said here.
BLUMBERG ANNOUNCED his intention to name the
committee early last March in the wake of charges that some of
B'nai B'rith's Hillel directors are promoting Anti-Israel, pro-
Arab views through their membership in Breira.
In a memorandum to the Board of Governors at the time
Blumberg said the committee would recommend a "policy
which protects both the integrity of the institution (B'nai
B'rith) and that of its staff members."
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Friday, May 20,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
Ml-"-'
:'

Marty Rubin,
People -Builder.
Marty Rubin is a cab driver.
He works hard for a living.
He also holds down another full time job.
People building.
Because Marty is Jewish,
he thinks about millions of Jews he's never met.
Marty knows the people of Israel are having a tough time.
They make impossible sacrifices to keep a dream alive.
Marty figures that s their part of the deal.
His part of the deal is to help out by giving.
Because when he gives,
housing gets built,
everyone goes to school,
immigrants get a new lease on life.
And Marty wants to be a part of it.
Marty Rubin is a people builder.
\AfeAreOne
One in Mind One in Spirit One in Purpose
1977 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Jewish Federation of South Broward
2838 Hollywood Blvd. Hollywood, Fla. 33020 Telephone 921-8810


Page 12
The Jewish Fbridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 20,1977
Carter's Freedom of Religion
J
fWanted: 20,000 Tutors
DOES Jimmy Carter have the
right to practice and to preach
the principles of hi? religion?
The question arises as a
consequence of the brouhaha that
the Jewish community is making
over a Bible class the President
attended the other Sunday in
the crucifixion at
the feet of the Jews
THE ^A KR -.he
_
-
of Judaism and Christianity very
seriously They believe in the
propaganda generated b>
Brotherhood Week because it
makes them and their role in
society far easier to bear Indeed.
that is why they are so important
3ders m Brotherhood Week
celebrations They have a great
in spreading the gospel of
are largely the
I
hemselves into be-
.alsof
Carter: A believing Christian
that right Freedom of religion is
an unimpeachable right
belonging to every American.
It is a right that cannot be
denied simply because a man
happens to be President of the
United States.
I suppose the brouhaha arose
\ Kause the Jewish community
conceives of Carter as "dif-
ferent." They see him as an
intellectual" which he most
decidedly is not who should
therefore not have said what it is
reported he said in his Bible
class.
FOR ONE thing, intel-
lectualism and anti-Semitism
share a long and glorious history
together during which untold
millions of Jews have been
murdered over a period of
thousands of years murders to
which the intellectuals were
indifferent at best and which, at
worst, they rationialized or even
helped to commit-
Some of the most exquisite
intellectuals in the 20th century,
from Edmond Husserl and Max
Planck to T. S Ebot and Ezra
Pound, have been anti-Semites.
For another, the Jewish com
munity reacted to the Carte
Bible class utterance with the ui
founded emotional feeling tha.
surely the President is more
sophisticated than to prattle on
about the Jewish "sin" of deicide
BUT THE point is that that ii
what Christianity is all about
Christianity is rooted in the
historicity of Jesus as messiah
and in the complicity if not out-
and-out guilt of the Jews in his
crucifixion.
There is no point in entering
into theological argument here
that would debate this or to raise
questions about the vibrancy of a
religion that is based on so mean
and hateful a principle.
There is. however, a very good
point in recapitulating this
principle because Jews, par-
ticularly middle and upper
middle class Jews, tend to forget
it or, what is worse, not to want
to know about it altogether.
THEY TAKE the hyphenatioc
Mindlin
Christians in acceptance and
respectability because it
strengthens their own innermost
doubts as potentially alienated
human beings and also their
socio-economic fears.
If there are still some cases of
executive suite discrimination
hanging around, still some
restrictive covenants tacitly
understood, the Brotherhood
Week jazz helps them to forget
these things or to tninim?
their importance.
BUT THE fact is that if
President Carter did not believe
in the Christian theological
doctrines that Jews find so
repugnant, he would not be a
Christian.
And the fact also is that as
Americans, as Jews or anything
se. we cannot deny him his
nght to practice and to preach
hese doctrines. President of the
United States or not.
To be startled that he does
practice them, to feel betrayed
that he does, is not only to be
ignorant of Christian history.
theology and intent, but
unrealistic too. not to mention
hypocriticaL
I ADMIT that this is a terrible
dilemma But Christians have
theirs also, and it is one upon
which our fate as Jews hangs
her to practice or n-
practice ncipies
preach and. s'r -ct to
practice them, to what extent.
are suit
hours a day by people
in the Jei
deicide: and many, if not most of
them, also believe that Jews are
collectively guilty of the "sin" to
this very day
To what extent do Christians
act on their belief? That is the
question. I suspect that. say. an
Austrian Catholic would be far
more prone to do so than a
Baptist Georgia peanut farmer
who happens to be President of
the United States. We've had no
Zys-Inquarts here so far not
yet anyway.
THE EXTENT to which
Christians divorce their religious
principles on this issue from their
daily interaction with Jews is the
extent to which, as Jews, we tend
to regard them as "civilized."
In short, in our middle class
Jewish view of Christianity, the
more schizophrenic a Christian is
with regard to his faith, the
better the Christian he is in our
eyes
The more he tends to be
doubtful of this very central prin-
ciple to his faith, the more we like
him.
I AM not at all sure that this is
good practice for Jews to look for
or encourage in Christians in the
same sense that I am not sure
that it is good practice for Jews
to prefer to forget the principle of
deicide itself which Christians
hold as central to their faith
Both attitudes lead toward an
avoidance of reality, which is
deleterious to each. The best we
can do is to deal with ourselves.
With respect to President
Carter, be is obviously one of
those Christians who bear the
schizophrenic assault upon his
sensibility with great dignity. In
this sense, he is different from
many other Christians, who from
tune to time let it erupt into
hatred ranging from pettv anti-
Semitism to Hitlerian Holocaust
WE MUST never allow our-
selves to forget that the
"eruptive factor" is omnipresent
and with varying potential in its
fury from Christian to Christian.
In this sense, the Christians
burden to bear it is at least as
great as ours if finally we become
bis victim.
That Admiral Hyman
Rickover should be President
Carter's personal "father figure"
is of greater significance to me
than what he said in that Sunday-
morning Bible class.
Certainly, in his case, we
should be able to do no leas than
bear our own schizophrenia well
too.
Six years ago. Roni Atar
met three neglected children
war orphans who had run
away from a public insti-
tution. Although they were
age 10. they couldn't read or
write. Roni brought them
back to the Weizmann
Institute, where he was
studying for his PhD. After
temporarily housing them at
the university, he took them
home, where they remained
for two years and were cared
for together with his two
i read and
Ron: V -
born in Iraq and ha-- six
brothers and They
were all raised in the
Maabara Ramatayim. He
later attended the high
school in Kfar Saba. and
received a university
scholarship.
Today we have 1.000
tutors all over Israel,
working with 1.000 pupils on
an individual basis." he
reports. "Our goal is to reach
at least 20.000children."
FOUR YEARS ago. Roni
approaced Prof. Hayim
Harari at Weizmann. and
suggested a simple formula:
that student tutors handle
selected children who are
economically and socially
deprived.
Harari explains: "Every
year we allocate grants to
students unconditionally,
without getting anything in
exchange. On the other hand,
there are scores of children
who need private tutoring
and counselling, which can
be done by students."
Atar's solution was that
the students become tutors
in exchange for scholarships.
The student has to meet a
minimum condition: that the
child spend at least twice a
week, two hours each time,
with him or her.
TWO EXAMPLES: Anat
and Bella from Dimona.
Anat came from Rumania six
years ago. Bella was bom in
Israel. Anat tutors a little
girl of the fourth grade, and
Bella a boy of the tenth
I I fallen behind
in hib >< hoolwork and had a
h :mpediment. He now
has many friends and at-
tends a regular public school.
The gir! who la being tu
by Anat was behind in her
Bchoolwork because her step
mother made her do all the
housework.
"There is a part-time
supervisor for every 50
tutors in the program. The
student organization in
every university is respon-
sible for these supervisors.
The children are often taken
on outings by their tutors, to
the zoo or to a museum
Some 20 percent of the tutors
are studying sociology or
psychology and this helps
them with the children."
Roni explains.
Yosef Tekoah. president of
the Ben-Gurion University of
the Negev, decided a year
ago to award incentive
scholarship to tutors for this
project, after having heard of
Prof. Harari s success in
Yavne and Bet Shemesh. In
the Schechuna Dalet in Beer-
sheba, 330 tutors were
enlisted for the project.
Atar estimates that at
least 100.000 Israeli children
need tutoring. The problem
is that geographically speak-
ing, there are not always
university students nearby
to take on tutoring assign-
ments. Thus, the immediate
goal is to obtain 20.000
tutors for 20.000 children
who live in areas near
Israel's universities.
Orthodox Prisoner
UN Commission Proposed
UNITED NATIONS (JTAl
- Israel proposed here that
Lnited Nations regional
disarmament commissions be
established and called for a
worldwide educational program
that would underscore the danger
of the arms race and the effort of
the international community to
achieve disarmament.______
In a letter to Secretary' General
Kurt Waldheim. Israel's
Ambassador to the UN. Chaim
Herzog. said "Disarmament and
arms control measures are not
only of concern to major powers
onm global level but are also of
vital interest to small countries it
Continued from Page 1
Martin Lacher was verbally
abused, beaten and placed
in solitary confinement
allegedly for wearing a
skullcap without the pass
required of all prisoners at
the Clinton Correctional
Facility at Dannemora who
want to wear headgear for
religious reasons.
DAN STEINBOCK. associate
director of Prisoners Legal
Service, which filed the Utica suit
m Apr. 26. said Lacher lost his
sennit but continued to wear his
skullcap after having been
warned not to do so until he
obtained another permit
Lacher. 32. of Staten Island.
was sentenced last Sept. 27 in
Kings County (Brooklyn) court
to an indeterminate sentence,
with a maximum of 15 years, on
charges of murder in the second
degree. He was issued the permit
permitting him to wear the
yarmulke on Oct. 30.
The other 14 inmates are
BKkl or ""P-1"" Since the
*Ueged incidents took place
Steinbock said, all but five of the
15 inmates, including Lacher
have been transferred to the
Green Haven Correctional
Facility. another maximum
security prison.
THE SUIT claimed the mis-
treatment occurred between last
September and last March The
SU'tr^Md M *"<** officers
and lieutenants: Eugene Lefevre.
Clinton superintendent: and
Benjamin War. State Corrections
Commissioner.
Steinbock said that when
Lacher was being taken to the
solitary confinement unit on the
yarmulke issue, one of the correc-
tion officers allegedly grabbed
Lacher by the collar several times
and struck him on the ear.
Lacher also complained that
when he arrived in the confine-
ment unit, he was told to bend
over and put his head on the
table. Several of the correction
officers smashed Lacher s head
into the table top. he said in his
complaint.
THE NEXT day. a correction
sergeant deliberately damaged
several of Lacher s personal
possessions. including some
religious articles, which were not
identified, according to the
complaint
The Jewish inmate reported
being told by the guards that
"Hitler had the right idea." and
by another, in a mock German
accent, that he "would make a
good lampshade."
Steinbock told the Jewish
elegraphic Agency that
damages were not specified as to
amount because that would be up
to the jury. He said "we are
asking for damages to appro-
priately compensate the inmates
lor their physical, mental and
emotional damagea, as wdl as


Friday, May 20,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
Federation Thanks So. Broward
"Community pride was at its peak," declared Lewis E.
Cohn, president of the Jewish Federation of South Broward. "It
was a beautiful evening with songs and melodies I'll remember
for quite awhile," commented Dr. Stanley Margulies, general
chairman of the 1977 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Kmergency Fund campaign of the JFSB. "It was a thrill to be
part of the warmth and spirit generated by members of the
South Broward community and the Jewish Federation." noted
Leonard H. Marcus, a resident of Hollywood Beach.
These are just a few of the comments which have been
pouring into Federation headquarters as a result of last Sun-
day's community-wide day of appreciation sponsored by the
Jewish Federation of South Broward. "The Night Shall Shine
As the Day," starring Theodore Bikel, was "viewed by several
thousands who laughed a little, cried a little and enjoyed a lot,"
according to Cohn.
**
*-^m:i
More than 5,000 people crowded in and
around the band shell in Hollywood's Young
Circle to view "The Night Shall Shine As
The Day," the musical extravaganza
starring Theodore Bikel, presented to the
South Broward community by the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
Proclaiming May 15 as Jewish Federation of South Broward
Day is Hollywood Mayor David Keating (right) as he presents
official city proclamation to Federation President Lewis E.
Cohn and chairman of the Theodore Bikel Gala Show, Phyllis
Kraemer.
I Tal, part of the Israeli duo, Hedva and David, performs a j
ballad before the capacity crowd in Young Circle.
Theodore Bikel tells the
audience at "The Night Shall
Shine As The Day" what it
would be like ... if he were a
rich man, the well known song
from "Fiddler On The Roof."
The Jewish Familv Service of Broward eration of South Broward. told its story in a
County, a constituent of the Jewish Fed- colorful booth and display.
Before the show began, exhibits and displays depicted
Federation and its services to the community. Here the
Federation booth is viewed by passersby.


PigeU
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Holly u-ooc
Friday, May 20,1977
Joining in the send-off of the Israel Bonds Xew Leadership
delegation to Israel were Larry Gotlieb. Arthur Kail cochair-
man of the Israel Bonds South Broward Xew Leadership
Division. Robert Stayer Evans, guest speaker. Steve Shere and
Gary Dix.
Young leaders of the Jewish communities of Dad* and Broward
Counties joined in a gala send-off for the Israel Bonds Xew
Leadership delegation to Israel. Israel Bonds Xew Leadership
members lleft to right). Robert Weissler. Ron Krongold, Xew
Leadership chairman of the southeastern region, Mrs.
Krongold Roberta Gotlieb and Dr. Michel Xahmad
Party Welcomes Bonds
New Leadership Group
Home from Israel Trip
South Florida delegates who attended the 10-day
Israel Bonds New Leadership Conference in Israel were
welcomed home at a reception and dinner last Mondav
night, May 9 at the Kings Bay Yacht and Country Club!
The 26 South Floridians were among the largest
delegations in the mission of 150 young leaders of Israel
Bonds representing communities throughout the United
States and Canada who met with leaders of Israel for
private briefings on the nation's economic and political
situation.
Ronald Krongold. Miami attorney, who is chairman
. of the southeastern region of the New Leadership, said "In
the course of the whirlwind tour of the country, they
studied Israel's needs and problems, conferring with
people from all walks of life and held discussions with
kibbutz members."
HE ADDED. The role of the New Leadership is a
vital growing one. comprising dynamic young people who
reflect the "new look' in the Jewish community. Our
delegation will use the experience as a springboard to
provide more effective ways of strengthening Israel
economically through the Israel Bond program. "
The delegation included Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Arvin.
Hollywood. Mr and Mrs David Dubrow. Miami Beach
Charles Gans. North Miami: Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gillon.
Hollywood. Mr. and Mrs. Lam- Gotlieb. North Miami
Beach: Mr and Mrs. Arthur Kail. Hollvwood: Dr. and
lira. Fred Khani. Fort Lauderdale: Dalian Lavi. North
Miami. Michael Pascal North Miami: Mr. and Mrs. Gene
Pertin. North Miami Beach: Mr and Mrs. Stanley
Kossoff. Miami Beach: Dr and Mrs- Robert Rosenblum
Miami Beach: Mr and Mrs Arme Sedei. Hollvwood and
Dr and Mrs. Pablo Tachmes. Miami Beach
The leader of the South Florida delegation was
.Arthur Kail, cochairman of the South Broward New
Leadership Division David Dubrow. a member of the
South Florida Israel Bond staff, was group coordinator.
AMONG THE highlights of the mission reported bv
the delegation at the dinner was a reception at the home of
the President of Israel Ephraim Kauir. and a meetag
and dinner in the home of former Defense Minister Moshe
Da van and Mrs. Day an-
other
by Mayor
home of
Agricuhurv
Minister. Yehuda Avner
ts were a reception
Kollek. a reception and dinner at the
Jaber Muadi. Deputy Minister of
with the adviser to the Prime
taab pi-
Day
Hal :*--
in
.
The
festivities and a
anniversary of the reunification
Zedeauah s Cave, in the OU C:
.addition to touring major dues, thev visited
Israv West Point" ami held a dialogue with the officers
aadmer raining school. They also visited mar
-ished with the aid of
:rom the sale of Israel Bonds.
Brave Words, Clear Dead-Ends
GENEVA (JTA) -
President Jimmy Carter
said here that a Middle
East peace settlement must
include "a resolution of the
Palestinian problem and a
homeland for the
Palestinians."
President Carter, who
arrived in Geneva for a
meeting with Syrian Pres-
ident Hafez el Assad, added
that such an agreement
must also include "an
assurance of permanent
and real peace with guaran-
tees for the future security
of these countries (in the
Middle East) which all can
trust."
THE AMERICAN President
who arrived here from the
Economic Summit Conference in
London, declared upon his arrival
at Geneva airport, "I hope that
later this year we might come
back (to Geneva) to find a reso-
lution of differences that have
separated one nation from
another and one people from
another for many, many years in
the eastern Mediterranean area."
The American President
walked into the meeting with
Assad shortly after 3:30 local
time. He was accompanied by
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance
and the head of the National Se-
curity Council Zbigniew
Breszinski.
Before the meeting, he ad-
dressed the press together with
Assad. Both men seemed to
speak more to each other, telling
one another openly and in public,
mainly what they thought the
other would like to hear.
PRESIDENT CARTER paid
tribute to Assad's "work for
peace." thanked him for coming
to Geneva to meet with him and
described his "experience" in
world affairs.
He also wanted to prepare a
good working climate by
stressing the Palestinian home-
land and resolution to the Pales-
tinian problem.
Carter continued by saying
such an agreement (peace) must
"be based on flexibility: There
must be forgetting about past
differences and misunder-
standings: there must be
determination and there must be
a resolution of the Palestinian
problem and a homeland for the
Palestinians: there must be some
resolution of border disputes:
there must be an assurance of
permanent and real peace with
guarantees for the future security
of these countries, which all can
trust."
Assad, in his declaration,
spoke in Arabic and without
notes, stressing Syria's desire
"for peace" and its determination
"to seek a just and lasting
solution."
HE SAID he was "optimistic"
as President Carter by his
previous remarks had created
"an optimistic climate."
Then he turned to a written
statement in which he deplored
the continued occupation of the
Arab land and "Israel's denial of
the legitimate recognition of the
national rights of the Palestinian
people."
Even more serious was his
interpretation that the Geneva
Conference should "provide a
suitable framework for the imple-
mentation of the resolutions on
the Middle East of the United
Nations Security Council and the
United Nations General
Assembly."
THE GENERAL Assembly's
resolutions on the Middle East
have often been violently anti-
Israeli, and it was generally
thought they could not serve as a
basis or a framework for the
Geneva Conference or for any
solution to the conflict.
The two men retired to the
Intercontinental Hotel's 17th
floor, overlooking the Palace of
Nations where the Geneva Con-
ference opened four years ago in
December, 1973, for their
discussion.
Cyrus Vance was due to meet
this week in London with Israeli
Foreign Minister Allon and will
visit the Middle East next
month. In the meantime Carter,
will meet in Washington with
Saudi Arabia's Prince Fahd
Diary of an Historic Moment
Unification of Jerusalem
By JOSEF GOLDSCHMIDT
Depot? Mayor of J
Israel under the
an autonomous
There are few events in
modern Jewish history so
elating as what happened in
the Six-Day War in June,
1967. There are many sides
to this. There was the light-
ning speed victory of the
Israeli army on three
fronts. against three
enemies who had agreed on
a common aim: the anni-
hilation of Israel. There was
the feeling in many of
having been saved from
personal disaster and
perhaps death.
But the crowning event
of it all was Jerusalem
its reunification and its
return to the Jewish people.
THE REUNIFICATION took
the Jerusalemitea back by 19
.wars, to 1948. before which Jero-
aaatan bad never been divided
The meaning of this reversal was
fen most by the Jerusaksnites
taaaaaarrea, aad only more
distaachr bv the Israelis or Jews
abroad.
But there was the return of
Jerusalem to the Jewish people
Thss took the Jewish naooa back
about 2.000 rears, to the
destrocooa of the Second Temple
by the Roaaans. After that
Jerusalem aad the Temple area
were onrsirW> Jewish jmitrlirtinn
the land of
authority of
Jewish State.
It is this reversal of our for-
tunes whose deep historical
meaning appeals to every Jew.
That is why hundreds of
thousands streamed to the
Western Wall: that is why young
soldiers who bad never seen the
Wall before broke out in tears
when they touched those sacred
stones.
HOW DID it come about, how
could it happen? Jerusalemitea
had been asking themselves time
and again: shall we ever stand in
prayer before the Western Wall?
And their answer was that their
children or children's children
might achieve this by develop-
ments nobody could yet imagine.
But in their own times never
.And within three days it had
come to pass
That Monday morning. June 5.
the author of thaw lines attended
a meetDg at the Ministry of
Education which stood on the
border of No Man's Land"
between Israel and the Jordan
held part of Jerusalem. Shortly
after 8:30. shootmg began from
the Jordanian side, and the room
in which the rmmting took place
came under fire. Jordan's King
Hussein had decided to throw his
lot in with Egypt. The diaries of
the cotnmanding officer dfwifce
what followed:
*** The Israel Foreign
Office hands the officer com
reading the UN troops an
aadertaking of neutralhv
assarts Jordan if this b mutual.'
TUESDAY. June 6: Israel
counterattack develops in the
north of the city, and Ml Scopus
and environs (north of the Old
City) are isolated-
Wednesday. June 7:
get
7:36 a-m.: Paratroopers
ready to capture Old City;
8:32 a.m.: Israeli planes strafe
Arab positions on Mt. Scopus;
9:20 a.at.
conquered.
Mt. Scopus
9:30 a.*.: Division Com-
mander Motta Gur. from his
headquarters on the Mount of
Olives, gives the order of the day:
We are going for the Old Citv.
the Temple Mount aad the
Western Wall Good Lock to
you.":
10 a^.: Commander reports:
The Temple Mount under my
control":
lOrflS ami Commanders and
Chief Chaplain Goran pass
through the Lions Gate on their
way to the Western Wall:
10:45 aawj The party arrives
* the Western Watt. Rabbi
Goren sounds the Shofar the
signal of liberation.
The Western Wal became the
Wi: :~g Watt, before which to
shad ear tears was wuetimra a
pi ii ilaat to be acsjakaa by a
11:3
Jordanian hre
!* P-au: The Jordanians or-
ojpythe United Natweal head-
araaaalaea>aatan *" Betfchk*
deirad itself
4 p.at Paratr, iBc
mSZ ^^aipwat move to
WAS THIS the end or was k a
beginning- It was rather a begin
rung of a new period. Within a
few days not only the Jordanian
but also the Egyptian and Syrian
forces were broken. Jerusalem
was unified under Israel whose
government was to reshape the
city that Jordan's wanton
aggression had torn apart in
1948 ^^
Watts of separation were putted
down. BuuVhna* -hoae^tuy
to abstract the free
w of treat popaaafoa had to
mve way isne) passed legis-
**" the unification of the
Jews and Arabs aaaaa met
at aaathai


iday, May 20,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 15
AskABe
ByABehadpepn
Question: What ia a "Kame'a"?
^ Rose Light
Haliandale, Florida
Answer: Kame'a is a Hebrew word whose
origin is obscure. It is a term frequently used to
mean an amulet or lucky charm. It appears in the
,Talmud (Tractate Shabbat 61a, 61b).
Some authoritative sources suggest that the
word is derived from a root meaning to bind, or
from an Arabic root meaning to hang. In either
case the reference is clearly something that is
bound or hung on the person.
Sometimes this word is transliterated as
kami'a. In certain places of Eastern Europe it is
pronounced Kamahya.
'From earliest times, man has tried to protect
himself from misfortune by the use of objects
which he considered holy or otherwise (e.g.,
magically) potent. One of the ways of doing this
was to keep the object close to his person, fre-
quently wearing it as an article of clothing, or as
an ornament. It was felt that the evil spirits
which cause misfortune would not dare to attack
one so protected. It has been suggested that this
desire for protection is the source of man's habit
to adorn himself with jewelry and other ornamen-
tation: the female being weaker and conse-
quently in greater danger has the greater need
for protection.
"The custom developed for people to have on
their persons peices of paper, parchment, or metal
discs inscribed with various formulae wich would
protect the bearer from sickness, the evil eye, and
other troubles. The use of inscription as a means
to ward off evil spirits stemmed from a belief in
early times in the holiness and in the power of
words. Such artifacts are known as amulets.
"It is not known whether amulets were used in
the biblical period. Presumably they were, but
there is no direct evidence to prove it. Traditional
.Judaism does not consider tefillin (phylacteries)
and mezuzah whatever their original antece-
dents may have been to be amulets. The
purpose of tefillin is stated to be 'for a sign upon
thy hand' (Deut. 6:9) and from the immediate
proximity of the verse regarding mezuzah it
would seem that its purpose is the same.
The traditional interpretation of the sign was
that of a reminder of God's commandments and
of the duty of the Jew to bear witness to his
God." (Encyclopaedia Judaica, vol. 2, pp.
906, 907).
Amulets usually consist of sacred letters or
symbols; names of angels or demons, and often
written in geometric pattern. Some forms of
amulets are the Hexagram (the Star of David),
the Menorah (the seven branched Candelabra),
metal discs, or the Hand inscribed on paper or
parchment, and various forms of squares,
triangles, containing inscriptions of Biblical
verses or a combination of letters. Sometimes
they were worn on the person, sometimes hung on
the wall. Many of these amulets bear the Divine
Name Shaddai (the Almighty) and they often
attained a high degree of artistic achievement.
"In the Talmudic and Gaonic period, amulets
were widely worn and their use was recognized,
but not specifically approved by Rabbis. With the
development of the later Kabbalah (Jewish
mysticism) and its insistence on the efficacy of
combinations of letters of the Divine names, the
vogue of amulets became universal, and their
preparation regarded as a Rabbinic function ."
(The Standard Jewish Encyclopedia, p. 105).
Some authoritative sources suggest that the
custom of wearing an amulet or lucky charm (a
Kame'a) for the purpose of protecting the be^. er
from sickness, the evil eye and other troubles, was
simply a Jewish adaptation of non-Jewish
superstitions.
It is interesting to note that the use of amulets
is still prevalent mostly among Oriental Jews.
Editor's note: Please send questions to:
ASK ARE
c / o Jewish Federation of South Broward
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
I
Encyclopaedia Judaica
Four gold amulets using the Divine Name of
God, Shaddai (the Almighty). Top left:
Morroco, 18th Century. Top right: origin
unknown, 18th Century or earlier. Bottom
left: North Africa, 19th Century. Bottom
right: Egypt, date unknown. The Hebrew
inscription on the circumference is from
Psalm 121:4. Hiney lo yonum v'lo yishan
shomeir Yisrael (Behold, He that keepeth
Israel doth neither slumber nor sleep).
r-

J
Dr. Teitelbaum to Chair BBYO Commission
Dr. Mike Teitelbaum of North
r-liami, who as a teenager was
nternational president of the
oys' component of the B'nai
'rith Youth Organization, has
pi'in elected chairman of the
BBYO commission, its super-
visory and policy-making body.
Dr. Teitelbaum, medical
lirector of the Aventura Medical
Center in Miami, succeeds Mrs.
Louis Perlman of Chicago and
Fort Lauderdale, chairman for
Ihe last five years. The only
k>man ever to head a B'nai
rith commission, Mrs. Perlman
^as elected honorary chairman.
The commission also elected
fdward E. Yalowitz of Evanston,
1., an attorney, as vice chairman
|uring its annual meeting here.
Dr. Teitelbaum was president
^f BBYO's Aleph Zadek Aleph
wmponent in 1947-48 and has
|>een a leader in B'nai B'rith ever
since.
Currently he is a member of
i'nai B'rith's national member-
pbip cabinet, a member of the
district 5 (from Maryland to
Florida) board of governors and
pairman of the Florida B'nai
Bar Mitzvah
LISA POLEY
!-isa. daughter of Mrs. Ronald
lorowitz and Fred Poley, will be
I itzvah at Temple Sinai of
1 vood on Friday evening,
CLAIRE SULTAN
Claire Sultan, daughter of Mr.
|nd Mrs. Fred Sultan, will be
Fled to the Torah as a Bat
^litzvah on Friday, May 27, at
lemple Sinai.
MICHAEL WACHMAN
Ihe Bar Mitzvah on Michael
*achman, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Fames Wachman, will be held at
!em-ple Sinai of Hollywood on
Murday morning, May 28.
B'rith Hillel advisory board. He
is also a director of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
In July, Dr. Teitelbaum will
serve as physician to the U.S.
Maccabiah team that will parti-
Religious Directory
NORTH BROWARD
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
1 Drive. Reform (44).
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9104
57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. (44A)
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. t*20 SW 15th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Drazin.
Cantor Abraham Kester. (a)
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. *11 Tart St.
Conservative. Rabbi Sidney I. Lubin.
(n
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi
Sheldon J. Harr. (84)
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA-
GOGUE. 7473 NW 4th St. (69)
cipate in the Jewish Olympics in
Israel.
Prior to becoming a physician,
be was an attorney, practicing in
Dayton, O., for seven years.
He is a graduate of Ohio State
University Law School and the
University of Miami Medical
School. He received a B.S. degree
from Ohio State, where he was a
leader in its Hillel unit, and a
B.A. from the University of
Dayton.
Yalowitz, a partner in the
Chicago law firm of Bernstein &
Yalowitz, Ltd., has been a
member of the BBYO com-
mission since 1975. Earlier, he
was a member of District 6 and
chairman of the Chicago youth
boards. District 6 includes the
Upper Midwest.
Yalowitz also was a member of
BBYO as a teenager and af-
filiated with the Hillel Foun-
dation at Purdue University.
From 1961-64 he was a volunteer
advisor of a BBYO chapter ir
Chicago.
JEFFER
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
MttCTORS
kvmJetttt MtownJrflei MwiJeffw
KWrOM:
186-11 MUSK* Art HOWS. U, NT.
1283 CONtY ISIANO AW. WITH. MY
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OAK COUNTY -13386 W DM HWY
947-1185 Rap by Somt LMI f 0
BROWARD COUNTY 1821 PtMBIWM R0
925-2743 r oso~iyievtno
PALM BEACH COUNTY 625 S Ollrt AVE
1-925-2743 Rep DtPmmian
Sovces available m all com
mumiies m New Yorkand throughout
Ihe Gieaiei Main aiea
A MESSAGE OF IMPORTANCE
TO MEMBERS OF
ALL FRATERNAL
ORGANIZATIONS IN AREAS
ALL OVER THE COUNTRY
In time ol need why should you
LOSE Benevolence privileges that
you paid for. when BOULEVARD.
the most beautiful Jewish Chapel in
South Florida WILL HONOR THEM
LOCALLY.
For free information with no oblige
lion, call:
BOt I.KVAKIX HA PELS
100 SOUTH DIXII HIGHWAY
jvtt oh Mn.n*,i. kwk ei.a.
HAUANOAlI. FLORIDA 330O*
____ Til! 10S-4S4-09OO
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Dr.Carl
Klein, PhD, Rabbi. (12)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Relorm. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingsley. Cantor Irving
Shulke.v (37)
HOLLYWOOD
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max
Landman. (47B)
3ETH EL TEMPLE. 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. As-
sistant Rabbi Jonathan Won. (45)
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4401 Arthur
SI. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (44)
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Cantor Yehuda Helloraun. (ts)
iOLEL TEMPLE. 5100 Sheridan St.
Liberal. Rabbi Robert Fraiin. (47C)
'OUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
32*1 Stirling Road, Oaks Condomin-
ium. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe Bom
ier. IEVITT
memorial chap*!*
Ifll Pembroke Rd
Hollywood, Fla.
S34-BM7
Sonny Levitt. F.D.
11385 W. Dixie Hwy.
Norm Miami, Fla.
MV-4J1S
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
Ztmpte Betkl
Wemotiat
Garden*
The all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beau-
tifully landscaped, perpetual care, rea-
sonably priced.
For information call: 920-8225 or writ*: f'^tZ'^\
TEMPLE BETHEL"' """ /9.K'?{4&
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Pleaso iertd mi literature on the abovt.
NAME; ___________________^____^_
AODRESS:
PHONE:


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Page 16
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 20 I
MKM jmcnvt SUNDAY. HAY IMlTMV
1ATURPAY. MAY lit* AT All PAHTtY PMOtt "
FROM FT PHtCE TO KEY Wf ST
USDA CHOICE
Beef Round Bottom
you to
ROAST
**09
1
USDA CHOICE BEEF ROUND
fiRBW*
USDA CHOICE BEEF ROUND
Bottom Round $ <| 29
Rump Roast JL
C.IADI A IIOIIN .*,. OONO -
fia or shipped premium fresh Turkey Drumsticks ,. 39* Beef Round i. 1
Lots 4 (! hick en 2Z?E!.mmwmm cq< Beef Liver ..59*
LB.
USDA
CHOICE
? UMIT THRU CANS PHASE. WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF $7.00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CICARITTIS.
Eye Round $4 59
Roast X
LB.
29
Fryer Qtrs.
USDA CHOICE FIAT CUTS
GROUND
Corned $ \ 29 Beef
Beef Brisket JL Chuck
99c
CHUCK
BLADE STEAK
POUND CflKfc
YOU MAY PUKHAM ONI O* All STAmO IT1MS ON I Ml HIGH! WITH A 17 00 OlDf C MOIII ICl C ir. All 11 IS
TOP QUAIITY WESTERN '36' SIZE
Sweet Eating #*#%
CANTAL0UPES69
PLAIN
MARBLE
LEMON
99
u-oz.
PKG
PANTRY PRIDE 100".
Whole Wheat Bread
* uoz
PKG
35
6 39<
SEASTAR ICELANDIC FRIED
FISH STICKS
89
MB
PKC
HIGH UNI*
Perch Filet
SUNLESS C
AND **
BONflLSS
I"
oi.pkg.
'IIIM IIPI SALAD SIZI
Fla. Tomatoes
U.S. = 1 All PURROSI
Maine Potatoes.. 5 & 79*
TOP QUAllTf IARG1 HZI CAUF ^
Avocados <>. 1
GAtMN III SH CUSP
Red Radishes 2 r&23c
tOPQUAUTT CALIf OtNIA |Mf D M0 SIZI i ^^
Sunkist Lemons 10 Zi 79*
CRISPY FRISH l A
Romaine Lettuce
33*
EACH
Pineapples ,. 98*
u. I aii ruorosiirio ioui owni
Yellow Onions ,. 23*
GAROfN FRtSH iPlCB TOUR OWN
Green Cucumbers 5 79(
URM ANO FRISH
Fla. Carrots 2 .'Jo 39*
ANIIT IIIDI 0IAN0 UNSWIIIINID lull
Orange Juice SStfft 89*
MAUII'Ui COLORFUL ______
Potted Mums % %229
AIL FLAVORS
HAWAIIAN
KEEBLERELFWICH
CHOCOLATE
COOKIES
FRUIT N NECTAR
FRUIT
COCKTAIL
MEDICATED
Cruex
Powder
^L 4 oz
H TAN
3
SCENTED OR
UNSCENTED LOTION
Ultra-Ban
Roll On
$119
[ 1.5-OZ.
RRB BTl
REGULAR OR MINT
PHILLIPS
MMMEM
12-OZ.
Tl.
Phillips
MILK OF
Magnesia
98'
IOO-CT J> f
RKG. A
$1 09
'Nil' rridi
Tea Bags
PLANTATION PRIM
Kosher Dills 38 69*
GOL0IN CROWN
Lemon Juice !BE 59*
SuTTON BAY
AIL FLAVORS SIGO LIQUID
Diet Drinks 3 g 99*
Early June Peas 4 c'.0N's $1
Purple Plums ^'49*
IN SICIIONS _
Grapefruit 3 $1
CONIADINA
Tomato Sauce tfi 19*
PANTRY PRIDE REGULAR OR
NO.IM MOUNTAIN ^ou. .., ._
Wines.-- -..... '.0,r *369
All IIAVOH IANIIT II.OI ,NO Ml Hit }
Low Cal Sodas 3 SS 89*
PANTRY PRIDI SMOOIM OR CRUNCMY
Peanut Butter 58 89*
IANH IIIOI MIXID
Vegetables 3 '^,89*
TROPICANA FROZEN
Thin
Spaghetti
1 LB
PKG.
39
Orange
Juice
can29'
m-oi $ t 29
JAI A
39*
IANIIT IIIOI INSTANT
Iced Tea Mix
PANTRY IIIOI
Tomatoes....................................urn
All VAIMTMS
Purr Cat Food 6 t& $1
PANTIY PIMM PIT tITI __
Dog Food 6 c.2,99*
PO TOUR L AUNDIT _
Punch Detergent Vo'$l09
Waffles 5 AS $1
PANTRY MIDI 'ROIIN
Coffee Lightener 4 on0/ $1
IANIIT II.OI IIOIIN
Whipped Topping Sg 49*
VIIIIISH IIOIIN
Glazed Donuts ':.?.'89*
IANIII IIIOI IIOZIN
Cut Corn 3^.' $1
DELICIOUS SNACKING1 NABISCO
SfHAIMR SCHMIDTS OR _. I a.
BEER6 $ l29ITwrS' 89
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES NONE SOLD TO DEALERS NOT RESPONSHLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
SAVE 28
WALDORF
BATH TISSUE
4 69
ROLL PKG. ^^PF %0
* LIMIT TWO PKGS.. PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASeT
OF $7.00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
SAVE 24
VEGETABLE SHORTENING
crisco rg
$149
1
48-OZ.
CAN
? UMIT ONE CAN. PLEASE. WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF $7.00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
SAVE 60
PANTRY PRIDE
COFFEE
ALL
GRINDS
2
$*>25
1 IB
BAG
* LIMIT TWOIAGS PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF M 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
SAVE 88
LIGHT r LIVELY
COTTAGE CHEESE
LOW
FAT
79
24-OZ.
CUP
LIMIT TWO CUPS PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF $7.00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES.
All FLAVORS
Light n' Lively 4
Yogurt !
IIAKilONI s _
Sour Cream % 65*
99
ii 7Q
........owi m *J
HIISCHMANN i COIN OH
Soft Margarine
SAIGiNTOOlDIASHIONMIlO
Cheddar Cheese "a.'l"
'IOSUN Afkfte
Orange Juice 3 c oz
...................PRO.
59*
Cl
89
Cream Cheese
PANTRY PRIDE SLICED WIDE
Meat
Bologna PKo
IICMJ SUCID
Turkey Breast $1^
OSCAI NATII WIINII i OR ***m
Beef Franks SSk'Vf
OSCAI MATH COTTO SALAMI Ol 1-
Sliced Olive Loaf l.V 89*'
HMM NAIWNAl IOIhii HICIO __ I
Salami or Bologna o' 75*]
Kielbasi Rings W*M
IN OUR SERVICE APPETIZER DEPT. -I
AVAHAMI ONI Y AT ilOlft HAVINC SIIVICI COUNIIH
All IUNCH MIA IS ANO CHIIU LUCID TO TOO! OIO"
RICH S DELICIOUS
Chicken Roll .89
swins -
Genoa Salami ff 69*
'RIMHT l-O.IO -*
Whitef ish_________3f$ 1 "\


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