The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00156

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
^eJewislh floiriidlia m
Volume 6 Number 22
ml Mkofar of Proof r Holly wood
Hollywood, Florida Friday, October 22, 1976
Frtd K. Shochat-Friday, October 21, lWt Price 25 cents
S. Broward Leaders to Attend General Assembly

,
THE PRIORITIES and goals
of the Jewish community will be
the concern of the 45th annual
General Assembly, Nov. 10-14 in
Philadelphia.
Top leadership of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward
(JFSB) will join with Federation
leadership from throughout the
country during the assembly, a
once-a year gathering of repre-
sentatives from the more than
240 Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds in North
America.
DELEGATES to the as-
sembly from South Broward are:
Lewis E. Cohn, Dr. and Mrs.
Robert Pittdl, Joyce Newman,
Joel Weiss, Nancy Brizel, Helen
Cohan, Rabbi Morton Malavsky,
Donald H. Klein and Reva
Wexbr.
According to JFSB president
I^ewis E. Cohn, "this is most
valuable for exchanging ideas,
sharing materials and
strengthening bonds of Jewish
identity among leaders of the
American Jewish community.
"More than 1,000 delegates
are expected at the assembly,
which is the governing body of
the Council of Jewish Welfare by
which Federations determine the
policies, programs and finances
of their Council, and set
guidelines for local action.
Voting is by community or-
ganizations, and not by in-
dividuals.
"A WORKING meeting, the
assembly infuses local Feder-
ation programs with enriched
content and increased impact. It
is designed to inform, formulate
and inspire. Involved are a
fellowship of Jewish leaders who
carry heavy responsibilities
imposed by the pivotal times in
which we live," Cohn said.
Highlighting the four-day
session will be a variety of
programs including: "The State
of Federations," "Israel and the
U.S. Vital Relations
Following the U.S. Elections,"
Federation- Synagogue
Relations," "Jewish Role in
Helping to Shape American
Public Policy," "Soviet Jews,"
"Overseas Needs in the Year
Ahead." and "The Changing
Jewish Family."
Other programs include:
"Jewish Education and
Culture," "Long-range
Financing," and "Public Funds
and Grantmanship."
Emphasis will be placed on
small group discussions, where
participants will interact for
greater input.
CONCENTRATED over four
days will be conferences geared
to enrich and inform those dele-
gates involved in specific areas
of community service: the
general budgeting process, inter-
agency relations, health, leader-
ship development, educational
and cultural services, women's
communal service and many
others.
The assembly will also feature
several Shabbat observances.
Services, meals and study will
cap an entire four-day learning
and Jewish living experience.
More than 70 sessions are
planned for this, one of the
largest gatherings of lay and
professional leadership in
America.
Many of the South Broward
leaders attending the assembly
will be journeying to another. On
the final day of the conference,
they will fly to New York to join
more than 100 other South
Broward leaders in the ten-day
Community Mission to Israel
Nov. 14-24.
According to Mission chair-
man Melvin Baer, "the time is
drawing near for our Mission,
which will show those par-
ticipating an Israel not often
viewed by the average traveler.
The bond of Jewish solidarity
with Israel, while strong with
many who have never been to
Israel, is enhanced greatly when
Jews have the opportunity to see
what is taking place in Israel
today. During our mission, we
will visit various agencies which
are funded through our annual
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund campaign.
"WHEN YOU can see how
these much-needed funds are
being used, you become more
personally involved and com-
mitted in assuring that our
support of Israel continues,"
Baer said.
JFSB to Discuss Mission
An in-depth discussion of the itinerary planned for the Jewish
Federation of South Broward s Community Mission to Israel,
Nov. 14-24, is scheduled for Monday, Oct. 25, at 7:30 p.m. at the
Federation office.
The discussion will include a question and answer session for
participants.
The ten-day Mission will return to South Broward the day
before Thanksgiving, so that members can celebrate the holiday
with their families.
A variety of sights and events are planned for the Mission,
which will hear from top government officials about the "state of
the union," particularly regarding social service needs.
Those interested in joining the Mission are invited to par-
ticipate in the meeting. For further information, contact the
JFSB.
Israel May Have Nuclear
Power Station During '80's
JERUSALEM (JTA, A ministerial committee has
decided to recommend the construction of Israel's first nuclear
power station, a 900-megawatt plant that will cost an
estimated $700 million at current prices.
The decision came after prolonged deliberations and is
subject to final approval by the National Planning and
Construction Council and the Finance Ministry.
IF APPROVED, the plant would be built during the
1980s. The committee also recommended an option to pur-
chase a second nuclear reactor of the same capacity.
There are. reportedly, three potential suppliers the
Westinghouse Co.. Babcox &. Wilcox and General Electric, all
American firms.
Elaine Fleisher and Dr. Samuel Meline (right), representing
the Jewish Federation of South Broward, are seen describing
the upcoming Community Mission to Israel, Nov. 14-24, to
Mort Friedman (second from left), president of Miramar's
Temple Israel, and Harry Rosen (second from right), Mayor of
Miramar and member of the temple's Board of Directors. This
mission discussion took place during a "Road Show," given by
Fleisher and Meline, which describes the activities of
Federation.
Jewish Memorabilia in Capsule
WILMINGTON, Del (JTA) A Bicentennial time
capsule which included material related to Jewish history was
buried on Sept. 30 in Wilmington Square. According to the
Jewish Historical Society of Delaware, the capsule contained
"The History of the Jews in Delaware" by Rabbi M. David
Geffen and the Jewish Historical Society's publication
"Jewish Delaware: History, Sites, Communal Services."
Arthur Krieger, chairman of the event, also enclosed a
mezuzah in the hope that there would be peace for the world in
the next century. Krieger, according to the Society, was the
only Jew in the U.S. to be chairman of such an event during
the Bicentennial year.
Shady Deal?
Bank Nominee
Being Probed
By Police
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The man nominated to become
the new Governor of the Bank of
Israel. As her Yadlin. is under in-
vestigation by a special police
task force following a spate of
rumors and allegations linking
his name to illegal currency
transactions and other shady
deals.
Yadlin himself has denied all
of the charges and has counter-
charged that political and other
opponents of his appointment
have sought to frame him. The
appointment is to take effect
Nov. 1.
ACCORDING to press
reports. Premier Yitzhak Rabin,
Finance Minister Yehoshua
Rabinowitz and Justice Minister
Chaim Zadok are personally
following the course of the police
investigation which was ordered
by Attorney General Aharon
Barak.
They are hopeful that the
affair can be brought to a fast
and happy conclusion, with the
allegations proving unfounded so
that the new appointment, and
the Labor Party's broader
image, are not jeopardized.
Rabin refused to refer to the
Yadlin affair at the Cabinet
meeting. Answering a question
by one minister, he said that at
Continued on Page 11
CJF Fears Inflation 'Threat to Jewish Services'-
"Inflation," according to a
recent meeting of the Council of
Jewish Federations and Welfare
Funds (CJF), "is the number one
threat to Jewish community
services in North America.
"This," stated Lewis E. Cohn,
president of the Jewish Feder-
ation of South Broward (JFSB),
"will not only have a dramatic
effect on the rest of the country,
but particularly in our South
Broward community. That is
why it is so important that this
year we have unprecedented
support of our annual Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund campaign in order to
combat the destructive
elimination of vital life-building
services."
Also at the CJF meeting in
New York was Leon Dulzin,
treasurer of the Jewish Agency
of which the JFSB is a member,
who implored Jewish leaders,
despite inflation, to seek in-
creased contributions for the
Agency's humanitarian services
for 600.000 people in Israel in
1977.
"With a military budget of $4
billion next year, and inflation
now at 35 percent," Dulzin said,
"North American Jewry must
again meet 70 percent of the
Agency's annual budget to help
Israel's immigrants."
Morton Mandel, president of
the Cleveland Jewish Com-
munity Federation, called on
Jewish leaders to urge their
communities to be "watchful and
creative" in combating anti-
Semitism.
He reported that in 1974,
Federations had allocated $6
million to health services, as
opposed to $7 million in 1967.
While stressing that the balance
of allocations for domestic and
overseas needs must ue main-
tained, he stated that vigorous
support for existing community
programs for the aged, the
Jewish poor, for youth, health
and education services is
essential in preventing severe
restrictions of services in 1977.
Dublin reported on the 1977
budget of the Jewish Agency,
which is responsible for im-
migration and absorption,
agricultural, housing, settlement
and youth aliyah services in
Israel.
"Prohibitive increases in costs
1
of high school and university
tuition in Israel make the need
for additional generous support
of the Agency by American
Jewry imperative." he added.
He voiced concern on the issue
of Soviet Jewish emigration,
shared by leaders of Israel, the
U.S. and other countries.
DuUin called for "an in-
volvement of the entire Jewish
community in the 1977 campaign
in order to reach families who do
not share in the burden of
responsibility but benefit from
the campaign."
1



P^2
The Jeuith Floridian and Shofar o[ Greater Hollywood
Friday. October 22
. 1976
Israeli Observation Unit Treats "Retarded" Children
Many of Israel's children who'
are classified as retarded are
actually only emotionally
disturbed as a result of cultural
deprivation. With correct early
diagnosis and proper treatment
they are able to lead a normal
life.
These facts have come to light
in tests conducted over the past
year by the Eddy Shore Ob-
l*ervation Unit in Jerusalem,
part of the AKIM program
supported by the Joint
Distribution Committee to
provide services for retarded
children.
The Unit, initiated with the
help of the Joint Distribution
Committee (JDCl. one of eight
that JDC helps support
throughout Israel with funds
from the United Jewish Appeal,
refers children to the Unit for
observation and treatment
According to the director of
the Unit. Mrs Neta Viner. tht
tests disclosed that of 50
children aged two to six served
by the Unit and listed as being
retarded. 22 of them were able tc
enter normal school classrooms.
Three years ago the Uni'
added seven classes for specif
observation in which the pro-
fessional staff studied the chil-
dren's development. Some of the
children were listed as severely
retarded, some suffered from
brain dysfunction and others
were emotionally disturbed.
Previously these children had
been sent to institutions for the
retarded.
At the Unit it was discovered
that almost half of the children
were not retarded at all. The
causes for their "retardation"
could be found in their up-
bringing.
The Shore Unit created two
separate programs for the
children half of the children
were placed in classes for the
retarded of various stages, and
the other half in observation
classes. In some cases the
children moved from one frame-
work to the other according to
findings on their development.
In every observation class
there are four children under the
guidance of a specially trained
teacher. There is also a clinical
psychologist and a social worker
who. together with a sensory-
motor specialist, work with the
families, either individually or in
groups For a full year the child
Hadassah Features .
Monthly Book Review
The Hollywood Chapter of
Hadassah will feature its
monthly book review on
Tuesday. Oct 26 at 1 p.m. in the
Home Federal Building on
Young Circle.
This month's book, to be
reviewed by Mordecai Paldiel. is
Chaim Potok's 'The Truth
About the Yom Kippur War"
The public is invited to attend
RELGO, INC.
Religious Goods, Gifts,
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1 507 Washington Avenue
Viomi Beach
PHONE 532 5912
1
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966-49001
is observed and is given all the
necessary aid for his develop-
ment.
The intensive professional
treatment given to a child in
early childhood in an institution
enables him to enter normal life.
However, in certain cases a
reversal sometimes sets in when
the child returns to his previous
surroundings where he cannot
find tne self-confidence he needs.
In 1975. the Unit carried out a
preliminary follow-up on children
who had completed assessment
in 1973 and in 1974. in order to
learn about their integration and
progress in their new educational
settings Thirty-five of the
children continued attending the
recommended settings and only
five of the children had to be
transferred elsewhere.
Karen, a special education
teacher, tells about Kami, who
came to the Unit with deep-
seated fears. "He was afraid of
his own shadow." she said. "He
used to look at the sky all the
time and could say only sky'
and far.' A psychiatrist had
decided that Rami should be ad-
mitted to a kindergarten for
retarded children. He was four
and a half when he came to the
AKIM Institute in Jerusalem
We worked hard with him. Next
year he will go to an ordinary
elementary school, but in a
special class. Without the
treatment he received here, there
is no doubt that he would have
had to be sent to a hospital for
the mentally ill." she said.
Parents play an important
part in the development of their
children. Middleclass parents
with a good education are
sometimes unable to accept and
understand retardation in their
children. Help is necessary to
change this attitude toward their
children. Some parents run from
doctor to doctor in order to get a
more positive diagnosis. If they
agree to enroll the child in an
institution. and the child
becomes dependent on the staff
and workers. the parents
sometimes refuse to take the
child back, even when it is
shown to them that the child
could live a normal life.
Many immigrant parents upon
arrival in Israel have so many
problems that they are not
capable of caring for their
children and send them to an
institution claiming that they
are retarded After proper diag-
nosis and in some cases
treatment the children are
returned to their parents.
The Observation Unit also
fulfills an important role in the
training of students in Special
Education. In 1975 eleven
students from the Hebrew Uni-
versity School of Education and
the Teachers Seminar in
Jerusalem were placed in the
Unit for their field training.
The AKlM Unit in Jerusalem
has helped many children who
were thought to be mentally
retarded.
With JDC support the Unit is
expanding, and family coun-
seling and follow-up guidance are
being intensified. Young children
who might otherwise have spent
their lives in an institution are
finding their way back to
society.
The American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee
initiates, develops and support
in cooperation with local
agencies, a wide range of health
educational and social services
for the aged, the handicapped
the chronically and mentally ill
the disadvantaged. and the
training of professional per.
sonnel. JDC receives its funds
chiefly from American Jewry
through the United .Jewish
Appeal.
For Your
Investment Needs Gall
Shields Model Roland
Incorporated
MEMBERS PRINCIPAL SECURITIES EXCHANGES
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Hollywood
BaoWAan: 963-4970
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Buowaid! 925-7317
When we put our name on
achapel,
ift exclusively
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chapel at 2230 Hollywood Boulevard.
Unlike many other Jewish funeral directors in Florida.Riverside is not
represented by any other organization.
Our new Hollywood chapel is another example of how this policy helps
us to provide service dedicated only to the needs and wishes of each fami ly and
the requirements of Jewish Law and Custom.
From the original concept to the completed building.our new chapel
iswhollyinkeepmgwithJewishtradition.lt is more spacious and comfortable
It contains a Ritualanum (Mikva) and other required facilities for the
observance of the Jewish Ritual of Washing (Tahara).
And.reflecting another Riverside policy.it is manned by one of the
largest staffs of Jewish personnel available in Broward County.They are people
who understand Jewish tradition.and honor it.And in that tradition we serve
every family.regardless of financial circumstance.
2230 Hollywood Boulevard (near Young's Circle)
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Friday, October 22,1976
The. Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Federation Board
of Trustees Meets
A meeting of the Board of
Trustees of the Jewish Feder-
ation of South Broward was held
on Oct. 14, according to Lewis E.
Conn, president.
Joining the Trustees at the
meeting were the Board of
Directors of Federation and its
Women's Division.
Highlighting the agenda was a
review of Federation's activities
and programs, along with
reports on future plans, in-
cluding campaign, community
services, the Community Mis-
sion, administrative activities
and Women's Division
programs.
The overall purpose of the
Hoard was reviewed by Conn,
followed by reports from Dr.
Stanley Margulies on campaign,
Dr. Samuel Meline on Com-
munity Services, Allen Gordon
on Administration, Joyce
Newman on the Women's
Division, Melvin Baer on the
Community Mission and
Abraham Halpern on the Soviet
Resettlement Program.
The general meeting was
followed by a program featuring
a Soviet family that has re-
settled in the South Broward
community. The family dis-
cussed its resettlement, detailing
past and present lives and how
members were adapting to the
community. Federation members
had the opportunity to question
the family and to chat informally
after the meeting was over.
Sophisticated Missile
System for Israel
WASHINGTON Only hours after Israeli Foreign
Minister Yigal Allon said here that "no new arms agreement"
has been made between Israel and the U.S., but that a "new
decision" on "important items" was reached by the U.S., it
was disclosed that the United States will provide Israel with a
new night-fighting anti-tank missile guidance system.
The system is known as FLIR Forward-Looking Infra-
Red and it takes the place of conventional radar equipment,
enabling potential targets to be spotted from planes or on land
at night and in bad weather.
FLIR SENSES heat and is able to distinguish between
military targets and inert objects. Its major characteristic is
that it cannot be jammed.
The new system will thus provide Israel with what it so
desperately needed during the 1973 war and has been asking
for from the U.S. ever since.
During the 1973 war, Israel lost many tanks to Syrian
military forces in night fighting and could not effectively
retaliate.
FLIR AND other unspecified military equipment will be
provided to Israel under the existing $1.5 billion fiscal year
1977 and won't represent an increase in foreign aid to Israel.
Observers here promptly declared that President Ford
announced the new decision to supply Israel with this most
sophisticated system as a consequence of statements he made
in his debate with Democratic nominee Jimmy Carter last
week.
During that debate, both candidates spoke favorably of
the U.S. commitment to Israel's survival and of Israel as
America's principal ally, not only in the Middle East but in
the world.
It was considetcd at the time that both Ford and Carter
were angling for the Jewish vote.
WHITE HOUSE press secretary Ron Nessen promptly
declared as "unworthy of answer" these observations Also
recalled was a statement by Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger recently that "the new military item would be
approved for sale at just about this time."
While posing for photographs in the Oval office, Allon
and Ford were heard conversing. According to reporters
present, the Israeli Foreign Minister expressed his thanks and
"satisfaction with your (Ford's) new decision on the modern
(inaudible) and other important items."
Ford was heard to reply that "it obviously was the right
thing to do to make certain that it was no question about the
support and to meet the circumstances that we want to
avoid."
NO AMPLIFICATION of those remarks was given by
the White House or by Allon when he met with reporters
afterwards. At that time, Allon had merely said that "there is
no new arms agreement."
Following the U.S. announcement, both Dr. Kissinger and
Allon explained that Israel provides the U.S. with a "shopping
list" of weapons and related items in which it is interested.
The U.S. then reveals what will be made available to Israel for
purchase, after which it takes month* for the arrangement to
be implemented.
CJF Committee Proposes
Elderly Living Alternatives
apartment living, in the form of
innovative and homelike group
living arrangements," it was
advocated at a recent Seminar
sponsored by the Committee on
Aging of the Council of Jewish/
Federations and Welfare Funds
"The elderly citizen deserves
alternatives to traditional in-
stitutional care and independent
Selma Hopen, chairman of
the recent Jewish Family In-
stitute sponsored by the Wo-
men's Division of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward,
was recently honored as one
of the "Outstanding Women
of the Year" in Broward
County by the Atlantic-Flor-
ida Chapter of Women in
Communications, Inc. Mrs.
Hopen, who was selected in
the Community Involvement
category for her volunteer
services, is active in many fa-
cets of Federation. Women in
Communications, a national
organization for women,
consists of professional and
associate members in journa-
lism and communications.
Charles S. Wolfe was recently
honored as "Man of the
Year" by the Temple Beth El
Brotherhood. Born in New
York, Wolfe attended Yale
University. He is a member of
B'nai B'rith; and a life
member of the Chautauqua
Society, "Fight for Sight"
and the Hope School. Wolfe,
a past president of the
Brotherhood, is a member of
the temple's Board of
Trustees.
Temple Sinai Offers Adult Education
Adult education sessions will
begin at Temple Sinai on
Monday, Oct. 25, and Wed-
nesday, Oct. 27, for 16 weeks.
At 7:30 p.m. on Oct. 25 a one-
hour session in Beginners
Hebrew is offered. Cantor
Yehudah L. Heilbraun will teach
the session for adults interested
in becoming Bat or Bar Mitzvah.
On the same evening, from 8
to 9:30 p.m., there will be a
Parents Education Program
taught by Miles Bunder. This
class is for parents interested in
sharing Jewish learning with
their children, including Jewish
customs, Hebrew and a better
understanding of the prayer
book.
Wednesday morning sessions
include: "Unique Values in
Judaism," a one-hour class
beginning at 10 a.m. and taught
by Rabbi David Shapiro. The
course will highlight the Jewish
value system, recognizing
distinctive Jewish contributions
to society.
Another one-hour session
begins at 11 a.m., titled "The
Jew of America (1654-1976),"
The class taught by Rabbi
Seymour Friedman, Joseph
Kleiman and Leo Klauber on a
rotating basis will feature the
personalities who contributed to
the growth of America and to
the ideas of the American
society.
For parents of students in the
temple's youth and school
programs, Wednesday evening
home study groups will be held,
taught by Rabbi Shapiro and the
rotating faculty.
Classes will have a limited
enrollment, since they will meet
in the homes of participating
students. Classes are available in
Jewish Philosophy and Modern
Jewish Literature.
For further information and
registration, contact Temple
Sinai.
(CJF). at the Waldorf-Astejia
Hotel.
The Seminar, "Options in
Living Arrangements for the
Elderly," focused on pilot
programs in group living for the
aged who are frail but self-
sufficient enough to live together
in small groups, sharing
household tasks, in rented
apartments or purchased town-
houses designed for them, with a
minimum of supervision.
Residents often retain their own
physicians and specialists but
other services are provided in the
community.
The concept allows the elderly
person both anonynimity and in-
dividuality, bolstering his self-
esteem and giving him free
movement within the com-
munity.
Community group living
models were conceived for
elderly citizens who do not need
"packaged" institutional care
but want more than independent
apartment living where no
services are provided.
The Seminar was held during
the four-day Board of Directors
meetings of CJF.
I The CJF is the association of
i central community organizations
Federations, Welfare Funds,
Community Councils serving
800 Jewish communities in the
United States and Canada. It
aids these communities to
mobilize maximum support for
the UJA and other overseas
agencies, as well as for major
national and local services in-
volving financing, planning and
operating health, welfare,
cultural, educational, community
relations, and other programs
benefiting all residents.
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Phone 961 -6998
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Sfco/or of Greater Hollywood Friday, October 22, 1976
Soviet Jews Appeal and Hope
Nearly 100 activists from 14 of the main Soviet centers
addressed an open letter to both United States
Presidential candidates Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter
impressing upon them the importance of maintaining
American pressure on the Soviet leadership to carry out
its commitment under the Helsinki Agreement. The
Appeal read:
It is with great satisfaction and much hope that we
heard about the fact that the questions of freedom of
emigration received great attention in your statements
and your pre-election platforms. Only a really free great
country could show such interest in the fates and the
rights of people of other countries. We understand that the
future President of the USA will be responsible first and
foremost for the American people, but we also hope that
we will continue the American historical tradition with
its deep and principled respects for the rights of man
wherever he lived. This tradition notably distinguishes the
USA among the other nations.
Moth of you have to deal, of course, with much more
pressing problems than the emigration of Jews from the
I SSR. but, at the same time, the observance of human
rights can become a most important test of the sincerity of
the interrelations between great powers and the
Helsinki Conference has confirmed this
Under the pressure of the international public opinion
the Soviet authorities were compelled to allow more than
VIO.OOO Soviet Jews become reunited with their nation.
Yet, at the same time, they created a whole apparatus of
pressure and repressions directed against those who want
to and try to realize their right to emigrate.
The USSR is not fulfilling the obligations it took up in
Helsinki in regards to human rights. Only the continuous
and persistent pressure of the international public opinion
and especially of the American people and its leaders
could make the Soviet Union fulfill these obligations.
There is no doubt that the lives and the freedom of
many people depend on your moral position in in-
ternational politics.
Reports from throughout the Soviet Union indicate that
a record number of Jews celebrated the Jewish New Year.
One participant from I>eningrad said "not only are there
more people than ever before, but it is good to see many
more young men and women in the congregation."
IN MOSCOW, the congregation remembering the
incidents last year when city traffic had been deliberately
diverted down the narrow street outside the synagogue
were again prepared for trouble. But the police, aware of
the outcry caused by the 1975 street fighting, watched
without interfering.
REPORTS FROM RIGA which has no official
synagogue indicate that groups of Jews met all over the
city in private homes.
Arkady Tsinober who played host to such a group,
said "our flat was crowded out. the feeling was one of real
hope After the service we went on for a long time singing
Hebrew songs."
Perhaps the largest congregations were in Minsk. "Not
only was the synagogue filled to overflowing." a Minsk
activist reported, but there were many new young faces.
Some came to pray and some to talk about the prospects
of Aliyu."
Even in remote Tbilisi with one of the most ancient
synagogues in the Soviet Union, where until recently only
elderly Jews worshipped this year's service attracted
many young Georgian and Ashkenazi Jews. Because the
synagogue was full, many stayed outside to exchange
information about their applications to emigrate.
THE GENERAL MOOD throughout the soviet Union
appears to have been buoyant to optimistic. As a Moscow
activist told a friend from London. "You can tell Jews in
the West that they have many friends here. I hope that
next Rosh Hashanah you will have fewer here and a lot of
new ones in Jerusalem."
A Second Question for Carter
fJemisiificrlcH in
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Melvln H Baer Samuel Meline D.M.D
C Fr*4 K. tmtStmt (Friday, October It7*
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DURING AN interview years
ago with Eugene McCarthy on
one of his other runs for the
presidency. a photographer
caught me in an immortal pose
questioning the Senator with one
eye closed and the other
squinting.
In looking at it again today, I
consider the photo just as
eloquent as it was then. On the
occasion of this, his latest run, I
still find McCarthy only half-
believable, and what there is to
believe, I prefer to take with a
grain of salt.
Mindlin
ou -trie way roineu.rJ.
BUT REFERRING recently
to the candidacy of Jimmy
Carter, the Senator hit it
squarely on the head when he
said of Carter's foreign affairs
advisers: "You would not want
to put them in charge of snake
control in Ireland."
Columbia University's Prof.
Zbigniew Brzezinski is what one
loosely calls a Kremlinologist,
and he has a fair track record as
a Soviet specialist.
At least. Prof. Brzezinski's
advice did nothing to prevent
Carter from going for Gerald
Ford's jugular when Ford com-
mitted what may well be the
suicidal blunder of the second
debate Ford's reference to
Eastern Europe as free from
Soviet domination.
MORE TO the point so far as
McCarthy's acid comment was
concerned is former Under-
secretary of State George Mall
who, particularly on issues
relating to the Middle East, has
enough snake oil up his sleeve
for both himself and Prof.
Brzezinski if Brzezinski suffers
the lack of a sufficient supply of
his own.
Mr. Ball, now with Lehman
Brothers of New York, en-
tertains some rather quaint
notions about Israel and the
Arabs which, if he is peddling
them these days to Jimmy
Carter, would of necessity make
me suspicious of Carter's can-
didacy generally and,
specifically, of those sweet
nuggets he served up during the
second debate in his repeated
references to Israel and to his
personal commitment to Israel's
survival.
That is why. in this column
Continued on Page 13-A
Friday. Oct. 22. 1976
Volume 6
Number 22
28 Tishri 5737
WASHINGTON The
United States had a secret spat
with Mexico earlier this year
over illegal aliens. Here are the
backstage details.
There are between six and
eight million illegal aliens in this
country today. The Immigration
Service calls them "illegals."
About 60 percent of them
came from Mexico. They came
here, as our own forefathers did.
in search of a better life. But un-
fortunately, their presence has
stirred up resentment. They are
willing to work for low wages.
Therefore, they have taken jobs
from U.S. citizens.
IN THE past, the Im-
migration Service rounded up
these illagal aliens and simply
dumped them on the Mexican
border. But this year, im-
migration officials decided to try
a more humane experiment.
They also reasoned that the
illegals would be less likely to
return to the United States if
they were repatriated close to
their homes.
So the Immigration Service
hired a small charter airline
company to fly the illegals back
into the interior of Mexico.
rather than releasing them at the
border.
THIS UPSET the Mexican
government, which had not been
notified. So Mexican officials,
understandably, refused to
cooperate. The State De-
partment sent trouble-shooting
diplomats to smooth things over.
They reached a new agreement
after two months of delicate
negotiations.
Mexican illegals are now being
shipped into the interior on
regularly scheduled flights,
instead of charter planes. Each
illegal is also interviewed by a
Mexican consul before he is
accepted back into Mexico.
Since July, about 7,600
?xican illegals have been
atria ted
U.S. Had Secret Spat With
Mexico Over Aliens
jeckenderso
NOBLE STROM: It is our
peculiar function to cover the
shady side of Washington. We
expose the villains in the drama
of government the self-seekers
who put their personal interests
ahead of the public welfare.
Yet the public should be
reminded occasionally that there
are more decent, honest, hard-
working officials in Washington
than there are scoundrels. Nor is
it always easy to separate the
wheat from the chaff. The sellout
in government one day may be
the holdout the next. For even
the worst rascals in Washington
have their moments of
righteousness.
We've often had the occasion,
for example, to criticize old
Strom Thurmond. He's the
Republican senator from South
Carolina, an unreconstructed son
of the Confederacy. He was one
of the last to accept the idea of
civil rights. He still seems to live
in an antebellum world of mint
juleps and magnolia blossoms.
BUT THERE'S another side
to Strom Thurmond. A couple of
weeks ago he received a touching
letter from a Columbia, S.C.,
man named Richard Davis.
Davis reported that his 84-
year-old mother appeared to be
dying and wanted only one last
thing from this world. She
wanted to be buried next to her
husband.
But the military bureaucracy,
it turned out. intended to keep
the couple apart, even in death.
The husband had been buried
years ago in a part of South
Carolina which is now Fort
Jackson. Military regulations
prevented the widow from being
buried in the same plot.
THURMOND WAS swamped
with work in the closing days of
Congress. Yet he dropped what
the world might have considered
to be more important work He
moved heaven and red tape to
help the elderly Mrs. Davis
before she died. Congress has
seldom acted so swiftly.
Thurmond got a law passed to
let the widow Davis lie beside
her husband.
There's still a happier ending
to the story. After the law was
passed. Mrs. Davis began to
| recuperate. She is still very
much alive.
Meanwhile, old Strom, with-
out ever expecting a word of
praise, least of all from us, was
so moved by her situation that
he drafted another bill. This
would prevent such cruelty from
ever happening again to the
hundreds of other elderly Amer-
icans who also have loved ones
buried on what is now military
land
CHILE PLOT?: Orlando
Letelier, the former Chilean am-
bassador who recently died in a
bomb blast on Washington's
Embassy Row, had been meeting
secretly with representatives of
Chile's Christian Democratic
Party. They were discussing
plans to form a coalition move
ment to oppose the Chilean
dictatorship.
At first, the military junta
merely outlawed the Com-
munists and the Socialists. They
gave lip service to Chile's tra-
ditional democracy. But we have
spoken with Chilean sources,
whose reliability cannot be
questioned. They report that the
military dictatorship has now set
out to destroy the moderate
Continued on Page 13


Friday, October 22, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
Why we can depend on
President Ford.
Resident Ford has demonstrated his
dependability over 28 years.. .as a
Congressman, Vice-President and
President. We can believe him when
he speaks out on these crucial
issues...
Israel
"There will be no imposed solutions,
but agreements whose terms are
hammered out between the parties."
"There will be no one-sided
concessions."
"We will proceed as we have in the
closest constant consultations with
Israel."
"1 am proud to stand on my
consistent 28-year record of support
for Israel. You know where I stand."
"The funds 1 proposed for Israel in
my first two budgets totaled over $4
billion for 27 months. These figures
speak more eloquently than words."
Soviet Jewry
"1 will continue to seek further
progress on the issue of emigration
from the Soviet Union. 1 raised it
personally with General Secretary
Brezhnev. 1 have discussed it on
many occasions with my former
colleagues in the House and in the
Senate with the determination to
restore the prior rate of emigration."
Zionism and the UN
"I tell you now that we will fight any
measure that condemns Zionism as
racism or that attempts to deny Israel
her full rights of membership in the
United Nations."
Terrorism
"A free people must never capitulate
to terrorism...Certainty of
punishment prevents crime. I very
strongly urge international action to
stamp out terrorism wherever it may
occur."
"The Entebbe raid on July 4 was a
magnificent display of heroism and
dedication really unmatched in recent
history throughout the world."
Arab Boycott
"I opposed Arab boycott practices
when I was in Congress...As
President, I have taken the strongest
executive action in American history
against economic practices that
discriminate against American
citizens."
U.S. AID TO ISRAEL
(Shown in Millions of Dollars)
Performance
Not Promises
4,500
4.4J9.7
"As good a friend
as Israel's had!"
Jtmiih m *m*nc*n litmmei. August 22 i. IB76
We agree that President Ford is such
a friend.
That's why we can depend on him.
"The U.S. government supports Israel in the
international arena, in the supply of arms
and in economic aid almost with no
precedence. The margin between what we
want and what we get is very small. "
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin
Rabbinical Council of America
August, 1976
"A review of President Gerald Ford's record
in Congress offers strong assurance that the
United States will continue to be deeply
concerned about Israel's security and the
search for an Arab-Israel peace...
' 'The best reassurance is the consensus on
Ford's character, revealed over the years. He
is an honest man who has always spoken
frankly and who is unlikely to yield to
political and diplomatic convenience. "
I.L. Kenen
Near East Report
August 14. 1974
President Ford.
We know
we can depend
on him.

j


Page 6
The Jewish Ftoridian and S ho far ofGrtaUr Hollywood
Pridy, October 22, 1976
Arabs Destroy Religious Articles
I filing |
By GIL SEDAN
And DAVID LANDAU
HEBRON (JTA) -
The government is trying
desperately to cool in-
flamed passions that
erupted over the Yom Kip-
pur weekend in a bitter
clash between religious
Jews and Arabs in this
West Bank town, site of
shrines sacred to both the
Jewish and Moslem faiths.
The events touched off
rioting in other West Bank
towns and villages during
which numerous Arabs
were arrested and several
wounded in skirmishes
with Israeli troops and
border police.
THEY ALSO resulted in a
sharp polarization of opinion
among Israeli Jews with
potentially far-reaching political
repercussions for the Rabin
government.
The violence was precipitated
by the destruction of Jewish
religious artifacts in the Much
pela Cave (Tomb of the
Patriarchs) where Jews and
Moslems are permitted to
worship, but at separate times.
According to eye-witnesses,
the cave was entered Sunday
morning by a "frenzied mob" of
about 200 Arab youths who left
the Jewish area in shambles,
ripping Sifrei Torahs and
prayerbooks and smashing and
scattering the furnishings.
Those acts followed what local
Arabs charged was the
deliberate desecration of the
Koran. the Moslem holy
scriptures, by Jews from the
nearby Orthodox township of
Kiryat Arba.
-EWISH WORSHIPPERS
arriving at the cave later Sunday
for prayers to usher in Yom
Kippur. were greeted by the
scene of destruction. According
to eye-witnesses, they were
stunned and then infuriated.
One eye-witness reported that
a fistfight developed between
two Jews and several Arabs
inside the shrine when Jews dis-
covered that an altar cloth had
been torn.
Soldiers intervened to keep the
clash from spreading But
tempers were already running
high because of an incident the
previous day when Israeli
soldiers prevented Kiryat Arba
Jews from conducting Sabbath
services at the old Ohel
Avraham synagogue a few yards
from the Machpela Cave.
THEIR PURPOSE was to
avoid a Jewish-Arab con-
frontation such as have occurred
frequently in recent weeks.
Jewish worshippers were
removed bodily from the site in
the presence of Arab onlookers.
Israeli troops feared the Arabs
might be tempted to join in
hustling Jews away and the
Military Governor thereupon
declared the entire market area
adjoining the shrines closed to
all
At about the same time,
rumors spread like wildfire
among Hebron Arabs that Jews
had torn and trampled the Koran
in the Machpela Cave. The
Military Governor, Gen. David
Hagoel, visited the scene.
According to Military Govern-
ment sources, a Koran was found
on the floor though not
damaged.
NEVERTHELESS, "the sight
was definitely provocative," a
military source said. It was
viewed by Mayor Fahed
Kawassme of Hebron, Sheikh
Hilmi Al Muhatassib, head of
the Moslem Council in
Jerusalem, and Hassan Tahbub,
director of the Waqf. the Moslem
religious organization which is
the legal owner of the cave.
however, prepared a memo con-
demning the act which was
broadcast by radio throughout
the Arab world.
m
I B3yCkQROUn6 I
niiiiiimiiiiiiiiimimimFr
The Jewish officers and
Moslem dignitaries reportedly
agreed on the need to calm
tempers. The Moslem leaders.
THE MOSLEM leadership
published a condemnation of
those acts. Muhatassib ex-
pressed painful regret over the
desecration of Jewish articles, as
well as of the Koran. Kawassme
urged all parties to act with
restraint, an appeal echoed in the p"ve A P:ial police task force
desecration occurred too quickly
to have been prevented. Police
reinforcements forcibly broke up
the mob. Sixty Arab youths
were injured in the melee, four of
them requiring hospitalization.
Security sources reported that
more than 50 Arabs are being
held in custody on suspicion of
having participated in the
desecration.
MANY WERE said to have
been apprehended inside the
East Jerusalem Arab newspaper
Al-Quds.
Rut the grief and anger of
Orthodox Jews was boundless.
Israeli military sources said the
Arab invasion of the cave and
has been set up to investigate
the incident with the aim of
bringing to trial those Arabs
found to have been directly
involved.
The army has replaced the
desecrated articles and permitted
Kiryat Arba Jews to conduct
Yom Kippur services at the cave.
Immediately following the
holiday, there was a ritual burial
of the mutilated Sifrei Torah and
prayerbooks which, according to
Orthodox tradition, must be
mourned in the same manner as
a deceased person.
Ashkenazic Chief Rabbi
Shlomo Goren visited the cave
shortly after Yom Kippur to
begin the delicate task of
retrieving the remains.
Sephardic Chief Rabbi Ovadia
Yosef was also at the scene.
THE ARMY conducted the
burial at the Jewish cemetery
here.
'
CAN JIMMY CARTER KEEP THE PROMISE?
The American Jewish community Is now searching
its minds and hearts. A decision must be made on
November 2nd.
But it is not just a decision on who's going to be our
next President
There is much more at stake here: the justice and
equalty promised by our Constitution. And the survival
of a promised land, Israel.
The records of the candidates must be examined.
Carefully and objectively. For unless a President attends
to human rights and decency at home, he wiH neglect
them in foreign affairs also. If the American Jewish
community takes the time to judge each candidate on
these terms, there should be no doubtno doubt
whatsoeverthat Jimmy Carter should be the next
President of the United States.
THE FORD ADMINISTRATION
HAS IGNORED THE NEEDS
OF THE AVERAGE AMERICAN...
When Gerald Ford took office, there were 5 million
persons unemployed. That number has increased to
7 1/2 milkon people. We've seen inflation soar, while
pressing needs in health care, housing and education go
unmet. We've seen a growing lack of confidence in our
country's institutions, arising from a lack of confidence in
our government.
YET IT HAS ACCOMMODATED
SPECIAL INTERESTS.
The Ford Administration in 1975 refused to allow the
Commerce Department to disclose to Congress reports
by American corporations participating in the Arab
boycott, until Commerce Secretary Morton was cited for
contempt
THE FORD ADMINISTRATION
HAS BROKEN AMERICA'S
PROMISE TO ISRAEL...
In March, 1975. the Ford Administration "reassessed'
America's relationship with Israel This included a virtual
embargo of critical military aid. the outright stalling of
badly needed funds, and a verbal attack branding Israel as
'short-sighted'' and "needlessly intransigent"
BUT THEY HAVENT BROKEN
THEIR PROMISE TO THE ARAB STATES
THAT THREATEN TO DESTROY HER.
Since 1974. the Ford Administration has provided Arab
States on Israel's borders and in the Persian Gulf with $8
billion worth of military equipment.
In Jury of 1975. the Ford Administration sought to
supply Jordan with highly mobile Hawk missiles and only
after intense Congressional pressure, assured that the
missiles would be non- mobile.
JIMMY CARTER'S COMMITMENTS ARE UNSHAKABLE AND
UNMISTAKABLE. THE PROMISE WILL BE KEPT.
f
u
1 The test of any government is not
how popular it is with the powerful, but how honestly and
fairly it deals with the many who must depend on it. AA
u
1 Our nation should make it
clear that a basic cornerstone of our foreign poky is the
preservation of a strong and secure Israel. Ai
On social services:
"The Republican Administrations have
reduced, underfunded and vetoed virtually
every social service program proposed.
The Carter Administration seeks to restore
hopeour young, families and elderly
should not have to worry whether their
basic needs will be met."
On health care:
"We need a nationwide health care delivery
system. The Carter Administration is
committed to freedom from fear of illness
and so is the Jewish community
throughout America. We know this job can
and will be done."
On cultural neighborhoods:
'We can have an America that encourages
and takes pride in our ethnic diversity, our
religious diversity and our cultural diversity
We know that our pluralistic heritage has
become the strength and vitality and
creativity that made our nation great and
will keep us great."
On the Arab oil embargo:
"I would make it clear to the Arab countries
that if they ever again try to blackmail this
country as they did in 1973. we would
consider it. not a military, but an economic
declaration of war. We would respond by
declaring a total embargo again*:
themno food, no weapons, no spare
parts for weapons, no nothing."
On Arab boycotts:
"We ought to resist all attempts by foreign
governments to impose racial or religious
discrimination on American citizens as the
price of doing business. The Department of
Commerce has shut its eyes to the boycott
Jimmy Carter received the coveted
Eleanor Roosevelt-Israel Humanities
Award in 1973 from Israel
Ambassador Simcha Dinrtz.
by failing to collect information on alleged
offenses and failing to carry out a firm policy
against the boycott. All laws concerning
these boycotts should be vigorously
enforced and legislation should be passed to
make compliance with any secondary
boycott against Israel illegal."
On Soviet Jewry:
"I would not hesitate to use trade pressure to
encourage the Soviet Union to allow the
emigration of Jewish citizens. The
Jackson Vanik Amendment which is now
the law of the land will be effectively
implemented by a Carter/Mondale
Administration."
On his religious beliefs:
"Our nation was founded by those who
demanded religious freedom and
respected relgious diversity. I believe faith
is a deeply personal matter. One of the
basic tenets of mine is the complete
separation of Church and State. But I can
also say with pride that the very essence of
my faith is the very essence of the Jewish
faith. Its roots are imbedded in the Judeo
Christian tradition of a well-integrated
family life, a fair and just legal order and the
principles of ethics and morality. Its highest
ideals are based on love of one's fellow
man and respect for his personal beliefs."
THESE LEADERS IN YOUR COMMUNITY ENDORSE JIMMY CARTER.
i
Ann* Ackermon
Michael Adler
Santael Adler
Bernardo tanas
Hslene Berger
Han. Elaine Bloom
Marvin S. Cassel
Myro Farr
David I. Fleeman
Mormon M. Giller
B.B. GoMstaia
Goldie R. Golds tern
Hon. Jock Gordon
Hon. Rom Gordon
Hon. Marshall S. Harris
Arthur Horowitz
Bonny Horowitz
J.H. Konter
Donald Lofton
Moo La via
Norman H. Lipoff
Barnard S. Mandler
Allan Mandler
Allan B. Morgan's
Allan Merrier
Sylvan H. Mayor
Hon. Phyllis Millar
Harris Millmon
Hon. Kenneth Myers
Stanley C. Myers
E. Albert PoMof
Donald j. Reiff
Howard R. Scharlin
Judge Herbert S. Shapiro
Kenneth J. Schwartz
Morton Silbormon
Val Silberman
EliTimoner
R abort H. Tioorhj
Helen Weisbarg
Dr. Robert WoH
Joseph P. Zackermon
VOTE FOR JIMMY CARTER, DEMOCRAT FOR PRESIDENT.
Paid for and authorised by 1976 Democratic Presidential Campaign Committee. Inc.


-
Friday. October 22, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
WE EACH
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PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT..
OCT. 23 AT ALL PANTRY PRIDES
FROM FT. PIERCE TO KEY WEST
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Saltines
1 LB
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BTL.
49
IT LIMIT ONE ill WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF 7 00 OR MORE
EXCLUDING CICARETTES
ASSORTED OR DECORATED
ScoH
Towels
140
SHEET
ROLL
39
If LIMIT TWO ROLLS WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF $7 00 OR MORE
EXCIUOINC CICARETTES
PANTRY PRIDE
Meat
Franks
12 OZ
PKG.
59
f)f LIMIT TWO PKCS WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF 17 00 OR MORE
EXCIUOINC CICARETTES
BORDEN
Sour
Cream
PINT
CONT.
45
J
4f LIMIT TWO CTNS WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF $7 00 OR MORE
EXCIUOINC CIGARETTES
~k CUSTOMER MAY PURCHASE AIL THE STARRED ITEMS WITH ONE S7 00 ORDER OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
Bargains in Grocery & Frozen Foods!
PANTRY PRIDE
Fruit
Drinks
DELTA
Bath
Tissue
ORANGE
GRAPE
FRUIT PUNCH
46-OZ.
CAN
Realemon Juice.............".f 69c
Tomatoes 3 Wrt
Tea Bags 38 99*
CHt MHAVUI Ot
Schmidts ..
500
SHEET I
ROLL PKG.
CAINAllOK
Coffee Mate
moo nouto
.... $i
Diet Drinks
Nit. eiiM fnoziN
Orange Juice
anibv eiioi teoziN
Cut Corn
no. SI 49
.......iai *
3.0-OI QQc
CANS *M +M
5 SS $1
29
10.01
MO
ZESTY ANDTANGY
Heinz
Kosher Dills
FROZEN
Sara Lee
Pound Cake
32 OZ
IAN
10- .-OZ.
PKG
Bargains in Dairy & Dei Depts.!
i
FIO SUN
Orange
Juice
PANTRY PRIDE WIDE
Sliced
Bologna
QT
CONTS
VACUUM
PACKED
Bargains in Meat and Poultry!
US.DA.
CHOICE
Beef Loin
Sirloin Steak
USOA CHjOKa Wilt COM MO Ml* OHfCI Mil )
Shoulder Pot Roast
UN Quid atOItd
use* choki wist com no Mir too***
*ll* Btm. Round Roast......
IP* t#un 'wi. j, j. FtlSH
Turkey Drumsticks ,. 39 Ground Beef......._____
n29
79
us** choki svtiT com fie sctf cmwch
Blade Steaks
HUM CHO0C1 WIST COtH Ml> tOM
. 7 9c Porterhouse Steak .. 1"
Beef
Brisket
U S.D.A. CHOICE
WHOLE OR POINT HALF
BONELESS
USOA 'MOKI Will COIN MO SMAll !* Sllf
Rib Steak -*.
Ma| ailMIURa 'RISH
Fryer Quarters
ll* Ol IMIRRII RIIMIUM WMOsI
Fryor Porta 99s Fresh Fryers
mown. MMtai neu **' mmm
,. 59*
.49*
Lots 0
Chicken
FIA OR SHIPPED
PREMIUM
EACH PKG CONSISTS Ol
3 WINGS 3 NECKS
3 OIBIET PKGS
3 BREAST Q1RS W BACKS
3LEGOIRS Vw BACKS
Bargains in Fresh Produce!
FIRST OF THE SEASON
WHITE SEEDLESS
American WagS* W9m" Salami or Bologna 'XL*% 1s
CottTg. Cheese___**99 Katd^orKni^cto^^ *V
airii ouna oMVajOAf oe -*.,-.
LISCAl All RIAVOtS -R*. ^t* 11 a I ______ eifiO
Yogurt_________4 S r
Grapefruit
OauHttTIHW
Cranberries
Face Pumpkin*
Eggplants
wns iii Servrce Appefixerf
Lemons
_ 8
-jr. 29* Idaho Polato'es 5 .i." 79*
' 10 Si69* nerida Okra_______-^ 39*
AUGUST itOS.
Rye Bread
49c
i. < MRM *"" otoi o
Cooked Salami
Salads-
MB..
LOAF
Nova Salmon
an u""i.
Citsrag IrsMt
i. 69*
_*49*
TenderCarrotsG"N2.l.c 35c
Red Grapes
Oranges
EMPEROR
TOP QUALITY
FIRST OF
THE SEASON C/-I
FLORIDA rUK
LARGF I 25 SIZE

WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES. NONE SOID TO DEALERS.


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, October 22.1976
EDITOR. The Jewish Floridian:
In your Fort Lauderdale issue
of Aug. 20, 1976, we read with
interest Ms. Panoffs review of
Rose Kushner's book, "Breast
Cancer." While most of th<
points raised in the review are
very worthwhile and valid, we
would like to take strong issue
with several.
We. too, agree that choosing a
doctor is very important to
achieve quality medical care,
especially when it involves
surgery. However, her choice of
oncologist is misleading. A
medical oncologist is a doctor of
internal medicine specializing in
cancer and primarily in treat-
ments using chemotherapeutic
agents, or drug therapy, for
cancer. He also directs patients
to radiation therapy and surgery.
Medical oncologists, by and
large, have very little contact
with or experience in dealing with
breast lumps.
IN THIS country breast
surgery is the specialty of general
surgeons. No other doctors are so
trained or qualified to diagnose
breast lumps, whether benign or
malignant. While there are a few
general surgeons who do
specialize only in cancer, their
numbers are indeed very small,
such as one or two in South
Florida and maybe three or four
in the entire city of New York, for
example.
The thousands of women each
day or week with breast lumps or
the thousands each year with
breast cancer would not be able
to find a doctor if they confined
their efforts only to cancer
specialists or cancer centers in
this country.
General surgeons who see
hundreds and thousands of
patients with breast lumps
annually do know how to dif-
ferentiate between benign and
malignant lumps. Physical
examinations. x-ray
examinations, such as mam
mograms, needle aspirations of
cysts and finally biopsies are the
methods used.
Using Ms. Kushner's
suggestion would cut off and
delay the detection of cancer and
treatment needlessly to
thousands who now get prompt,
personal and very up-to-date and
highly qualified treatment from
many well-trained and ex-
perienced general surgeons
throughout this country.
OUR
Reaoeps
wRite
"Let Thy Words Be Brief"
KoheUth (EccUsiastei)
and better cosmeticalry than the
standard radical mastectomy
formerly used (that is, leaving
the large chest wall muscle in the
arm in place rather than
removing it).
Less than total mastectomy is
under present knowledge an
experimental operation as yet
unproven in long-term curee and
used only in highly selected cases
and by those surgeons engaged in
clinical research with the per-
mission of their patients Most
cancer centers in this country
tend to be more than less radical
in their treatment of breast
Shalom Hadassah To Hold Luncheon
MEDICAL oncologists
specialize primarily in the
treatment of advanced breast
cancer and in supplementary
chemotherapy of primary breast
cancer. Most patients going to
medical centers are treated by
residents with the supervision of
professors.
To address the issue of other
options in treatment of breast
cancer, Ms. Kushner alludes to
other alternatives, such as partial
mastectomy, x-ray and
chemotherapy. All these
treatments are useful under
specific indications, but they are
not necessarily options to be
chosen by patients as if shopping
for various brands of a com-
mercial product. These options
may be chosen by doctors who
take into consideration the
patient, her condition generally
and the size, location, extent and
type of breast cancer.
Under the presently acceptable
treatment by most experts on
breast cancer in this country, the
treatment of primary breast
cancer involves total mastectomy
and removal of lymph nodes.
Anything less leaves the patient
with a risk of not removing all the
cancer.
IN THE last eight to ten years
most experienced and up-to-date
surgeons agree that modified
radical mastectomy is now as
effective and far less debilitating
The one-step biopsy-
mastectomy method is neither
blind nor is it less desirable. But
most surgeons will agree to
biopsy-only operations; in recent
years, however, it has been my
experience with this procedure
that if the biopsy proves malig-
nant, the patients are usually
sorry that they did not allow the
surgeon to go ahead with the
mastectomy during the first
operation rather than undergo
two surgeries.
Ms. Kushner's statement and
Ms. Panoffs review are very mis-
leading on these issues and.
further, may undermine the
adjustments and the confidence
of many hundreds of mastectomy
patients successfully treated and
facing treatment with newly dis-
covered breast lumps.
I.nstly. we commend Ms.
Kushner's comments on the psy-
chological adjustments and the
practical help she provides for
breast cancer patients.
Arthur I. Segaul, M.D., FACS
President,
Broward Surgical Society
A. A. Goodman, M.D., FACS
Alan Goldenberg, M.D.. FACS
Members of the
Executive Committee.
Broward Surgical Society
BrandeLs Women hold Meeting
The opening meeting of the
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee of Holly-
wood was to be held on Thur-
INTERNATIONAL
AAARRIAGE CONSULTANTS
Dr. John S. Sanders & Staff of Sydney, Australia
Seek American Jewish Wives for
Australian Jewish Gentlemen
Interviews may now be scheduled for early November in Miami
through the facilities of:
INTItSTATE PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
IPS of JACKSONVILLE. INC.
3986 BL.VD CTR. DR.. JAX. FLA 32207
(904)391 8310
Authorized agents for Dr. John S. Sanders l Staff in U.S.A.
In Australia there are TENS OF THOUSANDS OF MEN WHO WILL
NEVER MARRY for the simple reason there are not enough women.
In the United States the reverse situation applies MILLIONS OF
WOMEN WILL NEVER MARRY because of the shortage of men.
All of Dr Sanders male clients are of impeccable character, sound
financial status and have stable employment records. If you are
widowed, divorced or single and can substantiate a responsible
life style and sincere desire for a compatible marnoge partner,
you ore invited to contact IPS of Jacksonville, Inc. for a private
and strictly confidential interview.
sday. Oct. 21. at the Hollywood
Art and Culture Center, 1301 S.
Ocean Drive.
Dr. J. K. Kerrigan, assistant
professor in the Life Sciences
Center of Nova University, was
to be the guest speaker. His
subject was "Daily Rhythms
Why We Have Good and Bad
Days."
Plans for study groups in
courses in French, arts and
crafts, current events, literary
sessions and lectures on "Your
Life as a Woman" were to be
presented. Registration for the
courses was to be accepted.
The Shalom group of Holly-
wood Hadassah will hold their
fifth annual Hadassah Medical
Organization Luncheon on
Wednesday, Oct. 27, noon, at the
Reef restaurant.
All proceeds from the lun
cheon will go toward the
Hadassah Medical Organization
Pearl Wendell is chairperson of
the event.

Marine Supplies
Hardware I Paint, Inc.
Hoosewares A Gifts
Home Decor
Patio I Dinette Furniture Bath Closet Shop
BEADED WINDOWS
WINDOW SHADES
DRAPERY RODS
WALLPAPER
KEY LOCK WORK
Store Hoars: 7:30 a.m. 6 pan. Closed Sunday
100 East Beach Boulevard
HaUendeio, Florida 33009
Phone 927 0566
ROOM DIVIDERS
ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS
FOLI AGE
PLANTS
PATIO FURNITURE
WALDMAIM'S,
MIAMI BEACH'S FINEST GLATT
KOSHER HOTEL
REOPENS NOVEMBER 25th
4 DAT 3 NIGHT
THANKSGIVING
WEEKEND
*S9
BJrV ^WPer person,
includes meals,,tax and
gratuities. Free serf-porking
Groups mviied
Phone 538-5731
Ocean at 44 St
Miami Beach
H01LT WOOD'S LABOKATOtY
FOB PROCESSING KODAK'S COLOR FILMS
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
Branch Sfores
MAIN STORE AND PLANT
2000 NORTH DIXIE HIGHWAY
PHONE: 920 B021
Monday thru Friday 8 to 5:30
Saturday 9 00 to 1:00
4551 Hollywood Blvd.
911 1555
BIB Atlantic Shores Blvd.
9203719
U04 N. University Drive
Phone: 962-0999


[riday. October 22, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Skofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
tySacflS Association Forms Beth E1 Si8terhood Brtffle Transcribing Offered At Beth El
South Broward Chapter To Hear 0pu8 Sin8;cre
A Broward County chapter of
he National Tay-Sacha and
[Hied Disease Association is
Ping formed, with headquarters
Community Hospital of South
(roward, according to Erwin
[brams, hospital administrator.
THE GOAL of this new or-
ganization," Abrams said, "is to
id in the total eradication by
sting of a disease that is
lways fatal. Recant medical
dvances have made possible the
ttection of this incurable
edition in unborn children by a
imple test during the early
tages of pregnancy to determine
nether the fetus is afflicted,
("here is a 25 percent chance that
will be if both parents are Tay-
achs carriers. Carriers of the
pno, both male and female, can
so be detected prior to
i;nancy."
The first meeting of the new
ispter was held on Oct. 20,
flighted by Dr. Paul Tocci,
m^ram director of the Genetic
rv ices Laboratory at the
uilman Center for Child
ewlopment a part of the
niversity of Miami School of
dicine.
TAY-SACHS IS a
generative, hereditary disorder
suiting in blindness, seizures,
lal mental retardation, com-
eie motor paralysis and,
tally, death before the victim
idies the age of five," ex-
ained Dr. Tocci. "There is no
tatment for the disease; the
ipe lies in identifying carriers
<: providing genetic coun-
Bng,
lay-Sachs disease is 100
lies more common among one
every 27 Ashkenazic Jews
rries the Tay-Sachs gene, and
ie of every 3,200 babies is a
i> Sachs child. The carrier rate
Sephardic Jews and non-Jews
>ne in 300.
A SIMPLE blood test can
t ermine whether either parent
a carrier of the gene. Where
v one parent is a carrier, there
no danger of a Tay-Sachs
nh, although the odds are then
m two that his or her
Jdren will be carriers capable
passing on the disease to the
xt generation. If both parents
rry Tay-Sachs, one in four of
eir children will probably have
disease," Dr. Tocci con-
fined
"Even Jews past the child-
"ring age should be tested so
at their children can be in-
med as to the possibility of
ing carriers. Community
spital is one of the testing
nters, with blood samples
(en in our laboratory free of
' or jrroi Jewish food...
Oomt to Twelve Tribes.
M 123rd Street
il Eott of Biscoyne Blvd
'JorthMiom
OPEN
MGHTUY
430 PM
'EXCEPT MONDAY)
k. 883 5600
ISRAEL
$664!
FLORIDA TO I LORIDA
IM'
AIH THAVrI HOTELS
t'ransurs taxis .
ANDSIMVICI CMARGfcS
SHALOM TOURS
TRANS Ol YMPIA TOURS
1800 S.. Young Cin
Molltj ^.....i I i
925 8??0 MIAMI 944 4879
charge. A donation to the
Mailman Center is requested,
however," stated Abrams.
Interested South Broward
area residents, particularly Tay-
Sachs parents, are invited to
become active in this new
organization. For further in-
formation, contact Community
Hospital of South Broward or
the Mailman Center.
An evening of entertainment
by the Opus III Singers will be
presented on Nov. 4 at 8 p.m. by
the Temple Beth El Sisterhood.
The program in the tem-
ple's Tobin Auditorium will
feature two hours of songs,
dances and humor from Broad-
way musical comedies, as well as
opera, arias, duets and quartets
by a variety of entertainers.
The public is invted to attend.
For ticket information, contact
Temple Beth El.
Hollywood's Temple Beth El
is offering a Braille Transcribing
course beginning in November,
according to Mrs. Caryl Feld-
man, coordinator of the program.
A limited enrollment is open
to those interested in performing
the valuable service of producing
.material for the blind.
Sponsored by the temple's
Sisterhood "Service to the
Blind" program, the course will
enable students to qualify for
certification by the Library of
Congress. Mrs. Thelma Kurzrock
will teach the course, which will
meet once a week for 20 weeks.
For further information,
| contact the temple.
UNIVERSITY MALL
(University Dr. Hollywood Bird)
PEMBROKE PINES
Sunny and Rot
PHONE: BROWARD963-3660 DADE 621 1333
HAROLD A. COHEN, m.o.pjl
ANNOUNCtS THE OPINING
OF AN ADDITIONAL OFFICE
IN HALL AND ALE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
PLASTIC SURGERY
SUITE 311
2510 t. MLLMMLC IUCH 11*1.
UUMtLE. FLORIO* 33001
SUITE C
4420 mMDU STREET
MOIUWOOO. FLMIDi 33021
962-1696
(irc.it Italian Resorts take vou to the
Caribbean
& South America
Bonus!
Federico C. Theme Cruises
The Wines of Italy
12-Day Cruise Nov. 28,1976
Italian Gourmet Cuisine
11-Day Cruise Dec. 10.1976
Discover the pleasure of good living at Sea! Experts and aficionados present
a program dedeciated to heighten your enjoyment and appreciation of the wines of Italy.
On the Italian Gourmet Cruise. Marina Polvay will share some of her Italian recipes with you
and bring you closer to the secrets and harmony of Italian cuisine.
Country 1 Western Music
10-Day Cruise January 5. 1977
A Caribbean cruise with a country beat! The "Bill Anderson Show at Sea*'
will star Bill Anderson, and feature Mary Low Turner, and one of
Country Music's top bands, the Po" Boys.
All this is in addition to our regularly featured orchestra and entertainment.
./, Federico C
Cruise
to ports such as San Juan.
St. Thomas. Antigua.
Martinique. Trinidad.
Caracas (Venezuela).
Aruba. Cartagena
(Colombia). Panama.
Montego Bay. Port-au-
Prince (HaitiI. Curacao.
A choice of 10. II. 12. 14.
15 day air/sea packages.
h
s Italia
m
Cruise
lo ports such as San Juan,
St. Thomas. Antigua.
Guadeloupe. Martinique.
Barbados. Caracas
(Venezuela). Curacao.
Aruba, Cartagena
(Colombia) Port Antonio.
Panama. Port-au-Prince
(Haiti). Cap Haitien
(Haiti) A choice of 10.
II. 14. 16 day air/sea
packages
Ships are Italian Registry.
Sec your travel agent or Costa Line
I Biscaync Tower. Miami, Fla. J3131
Tel: O0$) 358-7 J95
_ltsa
Roman
Holiday

For more information and reservations contact AMERICAN EXPRESS
OPEN SATURDAY North Miami Beach
1735 N.E. 163 Street Telephone 945-0835


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, October 22, 1975
1111111111T n Tm 11111111111111 u u 111 in 1
Conservative
Rabbis Take
Part In
Conversions
The great majority of Conservative rabbis are hospitable
to, and participate in conversion programs, according to a
survey recently completed, it was announced by Rabbi Stanley
Rabinowitz of Washington, D.C., president of the Rabbinical
Assembly.
With 166 of its almost 1,000 members answering the
questionnaire on conversion, the Rabbinical Assembly survey,
conducted by Chaplain Gary L. Atkins, now serving in the
U.S. Air Force in the Philippines, indicated that over 90
percent have positive feelings about conversion, or accept it as
a valid aspect of contemporary Jewish life.
Only one of the rabbis refuses to participate in con-
versions, with another two stating that they do their best to
discourage individuals seeking to convert. Over 42 percent of
those answering the questionnaire favor positive programs of
conversion, with an additional 50 percent accepting con-
versions, particularly among intermarried couples, as a normal
aspect of rabbinical life.
Daniel Patrick Moynihan, former U.S. permanent
representative to the United Nations, will be the major
speaker at the 31st annual Weizmann Dinner on Monday at
the New York Hilton Hotel, it was announced by Stephen L.
Stulman. president of the American Committee for the
Weizmann Institute of Science, sponsors of the dinner.
The guest of honor will be Edgar M. Bronfman, chairman
and chief executive officer of the Seagram Company. Ltd.
Bronfman is the recipient-designate of the Weizmann
Medallion, which is awarded annually at the Weizmann dinner
for distinguished service to science. Israel and the Jewish
people.
Another featured speaker will be Prof. Michael Sela. the
sixth president of the Weizmann Institute of Science at
Rehovot. Israel.
Florida could gain $50 million a year more in federal aid in
coming years because of a mid-decade census and annual
estimate bill, passed by the House and Senate prior to its
adjoournmg in Washington last week, that will help target
federal spending more accurately by providing better
population information.
The measure. H.R. 11337. was introduced in the Senate by
Sen. Richard Stone and in the House of Representatives by
Rep. Patricia Schroeder of Colorado. Rep. William Lehman
and Rep. Dante Fascell supported it.
H.R. 11887 mandates an accurate population count every
five years, instead of every ten. It also requires the Census
Bureau to publish estimates of total population and other
population characteristics annually where possible.
A check for $2,500. together with a message of support,
has been delivered to the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People from the National Council of
Jewish Women.
Calling the $1.2 million lawsuit against the NAACP "a
tremendous injustice," Esther R. Landa. national president of
the National Council of Jewish Women, expressed to NAACP
Executive Director Roy Wilkins the hope that the
organization will be successful in its struggle to avert what
could mean financial ruin if NAACP is unable to raise the
money needed to post a bond required as a result of the court
award arising out of the 1966 boycott in Port Gibson, Miss.
A promising treatment for some forms of skin cancer has
been developed by scientists at the Hebrew University-
Hadassah Medical School.
The therapy, developed by Prof. Adam Bekierkunst of the
Medical Bacteriology Department, and Prof. Haim Cohen of
the Dematology and Venereology Department, is the result of
research going on for the past eight years on the biological
activities of cord factor.
Based on their findings, Bekierkunst and Cohen
developed a killed BCG and cord factor preparation in the
form of an ointment which Prof. Cohen successfully uses on
patients with skin tumors.
An appeal was filed last week with the United States
Supreme Court by the National Jewish Commission on Law
and Public Affairs seeking reversal of a Manhattan federal
court decision denying reimbursement to non-public schools
for performing services mandated by the state, according to
Sidney Kwestel, COLPA president.
The case involves a law passed in 1974 providing for
reimbursement to non-public schools of the costs of complying
with state requirements for pupil attendance reporting and the
administration of state prepared examinations such as regents
tests. These are required of both public and non-public schools
alike
Riverside Dedicates New Hollywood Chapel
Riverside Memorial Chapel.
Inc.. has announced that the
formal dedication of its newly-
constructed Hollywood Chapel
at 2230 Hollywood Boulevard
was to have taken place
Thursday. Oct. 14. with
UNESCO Urged
Stop Being
Political
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTAI Some 160
prominent scientists, writers and
intellectuals from 25 countries
called on UNESCO and other
specialized international agencies
to stop the politization of their
organizations and anti-Israel
discrimination.
This call was addressed to
such bodies as the World Helath
Organization, the International
Labor Office and the United
Nations Educational. Scientific
and Cultural Organization
(UNESCO) after a one-day
conference.
AMONG THE participants
were Nobel Prize winners such as
Prof. Christian Anfinsen, Werner
Forssmann, Andre Lwoff and
Carl Cori: labor leaders, in-
cluding a vice president of the
AFL-CIO, Albert Shanker. and
writers and philosophers such as
Simone de Beauvoir and Herbert
Gold.
The conference was held a few
weeks before the UNESCO
General Conference opens in
Nairobi, Kenya. That conference
will consider Israel's application
to join the European Regional
Group.
Observers close to the in-
ternational symposium said they
were hopeful Israel's application
to rejoin UNESCO's work will be
successful. The sources said that
several countries previously
uncertain of their vote, now
intend to support Israel's ad-
mission to the European
Regional Group.
FORMER ISRAELI Foreign
Minister Abba Eban said: "I
urge the intellectual community
to declare its non-cooperation
with any organization which
violates its own constitution by
discrimination. If the UN held a
conference on locust plagues the
participants would adopt a
resolution against Zionism and
leave the locusts intact."
He added, "We urge the Arab
states to regard the United
Nations as the appropi
of struggle and to
humanitarian enter prises jj. the
specialized agencies toMTarried
on."
Elie Wieael suggested a
second, and real UNESCO, true
to its original charter, be started.
He urged intellectuals the world
over to cooperate with the new
body he suggested by estab-
lished. No other speaker,
however, followed his
suggestion.
PROF. RAYMOND Aron,
French philosopher and political
writer, warned, "We should not
imagine that the efforts to
manipulate the UN agencies will
vanish by magic.
"We must defend these or-
ganizations against the states
which want to manipulate
them."
dedication ceremonies scheduled
at 4 p.m., and a reception to
follow at Temple Beth Shalom in
Hollywood.
Mayor David Keating of
Hollywood, Mayor Dr. Milton
Weinkle of Hallandale and com-
missioners of both cities were to
be in attendance. Also scheduled
to be among those present were
Rabbi Avrom Drazin, president
of the Greater Miami Rabbinical
Association: Dr. Morton
Malavsky. president of the
Mm ward Board of Rabbis: Dr.
Samuel Jaffe, and Rabbis David
Shapiro, Robert Frazin, Moshe
Bomzer, Philip Labowitz, Joel
Goor and Emanuel Schenk.
Joining them were to be Lewis
Cohn, president of the South
Broward Jewish Federation, and
officers of all major Jewish or-
ganizations in Broward County.
Alfred Golden, vice president
of Riverside and chairman of the
dedication program, announced
that Carl Grossberg, president
and one of the founders of
Riverside, was also to be in
attendance.
The new Riverside Chapel is
located just a few blocks west of
Young's Circle. Golden said that
"the chapel will offer far greater
convenience and accom-
modations of importance to the
Jewish community."
The new Riverside Chapel
contains a Ritualarium (Mikval-
and other
performance of the
Washing (Tahara).
facilities for the "
Ritual of
Golden a bo announced
Arthur Grossberg. LFD,
serve as manager of the
chapel,
largest
sonnel
County.
heading
staffs of
available
that
will
new
the
one of
Jewish pei
in Broward
Friedman Supports Senior Citizens
Charlie Friedman, Democratic
Nominee for Congress. 12th
District, said today that he wants
senior citizens to be allowed to
work without giving up their
Social Security benefits.
Friedman said that older
Americans want to continue con-
tributing to this country.
"Many of our senior citizens,
either because of desire or out of
necessity, continue working
beyond the age of 65. but are
penalized under our present
Social Security laws," he said.

"Social Security is something
that recipients receive, not as a
present from the Government,
but as a result of monies paid in
during their working years much*
the same as annuities.
"If circumstances should force
senior citizens to continue
working, under the present
system they lose their Social
Security benefits which rightfully
belong to them." Friedman said,
and added that the additional
taxes paid by older working
Americans would support the
program.
Charlie Friedman, Democratic Nominee for Congress, 12th
District, receives a 'Good Luck Charlie" from U.&Sen. Henry
M. "Scoop" Jackson (D., Wash.}. Jackson was in Fort
Lauderdale on Oct. 3 campaigning for the Democratic ticket-
Friedman joined Jackson at an appearance at Temple Isratl
where the Senator spoke on the Middle East.
SOLI
Lit


The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
KAREN JOY KLEIMAN
Karen Joy, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Elliot Kleiman, will
celebrate the occasion of her Bat
J.Mitzvah on Friday, Oct. 22 at
*>j*ih p.m. at Temple Solel.
Rabbi Robert Prazin will
officiate.
Karen is a student in the
.i^hth grade at Nova Middle
School and Temple Solel
Keligious School. She is
treasurer of the Temple Solel
Junior Youth Group, past vice
president of the Junior Youth
(Iroup and a teacher's aid.
Mr. and Mrs. Kleiman will
host a reception and Oneg
Shabbat in Karen's honor.
Special guests include grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam
villoway of Miami Beach and
-internal grandmother, Mrs.
1 It-nore Kleiman; great aunts and
dick's. Mrs. Loukl Pallot. Mr.
ifod Mrs. Joseph Perlman. Mrs.
Morrw Cantor. Mrs. I ..mi-.
Kleiman, Mrs. Phyllis Kleiman,
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore
Firestone. Mr. and Mrs. Henry
villoway. Mr. and Mrs. Barnes
Sofloway and Mr. and Mrs. John
Budarin.
Out-of-town guests include
\1r. and Mrs. Charles Cherry
and family from Tampa, and
iii aunt and uncle Mr. and
Mrs. Sidnev Solloway from New
Nork.
Religious Directory
NORTH BROWARD
' iilH OR TEMPLE. 3721 NW 100th
Ay*. Reform. Rabbi Max Wtiti. (44)
' .MARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9104
s'lti St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. (44A)
MIRAMAR
HAEL TEMPLE. 49J0 SW 3ittl St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Draiin.
Cantor Abraham Kester. (41)
PEMBROKE PINES
EMPLE IN THE PINES. 1 Taft St.
Conservative. Rabbi Sidney I. Lubin.
(43)
PLANTATION
ANTATION JEWISH CONGRE
ATION 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi
Iheldon J. Harr. (44)
(CONSTRUCTIONS SYNA-
GOGUE. 7473 NW 4th St. (40)
S
HALLANOALE
.LANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 414
th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Irry E. Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
niiqer (II)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
VI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
0) NE J2nd Av*. Reform. Rabbi
ilph P. Kmgsiey. Cantor Irving
Nolkes. (37)
HOLLYWOOD
TH AHM TEMPLE. 31* SW 42nd
Vvo. Conservative,
-andman. (471)
Rabbi Max
:TM EL TEMPLE. 1351 S. >4Ml Ave.
[Retorm. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa. As
siMant RabM Jonathan Won (45)
lETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4401 Arthur
St. Conservative. RabM Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving GoM. (44)
(IN*! TEMPLE. 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun. (45)
ftOLIL TEMPLE. SIM Sheridan St.
Liberal. Rabbi Robert Fraiin. (47C)
W. German Elections Yield
By JON FEDLER and TOM SEGEV
No Political Changes
BONN (JTA) Chancellor Helmut Schmidts re-
election by a slim eight-seat majority in the West
Uerman Parliament is expected to bring no change in
Bonn s policies toward Israel.
Schmidt's Social-Demo-
cratic Party (SDP) and its
coalition partner, the Free
Democratic Party (FDP),
headed by Foreign Min-
ister Hans Dietrich
Genscher, won 252 seats.
The opposition Christian
Democratic Union-
Christian Social Union
(CDU-CSU) won 244 seats.
Schmidt and Genscher
pledged to continue their
a Ilia nee for another four
years starting Dec. 14.
ISRAELI AND Jewish
sources in Bonn had expected no
change in Middle East policy no
ma'.ter who won. As Dr. Nahum
Go'dmann, president of the
World Jewish Congress and a
longtime student of German
politics, said recently: "Ger-
many will continue to follow
more or less the same lines of
even-handed policy, no matter
who wins the election."
Things weren't always this
way. The predecessor of the
present government, the CDU,
under the late Chancellor Konrad
Adenauer, conducted a policy of
strong and unambiguous moral
and material support for Israel,
based on the acknowledged guilt
of the Germans for Nazi per-
secution of European Jewry.
When Bonn formally recog-
nized Jerusalem in 1965, 10 Arab
states broke off diplomatic
relations in protest.
THIS LED to a vacuum in the
West German government's
Middle East policy, since Bonn
for its part refused to establish
relations with any country
Arab or other which had dip-
lomatic ties with East Germany.
The SDP-FDP coalition which
came to power in 1969 continued
to uphold the "special relation-
ship" established by Adenauer
and the late David Ben Gurion,
but introduced the concept of
"neutrality" toward Mideast
issues as a whole.
Bank Nominee
Under Scrutiny
Continued from Page 1
the moment there is no reason
tor the government to change its
original recommendatirjn to
appoint Yadlin.
YADLIN, a longtime Labfr
Party leader and economics
expert, served during the early
'70s as secretary of Hevrat
Ovdim, the Histadrut's holding
company which controls the
trade union organization's in-
vestments and industries.
At present, he heads Kupat
Holim, the Histadrut's sick
fund, itself a huge economic
enterprise. His nomination has
been criticized in some quarters
on the grounds that he is too in-
volved politically to play the role
of counterweight to the Finance
Ministry, the essential job of the
Bank of Israel Governor.
There were strong economic
motives for this approach. East
German promises of aid to the
Arabs had not materialized By
contrast, Arab-West German
trade had expanded to the point
where the Federal Republic was
the Arabs' most important
trading partner after France.
THE ARABS, like Israel,
hoped Germany would use its
strong influence in the European
Economic Community to press
for preferential trade agree-
ments. And with Germany's
likely entry into the United
Nations, both sides saw benefits
in resuming relationships.
In spite of occasional setbacks
in German-Israel relations
especially after the massacre of
Israeli athletes at the Olympic
Games in Munich in 1972 and
in spite of a vast increase in
German-Arab trade in the past
five years and German de-
pendence on Arab oil imports,
ties with Israel have perhaps
never been better than they are
today.
Israeli Foreign Minister Yigal
Allon visited Germany (in-
cluding Berlin) five times in the
past 15 months and several
German and Israeli Cabinet min-
isters and other delegations have
exchanged visits.
THE FLOOD of telegrams
and donations received by the
Israeli Embassy in Bonn after
Israel's daring Entebbe raid
testifies to the deep public
sympathy for Israel.
Israeli dependence on Ger-
many results partly from the
fact that the Federal Republic
the economic giant of Europe
is its second biggest supplier of
goods and its third biggest
customer after the United States
and Britain.
A big export offensive is
currently under way to cut back
Israel's massive $550 million
trading deficit with Germany,
and a treaty was signed recently
to promote mutual trade and
investment.
SINCE THE oil crisis of late
1973, Bonn has adhered more or
less to the EEC line on the
Middle East, namely, calling for
Israeli withdrawal from the
occupied territories (this was
recently "elaborated" to "all"
the occupied territories) and
establishment of a Palestinian
state in return for recognition of
Israel's right to exist in secure
borders.
Observers considered it
unlikely that a CDU-CSU
government would have changed
this.
Helmut Kohl, who was the
opposition's candidate for Chan-
cellor, is believed to have no
well-defined opinions on Mideast
matters. His designated Foreign
Minister, Prof. Karl Carstens. is
considered a friend of Arab oil-
producing countries.
But CSU leader Franz-Josef
Strauss, who, as shadow-Finance
Minister, would have n the
real strong man in CDU-
CSU government, ha.' supported
Israel in the past.
ONE INTERESTING aspect
of the recent bitter campaign is
that speakers for both parties
frequently accused each other of
using National-Socialist propa-
ganda tactics, of following Nazi
ideas or having ex-Nazis among
their party leadership.
Both Schmidt and Kohl re-
peatedly mentioned the per-
secution and extermination of
the Jews under Adolf Hitler in
their speeches as part of their
efforts to present themselves as
I'OUNO ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
4171 Stirling Road. Oaks Condomin
jum. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe Bom
r. (SJ)
liberal, tolerant men.
"I feel that mentioning the
Jewish Holocaust gets me a very
positive response," the Chan-
cellor told a correspondent for
the Israeli paper, Maariv.
"I mention the Auschwitz,
Treblinka and Maidanek death
camps in order to point out the
moral burdens of our time,"
Kohl told the same
correspondent.
Argentine Official Sounds
Off on Jewish Community
BUENOS AIRES -
(JTA) Interior Minister
Gen. Albano E. Barguin-
deguy has assured the
Jewish community that
"adverse opinions" re-
garding its solidarity and
devotion to Israel are not
shared by the Argentine
government and people.
"I am convinced that the
Argentinian Jews are very
much aware which are the
limits between filial de-
votion (to Israel) and our
duties as Argentine citi-
zens and only a mis-
chievous reading of these
limits could cause critical
judgments," he said.
BARGUINDEGUY's com
ments were published in the
Jewish weekly, Mundo Israelita,
in the form of responses to
written questions submitted to
the Minister by the editors.
The interview was clearly
intended to elicit the govern-
ment's attitude toward the Jew-
ish community which has
become increasingly concerned
over the upsurge of anti-Semitic
propaganda and vandalism by
right-wing groups and charges of
dual loyalty leveled against Ar-
gentine Jews who support Israel.
Asked if the government
agreed with the "calumny" that
Argentine Jews are outside the
mainstream of the country. Har-
guindeguy replied:
"The government has at no
moment whatever questioned the
Jewish community. The only
enemies of the country arf en
ruption and subversion. If i
make a suggestion. 1 would say
the Jewish community should
show and make known the
freedom within which they
develop. Thus, ihcv will counter-
act tendentious reports from
abroad which attempt to insist
on nonexistent racial per-
secution."
THE MINISTER implied that
the relatively small rate of
Jewish emigration from Ar-
gentina to Israel indicated the
Jewish community's strong
integration into national life. "I
have the impression that your
community, in comparison with
the communities in other
nations, is one of those who have
contributed less in terms of
human potential in the formation
of the State of Israel." he told
Mundo Israelita.
"This shows not only their
rootedness within the Argentine
nation but also that the con-
ditions in which they develop
their social, religious and
economic life are very favor-
able." he said.
BARGUINDEGUY defended
the government against charges
in the daily La Prensa that it
had taken only half-hearted
measures to fight racism when it
recently suspended publication
and distribution of anti-Semitic
periodicals put out by Editorial
Milicia.
La Prensa claimed in an
editorial that some of the para-
graphs in the suspenskin decree
were restrained rather than
openly condemnatory- Milcia's
hate literature.
MEJJC
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Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, October 22
1976,
AskAee
ByABchalpcRn
Roaman's Named Israel BondsCochairmen
Question: Why don't Jews
proselytize?
Carl Mintz
Hallandale
Answer- Proselytize is a
variant of the word proselyte,
based on the translation in the
Septuaginl of the Hebrew Ger
(gerim plural).
Originally the word Ger meant
stranger; later on it became to
be used in connection with one
converted to Judaism.
According to the American
Heritage Dictionary, the word
proselyte means "one who comes
to a place, stranger, religious
convert."
In modern usage the word
proselytize came to mean the
active process of persuasion,
trying to convert an individual
or a group of individuals from
one belief or faith to another.
Throughout history, ever since
the F.xodus, with few exceptions,
the Jewish People never engaged
in large scale proselytization, i.e.
set up missionaries to persuade
large groups or individuals to
convert to Judaism.
The Bible has many references
to converts and conversion
(Ruth. 2 12. Exodus 12 48. etc.).
During the Talmudic period
there was much discussion
among the Rabbis with reference
to Gerim proselytes. The Rabbis,
however, distinguished between
two types. The half proselyte
was called Ger-Toshav. a settler,
and a full proselyte was known
as Ger-Tzedeh, a righteous
proselyte.
The half proselyte undertook
in the presence of three scholars
to observe some of the basic
principles but not the ceremonies
of Judaism. He had to denounce
idolatry or undertake the
keeping of the seven Noachian
laws which are as follows:
t Abstinence from idolatry
Abstinence from murder
Abstinence from theft
9 Abstinence from blasphemy
9 Abstinence from incest
9 Abstinence from eating
flesh of a living animal
9 Duty of promoting justice
The Ger-Tzedek. a full
proselyte, is one who enters into
Judaism with sincere con-
victions. He accepts all its laws
and ceremonies. However, since
the laws pertaining to the ac-
ceptance of a Ger-Toshav were
no longer in power during late
Talmudic and post-Talmudic
times, the discussion about the
half proselyte was purely
academic.
According to the authoritative
Encyclopaedia Judaica (vol. 13,
p. 1183). the Laws and procedure
of conversion as established by
the sages, consisted of the
following-
9 To discourage and try to
dissuade the prospective
proselyte by explaining that it is
very difficult to embrace
Judaism and live by its precepts. .
9 To determine if the desire to
be a Jew is based on conviction
and love for Judaism and not for
other purposes.
Once his or her convictions
were established, a proselyte was
accepted into the faith by cir-
cumcision and immersion in a
\hK rah (ritual bath) in the case
of males, or immersion in the
case of females.
"The halakhah also accepts a
posteriori, proselytes who had
converted in order to marry, to
advance themselves or out of
fear the acceptance of a
proselyte 'under the wings of the
Divine Presence' is equivalent to
Israel's entry into the covenant
. ."(ibid).
Albert M. Shulman in
Gateway to Judaism (vol. 1, p.
260) states that while Jews are
often called a missionary people,
"the mission of the Jew is not to
proselytize or convert non-Jews
to his religion. The Jew has
received from God a holy Law. It
is his duty, his mission, to keep
safe this Law through service as
priest and by act of holiness and
righteousness. Every Jew is to
be a teacher of God's Law and
his mission is to teach and to
spread the knowledge of God."
While there are many
references to proselytes, during
the Talmudic and post-Talmudic
period, it is difficult to tell with
certainty the extent of
proselytism in the Middle Ages.
Stringent church decrees forbade
Jews to proselytize. The church
considered the transfer to
another religion as a capital
offense. Christian rulers fiercely
opposed any tendency to adopt
Jewish religious customs. The
number of proselytes diminished
in Christian countries.
Moreover, the church began
enforcing its decrees against
conversion to such an extent
that in 1539 an old woman of 80.
Catherine Wiegel, the wife of a
citizen of Cracow, was burned at
the stake for having embraced
Judaism.
"Jews were falsely accused of
smuggling proselytes into
Turkey, and an official in-
vestigation of this matter took
place in Lithuania causing great
harm to the Jews of that
country. Nevertheless, it appears
that most Jews not only
refrained outwardly from
engaging in proselytizing ac-
tivities as the result of external
pressures and penalties, but the
attitude of Judaism itself in that
period formed an important
factor.
"The Jews increasingly with-
drew from the outside world: the
difference between Judaism and
the other faiths was regarded as
an inherent, radical distinction
between two unbridgeable
worlds with scarcely any points
of contact. The general tendency
of that entire period is expressed
in the words of Solomon Luria*
Would that the seed of Israel
continue to stand fast and hold
its own among the nations
throughout the days of our exile
and no stranger be added to us
who is not of our nation.'
(Encyclopaedia Judaica. vol. 13,
pp. 1190. 1191)
After admittance into the
faith, a proselyte is welcomed
and considered Jewish in all
respects.
It is interesting to note that
whereas a small minority in
Jewish life is of the opinion that
Judaism should engage in
proselytization. the consensus of
the greatest majority of Jewish
opinion is negative. Aspirations
to win over people of other faiths
to Judaism is dwindling. It is
practically nonexistent in
modern times.
Editor's note'
Please send questions to:
ASK ABE
c / o Jewish Federation
of South Broward
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood. Florida 33020
Holly dale AJC
Plans Party
The American Jewish Con-
gress- Holly dale Chapter will
hold a luncheon card party on
Monday. Nov. 22, 12:30 p.m. at
Galahad South. Betty Rader can
furnish ticket information.
One of South B reward's
husband-and-wife teams of com-
munity leaders, Alan and Joyce
Roaman, have accepted the co-
chairmanship of the South
Broward Israel Bond campaign
for 1976-77.
Announcement of their ac-
ceptance was made by William
Littman, chairman of the Israel
Bonds Board of Governors of
Broward County.
In announcing the ap-
pointment, Littman cited Mr.
and Mrs. Roaman's record of
leadership and achievement on
behalf of many community and
Israel causes, both in South
Florida and in New York where
they formerly lived.
In recognition of their leader-
ship on behalf of Israel's
economic development, Mr. and
Mrs. Roaman were honored with
the David Ben Gurion Award at
the Temple Solel-Emerald Hills
dinner for Israel Bonds earlier
this year.
A member of the Board of
Directors of Temple Solel, Mr.
Roaman served as chairman of
the Israel Bonds Temple Solel-
Emerald Hills dinner in 1974.
Mr. and Mrs. Roaman served
together as West Broward
Chairmen. South Broward Board
of Governors, State of Israel
Bonds. Mr. Roman also served
as treasurer of the Hollywood
Federation in 1973.
Prior to moving to Florida.
Mr. Roaman was New York
chairman of University Gardens
UJA campaign for three years
and served as chairman of the
Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies, University Gardens, for
three years.
He also served on the Board of
Directors, textile division, for
the UJA and Federation.
Among many other in-
stitutions to which they have
given their leadership are the
Hillcrest Hadassah
Gets Underway
The opening meeting of the
Hillcrest Group of Hadassah got
under way with its recent
meeting.
President Birdie Fishman per-
formed a candlelighting
ceremony and greeted members
returning from summer
vacations.
She lit the first candle in
memory of Maxwell Rittenberg,
who passed away during the
summer. Mr. Rittenberg is the
late husband of Sally Rittenberg,
Hillcrest's membership vice
president.
Esther Goldberg. American-
Zionist Affairs chairman, urged
all members to vote on Nov. 2.
Etta Scheinbaum, education
vice president, spoke about the
Festival of Succoth.
The refreshment committee
members are Gert Banner, Stella
Spector and Molly Cohen.
Program vice president Sophia
Pressman presented a skit on the
Hadassah National Convention
which was recently held in
Washington. D.C.
Great Neck Synagogue, the
Scandinavia Scholarship Fund.
the Hofstra University and the
Long Island Jewish Hospital
Members participating were
Lillian Goldberg, moderator:
Birdie Fishman. president: pro-
gram vice president. Sophia
Pressman: journal chairman.
Betty Goodman; Youth Aliyah
Chairman, Ethel Jacobs: and
Fund Raising Chairman, Cele
Heller.
Ethel Jacobs announced that
the Youth Aliyah luncheon will
be held at the Marco Polo Hotel
on Nov. 16.
On Tuesday. Oct. 26 at 1 p.m.
at the Home Federal Bank
Building. Young Circle, Rabbi
Moshe Bomzer will review
Chaim Herzog's book "The Yom
Kippur 1973 War." There is no
charge and everyone is welcome
to attend.
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r


T
Friday, October 22. 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
LROMINDLIIV
A Second Question for Carter
Icui
4
Continued from Page 4
last week, in which I questioned
Carter's indifference to the extra-
curricular activites of one of his
top aides, Patrick Caddell, as a
blic relations consultant to the
Embassy of Saudi Arabia in
Washington, I ended the column
with the promise of a second
question this week.
THE SECOND question, of
course, is George Ball.
I consider the answers to both
these questions as the litmus of
my own voting intentionr.
When Carter talks about his
Irommitment to Israel's survival,
1 am forced to wonder: survival
yes, but how? My main fear is
that it is George Ball who will be
supplying the answer.
v JOn Aug. 24, Mr. Ball wrote to
me to complain about a column
that had appeared in The Jewish
Floridian of July 9 by Victor
Bienstock. retired general
manager of the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency in New York, in
which Bienstock argued that if
Carter is elected. Ball might very
wi'll become secretary of state to
I he detriment of Israel.
IN HIS article, Bienstock
culled Ball "one of the country's
most vocal and effective op-
ponents of an American policy of
out support for Israel and.
oarticularly, of extensive
military assistance so long as
l-rael retains control of the
> ^rritories it occupied in the 1967
fv\-I)ay War."
II
Mr. Ball complains in his Aug.
24 letter to me that statements
in the July 9 article "do not fully
state my position." He cites, for
example, alleged inaccuracies in
the article pertaining to his
position on Jerusalem which
ignores "the Jordanian Army's
seizure of the Old City in 1948
. although by UN decision
Jerusalem was to have been
internationalized, while the
Israeli liberation of the Old City
in 1967 was an aggression that
had to be undone."
Not so, argues Mr. Ball in his
letter, who insists on the con-
trary that "the issue of Old
Jerusalem should be settled by
some form of international
arrangement for which a number
of formulas have been devised."
Certainly, this is not a
rebuttal calculated to appease
the fears of anyone ardently
interested in Israel's survival
nor, indeed, calculated to answer
the questions one may be en-
tertaining in one's mind as a
consequence of the unhappy
reality that Mr. Ball is a Jimmy
Carter adviser on foreign affairs.
It is, in fact, precisely the
position the July 9 article at-
tributed to him.
INEVITABLY, one is forced
to wonder why Jerusalem
disturbs Mr. Ball so and what
"formulas" for "international
arrangement" he may be
prepping Jimmy Carter on at the
same time that Carter orates on
his commitment to Israel, and
Israel has served notice to the
world that Jerusalem shall never
be divided again.
U.S., Mexico Had Spat Over Aliens
Continued from Page 4
Christian Democratic Party.
They ordered their secret
IKilice, the dreaded DIN A, to
ireak up the coalition move-
ment. Orlando Letelier was the
rst of the coalition leaders to
it'. Our sources say the lives of
le others are also in danger.
iAnd where does the United
ates stand? It is subsidizing
dictatorship.
FORD'S MAN: The Repub-
ans put the Postal Service on
business basis in 1971. They
ed businessmen to manage
i Postal Service. They
bmised it would bring ef-
iency to the mails.
Mail delivery is now so in-
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gle Issue nearest to filing date 110
II subscription. M*
gle Issue nearest filing date 8,287
tal paid circulation 8.384
gle Issue nearest to filing date 8.397
t distribution by mall, carrier or
_mt means, samples, com
Umentary and other free copies 60
gle Issue nearest to filing date 60
distribution 9.S94
ngle Issue nearest to filing date 8.407
not distributed office use,
over, unaccounted, spoiled after
ting
e Issue nearest filing date 143
9.485
_ Issue nearest to filing date 8,600
certify mat the statements made by
are correct and complete.
r FRED K 8HOCHET. Publisher
15
efficient that the Republicans
themselves have turned to
private industry to deliver their
campaign mail. President Ford
has been using the United Parcel
Service, a private company, to
deliver his campaign mailings.
The President's campaign
material was held up by a strike
at United Parcel. Tons of
material are stacked up in the
back rooms of Ford head-
quarters.
Yet the Republicans still
wouldn't rely on the Postal
Service to deliver the campaign
mailings. When United Parcel
was struck, they arranged to
move most of it by bus.
Is it a Carter commitment to
the survival of Israel as, say, the
infamous Rogers Plan proposed
Israel's survival during the
Nixon years?
The issue of Jerusalem apart,
the main purpose of Mr. Ball's
Aug. 24 letter was an "in all
fairness" request for the right to
reply, which appeared three days
later in the Aug. 27 edition of
The Jewish Floridian.
THE REPLY no more ap-
peases my fears than did his
letter to me itself. Referring to
M. Raymond Aron's "logic of
numbers," Mr. Ball reminds us
that "3.5 million Jews confront
something in the neighborhood
of 100 million Arabs" in the
Middle East.
Furthermore, "the oil revenues
available to the Arab nations for
the purchase of arms are ex-
panding at a fantastic rate."
This means, argues Mr. Ball,
that "if Israel continues to give
the impression that it resists
serious settlement efforts," the
American people will not
"provide her indefinitely with
military and economic aid at
something approximating 1976
levels (which means roughly
$700 for every man, woman and
child in Israel)."
Nor, says Mr. Ball, would
Israel be able to avoid blame in
the eyes of the American people
"for renewed war and the oil
embargo that would inevitably
follow."
THESE observations are what
I would call the diplomacy of
threat tricked out in the kind of
humanism such as must come
easily to Mr. Ball in his current
professional affiliation with the
Jewish firm of Lehman Brothers,
one of whose late members. Sen.
Herbert I^ehman, would un-
doubtedly feel as uncomfortable
with them as anyone else con-
cerned with the safety of Jews
and the Jewish State.
They not only raise the specter
of Moslem genocide. They are
also designed (1) to coerce Israeli
submission to the blackmailing
proposition that America's short
fuse attached to its passion for
that fast-disappearing creature
comfort, the monster auto-
mobile, is about to explode; and
(2) to encourage the spurious
notion that the international
energy crisis is entirely the fault
of Israel.
Furthermore, these ob-
servations are at absolute
variance with Gov. Carter's
stated campaign positions
particularly the possibility of
another oil embargo, which the
Governor said, during the second
presidential debate, he would
consider "an economic act of
war" and against which he
would retaliate, if the Arabs
launched a second such round, in
total kind, not just food, but in
all manner of exports to the
Arab world.
IS THIS just Carter campaign
rhetoric to be supplanted by Mr.
Ball's diplomacy of threat should
Carter be elected?
What is Mr. Ball's solution in
the Middle East as defined by
his Aug. 27 reply in this
newsnaoer? It is as follows:
A settlement "must involve
the withdrawal by Israel to sub-
stantially the borders existing
prior to the 1967 War. subject to
such minor boundary rec-
tifications as might be achieved
through negotiation" pre-
cisely what the July 9 Bienstock
column opined of him and which
Mr. Ball wrote to me misrep-
resented his real views;
The conviction that "the
longer the delay in coming to
grips with the fundamental
substantive problems prin-
cipally the Palestinian issue, the
Golan Heights and Jerusalem
the more perilous Israel's
position will become the
longer those problems are per-

$
Ford Awards
Israel C of C
NEW YORK (JTA) -
President Ford has conferred an
"E" Award on the American-
Israel Chamber of Commerce
and Industry in recognition of
its outstanding performance in
the field of international trade, it
was announced here.
The formal presentation will
be made on Oct. 26 at the
Waldorf Astoria Hotel. Rina
Messinger of Israel. Miss
Universe of 1976, will serve as
hostess for the event.
THE "E" award is the highest
tribute bestowed by the U.S.
government on firms and
organizations that have con-
tributed to the advancement of
industry and trade.
bttuartcB
STERN. Daniel, 71. of Hollywood, on
Oct. 4. Interment Hollywood
Memorial Gardens. Levitt.
7.KITZ. Sol. 72. of Hallandale. on Oct. 4.
Interment Beth El. Levitt.
I.ITWIN. Jules Sol. 68. of Hollywood, on
Sept. (0. Interment Hollywood
Memorial Gardens. Riverside
GOLDMAN. Mandel. 76. of Hallandale,
on Sept. 28. Riverside.
WOLFE. Harold. 88, of Hallandale. on
Oct. 6. Interment Sharon Gardens
Levitt
IEVITT
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$
mitted to fester, the greater will
be the pressures for replacing the
relatively moderate Arab leaders
by more radical leadership ."
THESE ARE heady state-
ments, but like his reference to
Jerusalem, they pose more
questions than they answer.
What are "minor boundary
rectifications"? What is "the
Palestinian issue"? Which of the
"moderate" Arab leaders does he
mean Sadat, who only last
week threatened renewed war
against Israel after the American
presidential elections; Assad,
who would march on Tel Aviv
tomorrow if he could; Qaddafi,
who would set the whole of the
Middle Fast on fire?
In the end. I am not really
interested in Mr. Ball's argu-
ments. I have heard them a
thousand times before from a
thousand other such "friends" of
Israel.
I am only interested in Gov.
Carter's feelings about George
Hall. Is this his trusted adviser
on Middle Eastern affairs? Is it a
likelihood that Mr. Rail will
indeed be a frontrunner for
secretary of state?
WRITING OF President Ford
and his "victory" in the first
debate. I said that "he is a mere
puppet for a juggernaut" and
that his answers to questions
"would be meaningless anyway."
Ford's failure to rectify his
monumental gaffe on the
question of Soviet domination of
Eastern Europe immediately as
he made it demonstrates the
principle. Ford as automaton is
not the President now. nor would
he be the President if reelected.
and so questions asked of him
are an irrelevancy.
But Gov. Carter is another
matter. During the second
debate, he declined to list
members of his Cabinet if he
were elected, but there is no
doubt that George Ball sits tall
in the saddle among them. And
so does Patrick Caddell as at
least some sort of high
presidential aide.
What are the answers? I am
waiting.
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.


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
T
Friday. October 22, me JfM
^<->:<--<>:<::<<^^^^^
lipsky Was a Qiant
among eminent Jews

j:j: ZIONISM IN America in the late nineteenth
X;and early twentieth centuries could boast of
^adherents led by some of the most eminent Jews
tin American history. One of the outstanding
spokesmen of this period was Louis Lipsky. He
'was an orator, writer, editor and critic.
Until his death in 1963 at the age of 86, he was
Ivthe creator and representative of Zionism in
:America. He led American support for the
:': Halfour Declaration, and eventually support for
:|:the creation of the State of Israel.
jjj: THE HUMBLE man from Rochester worked
:vwith such intellects and leaders as Louis D.
:: Brandeis, Stephen S. Wise, Maurice Samuel and
X; Meyer Weisgal.
|:j. A small part of the new book about and by
X- Lipsky, Memoirs in Profile (with a foreword by
':' lien Halpern, Jewish Publication Society, 669
8 pp. $12), includes his own personal memoirs. The
j:|:bulk of the book, though, is composed of Lip-
jijsky's Gallery of Zionist Portraits first published
t-r- in 1956. These are far from dull biographies.
gj LIPSKY PORTRAYS the great Zionists
:v through his own eyes. He offers impressions and
:: knowledge of those men and women whom he
:knew personally. We participate in exciting and
: often warmly humorous episodes with Henrietta
ijjjSzold, Jacob de Haas, Solomon Schechter and
:-: many other American and European Jews.
:: A further variety of Lipsky's writings scat-
:tered over a long period of time conclude the
:: book. These essays, addresses and lectures range
:!; from the early years of the development of the
:: American Jewish community to American
S; Jewish support of Israel during the past two
:: decades.
Sus^paJioff
A JEWISH man who had wide impact with a
message in a different medium is the subject of a
recent biography by Karol Kulik. Alexander
Korda: the man who could work miracles
(Arlington House, 407 pp. $12.95) is the account
of the flamboyant and ruthless British film
producer. Based on research and interviews, this
book is a history of twenty-five years of inter-
national film-making and Korda's contribution
to it.
The author has included a complete
filmography of Korda's work including critical
evaluation.
The House on the Roof: a Sukkot Story, by
David A. Adler, with pictures by Marilyn Hirsch
(Bonim Books, 28 pp. $5.95) is a timely
children's book.
ADLER CREATES an unusual story of an old
man whose preparations for Sukkot mystify his
neighbors. It is the contrast of tradition and
modern living so vividly portrayed that we
recognize, and which draws us to the old man.
Hirsh's illustrations are rich in detail and
expression. In fact, her work is so popular that
her last juvenile book .So What Could Be Worse?
has been made into a sound filmstrip. The
relationships between the old man and his
grandchildren, and the old man and society are
very positive and constructive.
These relationships present values that make
the steep cost of this slim volume worthwhile.
the Arab Boycott
Seen as a mopal Issue
i
i
i
ROBRt
Segal
::: SO LOADED with technical complexities is
:". the ugly issue of the Arab boycott that those of
H us who are neither lawyers nor accountants
:: cannot begin to sort out the conflicting strands
::' of the dispute.
: But one point is no longer to be questioned:
:: The Arab boycott campaign is a moral issue
|:j today. And those businessmen and politicians
:j: insisting otherwise are destined to leam, perhaps
. too late, that they are wrong, dead wrong.
9
: SOME BANKERS and people high in govern
:: ment seem still determined to reduce the issue to
: an economic and political proposition. War is
:: war and trade is trade and profit is profit in
:: their limited view.
:; They remain oblivious to the haunting truth
|:|: that the fierce Arab campaign to win the
: American businessman over to the honey land of
j;|: huge profits in oil and Arab economic expansion
;j:j cannot be separated from such deviltry as the
|:|: Arab and Third World insistence that anti-
Zionism is not anti-Semitism and that Zionism
$: constitutes imperialistic racism.
:-:: A CLASSIC example of stiff-necked deter
>: minatkin not to yield to the imperative to accept
:-:j morality as the paramount consideration in the
:: boycott campaign is the acitivity of Under
:: Secretary of Commerce James A. Baker III.
ft Despite traditional, official U.S. policy to
S oppose boycotts fostered or imposed by foreign
|:j: countries against other countries friendly to the
:: U.S., Baker has acknowledged that Washington
ft was not making use of its considerable power to
:: frustrate the Arab boycott against a valiant
ft American ally, Israel.
Throwing higher considerations to the winds,
fa
Maker told an audience at the University of
Texas: "A businessman should be free to make a
choice between the countries when certain com-
mercial relations with one may result in
retaliation by the other. He, after all, is the best
judge of the requirement of his business."
SUBSEQUENTLY. Baker asserted that
Congress has twice considered legislation that
would forbid compliance with any Arab boycott
request and had concluded that such a "blanket
prohibition" could reduce prospects for a
peaceful settlement of Middle East tension.
Little wonder that congressmen sensitive to
the overriding moral coloration of the Arab
attempt severely criticized Baker for his role in
making things more difficult for Israel and
particularly for his bold assertion that "the
distinction between boycott requests that are
discriminatory and those that relate solely to the
economic boycott of Israel by Arab states is a
valid one." Quite clearly, the current Arab
boycott discriminates against American firms
owned or run by Jews as well as against
American firms doing business with Israel.
IN THE half-year that has elapsed since
Baker's incredible apology for Arab boycott
activities, those who see the issue clearly have
taken off their gloves and counterattacked with
commendable vigor.
Public exposure of the extent of Arab
manipulations in America haa been broad and
effective. Legislative and court actions have hit
the pages of the nation's press with gratifying
regularity. Suits have been filed, stockholders in
position to curb corporation surrender to Arab
demands have spoken up, and new Executive
Orders have been issued by the federal gover-
nment.
1
I
haskeU
Cohen
j non-Bon6inq
Op Jewish
Athletes
WE NOTE with great interest the fact that two of the out-
standing collegiate basketball players last year, both of whom
were considered for the United States Olympic team and were All- -mp-
American caliber players, who were drafted by the Boston Celtics *
and Seattle Supersonics respectively, have refused lucrative
contracts in order to travel with a team known as Athletes in
Action, a Christian-oriented group of athletes.
The players involved are Forrest Bayard of Grand Canyon
College and Ralph Drollinger from UCLA. Both boys are
religiously inclined and are active in the Fellowship of Christian
Athletes, a group of non-Jewish athletes, obviously, who are
serious about leading strong moral and religious lives.
IN TIMES past we have pointed out the fact that a famous
former NBA Jewish player approached the writer, who at that
time was the public relations director of the NBA, to form a
fellowship of Jewish athletes. I pointed out to the player that the
idea was fine, but he didn't seem to understand that the
fellowship was based on a religious motif that the non-Jewish
athletes performed in a group to have meetings during the off
season at which time they have seminars where prominent
authorities in the Christian doctrine and theology address them.
Also, they have religious prayer meetings. When the Jewish t
player from the NBA heard this description of what was involved '
in such a movement, he backed away quickly and that was the
end of the attempt to start a fellowship of Jewish athletes.
SO FAR as Jewish athletes are concerned, over the years they
have shown little inclination to band together to discuss their
tradition, cultural and religious backgrounds and just have been
content to let it be known that they are members of the Jewish
faith.
A concession has been made by many baseball players, for
example, not to play in the World Series on Rosh Hashanah and
Yom Kippur.
At one time when Hank Greenberg was with the Detroit Tigers
and they got into the World Series, there was a big fuss made as
to whether or not he should play on Rosh Hashanah. As I recall it,
the matter was taken before a Reform rabbi who indicated that for
a variety of reasons it was permissible for Hank to play.
OTHER THAN this particular instance, I can't recall any
matters pertaining to participation in sports by Jewish athletes^,
where the rabbinate and/or Halacha was involved, although we^J
have had a humorous situation where Ron Blumberg of the New *
York Yankees tried to date his future wife and she refused to go
out with him because she felt he was not of the faith.
In order to prove to her he was Jewish, Ron recited to her the
Hebrew blessing over wine. This particular demonstration
koshered the whole situation, and eventually the pair was married.
Ken Holtzman of the New York Yankees' pitching staff is free to
state that his wife keeps a kosher home.
Basically, however. Jewish athletes never band together: they
merely lend encouragement to amateur Jewish athletes and
certainly have never offered any financial help to programs such
as the Maccabiah Games where some 250 athletes, every four
years, are sent over from the United States to participate in the
so-called Jewish Olympics.
AS A matter of fact, Jewish owners and they are numerous
in baseball, football and basketball have been approached to
contribute and to my recollection, not one has even sent in a $10.
bill to aid in financing the cost of transporting amateur Jewish**
athletes to Israel for these games.
One would have to come to the conclusion that as "active Jews"
99.9 percent of our athletes are far off the mark. It is not our
posture to criticize or suggest that they do anything to change
their thinking or actions, but the fact does remain that our
athletes make a poor showing when it comes to a display of
Yiddishkeit.
Why the build-up to what I am about to disclose? Because of
the fact that there is such a lack of Yiddishkeit among our
athletes, both in the diaspora and Israel, it is refreshing to note
that one of the participants in the Disabled Olympics, which were
held recently in Canada, made a strong effort to comply with his
religious tenets and ran into some difficulties in so doing.
Shmuel Chaimovitch, a weightlifter on the Israeli Disabled
Olympic team, w a very religious young man and found himself
faced with a senous problem during the course of the running of
the Olympics. Shmuel was so anxious to compete in the light
featherweight weightlifting division on the Saturday on which this
event was scheduled that he spent all Friday night in the arena at
J.he Olympiad for fr PhYllifnllv n:f "
J2&2L OReame6 of Buil6inq the Panama Canal
Etobicoke,
gjiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu
THERE HAS been a great deal of talk of late about
the Panama Canal. A lot of party politics has entered
into it. There has been talk that the issue might
engender another war. The Panama Canal is a hole in
the ground and we need a war about it like a hole in
the head. Anyway, it is gratifying that no Jew is
mentioned in its connection.
But it might have been different. Theodor Herzl aa a
child would tell his playmates that when he grew up,
he would build the Panama Canal but he would warn
them, "Don't tell anyone."
HIS PARENTS encouraged him in his early
technical studies to that end, but it was destined for
another by the same name Theodore Roosevelt
to bring the canal into existence.

fcavifc Schwamz
lay in a different direction and he became a news-
paperman, playwright and ultimately the founder of
the Zionist movement.
He seemed in the beginning to be as fitted to be a
Jewish leader as to build the Panama Canal. His first
proposal for the solution of the Jewish problem was for
the Jews to convert. Shakespeare in the Merchant of
Venice had pointed out one of the difficulties of that
solution it would be inflationary, raise the price of
pork.
THERE WERE other difficulties and Herzl must
millllllllllllliilllllliJ:
have recognized them for in his play "The Ghetto," his !
solution was different. In just a little time he thought '.
by the processes of civilization, the prejudice would 5
disappear. One of the Jews in Vienna who came to see
this play was a man who was probing deep into the J
human emotions and who probably was not as op- 2
timistic about this solution Sigmund Freud.
Mark Twain was a visitor to Vienna at that time 5
and his picture of the city from which Hitler .. u> =
come was also very dark.
rhich Hitler was to 5
Twh^^19^ffent parties m Vienna." he wrote. J
each fighting all the others and the only point on :
which all are united is in hating the Jews."
WEIZMANN ONCE remarked that Herzl had one l
advantage over him as a Zionist leader he
nothing either about Jews or Palestine.
knew :
Growing up, young Herzl realized that his talents
^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiBiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiisimini^
w^1


Friday. October 22, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 15
Alton Calls UNations Record 'Dismal
UNITED NATIONS -
WNS) Israel is ready
now, even before peace is
ade," to negotiate with
he Arabs on agreement to
imit the flow of arms into
he Middle East, Israeli
reign Minister Yigal
Ion told the 31st General
ssembly.
But as long as the Arabs
intinue to arm themselves
ith highly sophisticated
modem weapons, "Israel is
ompelled to keep up and
ill keep up," he stressed.
Mlon also said that Israel
s ready to participate in a
(.convened Geneva peace
onference but only with
he original parties invited
o Geneva in December,
973.
ALLON SAID that at a
onvened Geneva conference,
rael would hope to negotiate
with each of our neighbors, a
ace which will emerge from the
gion itself, a final peace settle-
nt based on a fair compromise
d which, on the one hand will
ovide Israel with defensible
rders and on the other satisfy
nuine Arab interests in
ding, within the context of
settlement with our eastern
ghbor (Jordan) a just and
structive solution to the
blem of Palestinian Arab
ntity."
A lion stressed that "Peace is
the foremost objective of Israel
and its government will not be
deflected from the constructive
effort required to attain it." But,
he emphasized, "only a peace
which serves the interests of
Israel and its neighbors will
endure."
ON THE issue of terrorism,
Allon said the record of the UN
in combating the international
problem is "dismal." He
welcomed the proposal by West
Germany to the Assembly for a
convention barring the taking of
hostages and providing for the
prosecution or extradition of
terrorists.
Allon criticized the United
Nations for what he termed "the
power of a mechanical majority
to bend the organization to its
own purpose." He said the UN's
specialized agencies must
abandon "the dangerous paths
of politization" and called for full
participation of all members in
all UN activities by "strict
alphabetical rotation instead of
the discriminatory bloc system."
DECLARING that "detente
has not been felt in the Middle
East." Allon said there has been
no improvement in the situation
of Soviet Jewry during the past
year. He said exit from the
Soviet Union is still restricted
and Jews who insist on the right
are subject to harassment, dis-
missal from their jobs and in
some cases, arrest and im-
prisonment.
"We discussed in general how
the peace process in the Middle
East can be given a new im-
petus," Kissinger said. "I think
we agreed that it would be
desirable for progress toward
peace to be made as rapidly as
possible." But Kissinger added
that they did not discuss any
particular method for achieving
peace.
Allon Meets Minister
NEW YORK (JTA) Israel's Foreign Minister Yigal
Allon met here with Portugal's Foreign Minister Jofe
Mcdeiros Ferreira and discussed with him the taking of
further steps toward the normalization of relations between
the two countries.
THE SITUATION in the Mideast was discussed here at
a luncheon given by Israel's UN Ambassador Chaim Herzog,
hosting Allon, Secretary General Kurt Waldheim. General
Assembly President Hamilton Shirley Amerasinghe of Sri
Lanka and other top UN officials.
Ferreira, it was reported, is scheduled to visit Israel in the
near future for talks with Israeli officials and to conduct
negotiations concerning exchange of technological know-how
and agricultural aid between Israel and Portugal The meeting
between the two foreign ministers lasted 45 minutes.
He said the situation of Syrian
Jewry "remains tragic" and they
continue to be held hostage.
Earlier. Allon met with
Secretary of State Henry A.
Kissinger at a breakfast
meeting.
Col. Davidovich Buried in Israel
JERUSALEM (JTA) A funeral service with full
military honors was held here for Col. Yefim Davidovich, a
much decorated hero of the Red Army during World War II,
who died in Minsk six months ago after a long, futile struggle
to obtain a visa to emigrate to Israel.
Davidovich's remains reached Israel last week for
reburial. His widow, daughter and grandson arrived here
earlier. Hundreds of olim from the Soviet Union, war veterans
and a crack paratroop unit attended the services at the Mount
of Olives Cemetery to pay final tribute to the soldier who did
not live to see the country that he declared his "motherland."
ALTHOUGH HE held 14 medals for valor in combat,
including Hero of the Soviet Union, that country's highest
award. Davidovich was stripped of his rank and denied his
pension by Soviet authorities because of his efforts to
emigrate to Israel. But his rank was restored.
No Incidents at Babi Yar
NEW YORK (JTA) The Student Struggle for So-
viet Jewry reported here it had learned by a telephone call to
Kiev that some 300 Soviet Jews held a memorial service at
Babi Yar Sept. 29 which lasted several hours and that there
was no interference by police or KGB agents.
Glenn Richter. SSSJ coordinator, said the services were
held, or attempted each year also because the Soviet gover-
nment refuses to identify Jews as among the victims of the
Kiev ravine slaughter. A new large monument recently erected
on the site omits all references to the Jewish victims.
The Soviet secret police had threatened to arrest anyone
memorializing the massacre of 100,000 Jews by the Nazis
during World War II. The memorial service marked the 35th
anniversary of the massacre.
J.HERBERT BURKE
\urke Seeks
'election To
I Congress
|ngressman J. Herbert Burke
eking reelection to Florida's
I District, covering Broward
ty-
pupying the post for the
12 years, Congressman
points to his service in
ess and political life as a
i of accomplishment."
essman Burke states
is "one of the leaders in
ss working to maintain
| in the Middle East." and
believes that "a strong
i necessary to maintain a
of power in the area."
is met and discussed the
rith leaders of mideastern
|es and has made seven
Israel.
Idition to being active in
phase of good government.
Bra of Burke's reelection
ess point out that he has
ery active in the area of
a and drug abuse.
[was a member of the
sional ad-hoc Committee
>tica Abuse and Control
l instrumental this year in
which established a
on Narcotics
f Abuse Control.
RE-ELECT
J.HERBERT
BURKE
Your Congressman
A lifetime of Accomplishment
Congressmon BURKE is one of the
leoders in the Congress working
to maintain peace in the Middle
East.
HERB BURKE believes that a
strong Israel is necessary to
maintain the balance of power and
assure a lasting peace in the
area. He has met and discussed
the issues with leaders of mid-
eastern countries and has made
seven trips to Israel.
ft. m. ML _________^_______
From left to right: Israel Chief of Staff,
Mordechai Gar; former Prime Minister Golda
Mak; Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin.


Pageie
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. October 22
ISRAEL WILL LIVE
Charlie Friedman-ATRUE Friend of lsra<
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CHARLIE FRIEDMAN
CONGRESS12th DISTRICT
CHARLIE FRIEDMAN IS DEDICATED TO ISRAEL
Holywood Federation, I9601976 B'nai B'rith
South Florida Conference for Soviet Jewery
Jewish Welfare Federtion of South Broward,
Board of Trustees
Temple Sinai, Education Committee
Burke votes against Israel.
Burke is fond of inserting statements in the Congressional Record proclaiming his support
for Israel, but when it comes time to vote on funds to preserve Israel's military and economic
security. Burke votes against Israel.
Anarch 13, 1975, Foreign Assistance Appropriations for FY 1975, passed 212-201 Burke
voted NO.
March 24, 1975, Foreign Assistance Appropriations for FY 1975-conference report, passed
193-185. Burke voted NO
March 4, 1976, Foreign Assistance Appropriations for FY 1976, passed 214-152. Burke voted
NO
June 29. 1976, Foreign Assistance Appropriations for FY 1977, passed 238-169 Burke voted
NO.
While Burke might try to point to other votes in which he voted for Israel, it is the
Appropriations votes which ore the most important.
Burke voted against monitoring Soviet Violations of
human rights.
Establish Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe (Fascell, chairman) to
monitor Soviet compliance with the Helsinki accords regarding human rights and freedom of
emigration in Eostern Europe. Passed 240-95 May 17, 976 Burke voted NO
Persons interested in freedom for Soviet Jewry were especially interested in this measure.
Temple Beth Shalom, Past Board Member
Young Israel, Member
Temple Solel, Education Committee
Jewish Family Service, Board Member
Lived One Year in Israel
Visited Jewish Communities in Russia and Eastern Eurol
Zionist Organization of America
Touro Synagogue National Shrine, Board of Directors
BUT, BURKE WHO PROMISED TO CUT
FEDERAL SPENDING, VOTED TO RAISE HIS
OWN SALARY (Congressional RecordJuly 30, 1975)
Burke has one of the worst attendance records h the Hows*.
Last year it was 68%
Burke has traveled all over the world at taxpayers expanse.
According to the St Petersburg Times, Burke has visited these countries in recent y
taxpayers expense: Sweden, Denmark, Norway. England. Sri lonko. Singopoie,
Isroel. Moloys.a, Egypt, Switzerland. Zaire. Belgium. Portugal. Thailand. Hong
Taiwan, Korea and Japan.
Burke voted against a cut in your taxes.
Io "educ,ion Act 'ndiv.duol tax relwf March 36. 1975. conference report odopt
125 Burke voted NO
Burke voted for the Uq ail companies.
Vote to repeal the oil depletion allowance, an unwarranted tax subsidy for an
enioymg record profits, February 25. 1975 Passed 248-163. Burke voted NO.
Burke votes against senior erf dens.
The Notionol Council of Senior Citizens, which represent I
million older Americans, says Burke voted "right" for seniorcifl
only once out of ten important votes.
Burke votes against consumers.
The Consumer Federation of America gives Burke a pro-cc
rating of 23 H. Out of 13 key consumer votes. Burke voted<
the consumer 5 times and wasn't even present for 5 other voK
Burke votes against tt*a envkwmmnt.
The League of Conservation Voters keeps watch on,
Congressmen vote to preserve the environment. Burke'^
environment rating was a weak 31 S
Rolph Nader gives Borfce low marts.
The independent Ralph Nader groupPublic Citizen -roiesl
voting record ot 17% "right".
J. HERBERT BURKE VOTED AGAINST YOU
For Goodness SakeWe Need A Change!
FRIEDMAN IS DEDJCATEI
Proudly Paid For By The Committee to Elect CkarKoTrMmZT
FRED NOBLE. TREAS
VOTE NOV. 2nd DEMOCRAT


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