The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00159

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
Uemst? Florid fan
>e
Number 26
**d fcofor o# Proof or Hollywood
Hollywood, Florida Friday, December 3,1976
I Fred K. Shochet- Friday, Dtc. a, 1*74 .Price 25 cents
Rabbi Zelig Chinitz to Address Shomrai Dinner
ig Chinitz, resident
ive of the United
al, will keynote the
irai Dinner at the
Country Club. Spon-
e Jewish Federation of
ard as part of its 1977
Jewish Appeal-Israel
Fund campaign, the
[is expected to attract
ndred South Broward
assuming his present
Israel, Rabbi Chinitz
[director of Special Ser-
the United Jewish
|e is the former spiritual
the Utopia Jewish
>ng Island. N.Y.
fed as Chaplain in the
luring the Korean War.
rse of his tour of duty,
i only Jewish Air Force
1 in Japan and Korea,
id responsibility for all
ivities in that area.
Prior to his service in the
Armed Forces, he made an ex-
tensive tour of Israel, which
brought him into every corner of
the Jewish State.
A graduate of Yeshiva
University, Rabbi Chinitz earned
his Master's Degree from Colum-
bia University. He also served on
the staff of Queens College in the
Department of Contemporary
Civilization.
Pollack to Keynote Soviet Jewry Plea
RABBI ZELIG CHINITZ
Prof. Allen Pollack, an
authority on Soviet Jewry, will
keynote the "Soviet Solidarity
Day Plea on Behalf of Soviet
Jewry," Sunday, Dec. 12, begin-
ning at 7:30 p.m. at Hollywood's
Temple Solel.
Open to the entire community,
the Plea is sponsored by the
Community Relations Committee
of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward. Composed of 30 con-
stituent community organiza-
tions and agencies, the CRC
formulates policies and conducts
programs of community action
on issues of Jewish concern
affecting Israel, Soviet Jewry
and Jews locally.
The convening organization for
this year's Plea is the Aviva
Chapter of B'nai B'rith Women.
POLLACK
Barbara Stein, National Affairs
chairman, is coordinating details
for the program.
"We look forward to a total
response by our community. A
plea on behalf of human rights
affects all peoples throughout the
world. Prof. Pollack, a member of
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry as well as numerous
other organizations concerned
with Jewish life throughout the
world, is an articulate and
knowledgable speaker. He will
present an exhilarating and edu-
cational program for our com-
munity," Mrs. Stein said.
"It is up to all of us,
throughout the free world, to join
in the struggle being waged by
Jews in the Soviet Union. They
need our support and, through
pleas such as this which are
held throughout the United
States they learn that we care
and are doing everything we can
to assure that freedom of choice
will, one day, be a reality for all
people," she concluded.
\urba is the Latest
\tim of Gen, Brown Dr. K. Bewildered by Fuss;
'Was Our View All Along'
INGTON (JTA) The chief civilian in-
specialist on Middle East affairs for the U.S.
e who "as a matter of conscience" had publicly
Gen. George S. Brown's views on Israel is out of
Brown is not about to help him get it back.
Churba, a former banking and newspapers insists
on his pound of flesh, and now he
has it."
The JTA asked Brown's media
assistant, Navy Capt. Sid
Wright, whether Brown had been
involved in any way in the
Churba case and whether he
would forgive Churba for his
criticism.
professor who
with the Air Force
than eight years,
Nov. 11, the day
laj. Gen. George
Air Force intel-
1 chief to whom he
special assistant,
him of access to
pee information
fc his criticism of
Birman of the Joint
Staff.
[SEF.MS a double-
applies to my case,"
bold the Jewish Tele-
hAgency "Gen. Brown
Wen three times for out-
Somments (about Israel
Merican Jews), but he
i | does not exhibit the
jcai generosity when a
officer such as myself
a matter of conscience.
Ku the authority on
WRIGHT LATER said he
"posed the questions" to Brown
and had two remarks: Brown had
"no involvement whatsoever"
and he had "no other comments
on any aspect" of the case.
Earlier, Maj. Mike Burch of
the Pentagon's public affairs
office told the JTA that "no one
asked for his resignation" and
that a paper Churba had written
last summer that saw U.S.
elements tilting toward the
Arabs against Israel could be
released by Churba provided it
disclaimed connection with of-
Continued on Pane 8
Irtet Authorities Release
Tfwo Jewish Activists
BW YORK (JTA) Soviet authorities have unex-
released two Jewish activists who were facing prison
r up to five years for their part in demonstrations by
Jews last month to demand to know why they have
Anied exit visas.
t>ris Chernobilsky and Dr. Iosif Ahs, who were to stand
ortry on charges of "malicious hooliganism, were told
et authorities that they were being freed because it was
st offense and because both are family men.
IE NATIONAL Conference on Soviet Jewry called the
unprecedented" and reported that it was "greeted with
sent by other Jewish activists who said they could not
uoer a previous incident where criminal charges did not
tely result in conviction and imprisonment.
According to the NCSJ. veteran MtMrt Vbdtafr&?*
futed the Soviet action to pressure from the United States.
4CSJ chairman Eugene Gold said the release was
A and added. "We are glad the Soviet authorities
the unwarranted charges-
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger said
that the U.S. approved the
censure of Israel's policies
in the occupied Arab ter-
ritories because it reflects
America's position since
the Six-Day War and be-
cause of pending develop-
ments at the United
Nations.
He expressed support of the
Security Council's consensus
statement, adopted unanimously
last week, in response to a ques-
tion from a delegate to the 22nd
annual North Atlantic Assembly
in Williamsburg, Va., where he
had just given an address in sup-
port of NATO.
KISSINGER was asked about
the "cynical" belief that the U.S.
vote might have been different if
the censure had come up before
the Nov. 2 Presidential elections.
He replied, "That belief is totally
incorrect."
He added that the U.S. had to
take into consideration the
United Nations Disengagement
Observer Force (UNDOF)
mandate on the Golan Heights
which expires Nov. 30 and the
general debate on the Palestinian
question in the General
Assembly.
"If we were to contribute to
peace in the Middle East, we
must be prepared to take into
account the views of all parties,"
Kissinger said.
THE CONSENSUS state-
ment, he continued, "sharply
reflects" statements the U.S.
itself has made over the past 10
years since the 1967 war. He
said the censure did not reflect a
change in U.S. policy, observing
that "we felt we had an obli-
gation to go along with the
consensus."
Kissinger also pointed out that
the U.S. has cast seven vetoes of
Security Council resolutions on
Mideast issues alone. He noted
that this is a period of "great un-
Continued on Page 10
Soviet Underground Art Exhibit
Opens at Miami Beach
An exhibition of smuggled
Soviet Underground Art,
"Twelve from the Soviet
Underground," will open at the
Lowe-Levinson Art Gallery on
Nov. 28, under the auspices of
Temple Beth Sholom and South
Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
"Twelve from the Soviet
Underground," opened at the
Lowe-Levinson Art Gallery on
Nov. 28 and will continue
through Dec. 10, under the
auspices of Temple Beth Sholom
and South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry.
All of the artists are graduates
of art schools in the USSR but
have been denied persmission of
the Artists Union (and therefore
the right to declare art as their
profession) because they applied
for visas to emigrate to Israel.
The exhibit is currently
touring the United States and
Canada.
Temple Sinai Library
Dedication Scheduled
The Hyman Hornstein Library
and Learning Center will be dedi-
cated on Sunday, Dec. 19 at
Temple Sinai, according to
Joseph Kleiman, temple
president.
"A gift from one of our
members, Mr. Moees Hornestein,
in memory of his father, has
enabled us to serve not only the
expanding needs of our own
members but of others in the
community. Open to all, this new
library will enlarge the vision of
Judaism for all South Broward
residents," said Kleiman.
"We deeply appreciate this
generous and humanitarian gift
from Mr. Hornstein, who is a
member of the Board of Gover-
nors of our Temple. Mr. Horn-
stein has always considered edu-
cation a primary factor in Jewish
life, and the addition of this
extensive Judaica library will
make education an even more
important element of all our
lives," continued Kleiman.
A year's planning and research
resulted in the opening of the
library, which will contain some
3,000 books to begin with.
Besides a complete reference and
resource center, the library will
also contain an audio-visual
department, with tapes, cassettes
and film strips.
The planning committee, co-
chaired by Jeanne Waldorf and
Barbara Stein, also includes
Lillian Gold, Irving London,
Melvin Waldorf, Marcy Kameron
and Roslyn Seidel. Members M
the committee met with li-
brarians throughout South
Florida in order to ascertain what
would best meet the needs of the
South Broward community.
Committee members also
worked with the Association of
Jewish Libraries to obtain advice
and guidance. Several excellent
Continued on Page 7


I
Pag*2
The Jewish Florithan gad Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, December 3,1979
Two Receive Young Leaders Award at G
Two South Broward
women Mrs. Helen Cohan and
Mrs. Elaine Pittellwere among
120 recipients of Young Leaders
Award presented at the recent
General Assembly in Phildelphia.
"Twenty/years ago. the first
Young Leadership Award was
established in Montreal. It was
Elaine Pittell, a recipient of
the June Gordon Young
Women's Leadership Award,
is a member of the Women's
Division Board of Directors of
the Jewish Federation of
South Broward. She is the
chairman of. the Soviet Jewry
Committee and was recently
appointed as a member of the
National Committee for
Soviet Jewry. Mrs. Pittell is
also a life member of Hadas-
sah and a member of the Na-
tional Council of Jewish
Women.
Chanukah Party Set
For Sisterhood Meet
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Shalom will hold its annual paid-
up membership general meeting
on Monday, Dec. 6 at 8 p.m. in
the Grand Ballroom of the
temple.
The program for the evening
will be a Chanukah Party, a
"Festival of Lights,'' presented
by Temple youth.
Refreshments will be served
and Chanukah gifts will be on
sale before and after the meeting.
Guests are welcome to attend the
festivities.
Mrs. Spencer Schoem is pro-
gram vice president; Mrs. Marie
Portnoy is Sisterhood president.
All in the family .
That's what it was when we
incorrectly printed the wrong
photo in our last issue. Named
to the Allocations Overview
Committee of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward
was Ben Salter, who is Policies
subcommittee chairman.
However, a photo of his
brother, Abe, was utilized. Our
apologies to both!
recognized even them that a
generation of Jewish leadership
would soon be passing from the
scene and that other men and
women would have to accept the
mantle of responsibility," said
Lewis. E. Cohn. president of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
"New leadership trained,
committeed, better equipped to
meet challenges that were
ahead was needed.
"The Young Leadership
Award was concrete testimony
that the North American Jewish
community was acting to ensure
its continuity. It was recognition
that Young Leadership was an
important community priority
whose development has to be
encouraged.
"Since 1956, there have been
1,183 award winners. Winners
this year both men and
women have already demon-
strated a high degree of com-
munal involvement which calls
for them to be singled out for
local and national recognition,"
Cohn concluded.
Tikvah Program To Begin Dec. 3
The Tikvah Program, which
helps provide a Jewish education
to the residents of Sunland
Training Center, will begin this
year's activities by joining in
worship with Congregation B'nai
Raphael on Friday. Dec. 3 at 8:15
p.m.
The Intermediate Group
USY will conduct the services.
of
Sunland Training Center is a
residential developmental center
which services approximately 585
retarded persons.
The program is made possible
by donations from the com-
munity at large and is currently
under the direction of Rabbi Sey-
mour Friedman, United Syna-
gogue of America. Estelle
Slomovitz is acting coordinator.
Helen Cohan, member of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward Women Division's Board of Directors, is seen after she
received the Hy and Belle Schlafer Young Leaders Award from
Alan Marcuvitz, chairman of the Leadership Development
Committee of the Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare
Funds. An active member of the JFSB's Leadership Develop-
ment Program, she is also a member of the National Council of
Jewish Women.
7
pie who
Asymboiofapeoi
will not die.
Not even in death.
i
Yahrzeit is the Jewish ritual observed
upon the anniversary of the death of a parent
or close relative.
A candle is lit and burns for twenty four
hours in the home of the family. As it burns, a
'son or daughter of Israel is remembered and
loved. And the Faith and the destiny of the
Jewish people becomes unforgetable.
Each time a Yahrzeit candle is lit, it is the
fulfillment of God's promise to Abraham. An
assurance of new generations for all time.
For the flame is eternal. It symbolizes
Jews as a people who will not die. Not even
in death.
HOLLYWOOD: 2230 Hollywood Boulevard
Other Hollywood location MO I Hollywood Boulevard
920-1010
SUNRISE: 1171 Northwest 61stAvenue (Sunset Strip)/
584 6060
North Miami Beach,Miami Beach and Miami,
five chapels serving the New York City Metropolitan area
H Riverside
Memorial Chapel.Inc /Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
H U-J-74 >
H--- 1
H -II j H


Friday. December 3,1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofdr of Greater Hollywood
Paw>3
^
I
OUR
R6A66RS
WRIte
"Let Thy Words Be Brief"'
Koheleth (Eoclesiastes)
,
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Two hundred years ago a band
of idealistic, concerned colonists
wrote the now immortal Dec-
laration of Independence. The
document has inspired the
citizens of many a nation to
undertake the responsibility of
bringing about a change in their
own government.
We were an agrarian com-
munity in 1776. The respon-
sibilities of the new nation were
to defend its rights to exist and
to create a climate of approval
amongst the colonists that would
permit waging a successful war
against the mother country.
As early as our public school
years we were taught what had
occurred in the War of Inde-
pendence. We learned of the great
sacrifices which were made so
that this infant nation might
survive.
Out of the war came a new
Constitution and a Hill of Rights.
We are the beneficiaries of
freedoms which are known to few
peoples on this planet. The least
of us may rise to his or her poten-
tial, irrespective of the economic
background of one's family. We
have a freedom of religion which
permits each inhabitant of this
land to exercise his privilege of
prayer or of non-prayer.
As we celebrate this great
anniversary, let us reflect on the
influence that members of the
Jewish faith had on our land. The
majority of the signers of the
original Declaration of Inde-
pendence were able to read the
Old Testament in the Hebrew
language. Much of what is set
forth in this magnificent in-
strument and the Bill of Rights
can be traced to the Old Testa-
ment. "Proclaim liberty unto all
the inhabitants of the land" from
the Book of Leviticus is inscribed
on the Liberty Bell in
Philadelphia.
Over these many years since
1654. members of the Jewish
faith have made their con-
tribution to their land. They
fought in all the wars. They con-
tributed to the cultural and
scientific advancement of our
country. They achieved the
highest honors in government,
education and the judiciary. They
have made of philanthropy a part
of the life of America.
May each of us, in his or her
humble fashion, play a role in the
third century of this land with
dignity and integrity.
LEO KLAUBER
Hollywood, Fla.
i
EDITOR. The Jewish Floridian:
If you remember what I wrote
in your paper many years ago,
the PLO. the HPLO, will first
try, and must destroy Israel as a
country, then conquer Syria,
Lebanon, Jordan, Saudi Arabia.
Kuwait. Egypt and Iraq The last
will be Iran, by George Habash
(Popular Front for the Liberation
of Palestine). Yaair Arafat will be
thrown out after all his blood-
thirsty murders.
I deplore the killing of 45,000
innocent Christians and
Muslims, but this war is not over,
even though there is a peace for a
week or a month or so. This is an
Islamic war against Lebanon's
Christians and Muslim Leftists,
against the rich Muslims.
The Christians in Lebanon
know all too well that victory for
Arafat and Habash means the
end of Lebanon as a solid
country. They, the Lebanese
people, will become second-class
citizens.
When King Hussein of Jordan
fought the PLO and HPLO many
years ago and won the battles on
the battlefields, he knew if he
failed, that would be his last day,
"dead or alive."
Lebanon was much weaker
than Jordan and all the
"refugees" from all the Middle
East came to Lebanon to get free
help and money from UNWRA,
which is 100 percent American
monies.
Now, let us see why Syria is
fighting and losing soldiers and
ammunition because Syria
wants to be the major force in the
Middle East. She will first get
Lebanon, Israel, Saudi Arabia,
Iraq, Egypt, Kuwait, and last,
Iran. This is the way they all
dream for a Muslim world in
peace.
If all this is correct, the Left-
ists, supported by the Soviet
Union, will be the winners of all
the bloodshed transactions in the
Middle East, with not even one
Soviet soldier killed.
Edward A. Dincin
Hallandale, Ha.
Beth Shalom
Arts Exhibit
Set, Dec. 4
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Shalom will hold its Eighth
Annual Arts Festival Exhibition
and Auction on Saturday. Dec. 4
at 8:30 p.m. Admission is free to
the general public.
A preliminary showing of these
works of art will take place at the
Temple on Friday. Dec. 3 from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Saturday.
Dec. 4 from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
prior to the auction.
GA Delegates Act on 11 Key Policy Issues
Resolutions determining
Federations' policy positions on
11 major issues of concern to
North American Jewry were
presented for consideration by
community delegates when they
met in Phildelphia for the 45th
General Assembly of the Council
of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds.
Delegates to the General
Assembly acted on resolutions
calling for action on:
The Middle East Peace-
Making Efforts, to secure
commitments of support for
Israel by the United States and
Canada.
U.S. Aid to Israel, for
economic and military resources
to deter Arab aggression and to
aid in housing and social services.
Arab Economic Warfare, to
specify legislation for enactment
by the U.S. and Canada to
combat Arab economic warfare,
especially boycotts of Israel and
against North American Jews.
Jews in the Soviet Union, to
press for emigration for all who
wish to leave, with full rights to
live as Jews for those choosing to
remain.
Resettlement of Soviet Jews
in the US. and Canada, for their
absorption in as many cities as
possible, with larger cities
assisting smaller communities,
and the development of more
uniform assistance standards
under the aegis of local
Federations.
Syrian Jews, to press for
moves to secure their human
rights, including the right to
emigrate.
Unemployment and Welfare,
for more comprehensive
programs for employment op-
portunities and to bolster
unemployment and welfare
compensation.
Block Grant proposals, to
prevent reduction of health, child
nutrition and social services by
Federal grant levels and
arrangements.
Housing for the Elderly, to
expand Federal funding of vitally
needed housing programs for the
aged.
Government Voluntary
Relations, the crucial role of
Federations and voluntary
agencies in shaping and im-
plementing sound public social
policy.
1977 Campaigns, in iden-
tifying and implementing basic
techniques for maximum cam-
paign achievements by com-
munity Federations.
A Patron's Buffet Dinner will
be served starting at 7 p.m. on
Dec. 4. For patron's reservations
contact Mrs. Fred Blumenthal or
Mrs. Bradley Buschel.
Working on the Arts Festival
Committee with Mrs. Buschel
and Mrs. Blumenthal are Mrs.
I^on Brauser; Mrs. Alvin Stein;
5 Floridians
Elected to Board
Five Florida women were
elected national board members
of the Women's League for Con-
servative Judaism, at the five-
day convention of the League,
which brought together about
2.000 delegates from the United
States, Canada and other
countries.
Mrs. Jack Wolfstein of North
Miami Beach, Mrs. Chester
I^eiter of Coral Gables, Mrs.
Louis Cohen of Miami Beach,
Mrs. Morton I^evin of Hollywood
and Mrs. Albert Applefield of St.
Petersburg Beach were named to
the posts.
The league is dedicated to the
perpetuation of traditional
Judaism in modern society
through living Judaism in the
home, the synagogue and the
community. It is associated with
the Jewish Theological Seminary
of America, for whose programs
it raises $1 million annually.
'Death'to be Topic
Of Public Lecture
I^onard Emmerglick. J.D.,
professor of family medicine and
oncology at the University of
Miami and professor emeritus of
law at that school, will address
the subject of death at a free
public seminar at Community
Hospital of South Broward, on
Mrs. Harvey Peretz; Mrs. Albert Wednesday, Dec. 8 at 7:30 p.m.
tn discussion will follow
Prof. Emmerglick's lecture;
refreshments will be served.
Robert, fund-raising vice pres- An opcn discussion will
ident; and Mrs. Marie Portnoy.
president of the Sisterhood.
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Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200


you
last see.
your attorney?
How long has it been
since you re-examined
YOUR WILL?
Circumstances change.
Maybe your Will
requires some changes too?
And while you are at it,
make sure that you have not
forgotten one of your most
IMPORTANT RELATIVES .. .
THE PEOPLE OF ISRAEL!
One paragraph
IN YOUR WILL
"I give and bequeath $ to the
ISRAEL HISTADRUT FOUNDATION
Will help maintain the flow of
financial support to Israel for tht
constructive programs of Histadrut.
For further particulars, please contact
(Israel Histadrut Foundation, Inc.
1,1920 E. Hallondole Beach Blvd.
I Hallandale, Fla. 33009
(Telephone: 920-9600
I This is to inform you that I plan to include in my WILL a
BEQUEST to the Israel Histadrut Foundation. Inc.
r
RIHl------
-
i
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Pag* 4
Th jjfjfa* FloruUan and SHofdr of Greater Hollywood I
Friday. December 3.1976
TgHt About Expediency
Henry Kissinger is bewildered. At a meeting of the
NATO nations in Williamsburg, Va., last week, he
wondered what the fuss was all about meaning the
reaction to the U.S. vote to censure Israel for its settle-
ment policies on the West Bank and what the Third
World-Arab bloc-Soviet satellite nations resolution called
Israel's illegal occupation of the Old City of Jerusalem.
Somehow, we keep remembering all those heartwarming
things President Ford said throughout the recent presi-
dential campaign and right on up to Nov. 2 so far as Israel
and the Middle East were concerned.
None of what he said squares with the U.S. vote at the
United Nations. And that's what the fuss is all about .
the obvious fabrication, the lie to suit political conditions.
Not so far as Henry is concerned. As Henry sees it, the
U.S. vote in favor of the consensus statement reflected,
American policy since the Six-Day War.
AU we can say is wou .'Talk about expediency.
.. And Then Came Carter \
Lest our reaction to the Kissingerean bewilderment
seem partisan, we are urged also to comment on a Jimmy
Carter observation about Jerusalem last week.
Referring to the devoutly to-be-hoped-for decision to
move the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, the'
President-Elect said that he wasn't sure about that at all.
Reminded that the move was affirmed as part of the
Democratic Party platform last summer at the convention
which nominated him for the presidency. Carter
responded: "I have never said I would fulfill that contract
... I may or may not want to move the embassy to
Jerusalem, but I'm not committed to that at this point."
Nice going particularly because when he was
scrabbling for votes here and there, we never heard Mr.
Carter say so much as a single word like that.
Those Soviet Dropouts
A far-reaching discussion is currently taking place in,
Israel and in the American Jewish community over what
position should be adopted on the issue of Soviet Jews
who obtain exit visas to go to Israel but who drop out in
Vienna and decide to go to other countries.
The nub of the problem is whether the dropouts should
be given any assistance by Jewish aid organizations and
whether such aid, as is now being given, is actually en-
couraging the high dropout factor.
What is at stake is the entire issue of aliya on the part of
Soviet Jews who wish to live as Jews and the con-
sequences for Israel of the high dropout rate estimated to
be some 50 to 60 percent.
The very nature of aliya negates what amounts to
flight, a continued dispersion of Jews throughout the
world and the implicit renunciation of Israel as the
homeland of the Jewish people. Leaving one country for
the sake of going to another country other than Israel does
not solve the very basic needs of those Jews who them-
selves proclaim the desire to live as Jews.
At issue is not the freedom of choice to decide their
destination but their destiny and the historic importance
of aliya to Israel. Soviet Jews, more than other Jews,
should appreciate the historic imperative, since their own
struggle against Soviet injustice helped break a historic
pattern of silence against Soviet oppression.
JusticeNot Revenge
There is great satisfaction in the appearance at U.S.
Immigration and Naturalization Service hearings of three
persons accused of war crimes in the Nazi-occupied Baltic
countries during World War II. They face deportation on
the ciiarge that they lied about their participation in
atrocities when they entered the United States.
Boleslavs Maikovskis, 75, of Mineola, L.I., Karlis
Destlavs, 65, of Baltimore, and Bronius Kaminskas, 73, of
Hartford, are all charged with the murders of Jews and
non-Jews in Latvia and Lithuania.
While the hearings on their cases have been postponed
until January or February, and long legal battles are
expected, the INS has finally taken the stand that the
"murderers among us" cannot continue to be immune to
punishment.
Mr. Carter and the Middle East
Jewish Floridianf
snd SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Suite 106 13a S Federal Hwy DanU. FU MOM
MAIN OFFICE and PLANT-UO NB h St.. Miami. Fla SJ182 Phone 173-4*06
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone (11 J7*806
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Editor and Publlaher Executive Editor Aaalatant to Publisher
All P.O. javnj retumi are to be forwarded to
The Jewlah Florldlan, P.O. Box 01 7S. Miami. Fla. (8101
The Jewish Flondian Does Net Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published Bl Weekly
Second Class Postage Paid at DanU. Fla
Jewish Federation of South Broward. Inc SHOFAR EDITORIAL
ADVISORY COMMITTEE-Nathan Prltcher, Chairman; Lewis E Conn
Melvln H. Beer; Samuel Meline, D.M.D.
C Fred K Sheens* Friday, December 1,1*7*
The Jewish Fioridiao has sbtorbed the Jewish Unity ana tile Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Teteeraphic Aeency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate.
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association. American Association o<
f nejlish-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association
THERE IS a great deal of
insight to be experienced for
Jimmy Carter-watchers between
now and the inauguration.
The insight begins, somewhat
exotically, in the recent visit by
Polish Communist Party Chief
Gierek to Moscow.
Moat observers have tied the
visit to the fact that Pland is
currently suffering severe
economic woes. These woes, as in
the case of other Soviet satellite
nations, are incontrovertible.
BUT THE Gierek visit is a
prelude to far more important
things than Poland'a plea to
Moscow for assistance.
It presages a resumed Soviet
Mindlin
grip on its East European empire
from Warsaw to Prague even if,
as in the story of the chicken and
the egg, one does not know which
came first, the low state of
1 J6WISN
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IT. ( vRrV.
economic affairs in the satellite
nations or the recrudescence of
brute international Soviet Com.
munist power there.
The German press is a prac-
tical observer of East European
affairs, and the Berlin Tage-i-
spiegel of Nov. 12 considers both
possibilities: "Unrest in Poland
(economic) was a warning
signal to Moscow, too. Such
unrest in an Eastern bloc state
necessarily takes on an anti-
Soviet tendency ... A demon-
strative support of the Polish
Communist Party, which had
fallen into difficulties, was
overdue."
AND SO, argues the Berlin
Tagesspiegel, the Gierek visit
was illustrative of one Com-
munist in trouble fraternally
asking for aid from another Com-
munist, and getting it.
On the other hand, continues
the newspaper. "Gierek will prob-
ably have to pay the price for this
'brotherly help' through a forced
support of Soviet hegemonial
claims in Europe."
In essence, however, it doesn't
matter which comes first, the
economic woes or the renewed
"Soviet hegemonial claims." The
bitter fact is, observes the Tages
spiegel, that "On this point, un-
pleasant surprises are to be
anticipated in the future."
FOR THE Frankfurter
Rundschau, the meaning of the
Gierek visit was far more ob-
vious. "It stands beyond doubt,"
opined the Rundschau on Nov.
10, "that Moscow made up its
mind to win back ideological and
political territory that was sacri-
ficed to the illusion of the unity of
European Communism" an
illusion fabricated, no doubt,
especially for the heyday of
Kissingerean detente.
I said before that the
catastrophic economic factor in
all of this is "incontrovertible."
Continued on Page 1,1
Jews Continue to be Caring
SUBSCRIPTION RATES (local area) One Year Seat Out ef Tewn Upon
easiest.
s-riday. Dec. 3.1976 11 KTSLEV-6737,
/olume 6 Number 2bt
By definition, a cliche is a com-
monplace phrase and, by custom,
a phrase to be avoided by the
more articulate among us.
Picture Steve Allen reading from
one of those New York Daily
News letters to the editor, raising
his voice as he cries out, "A
nation that can put a man on the
moon ought to be able to figure
out how to get decent people who
want to work off welfare." and
your mind bogs down.
"Put a man on the moon,"
indeed. That was one of Ann
Landers' recent responses to a
letter. It's a phrase which repeats
and repeats can't get the
traffic lights to work, the water
running through the pipes, the
buses coming on time, but there
goes that man again to the
moon and qualifies not only as
a cliche but, if you'll pardon the
tautology, an overworked one.
HAPPILY dropped from
editorial sight was one that came
into common currency some 30
years ago: "In this atomic age
..." I probably have written this
before, but I never can forget the
editor to whom this cliche was an
"automatic" until the day he
wrote an editorial suggesting
that "in this atomic age" what
the local police department
needed desperately to catch crim-
inals escaping across the Passaic
River was a row boat. And he
wasn't joking, although everyone
laughed him out of town.
But like paranoia, sometimes
using the man on the moon as an
example is not so crazy a
thought. After all. our tech-
nological skill is obviously great
and it has produced great bombs
that can kill great amounts of
people, and it has produced
rockets which can give us
glimpses of other worlds.
Why. indeed, cannot all this
great skill be channeled into ways
Edward
of helping people?
IF VOTING means anything,
the electorate continues the mean
streak that became noticeable
several years ago. School budgets
are voted down with monotonous
regularity in those places where
they vote on them even if it
means closing the schools.
Bond issues that would help
the less prosperous are rejected
but. as in the case of the Dade
County Zoo several years ago,
funds are approved by the same
voters for what, in contrast at
least, must be considered a
luxury.
All the indicators are that a
majority of the articulate people
in this country have become
selfish, defining, as one writer
has put it recently, the "common
good in egocentric terms." Poor
people can go to hell. Blacks may
stew in their second-class juices,
and so on.
BY AND large. Florida voters
were picky and choosy when it
came to voting on nine amend-
ments last Election Day. And
again, they turned their backs on
the less fortunate in our society
by rejecting the two amendments
which might just might, mind
you break up the large city
slums to some extent
Passage would have really cost
no one anything and would have
helped some.
Plain meanness prevailed, as it
did in 1972, when the only Bonds
for Progress questions turned
down were those which would
have provided day-care and com
munity centers and housing loans
for those who could not pay the
conventional interest.
THERE ARE some few people
who do believe that if you can put
a man on the moon you should be
able to do for people. Again, this
year, as in 1972. the voters in
those by now easily-identified
"Jewish" precincts defied the
trend of the times and voted
strongly for Amendments 4 and 5
which would have been of as-
sistance to those of lesser means
and the inner city inhabitants in
particular.
That pattern went for the mid-
Beach precincts which voted for
Ford equally, as well as for the
South Beach precincts which
gave a heavy majority to Carter
The one aberration which stood
out was Point East which voted
heavily in favor of No. 5 and just
as heavily against No. 4.
At any rate, those two
amendments were defeated and
that is no surprise.
WHAT IS a surprise and a
course of satisfaction, is that
Jews continue to be a caring
people, undoubtedly the only
such ethnically or religiously
identifiable group in this country.
In a recent talk to the Amer-
ican Jewish Congress, liberal
spokesman Irving Howe ("World
of Our Fathers") commented that
if the American Jews were to
"cease the kind of large scale
participation and generosity
which marked their role in the
Civil Rights movement; if they
were to turn their backs on the
poor, the blacks, the exploited; if
they were to settle into a sub-
urban complacence which con-
sisted mainly of writing checks
for Israel then a major, and I
would think, shattering change in
self-perception would have to
follow."
As the 1976 election reveals, it
hasn't happened yet.


Friday. December 3,1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Pe5
High-Rise Activities Set
For Israel Bonds Drive
The 1976-1977 Israel Bond
Campaign will swing into full
gear in the coming days and
weeks with heightened activities
at many high-rise buildings in the
South Broward area, according to
an announcement by William
Littman, chairman of the
Broward County Board of
Governors.
These activities will be in
addition to the dinners sponsored
by various synagogues and other
activities undertaken by various
divisions of the campaign, such
as organizations and the New
Leadership.
GALAHAD COURT
On. Dec. 7. the Galahad Court
Night in Israel will take place in
the Social Hall at 8 p.m. Matilda
Kimelblot will be the honoree.
Guest entertainer will be Eddie
Schaffer, American-Jewish folk
humorist. Joseph Greenberg is
chairman.
GALAHAD III
Dr. and Mrs. Morris Josell will
be the honorees at the Night in
Israel to be held at Galahad III
on Tuesday, Dec. 7, in the Social
Hall. Cochairmen are Mr. and
Mrs. Jules Gordon and Mr. and
Mrs. Jacob D. Menkes. Joey
Russell, television and night club
entertainer, will be the guest
performer.
AQUARIUS
The Night in Israel at
Aquarius will be held on Wed-
nesday, Dec. 8, under the
auspices of the David Ben-Gurion
B'nai B'rith I^odge and the Golda
Meir Hadassah Group. Milton
and Rose Jacobs will be honored
as recipients of the Israel
Solidarity Award. Julius Freilich
is chairman. Mickey Freeman,
screen, television and night club
entertainer, will perform.
BEACON TOWERS
The Beacon Towers Night in
Israel will be held on Wednesday.
Dk. H. at 8 p.m.. in the pool area.
Honoree will be Isidor Jan Book-
binder. The guest entertainer will
be American Jewish folk
humorist. Joey Russell. Mr. and
Mrs. Saul Benjamin are chair-
men.
DE SOTO PARK
On Thursday. Dec. 9. a Night
in Israel at DeSoto Park will be
held in the Social Hall under the
auspices of the DeSoto Park
Israel Bond Committee.
Cochairmen are Harris Herman
and Joseph Kleinman. The guest
entertainer will be Mickey
Freeman, American-Jewish
humorist.
GALAHAD SOUTH
Sydney Holtzman, a leader on
behalf of many civic and com-
munal courses and the State of
Israel, will be the recipient of the
David Ben-Gurion Award at the
Galahad South Night in Israel,
Thursday, Dec. 9. at 8 p.m. in the
Galahad South Social Hall. Paui
Sneider is chairman and Jack
Nelson and Emanuel Kirwin are
cochairmen of the Galahad South
Israel Bond Committee which is
sponsoring the event. Joey
Russell, star of screen, television
and night clubs, will be the guest
entertainer.
IMPERIAL TOWERS
A Salute to Israel and Break-
fast will be held under the
auspices of the Imperial Towers
Israel Bond Committee on
Sunday. Dec. 12. at 10 a.m. in the
Social Mall of Imperial Towers
North. Walter Gartner will be the
recipient of the Israel Solidarity
Award. The entertainer will be
Mickey Freeman.
GOLDEN SURF TOWERS
The Night in Israel at Golden
Surf will take place on Sunday.
Dec. 12. at 8 p.m. under the
auspices of the Golden Surf Israel
Bond Committee. Irving and
Reba Schwartz will be the
honorees and Mickey Freeman
will be the guest entertainer.
Murray Green is chairman and
Arthur Seidenberg and Arthur
Prenner are cochairmen.
HOLLYWOOD TOWERS
Jack and Leona Gold will be
honored at the Night in Israel at
Hollywood Towers, Thursday,
Dec. 16. in the Social Hall. Dr.
Henry R. Bloom is chairman and
Benjamin Neisner is cochairman.
The spcial guest of the evening
will be Eddie Schaffer. American-
Jewish folk humorist.
JCC Seniors Map
December Events
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Florida Senior
Adults Activities Center in
Hollywood has a full schedule
during the coming weeks, ac-
cording to Elaine Goldstein,
program director.
A special trip to Disney World
in Orlando is scheduled for Wed-
nesday and Thursday, Dec. 8 and
9. Open to members, the outing
still has a few openings left.
Also for members is a
Chanukah Latke Party on
Friday, Dec. 17. beginning at
10:30 a.m. The JCC Comedy
Players, directed by Saul Levine
will provide entertainment as wil
the folk dancing class under thi
direction of Claire King. I^atkes
will be served at noon.
Another program is set for
Thursday. Dec. 16 at 10:30 a.m.
when members will see nursery
school children perform from the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center.
An educational day is planned
for Tuesday. Dec. 21. from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. when members
visit Douglas Gardens Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged.
Also on tap is a program at the
South Beach Activities Center on
Miami Beach.
Further information about
these and other programs can be
obtained at the JCC.
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Jewish Federation of South Broward board of directors and
chairman of the Federation's Education Committee, is seen
with his wife, Gertrude, and Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger. A resident of Emerald Hills, Hornstein is cochair-
man of the Society of Fellows of the Synagogue Council of
America.
Beth El Announces Program
Temple Beth El will hold its
Twentieth Anniversary Dinner
and Dance on Saturday, Dec. 4,
at the 11 illcrest Country Club.
The dinner is a tribute to the
Founding Families of the temple.
Cocktails will be served at 7 p.m.,
dinner at 8 p.m.
A rummage and white elephant
sale, sponsored by the Sister-
hood, will be held Thursday, Dec.
9 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the
Tobin Auditorium. Proceeds will
go toward the Religious School.
The Sisterhood will also hold a
luncheon meeting Tuesday, Dec.
14, at noon. Rabbi Jonathan S.
Woll will speak on "The New
Concepts of Sisterhood."
On Thursday evening, Dec. 16,
the Brotherhood will hold its
annual Chanukah dinner for chil-
dren and adults. Space is limited
and the Brotherhood urges those
interested to make their reser-
vations early.
Hallandale Hadassah
Plans Bond Luncheon
The Hallandale Chapter of
Hadassah will hold a South
Broward Hadassah-Bond-with-
Israel luncheon, 11:30 a.m.,
Tuesday, Dec. 14 at Temple Beth
Shalom.
Mrs. Norma Gofberg is
honoree, and will be presented
with the Woman of Valor award.
Mrs. Gofberg is HMO chairman
of the Chai GroUp.
Guest speaker at the luncheon
will be Yehuda Avner, political
assistant to Prime Minister
Yitzhak Rabin.
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Page6
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday. December 3,1976
Seminar to Review Tax Reform Gershon Avner to Speak
The new Tax Reform Act will
be reviewed during an Estate
Planning Seminar presented by
the Israel Histadrut Foundation
(IHF) of South Florida as part of
its annual Founders Day
Monday. Dec. 6. at the Holiday
Inn in Hollywood, 4000 Soutl
Ocean Drive.
Participants in the seminar
"Your Estate and Taxes" will
be Dr. Sol Stein, national IHF
president and noted economist
and authority on estate and
personal financial planning: and
Mrs. Phyllis Drickman. Holly-
wood attorney and counselor at
law and a member of the IHF
South Broward Council Advisory
Board.
David W. Aranow. vice
president of Reynolds Securities,
Inc., will serve as chairman of the
seminar. Aranow is a member of
the South Broward Histadrut
Council, and serves on the Presi-
dent's Council of Brandeis
University.
Lupcheon chairman will be Dr
Morton Malavsky. spiritual
Wolff Named
General Manager
William Wolff has been named
general manager of Saks Fifth
Avenue in Bal Harbour.
Wolff. 41, was born in
Greenwich, Conn. After
graduating from Lehigh
University in Bethlehem, Pa., he
began his retailing career with a
prominent department store.
He joined
Saks Fifth
Aven ue in
1970 as an ad-
vanced mem-
ber of the exe-
cutive deve-
lopment pro-
gram and be-
came assist-
ant manager
of the Sake
Fifth Avenue
store in At-
lanta. Ga., in
1971. In 1975
he was promoted to general
manager of the Saks Fifth
Avenue Miami Beach store, and
was subsequently voted
resident of the Lincoln Road
Mall Association.
An avid tennis player and
vigorous athlete, he is active in
community affairs at Emerald
Hills, where he lives with his
wife. Zelda. and their three
children.
DRICKMAN
ARANOW
leader of Temple Beth Shalom in
Hollywood and chairman of the
IHF South Broward Council
Featured speaker at the,
Founders Day luncheon will be*
Avi Pazner. press counselor to
Israels embassy in Washington.
D.C.. who served as spokesman
for the Israeli delegation to the
Geneva Peace Conference after
the Yom Kippur War.
Seminar topics include "The
New Tax Reform Act and Your
Estate." "The New Standard
Deduction." "Consequences of
the New Capital Gains Restric-
tions" and "Will-Making in
Florida "
Tickets are available through
the Histadrut office in Hallan
dale
At Bond-With-Israel Lunch
Bernstein Urges Creation
Of New Programs for Ws
WILLIAM
WOLFF
Calling on Federations to
create new programs to deal with
changes which will take place in
the decade -ahead. Council of
Jewish Federations Executive
Vice President Philip Bernstein
addressed the General Assembly
held recently in Philadelphia.
In his talk, entitled "Fed-
erations in the '80s." Bernstein
noted that new programs will be
needed "to assure the Jewishness
of the Jewish family and home,
the quality of Jewish education
and especially the highest quality
of Jewish educators, new pat-
terns of closer cooperation with
synagogues, comprehensive com-
munity services for the elderly
and greater involvement of uni-
versity faculty and students in
community responsibilities."
Support for Israel. Bernstein
said, will have to go beyond
resisting the barrage of attacks
upon it to include assisting it "to
build the model society of social
justice, intellectual greatness,
scientific excellence and spiritual
living that are its true meaning
and purpose."
He urged Federations to build
future programs and services on
the current base of the network of
over 200 Federations covering
almost 800 communities with 95
percent of the Jewish population
of the U.S. and Canada, raising
close to a half billion dollars a
year and subsidizing a worldwide
complex of agencies and services
expending S2.5 billion annually.
"Underpinning the entire
effort." Bernstein concluded,
"will be the continued com-
mitment of the underlying prin-
ciples of united rather than frag-
NCJW to Turn 21 ^AJCongress to Hear
The National Council of Jewish
Women. Hollywood Section, will
celebrate its twenty-first birth-
day on Monday. Dec. 6 at 12:30
p.m. at Temple Sinai.
A birthday candle-lighting
ceremony and entertainment are
planned for the enjoyment of
members and friends.
The public is invited.
CIA Agent at Meet
The December meeting of the
American Jewish Congress will
be held on Monday. Dec. 27. at
12:30 p.m. at Galahad South.
Mike Ackerman, former CIA
agent, will be guest speaker. He
will present a view of the role of
the CIA in our society.
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mented ettorts. without
sacrificing diversity and
pluralism in views and beliefs and
reaching decisions by con-
sensus."
The CJF executive also
suggested all Federations think
of raising the level of their
resources by an additional half-
billion dollars in the next decade
"by having all Federations
achieve even part of what some
Federations have already
achieved in their annual fund-
raising campaigns, in develop-
ment of endowment funds, in
obtaining government grants and
loans and in fees from the users of
their agency's services."
A readiness to create and
support new programs will be
essential. Bernstein added, "even
if Federations are not doing
enough for the old programs. The
new may be more important .
it will put a premium on flexi-
bility and innovation in planning
and budgeting."
Ambassador Gershon Avner,
secretary to the Government of
Israel, will he the guest speaker
at the South Broward Bond-
With-Israel Luncheon, Tuesday.
Dec. 14. it was announced by
Irman Rochlin, South Broward
Israel Bonds Women's Division
Chairman. The luncheon will be
at 11:30 a.m. at Temple Beth
Shalom. Hollywood.
Prior to as-
suming his
present post,
he was assist-
ant director
general of the
Foreign Min-
istry Before
that. Avner
was Israel's
Ambassador
to Norwas and
Canada. Pre-
viously, he
served as
director of
the United States Department of
Israel's Ministry for Foreign
Affairs, and was a representative
to the UN General Assembly.
Before Israel's proclamation of
independence, he was a member
of the Political Department of the
Jewish Agency for Palestine.
He became the first director of
the Ministry's West European
Department at the age of 29 It
was his task to develop relations
with France. Italy, the Benelux
nations. Norway. Sweden,
Denmark and other European
states, and to held set up Israel's
missions to these countries.
As Charge D'Affaires in
Hungary and Bulgaria, he
negotiated successfully for the
release of Jewish refugees who
eventually emigrated to Israel.
He also performed other delicate
diplomatic tasks involving
GERSHON
AVNER
Israel's relations with Eastern
European governments. Later,
Avner was named Counsellor of
the Israel Embassy in London,
where he remained until he was
called to head the American
Division of the Foreign Ministry
Sylvia Herman and Norms
Gofberg. Hadassah and civic
leaders, will be honored at the
luncheon. Mrs. Herman is
president of the Hollywood
Chapter of Hadassah. Mrs.
Gofberg is a life member of
Hadassah and a leader in the
organizaion's fund-raising ef-
forts. They will be the recipients
of the National Israel Bonds
Women's Division Leadership
Awards, according to Mrs
Rochlin.
Anne Gans and Ruth Gillman
are luncheon chairpersons. They
indicated that reservations for
the Bond-With-Israel Luncheon
may still be made.
Fairways
Hadassah Plans
Dec. 1 Meet
The Fairways Group of Ha
dassah will meet on Wednesday.
Dec. 1, at the Home Federal
building. Casa Grande Room
The social hour will begin at
12:30 p.m. and the meeting will
convene at 1 p.m.
Libby Wise, former president
of Chai group of Hadassah. will
speak on her personal experience
with Israeli youth this past
summer.
A candle-lighting ceremony
will be held in celebration of
Chanukah.
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Friday. December 3,1976
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 7

I
I
Reflections on a Bar Mitzvah Jews Should'Fight Back\Herzog Declares
By MRS. ANNE HART
Hollywood
It's planning and planning for more than a year,
Then its hustling and bustling as the time draws near
Those restless nights when you just can't sleep,
You count "how many people" instead of sheep.
You lie awake and remember a boy you once knew
On the day of his bar mitzvah he had a temperature of 102
"Please God, don't let that happen to us."
You check your invitation list, and recheck it from A to Z
But if you've omitted some long lost kin. woe. oh woe is me
And now you have a problem with table No. 4,
How, oh how can you squeeze in two more?
You must call the caterer, you've had a change of heart,
Instead of yellow tablecloths, blue would be quite smart.
Our son has studied long and hard, and is doing very weil.
But when he gets to temple will he be nervous who can tell?
Honey, please stop worrying, all will be well, you'll see;
I've taken care of everything, just leave it all to me.
To run a bar mitzvah is like running a Broadway show;
You produce it, direct it and finance it, you know.
And even though you've done your best, and done all that you could
and should.
You're still a little worried and hope the "reviews" are good.
No matter what the outcome, after all is said and done,
Despite its trials and tribulations, it's been such pleasure and such
fun.
Describing recent Arab actions
as a clear indication that "a
major anti-Semitic world cam-
paign is under way," Israel's
United Nations Ambassador
Chaim Herzog urged Jews to
"fight back."
Addressing an audience of
'2,000 North American Jewish
leaders attending the recent
General Assembly of the Council
of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds (CJFWF) in
Philadelphia, Herzog called on all
Jews to recall the anti-Semitism
of Hitler.
"This time, let us fight before
it is too late." the Israeli Ambas-
sador declared. "We owe it to our
forebears. We owe it to ourselves.
We owe it to our children and we
owe it to the generations to
come," he told the audience,
which greeted his words with a
standing ovation.
Herzog noted that American
Government policy is directly
influenced by the degree to which
American Jews voice support for
Israel. "The ordinary Jew in the
street will not be pushed
around," the Ambassador
declared. "He will fight. Action is
needed to prove to the world that
we stand as one, ready to face our
enemies."
Herzog called for action con-
demning the recent consensus
agreement reached by the UN
Security Council on Israeli ad-
ministration of the occupied
territories.
"A massive Jewish reaction is
necessary. Your task is a vital
one. In your hands lies the
future," the Israeli Ambassador
said.
"How many could we have
saved in the past if we had fought
back?" he asked his assembled
audience.
Herzog noted that "each and
every one of us has reason to be
proud." and cited the 800.000
Jewish refugees from Arab lands
who today are productive citizens
of Israel compared to the 500.000
Delta Players Offering ADL Award p^^ At
Fund-Raising Breakfast
'The Mikado' in Yiddish
The Delta Players, a group of
unpaid senior citizens who share
a love of the theater and a strong
commitment to Israel, are pre-
paring for their second Gilbert
and Sullivan production. "The
Mikado." translated into Yiddish
by Mims Walowit.
The Players are supported by
more than twenty-five local
charities in South Florida for
"The Mikado." These organ-
izations have booked the Delta
Player* in advance for per-
formances scheduled from
January through March. 1977.
This repertory company is
made up of people from all walks
of life doctors, lawyers,
teachers, businessmen and
housewives.
Although the show will be per-
formed in Yiddish, it can still be
appreciated I for those who don't
know the language) for its music,
costumes and the sheer wit of the
translation.
For information, please call: in
Broward. 929-4307; Dade. 940-
2389; and Fort I.auderdale. 929-
4307
The South Broward region held
its third annual fund-raising
breakfast on behalf of the Anti-
support of Jewish concerns
everywhere.
The Master of Ceremonies was
Tom Cohen of Hillcrest I-odge
and a member of the Board of
Governors of B'nai B'rith
District No. 5.
Arab refugees who are today still
in refugee camps.
Turning to the recent action of
the UN Security Council, Herzog
termed it "despicable behavior"
and called the members "lacking
in moral courage."
"The action can only be labeled
as a direct and very serious insult
to the Jewish people, but what
hurt the most is the willingness
of the United States to go along,"
Herzog declared.
He noted that a similar
resolution introduced by the
Arab nations last May was
branded by the United States as
"one-sided, biased and un-
balanced."
"Never has U.S. prestige been
as high in the Arab world as
when it stood by its friends
courageously and firmly,"
Herzog stated.
"As Jews, we must stand as a
proud people ready to take a
stand on these issues. Each and
every one of us has reason to be
proud," he said.
"Action is needed to prove to
the world that we stand as one to
face our enemies," Ambassador
Herzog demanded.
At the conclusion of his talk,
Raymond Kpstein of Chicago,
who chaired the session, informed
the Ambassador that the General
Assembly had sent telegrams on
Friday to President Ford and
I'rcsident-Klect Carter protesting
United States actions in the
Security Council.
Temple Sinai Library
Dedication Scheduled
Teitelbaum
I.ittman
Continued from Page 1
libraries were ultimately used as
models for the Hyman Hornstein
Library.
"Besides library books for
reference and research, the new
library will also contain extensive
periodicals, a reading room and a
special children's area where
storytellers will visit
periodically." said Shirley Wolfe,
head librarian, who will oversee
all facets of the library's oper-
ation. A resident of Coral
Springs. Mrs. Wolfe has a Master
of Library Science Degree from
McGill University in Montreal,
Canada.
"For the present, the library
will be open approximately 20
hours weekly, to serve the needs
of the community. As services
are expanded, so, too, will the
library hours," stated Mrs.
Wolfe, who also serves as a re-
ligious school teacher at Temple
Sinai.
"As both a teacher and
librarian, I can see the needs of
our students from both sides. We
will have a library atmosphere
that will make it easy for
students to learn, without being
forced. We want to open new
vistas of education for our
students and make Jewish edu-
cation an integral part of their
lives," concluded Mrs. Wolfe.
Mrs. Wolfe will be aided by
Lillian Gold, who served for
many years as the volunteer
librarian for Temple Sinai.
According to Mrs. Waldorf,
"when our library is completed
and all books are in, we will have
one of the finest, and most com-
plete Judaica libraries in South
Broward. After one year, we hope
to receive our accreditation.
"Kven the furnishings in the
library underwent careful
research and were specially
designed.
"Both my husband I have been
temple members for 10 years. We
both have worked on many
projects during these years, but
this library has been a real labor
of love. This library will enable
our people to learn about their
history to appreciate and love
the beauty of our heritage," said
Mrs. Waldorf.
Working closely with the
committee as a consultant has
been Roslyn Seidel. the Edu-
cation and Youth Director of
Temple Sinai. She feels that
"every need of every age level in
both the religious school and
adult education program will be
met by this library. Children will
be able to work at their own pace,
and the library facilities will be
geared to a wide spectrum of
students, including the gifted.
"The addition of this library to
our temple means that our edu-
cational programs will be greatly
enriched and enlarged." con-
cluded Mrs. Seidel.
The dedication of the Hyman
Hornstein Library and Learning
Center will begin at 12:30 p.m.
The public is invited.
Defamation league ot B'nai
B'rith recently at 9 a.m. at the
Hallandale Jewish Center.
The Torch of Liberty Award of
the Anti-Defamation league was
presented to William I.it I man for
his efforts on behalf of the
League, and his activities as
chairman for Israel Bonds in
Broward County. I.ittman is a
member of ADL's Florida
Executive Committee.
The principal speaker was
Arthur N. Teitelbaum. Southern
area director of the ADL. who
gave an in-depth report on the
latest activities of the league in
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Pe 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofdr of Greater Hollywood
Friday, December 3,1976
GA Delegates Hear Call for Heritage Preservation
Describing America as "the
world's last best hope for freedom
and justice" and the "greatest
bulwark for the life and liberty of
the Jewish people," Dr. Robert
Gordis. Biblical scholar, has
called for the building of a
"voluntary community dedicated
to an organic view of Judaism to
arrest the decay of the Jewish
heritage" in the future.
Delivering the Herbert R.
Abeles Memorial Address at the
45th General Assembly of the
Council of Jewish Federations
and Welfare Funds (CJFWF)
meeting in Philadelphia, Dr.
Gordis, who is professor of Bible
at the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America, said that
American Jews must give top
priority to Jewish education and
to encouraging Jewish couples to
have larger families.
"Jewish loyalty," he said, "far
from being narrow and limited, is
the royal highway of service to
humanity" achieved by thorough
Jewish education at every age
level.
He told some 2.000 North
American Jewish leaders,
Federation executives and dele-
gates to CJF's annual Assembly
that Jewish teaching can make a
unique contribution in the major
crisis areas today, which include
personal morality and the family,
the role of nationalism in the
world community and the
doctrine of religious tolerance "in
an age which has witnessed the
blood bath in Ireland and in
Lebanon ... the issues of race
relations and the interplay of
social justice and personal
freedom ."
Urging his audience to be
concerned about the present
generation as well as their grand-
children, Dr. Gordis said that
"our example of learning and
practicing Jewish values will win
the loyalty of the best of our
youth and will guarantee the
Jewish future" thereby demon-
strating that "being a Jew is the
least difficult way of being truly
human.
" 'Organic Judaism" the
meshing of Jewish religion,
culture and peoplehood. must be
the goal of every Jew who
Bonds New Leadership Slates Barbeque
The New Leadership of Israel
Bonds for South Broward will
kick-off its 1977 campaign with a
shish-kebob barbeque. en-
tertainment and bonfire,
Saturday, Dec. 18. 7:30 p.m.. at
Hada Farm, owned by Dr. Fred
and Sandi Khani. Fort
Lauderdale.
The evening will be highlighted
by Aaron Bergell. American
tenor, who will offer popular
arias. Israeli and some Yiddish
favorites. Bergell. in addition to
singing lead roles with major
operas in the United States,
Europe, South America and
Israel, has also been the guest
Cantor at Temple Solel for the
high holy days since 1973.
The committee for the New
Leadership barbeque is headed
by Herb and Susan Grossman,
Arthur and Betty Kail. Bob and
Marion Wolfson. Bob and Dee.
Gillon. Stan and Fern Emas and
Abe and Barbara Elkin.
The Israel Bonds New
Leadership representes the
younger generation of Jewish
Americans who seek to aid
Israel's economy by securing
investment capital through the
sale of interest-bearing Israel
BonH
Interfaith Committee
To Hold Discussion
The Miramar Interfaith Bicen-
tennial Committee announces a
panel discussion on "Family Life
in Third Century USA." This
event will be held at First
Presbyterian Church of Miramar
on Wednesday, Dec. 1 at 8 p.m.
The moderator for the
evening's program will be Craig
Worthing of WKAT. The panel
members are Rev. Claude Tucker
of First Presbyterian, Father
Edward Moen of St. Stephen's
Catholic Church and Rabbi
Avrom L. Drazin of Temple
Israel.
This event is open to the
public, and the panel will answer
questions from the audience.
Israel Tour Planned
A special tour to Israel, for 11
or 14 days, will depart South
Broward on Jan. 24, according to
Dr. Morton Malavsky, spiritual
leader of Temple Beth Shalom
Rabbi Malavsky will lead the
tour, which is being handled by
Shalom Trans Olympia Tours in
Hollywood.
Included are first-class hotel
accommodations and in-depth
tghtaeeing. In addition, special
arrangements are being made for
group members to meet with per-
sonalities and dignitaries in
Israel.
Having led several tours to
Israel previously. Rabbi
Malavsky can provide insight
into many special facets of the
country.
New Leadership leaders (from left) Herbert Grossman, Robert
Wolfson and Arthur Kail discuss barbeque to be held Satudax,
Dec. 18.
Churba is the Latest
Gen. Brown Victim
Continued from Page 1
tu'ial policy.
Rurch read a Pentagon
statement that said when Churba
accepted the job on Keegan's
staff about four years ago he was
advised that the intelligence
information to which he would
have access would "require some
limitations on his prior freedom
to write and speak publicly" and
that "his demonstrated un-
willingness to accept those
limitations would preclude his
continued access to sensitive
information."
CHURBA SAID his article
was unclassified, that is, free of
official secrecy, and carried the
disclaimer. Brown was not men-
tioned in it, he said. According to
Churba, his paper argued that
there is a strategic rationale for
close ties between Israel and the
United States.
It is not necessarily a question
of the U.S. choosing between
Israel and the Arabs but that the
U.S. could have a relationship on
its own terms with both Israel
and the Arab states, he noted.
Another point, Churba said,
was that "from the viewpoint of
strategic interests, Israel is an
asset and not a liability as is
commonly argued by Arab-
oriented circles in the U.S., in-
cluding the government."
BROWN WAS disclosed last
month as having declared in an
interview that Israel is a military
burden to the U.S. Later,
however, under pressure from
President Ford, he told a news
conference that his comments did
not indicate disagreement with
U.S. policy of aiding Israel.
Churba later told the New
York Times on Oct. 19 that
Brown's view about Israel was
"dangerously irresponsible" and
that it encouraged the Arabs and
Russians to believe U.S. backing
for Israel had diminished.
That published comment ap-
parently started Pentagon action
to strip him of his special
clearance. Churba indicated to
the JTA that the deprivation was
the means to end his usefulness
to the Air Force.
"My reaction (about Brown)
came after his statement on
Israel being a strategic liability,"
Churba told the JTA. "I saw
Gen. Brown's statement in the
context of a Pentagon tilt against
Israel. I characterized Gen.
Brown's statement as being dan-
gerously irresponsible and an
indicator of the growing tilt
toward the Arabs."
CHURBA did not blame
Keegan. He called him a
"courageous man" with whom he
had fought "many battles
together."
:=
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regards himself loyal to his
people," he said
He appealed for a Jewish
population growth with three
or four children in Jewish families
to preserve the Jewish group,
noting that the Jewish people has
already made its contribution,
through the Holocaust, to zero
population growth.
Dr. Gordis praised the role of
Federations and Welfare Funds
in North America in preserving
Jewish life and values, noting
that CJF Assembly delegates
were gravely concerned with the
viability of the Jewish heritage in
this Bicentennial year.
Today's American Jewish
community, he continued, is the
end-product of Sephardic,
German and East European im-
migration over the centuries, and
post-Nazi Holocaust survivors,
envisioning for itself a goal of
"integration without absorption,
acculturation without
assimilation."
The scholar described Amer-
ican Jewry as the "most free,
most affluent and best organized
Jewish community" anywhere in
history.
"Yet." he emphasized, "it is
precisely the sunshine of Amer-
ican freedom and opportunity
which causes deep concern for the
preservation of Judaism and the
Jewish people." as evidenced by
intermarriage, defections from
Jewish ranks into the established
churches of Christendom and the
esoteric religious cults of today
He cited the emergence of the
"modem Jew" highly literate
and informed in all cultural and
contemporary affairs except his
own heritage. For him, he said.
Judaism is a fossilized relic of the
past.
" 'Organic Judaism,' he con-
cluded, "is the key to preserving
Jewish identity, embracing three
main elements: loyalty to the
Jewish people, involvement in
Jewish culture and a personal
commitment to Jewish religious
and ethical values."
The Herbert R. Abeles Mem-
orial Address, established in 1961
in memory of Mr. Abeles, who
served as CJF President from
1955 through 1959, is given each
year at the CJFWF General
Assembly on a subject of "funda-
mental concern to Jewish com-
munity organizations in North
America."
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r
Friday, December 3,1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
United States-Israel Friction Apparent
TCI VIV IITAI I_____II __i. *""" MT

I
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israeli
leaders are making no attempt to
conceal their anger and dis-
appointment with the United
States for its support of a con-
sensus statement of the Security
Council that strongly deplored
the establishment of Jewish
settlements in the administered
Arab territories and declared that
all Israeli actions "which tend to
change the legal status of Jeru-
salem are invalid."
The new friction between
Jerusalem and Washington was
evident at the Histadrut Solidar-
ity Conference here where 550
American Jewish leaders of the
Histadrut Foundation were
addressed by Premier Yitzhak
Kabin, former Premier Golda
Meir and U.S. Ambassador Mal-
colm Toon.
RABIN remarked that he was
well aware of the American at-
titude and positions, "but I do
not have to say that these are
always right." Mrs. Meir was
^more vociferous in giving vent to
'her feelings. She described the
American support of the Security
Council consensus as harmful
and insulting to Israel, and
unjust.
"We do not deserve it," Mrs.
Meir said. "Those who back the
U.S. attitude at the Security
Council know only too well that
they cannot compel Israel to
accept something that will un-
dermine its security. If anybody
thinks he could force us and
soften us through a UN reso-
lution he is mistaken," she said.
Mrs. Meir questioned whether
American policy has "changed
overnight," and if Washington
relieves that a weak Israel would
e easier to deal with.
SHE SAID that talk of the two
sides taking risks for peace "are
nothing but lip service" because
u> date it was only Israel that
took risks by returning territory
and strategic positions
Toon told the delegates that
the American representative at
the Security Council joined the
consensus only after negative
elements were deleted from the
statement. He said the U.S. had
to maintain its credibility in the
world and in the Middle East,
meaning apparently that failure
to go along with the condem-
nation of Israeli actions in the
Arab territories would have lost
Washington leverage in the Arab
world.
Toon was summoned to a
meeting with Foreign Minister
Yigal Allon at his Tel Aviv office
and was told bluntly to inform
Secretary of State Henry A.
Kissinger about Israel's "deep
sorrow" and disappointment over
America's position in the
Security Council.
A COMMUNIQUE issued by
the Foreign Ministry later said
Allon had informed Toon that
"Israel was not unaware of dif-
ferences existing between Israel
and the U.S. concerning Israel's
policies in those areas," but that
there was no necessity to voice
those differences "every hour"
and in "every place."
The communique added that
Allon had "expressed his apprec-
iation in regard to positive
elements in the U.S. repre-
sentative's speech concerning
Israel's policies, but pointed out
that as far as Israel was con-
cerned, the negative content of
the final statement far out-
weighed any positive comment
that may have been made "
IT WAS apparent that Alton's
anger was more than simply a
reaction called for by diplomacy.
During a chance meeting with
Toon at a reception for visiting
American Congressmen here,
Allon snapped "good morning"
to the U.S. envoy and was over-
heard by reporters to say, "It is
only a diplomatic duty that I
greet you good morning on such a
morning."
According to American offi-
cials, the U.S. joined the con-
sensus statement because it was
more moderate than a similar one
which the U.S. had opposed in
the Security Council last May.
The officials said that by
making the statement unan-
imous, the U.S. forestalled an
even stronger condemnation of
Israeli practices in the admin-
istered territories.
SUCH A statement would
most certainly have been adopted
by a majority of the Security
Council in face of U.S. op-
position. Since the condemnation
was in the form of a consensus
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cordially invited to our annual IWNtton.
Soturdoy. December 18, 1976 1 *4MPM._______ M Tony', Fl* Mark., Re..auran.-79th St. Causeway J Jg
MiamiBeoch ColorSlide.-Ent.rta.nm.nt-8ar-B
statement rather than a formal
resolution, it would not have been
subject to an American veto.
Israeli sources here and in
Washington reportedly tend to
agree in private with the Amer-
ican explanation. But they are,
nonetheless, deeply concerned
that a new application of pressure
on Israel will be brought to bear
much sooner after the American
Presidential elections than
pected.
ex-
They are also clearly alarmed
that the Security Council state-
ment will encourage extremist
elements in the administered
areas to launch a new wave of
disturbances.
Calder Work in Jerusalem
JERUSALEM (JTA) The last major work by the
famed sculptor Alexander Calder, who died last week at 78, will
be erected at Holland Square in Beit Hakerem, Jerusalem, next
May, it was learned here over the weekend.
Calder donated the model for the work during his first and
only visit to Jerusalem last year. He picked the site himself.
THE SCULPTURE is now being completed at Tours,
France. It is being paid for by Phillip Herman of AUentown, Pa.
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Pig* 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, December 3,1976
RABBI and MRS DAVID SHAPIRO
Rabbi and Mrs. Shapiro
To Receive Koah Award
Rabbi David Shapiro, spiritual
leader of Temple Sinai, and Mrs.
Shapiro have been named to
receive the Israel Koah Award at
the annual Temple Sinai-Israel
Dinner of State, it was an-
nounced by Milton M. Parson.
executive director of the South
Florida Israel Bond
Organization.
The dinner will take place on
Sunday. Dec. 19. at 7 p.m. at the
Haher-Karp Auditorium of
Temple Sinai.
In announcing the award to
Rabbi and Mrs Shaprio. Parson
noted that they have been
"dedicated and tireless in their
efforts to further Israel's
economic needs
Spiritual leader of Temple
Sinai for nearly a quarter of a
century, Rabbi Shapiro has
provided leadership to the Jewish
community of Hollywood during
its most rapid period of growth.
He has served as president of
the Greater Miami Rabbinical
Fuss Bewilders Dr. Kissinger;
'Was Our View All Along'
Continued from Page 1
certainty in the Middle East'"
and that it was "in the national
interest and in the interest of
peace in the Middle East that we
voted for it" (the consensus
statement).
He said the U.S. would have
voted for such a resolution last
May if the Arabs had agreed to
delete "two sentences" as they
did in the consensus statement.
HE ALSO pointed out that the
statement does not have legal
force.
Kissinger said the easing of
Syrian-Egyptian tensions means
progress "can again" be made
"toward peace negotiations" and
toward a general or preparatory
conference in Geneva.
TEACHER/HEAD TEACHER
targe modern Congregation in
Florida desires Hebrew leocher
who will serve as a head teacher
and coordinator. Must have
excellent references ond
willingness to work. State ac-
ceptable salary Position open
Fall of 1977. HI., Box 012973.
Miami 33101
par-
East
He said European
ticipation in the Middle
political process would depend on
European-U.S. coordination.
Kissingers references to the U.S.
position over the past 10 years,
some observers felt, appeared to
reflect his thinking all along,
since he became Secretary of
State three years ago.
to cook
for greot Jewish tood
Come 'o Twelve Tribes
Nf 123rd Street
iui" f osi of Biuoyne Blvd
Norlh Miom
OPEN
NIGHTLY
430 PM
(EXCEPT MONDAY)
883 5600
Restrictions on Jewish Prayer Imposed
Soviet citizens are forbidden to
pray in small gatherings in
private homes, as hitherto has
been the general practice The
ban follows a new restriction
imposed by a legislation on
religion in the USSR which
seems to aim mainly at Jewish
Beth El Announces Upcoming Events
Association, president of the
Hollywood Clergymans
Fellowship and president of the
Southeast Region of the Zionist
Organization of America. He is a
past president of the Mroward
Board of Rabbis.
Heading plans for the annual
dinner are Mr. and Mrs. Moses
Hornstoin, Mr. and Mrs. JoMph
Kleinman and Mr. and Mrs
Jacob Mogilowitz, chairmen. Dr.
Milton P. Caster and Seymour
Mann are honorary chairmen
Joeaph Kleinman is president of
Temple Sinai.
"The award was created by the
worldwide Israel Bond
Organization to give recognition
in selected individuals who have
played a vital role in helping to
develop the economic strength of
Israel through the Israel Bond
Organization." Parson said.
"It is truly appropriate that
Rabbi and Mrs Shapiro have
been chosen to be the recipients
of this award." he added.
It also seemed to buttress the
view that the State Department
believes a Mideast settlement
must be along the lines of the
Rogers plan.
Sfls
Sage
Sagel & (Appetizer Shop
HOT BAGELS-N.T. APPETIZERS
WORLD CHEESES CATERING
PARTY PLATTERS
Hebrew Notional Kosher Delicatessen
PREPARED FOODS SALADS
921-74ff
100-1 E. HALLANDALE ILVD.
HALLANDALE
Temple Beth Fl announces an
extensive cultural and adult edu-
cational program
Famous guest speake-s and
prominent authorities on special
subjects are scheduled to speak
at various sessions.
The 1976-77 expanded program
will include six Sunday morning
breakfast seminars; a four part
evening discussion series on
"Bio-Ethical'* issues of "ital
concern to people of all ages;
another four-part evening series
on "Health and Education."
adult classes in elementary i.nd
advanced Hebrew; a continuing
bi-weekly series on "The Book of
Genesis," conducted by Dr.
Samuel '/.. Jaffe, plus the popular
annual "Charles Doppelt Mem-
orial I^ecture." presenting Dr.
Abram L Sachar. president
emeritus. Brandeis University,
historian, author and lecturer, on
Jan. 23. He will discuss "In
Defense of Tomorrow."
The Sunday morning breakfast
seminars, hosted by the Brother-
hood, will have as its theme
"Jews Around The World."
On Sunday, Dec. 19. Rabbi
Marvin Tokayer will discuss
"The Ix>st Jews of Japan and
China." Other prominent
speakers will discuss "Jews In
South America, the Soviet Union
and the U.S." The public is in-
vited.
religious life. Although the new
legislation was adopted on June
23, 1975, it escaped attention
until the official Soviet govern-
ment gazette published it
recently.
The legislation specifies
several restrictions, such as
where religious services may be
held. It also enforces a law which
requires special permission for
each occasion that a religious
service is to be held.
In many parts of the Soviet
Union where religious Jews had
no official facilities to perform
prayer services, they relied often
exclusively on a minyan
(quorum) to observe the religious
traditions.
"These minyans simply
gathered in private flats, be it for
circumcision ceremonies, wed-
dings or Holy Days," said a
Kishinev Jew. "The new laws
impose an additional difficulty in
already greatly restricted Jewish
life."
"YOUR ESTATE AND TAXES'
ESTATE PLANNING SEMINAR
The new Standard Deduction
Consequences ot tha naw Capital Gains Restriction*
Tha Int and Outs ot Will Making In Florida
Thenev. Tan Reform Act and Your Estate
New Gilt Ti. Limitations
Tha Eltact ot tha Marital Deduction
MONDAY, DECEMBER 6,1976
HOLIDAY INN, HOLLYWOOD
4000 S. Ocean Drive
DR. SOL STEIN
MRS. PHYLLIS DRICKMAN DAVID W. ARANOW
National President.
Israel Histadrut
Foundation
Noted Economist and
Authority on
Estate and
Financial Planning
SEMINAR 10 A.M.
Member. South Broward
Histadrut Council
Advisory Board
Hollywood Attorney and
Counselor at Law
Family Estate Planning
Seminar Chairman
Vice President. Reynolds
Securities. Inc
Member. South Broward
Histadrut Council
Advisory Board
Member. Presidents Council
of Brandeis University
LUNCHEON 12:30 P.M.
Special Guest
r /I
AVI PAZNER
Press Counselor
Israel's Embassy, Washington, D.C.
Dr. Morton Malavsky, Luncheon Chairman
Couvert $4.00 Per Person
CALL 920-9600
FOR RESERVATIONS
K.RAEL HJ^TADaRUT FOUNDATION
., p
., i






December 3, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
ByABehalpeRn
tut ion: It is permitted to
walk upon a grave?
Joel Moss
Hollywood
swer: The Rabbis have laid
rules about visiting ceme-
and graves. However,
ic rules and customs of
lg cemeteries, graves and
there, varies from
to country and from
i to region.
Code of Jewish Law
\r Schulchan Aruch), which
abridged compilation of
laws and customs,
in the 16th century, has
wing paragraph:
cause some authorities
that no one should derive
brsonal benefit from graves,
forbidden to tread upon
However, if one has oc-
i to visit a certain grave and
i no other way of reaching it
by treading upon graves,
ermitted to do so" (vol. 4.
>. par 14).
11id.-iism a cemetery is in-
with a certain sanctity,
tivity which might tend to
iisregard for the dead is
Jen. The following para-
is also of great interest.
le should not practice levity
cemetery because of the
due to the dead. One
should neither eat nor drink in
the cemetery, nor respond there
to nature's call, nor allow cattle
to graze, nor should one gather
the vegetation that grows there.
It is permitted, however, to pick
the fruits from trees, which,
although planted in the cemetery,
do not grow over the graves"
(ibid par. 16).
As I have written on another
occasion (ASK ABE column. The
Jewish Floridian and Shofar,
Dec. 5. 1975, p. 5A). according to
the American Heritage Diction-
ary, the English word cemetery is
based on a Greek term meaning
"to put to sleep." In Hebrew,
however, a cemetery is called
either Beth Olam House
Eternal, or Beth Chaim House
of Life. Another designation for a
cemetery in Hebrew is Beth Ha-
Kvarot House of Graves. In
Yiddish the cemetery is called
B's Oylem. Other idiomatic
names for a cemetery in Yiddish
are Dos Gute Ort The Good
Place, and Dos Reyne Ort The
Pure Place.
Editor's note: Please send
questions to:
ASK ABE
c o Jewish Federation of
of South Broward
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood. Florida 33020
Herzl Lodge BB
To Honor Keating
At Bonds Event
In recognition of outstanding
achievements on behalf of the
community and on behalf of the
State of Israel, the Herzl I.odcc
of B'nai B'rith will honor Mayor
David R. Keating at a Night For
Israel on behalf of Israel Bonds.
On Wednesday, Dec. 15, 8 p.m. in
the Haber-Karp Auditorium of
Temple Sinai, Hollywood.
Mayor Keating and his family
have been re-
sidents of
Hollywood
since 1948.
His active
participation
in the civic
and business
life of the city
led to his elec-
tion as City
Commissioner
in 1961. Since
that time, he
has served as KEATING
commissioner, vice mayor and is
currently serving his third term
as Mayor.
Will Indian be
Extradited?
YORK (JTA) The
Department will now have
tide whether to extradite an
Jew to face criminal
in India or allow him to
in the United States.
Court Judge Gerard L.
has allowed Elijah
I Jhirad to remain free on
bail pending the depart-
decision after certifvinir
ling over Jhirad's file to
lent.
LD, a Judge Advocate
of the Indian Navy for 18
jid a president of the Fed-
of Jewish Communities in
has been the target of
Stion procedures by the
i government for four years
rges he misappropriated
from India's naval Prize
] 63-year-old Jhirad asserts
|the Indian charges are
illy motivated against him
e of his outspoken defense
ionism and Israel and
Ke of his pro-Western anti-
^%un'st views.
\ turning over of the files bv
was a formality following
3. Supreme Court's refusal
ew Jhirad's appeal. But
noted that the U.S.
ent has not appeared in
_ JNTINUINO the bail on
[ Jhirad has been free for the
,j>ur years, Goetel noted that
Jt no law on whether some-
raiting extradition can be
bail. But he said if bail
j>t been allowed, Jhirad
have been in jail for four
l judge added that it should
in mind that there will be
administration in
Washington soon and that India
is presently in a state of political
turmoil.
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Soviet Authorities Detain Two
He has received many awards,
including the Defender of
Freedom Award from the Florida
Society of Editors. the
Brotherhood Award from the
Civitan Club, a number of civic
achievement awards from several
organization and the Zionist
Award of Merit from the Zionist
Organization of America.
Mayor Keating is vice
chairman of the Broward
Manpower Council, president of
the Areawide Council on Aging of
Broward County, chairman of the
Inter-Faith Council of South
Broward and active on behalf of
many other communal in-
stitutions.
Reflecting a serious turn for
the worse and after many months
of seeming quiescence, Soviet
authorities have detained and
charged Boris Chernobilsky and
Iosif Ahs with "hooliganism,"
under a statute that carries
penalties of one to five years in
prison. The charges stem from
their activities as part of the
peaceful protests at the Supreme
Soviet by Moscow Jews during
the last week in October.
Both men are currently being
held in Moscow's Buterky
Central Prison.
Information on Chernobilsky,
according to the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry, is
sparse. New to the emigration
movement, the electronics
engineer was born in 1944; is
married, with two daughters.
Iosif Ahs, a physician, first
applied for an exit visa to Israel
for his wife and two children in
February, 1974. Refused in May,
1974, the activist was told that he
would not be able to emigrate due
to his prior service in the Soviet
Army. Ahs' last refusal came in
April, 1976, though his mother
and in-laws are presently living in
Israel.
According to Elaine Pittell,
chairman ot the Soviet Jewry
Committee of the Jewish Fed-
eration of South Broward's Com-
munity Relations Committee,
"immediate action on these
activists' behalf is required to
show the Soviet authorities that
this hardening attitude toward
Jewish activists must not go un-
noticed. The arrests are viewed
by other Jewish activists as a
setback for the Soviet Jewry
movement.
"The Jewish Federation has
sent telegrams to public officials
and government leaders pro-
testing the outrageous action by
Soviet authorities."
Soviet Jewry Committee Report
Moscow activists, speaking
on behalf of Jews in every major
Soviet city, announced a three-
day symposium that will be held
this month to examine the
present state of Jewish culture in
the USSR and possible ways to
develop it. Invitations have been
sent to 40 prominent cultural
figures in Israel and the West,
some of whom have already
accepted.
Telegram banks were ac-
tivated this month to protest
that Jews were threatened with
arrest if they attended memorial
ceremonies at Babi Yar. Nation-
wide, Soviet Jewry groups also
protested the non-Jewish marker
at Babi Yar. Victims have been
labeled citizens no mention of
Jews. Group efforts seemed to
have some success in that no
violence marred the occasion.
Telegrams were also sent to
President Ford to urge him to
sign the bill providing additional
funds to the Helsinki Com-
mission. On Monday. Oct. 18. it
was announced that President
Ford had signed the bill "without
comment."
This month. Soviet officials
used the Helsinki Accord to deny
permission to emigrate a com-
plete distortion of the spirit and
letter of that agreement. Mikhail
Mager was called in by the local
KGB in Vinnitsa. Officials told
him he was denied a visa. They
claimed his family was not con-
sidered a separated one as his
parents and wife went to Israel of
their own free will and left him in
the USSR. The truth is, at the
time the family left in January,
1973. they were assured by OVIR
officials that Mikhail would soon
join them.
9 Again, additional reports are
arriving from Moscow of more
and more cases where the Hel-
sinki Agreemt'nt is being used
against other emigrants.
Authorities are interpreting the
clause about recruiting families
to exclude those who wish to go
to Israel out of pure conviction.
They are told, "What you feel
about Israel is unimportant:
unless you have close relatives
there the Helsinki Agreement
says you are not allowed to eo "
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fm*
Tht Jewish Floridian and Shofdr of Greater Hollywood)
Friday. December 9,1976
j
Qflje
Rabbinical fane
wtoTwttow H ftJW tf HlWII MJ bI rctovant to Jewish kft past and ereieat
co ofdinoted by the
Gfeoter Miomi Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr Man A lipschitz Robbi Simcho Freedmon
Your Ribbi SikvU^
Some Thoughts on Chanukah
By RABBI EMANUEL
EISENBERG
Tempi* Bath Sbolom L.W.
More than 2000 years ago.
when our people yet dwelt upon
it* own land and the beautiful
Temple stood in Jerusalem.
Palestine fell under the rule of
Antiochus. the King of Syria.
In his attempt to completely
subjugate the Jews and destroy
their faith, he proclaimed
paganism to be the state religion
of Judea and turned the Temple
into a heathen shrine
The Jewish population was
ordered to offer public sacrifices
to idols. Antiochus might well
I sit ut's and Answers
Traditional* Foods
Not Always Kosher
By DR. MAXWELL BERGER
Auxiliary Rabbi
Temple Fmaou El
1 saw an ad in one of our com-
munity publications that listed
the availability, at a price, of
"traditional foods for Shabbas
and Yom Tov They list the
"traditional foods for Shabbos
the traditional challah for a
moUi. a variation of all 'tra-
ditional selections of soups,
chicken, flanken. uimmts. and
kugel It all Amnd* \ery good
There is otuy one problem S'one
of it is Kosk*''
True enough, they don't use
the word Kosher" in the ad But
the* certainly confuse enough
"tradition* in it to make it
totally misleading Although this
may not be WgalN wrong, and I
haw some doubts about that, it
certainly i morally and ethically
wrong and there i* no doubt
about that. and. 1 think K time
we do something about it
There is one restaurant in our
community that advert isee each
yoax before IVsach to make
reoorvntavn* and celebrate the
traditional Sexier with all the
"MMmI food* for Paaach"
The problem i* none of tf is
Kosher and obviously none of
Paaachdtg True enough, the?
don t ure the word Kosher but
0 certainty chnwty concealed
and mw leading
to
Before UkM Yom
lother reataurant ir. our o
ty. advertised thai
with (hear XradsUaa
11 the Hohr Day
they ware dooed for two
Nut will cm* for try ear tc
come break the fas* at iw
o clock on Yoan Ke^pur Day
I mat receoW. the currant cony
of the Nauaaal Jeww* Moothiy
In a there i* a fall page ad
B amBr*h a> mthan
- too ceashrai*
the hwana Seder
RABBI
KISENBERG
will be celebrated in the
traditional manner Kosher
menu is also ai-ailabl* as an op-
tional plan at an additional
charge ." Can you imagine the
audacity of R'nai B'rith to spon-
sor this kind of promotion on a
national level?
Surely, anyone in business has
the right to advertise his mer-
chandise and service to best ad-
vantage But doesn't it strike you
as being the height of unmiti-
gated chutjpah for Jewish people
who seek patronage from the
Jewish community, to braaenty
insult Judaism and Jewish law.
and denigrate the Jewish values
that should be heid dear and
sacred"
No amount of chopped liver
and kishka and matao balls he
may eat. will make a Jew
traditional if he does not
observe what the tradition calls
for For promoters to us*
devious, tongue-in-cheek, thinly
veiled or cleverly concealed words
that are intended to appeal and to
relate to returtous ooser>-ance.
and knowingly defy and defile the
very basic taws of that ob-
servance is unforgivable and I
think it high time w* do some-
thing about
There was a tune in Jewish Ida.
hen a Rabbour proclamation
would have taken care of such
matters Today other measures
art reeded The moat effective
way to stop this kind of aaauh to
the Jewish rrauaay would be
to to those advertisers know that
tk* to hewn then are
dart tot there ade. art laoutud
and ofhndod by thar lark of
decency m serlgot and m good
taste, if not by then- grow
vwvkstaaa of Jewish law Toward
Sf SSJ ****wtmnui -
far
have succeeded in his sinister
purpose to destroy our faith has
it not been for a courageous band
of pious people. They took up the
struggle against him under the
leadership of Judah the Mac
cabee.
Inspired
with a spirit of
loyalty to
their people
and devotion
to God. the
small un-
trained Mac-
cabean army
succeeded in
defeating the
numerically
superior Sy-
rian armv.
The Temple was then purified
and rededicated. An unused cruse
of oil containing sufficient oil for
but one day's burning
miraculously lasted for eight
days It is therefore that we
celebrate this Festival of Lights
i Chanukah I for eight days, while
we praise the Ixird for the
miracles performed for our an-
cestors in ancient days during
this season.
The eight day Jewish Festival
of Chanukah beginning at
sundown. Thurday Dec 16.
Kislev 25. has a historic
significance which transcends
Judaism. It commemorates what
is thought by many historians to
be the first recorded instance of a
people's fight for their religious
freedom and cultural identity
This is the struggle which has
persisted for the Jewish people
o\ er the centuries, and the fact of
us celebration is testimony to be
survival of Judaism despite
endless persecutions
But what. then, is the
significance of Chanukah for us
in the 20th century *
First Chanukah com-
memorates and celebrates the
first serious attempt in history to
proclaim and champion the right
of a people to be different The
primary aim of the Maccabees
was to praam t their own Jewish
identity and to safeguard for tht
Jewish people tht poaatbtbty of
maintaining its traditions
What was being defended was
tht notion that a vibrant society
needs d: versification, for only
then will that society continue to
grow, drawing on the varied
behefsaad talants of its people
>een from this point of
a. If:
udw Maps to
ftaias wwdo
y*m as add
As a from*!
* *y raiihiaiw aaortthaa
gsfifiaa tht right of fa
m pecpsas. 3: aa*- a u=-
precept of tht I" S
[Program*/
run c*
wxsrrr <* r-jj<
safeguarding of their identity as
Jews. Thus the famous war of the
Maccabees was not only a fight
against Antiochus and all he
represented, but also a fight for
Judaism.
Finally. Chanukah reafirms
each year the commitment of all
of us to the preservation of the
Jewish people.
At this Chanukah. let ua
reaffirm those values for which
the Maccabees fought. And lot us
again, vow to rededicate our-
selves to the task of preserving
all that which has proven to be of
such value and worth in our
religious heritage, if Judaism,
and the Jewish nation is to
survive.
? ?Question Box? ?
By DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
Quest km: Why is it required
by Jewish law that Jews actually
live in the booths called succoth
for the week of the Succoth
festival, at least to the extent of
having all their meals in tht
succah?
Answer: This was ordered by
the Bible (Leviticus 23:42. 431
where it is written "Ye shall live
in succoth seven days." In the
same text the reason for this
requirement is also given as. "so
that the future generations will
know that I caused the Israelites
to live in booths when I brought
them out of the land of Egypt "
There is a difference of opinion
among the sages of the Talmud
(Sukkah Ubl. One opinion says
that the latter verse refers to the
actual booths or temporary
structures that the Israelites
used during their journey
through the wilderness because
thev were traveling from place to
place (Rabbi AkibaJ
A second opinion darns that
it is not actual booths that are
remembered by our succahs but
rather the clouds of Divine Glory
which tht Almighty directed
over the traveling Israelites to
protect them from the natural
elements such as the sun. heat.
etc
The Zohar (Emor 103a)
contends that the Almighty
baked seven precious clouds
with tht people of Israel whan
they traveled through the
wilderness Some aian am them
clouds wah fi fliers of smoke from
Mt Smai during the Mm law am.
whaV others ~~~- them with
tht paunrs of senoke rang
the akar of aeenfir* to
the AhnarhtT mnlHi
This experience is especially
fit for a date right after the Day
of Atonement iVom Kippur)
when the judgment for every in-
dividual is sealed. There are
some who claim that the succah
i- an indication of faith and trust
in the Almighty.
The point was that even six
months after the exodus, in spite
of the hardships the people
faced, they still displayed trust
and faith in the Almighty Also,
after the judgment of Yorr
Kippur is sealed we really do not
know its contents but we display
our faith and trust in the
Almighty to the extent that even
if our destiny may include7
deprivation, we still retain out
faith in Him
Still others claim that the
succah dwelling was ordained in
the fall because this was when all
the crops had been gathered in
and in the midst of enjoying a
rich harvest a Jew was ordered
to remember the plight of the
less fortunate or his own humble
beginnings
Religious Directory
NOTTM IIMilO
acTH oa Tcatn* vn m im
Ae l*tm IMIiHiitM (44)
TAMAtAC JEWISH CENTER flat
JJUl $1
ccoaisTrvcTBBarrr $ta-
6*ve 47j ana ea> at iar>
Greats warms



iber 3, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
Carter and the Middle East
ued from Page 4
iple, in the last half-
or so, the East
Communist bloc has
; only to equal but to out-
Soviet Union in tech
I achievement.
end, countries like
Hungary and Rumania
rard the blandishments
credit and industrial
But inflation and
in the West caught
intries in a terrible bind;
lid not afford to buy more
i new prices at the same
It they found it in-
hard to pay back what
long since signed for.
jtedness to Western
im increased as their
economic capability to deal with
the indebtedness declined.
THE GIEREK visit was
ostensibly intended to cast the
Russian Bear in the role of the
Lone Ranger riding to the rescue.
But as the Sueddeutsche Zeitung
of Nov. 10 points out, the Lone
Ranger "has no high esteem at all
for refractory Poland (or for any
other revanchist satellite), but
there will be *ome advantage to
him, too, in helping Poland."'
As the Zeitung sees it, "In
return for this aid, Soviet Party
Chief Brezhnev demands 'ideo-
logical unity and political sol-
idarity.' "
What Moscow can hence-
forward preach to the enslaved
states is this: See what you get
for playing footsie with the cap-
italists? From no on, you do it my
way, or else .
THIS MEANS a renewed and
stronger exchange of goods with
the Soviet Union, inferior goods
at that, and an end to satellite
dreams for abandoning mediocre
Soviet technology.
It means a tighter Soviet grip
on the Eastern bloc than before,
at least since the mid-1950s.
All of which makes the
President Ford statement in his
second debate with Jimmy Carter
about the diminished, if not non-
existent, Soviet presence in
Eastern Europe an absurdity.
That statement, some pundits
declare, helped seal Ford's doom
in his race for the presidency.
BUT CERTAINLY, Carter
made at least as absurd a
statement in the third and final
debate, when he said that under
his administration the United
States would send no troops and
' offer no challenge in the event of
a Soviet invasion of Yugoslavia
when now 82-year-old Tito finally
passes away.
Both absurdities are opposite
sides of the same coin: that old
iacred cow, spheres of inter-
national influence, which must
not be challenged or disturbed. If
one had to choose between ab-
surdities. Carter's statement is
the more compelling one, not only
because, since he is President-
Elect it can hardly matter any-
more what Ford said, but because
what Ford said was said in
ignorance.
\ate Dept. Pressed to Explain Consensus
I06EPII POLAKOFF
kSHINGTON -
% The State
jnt is hard-pressed
lain convincingly
the United States
in the UN Security
to censure Israel
than two weeks after
lent Ford was telling
rican voters his
Administration was sup-
porting Israel in every way,
and Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger said
only a few days before that
he would not "preempt"
the incoming Carter
Administration in the
transition period.
The Department is ex-
plaining that the Council's
Vance, Brzezinski
For State Sec'y?
i
i
i
JHINGTON (JTA| -
[it-Elect Jimmy Carter's
coordinator has in-
the successor to- Sec-
State Henry Kissinger
yet been selected, and
linger would provide
i him and the new Chief
Jordan, head of
i successful campaign for
ncy. said on the CBS-
program "Face the
he does not rule out
ranee, former Defense
or Zbigniew
Columbia Uni-
[ professor, from high
M new administration.
HAVE been mentioned
inners for Secretary of
ind the President's
for National Security,
ly.
Ibout Carter's reference
w at their meeting
in Plains, Ga.. as his
_ old friend," and hia
long relationship with
him, Jordan said there is a
tradition of former Secretaries of
State being available to the
President and their successors for
advice and counsel.
"I am certain that President-
Elect Carter, when he is Presi-
dent, would want to have that
kind of relationship with
Secretary Kissinger," Jordan
said.
"No specific role has been
discussed That would be inap-
propriate before Gov. Carter
decided who he wanted to be his
own Secretary of State. So that's
premature at this point."
SAYING IT is also
"premature for us" to discuss
suggestions that Kissinger serve
as a special envoy to the Middle
East. Jordan said that in the1
interim period before Carter is in-
augurated Jan. 20. the "main
thing" is for Carter and Vice
President-Elect Walter Mondale
"to have a close relationship in
the exchange of information"
between them and President
Ford and Kissinger.
condemnation of Israel for
its settlements in admin-
istered areas and other
policies is a "consensus
statement" and not a
"resolution" and therefore
it is not binding on any
country.
THIS EXPLANATION was
questioned by reporters as a
distinction without a difference in
the anti-Israel impact it is
designed to make on Western
public opinion by Israel's
enemies.
The "resolution" and "state-
ment" argument was offered by
State Department spokesman
Robert Funseth when he was
asked why the U.S. had blocked
similar Soviet-Arab proposals in
the Council last March and May.
He pointed out that those
resolutions called on Israel to
"rescind" those policies while the
"statement" said "refrain."
Also, he said, no country is
named as "profaning holy
places." Since Israel alone is in
control of the Holy Land,
reporters were mystified as to
what other country could be
involved in the Department's ex-
planation about "profaning" in
the statement.
AS FOR Kissinger's pledge
not to "preempt" before the Ford
Administration leaves office Jan.
20, Funseth explained that the
Administration is still the
government and has "respon-
sibility."
Since the censure was
deliberately delayed from
presentation in the Council by its
backers during the election cam-
paign, Funseth was asked
whether the U.S. would have
agreed to it two weeks ago.
He claimed it would have,
contending the statement reflects
the U.S. "previous position," and
"we consistently held to that."
This "consistency" was
questioned by reporters who
wanted to know how it was
logical that the position was con-
sistent when for five years the
U.S. had resisted such condem-
nation in the Council and this
was the first time the U.S. agreed
to it.
Funseth would not discuss a
question on whether the U.S.
delegation at the UN was divided
on the position it had taken. He
pointed out that the delegation
received its instructions from the
Department.
The question arose because one
U.S. delegate, Albert W. Sherer,
publicly acknowledged its unfair-
ness. He told the Council: "The
criticism of Israel which
dominated these proceedings has
been largely one-sided and ex-
cessive."
U.S. AGREEMENT to join
with the 14 other Council
members to condemn Israel at
this time was seen as based on at
least three other reasons. One is
that Egypt sponsored the
condemnation, and Egypt is
seeking to regain its leadership in
the Arab world.
Beyond these things, the
Carter statement acknowledges
the reality of Soviet expan-
sionism, which is what the
German press saw in the Gierek
visit as prelude, and I agree;
while the Ford statement, tem-
pered by the Bismarckian myth-
making of Henry Kissinger,
denied it.
FOR THOSE of us particularly
anxious about the President-
Elect's future foreign policy in
the Middle East, there is much to
be learned in how he reacts to the
Soviet Union's renewed power
plays in Eastern Europe as
exemplified by the Gierek visit to
Moscow.
For example, why is it ac-
ceptable in our eyes these days
for so many countries to move in
behalf of their national integrity,
including some on whose soil our
best men have spilled their blood
to defeat them: North Vietnam
on South Vietnam, the inev-
itability of North Korea on South
Korea, the possibility of the
Soviet Union on Yugoslavia, not
to mention the lethal can of
worms that Syria on Lebanon
represents?
But when it comes to the fate
of Israel, all the world can think
of is amputation Israel's
I amputation.
IF PRESIDENT-Elect
Carter's reaction is consistent
with his statement on projected
Soviet invasion of Yugoslavia,
then will his consistency apply to
Israel and the occupied ter-
ritories, too?
Or will it flipflop wildly, as the
Ford administration flipflopped
hardly two weeks after the elec-
tion when it voted at the United
Nations to censure Israel's
occupation policies and her
"illegal" presence in Old
Jerusalem?
How Carter reacts to renewed
demonstrations of Soviet power
in Eastern Europe may well hold
the answer to what he will do in
the Middle East that is,
assuming he operates on the old
principle that what is sauce for
the goose ought to be sauce for
the gander.
If President-Elect Carter is not
consistent with his campaign
statements, then amputation is
indeed in Israels future.
\portation Hearing for
Inn. Janitor Postponed
YORK (JTA) A deportation hearing for
[aminskas, charged with complicity in the murder of
|h adults and children in Uthuania in 1941, was post-
tilJanuary.
ainskas. a 73-year-old janitor in Hartford, Conn.,
[before an Immigration and Naturalization Service
flVaterbury on charges that he falsified his Nazi oast
imigrated to the United States in 1941.
^AR CHARGES were made against two Latvian
Boleslavs Maikovskis, 72. of Mineola, L.I., and
ivs, 65. of Baltimore when they appeared in INS
law York and Baltimore.
hearings were also postponed until January or
It
EVITT
memorial chapol*
ltli Pambroka Ho1-
Hollywood. Fla
SIMM'
Sonny Levitt. F.D.
11MSW. WxtoMwy.
North Miami, Fla.
?4-43IS
Palmer's Miami
Monument Company
Peraonallu-d Memorial*
Custom Crafted
lnOurWorkariop
BROWARD 525-5961
Dade 444-0921
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
7mple 3etkl
Wemctat
(jazde**
The all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beau-
tifully landscaped, perpetual care, rea-
sonably priced.
For information call: 920-8225 or wWWt
TCUPl E BETH EL ** "^""
IMI I I4tn AVE7-HOLLYWOOO. FLORIDA 33020
Pleat* MRd m* literature on the above.
NAMEt



Pat* 14
The Jewish Fbridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. December 3.197-
UN Debate
By MURRAY ZUCKOFF The ^m a, ^^^^
iiSI?1 r*ATINS Pro to implement!
Security 1974 resolution supporting
the right of self-deter-
Council consensus state-
ment last week was seen
here by some observers as a
prelude to a debate in the
General Assembly.
Temple Sinai
Calendar For
December
Temple Sinai's Sisterhood paid-
up membership luncheon will be
held on Tuesday, Dec. 7 at 11:30
a.m.' at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
ElHAt Stein.
Mrs. Albert Freeman, Sister-
hoefl president, will present a
bodf review on the R Document.
fie Sisterhood's Chai Tea will
be held Dec. 15 at the home of
Mr.Vnd Mrs. Stein beginning at
The Bat Mitzvah of Holly
ermy Saver will be celebrated
evening, Dec. 17. Oneg
t will be sponsored by
parents. Mr. and Mrs.
I Saver.
Dec. 12 and 13. a Great
Elephant SaJe is being
by the Sisterhood. Co-
uple are Mrs. Bertha
ftz and Mrs. Shelley Roth,
pale will run both days from
to 7 p.m. Pots, pans,
9. glassware, bric-a-brac and
ng are for sale. Refresh-
1 will be served.
Sunday morning. Dec. 19,
'eligious School of Temple
[will celebrate the "Festival
'hanukah." Families are
to attend and partake of
aditional potato latkes after
a gram
Israel Bond dinner spon-
, by Temple Sinai has been
Dec. 19 in the Haber Karp
according to Joseph
in, president.
Inorees of the dinner are
David and Leila Shapiro.
fcg Mr. and Mrs. Kleimanas
ncn are Mr. and Mrs.
Homstein and Mr. and
Jacob Mogilowitz.
naJist David Schoenbrun
willM guest speaker.
mination and national inde-
pendence for the Pales-
tinians and their riarht to
"return to the homes and
property from which they
were uprooted."
THE 1974 resolution was
revived on Nov. 10, 1975, the
same day the Assembly adopted
the nefarious resolution equating
Zionism with racism and another
resolution sponsored by Egypt
and 40 other countries invited the
Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization to take part "on an equal
footing" with other parties in any
Middle East peace conference.
The resolution dealing with the
Palestinian rights called for the
establishment of a 20-nation
committee of the General
Assembly, subsequently formal-
ized as the Committee on the
Exercise of the Inalienable
Rights of the Palestinian People,
to draft plans to implement the
1974 resolution.
The measure, which was
sponsored by 50 East European
and Third World countries, was
adopted by a vote of 93-18 with
27 abstentions.
THE COMMITTEE was es-
tablished at the initiative of the
PLO which participated in all
stages of the Committee's
deliberations, although it was not
a member of the Committee, and
influenced the proceedings to a
point where the Committee's
recommendations are essentially
a restatement of the PLO
position.
When the report by the Com-
mittee was considered last June
by the Security Council, it was
rejected by the Western powers
and vetoed by the United States
as "misguided" and totally
devoid of balance.
However, the consensus
statement may very well have
acted as a spur to the extremist
Arab elements in the UN. in-
cluding the PLO. to push with
greater and renewed vigor for the
adoption of the Committee's
recommendations. some ob-
servers noted.
THE RECOMMENDATIONS
were overshadowed last year by
the Zionism equals racism
resolution but may now receive
favorable responses from some of
the Western nations in view of
the consensus statement and the
resolution adopted earlier last
week condemning Israel's
Tfcr Operators Set Cruise to Israel
trar
119-day air-sea Passover
to Israel has been an-
by Diamond Tours of
and West Coast Israel
Associates of Los Angeles.
ewly formed association,
tour operators jointly
the SS Ithaca for the
[froaj March 29 to April 15.
igers will fry trans
on TWA and Olympic
flights to Athens,
[to the Greek Islands oi
Santorini, Heraklion,
and Lesbos, use the ship
' hotel for the eight days in
luring the Passover Week.
'visit Istanbul before
ig to Piraeus and an air
Ire for the U.S.
air-sea rates from
for Fort Lauderdale are per
double occupancy in
(with twin lower beds and
: include port taxes or the
ire Tax. Price of the
ly escorted tour includes
between the airport and
The Ithaca Air-Sea Pas-
sover Holiday will feature
one traditional Seder on board
ship and one Seder in a kibbutz
near Haifa, specially selected
menus. Israeli and international
nightly entertainment and a
Resident Rabbi who will conduct
services on board ship. Optional
excursions will be offered in every
port and a sightseeing program
will be available in Israel.
The 12,600-ton Greek
registered SS Ithaca rebuilt in
1973 and offers the latest in
modern safety and convenience
equipment. The ship has Denny
Brown stabilizers, is completely
carpeted and air-conditioned, has
seven passenger decks, swim-
ming pool, elevator, a complete
deck of public rooms, duty free
shop, hairdresser and a ship
doctor and nurse.
Additional information and
reservations are available
through authorized travel
agencies or from Diamond Tours.
or West Coas Israel Tour,
Associates, Los Angeles, Calif, j
"collaboration" with South
Africa
The danger of the Committee's
recommendations was high-
lighted in a report by Dr. Harris
Schoenberg. B'nai B'rith deputy
director for UN affairs, who
stated: "Behind a facade of
pseudo-legalistic formulations
regarding the right of return and
of self-determination, is a funda-
mental and retroactive challenge
to Israel's right to exist, one that
ignores Israel's sovereignty and
laws."
SCHOENBERG NOTED that
the recommendations violated at
least three articles of the UN
Charter which deal with the need
for a peaceful and just settlement
of international disputes, the
protection of sovereign equality
the UN is supposed to afford its
members, and the objectives of
UN studies which are required to
promote international co-
operation in the political field and
the realization of human rights
and fundamental freedoms for all
without distinction.
The consensus statement is
very likely, some observers
noted, to influence the Assembly
debate precisely because it
deplored Israel's establishment
of settlements in the admin-
istered territories and could, by
implication, be used by the Com-
mittee to assert that as the
"legal" basis for its objectives.
This was one of the reasons
why Israel vigorously condemned
the consensus statement which
was the culmination of a request
by Egypt to discuss the "ex-
plosive" situation on the West
Bank, particularly Hebron.
ISRAEL'S Ambassador to the
UN. Chaim Herzog, denounced
the statement as "illustrative of
the biased selectivity, one-sided-
ness and political expediency" of
the Security Council and a mani-
festation of "a modern inter-
national expression of anti-
Semitism."
Continuing, he told the
Security Council meeting: "A
discussion such as we have had
here and in other parts of the
United Nations and to which we
will be subjected to in the coming
months have only one purpose
and one effect namely, putting
off negotiations for peace."
Herzog declared further: "Let
me make it quite clear. No
amount of threats, no amount of
browbeating, no amount of
biased and one-sided resolutions,
no amount of anti-Semitic in-
nuendos, will change our basic
attitude or will influence us in
any way.
"ON THE contrary, it can only
strengthen our resolve to resist
these attempts to impose
solutions. We will not agree to
any solution that is proposed
here. The solution must be
arrived at in direct negotiations
between the states and parties to
the conflict on the basis of
mutual respect and recognition."
Referring to a key section of,
the consensus statement which
warned against "profanations of
the Holy Places," Herzog
recalled the Yom Kippur eve
incident in which "an Arab mob
defiled and desecrated the Holy
Scrolls of the Law which the
Jewish people hold in reverence
and sanctity more than anything
else in the world."
I
i
Hotlijwod imsumm
See the New still big i Better Beautiful 1977 Continental Now.
1700 Sheridan St.
u 11 j/- 11 (Corner Federal Hwy.)
Hollywood Coll ^
920-6010
949-5486
SOUTH BROWARD COMMUNITY
JUDAICA HIGH SCHOOL
CO SPONSORED BY
Temple Beth El Temple Beth Shalom Temple Israel of Miramar
Temple Sinai Temple Solel
Jewish Federation of South Broward
Central Agency for Jewish Education
CONTEMPORARY JUDAICA PROGRAMS FOR
LOCATION
TEMPI! BETH SHALOM
1400 N. 46 Avenue
966-2200
TEMPLE BETH EL
1351 S. 14 Avenue
920-1225
TEMPLE SIHAI
1201 Johnson Street
920-1577
HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS
SUBJECT
Beginning Hebrew Ulpen
Answer to the Missionary at
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Love. Sax and Marriage
Future Religious School
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The Holocaust
Jewish Film Court*
The Jewish Catalogue
What Does Judaism Say
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Answer to the Missionary at
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TEMPLE SOLEL
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Sociology ol the American
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Street Comparative Religions
What Does Judaism Say
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Lave. Sex and Marriage
DAY
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Tuesdays
Wednesdays
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TIME
7:00 9:00 PM
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Wednesdays 4:30-6:30 PM
JEWISH FEDERATION
2131 Hollywood Blvd.
Thursdays 7:00
Tuesdays 7:00
Tuesday 8:00
TEACHER IN-SERVICE PROFESSIONAL GROWTH COURSES
9:00 PM
8:00 PM
9:00 PM
Early Childhood Education
Values Clarification
Roots o. Contemporary
Jewish Lite
Wednesdays 8:00 9:00 PM
Wednesdays 8:00-9:00 PM
Wednesdays 9:00-1
For information and Registration for all courses mnmn
DR. DiANE REISMAN. ADMINISTRATOR W 88 nT'
EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS. CO-STON^Tr^SYN^GOGUES


*v

r, December 3,1976
The Jewish Floridjqnand Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 15
16 an& Qaay in PubIic SeRvice.. .then What?
UFA In the 28 years since establishment of the
j of Israel, the average age of the Government
era has been rising from year to year. The
klutionary young people who rebelled against the
kish mandate and fought off the Arabs have grown
[and gray in service to the State, but few of them
Bte their positions except for reason of death
^bba Eban was 33 when he served as Israel
esentative at the UN. Ben Gurion held the in-
ntial position of secretary general of Histadruth at
[Yigal AUon headed the Palmach at 27. Men of this
I would today have little opportunity to fill posts of
lilar responsibility. The old-timers have not retired.
JlTZHAK BEN AHARON, who six years ago had
d for mandatory retirement from all positions of
ership responsibility when the office holders reach
[age of 70, this year attained that age and is clearly
i mood to enforce such retirement upon himself.
|ight years ago an attempt was made to implement a
el solution of this problem. Uri Avneri, then a
iber of the Knesset, proposed a bill calling for
tion of a "Council of Veterans of the State," or as
Caul
AVNERI WOULD give that body full power and f
Alpept
necessarily be binding on anyone
The idea was at first greeted with some amusement.:-::
Then it gathered scattered elements of support. But*:
when the Knesset debate was held the arguments were
all against the House of Lords. Who would want to be;:-:
in a body which had no power or authority? Indeed, 8
persons named to it would have reason to feel insulted. ::
They would be told, in effect, that they were no longer X
good for anything but to talk and nobody had to ::
listen to them. ?.
a
The vote was taken and when the hands were raised, :
only the single vote of Uri Avneri was cast in favor. :j
But the problem remains of how to get the old-timers :
to vacate their seats and make way for younger per- ::
sonnel. The accession of Zevulun Hammer to the ::
Cabinet as Minister of Social Welfare at the age of 39 is :j:
an encouraging and hopeful step in the right direction. <.
the press quickly dubbed it, a House of Lords. Avneri
presented the Knesset with his detailed proposal.
FIRST OF all, he would limit Knesset membership to
no more than twelve years three terms. He pointed
to the Israel Defense Forces, which seldom keep a
general in responsible military position beyond his 40s.
However, since the "aging" generation of leadership
cannot simply be discarded he proposed that they
become members of the House of Lords.
He would also automatically put in that body retired
Supreme Court Justices, Chief Rabbis, ex-prime
ministers, municipal mayors who were not reelected,
pensioned top generals, etc. The Upper House would be
a reservoir of the best brains and experience in the
State.
Women's Qpoups
A66 Up to
million memBeRs
/ISH WOMEN'S organizations in this country count at
ne million members. This is no small force in American
, communal life, considering that the total Jewish population
J nited States men. women and children is below the six
i mark.
importance of the Jewish women's organizations is usually
in the fact that they raise millions of dollars each year for
causes. Of equal importance, however, is the fact often
iked that through the activities the women play a
ldous role in strengthening Jewish consciousness in their
I among the younger members of their families.
[Boris SmotoB
i who are active in Jewish organizations are also taking their
very seriously. However, most of them are too busy with
bs interests to give too much of their time to communal
\ HARDLY find time to read the reports and literature
they receive from their organizations. Their interest with
unal affairs expresses itself more through generous financial
tuitions than in devoting much of their time.
I is not the case with the women. Women read all the material
iceive from the organizations to which they belong. They are
lasionaries for their organizations in spreading the contents
material. They constitute a huge army disseminating in-
Jon and knowledge on activities of Jewish interest,
ply they help to develop Jewish consciousness,
[best-known organization of Jewish women in this country is
ih. It has 350.000 members, which is more than the total
ship of all the Zionist groups of men in the United States
agether.
Dugh Hadassah is the organization of Zionist women in this
C it would be a mistake to think that its program is devoted
vely to Israel.
tfEVER the major task in which Hadassah is engaged is
iising for the programs it conducts in Israel primarily in the
STefd This has been the center of its work ever since the
ation was established about 65 years ago when it sent the
oup of American Jewish nurses to Jerusalem.
lly active in American Jewish communal life are the women's
mas of the United Jewish Appeal and of the Jewish
Miions. These groups conduct fund-raising separate from men
be among their own members tens of millions of dollars a
.WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT is also one of the "JP0^"1
m's groups in this country. It has more than 120.000 mem-
El of them deeply interested in financing and promotmg the
nal training programs which ORT is conducting for Jews in
S o the*free world, teaching them various techmca
Jons from artisansh.p to complicated modern electronics
|enabling them to stand economically on their own feet.
to front row of the national organizations f Jewish women
[also the National Council of Jewish Women. This "the
estigious group of organized Jewish women in this
. It Iras founded in 1893 when the "* <**%
[ion from East European countries grew larger with every
ESsMEasBSacsHs
fa labor movement in Israel
Books on Chafcisim,
hitlep an6 medicine
FRED BERK is America's leading teacher of
Israel folk dancing. In this slim volume entitled
The Chasidic Dance (UAHC. 64 pp. $3). he has
compiled articles written in the early 1970s
discussing the origin of the Chasidic dance,
material on the development of various forms of
wedding and other festive dances, a history of the
Chasidic dance in the Jewish theater and a
definition of the Chasidic movement.
This survey is followed by a section describing
the dance steps with pictures to introduce us to
the world we hardly know.
WE ARE so inhibited in America in 1976. We
have no spontaneity, no "ecstasy of spirit" as the
Hassidim would say. How many Jews will look at
the Chasid on the street with embarrassment
let alone consider celebrating a Jewish holiday in
a way other than filing solemnly in and out of the
synagogue?
How many feel free to feverishly dance in
celebration of the giving of our Torah rather than
standing by silently watching?
WE NEED not agree with the ideology of
Chassidism, but we may well enliven our attitude
toward the Jewish holidays and enrich our
feelings for Judaism with less formality and
rigidity. And add more reinforced joy, ecstasy
and spontaneity of spirit .
H. W. Koch examines the origins and develop-
ment of The Hitler Youth. 1922-1945 (Stein and
Day, 348 pp. $12.95). Some of his research and
interest comes from personal experience. As a boy
he belonged to a Hitler Youth unit during World
War II.
Koch describes the emergence of the movement
and its rise to power. He shows how the Nationa
Socialist party manipulated the energy and social
consciousness of German youth for its own ends.
By examining the literature, education and
training of the Hitler Youth. Koch provides a
scholarly study of the effectiveness of totalitarian
techniques.
Susan paJiopf|
HOW FRIGHTENING in its similarity to an
American Scout promise which many of us have
made as youngsters, is this Hitler Youth oath: "I
promise in the Hitler Youth to do my duty at all
times in love and faithfulness to help the Fuehrer,
so help me God." Interesting how Gods name is
invoked for the support of such activities.
Neil Shulman's account of the misery and
mirth of medical school is chronicled in the enjoy-
able and lighthearted Finally .. Tm A Doctor
(Scribner's,258pp*7.95).
The author takes us through his pre-med
courses in college, and exposes us to the very real
anxieties of students trying to get into medical
school. He then treats us to a look at the rigorous
four-year stint of medical study itself.
Along with his determination to be a doctor
Shulman exposes the emotional traumas he had
lo face to achieve his goal: the frantic "firsts in
the operating and emergency rooms: his nrst
death a pediatric patient, and his sexual
frustration and deprivation during years of
serious study. Shulman says he is the nice Jewish
boy who finally became a nice Jewish doctor. He
has combined the serious and the comical in a
nice, warmly humorous book.
lsRael's BasketBall Season
Is Well UnoeR Way
THE BASKETBALL season is well under way
in Israel, and there have been several additions to
lineups which will have a bearing on the outcome
of the future champion of the National Basketball
League.
The biggest piece of news in this area is that
Mickey Berkowitz, who was a star with the
Maccabi Tel Aviv five prior to last year, has
rejoined his team after a stay in the United
States. Berkowitz wanted to attend an American
college, and after trying without success to enter
Duke University ended up at Nevada-Las Vegas,
a basketball factory.
UNFORTUNATELY for Berkowitz, the Las
Vegas team was juat loaded with super talent,
and as a consequence the Israeli star rarely per-
formed with the varsity five. He did perform m
yeoman fashion for the junior varsity and was
promised a shot at a starting berth this year by
the coach at the institution.
Desptie the glamor of American basketball
which apparently was beginning to wear thin with
Berkowitz, the former all-time junior star of Israel
decided to cast his lot once again with his
Maccabi teammates after contracting for a tidy
sum plus receiving a guarantee that he would be
established in the sporting goods business, much
aa Israels hoop idol, Tal Brody. has been set up
by the Maccabi basketball organization.
Berkowitz had dreams of becoming the first
Israeli player to break into the professional ranks,
but the competition here is just too much for him.
NOW THAT there is but one professional leage
in the United States, Berkowitz realized that his
chances for ever making the grade here were very
slim and decided to take what insiders advised us
is a very lucrative Maccabi contract. The cost of
maintaining amateur basketball in Israel is going
up very rapidly, and the 'amateurs" in Israel
receive much more money than they did, say. five
years ago.
The Maccabi team probably should be favored
to win the league title what with the addition of
Berkowitz; the unexpected return of Lou Silver,
former Harvard University stickout, who ap-
parently fell in love with an Israeli woman and
decided to settle in the Holy Land rather than
make his mark in the industrial field in the U.S>.
IN ADDITION, the Maccabians of Tel Aviv
have, for International Cup purposes, signed the
most valuable player, last year, from the Eastern
Professional League. Aulcie Perry The writer
was instrumental in aiding the Maccabians in
securing the services of Perry, who is built like a
:toothpick but has one of the finest shooting
touches within a radius of 26 feet of the hoop.


f-
Pagel6
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday, December 3,1974

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Full Text
f.
n
chanukah festival: dual Struggle For fRee6ofn
By I. M. GREEN
The eight-day festival of Cha-
nukah which we are now
celebrating symbolizes, in a way,
the dual struggle of the Jewish
people throughout much of its
history for political as well as
religious freedom.
The struggle of the Maccabees,
led by Mattathias the Has-
monean, and his son Jmiah,
against the Syrian ruler of the
Jews, Antiochus Epiphants. at
first had as its object onlv the
restoration of freedom of
religious worship and the preser-
vation of Jewish laws and
customs. King Antiochus, in his
continuous attempts to Heilenize
his subject peoples, was led to
suspend Jewish practice*, to
convert the Temple in Jerusalem
into a Greek sanctuary, and to
erect Jethen altars in the
country's towns. The revolt of
the people succeeded in restoring
religious freedom and spiritual
autonomy to Judea, and the re-
dedication of the Temple in 165
B.C.E. marked the end of this
stage of the conflict
THEREAFTER the conflict
with the non-Jewish rulers
became political. Mattathias'
sons gradually gained both
religious supremacy, as high
priests, and political supremacy.
as kings in Judea. and estab-
lished the Hamonean dynasty,
whose political independence was
recognized by the Roman Senate
in 139 B.C.E.
The Hasmonean dynasty ruled
Judea for more than a century. It
was not a happy period in Jewish
history. After religious and po-
litical independence had been
achieved, there came bitter in-
ternal struggles which shook
Judaism and the Jewish state to
their foundations. "The new
state," according to the Uni-
versal Jewish Encyclopedia,
"entered into diplomatic
relations with other states, made
alliances, created a standing
army, conducted wars; in short,
it tended to become just another
one of the many Hellenized states
in the Orient."
This secular attitude of the
Hasmonean rulers came into
conflict with some fundamental
ideas of Judaism. A religious
struggle, this time an internal
one, flared up again.
TWO JEWISH parties were
formed, the Pharisees, who were
the zealous guardians of tra-
dition, of the unwritten law, of
theocracy, and who had the
masses of the people on their
side, and the Sadducees. whose
adherents were drawn from the
priestly aristocracy and the
wealthy and influential laity. The
Hasmonean rulers tended, for the
most part, to the Sadducean
view.
The Hasmonean dynasty came
to an end in 37 B.C.E., when the
Idumean half-Jew Herod,
ascended the Judean throne and
slaughtered the remaining mem-
bers of the Hasmonean dynasty.
NEVERTHELESS, the
troublesome and rather unhappy
aftermath of the Maccabean
revolt, an aftermath of royal
intrigues and throne usurpations,
of bitter religious conflicts and
even of civil war, does not detract
from the great importance of the
revolt itself, which the Chanukah
story symbolizes.
The restoration of religious
freedom to Judea through the
defeat of the tyrannical Greek
king was a great event not only in
Jewish, but in human, history.
Had Antiochus won, Judaism
would have been annihilated.
And, had Judaism been an-
nihilated, no Christianity, which
was born out of Judaism, could
have arisen a couple of centuries
later.
Thus, had the Maccabean
revolt been crushed, instead of
having emerged victorious, the
whole course of human history
would have been altered. And so
the Maccabean revolt became a
turning point in history and is
recognized as such even in the
religious calendar of the Roman
Catholics.
NO MATTER how bitter may
have been the religious struggles
between the Pharisees and Sad-
ducees following the Maccabean
revolt, the Jews were again free
to practice their religion and to
develop it in accordance with
changed conditions. It gave the
Continued on Page 2-B


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