The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00165

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJemsti Flcndli<3i m
and Shofar of Greater Nolly wood
Volume 7- Number 4
Friday, February 25,1977
Price 2 5 cents
Recent Hi-Rise Events Support CJA-IEF Campaign
Hundreds of residents of area
Hi-Rise apartments and con-
dominiums rallied in support of
the 1977 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
campaign of the Jewish Feder-
ation of South Broward.
At Hillcrest, the Men's Honor
Roll Breakfast attracted more
than 300 men who demonstrated
unprecedented financial support
of the CJA-IEF campaign effort.
The Feb. 22 event was headed by
Nathan Pritcher, coordinator was
Alvin Hess, breakfast chairman
was Milton M. Winograd and
cochairman was Joseph Bloom
Pritcher thanked everyone for
attending and said "I am not
surprised at the terrific response
to the campaign by Hillcrest
men. We are generous people and
have once again shown our people
that we care."
Residents of Aquarius met
Feb. 20 to honor Bernard J.
Goldberger for his many years of
Jewish communal service in New
York and locally. Henry Levy,
former director of HIAS Euro-
pean operations, was the guest
speaker, and called for "more
money than ever to help meet the
needs of the Israelis and Jews
around the world." Herbert
Lebovitz was building chairman
and cochairmen were Abraham campaign chairman was Harry
Cohen and Max Verebay. Sussman. Honorary chairman
was Moe Levin.
Also on Feb. 20, residents of
Galahad IV Court met to pledge
support for the CJA-IEF cam-
paign. They honored Milton
Kritzer, a retired stockbroker, for
his 40 years of work with Jewish
organizations. Dr. Avraham Avi
lai was the guest speaker and
Residents of Paradise Towers
pledged support of the 1977 CJA-
IEF campaign at a reception on
Feb. 24. They viewed the movie,
"There's a Place for Us," starring
Barry Newman. Nathan Solomon
was building chairman.
r Barnett, Kraemer Head Mercantile Div. l
Herman Barnett and Paul Kraemer have been
named cochairmen of the newly formed Mer-
cantile Division of the 1977 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund campaign of the
Jewish Federation of South Broward, according
to Stanley Margulies, M.D., 1977 CJA-IEF
general campaign chairman.
In making the announcement, Dr. Margulies
indicated that both men have a strong sense of
commitment to the Jewish people and both have
demonstrated their concern for the people of
Israel and for Jewish agencies in this community.
"I am delighted to be able to make this dual
appointment," he declared, "as both Herman
Barnett and Paul Kraemer are perfect examples
of busy local businessmen who still find the time
to work for the Federation and for our CJA-IEF
campaign which is so vital to the continuance of
our culture and heritage here and abroad."
The CJA-IEF Mercantile Division will com-
prise all specialty shops, businesses and stores
not otherwise covered in already established
campaign divisions.
Vance Gives Views on the Mideast
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Secretary of State Cyrus R.
Vance said that "The parties will
determine whether there will be a
Palestinian state" in the Middle
East, that the situation there has
"improved from what it was nine
months or a year ago," but that
the favorable conditions may be
destroyed if no progress is made
toward peace this year.
Vance expressed those views in
a special interview with the
Associated Press and United
Press International. The Secre-
tary began a six-nation tour of
the Middle East Feb. 15. He also
told the wire services that he has
severed the "linkage" between
human rights issues and other
matters between the U.S. and the
Soviet Union.
AT A PRESS briefing later,
State Department spokesman
Frederick Z. Brown was asked by
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency if
Vance's remarks meant that the
Administration opposes such
laws as the Jackson-Vanik
amendment to the U.S. Trade
Act and the Stevenson Export-
Import Bank legislation which
link Soviet emigration and
human rights practices with U.S.
trade and economic benefits.
Brown said Vance had thought
about it and indicated that the
Secretary will address that
matter at an appropriate time
with the Soviet Union. Vance is
going to Moscow to discuss
bilateral issues late in March.
Brown said the State Depart-
ment would respond to the jTA's
question at a later date.
Vance was questioned closely
on Mideast issues by the wire
service reporters. He was asked,
"Must there be a Palestinian
state for there to be peace in the
Middle East?" He replied, "That
is up to the parties to decide" but
he did not identify the "parties."
He added, "I think it is necessary
if one is going to achieve a settle-
ment to recognize the legitimate
requirements of the Palestinian
people and I have said this many
times before."
ASKED IF those requirements
included statehood, Vance said
"That is up to them to decide
how that might be done." Asked
if "them" referred to the Pales-
tinians or the parties to the
conflict, Vance replied, "the
parties."
He said that "despite dif-
ficulties which exist" the Middle
East situation has "improved
from what it was nine months or
a year ago." But he added that if
progress is not made in 1977,
"other factors may arise which
may destroy the more favorable
conditions which currently
exist." Vance's remarks in that
connection differed from the more
blunt prognostication by UN
Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim who said last week
that a Middle East war would
erupt in two years if progress
toward a settlement is not made
this year.
News Briefs
Ex-Nazi Druschke Tracked Down
VIENNA (JTA) Simon Wiesenthal, head of the Jewish
Documentation Center, announced that he has tracked down another
Nazi war criminal.
He said that former German SS officer Clement Druschke, 62,
who is now a tavern keeper in Heidelberg, West Germany, was
responsible for the shooting of 45 hostages in 1942 when he was head
of the Gestapo police in Jesenice, Yugoslavia. Druschke is also
believed responsible for having shot a 16-year-old Yugoslav boy just
before the end of the war. He sent several hundred Yugoslavs to
German concentration camps where most of them were killed,
Wisenthal said.
Wiesenthal said German authorities have started an in-
vestigation.
Spain Nixes Israeli Fair Pavilion
TEL AVIV (JTA) Spain has notified Israel that an Israeli
pavilion will not be permitted at the agricultural exposition in
Saragossa at the end of March although Israeli companies will be
allowed to participate under their own names.
The Spanish action came as a surprise here since Israel was in-
vited to participate in the fair following the success of the Israeli
pavilion at an agricultural fair at Seville several months ago.
The Foreign Ministry has to deckle now whether to permit any
Israeli firms to participate in the Saragossa exposition. Israelis see the
withdrawal of the invitation to Israel as another example of the
Spanish government bowing to Arab pressure.
Boumedienne: Nab Temple Vandals
PARIS (JTA) Algerian President Houari Boumedienne said
that he has ordered police to track down with all available means the
vandals who desecrated and looted the Algiers synagogue last month
and bring them to trial. Boumedienne, who received Marcel Said,
president of the city's Jewish community, in a private audience, asked
him to convey to all community members his "sympathy at the loss
they suffered." He also told Said that Algeria's Jews will "always find
my door open."
Three suspects have been arrested in connection with the
synagogue break-in but none of the stolen objects, including silver
candlesticks and Torah scroll ornaments, have been recovered. The
police investigation is continuing.
Shoshana, Pacesetter Women Pledge Support------ n>000 Floridian8 xm
\Mury Zinn (left) was the hostess for the Shoshana luncheon on
Xbehalf of the 1977 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
\Fund campaign of the Jewish Federation of South Broward.
The $2,500 minimum event raised unprecedented amounts to
tefit the multi-mUlion-dollar campaign which aids Jewish
feople in Israel, behind the Iron Curtain and m the South
Vinward community. Leah Harris, a campaign director of the
United Jewish Appeal (center), is shown with Marge Saltzman,
chairman of the event.
The CJA-IEF Women's Division Pacesetters held "an over-
whelmingly successful" $1,000 minimum luncheon at the
Diplomat Hotel, according to CJA-IEF WD campaign Vice
President Jo Ann Katz (right). With Mrs. Katz are (from left)
I Elaine Pittell and Rochelle Koenig, Pacesetters cochairmen;
and Elaine Siris Winik, guest speaker and president of the
Women's Division of the United Jewish Appeal.
Israel in 76, Up 64%
Close to 11,000 tourists from
Florida visited Israel in 1976, it
was disclosed by the Ministry of
Tourism in Jerusalem. This
lumber is an all-time record, a 64
percent increase over the
previous year, 1975.
The tourists included groups
from congregations, con-
dominiums, churches, as well as
individual visitors who came for
sightseeing of the historical sites,
for holiday celebrations, or for
prolonged vacation at the various
resorts.
Some traveled on Inter-faith
Groups, comprised of Jewish and
Christian participants who went
for a study tour of the Holy
Land. One of these groups,
headed by Sen. Richard Stone,
Florida, went in November, 1976,
to Israel and Rome.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofarof Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 25,1977
GILBERT BOCHET
/ Didn *t Convince
AllFrench Consul
By MINDY KLEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
French Consul General
Gilbert Bochet denied here
last week that the
French government
knuckled under to Arab oil
pressures or feared terrorist
reprisals if they did not re-
lease Abu Daoud, the PLO
terrorist suspected of
masterminding the 1972
Munich Olympic Massacre,
and further maintained
that the French laws of
extradition were applied
"correctly" in the case.
Bochet flew to Miami
from New Orleans
voluntarily to meet with area Jewish organization leaders in
what turned out to be not a new French statement on the case,
but a public relations gesture.
Mochet admitted that the controversy did cause "some em-
barrassment." and said he "would have hoped for something
better than that which took place."
THE FRENCH secret service detained Daoud in Paris in mid-
January and a French court released him four days later, before
extradition documents from West Germany or Israel were
prepared, despite a French law which allows 18 days for filing
exl radition requests.
Public opinion in general and Jewish opinion in particular
flared up against the French government for its action, hut the
government stood firm.
According to the Consul General the Daoud release was
judicial, nol political. Asked if France would have acted in the
same manner had those slain at Munich been Americans, he
replied, "Yes, most probably." adding that Daoud wasn't
released because the slain were Jewish men and women. There
was nothing anti Israel in the French action.
"THERE IS no legal case against him (Daoud I." Bochet said,
voicing (he official French position that there was no crime corn-
mil ted in France or against a French citizen and thus did not fall
under t he jurisdict ion of French law.
Bochel indicated that the angry response from the Florida
Jewish community had been large, lie received "100 letters of
protest from Florida." more than from any other state.
BUT. he said, "emotions are not the right way to settle a
problem or a situation."
Bochet expressed the view that the French government felt it
had been tried by the press,
"It was a very bad. very wrong thing that some articles could
be written in newspapers without the French position being
clearly known." he said.
BOCHET ALSO indicated that a Jewish travelers' boycott of
France as yet "doesn't affect the French economy." He added,
however, that many French Jews benefit directly from the
tourist trade and said that he felt they were the ones who would
lie hurt most by the boycott.
I've been pleased that our meeting has been a quiet one. It
gave us an opportunity lo express our views." Hornet said. He
did concede, however, that "I am sure I didn't convince
evervbodv."
Senior Center to
Have Birthday
The Senior Adult Activities
Center of the South Broward
Jewish Community Center is
celebrating its first anniversary
Sunday, March 13. with a special
week of activities and programs.
Advisory Board Chairman Syd
Feinsand announced that
speakers, entertainment, refresh-
ments and special exhibits will
highlight the anniversary week.
He has appointed Fran and Joe
Berks as cochairmen of the
special events.
The JCC will host an open
house for friends and visitors on
Thursday. March 17.
There's a new Social Club for
Seniors at the Jewish Com-
munity Center in Hollywood.
The group, called the Chaverim
Social Club, meets every Tuesday
from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Newly elected officers are:
Louis Cantor, chairman; Shirley
Cooper, secretary; Joe Gordon,
program; and Carrie Gordon,
hostess.
The club welcomes new
members to join them and social-
ize each week. Programs are
planned, including a Medicare
Claim Filing Seminar on March
15. Refreshments are served.
Call Elaine Goldstein at the
Jewish Community Center for
any additional information
Seminar Topic:
Breast Cancer
"For Women An In-depth
Look at Breast Cancer" will be
the subject of a free public
seminar at Community Hospital
of South Broward on Tuesday.
March 1, at 2 p.m.
Sponsored by CHOOSE, the
organization of physician's wives
that deals with community
service and education. the
meeting will be highlighted by
the appearance of Marie Maxson,
state chairman of the Reach to
Recovery program aimed at
mastectomy patients, and a
member of the board of directors
of the Florida chapter of Amer-
ican Cancer Society.
Demonstrations of self-
examination technique will be
done on "Betsi" mannequins by
hospital nursing staff.
Hillcrest Hadassah
The next meeting of the
Hillcrest Group of Hadassah will
be held on March 7 at the Hill-
crest Playdium at noon. Refresh-
ments will be served.
Banding together on behalf of the 1977
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund campaign are residents of several local
apartments and condominiums gathered to
make their commitment to the Jewish State.
Standing (from left) are Perry Simons,
Stratford Towers; Samuel Grunther and
Ijouis Rabinowitz, Wellington Towers;
William Westerman, Hyde Park; Dan Pollin,
Stratford Towers; and Philip Plender, Dr.
Reuben Posner, Harry Scheiner and Dr.
William Feder, Oxford Towers. Seated (from
left) are Abraham D. Bressman, Hyde Park;
Joseph Reiss and Albert Adelman, Cam-
bridge Towers; SaulNucian, Attache, and Al
Loewy, Twelve Pillars.
i-Rise Events
The Hemispheres buildings held their annual brunch to benefit
the 1977 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
campaign and chairmen (from left) Pat Klein, David Schwartz-
man, Kalman Rado, Morse Engelman, Abe Lewis and Jack
Udis will dedicate their energies to make this campaign the
most successful in the building's history.
1 ;*;--:--
HH W
t jfl Hfz^H i M
H m* ^*WWm ^m
W* 1 '4
Residents of the Diplomat Towers gathered to make their
financial commitments to the 1977 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund campaign of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward. Demonstrating their concern for world Jewry
are (from left) Bea Weiss, chairman; Sam Weiss, honorary
chairman; Florence Goodman, chairman and Frank Becker-
man, executive advisor.
BBG Donates $800 to CJA-IEF
Proceeds from a Bike-a-Thon held by the B'nai B'rith Girls-
Gimmel Chapter. Hollywood, were presented to Lewis E. Cohn,
president of the Jewish Federation of South Broward, as a
contribution to the Federation's 1977 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund campaign.
The check for more than $800 was presented by Susie
Schachter, past president of the group; Sally Katz, current
president and Joyce Nathanson, advisor.
When we put our name
onachapd,
it'sexchisivelya
Riverside chapel
Announcing Riverside's new Holly wood
chapd at 2230 Hollywood Boulevard.
Unlike many other Jewish funeral directors in
Florida.Riverside is not represented by any
other organization.
Our new Hollywood Chapel is another example
of how this policy helps us to provide service
dedicated only to the needs and wishes of each
family and the requirements of Jewish Law and
Custom.Our new Hollywood Chapel is wholly in
keeping with Jewish tradition.lt is spacious and
comfortable.lt contains a Ritualarium (Mikva) and
other required facilities for the observance of the
Ritual of Washing (Tahara).
And it is manned by one of the largest staffs of
Jewish personnel in Broward County.They are
people who understand Jewish tradibon.and honor
it.And in that tradition,we serve every family
regardless of financial circumstance.
2230 Hollywood Boulevard
920-1010
Other Hollywood location 5801 Hollywood Boulevard
Other Riverside Chapels in the Greater Miami Area:
Sunr.se. North Miami Beach, Miami Beach Miami
I ive chapeK serving the New York City Metropolitan Area
HRiverside
'> Owe*. Inc, Fun.,* r>lrio-.
____Fof "ration* a symbol ot Jewish tradition.
near Young's Circle)
paadia Judaic*, vol-7, P-40BT


Friday, February 26,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
PageS
Israel Film
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Rabbi Marc H. Tanenbaum,
lational director of interreligious
iffairs of the American Jewish
Committee, has disclosed that
Israeli government authorities
will not permit a Danish film pro-
ducer to make a pornographic
film about Jesus in Israel.
Tanenbaum said that the
producer, Jens Jorgen Thorsen,
obviously attempting to cash in
on the current sickness of por-
nography, has prepared a film
script that blasphemously seeks
to portray Jesus as a drunkard, a
fornicator and homosexual."
TANENBAUM stated that
the promoters, who seek to
release the film about 'the love
jffairs of Christ," have announced
urith incredible arrogance that
He film will be blasphemous,
pornographic, sadistic/ "
Tanenbaum revealed that he
had made an immediate inquiry
of Israeli government authorities
in Jerusalem and had received
this official reply: "Mr. Thorsen
has not applied to enter Israel for
the purpose of filming, and
should he apply for such pur-
poses, he would be denied entry.
The government of Israel will not
allow any film to be made that
would be offensive to any
religious group."
LaMer FStes Epsteins, Friedkins for CJA-IEF
Mr. and Mrs. Morse Epstein (right! were honored by residents
of La Mer for their many years of dedicated and humanitarian
service to the Jewish people around the world. Presenting the
award on behalf of the 1977 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund is Morris Fogelman.
Rakitas Named Honorees
For Emerald Hills Event
Residents of Emerald Hills will gather at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, to
pli-d^e moral and financial support to the 1977 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund campaign of the Jewish Federation of
South Mm ward, according to Chairmen Lee and Ben Rosenberg.
The Rosenbergs disclosed that at the same time Emerald Hills
residents Lillian and Nathan Rakita will be honored by the CJA-IEF
"for their long years of dedication and humanitarian service to the
people of Israel and Jews around the world."
The Rakitas have been long active in Jewish communal affairs in
their native Milwaukee. Mrs. Rakita is vice president of the Women's
Division in that city and president of the Jewish War Veterans
auxiliary.
Kakita, an attorney, is past president of the Milwaukee Jewish
Home for the Aged and past department commander of the Jewish
War Veterans. He is a board member of the Milwaukee Jewish
Federation.
(iuest speaker at the dinner meeting will be Dr. Nathan Zur, an
Israeli surgeon who participated in the raid on Entebbe.
Also at La Mer, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Friedkin were honored
on behalf of the CJA-IEF for their long years of Jewish com-
munal service. Presenting the award is Otto Stieber, CJA-IEF
Hi-Rise chairman (left), and La Mer General Chairman Reuben
Goldstein (right).
Allon Expects U.S. Aid Increases
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Carter Administration has
recommended that Israel receive an additional $300 million in
economic aid for fiscal 1978, Foreign Minister Yigal Allon told the
Cabinet yesterday. This means that Israel would get SI billion in
military aid and $800 million in economic aid.
Israel had asked for $2.3 billion of which $1.5 billion would be ii.
military aid and $800 million in economic aid. The Ford
\dministration had recommended that Israel get $1.5 billion.
LILLIAN AND NATHAN RAKITA
Carter States
Commitment To
Israel's Security
NEW YORK (JTA) -
President Carter has assured the
A nti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith of his abiding commitment
to "preserve the integrity and
security" of Israel in a peaceful
Middle East.
The statement was made in a
telegram to Burton M. Joseph,
ADL's national chairman, to
mark the opening of the ADL's
national executive committee
meeting at The Breakers Hotel in
Palm Beach. The policymaking
body, consisting of ADL leaders
from all over the country, con-
cluded its meeting yesterday.
After praising the ADL's
"efforts to eradicate not only
anti-Semitism, but all forms of
prejudice and discrimination,"
the creed "which my Admin-
istration is fully dedicated to
uphold," Carter added: "I also
welcome this opportunity to
assure you of my abiding com-
mitment to preserve the integrity
and security of the State of Israel
m a peaceful Middle East."
RELGO, INC.
Religions Goods, Gifts,
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1507 Washington Avenue
Miomi Beach
PHONE 532-5912
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coffee & a nosh
complimentary
ART Q GIFTS O FASHIONS Q JEWELRY Q BOOKS
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arnett
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of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-820C
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Marine Supplies
Hardware A Paint, Inc.
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Store Hours: 7:30 a.m. 6 p.m. Closed Sunday
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ROOM DIVIDERS
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PATIO FURNITURE


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 25,1977
Editorial
The Needs Are Great
Edward A. Dincin, a resident of Hallandale, sums up
the feelings of the editorial staff-
Let me. first of all. tell it like it is I'm here to per-
suade you to open your checkbooks and write checks
payable to the Combined Jewish Appeal. I can hear you
saying. "What, again?"
I know. I know, you're tired of hearing this old tiresome
'Give, give till it hurts'" song. You've heard it almost
every year since World War I. if not earlier. And there
seems no end to it. Every year fellows like me come to you
and ask you to give. Will there ever be an end to it. you
ask? Isn't there a "Bright prospect for peace in the Near
East? Isn't Saudi Arabia and even Syria and Egypt now
asking for a Geneva conference to make peace, permanent
peace with Israel? Isn't Russia at long last letting a few
Jews leave? Why then this old "Give" song again?
Well. I'm sorry to blow away your rosy dreams, ladies
and gentlemen, but there is no peace, and there is no
prospect for peace, at least in our own lifetime.
The Russians are letting out a trickle of Jews in order to
pacify American public opinion.
The Saudis, the Egyptians and Syrians say they are
willing to make peace, on their own terms! The Russian
bear has not discarded his sharp claws and his murderous
teeth, and they never did. And as for the Arabs, they too
have not changed their spots, and unlike an English
gentleman, their word is not their bond.
The late Mr. Nasser and the present. Mr. Sadat, have
shown time and again that their verbal assurances and
their signatures on written agreements are valid only as
long as it suits them: once it ceases to suit them, they'll
break them as non-gallantly as they would break a used
match. And they did it many times.
No. ladies and gentlemen, as long as there is a single
Jew in Russia, we must try our best to get him out.
because neither his life nor his Jewishness are safe. The
Israeli government is an open country where the refugees
come from not only Russia, but from Poland. Asia. Africa
and all the Arab countries. They all have to be clothed,
fed. housed, taught the language of the land, taught a
trade, or if they are professionals, they too must be rehab-
ilitated and trained They take care of their children and
BOme come with poor health and they too must be taken
care of. So you see, there is a great need for monies for all
above and more And we must help them to become again
free human beingk.
And the only way Israel can be safe is by keeping armed
to the teeth. And if Israel has to spend one-half to three-
quarters of her budget on armaments she needs help from
us in order to prosper her population and maintain her
civilization. The Israelis are already one of the heaviest
taxed people in the world.
And don't forget the ill wind that blows from Africa,
where black nationalism and racism are burning red hot
if history teaches us anything, it is that nationalism and
racism are father and mother of anti-Semitism this is
another nightmare that the government of Israel has to
think about and plan for, as if they didn't have enough to
worry about already.
No, ladies and gentlemen, the present is not rosy, and
the future is black. There is still no end to the suffering of
the Jewish people. We have friends in Europe and in
America, but when it comes to the crunch, we have only
ourselves to count on. No one will fight our real battles,
battles with rifles and bayonets. We must fight alone.
The Israeli people, thank God, realize it and are ready
and willing to defend themselves against great odds. They
count on us to help them, just as the Russian Jews count
on us to help them in their struggle to get out of their
country-prison. If we are proud of our Jewishness, of our
civilization, we cannot fail, we must not fail so ladies
and gentlemen, open your checkbooks and give to the 1977
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund of
South Breward
e Jewish Floridian
and SHOFAR OF GREATER MOLLYWOOO
w.~,m^ultea8 mS r0*ralHwy Danla Fla 004
_ P.O. Box 2R7S. Miami Florida moi
hbsjkse -i^SF P "-a"-----.
All P O. 7t> return, are to be forwarte The Jewish Floridian. P.O. Box 01-JRTS. Miami. Fla. M101
Th* ASS ?.'or'"*n Do*, 5* 0u"" Th Kashrvfh
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published Bl-Weekly
Second Clan Postage Paid at Danla. Fla
Jewish f ederatlon of South Broward. Inc SHOFAR FniTORlai
ADVISORY COMMITTEE Nathan Prltcher S S22"'Cohn;
Mrlvln H Baer; Samuel Mellne. DM n
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unify and tne Jewish Weekly
g**T **** Telegraphic Agency. Sev.nArfs FesfuV* SySSSt.'
Wor dw,de News Sery.ce, National Editorial Assoc.fion, Amer.ran Ass,?fiono,
Enghsh- Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association '" '
.ieqBuwf"PT,ON "*TES """ mm 0n* V,,r -**" 0u' >' To"" UP-
Meetings

On Sunday morning residents of five area Hi-
Rises will meet to pledge support for the 1977
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
campaign of the Jeuish Federation of South
Broward.
HOLLYWOOD TOWERS: Residents of
Hollywood Towers gather at 10 a.m. to hear Prof.
B. Z. Sobel of the University of Haifa discuss the
latest situation in the Middle East, and to honor
Mrs. John Askin for her many years of service to
the Jewish community. Jack Gold is chairman
and Ben Neisner. cochairrnan.
GOLDEN BAY TOWERS: Golden Bay
Towers residents meet Sunday morning. 10:30
a.m.. to hear I. J. Bookbinder of the United
Jewish Appeal, speak on the worldwide needs of
the Jewish people. Sam Stept is chairman of the
building's CJA-IEF campaign.
HALLMARK: Sunday morning, at 10:30 a.m..
residents of Hallmark will gather in support of
the CJA-IEF campaign. The guest speaker is
Leah Harris, a campaign director of the United
Jewish Appeal. Building chairman for the event is
Sam Elkins.
QUADOMAIN: Quadomain residents wfll
meet Sunday at 11 a.m. to honor Morris and Faye
Hollander on behalf of the CJA-IEF and for their
generosity and diligent work for the Jewish
people. Jack Leffel is general chairman of the
event, cochairrnan is Joseph Ehrlkrh and co-
ordinating chairman is Samuel Koffler. Leah
Harris will speak.
ALLINGTON TOWERS: Residents 0f
AUington Towers will pay tribute to Jacob
Rosenblatt at their CJA-IEF brunch. Sunday
morning at 11 a.m. Guest speaker is Prof. B. Z.
Sobel and campaign chairmen are Charles Gold in
and Dr. Harry Newman. Cochairmen are Murray
Beck. Manuel Feldman. Samuel Goodman and Eli
Stiftel.
On Sunday morning, March 6, several other
buildings will demonstrate their support of the
multimillion-dollar fund-raising effort on behalf
of uvrlduide Jewry.
LAKE POINT TOWERS: Residents will
gather to honor Seymour Moses for a lifetime of
work on behalf of world Jewry. Brunch is slated
at 10 a.m. with guest speaker Henry Levy, former
European director of HIAS. The brunch will be at
the Newport Pub. North Miami Beach. Julian
Lewis is chairman and cochairrnan is Mildred
Willensky.
PLAZA TOWERS: Plaza Towers meets
Sunday at 11 a.m. to honor Mr. and Mrs. Leon
Lutzker and Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel Prouse.
Honorary chairmen are Mr. and Mrs. Nathan
Greenberg and general chairmen are Mr. and Mrs.
Maxwell Taraza.
SEA EDGE: Sea Edge residents will meet 11
a.m. Sunday at the Riviera Motel in Hallandale.
TRAFALGAR I AND II: Residents of
Trafalgar I and II will meet Sunday morning at
10:30 a.m. at Temple Beth El.
Belated American Conscience
Spurs Nazi Investigations
Friday, February 25, 1977
Volume 7
7 ADAR5737
Number 4
By NORMA A. OROVTTZ
The author of Wanted.' The
Search for .Van's in America
hopes, one day. to be an "im-
portant novelist.''
The author is 28 years old. But.
sometimes he feels like an old
man.
Howard Blum is that author,
and he appears to be an oasis of
calm and quiet honesty sur-
rounded by a desert of doubts
and accusations.
IT IS difficult to write about
Howard Blum and not touch
upon his work If it were not for
that work, this reporter would
not have had the opportunity to
meet and talk with him. Along
with lunch, our interview was
sandwiched between a radio
taping and another media ap-
pointment. Miami was No. 18 or
19 on a 28-city promotional tour
sponsored by Quadrangle. The
Xeu York Times book publishing
company.
When I arrived at the radio
studio to meet Blum, he was
outside, leaning against a lamp-
post, bee facing East to catch
the Miami Beach morning sun.
He looked so vulnerable, so com-
pletely intent on warming his
bones after a bitter winter junket,
that I was totally disarmed.
After all, my assignment was to
cover a hot-shot New York
reporter from The Times. So
much for P.R images.
BLUM IS a clean-cut, in-
telligent young man void of Big
Man-on-Campus symptoms. His
quiet assurance of his aptitudes
and achievements comes from an
honest self-appraisal.
He admits to lucking into the
whole subject of Nazis in
America. But. like most self-
motivated individuals, he made
his own motel after the initial
find. As a "stringer" I free-lancer)
for The New York Times, he
covered Brooklyn Queens /
Long Island stories.
Because of some pieces he
/rote, whkh were considered
front-page material, he was
moved to the Metro desk. It was
then, nearly four years back, in
1973. that Blum noticed a one
paragraph page 40 Associated
Press article relating to the Im-'
migration and Naturalization
Service and some pending Nazi
cases.
Blum thought that they might
lead to a series of investigative
reports.
HOWARD BLUM
HE MET with Anthony
DeVito, INS investigator, and
Dr. Charles Kremer, a New York
dentist who had fought a one-
man battle to bring charges
against alleged former Iron
Guard member Bishop Valerian
Trifa. He made one contact, then
another. What developed for
Blum were the makings of an all-
too-true adventure story and a
story too long for newspaper
articles. That is how Wanted!
The Search for Nazis In America
came to be.
Nearly four years, 700 inter-
views. Nazi files and meetings
with the alleged Nazis went into
the book that will soon become a
movie. (Frank Sinatra is con-
sidering the title role of DeVito.)
But Blum had more in mind
than just penning an adventure
story. He was angry. He still is
angry. For 25 years, he says,
people knew about Nazis in
America. And for the most part,
that knowledge did not matter to
people in high places.
HIS BOOK, he says, does not
just chornicle the past. In fact, he
barely touches upon Nazi
atrocities. Rather, Wanted! is a
diary of American inaction since
World War II. Blum wanted
Wanted! to "perform an
educative function to create an
atmosphere" for action. If his
proclaimed goal was "to spur
government on." then he has
already succeeded.
At nomination hearings. Atty.
Gen. Griffin Bell promised that
the Justice Department would
look into the INS. The General
vestigative arm of the Federal
government, will inquire into the
INS and possible CIA involve-
ment. Congressman Joshua Eil-
berg of Pennsylvania. Congress-
woman Elizabeth Holtzman of
Brooklyn and Sen. John Heinz of
Pennsylvania are actively
assessing the status of Nazi
cases
HOWARD BLUM b satisfied
that some new beginnings have
been made in dormant investi-
gations. DeVito, who quit the
INS in disgust t" follow through
on his own investigation-.
suspected an Odessa-type
organization infiltrating the is
government. Blum would rather
think of the Odessa as a
"metaphor" for the pervasive
attitude throughout government
He does not buy the idea of a
concrete super-organ directing
U.S. policy but he does suspect
the subversion of American laws
by too many individuals for too
many years.
Blum does not take his stand
as a screaming moralist, a stand
he would consider "dangerous,"
but as an American who sees his
country's laws subverted. Once
laws, already on the books, are
upheld, Blum sees a pathway for
moral behavior. Simple justice is
what he envisions, this young
man of the post-war baby boom.
Not vengeance, just justice.
BLUM WORRIES that if
American justice is not done in
the courts of law, fringe groups
may use vigilante tactics in an
effort to solve the Nazi problem,
as did the JDL in Chicago
recently. "If America is to be
different than Europe, official
organizations should act, not the
fringe groups." It was a turning
point of pure irony when Blum
finally met accused Nazi Andrija
Artukovic on a California beach.
The old man, living securely in
America, did not realize that
Blum was a reporter. Artukovic,
thinking Blum was an extremist
who had come to kill him,
screamed. "He was trembling. I
couldn't hold him there. In
America, he has to fee; fringe
groups but not our government."
Irony? Criminal, official irony.
Does Blum personify a belated
American conscience? He thinks
not.
BLUM BELIEVES that his
role in disclosing the cases
against four alleged Nazi figures
was played out as an in-
vestigative reporter following


Friday, February 26,1977
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
By ABe halpepn
Addenda: "What does
"Tosafot Yom Tov" signify?"
(ASK ABE, The Jewish
Floridian and S ho far, Jan. 28,
1977, p.ll).
Immediately upon publication
of the above column I received a
call from Ezerial Felsher (MRS.
I. BYRON) nee Schwartz, who
told me that she is a direct
maternal descendant of Rabty
Yom Tov Lipmann ben Nathan
Halevi Heller.
Subsequently I received some
additional information from Mrs.
Felsher not included in my an-
swer which I wish to share with
the readers of this column.
Mrs. Felsher told me a great
deal about Rabbi Yom Tov
Lipmann Heller from personal
family knowledge as well as from
numerous notes she has compiled
from various sources.
The family celebrated a sort of
Purim holiday on the first day of
the month of Adar.
her
Mrs. Felsher has
in
addition to Bibles and devotion
books, also volumes on homi-
letics and anthologies for days of
lamentation and days of
penitence. He also had two
scrolls, the M'gilath Esther for
Purim and the M'gilath Eiva
(Scroll of Suffering) by the scion
of the family, the illustrious
Rabbi Yom Tov Lipmann Heller,
commentator of the Mishna. The
second scroll was read on the
Tesofeth Yom Tov Purim, the
first of Adar."
Mrs. Felsher told me that while
the family celebrated this holiday
she does not remember the ob-
servance of the Fast.
Although Rabbi Yom Tov
Lipmann Heller is best known for
his commentary to the Mishna
known as Tosafot Yom Tov, he
wrote many other commentaries.
The M'gilath Eiva referred to by
Mr. Horwitz is one of his many
publications.
In writing this column I have
to take into consideration the
limitation of space. In resear-
ching questions I always have
much more material than I can
use. It is not possible to include
many details: I therefore have to
make choices. I appreciate very
much the information given to
me by Mrs. Felsher. I always
appreciate the comments which I
receive and I welcome any
questions which the readers
might have to further clarify
some of the facts which are
contained in my answers.
Because Mrs. Sidney Lerner of
Hillcrest who sent in the original
question also told me about a
family holiday known as Tosafot
Yom Tov Holiday, Mrs. Lerner
has communicated with Mrs.
Felsher to see if and how they are
related.
I always transliterate all
Hebrew words in the modern
Israeli S'fardit pronunciation.
Rabbi Heller's commentary on
the Mishna which I transliterated
as Tosafot Yom Tov (meaning
the additions or addenda of Yom
Tov) is pronounced in the
Ashkenazi either as Taysfes (or
Toisfes) Yom Tov.
Editor's note:
Please send questions to:
ASK ABE
c / o Jewish Federation of
South Broward
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
Salter Reelected to Chair
State Ombudsman Committee
Ben Salter, trust officer of the
First National Bank of Hallan-
dale, has been reelected as
chairman of Florida's State
Nursing Home Ombudsman
Committee. Gov. Rubin Askew
appointed Salter to this com-
mittee upon its formation a year
ago.
The State Nursing Home Om-
budsman Committee coordinates
and supervises the functioning of
the Ombudsman system which,
in addition to the State Com-
mittee, consists of eleven such
committees which cover the
eleven multi-county districts of
the Department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services. The Om-
budsman System was created by
the 1975 Legislative to receive
and resolve complaints about anv
state-licensed nursing home.
Salter was a prominent prac-
ticing attorney in Hollywood
The Chairmanship of the State
Ombudsman Committee
represents the most recent of
Salter's involvement in com-
BEN SALTER
munity affairs. He is a past
president and past campaign
chairman of the Jewish Feder-
ation of South Broward and is at
present a member of its board of
directors and its Executive Com-
mittee. He has also served as
president of Temple Beth Shalom
in Hollywood.
possession an old edition of the
Jewish Encyclopedia published
at the beginning of the twentieth
century in which the following
paragraph appears:
"Purim of Yom Tov Lipmann
Heller: Festival established by
Rabbi Yom Tov Lipmann Heller
in 1644 to be celebrated annually
bv his family on the first day of
Adar. In 1630 Heller had en-
joined on his family the ob-
servance on the fifth of Tammuz,
the day on which his troubles
began as a perpetual Fast Day
. but when fourteen years later
he was elected to the Rabbinate
of Cracow he established also the
Purim on the first of Adar" (vol.
10,p.283).
According to the authoritative
Encyclopaedia Judaica,
published in 1971, there are many
special Purims established and
observed.
"Following the Talmudic
injunction that one must recite a
special thanksgiving benediction
on returning to the place where
one was miraculously saved from
danger (Ber.54a) the custom
evolved for Jewish communities
or families to celebrate the an-
niversary of their escape from
destruction by reciting special
prayers, and with a ritual similar
to that of Purim" (vol. 13,
p. 1396).
Following this reference there
is a list of more than one hundred
special Purims for communities
and a list of eleven Family
Purims. Included in the list of
Family Purims is the following
slightly different version. "Heller
family of Prague observed on
first of Adar established 1629 by
head of family, Yom Tov Lip-
mann, Rabbi of Prague, saved
from death sentence" (ibid
pp.1399,1400).
Mrs. Felsher showed me an
article which appeared in the Mil-
waukee Wochenblatt, a weekly,
written by her mother's cousin,
the late Isadora S. Horwitz,
entitled My Heritage. Following
is an excerpt:
"My paternal grandfather, Reb
Hayim Dovid der Katzev, olov
h'shalom, never belonged to the
upper crust of his poverty
stricken town, Kapulie (Kopil),
White Russia. Yet he gave pro-
portionately very much to local
and outside institutions and
causes, befriended Jews and non-
Jews, was very hospitable and
was indeed a bibliophile.
"Wayfarers and ascetic
scholars were his welcomed
guests on Sabbath and on all
festive days.
"In his hum bonkraaa ware in
Much
More?
Just how much more is More, the 120mm
cigarette? Let's take a look.
More is longer. And bums slower.
That means there's more time to enjoy those
extra puffs of its smooth, mild taste.
More is styled leaner. And it's burnished brown.
That means it looks as good as it tastes.
More. It's like any really good cigarette.
And much more.
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Oeiermined
Thai Cigarette Smoking Is Oangerous to Your Health.
FIITER 21 nig !": lbmg income. MINIH01 21 mo 'i|-
16 mg mcotmt.av pti cigafeiit. FTC Ronon nfC 76


The Jewish Flohdia* a*d Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. February 25,1977
t
Anti-Semitic Incidents Hit Dania and Defray
Jew* Kiled Chne*
That was tike sign oc a track with Connecticut
Kaeaac plataa that parked tome tee dan
the strip along U-S. 1 in
'Decorators Row."
The posh colectioa of
piecjom
shock
THE SIGN caused shock wave after
wave of anger Soon, proprietors of the .
gathered outside to do verbal battle with the two
owners of the truck, two Black men.
;.- the -,'.'*.-,-.-. wmm. aval taaaott paawinj
back and forth, the "Jews Killed Christ" sign
somehow became embelhshed. Callers to The
Jeuith FUindian reported that there was another
sign on the track declaring. Sow KJ Jews." and
possibly even a third Black man involved
The Florida Regional Office of the Anti-
Defamauon League of B'nai B'rith is somewhat
skeptical about the second sign, but they are sure
of the first
-IN FACT." reports Arthur Teitelbaum.
director of the ADL Office, "we ve identified the
track."
One of the antique dealers is Howard Hirsch.
owner of the House of Hirsch. who is running for
office in Duma. He thinks the track, its vulgar
sign, and the Black men who picketed the area for
two days in a row were aU part of a plan to attack
DJB C3fl&OwUQ-
A shouting match developed between the
antique merchants and the picketers." Teitel-
baum told The Jtuxtk Flonatan. But there were
no arrests. The Blacks did not engage in any kind
of threatening activity. They didn't incite to
riot
IN THE ADL's view, the pohce of Dania "have
been very cooperative. Preaumabry, the Con-
necticut-licensed truck is now under national
surveillance.
The Dania incident occurred almost
simultaneously with a KKK-type cross-burning
at the construction site of the new Temple Emeth
in Delray Beach.
The burning was a typkal Klan venture, with
the cross wrapped in rags and string.
SAYS THE ADL: "Police there have also been
extremely responsible and mature, and are no*
guarding the construction site. In fact, the entire
community. Jewish and non-Jewish, is angry
about the occurrence."
There doesn't seem to be any relationship
between the two occurrences, and the ADL does
not believe that the Delray event presents a
threat to the Jewish community there.
Boston u. Will Close For Argentina to Halt Hate Material
High Holidays This Fall ByYirzHAKSHARciL
BOSTON (JTAi Boston
University will formally dose on
Roah Hoshana and Yom Kippur
in order to better accommodate
ks Jewish constituency In t
letter to Rabbi Joseph A. Polak.
director of the university's B'nai
B'rith Hulei Foundation. Dr.
John Silber. president of the uni-
versity, wrote:
I am pleased to be able to
advise you that for this coming
fall we have made an accom-
modation that will facilitate
celebration of Rosh Hoshana and
Yom Kippur by Jewish members
of the university community. I
believe that this is the first time
we have been able to treat these
days in the manner of in-
stitutional holidays, and I do
hope that this initiative will
provide an opportunity to you
and your community to welcome
Bruce Engleman has been
named public relations di-
rax tor fur the Jewish Feder-
ation of South Hroward,
I lolly u nod, according to
Donald //. Klein, executive
director Engleman, formerly
a public relatums coordinator
with the Federation of Jewish
Agencies of (Jreater Phila-
delphia, also served in public-
relations positions with Food
Fair Stores, Inc. and (Umbel
Brothers.
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
yfor tasty
Instant
---- IS
Seasoning
* Chicken, On ton, '
p'i'et.r Chip Dip
tmhmfHS/t fhw *a.s-
/ mil '*'. f
~HEB
appropriately the year 5738 and
observe the Day of Atonement on
the Tenth Day of Tiahri"
Polak pointed out that the
closing of the university was one
m a series of several moves made
by the university in recent years
out of greater awareness on its
part of its Jewish constituency,
on the one hand, and out of an
appreciation of the role of
Judaism in the Western cultural
heritage on the other. A little
over two years ago. Polak stated.
Dr. Nahum Glatzer, the scholar
of modern and ancient Judaism
was appointed a university
professor, together wkh two
other permanent Judaica ap-
pointments.
Last year. Dr. Gershom
Scholem. the historian of Jewish
mysticism, was a visiting pro-
fessor This year. Polak added,
the university has added to its
permanent faculty the prize-
winning author. Elie Wiesel. as
Mellon Professor of Religion.
Although there are no official
counts. Polak estimated that
more than a third of the uni-
versity's student body is Jewish.
TEL AVIV (JTA> -
An Argentine official af-
firmed that his government
intends to stop activities
that are considered inimical
to the coexistence of the
different communities in
that country.
Enrique Jorge Ros.
Argentina's Ambassador to
Israel, expressed this view
during a luncheon given by
the Israeli Executive of the
World Jewish Congress
when he was questioned
about the publication of
Nazi and anti-Semitic prop-
aganda in Argentina.
HE SAID the Argentine
authorities have taken strong
steps against the publishing firm
responsible for the publication of
this material, the postal
authorities have prohibited the
use of postal services for
distributing the publications and
the printing firms have been told
to stop printing the material.
4!
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_________WON UP NOW
Jorge Kos hailed the contribution
made by the Jewish community
to the economic and cultural
development of Argentina since
the days of the Jewish coloniza-
tion movement organized by
Baron Maurice de Hirsch more
than 100 years ago.
Referring to Israel-Argentine
relations, the envoy noted that
Israel has reached the 20th place
in the list of countries which
trade with Argentina.
SINCE A meeting last year in
New York between the Foreign
Ministers of both countries, the
door has been open to greater co-
operation. Mutual committees for
promoting cultural and scientific
cooperation were agreed upon
and their convention is expected
soon, he said.
These committees will decide
on an exchange ot scientists and
scientific knowledge as well as an
exchange of cultural delegations.
Jorge Ros called on the many
Argentine Jews who have settled
in Israel to be good-will ambas-
sadors for Argentina and to act
as a bridge for closer cooperation
between the two countries.
THE AMBASSADOR was ac-
companied by the first secretary,
Miss Marta Oliveros. and the
military attache. Col. Alberto
Omar Etchegorry.
Itzhak Koren, chairman of the
Israeli WJCongress Executive,
welcomed the guests and said
this was the first in a series of
meetings with ambassadors of
countries where the Jewish com-
munities are encountering
problems.
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Friday, February 25,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
Trying tO Fill the ReligioUS Gap- Declaration Commemorative Created
A Synagogue for Deaf-Mutes
By MINDY KLEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
William Cohn learned sign
language out of necessity.
Although he has perfectly normal
hearing and speech faculties,
both of his parents were deaf-
mutes. William learned quickly,
when he was hungry or thirsty, to
use his hands to communicate.
He learned how to speak after
he learned sign language "in
the streets."
Cohn, a retired delicatessen
owner from New York living i*
Margate, spends most of his time
now helping to bridge the com-
munications gap between deaf-
mutes and the orally articulate
world.
HE'S VOLUNTEERED
himself into a new job it seems,
translating in court litigation
involving deaf-mutes, working
with the Broward County Board
of Education and the Broward
County Association for the Deaf,
among others.
Putting his nearly fluent skills
to good use, he's presently affil-
iated with about a half-dozen deaf
organizations. "I'm so damn
busy now," he said.
His latest labor of love is not
working with an organization for
the deaf but starting one: a deaf
synagogue.
"I'm determined that there will
be a shut," he states, adding that
he was "shocked" at the absence
of such a facility in both Dade
and Broward Counties.
The deaf synagogue concept is
not novel. Many Jewish com-
munities in the United States
have one, including New York
City and Chicago.
Abe Cohen is a deaf-mute. He
lives in Margate and is over 70
years old. For 44 years Cohen
taught school for the deaf in
Providence, R.I. He's just com-
pleted a cross-country trip to
California and back in a camper.
Although Cohen was brought up
in an orphanage and was never
Bar Mitzvah, he did belong to a
congregation for the deaf in
Boston later on.
"The problem," said Cohen as
translated through Cohn, "is a
burning desire to observe Jewish
holidays, attend services during
the year and to partake in extra-
curricular activities. But we have
no place to go."
Many deaf-mutes do read lips,
but attending conventional
services poses problems because
"I the distance between the pulpit
and the synagogue's seats.
"They can't strain their eyes
trying to read a speaker's lips,"
in Hollywood, Fla.
offers
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ond
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Cohn explained, besides they're
"entitled to a social life of their
own."
"This group has to be an entity
!>y itself," Cohn continued. "I
an't see these men as part of a
lien's club (in a regular syna-
gogue) they would just be
tumps on a log."
Cohn and Cohen, with ob-
viously compatible goals, have
set out to accomplish them.
The two men have assembled a
list of 35 or 40 deaf-mute couples
who are interested in the
synagogue.
Cohn says he "hopes to for-
mulate more definite plans" at
he meeting and possibly set
>fficer elections. The major ob-
stacle to the group's realization is
a place to meet.
The potential synagogue mem-
bers are not wealthy enough to
build and support a synagogue so
the group needs to depend on the
generosity of the Jewish com-
munity, according to Cohn.
Cohn is hopeful that a
Hollywood temple will lend them
the use of a room so they would
be accessible to both Dade and
Broward Counties.
Despite the inevitable prob-
lems, Cohn has visualized a
number of programs he'd like to
incorporate. These would include
a Bible class for children, a Men's
Club, Sisterhood and a choir of
deaf-mute women using sign
language. The choir would be
"like a Hawaiian hula," Cohn
said, but they would "sing"
Cantorial music, Psalms and
modern songs.
Because of their mutual bonds,
"the deaf community is a very
close community, wherever they '
live, they know each other and
fraternize," Cohn said.
"It goes beyond Jews of
blacks," he continued, adding
that even a Catholic woman has
asked if she could attend services
because she feels the need to be
with others in her situation to
give her an opportunity to
communicate.
Some dedicated people are
striving to fill the religious void
of those who are deaf-mutes
and Jews.
"I just hope it will be suc-
cessful," summed up the feelings
of Abe Cohen, one who strongly
feels the lack.
NEW YORK (JTA) A commemorative has been created to
mark the sixtieth anniversary of the Balfour Declaration of 1917. This
event is memorialized by the Judaic Heritage Society in an historic
form combining a medallic sculpture of Chaim Weizmann, a facsimile
of the actual Declaration, and a type set of coins which played a part in
_ the daily life of Jews in Palestine before the birth of the State of Israel.
You con spend anywhere from a summer, to a semester, to a
year, .too lifetime: learning, experiencing, helping.
'rograms include ulpanim, archaelogical digs, kibbutz service, science
projects, university study, volunteer service for college graduates in
their profession, touring, and much more. .
[It's all available through Israel Youth Programs where we offer over 30
different programs.
Come to Israel. .soon.
ISRAEL
It's all
you
Israel Youth Programs
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Fl. 33137, 576-4000
am interested in information nhnnt
Name.
I
I Address.
I
Age ,
City.
-Slate.
.Zip.


Page 8
The Jewish Fioridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 25,1977
Belated American
Conscience
Continued from Page 4
through on a "good story" As an ,
American, the story "angered
him
He makes a point to share the
credit for awakening Americans
to the haven created for Nazis.
here at home. Ralph Blumenthal
of the Sew York Times, Bill
Clements of the Chicago Tribune,
Paul Meskil of the Sew York
Daily Sews, Bob Jones of the Los
Angeles Times and Charles Allen
of Jewish Currents have also
been responsible for figuratively
shaking Immigration lapels.
But it is Howard Blum who is
responsible for bringing Anthony
DeVito's story to the public.
DeVito's fight now must go
public and become our fight. Or
should we, thirty years and
eleven million victims later, say
"What difference does it make,
now?"
Luncheons Set For Beth El Sisterhood
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
El. Hollywood, will hold its
Donor Luncheon on Tuesday,
March 15 in the Regency Room of
the Diplomat Hotel. The Temple
office can provide further in-
formation.
The Sisterhood has- planned a
monthly luncheon meeting for
Tuesday, March 8, noon, in the
Tobin Auditorium of the Temple.
Paula Malamude will present a
book review on The Masada Plan
by Leonard Harris.
Mrs. Wolfe and Mrs. Sahm are
in charge of reservations.
Grand People Meet
The Holly brook organizations sponsored an
evening event to benefit the 1977 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
campaign of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward with the Beth Shalom singers
I-------------------Auxiliary Benefit
performing Israeli music. Pictured with the
choral group are (from left) Lester WeiL
chairman; Karen Margulies, CJA-IEF
Metropolitan Division cochairman; and Dr.
Alexander Goldenberg, cochairman.
The Grand People (seniors) of
Temple Solel were to meet on
Thursday. Feb. 24 in the social
hall of the temple.
On Feb. 5. two members of the
group. Jessie Clark and William
Wallace, celebrated their forth-
coming marriage with the Grand
People.
Leonard Simons is president
and Lillian Mandel is executive
director.
On Saturday evening. March 5.
the Hollywood Auxiliary of the
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged will hold
its annual benefit at the
Diplomat Hotel.
Mrs. Melvin Baer. auxiliary
president, stated that a S100 tax
deductible donation will entitle
the anticipated 300 guests to
enjoy dinner and a show starring
Anthony New ley and Chita
Rivera.
Auxiliary Members and the
general public may make
reservations by contacting Mrs.
Beckerman or Mrs. Baer.
r
|

More tourists are visiting
Skukuza
(Kruger National Park)
...and
Hluhluwe
(Home of the White Rhino)
...and
Table Mountain
(Cape Town)
...than ever before.
All these places are in
SOUTH AFRICA
"A world tour in one country.'
For information, contact:
Brotherhood Plans
Entertainment Eve
The Brotherhood of Temple
Beth El has planned an evening
of concert and entertainment
featuring pianist and vocalist
Chuck Lyons and Baron Buika,
comic violinist, on Wednesday.
March 9 at 8 p.m. in the Tobin
Auditorium of the Temple.
SPECIAL PASSOVER PACKAGE FOR
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South African Tourist Corporation
610 Fifth Avenue
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Tel (212) 245 3720
Fly South African Airways
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on Friday and Saturdays.
SQHi>
SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS
South African Airways
Milam Building
1100 Milam Street. Suite 1519
Houston. Texas 77002
Tel (713)658-0360.
The "Fun Ships" otter you more than
the usual Besides a choice ol desti
nations, they offer two different
departure days (The only weekly
Caribbean Cruise line that does')
The tss CARNIVALE departs on
Saturday for San Juan, St Maarten
and St Thomas Her sister ship, the
tss MARDI GRAS departs on Sunday
for Nassau, San Juan and St Thomas
(The only weekly fleet that docks at
every port no tendering1)
But, whichever day you choose,
you'll be setting out on a cruise vaca-
tion you'll talk about lor years Both
"Fun Ships" have a reputation lor
offering exciting destinations, lively
entertainment, "fun" things to do.
spacious accommodations, comfort
able lounges, full gambling casino.
and superb International and Amen
can cuisine of lavish proportions.
With two fantastic ships to choose
from, one departing on Saturday,
one departing on Sunday, you will
be hard pressed lor a decision
You probably never quite realized
what a difference a day makes
H
Weekly CARNIVALE Caribbean Cruiws. Saturday Departure. From Miami
t-or ban Juan. St. Thomas And St. Maarten
Weekly MARDI GRAS Caribbean Cru.. Sunday Departures From Miami
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Cruise "the Fun Ships"
Mai?l[(irrvs
$395 to $655
r*r person, double occupancy
plus port taxes
each 27, 250 gross tons registered in Panama
For further information or reservations see your travel agent
Carnival Cruise Lines, Miami, Florida 33132.
mi Ami, n.m.
For reservations.call American Express Travel Servii
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32 Miracle Mile 1351 Bucoyne Blvd 8523SW I36SI I735NE I
(305)446-3381 (305)3587350 (305)251 7454 1305,945 .runs
"PEN SATURDAYS QPf N SATURDAY
55ICHS]
A


Friday, February 25,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
IsraelIdeal for Warm Weather Vacations
While North America and
Europe are snowbound and
Ihiver in the icy winter storms,
list a few hours away in sunny
Israel the blue-green water laps
Lainst a beach of wonderful
Lhite sand glittering in the warm
lunshine. When people in Jeru-
lalem consider turning on the
Central heating, others only 15
.niles away put on their bathing
Jsuits to go floating in the Dead
feea. When chilly winds blow
through the Galilean hilltop of
safed, neighboring Tiberias lazes
(angorously in the sun.
For in Israel the climate
Changes dramatically within a
tadius of just a few miles. Warm
kummer sunshine is just arounfl
[he corner from the more wintry
treas in this wonderful land.
A'hat this means in a nutshell,
Israel offers a choice of winter
Resorts where rheumatism,
unning noses, and a host of
Jther winter ailments can be
exchanged for spring fever.
Tiberias on the Sea of Galilee
Coming down from Nazareth,
vhen another turn in the road
Suddenly opens up a magnificent
tista of the Sea of Galilee, every
traveler will recognize Tiberias at
it glance as a resort par ex-
cellence. He will immediately
picture himself depending on
his tastes swimming, water-
Bkiing, or boating in or on the
nirror-like lake. The subtropical
plantations reflecting the warm
sun will substantially contribute
|to make his stay in Israel a
elaxing vacation.
Today's Tiberias provides
most up-to-date facilities. The
[spring waters, which come out of
the ground at a temperature of
1110 degrees, are channeled into
Ian ultramodern bath house,
equipped with pools, private
baths, departments for mud pack
treatment, massage, hydro-
therapy and physiotherapy.
Treatment is given for such
ailments as rhematism, joint
inflammation, spinal and
muscular trouble, nervous dis-
turbances, sciatica paresis,
women's diseases, sterility and
respiratory defects.
Maximum temperatures in
January (the coldest month)
averages 69 degrees F. while the
lake water registers 64 degrees F.
In Tiberias you can pamper
yourself in deluxe (five star) or
lower class accommodations.
The "Dead Sea" Resort Area
The Dead Sea, located 1,200
feet below sea level, is not as dead
as its name implies. It is a
gigantic storehouse of minerals,
chemicals and healing waters
which have special properties for
restoring and regenerating life
and health. The mineral springs
at Zohar are beneficial for
rheumatism, degenerative joint
diseases and women's diseases.
The Zohar bath house is equipped
with pools, private baths, clinic,
massage and dressing rooms, and
a snack bar.
SINGLE LADIES
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Meet high type Jewish Individuals
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generally combined
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there is no dipping in
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springs are
with what
be called a
Except that
this sea, the
is ten times
water. Here
me can only float, which makes it
i kind of armchair sea for
fledgling swimmers. If you care
to have some refreshments while
bathing, the accoutrements will
float right along with you.
Eilat On The Red Sea
For more variation on the
theme, it's down south to Eilat,
the resort that has everything a
wintry heart yearns for. It's a
young playground drenched in
sunshine, blessed by one of the
most fantastic landscapes
contrived, by nature. Its white
houses nestle at the foot of
jagged mountain peaks, whose
colors change during the course
of the day from black to white to
mauve, blue, pink and purple. It
overlooks the bluest blue of the
Red Sea which blazes red at
sunset with the reflection of the
mountains.
The climate in this idyllic area
is always conducive to any ac-
tivity you may desire: sight-
seeing, swimming, skindiving,
tennis, boating or fishing, or just
plain relaxing on the beach or by
the pool of your hotel, or napping
in your room.
Its "Coral World" is the most
splendidly different resort area in
the Middle East so do add a visit
there on your itinerary for Israel.
It is an hour's flight from either
Jerusalem or Tel Aviv; about six
hours by land. If you are
traveling to Israel on a group
ticket, you can order flights to
Eilat at a special reduced rate,
"Add on Fare."
The latest addition to the
rapidly growing dynamic city of
Eilat is its newest attraction, the
underwater observatory and the
museum aquarium called "Coral
World." A spiral staircase of 42
iteps leads ,down to the ob-
lervatory, which stands 21 feet
oelow the surface of the water.
The observatory allows you to
see the vari-colored tropical fish
and coral in their natural setting.
Netany a
The Mediterranean Beach
Back to the Mediterranean,
Netanya, 19 miles north of Tel
Aviv on the Sharon Plain, is one
of Israel's finest resorts. Sur-
rounded by citrus groves, with
historical sites in close proximity,
it is a popular romping ground
for international travelers who
are attracted by the year-round
availability of surf, sand and sun
the perfect center for pleasure
and leisure.
Perched on the edge of land-
scaped cliffs, Netanya's beautiful
seaside promenade offers breath-
taking views of sunlit seas and
one of the finest beaches in the
country. Well manicured gardens
frame wide plazas and many of
che town's finest hotels. Autumn
land spring are especially
pleasant, combining a warm
limate with fresh clean air. Just
before spring, when the groves
are still laden with their last
golden fruit, the delicate scent of
citrus permeates the air.
A Vacation Bargain
Israel is one of the most
inexpensive places to visit, ac-
cording to a recently published,
survey by the London Financial
Times.
After compiling reports from
its correspondents in 50 key cities
throughout the world, the news-
paper found that a good average
hotel in Tel Aviv charges $26 a
day with breakfast. Only 16 other
cities had lower rates for com-
parable accommodations the
cheapest being in New Delhi at
I $15.50 and the most expensive in
Moscow at $49.85.
Restaurants in Israel were
even more of a bargain according
to the price survey, the Times'
correspondents found that dinner
in Tel Aviv costs an average of
$4.65 per person.
Israel Zuriel, Israel com-
missioner for Tourism, North
America, pointed out that the
above figures are indicative of the
trices in other parts of the
:ountry; and with the attractive
winter air fare (starting at $572
group fare for 10 days from
New York), a leisurely vacation
in Israel could be had at a very
reasonable price.
THERE IS NOTHING
THAT CAN BE SUBSTITUTED FOR
SEEING ISRAEL FOR YOURSELF"
Yitzhak Rabin, Prime Minister of Israel
"I don't believe that there is a better way
to express your feelings than to actually go
to Israel... .There is something special about
the Holy Land... .Those who go, come back
entirely different. They see something that
no words can describe."
So spoke Yitzhak Rabin, Prime Minister
of Israel, at the beginning of this Solidarity
Pilgrimage Year. Yet, what Rabin said is an
echo of what every person has felt who has
ever visited Israel. You know this.
If you don't you'll learn it at Pesach, when,
sitting at the Seder in Israel, every symbol
of this festival of freedom will take on
richness that almost aches.
You'll know the feeling when you join the
crowd and dance through the streets on
Purim or Independence Day.
You'll feel it on Shavuot, as the First
Fruits are paraded through the kibbutz
with so much bursting pride. And at the
Western Wall, where the ancient chanting
through the night seems to make centuries
melt away.
You'll know what "no words can de-
scribe" when you walk through the streets
of Israel at Sukkot, and find yourself sur-
rounded by beautiful Sukkot booths in
every yard and on every balcony.
You'll feel it at Chanukah, at the candle
lighting ceremony atop Mount Zion.
But you don't need a celebration to share
these experiences- Because every day of
Solidarity Year is a celebration of your
partnership with Israel.
And once you go and feel these things for
the first time, as many times as you return
will never be enough.
I
Contact your travel ajcent or
The Israel Government Tourist Ortu i
?95 I'eachticc St. NE


Page 10
The Jewish Fioridian and Shofar of Greater Hbllywood
Friday, February 25,1977
Hi-Rises Zero in on CJA-IEF
-


*"* 'v,ro/<^

vcars o/ ""
(io/dberg.

W^^W*^*- 1977 CJ^


Fat'-'
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TV-




t>ruary25,1977
The Jewish Floridian and ShofarofGreater Hollywood
Page 11
FLORIDAS NEW
STATE BIRD
IS SPREADING
ITS WINGS.
Introducing the only
nonstop jets to Tallahassee.
The state birds of Air Florida now give you the com
fort and convenience of three jets to Tallahassee
every business day, including the only nonstop.
With friendly, attractive hostesses to serve your
favorite beverage, or complimentary fresh Florida
orange and grapefruit juice, or freshly brewed cof-
fee On early and midmoming flights during the
week, we'll even serve complimentary champagne
and hot pastries And you get first class seating room
at less than coach prices
Lowest air fares in Florida.
Air Florida gives you the best travel values available
to all the cities we serve. To Tallahassee, for exam-
ple, our regular fare of $47 saves you $18, round-
trip, compared with any other airline Comparable
savings and the same luxurious service are yours on
all of Air Florida's frequent flights to major Florida
cities.
Jets to Tallahassee,
Jacksonville, Tampa, Orlando.
For reservations in Miami, call Air Florida at 592-
8010; statewide, 1-800-432-8505; or call your
Travel Agent.
Convenient Schedules
To Leave Arrive Fare Frequency Equip. From Leave Arrive Fare Frequency Equip.
Tallahassee 720 am 825 am $47 Mon. thru Fit Jt Tallahassee 8:15 am 10:10 am $47 Mon. thru Fri. JP
200 pm 4:00 pm $47 Mon. thru Fri. J 8:40 am 10:30 am $47 Mon. thru Fri. J
645 pm 8:40 pm $47 Mon. thru Fri. J 4:20 pm 6:15 pm $47 Mon. thru Fri. J
700 pm 8:20 pm $25 Sun JP+t 9:00 pm 10:10 pm $25 Mon thru Fri. J
Tampa 1110am 1200 pm $30 Mon. thai Fri. J Tampa ,. 920 am 10:10 am $30 Mon thru Fri. JP
5:00 pm 5:55 pm $30 Mon. thru Fri. JP 12:30 pm 120 pm $30 Mon thru Fri. J
8:15 pm 9:10 pm $15 Mon thru Fri. JP 6:15 pm 7:05 pm $30 Mon thru Fri. JP
11:00 am 1145 am $15 Sat. J 9:30 pm 1020 pm $15' Mon thru Fri. JP
1:30 pm 2 15 pm $15 Sat. J 12:15 pm 1:00 pm $15 Sat. 1
3:00 pm 345 pm $15 Sun. J 245 pm 3:30 pm $15 Sat.
8:30 pm 9:15 pm $15 Sun. J 4:15 pm 9:45 pm 5:00 pm 10:30 pm $15 $15 Sun. Sun. J J
Jacksonville 720 am 9:15 am $38 Mon thru Fri. J
2:00 pm 3:00 pm $38 Mon thru Fri. J Jacksonville 9:30 am 1030 am $38 Mon. thru Fri. J
6:45 pm 745 pm $38 Mon. thru Fri. J 515 pm 6:15 pm $38 Mon. thru Fri. J
8:00 pm 9:10 pm $20 Mon thru Thurs. JP 8:00 pm 10:10 pm $20 Mon thru Fri. J
8:15 am 9:15 am $20 Sat. J 9:30 am 1030 am $20 Sat. J
5:30 pm 6:30 pm $20 Sun. J 7:00 pm 8:00 pm $20 Sun. J
7:00 pm 9:25 pm $20 Sun JP
Orlando 11:20 am 1215 pm $15 Sat. JP

Orlando 10:00 am 600 pm 10:55 am 655 pm $15 $15 Sat Sun. JP JP 7:20 pm 810 pm $15 Sun. JP
727JH
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PWaurr tare* m cflecl all day Saturday Sunday and daily after 7 pm
*2-
AIR FLORIDA


Page 12
The Jewish Fhridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 25,1977
Back Room Boys Rigging Isabel's election day
HAIFA At the beginning of this month the
members of the Labor Party went to their private
polling places to choose the 3,000 delegates to the party
convention to be held on Feb. 22. The calling of the
national elections came so suddenly that there was no
time for the convention delegates to declare their
stands either on issues or candidates. Yet the con-
vention will have to make the decisions which will guide
the party in the national poll on May 17.
At least that is what everybody thought until
recently. The party leadership has now decided that nol
the convention, but the 601 -member Central Committee,
to be named by the convention, will in turn make the
decision whether Rabin or Peres or Abba Eban or
perhaps someone else will head the party ticket.
THE BACK room boys had come to the conclusion
that if the nomination came to the floor of the con-
vention, Shimon Peres stands a better chance of
winning support. In the smaller confines of the com-
mittee, dominated by the old-line politicians, Rabin's
chances would be better. Besides, decision between
competing candidates had never before been taken by
CarI aipeat
an entire convention, by any party in Israel. It's the
party bosses who make the decision.
The arguments against letting the convention decide
may sound far-fetched to those in the U.S. and
elsewhere who are accustomed to this form of open
democratic action. Said Meir Zarmi, Secretary-General
of the party: "I would not want a con flirt'like that to
shake the convention, nor that the 3,000 delegates
should be subjected to that trauma. It is our task to
preserve the unity of the party." _
NEVERTHELESS in the long run, it is the con-
vention which is sovereign, and if there is any serious
desire to challenge the control of the vested party of-
ficials, the 3,000 delegates could well overturn the
decision just made and take into their own hands the
naming of the candidate. Since the Labor Party u
today saddled with an image of corruption, mactionand
bureaucratic control, it could very well be that a
revolution by the rank and file of the convention is just
what is needed to give the party a fresh appeal to the
electorate at large.
There are secondary considerations as j*tell that go
into the making of the decision. The left-wing Mapam,
which commanded eight seats in the last Knesset, has-.
threatened that it will sever its alliance with Labor if
Peres is named party leader. That argument may
dampen some of the enthusiasm for Rabin's opponent.
PRIME MINISTER Allon, who of course is on the
Rabin team, now proposes that Labor adopt a plank
which would give the new Government, whoever from
Labor heads it, a mandate to proceed with negotiations
with the Arab states in the matter of the West Bank
without returning to ask public opinion. A vote for
Labor in May would presumably give approval to the
party stand in advance.
Jews In
non-Jewish
Social CIubs
i THE ISSUE of not admitting Jews as members of a number of
prestigious American social clubs has been relegated to a rear
position during the last 10 years by Jewish organizations standing
guard on equal rights for Jews. Some of the discriminating clubs
including university clubs have in the meantime begun to accept
Jews as members, while others are still stubbornly clinging to their
policy of keeping their doors closed to Jews. However, the issue as
such, lost much of its sharpness during the last decade.
NOW IT is coming back to the forefront. It has been brought
there by no other than the newly-appointed U.S. Atty. Gen. Griffin
Bell, who was recommended to this post a Cabinet post by
President Carter. He has now been confirmed by the Senate with a
75-21 vote. Mr. Bell, a prominent jurist and a long-time friend of
President Carter, has been a member of two exclusionary clubs in
his home-town Atlanta into which no Jew or Black is admitted.
National Jewish organizations are especially perturbed by the
fact that Mr. Bell declared that he is now giving up his membership
Boris SmolAR
in these discriminating clubs only temporarily for as long as he is
in the government in Washington.
HE INDICATED that when he leaves his Washington post and
returns to Atlanta, he will resume his membership in the clubs. His
statement provoked a good deal of criticism on the part of
American Jewish leaders. They interpret it to mean that the new
Attorney General believes that social clubs have a right to practice
racial and religious discrimination.
It is the obligation of an Attorney General to protect all
American citizens against discrimination based on racial, religious
or ethnic origin prejudices.
Leaders of the American Jewish Committee, American Jewish
Congress, Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith therefore feel
uneasy about Mr. Bell's implied intention to rejoin the two dis-
criminating clubs in Atlanta when he returns to civilian life.
THEIR ONLY hope is that Mr. Bell will, during his service in
Washington, realize that racial and religious discrimination in
American clubs no longer reflects the American spirit. By their
unequal treatment of Jews, the discriminating clubs relegate the
Jews to unequal citizens.
The argument of those who oppose admission of Jews into their
clubs is usually that Jews have their own prestigious clubs like
the Harmonie Club in New York, the Standard Club in Chicago,
and similar clubs in other cities and that in these clubs there are
no non-Jews as members. Why should Jews be ambitious to be
accepted as members in non-Jewish clubs where they are not
wanted? they ask.
THE ANSWER is that non-Jews have no interest to become
members in Jewish social clubs; if they wanted, they would have
been admitted, despite the fact that the Jewish clubs carry an
ethnical character.
The issue is not that Jews are not admitted in the exclusionary
clubs as individuals, but that the ban is practiced against Jews as a
civilization. The boards of the anti-Jewish clubs do not say "we
don't want this or the other individual Jew as a member."
What they say is "we don't want Jews in general." They place
the entire American Jewry in a different class than other American
citizens.
THE DANGER of their policy directed against American Jews
lies in the fact that it subconsciously develops among many in-
fluential Americans members of these clubs the feeling that
"Jews are different."
It implants negative sentiments with regard to Jews even among
club members who are not anti-Semites. When prominent Jewish
personalities industrialists, philanthropists, jurists, high
government officials, people who made great contributions to
science, literature and art are a-priori not accepted, it un-
dermines their status in the eyes of the important non-Jewish club
members who have a great influence on American life.
meaning op the ORtho&ox Life;
Susan panof f
THE AUTHOR of Wake Up, Wake Up, to Do
the Work of the Creator (Harper & Row, 210p.,
$8.95) explains in a uniquely simple, personal
way, the meaning of Orthodox life. William B.
Helmreich describes in detail his childhood: the
celebration of Jewish holidays and his teachers in
the Hebrew day school he attended. In short, he
portrays the all-encompassing religious system
which begins and ends the day.
Helmreich draws relationships to the secular
life. He justifies the Orthodox type of life and his
perceptions of the world as "an absolute necessity
for us to have survived the hostility and violence
of so many centuries." This specifically refers to
the Orthodox Jew's lack of social contact with
Gentiles.
UPON GRADUATION, Helmreich leaves his
day school for the grown-up world of the yeshiva.
But he does not attend an ordinary yeshiva.
While the author's day school had blended the
religious with the secular, the Gates of Israel
Yeshiva felt that such a synthesis in life was
impossible.
The Yeshiva's policy concerning the secular life
ran as follows: "the secular life insults and
degrades the holiness of the Jews' true purpose in
life. If a religious person compromises, then he is
by definition no longer religious."
200,000 TOURISTS
KNOW THE SECRET
Why it's never tee
early te book
an AJCongress Tour!
Why seeing Israel the AJCongress
way is more exciting and personal
Why visiting Europe, California or
the Orient with AJCongress becomes
a Jewish eventnot mere tourism
Why this above all is the year for
travel
Come and find ouf from
BETTY WIIR ALDIRSON
National Director, OVERSEAS PROGRAM,
American Jewish Congress
TIME: MARCH 104:00 P.M. or 8:00 P.M.
Address: HOLIDAY INN WEST 5100 N. State Rd. 7, Ft. Lauderdale
i""'l"'""" i ........ i ij
Mrs. Terry Feldman
! c/e AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS 4200 BISCAYNE BLVD., MIAMI, FLA. 33137
YpQ (') (We)_will be delighted to attend the discussion of the American
Jewish Congress Overseas Progrom
NAME___
ADDRESS.
CITY
.STATE.
ZIP
'TELEPHONE NO:.
LBBJjRB_______________________ssSJSLfSBSKLi
or CALL for RESERVATIONS
567-4330 (No Admission Charge)


|February25,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
ten fog Jifegfoh ame^
I "I'm joining. Rabbi, 'cause I only want to date
Jewish boys, observe the Jewish customs,
and learn the Talmud."
nedkins to Get Award
lorn Friends of Hebrew U.
flic Ilollywood-llallandalc Chapter of the American Friends of
Iclircw University will pay tribute (in Feb. 28 to Mr. and Mrs.
Iricdkinnf llallandale.
Iicy will lie presented with the Hebrew University's Torch of
Ini; Award, not only for their contributions U) the State of Israel,
in recognition of their devotion and dedication to all Jewish
(announcing the annual Associates' Dinner lieing held at the
|ai Country Club. Otto Stieber, president of the Hollywood-
9ale Chapter, and Moses llomstcin. chairman of the black tie
Kaid that Mrs. and Mrs. Morse Fpslein. Mrs. Meryl Kaufman
and \l ra Isaac Sherman will all be honored as founders of the
University and for their generosity and dedication to the
|l Israel.
illnn L. VVeinkle. mayor of the City of llallandale. will present
Is of the city to Otto Stieber. who has devoted his life to the
kf Israel, and to the education and training if its youth.
fierta Peters, Metropolitan Opera star, will be the guest
at this dinner, which will serve to raise scholarship funds for
.ml deserving students at the Hebrew University.
ingress Chapter (HJjfljffcSiSr
[lew Film Monday
American Jewish Con-
Holly dale Chapter will
i next meeting on Monday,
12:30 p.m. at Galahad
will be a film presen-
| "Rendezvous with Free-
from the W ABC-TV
program of that title.
tells the story of the
at ions of the Jews in
Narrators include Zero
| George Segal, Sam Jaffee
" i Kaplow.
rich flavor
7 vmfU*Ul: ctorry. tttmwhmiry. !<",
|;m. Mmtk ntmtty, m#Wnr. >
Chicag*
MM
[drmelnoshi
OIST. BY Ml GRADE FOODS
MIAMI. FLA.
PEMB80KE PINES VOTERS
ELECT
W. PHIL
McCONAOHEY
PEMBROKE PINES COUNCILMAN
VOTE MARCH 8th
"In Israel, in order to be a
realist, you must beliove
in Miracles'. .
lo Adv
David Ben Gurion
Paid for by Gail McConaghey, Treasurer
989-3091
Soviet Documentary Accuses
Activists of Zionist Conspiracy
A recent hour-long, nationwide
TV broadcast from Moscow
called "Traders of Souls,"
depicted Soviet Jewish activists
and refuseniks as "soldiers of
Zionism inside the Soviet
Union," and accused them of
being part of a "Western based
anti-Soviet conspiracy." The Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry (NCSJ) learned that the
"documentary" which dealt
heavily with the emigration of
Soviet Jews to Israel, took the
unprecedented step of naming
several activists and claiming
that they were involved in "sub-
versive" activities.
The broadcast depicted
Western writers, actors and
Nobel Prize laureates who have in
the past appealed to the Soviet
authorities on behalf of Soviet
Jews, as dupes of Zionist propa-
ganda. At the same time,
American and British
organizations helping Soviet
Jewry were stigmatized as agents
fli Jewish finance.
Long-term refusenik Vladimir
Slepak said that this broadcast
has incited anti-Semitism among
average Russians.
"Zionism," Slepak pointed out,
"is being used as 'cosmo-
politanism' and was used during
the Stalin purge period in the
early 1950s." Activist Anatoly
Sharansky said: "There is always
anti-Semitism among people in
this country and as a Jew you
learn to sense it. but now it is at a
higher level than normal.
Everyone in buses and subways
are discussing these films and
similar articles. It smells of a
pogrom."
The film is only one arm of thj
media recently utilized by Soviet
authorities. The latest issue of
the illustrated magazine
Ogonyok asserts that Adolf
Eichmann, the Nazi SS officer in
charge of rounding up Jews
during World War II. was kid-
napped by Israelis in Argentina
in 1960 to prevent him from
divulging pre-World War II
plans with the Zionists to set up a
pro-Nazi Zionist state.
Four Soviet Jewish activists,
Iosif Begun, Yuli Kosharovsky,
in addition to Slepak and
Sharansky, have filed a suit
charging insult against the tele-
vision network. A former Soviet
Jewish broadcaster told newsmen
in Rome of a second film called
"Secrets and Other Things,"
which suggests that the Jews
tried to kill Lenin, supported
Hitler's rise to power and juxta-
posed scenes of deprivation with
pictures of prominent Jews.
It seems that in preparation for
the upcoming Belgrade con-
ference in June on the fulfillment
of the Helsinki accords, the
USSR has prepared "an attack as
its best defense," said Soviet
Jewish scientist and refusenik
Benjamin Levich, who has been
waiting for an exit visa since
1973.
Cantors to Hold Concert
The annual Cantors Assembly Concert featuring prominent
Cantors of Greater Miami and Broward County will be held Sunday,
March 6 at 8 p.m. at Temple Sinai in Hollywood.
Proceeds to benefit the Scholarship Fund of the A embly in
training young men for the Cantorate.
Who has the
Fresh Kosher
Yellow Bird?
Empire, of course...
Look for the fresh Empire
Kosher Chicken with the
healthy yellow color and,
to be sure, look for this
red, white and blue metal
tag on each whole chicken
and on all chicken parts.
KOSHER
Empire
POULTRY
IKPI, U77
The Most Trusted Name in Kosher Poult r.
At better quality Kosher Butcher Shops, Food Stores and Dellys, Coast-to-Coast.
DISTRIBUTED BY:
AAENDELSONS', INC. 672-5800


Page 14
The Jewish Fioridian and Shofw of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 26,197/
SuBURBan Women Set tone fOR qa-ief With paRloR meetmqs
The suburban Division of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward's Women's
Division held a series of parlor meetings on
behalf of the 1977 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund campaign. Jo Ann
Katz, campaign vice president, said the
meetings were "an exciting coming together
of sophisticated young women who realize
the critical needs of the Israelis and Jews
worldwide."
Drazia Berman and Barbara Buchwald
were cochairmen of the series of meetings
and both agreed that unprecedented
amounts of money were raised on behalf of
the Jewish people. "We were able to
assemble a prestigious group of chic women
who realize how much the funds are needed
and were willing to make substantial
commitments," they said.
Toby Berman hosted the following women: (seated from left) Lynn Bial, Noreen Friedman and Joanne
Marks. Standing (from left) are Anne Fromberg, Ronni Van Geld'er, Toby Berman, Dory Distenfeld,
Noreen Shapiro, Janice Kapit and Linda Levin.
At the home of Anita Kashbaum committed women are (seated
from left) Kaye Schwartz, Louise Diamond and Abbe Klaits.
Standing (from left) are Anita Rashbaum, Marina Barron,
Daphna Weinstein, Helen Glassman and Barbara Rubin.
At the home of Ruth Rudensky are (from left) Rochelle Gordon, Paula
Platt, Cheri Rothschild, Helen Cohan. Ruth Rudensky, Rita Striarand
Eileen Schwartz.
At the Golden Surf are (from left) Bess Wisler, Pat Weiss, Rose Lubin, Freda
Rosen. Reba Schwartz, Gertrude Lazier. Mary Stander, Minna Wittner
AnabelleWeissbergandRhodaGrinberg.
At the home of Natalie Bluth are (seated
from left) Ruth Messer and Ilene Weisberg.
Standing (from left) are Nancy Pollack,
Audrey Meline, Toby Lipton, Susan Stone,
Sheila Kramer, Natalie Bluth and Marilyn
Kaplan.
k
Pledging support for the Israelis at Emerald
Hills are (from left) Ruth Gillman, Eleanor
Niederman, Edy Charlson, Sabina Sabin,
Irma Stein, Adele Levine and Jean Kruger.
Lakes women supporting the CJA-IEF
campaign are (from left) Brenda Greenman,
Harriet Blitz and Sylvia Abram.
At the home of Marion Wolfson (seated from
left) are Judy Hand, Wendy Benjamin,
Harriet Wellikoff and Marion Wolfson.
Standing (from left) are Cheryl Levin, Fran-'
Levin, Dee Gillon, Betty Kail and Arline
Ray.


Ly, February 25,1977
.'.
*Jeniti Flcrkiiati
i%'.\.
Page 15
osher Supervision Near,
To Serve Broward County
[ Morton Malavsky, rabbi
spiritual leader of Temple
Shalom of Hollywood has
junced the formation and
irporation of an organization
iroward County to be known
Broward Kosher Supervision,
or Broward Vaad
ashrut.
f"his organization will super-
vise and handle situations
pertaining to maintaining a high
standard of kosher supplies and
products for the consumption of
those who observe dietary laws.
Rabbi Avrom Drazin of
Temple Israel, Miramar,
named executive director.
was
Bonds to Honor Four Feb. 28
. Night in Israel on Monday,
J). 28, at 8 p.m., will take place
[the Beach Plaza Recreation
om under the auspices of the
tael Bond committees of Beacn
tza, Twelve Pillars and the
fistocrat.
.The committee planning the
lent is headed by Sidney E.
avis, chairman, and Arthur
Jaker. cochairman. Rabbi A.
Ban Steinbach is honorary
Liirman.
CANDLELIGHTING
TIME
I* 6:02
7 ADAR 5737
MM
,.,
bituarie0
IEHKRMAN, Nathan. 80. of Hallan-
dale, on l-'-h. 'J. Services in New York.
WSNICK, Hurry C. 80. of Hallandalo.
mi I.Ill :il Riverside.
|l: SKI. l/iiils B., 68, of Hollywood, on
Jan :.l l.evill
|KI\K. Harvey, SO. of Hollywood, on
I'.-ii i Interment Beth KI.LavUt
II.VKKMAN, ItiUh (neeKrenalofll. 72.
of Hollywood, on Keb. 7. Klverslde.
GRAY, Muriel, of Hallamtale. on Feb. 6.
I LPKItSTANDIQ, Harry. 73. of Hallun
dale, on Feb. 4 Cordon.
ItiKIUOY, Benjamin v.. 80. of Holly
wood, on Keb. Jl. Klverslde.
KKTHKIM, Murray. 79. of Hollywood.
on Feb. R, Levin
IKKINIIKKQ. Kenjamin. 6fi. of Hallun
Hale, on Feb. 10. Levitt.
H\\ WIT/.. Knianuel. 7ft. of 1'embroke
I'lues, or Feb. l" Riverside.
lAUnKSTY, Edward, 51, of Miramar.
l.i'Wtl
I'ASS. Lloyd K of Miramar. I.evttl
OltCKNSTBRN, Fannie, of Hallun
dale Levin
-:il'K\1 \V Myra.N..on Feb. 14.
teligious Directory
NORTH BROWARD
1MPLE BETH ORR. 7151 Riverside
Jnve. Reform (44).
IMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9104
I'lh St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
fimmerman. (44A)
MIRAMAR
JAEL TEMPLE. 4920 SW 3Sth St.
lonservative. Rabbi Avrom Drazin
lantor Abraham Kester. (41)
PEMBROKE PINES
APLE IN THE PINES. 9139 Taft St.
pnservative. Rabbi Sidney I. Lubin.
PLANTATION
STATION JEWISH CONGRE-
flON. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi
lldon J. Harr. (64;
3NSTRUCTIONIST SYNA
ICUE.74?3NW4thSt. (*)
HALLANDALE
1LAkDALE JEW|SH CENTER. 416
thrl Ave- Conservative. Cantor
pbDannger. (1J)
NORTH MIAM. BEACH
|l TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
f' NE nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
IP" P. Kings ley. Cantor Irving
'es. (J7)
HOLLYWOOD
AHM TEMPLE. 3)0 SW 62nd
conservative. Rabbi Max
aman. (47B)
TEMPLE '3*' S. Uth Ave.
?d ?^bbl Samuel Jaffe. At-
ni Rabbi Jonathan Won. (45)
SHALOM TEMPLE. 4*01 Arthur
vVJLlerV,,ive- R,bbi Morton
vsky. Cantor Irving Geld. (44)
.TEMPLE- "01 Johnson St.
ervaiive. R.bbi David Shapiro.
r Yehuda Meiloraun. (eS)
ra|T|M^Vl Jffi "rtdan St.
- Sebol Robert Praim. (47C)
IIshhi^V ?F HOLLYWOOO.
The Israel Solidarity Award
will be presented to Irving
Handler and Rabbi A. Alan
Steinbach of the Beach Plaza,
Mack Sepler of Twelve Pillars,
and Jerry Juran of the
Aristocrat.
Each of the honorees has been
a leader on behalf of South
Florida communal causes and
organizations and institutions in
their communities of origin.
Irving Handler is a past
chancellor commander of the
Knights of Pythias and a member
of the Board of Governors of the
Brooklyn Jewish Community
Council.
Mack Sepler is a past vice
president of the Jewish Con-
sumptive Relief Society in
Brooklyn, a past vice president of
he Jewish Convalescent Home in
Brooklyn, a past vice president of
the Coney Island Jewish Center
and served as chairman of the
Brooklyn Division of Bonds for
Israel Sportswear Division.
Jerry Juran is a past president
of the Haym Solomon Lodge of
B'nai B'rith and a past secretary
of the Free Sons of Israel Syna-
gogue of Brooklyn.
Rabbi Steinbach, author of
more than ten books and editor
emeritus of the Jewish Book
Annual, was the winner of the
Frank Weil Award for the
Advancement of Jewish Culture
in the United States. He is past
president of the New York Board
of Rabbis and past president of
the Brooklyn Board of Rabbis.
He is past president of the
Brooklyn Jewish Community
Council and is now rabbi
emeritus of Temple Ahavath
Shalom, Brooklyn, after serving
the congregation for more than
32 years.
The Vaad has received the
backing of the rabbis in Broward
County.
Rules are being set up to
govern the manner in which the
Vaad will operate. The Vaad will
not solicit business establish-
ments; the business establish-
ments must apply to the Vaad for
supervision.
Information on receiving
supervision may be obtained by
contacting Chairman Rabbi
Morton Malavsky or Supervising
Rabbi Avrom Drazin.
Activities Set At
Temple Sinai
Temple Sinai of Hollywood
would host a champagne cocktail
party in honor of Rabbi Shapiro's
birthday on Sunday, Feb. 27 in
the Haber Karp Hall at 7 p.m.
Entertainment will be provided
by the International Four.
On Sunday, March 6, the
fourth annual concert of the
Cantors Assembly, Southeast
Region, will be held at the
temple. The Cantors Institute of
the Jewish Theological Seminary
will benefit through these efforts.
On Monday, March 14, the
Temple Sisterhood will hold its
annual Scholarship Supper. Pro-
ceeds will benefit the children of
Temple Sinai to sponsor various
activities: trips to Israel, a USY
tour, or a convention.
The Sisterhood's Florida West
Coast Bus Trip is slated for
March 8, 9 and 10. Chairpersons
are Syd Sisholce and Malvina V.
Freeman, Sisterhood president.
Temple Sinai's Youth and
Education Committee is spon-
soring a Chuck Wagon Square
Dance for March 19 at 7:30 p.m.
in the Haber Karp Hall. A
catered dinner will be served. Ted
Anderson will be dance caller.
Bar Mitzvah
JOSH KAMERON
Josh Kameron, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Hy Kameron, will be called
to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday morning, Feb. 26 at
Temple Sinai of Hollywood.
"Der Yiddisher Mikado," Gilbert and Sullivan's operetta in
Yiddish, by the Delta Players, will be performed at South
Broward High School on Sunday, Feb. 27 at 8 p.m. More than
25 Jewish'organizations are endorsing this play and all
LaMer Bonds to Honor Gordons
Mr. and Mrs. Merrill Gordon,
active in the leadership of many
communal causes, both in South
Florida and in Detroit, Mich.,
have been named to receive the
David Ben-Gurion Award at a
"Night for Israel,'' Thursday,
March 10, it was announced by
Otto Stieber, chairman of the
event which will be held under
the auspices of the La Mer Israel
Bonds Committee.
Gordon is the pre-campaign
chairman of the Automotive and
Industrial Division of the Allied
Jewish Campaign: a trustee of
American Friends of the Hebrew
University; a patron of the
Founders Society of the Detroit
I nstitute of A rts and a member of
the National Patron Society of
the Jewish Theological Seminary
of America.
He is on the Board of Directors
of Congregation B'nai Moshe, a
member of the Detroit Chamber
of Commerce and the Michigan
Manufacturers Association. He
has been recognized by the
Jewish Federation of Florida
with an Award of Honor and by
the Women's American ORT
with a Golden Circle Award" in
appreciation for a classroom
donated to an ORT school' in
France."
He has received the Century
Isle of Paradise Night
in Israel Set
Julius Adler has been named to
receive the Israel Solidarity
Award at the Isle of Paradise
Night in Israel set for Thursday,
March 10. 8 p.m. in the Recre-
ation Room, it was announced by
Samuel J. Bernstein, chairman,
and M. I. ",Doc" Robins,
cochairman.
The event, sponsored by the
Isle of Paradise Israel Bond
Committee, will feature Larry
Dorn, American Jewish folk
humorist, in a program of en-
tertainment.
Adler, a production engineer
with various American electronic
firms, helped to set up an elec-
tronic manufacturing facility at
Kibbutz Yad Mordechai in Israel.
He served as cochairman of the
Isle of Paradise drives for the
past three years.
MR. AND MRS.
MERRILL GORDON
Club Award from B'nai B'rith
and a citation of merit from the
Disabled American Veterans. He
also is the donor of an athletic
room at the new Jewish Com-
munity Center in West Bloom-
field, Mich.
Gordon has visited Israel
several times. He has recently
been appointed the general chair-
man of Greater Metropolitan
Detroit State of Israel Bonds.
Recently, he held the volunteer
post of chairman of the Com-
merce and Industry Division of
State of Israel Bonds and is a
founder member of the Israel
Bond Prime Minister's Club, an
honorary society of top level
participants, sponsored by
Israel's Prime Minister. He has
recently become a member of the
Israel Bond Century Club which
requires a minimum $100,000
purchase to qualify.
S. S. St. Louis j
1939
I Were you or someone close to you a I
passenger on the ill fated voyage of I
the SI Louis? If so, please call Bruce I
IEngleman. 921 8810. Jewish Feder
at ion of South Broward.
IEVITT
memorial chapels
it2i Pembroke Rd.
Hollywood, Fla.
5I4-M97
Sonny Levitt, F.D.
1335 W. Dixie Hwv.
North Miami, Fla.
94 9 4315
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOO, FLORIDA
Vempte 3etki
Wemotiat
(jatdeit*
The all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beau-
tifully landscaped, perpetual care, rea-
sonably priced.
For information call: 9204225 or writ*:
"HmI^BEtTVeL "~~ ~ /?&$&
1351 S. Uth AVE.-HOLLYWOOO. FLORIDA 33020
Masse atad me literature on the above.
NAME*________________________________________
PHONE:


Page 16
The Jewish Fioridian and Shofar of Greater HdUywood
Friday, February 25. ij
STARfYOURSET NOW!
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Frozen Food bargains
PANTRY PRIDE FROZEN Ml)"DveG FRENCH GREEN BEANS
PC AS I CARROTS
Kooblcr CookI
eFrench Vanilla
Pitter Patter
Choc. Fudge
Sandwich
Vegetables
FROZEN .CMfESI .SAUSAGE PCPPERONI
'U1 I."1I SAUSAOI PEPPERONI
Jeno's Pizza 89
USDA CHOICE BEEF LOIN
Sirloin
Steaks
WESTERN
CORN
FED
ASK
UNM;
USDAi
MOjCE
Lots of Chicken
EACH PACIAGI CONTAINS
J IIIAST QtlS W iACS J HO OTIS W IACKS
3 WINGS ] NICKS 1 Oilili PKGS
USDA CHOICE WESTERN CORN FED
Beef Rib
Steak
FIA. OR SHIPPED
PREMIUM FRESH
SMALL
END
BONELESS
TV
USDA CHOICE (EfF CHUCK
Blade Steaks
WESTERN Oifst
CORN FED|V^^V
USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK
Blade Roast
IB.
79
Beef Chuck
99*
Sliced Beef Liver
our Service Appetizers
59* Pot Roast I *1"
HEBREW NATIONAL
Kosher Salami or Bologna V 99
HUT leKMI* IABM
White Fish
..... S 1 39
KM | AIL WWII MJA I
Chicken Roll
89
Seafood bargains
AOiiA JtWlLS 'tOUM 't-JC
Fish Portions ZAU" Perch Fillets
MSMM UStlil JUS* IOMii is fOOIlM
iei %% 29
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c nOiMftM
uni i Fionn
sea itu icna..,.. ._ -_
Fish Sticks________ii". 89* Fancy Smelts.
1
Baked goods---------
PANTRY PRIDE FRESH
Hamburger or% c*i
Hot Dog Rolls O I
PAHflT PMM ) HO >UKI
White Bread 3 5.J *I
AMI OIM till! aMOIW Mil Maa
Meal Bread jfif 59*
AMTI t PMM toul 0OUOH OR
NATlHAl OAAM OR kurlis plain
Enjlish j Q"7c
Muffins O O/
tl-OZ CAN
couw Lysd Spray
c?oV-. Disinfectant
\ COUPON GOOD tMPW IAT HI M*
SHOP
PANTRY PRIDE
FOR THE
Bill IN
FOOD STAMP
VAlUli
IA-OI PRO. aii A"n |
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COUPON OOOO MOV IAI NAJkA /
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