The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00152

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
weJewislh Florid lain
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 6 Number 18
Hollywood, Florida Friday, August 27, 1976
) Frd K. Shochtt Friday, Auamt v, iwt Price 25 cents
Federation Plans November Community Mission
Three Jewish ideals the past as our heritage, the
present as our responsibility, the future as our challenge
will be explored in depth by participants in the Jewish
Federation of South Broward's community mission
scheduled for Nov. 14-28.
Melvyn H. Baer, community
mission chairman, has announced
that to date over 60 reservations
have been made for the trip to
Poland. Rumania and Israel.
"We are offering a unique op-
portunity for people in South
Rroward to see, first-hand, the

New York, the first stop will be
Warsaw, Poland, where mission
participants will visit sites con-
nected with the Warsaw Ghetto
uprising, such as Mila-18. Travel
to Krakow, including the Krakow
Ghetto, Auschwitz and Birkenau,
are also on the itinerary.
"For so many of us in South
progression from the Holocaust ; Rroward," said Baer. "this will
in Europe to the Rebirth in
Israel. It is hoped that the
i
I
knowledge gained in the two-
week period will help build a
stronger, more united, better-
informed Jewish Federation and
Jewish community," said Lewis
E. Cohn, Federation president.
FOLLOWING A briefing in
be the first time we can per-
sonally examine our Jewish roots
and ancestry. Visits to the
Jewish Historical Institute and
the Remu Synagogue in Warsaw,
the museum and cemetery in
Krakow, cannot help but put us
more in touch with Jewish
Continued on Page 2
MELBAER
Ford Voices His Approval of Strongest
Republican Plank on Middle East Ever
The best time to visit Israel in the last 2,000 years is NOW!
Javits Condemns
Attack as Senseless'
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Sen. Jacob K.
Javits (R., N.Y.) has called
the killing by terrorists of
an aide, Harold Wallace
Rosenthal, and three other
passengers of an El Al
plane in Istanbul "a
stunning, awful and sense-
less tragedy. Hal was a vic-
. tim of a spreading vicious
insanity that must be
stamped out if we are to
maintain a civilized world."
The bombing and gun-
ning down by the terrorists
of the passengers as they
prepared to board the
plane, he added, "is a bitter
irony for me because I have
worked for years in the
attempt to achieve inter-
national agreement that
would restrain those
nations that harbor ter-
rorists. This is another
bitter lesson that such an
agreement is of the highest
priority. We cannot con-
done nations that justify
terrorism on political
grounds."
AT THE State Department,
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
was informed that for the time
being "it is police work" to de-
termine the facts of the attack.
The U.S. Consulate General in
Istanbul is in "constant touch"
with the Turkish authorities, a
Department spokesman said.
Rosenthal, 29, was an aide to
the Senator for the past six
months after having served for
almost two years as an economist
with the Rockefeller Brothers
Fund in New York. Previously,
Rosenthal had been a legislative
assistant to Sen. Walter P.
Mondale (D., Minn.), the
Democratic Party's vice presi-
dential nominee, and to New
Continued on Page 5
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
KANSAS CITY (JTA) President Ford, on the eve
of balloting at the Republican National Convention roll
call, stood united in his outlook with challenger Ronald
Reagan on the Middle East.
The President assented to
a pro-Israel plank for the
party's platform in the
coming presidential cam-
paign that ranks among the
strongest written by a major
American political organiza-
tion since the birth of the
Jewish State 28 years ago.
NO OPPOSITION, except
possibly from an individual or
two, was mounted after a week's
labor by a committee of 108
members and presented for adop-
and integrity of
tion to the convention's 2.259
delegates Tuesday night.
Representatives of President
Ford's forces have indicated
satisfaction to the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency with the 500-
word Middle East section that
declares: "Our policy must
remain one of decisive support for
the security
Israel."
Among other elements in the
platform are sections regarding
Soviet Jewry, federal aid for
parochial schools and the quota
system in job opportunities.
"Our commitment to Israel is
fundamental and enduring." the
Middle East plank says. "We
have honored and will continue to
honor that commitment in every
way politically, economically.
Continued on Page 7
Toy-Sachs Disease Is Preventable
PRESIDENT FORD
It is now possible to eliminate
totally a fatal genetic disease
which strikes infants. Tay Sachs
Disease testing programs are in
operation at the Community
Hospital of South Rroward. 5100
W. Hallandale Beach Blvd.,
Hollywood, and at the North
Beach Medical Center, Inc., 2835
N. Ocean Beach Blvd., Fort
Lauderdale. The centers are fully
equipped to screen individuals in
their childbearing years in an
effort to identify carriers of the
defective gene.
Tay-Sachs Disease is a de-
generative hereditary disorder
that results in blindness,
seizures, severe mental re-
tardation, total motor paralysis
and finally death before the
victim reaches age five. There is
Center Helps Seniors To Solve Many Problems
"What can I do about ?"
is the question often heard by the
staff of the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida's Holly-
wood Senior Citizen Activity
Center. 2838 Hollywood Blvd.
The Senior Adult living in the
South Broward area is learning
that there is an organization that
will assist him or her in finding
out what to do and where to go
for answers to that question.
If the Senior Adults are alone,
the Center provides two services
- Friendly Visitors and Tele-
phone Reassurance bringing
the world back into their lives. If
the need is to become active
again, the Senior Adult joins one
of the many classes or activities
offered by the Center, or joins the
Volunteer Corps the Center is
forming to assist those in need.
MANY QUESTIONS are suc-
cessfully answered. A number of
problems have been solved or are
on their way to being solved, thus
many people are benefiting from
their contact with the Center.
One individual was able to
receive additional funds to
purchase needed medicines that
cost more than the allowable
Medicaid assistance A couple is
receiving shopping assistance,
allowing them to prepare the nu-
tritional meals they were unable
to plan or shop for because both
are incapacitated.
Some of the people who
contacted the Center were
assisted in getting transportation
to doctors, others were directed
to social service agencies in
Broward County that specialize
in assisting with certain prob-
lems. A number of people met
new friends at the Center.
Herbert Rubin, the project co-
ordinator, said that "The Center
is looking for the senior citizen
living in South Broward whose
income is limited and may be
eligible under Title XX of the
Social Security Act." He added
that he and his staff would like to
talk to any senior about
eligibility and the Center's total
program. The telephone numbers
are 921-6511 and 949-6762.
The Hollywood Senior Citizen
Activity Center is funded under
Title XX of the Social Security
Act, the Department of Health
and Rehabilitative Services of the
State of Florida and the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
no treatment or cure for the
disease. The hope lies in iden-
tifying carriers and providing
genetic counseling.
If both parents are carriers of
the Tay-Sachs gene there is a 25-
percent chance that any child
they conceive will have the
disease. However, there is a
simple procedure for monitoring
the pregnancies of these couples
in order to determine the
presence of Tay-Sachs in the
fetus.
TAY-SACHS IS one hundred
times more common among Jew-
ish children. In the Greater
Miami area one in every 28 Jews
carries the Tay-Sachs gene. (The
carrier rate for the rest of the
population is one in 300.)
A simple blood test to identify
carriers and the monitoring of
pregnancies make it possible for
all parents to be assured that
their children will be free of the
dreaded disease. For appoint-
ments call: Mrs. Mary Moore at
966-8100 in Hollywood; Dr. Mark
Cohan at 565-3381 in Fort
Lauderdale
Other testing sites in this
community wide program are:
The University of Miami's
Mailman Center for Child
Development: call Dr. Paul
Tocci.
The Mount Sinai Medical
Center, Miami Beach; call Dr.
Milton Grossman.
For further information, call
the Jewish Federation of South
(Broward, 921-8810.


.

Pge 2
The Jewish Fkridion and Shpfar of Greater Hollywood .- __________ Friday, Augun 27,1976
S
P
C
/
d
n
P
He Knows Who Killed His Mother
LONDON (JTA) A son
of Mrs. Dora Bloch said here that
Federation Plans
November Community
Mission
Continued from Pane 1
history its pogroms, mas-
sacres and tragedies.''
From Poland, mission
members will go to Bucharest,
Rumania, where they will meet
with Grand Rabbi Rosen and his
wife, -both leaders of the
Rumanian Jewish community.
The life-sustaining programs of
the Joint Distribution Committee
will be viewed first-hand food
and clothing distribution centers,
the Medico-Social Center, and
Negru-Voda Nursing Home. On
the last evening in Rumania the
group hopes to meet with Israel's
Ambassador to that country.
Then, on to Israel, to discover
the rebirth of the Jewish people
through 27 years of Israeli
history.
"We will leave the graves and
the grief in Europe," said Cohn.
"In Israel we will rekindle our
hope as we view a society of
courage and determinism. We
will see lives that have been sal-
vaged, children who have
dreams. In Israel we will see the
Jewish tomorrow."
HIGHLIGHTS OF the stay in
Israel include visits to the
Knesset, the Old City, an ab-
sorption center, a convalescent
home for heroes of the Yom
Kippur War and an army base.
Also planned are stops at com-
munities on the Lebanese border
and the Golan Heights, and in
the Jordan Valley, plus trips to
the mystical city of Safed, to
Mount Scopus. Haifa and Tel
Aviv.
"Thanksgiving Day in
Jerusalem will prove a special
event for mission participants,"
said Baer. "We will attend a
unique service at Yad Vashem,
the Memorial for the Martyrs and
Heroes of the Holocaust, and a
tour of Ramat Eshkol in modern
Jerusalem is also planned for that
day. Out of the blending of the
old and the new, the ashes and
the reconstruction, the sorrow
and the hope, we will offer our
thanks for Israel the pride and
joy of world Jewry. And we will
share together our pride and joy
for being there on this ap-
propriate day of Thanksgiving."
Tying in the European portion
of the trip with the stay in Israel
will be a special visit to Kibbutz
Lochemai Hagetaot, which was
founded by survivors of the War-
saw Ghetto. Meeting with heroes
of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising
and a visit to the museum com-
memorating the event are also
planned.
Deluxe accommodations,
meals and round-trip tran-
sportation are included in the low
mission cost of $750 per person,
predicated on a minimum family
contribution of $1,500 and a
Women's Division commitment
of $500 to the 1977 Jewish
Federation campaign.
"Since reservations are limited
and visas to Poland take a mini-
mum of six weeks to obtain, we
are encouraging interested South
Broward Jewish residents to
make their reservations as soon
as possible," Baer urged.
MANY PARTICIPANTS in
last year's first Federation
mission are hosting small gather-
ings in their homes during the
next few weeks for potential
mission participants.
If you are interested in joining
the mission, or want to attend a
gathering for further in-
formation, please contact Sumner
G. Kaye at the Jewish Federation
of South Broward. 921-8810.
he knew the names of four mem-
bers of the Ugandan secret police
who had murdered his mother
and would be willing to testify to
a commission of inquiry in
Uganda if President Idi Amin set
one up.
He did not believe, however,
that the killers had been acting
on of1 from Amin. Bertram
Bloc. said the family had
received this information in the
past three weeks.
THE ISRAELI engineer was
addressing journalists at the end
of his stay in Britain during
which he has been investigating
his mother's death in the wake of
the Israeli rescue action at
Entebbe Airport.
He also thought that no more
witnesses of the murder were still
alive in Uganda. However, he
appealed to other witnesses, who
had since left the country, to
come forward to confirm what he
had already been told.
Mrs. Bloch, who held dual
British and Israeli citizenship,
was a passenger on the Air
France plane hijacked by pro-
Palestinian terrorists to Uganda.
Some of the passengers were
freed by the terrorists, and more
than 100 were rescued by Israeli
commandos on July 3.
MRS. BLOCH was reportedly
taken to a hospital in Kampala
before the rescue operation. On
July 13, a newspaper in Nairobi,
Kenya, reported that the partly
burned body of Mrs. Bloch was
found in a forest 11 miles from
Kampala, Uganda's capital.
Bloch's press conference was
held at the House of Commons
under the auspices of Labor MP
Greville Janner, who has formed
a group of MPs to keep a watch
on the case. Bloch thanked
Janner, his colleagues and the
British government for their
concern at the affair.
Temple Solel Names Youth Director,
Plans Open House for New Members
Temple Solel has planned a
Prospective Members' Open
House for Sunday, Aug. 29, at 7
p.m. At the annual event, in-
tended to inform interested
persons about all aspects of the
temple's life and facilities, Rabbi
Robert P. Frazin, spiritual leader,
and others will speak. There will
be tours of the temple and
refreshments will be served.
Elliot Kleiman, chairman of
the membership and retention
committee, expects over 300
persons to attend. The committee
BB Women
Hold Luncheon
Miramar, Hollywood and
Pembroke Pines Chapter of B'nai
B'rith Women planned a lun-
cheon for present and prospective
members for Aug. 26 at noon at
the Pembroke Pines home of Mrs.
Elain Lichty. A viva Players were
scheduled to entertain, according
to Hariette Weisman, publicity
chairman.
includes Mr. and Mrs. James
Kronengold. Morris Cook. Rubin
Piha, Leonard Simon, Karen
Zivick, Elaine Fleisher, Judiah
Mish, Nan Schwartzenfeld, Judy
Kleiman. Marian Wolfson. Lola
Spencer, Barbara Desky, Rene
Lieberman and Jerome Solkoff.
TO COORDINATE the con
gregation's youth activities and
programming, Ruthi Gordon has
been appointed youth director. A
native Floridian, she holds a
Bachelor's in special education
from the University of Florida
and a Master's in education from
the University of Maryland.
A past South Florida B'nai
B'rith Girls president and a life-
time local, state, district and
international B'nai B'rith mem-
ber, she has been active in USY
groups at Temples Zion and Or
Olom. Married to WCKT-TV Ch.
7 news reporter Russ Gordon, she
is interested in theater, music
and art, community service and
flying small planes.
Why it has to be said.
The services we render reflect the traditions and practices of the Jewish
community. In this respect, we are accountable to the community and to each of its
members for the performance of our responsibilities in a manner consistent with its
expectations and the high standards evoked by Jewish Law and Custom.
Implicit in this obligation is the responsibility to provide factual information in
order for the public to develop a better understandingof funeral service in terms of
the alternatives, prices and assistance we make avai lable, if the need should arise.
The explanation of our policies and services as listed below is one of the ways
we are trying to fulfill our responsibility to the community.
We're trying to help provide a way for families to compare
funeral charges.
We quote our prices over the phone, without obligation.
We explain every funeral arrangement and itemize the charges for each.
We give counsel on funeral pre-arrangement without charge.
We're trying to help make funeral arrangements less
complicated.
We provide a listing of all available funeral arrangements itemized by price.
We display caskets in all price ranges, with each price clearly indicated.
We offer need-oriented counseling, answer all questions fully and assure each
family the time and privacy they require to reach a decision.
We do everything possible to see to the comfort and well-being
of each family.
We maintain our own spacious,comfortablefacilities convenient to all
communities in Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties.
We try to be genuinely helpful, attentive to the needs and wishes of each
family in the spirit of Jewish tradition. In that tradition, we serve every family,regard-
less of financial circumstance.
We provide the expert services of the largest Jewish staff in South Florida.
We are available to families for assistance in every possible way after
the funeral.
We provide accommodations of special importance to Jewish
families.
We make available considerate,prompt and economical service in New York
and all other states.
We arrange burial in Israel within 24 hours.
We maintain Yahrzeit records for a family's use if needed.
h
In
U
b
.1
' i
.
HOLLYWOOD: 5801 Hollywood Boulevard/920-1010
SUNRISE: 1171 Northwest 61st Avenue (Sunset Strip)/584-6060
North Miami Beach, Miami Beach and Miami.
Five chapels serving the New York City Metropolitan area.
Riverside
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition
A G'ossberg.L F D
Ht-V-H
H--
Memorial Cnapel.lnc /Funeral Directors
M-.-27 7*


"Friday. August 27,1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar ofOreater Hollywood
Page 3
/ the wake of the Entebbe rescue. South Broward residents
ii e joined together in strong fund-raising programs
roughOUt the community. The efforts hare been lauded by
:ng Bernstein, executive rice chairman. United Jewish
nneal. New York, in his weekly newsletter One of the many
neighborhood" drives was held at Aquarius Condominium,
hire Herman Banish Iseuted) and Morris Schwortl gathered
iecks from residents to be sent to Israel.
PAINT &
NU-LIFE SSUV
SHOP
MAY I HAVl 1Ht Nl*t DINTS
COLLISION SPECIALISTS
INSURANCE WORK
SPECIALIZING IN QUALITY
WORK
30 YEARS EXPERIENCE
2111 S.W 59 TERR.
1 BL S. OF TREASURY
'. BL E. OF 441
BEN BERMAN, Proprietor
989-6040
Lippman Seeks
House Seat
Pharmacist Fred Lippman,
candidate for U.S. Congress in
the 12th District who was in-
strumental in seeing the Generic
Drug Bill passed into law, has
committed himself, if he is
elected, to initiating a national
bill patterned on the Florida law.
An executive council member
of the Broward County Boy
Scouts, he is concerned as well
with condominium contracts and
believes that certain sections of
such agreements should be
altered or eliminated. And he has
denounced politicians' use of
taxpayers' money for first-class
airfares and for foreign junkets.
In 1973 Lippman was selected
unanimously by the Broward
legislative delegation to head a
commission charged with
devising a charter form of
government for the county. The
voters approved the charter
during the November, 1974.
election.
A Broward resident for 14
years, he has been involved in
various Jewish activities, in-
cluding the Jewish Welfare
Federation of South Broward.
and is a member of Temple Beth
FA, where his and Judy's two
older sons celebrated their Bar
Mitzvoth and their youngest son
attends Hebrew School. A
keystone of his campaign, he
says, is to give "unflagging
support to Israel/'
JCC Has New Pre-School Program
Donald J. Reiff, president of
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida, has announced a
preschool program beginning
this fall for children ages two and
a half to five at the Michat'.- Ann
Russell Jewish Community
Center, 18900 NE 25th Ave.,
North Miami Beach.
Full-day day < ire service is
partially provide through the
National Counc of Jewish
Women, Miami Section. Care will
be from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. All
teachers are fully qualified early
childhood development in-
structors, licensed by the State of
Florida. The school is directed by
F.laine Herring, who has had
many years of experience in pre-
school education and until
recently directed the pre-school
program at Temple Sinai of
Hollywood.
Reiff said the school em-
phasizes Jewish cultural
programs through which young-
sters can understand the im-
portance of Jewish life in today's
society. All programs are geared
to the child'8 age level. For
further information and
registration, contact Elaine
Herring at the JCC.
The Michael-Ann Russell Jew-
ish Community Center is a
member of the family of agencies
of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
CANDLELIGHTING
TIME
X 1 ELUL-5736 *
RENT-A-CAR
$6
A DAY
6c Per Mile-100 Mile Radius
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
520 S. DIXIE HWY., HIWD.
920-4141
Marine Supplies
Hardware & Paint, Inc.
Housewares & Gifts
Home Decor
Bath Closet Shop
Patio & Dinette Furniture
BEADED WINDOWS
WINDOW SHADES
DRAPERY RODS
WALLPAPER
KEY & LOCK WORK
Store Hours: 7:30a.m.-6p.m. Closed Sunday
100 East Beach Boulevard
Hallondale, Florida 33009
Phone 927 0566
ROOM DIVIDERS
ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS
FOLI AGE
PLANTS
PATIO FURNITURE

Lippma
1 For Cona
For Congress.
12th Dist. Democrat
VOTE SEPT. 7
'-
Fred Uppmcm looks on as Gover-
nor Reubin Askew signs th* Generic
Drug Bill
Hera's what Fred Lippman Is fighting for:
A National Health Care Program based on
realistic costs and services lor the people
A National Generic Drug Law
Staunch support lor Israeli secunty
Ellective Gun Control legislation and the
prohibitionot "Saturday Night Specials"
Comprehensive Condominium Legislation
Reform to protect the rights ot condominium
dwellers
Fair share tax retorms to eliminate unjusti-
liable loopholes that benefit the tew and
penalize the majority
The Sunset Amendment (Zero Budgeting)
Legislation for alternate energy programs
to help solve our energy problems domestic-
ally while maintaining strong anti pollution
standards
Just criminal legislative reform to locus on
the rights of the victims of crimes and the
rights ol the community, as well as the rights
ot the accused
Supported by.
Lewis Cohn
Robert Baer
Seymour AMitzi Mann
Stanley & Karen Margulies
Moses Hornstein
MelvinA Lucille Baer
Robert Hand
James Fox & Barbara Miller
Gerald Radzvill
Sidney & Grace Finkel
Fred Blumenthal
Howard & Mary Lift
Sid Peck
Bill Richman
. .and many more.
Paidtorby Fred Lippman campaign lund William Casady, Treasurer


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 27.19,75
The 'Right' to be Cruel
THERE IS nothing at this point that can be expected
from the nations of the world in the stopping of terrorism
On the one hand, there is the kind of act such as occurred at
Istanbul Airport, where four passengers waiting to board
an El Al plane were killed and a score of others injured.
On the other, there are the kinds of acts such as the
torturing of political prisoners from Chile to the Soviet
Union.
Torture is already outlawed by the signatories to the
Declaration of Human Rights of the United Nations and.
especially as Moscow is concerned, through the Helsinki
agreement last year.
The sad fact is that those most vocal in their
fraudulent concern for human freedom and dignity, using
the United Nations as a backdrop for the insolent practice
of their fraud, are in effect the greatest practitioners of
political torture.
How. then, can the world hope to come to a consensus
of opinion against skyjacking and senseless terrorism
directed against civilians when there is no declaration
against it at all?
We Mustn't Give Up
The United Nations, which has had the issue of
terrorism on its agenda for four years, has failed to act in all
of that time, mainly because the Arabs and their supporters
have been effective in their blocking of any and all attempts
at outlawing this most heinous crime.
At a time when the nonaligned countries of the world
were this very week meeting in Colombo to mount their
latest move to drive Israel from the United Nations, was
there any hope at all that they would take some cognizance
of the growing atrocity of terrorism and its impact upon the
world? We doubt it.
Still, in the face of such discouragement, we should not
give up hope. The United States, either alone or in
cooperation with other countries, must begin instituting
their own sanctions against countries which help terrorists
or provide them sanctuaries
Law into Action
The Senate approval of a provision in the Tax Reform
Act that will penalize corporation executives for compliance
with the Arab boycott against Israel is a most welcome
development. The 86-1 vote for it shows a strong feeling in
the country against the compliance of American companies
with the boycott. Even the one Senator who voted against
the provision. Floyd Haskell (I).. Colo.I. said he was not
against the provision but opposed the entire Tax Reform
Act.
The provision adopted by the Senate, known as Title Ten
of the Trade Reform Act. would subject corporate
executives U> penalties, including a year in jail, for failing to
report any corporate incomes in any country that requires
participation in the boycott.
The thinking in the Senate, as demonstrated by the over-
whelming vote, was that if company executives realize that
they will be held personally responsilbe they will not be so
quick to justify caving in to the Arab boycott.
Issue of Jewish Survival
Jewish leaders are expressing with ever increasing
frequent concern that Jewish survival is endangered more
by assimilation and intermarriage than by physical threats
from their enemies. This was demonstrated recently when
Israeli President Ephraim Kat/.ir suggested that the in-
terpretation of Zionism should include not only aliya but a
more meaningful Jewish life everywhere.
Katzir's remarks are instructive because Zionists, and
especially Israeli Zionists, have always maintained that a
meaningful Jewish life can only be had in Israel.
The need for providing Jewish education for youngsters
is becoming increasingly apparent to American Jewish
leaders. During the past few years more money has been
allocated for education, although perhaps still not enough.
In fact, many Jewish leaders and others involved in Jewish
life are also seeking to educate themselves in Jewish
religion, culture and history.
i*Jewlst Flerklkir
andSMOPAK OP CREATED MOLLYWOOO
OFFICE and PLANT- 130 N.E gth St Miami, ria M1S2 Phone MMfjBJ
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone ITS-4M
PO Box am, Miami. Florida JJiOi
KKKDK SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SELMA M THOMPSON
Editor and Pubiiaher Executive Editor Aaalatant to Publleher
AU P.O. S67B returna arc to be forwarded to
The Jewlar. Floridian. P O Box 01 -27B. Miami. Fla S3101
ThtJiwiHi Fleridian Oaea Nat Guarantee The Kashrwth
Of The Merchandise Advertised la Its Cehimns
Publlahed EH Weekly
Second Claaa Poetaje Paid at Miami. Fla.
Jewleh Federation of South Broward. Inc. SHOT AR EDITORIAL
ADVISORY COMMITTEE- Nathan Prttcher. Chartman LewlaE. Oohn:
Malvtn H Baer. Samuel Mellne D.M.D.
Fred K. Ihechwt Friday, August 17, l7t______________
The Jewish Floridian hat absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly
Member ol the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Sayan Art* Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide News Service, National Editerlal Association, American Asseclatten
ft English-Jewish Newspapers, and ma Wgajja Press Asttattan._____________
lUMeftlPTtON AT8: (feel Area) One Yaar UM Out ef Tewn Upon"
Raavast.
Buckley FeltMoynihan fs Breath
NEW YORK The furor
here over Sen. James Buckley's
move to propose himself for the
presidency reached monumental
proportions by convention eve.
Bigwig Louis Lefkowitz.
who is the Empire State's highest
Republican, serving in the ad-
ministration as Attorney
General, offered a stinging
rebuke to the Buckley move as
"not only fostering disharmony
but jeopardizing his own can-
didacy for reelection" to the
United States Senate in
November.
BUT EVEN before the
Lefkowitz statement, it was clear
that most Gothamites believed
the Buckley proposal to be a
MIHNIIMI
Mindlin
aw
preposterous affair intended to
generate more fury than sound.
In what may be shaping up
as the Year of the Democrats, one
of the scions of the Buckley oil
secuKrry CjUARP
bonanza can by no means con
aider himself a shoo-in. The era of
political conservatism is at lean
for the nonce on the wane.
And so Buckley may indeed
have felt the pressure of the likes
of Daniel Patrick Moynihan 'j
candidacy for the Senate hot
upon his own seat, and it is
possible that he offered himself"^
as an alternative to the
ideologically divisive and
politically debilitating Ford-
Reagan impasse mainly u>
stimulate interest among
Republicans in his own in-
cumbency.
OR IT is possible that he
feared losing himself in the
shadow of Bella Abzug's hat for-
the-Hay. not to mention the
torrential winds of her massive
maw.
For a single moment, Sen
Buckley's Republican colleague!
Sen. Jacob Javits, got into the
act by dismissing the Buckley
proposal on the basis that it
wouldn't "make any materiaN
difference to President Ford."
All of which reminded me of
the nightmarish eventuality,
were Javits up for reelection this
year, of another Javits-Buckley
contest such as the one they
fought in 1968, when Buckley
polled only 17.3 percent of the
vote.
THE FACT is that Buckley
faces more than Moynihan and
Abzug. First, he must win over
Rep. Peter A. Peyser in a two-
way Republican primary Sept.
14. If successful, and there seems
little doubt that he will be. he
must face the winner of a five-
way Democratic primary after
that. -
I raise the what if nightmare
of a Buckley-Javits rematch as
more than idle speculation. A key
issue would be Javits' Jewish-
ness, and the ultimate what if
would be the choice open to
Jewish voters in the event of a
Continued on Page 13
Bad NewsEven on Vacation
Friday August 27, 1976
Volume 6
1ELUL5736
Number 18
I imagine it has always been
like this when one descends from
the mountain, whether it be
Martin Luther King's spiritual
height or the awesome spectacle
of the Canadian Rockies where I
spent most of my recent
vacation: confrontation with so
much of the ugly reality of our
daily lives in the valley.
A media addict, I never
realized how good it can be
without newspaper, radio or
television for aa many as four
days. What could I have missed?
READING THE last two
issues of The Jewish Floridian, I
noted with stomach-twisting
effect that Sadat's tough talk
worries many Israelis, the
Russians don't match peace
moves, George McGovern has
rented some property to the
Syrian Ambassador, we're still at
it with Agnew, there's something
new to complain about Carter,
U.S. contacts PLO. the boycott
they haven't stopped bugging
us Jews even during vacation
time.
Nor is the agony ameliorated
by the news that Schweiker has
a good record on Israel issues; so
did Gerald Ford until he became
President.
It must be confessed that the
churning stomach did not last
long. Aesop was right with his
story of "cry wolf." One learns to
live with Jewish paranoia, real
and imagined, some of the trivial
blown up beyond reason, some of
the important ignored. I include
Joseph Polakoff'I Agnew article
in last week's issue among the
latter.
HIS interpretation of the
Stephen Birmingham piece in the
journalism review (MORE)
edwapfc
Cohen
focuses on the "refutation" of the
common criminal's charge of
Jewish control of the media and
who needs more of the same
defensive tune? What seemed to
me of real concern, something to
kick the stomach around, was
that "The Jews in the 'impact'
media that he is talking about
are, without exception, as they
say, 'only a little bit Jewish.' "
"None," Birmingham writes,
"are religious Jews and most
have never set foot inside a syna-
gogue or Temple and tend to feel
about their Jewiahness as one
New York Times executive says,
'Well, I was married by a rabbi.'
These are not people who have
been major supporters of Zionist
causes, financially or otherwise
. Most are ambivalent about
their Jewiahness, uncertain what
it means and unclear as to what
to do with it" and many, in-
cluding local gal Barbara
Walters, fail to include their
religion in their Who's Who
biographies.
IT SHOULD be added that
they are not Federation, or B'nai
B'rith or other organized Jews,
and while it may appear futile,
given our history, here's where
our concern should lie.
Or in the mind-set of a Rabbi
Phineas Weberman, who, to give
him credit, has no hesitation in
again publicly announcing his
bigotry in a letter published in
the Miami News (Aug. 10).
He writes commending Dania
officials for refusing to par-
ticipate in a program which*
would "bring the poor into the
better neighborhoods. They are
right in wanting to maintain the
economic level and the ethnic
purity of their city" and goes on
to speak of garbage-strewn
streets, muggings, assaults and
shootings as inevitable in such a
program.
TO BOLSTER his argument,
he might have cited the Police
Commissioner of New York City
who wrote that "It is not
astonishing that with a million
Hebrews, mostly Russians, in the
city, perhaps half of the criminals
should be of that race when we
consider that ignorance of the
language, more particularly
among men not physically fit for
hard labor, is conducive to crime
. They are burglars, firebugs.. ^
pickpockets and highway robbers
That was in 1908, but given the
garbage-strewn streets of the
Lower East Side of the time, the
prostitution, pimping and crime,
one can hardly blame the
wealthier WASPs from setting
up zoning barriers and deed
restrictions to keep the dirty
Jews out of their better neigh-
borhoods.
COMING OUT of the moun-
tains one sees more clearly, I
imagine, the negative effects of
the shtetl mentality, whether it
be the wall of "ethnic purity" the
Phineas Webermans would have
us retreat behind, or the enclaves
of self-defense that our more
sophisticated spokesmen are
creating.
I deem them both destructive
of American Jewish life.


Friday. August 27, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
Javits Calls Attack 'Senseless'
Continued from Page 1
York Gov. Hugh Carey when he
was a Congressman.
Born in Philadelphia on Nov. 2,
1946, Rosenthal attended Temple
University, the University of
Cambridge Fletcher School of
Law and Diplomacy and the Uni-
versity of Dijon.
Meanwhile, other Senators
joined Javits in expressing con-
demnation of the attack and
anguish over Rosenthal's death.
The Palestinian attack on the El
Al airliner at Istanbul Airport
puts a new brand of violence and
terrorism on the Palestinian
movement," said Sen. Charles
Mathias(R., Md.).
"It raises new obstacles to the
achievement of their goals. It is
not only barbarous but self-
defeating." The Mathias state-
ment was especially significant
since he had met with PLO chief
Yasir Arafat last April and said
that Arafat appeared "reason-
able" in his view of the Arab-
Israel conflict.
Sen. Edward Kennedy (D.,
Mass.) said Rosenthal's "tragic
and senseless killing is a great
loss for us all."
THE U.S. government has also
condemned the "savage attack"
and hopes it will "prod leaders of
the world into taking positive
action on the question of
terrorism."
In a statement read to the
press, the Department declared,
further: "This is an issue that
Reagan Emphasized Need
For Mideast Compromise
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
In a last-minute bid to bolster his
sagging presidential hopes,
Ronald Reagan proposed that the
Republican Party platform
should declare that compromises
are required for a settlement of
the Arab-Israel conflict. Reagan,
who challenged President Ford
for the Republican nomination
for the presidency, also expressed
comments on Soviet Jewry,
i.rhiinon and the school prayer
issue in a message to the Repub-
lican platform committee in
Kansas City.
Reagan's proposals on the
Middle East were contained in
three sentences: "In the Middle
Fast, the United States should
stand ready to contribute to a
just and durable peace. Such a
peace must absolutely assure the
continued security and survival
of the State of Israel with recog-
nized boundaries accepted by all
ixirties. At the same time, it must
respect the legitimate needs and
rights of the Palestinian Arabs."
THE TEXT of Reagan's policy
position was made available to
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
by Peter Hanneford, of Los An-
geles, research director for the
Reagan campaign. Hanneford
also provided a statement ex-
panding on Reagan's views in
response to a request from the
ITA on how the former California
"iovernor felt on several issues of
particular interest to the Jewish
community.
In his statement on the Middle
Fast to the JTA, Reagan said
that "a reasonable and just
solution can only be reached by
the parties themselves,
negotiating in good faith" and
that "compromises will be
required on both sides to properly
protect the rights and position of
the Jewish people while at the
same time respecting the
legitimate needs of the
Palestinian Arabs."
REPEATING his statement
to the GOP committee about the
need to assure the survival of
Israel within secure and
recognized boundaries, Reagan
declared that "The United States
rtust maintain its support and
commitment to this moral
principle and must constantly
encourage all other nations to do
the same.
"The United Nations can help
promote a peaceful solution to
the Middle East conflict,
provided it accords fair treatment
to both sides and does not allow
its sessions to be used as a forum
for one-sided propaganda at-
tacks."
On the Lebanese conflict,
Reagan said that U.S. "leader-
ship" is "absent" and "Syrian
enforcement of a ceasefire would
prove helpful provided it does not
mask designs on the southern
portion of Lebanon which borders
n Israel."
IN HIS statement to the JTA.
Hanneford said "on the matter of
"
GOVERNOR REAGAN
emigration of Soviet Jewry, Gov.
Reagan believes that it is a basic
human right that individuals
should be able to emigrate to
other countries. As President he
would favor policies designed to
encourage all nations to recognize
this right."
Reagan's statement to the
Republican platform committee
also said that "school prayer is a
major important family issue.
Children should be permitted to
take part in nondenominational
prayer in school if that is the wish
of the parents of that community.
Our platform should recognize
this right of local choice."
On abortion, which has become
a major issue in the platform
committee, Reagan wrote the
committee members that "in
preserving the family, we must
recognize once and for all that to
perform an abortion is to take a
human life" and "the federal
government has no business
whatever underwriting abor-
tions."
MEANWHILE, the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith urged the platform
committee to include planks
which would reject racial quotas
and preferential treatment in
hiring and college admittance
practices and outlaw American
participation in the Arabs'
economic boycott of Israel.
Ex-ADL Board
Member Joins
Carter Campaign
Larry Kaminsky, a former
member of the Southern Regional
Board of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, has been
appointed deputy director in
charge of the Southeast region
for the Presidential campaign of
Jimmy Carter.
The announcement was made
by Harriet Zimmerman, national
director of Jewish affairs for the
Carter campaign, who added that
Kaminsky is also past president
of the Fitzgerald Hebrew Con-
gregation and past chairman of
the Southwest Georgia United
Jewish Appeals drive. He is
executive vice president of H. R.
Kaminsky and Sons, a south
Georgia manufacturing firm
must be addressed in the United
Nations and is a matter of
greatest urgency. It is fortunate
indeed that the aircraft was not
seized and still greater tragedy
did not take place."
The Department statement
added that "We profoundly
lament the death of Harold
Rosenthal," the aide to Sen.
Jacob K. Javits (R., N.Y.) who
was killed in the attack by the
terrorists, and extended "deep
sympathy" to his family.
A DEPARTMENT spokes-
man said that the United States
will be lending full support to the
plan to combat terrorism being
initiated by West Germany and
that it would also back any plan
for that purpose.
Hi 1 lei School
Plans Art Auction
The Hillel Community Day
School will hold its annual art
auction. Saturday, Sept. 11. at 9
p.m. at the Diplomat Hotel in
Hallandale.
Conducted by the Howard
Mann Art Galleries, the auction
will be preceded by an 8:30 p.m.
preview showing of the water-
colors, lithographs and oils.
Donation admission charge in-
cludes refreshments, and all pro-
ceeds go toward scholarships for
needy children.
For reservations or in-
formation, contact chairperson
Mrs. Alan Bostom or call the
school.
New Torah Study Institute
Opening in Early September
The establishment of a new
institute for Torah studies has
been announced by chairman of
the board Daniel Retter. The new
school will be called Toras Ernes
School of Miami.
President William Gordon ex-
plained that the purpose of the
new school is "to provide a
traditional concept in education,
true to the ideals of Torah
Judaism."
Classes will be geared to an
accelerated and comprehensive
academic program with in-
dividualized attention the
primary concern. Equal attention
will be given to quality education
in the Hebrew and secular de-
partments.
"The curriculum will insure
intellectual enrichment and
develop character and morality
so that the warmth of Torah
observance will be carried into
the home," Gordon added.
"Nursery through third grades
have been formulated, and fourth
through seventh grades will be
activated, providing the need
should warrant it."
REGISTRATION WILL be
held in the study of Beth Israel
Synagogue, 770 40th St., Miami
Beach, Tuesday and Wednesday,
Aug. 24 and 25, 7 to 9 p.m.
School will open Sept. 7. For
further information contact Mrs.
Ester Jacobowits.
The officers for 1976-77 are. in
addition to Retter and Gordon,
David Kraynek, Nathan
Goodman, Perry Ciment, Aaron
Katz, Robert Entin, vice
presidents; Michael Jacobowits,
secretary; Gerald Gordon,
treasurer.
The board of directors includes
Abbey Berkowitz. Murry
Berkowitz, Irwin Block. Mel Feit,
Rabbi M. Blumenfeld, Rabbi Y.
Zweig, Michael Lefkowitz,
Makhlouf Suissa and Edward
Reichman.
RELGO, INC.
Religious Goods, Gifts,
Books A Records
1507 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
PHONE 532-5912
arnett
anK
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-820C
ELECT
SHERMAN A.
KATZ
BROWARD COUNTY
CIRCUIT COURT
JUDGE
Admitted to Bar of State of Florida 1958
Admitted to Bar of State of Pennsylvania 1956
Admitted to Bar of United States Supreme Court 1964
Member of American Bar Association
Bachelor of Arts in Economics, University of
Pittsburgh-1949
Juris Doctor, Law School, George Washington University
1955, Law Review
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I
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Pag 6
The Jewish Ftoridiah and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. August 27, 1976
A Weizmann BiographyFinally
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Books
about the Entebbe rescue mission
appeared within days after the
mission. But the first biography
of Chaim Weizmann, leader of
Zionism and first President of
Israel, has only just appeared
nearly a quarter of a century after
his death. Its author is Harriet
Litvinoff, who in 1953 wrote the
first biography of David Ben
Gurion.
Like the latter book, "Weiz-
mann. Last of the Patriarchs."
has begun receiving admiring
notices in the British press. It
will be published in the United
States in November by G. P.
Putnam's Sons.
INTERVIEWED by the Jew-
ish Telegraphic Agency, Lit-
vinoff asserted that his book
shows the peerless contribution
of Weizmann to Jewish nation-
hood. The fact that no biography
had appeared for so long was, he
said, no accident. After the
establishment of the State, "Ben
Gurion ism became the creed of
the country."
The Israeli education system
ran down the diaspora, with
whose weakness Weizmann has
identified. There was also the fact
that Weizmann had written
"Trial and Error," a masterpiece
of autobiography.
Yet "Weizmann was the whole
and Ben Gurion merely a part of
the whole. Weizmann led the
Jewish world, including
Palestine. Ben Gurion was the
leader in Palestine." Litvinoff
observed.
THE NEW book covers Wei-
mann's entire life: from his birm
in Motol to his death in Rehovot.
It draws copiously on the Weiz-
mann Papers of which Litvinoff
is now the English edition's
editor, under the overall super-
vision of Meyer Weisgal.
L vinoff edited five of the
seven English volumes which
have so far appeared. The whole
work is expected to fill 23
volumes. Litvinoff also drew on
other primary sources in-
cluding the Zionist Archives in
Jerusalem and New York, and
Britain's Public Records Office.
The biography is. therefore, a
major historical study of the
whole Zionist struggle. One of the
areas on which it casts new light
is Weizmann's "conquest" of
American Jewry and its
unification on the Zionist
platform.
IT WAS at Weizmann's in-
stigation that the Biltmore
Conference of 1942 was held
the first global conference of
American Zionism.
The book also puts into a far
more critical light what Litvinoff
calls "the defection of American
Jewry." Very early on, Weiz-
mann saw that U.S. Jewry was
vital for Zionism. Yet it would
not criticize Britain until
1942.and then only after Pearl
Harbor.
American Jewry had been
pacifist venerating President
Roosevelt, who had been brought
to power by New York and the
big cities where Jews were
strong, according to Litvinoff.
Yet Roosevelt had not wanted to
rock the boat in the Middle East.
He had been told that
America's oil supplies would be
exhausted by 1957, so he was
busy filching the Saudi oil fields
from under Britain's nose. The
State Department in its ap-
Katz Running
For Judgeship
Attorney Sherman A. Katz, a
Hollywood resident for the past
15 years, is campaigning for the
Broward County Circuit Court
Judgeship in Group 2.
Before coming to Florida. Katz
practiced law in McKeesport.
Pa., and then associated himself
with his brother, Herb, and Paul
Koenig, in the firm of Koenig and
Katz. specializing in trial and
appellate work until semi-retiring
in 1974. Since then, he has been a
consultant to other attorneys.
Katz is especially concerned
with the "tremendous congestion
forced upon the courts by the
population growth of Florida and
the inadequate funding of a court
system to handle the increased
caseload." He notes that the
delays in resolving legal
problems allow the system to
creak along and that the parties
in cases suffer.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
OF MIRAMAR
6W0 S.W. 35 Street
Miramar, Fla. 33023
Invites your inquiry lor information
concerning Pro-School, Religious
School, Membership A High Holy Day
Tickets.
CALL 961-1700
HANS E.R. COIN. WD.
ANNOUNCES THE RELOCATION
OF HIS OFFICE FOR THE
PRACTICE OF
INFANT, CHILDREN AND
ADOLESCENT MEDICINE
AT
2311 MEDICAL DENTAL CENTER
NCXT TO PEMBROKE PINES GENERAL HOSPITAL
2301 H UNIVERSITY DRIVE
PEMBROKE PINES, FLA. 33024
IT
If?
MttfMBW
960-57OO
peasement of Ibn Saud and the
Arabs, was behaving like
Britain's colonial office, and
American Jewry was reluctant to
criticize Roosevelt.
STRANGELY, Litvinoffs
biography of Weizmann is not
the one the author expected to
appear. About five years ago.
Richard Crossman, the former
Labor Minister, was com-
missioned to write the first
authorized biography. It was
hoped that it would appear by
1974, the centenary of Weiz-
mann's birth.
Litvinoff was Crossman's re-
search director. But Crossman,
busy on other works and fighting
against the cancer which killed
him early in 1974, backed out of
the project after making little
progress.
It was handed instead to
historian Walter Laqueur, who is
understood to have been ap-
proached even before Crossman
came on the scene. Litvinoff,
disappointed at not being asked
to write the authorized
biography, decided to write his
own work.
IT TOOK him a year to
complete it. It is somewhat
shorter than he would have liked
due to the limit set by British
publisher Hodder and Stoughton.
He would have liked to devote
more space to Weizmann's family
life. Nevertheless, he has done
justice to his subject.
Friedman Runs
For Congress
Dentist Charlie Friedman, who
believes he cannot
simultaneously practice dentistry
and campaign for office, has
"resigned" from his dental
practice while running for a seat
in the U.S. House of Repre-
sentatives in the 12th District.
A member of Temple Solel and
Young Israel of Hollywood,
Friedman was born in Newport,
R.I., where his family were active
members of Touro Synagogue. In
the 1950s he worked on kib-
butzim in Israel and in 1974 was
a representative on a trip to
Russia of the South Florida Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry.
Friedman, who has practiced
dentistry in this area for 14 years,
has included in his campaign
platform several medical and
health care theories developed
through his work. He is also an
advocate of consumers' rights,
and believes that an independent
consumer protection agency is
necessary for defending the
public's interests in areas of food,
drug and product safety.
Shields Model Roland, Inc., Opens
Branch Office in Shopping Center
H. Virgil Sherrill, president of
Shields Model Roland, Inc.. and
former chairman of the Securities
Industry Association, and
Thomas W. Thompson, vice
president in charge of retail
branches, attended the opening
of the new Shields Model Roland
branch in the Post Haste
Shopping Center.
Shields Model Roland. Inc.,
founded in 1923. is considered
one of Wall Street's leading
firms, offering a wide variety of
investment services to the in-
vesting public. The local office is
managed by Alvin B. Epstein,
vice president, and staffed
mostly by local residents, in-
cluding Norman A. Berney. Mark
R. Fried. James J. Gensel.
Richard A. Hollander. Irving
Jacobs. Richard M. Knee.
William R. McCormick. E. Victor
Margand, Stuart J. Michaels.
Patricia A. Sharpe and Eliot C
Wells.
CARTONS
MANQERS
POLYETHYLENE
The Miami Beach office, which
had its fifth anniversary this
year, is managed by Hollywood
resident I. Laurence Hunter, vice
president of the firm.
The Shields Model Roland-
Hollywood office is a full-service U
branch with direct access to all
securities markets for order
execution, including point-to-
point telephone and wire com-
munications facilities. Pro-
fessional assistance is available
in financial planning for pension
and profit snaring plans, options
trading, fixed income invest-
ments including tax free
municipal securities and cor-
porate and government tmnds.
Their research is recognized by
financial institutions nationwide.
Members of principal securities
exchanges, their main office is
located at 44 Wall St.. New York,
with branches coast to coast, an
in London and Paris.
776-6272
HOWARD
|arer &
ack aging
120' N E 45 S'SEET
F0?T IAUDE&DAIE
The Sales Division is pleased to announce
that the following Account Executives are
now associated with our n^wly opened
Hollywood Office
Norman A. Berney
Mark R. Fried
James J. Gensel
Richard A. Hollander
Irving Jacobs
Richard M. Knee
William R. McCormick
E.Victor Margand, C.F.A
Stuart J. Michaels
Patricia A. Sharpe
Eliot C. Wells
Alvin B. Epstein
Vice President and Resident Manager
SlIIKLDS MOM.L KOLAM)
NmwimmmmI
Mi M .-
Postr Haste Shopping Center
4415 Sheridan St Hollywood Ha 33
Broward 963-4970 '[):, 7,34
HOLLYWOOD'S LABORATORY
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Friday. August 27,1976
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
page 7
Strongest Ever GOP Plank on Middle East
Continued from Page 1
and by providing the military aid
that Israel requires to remain
strong enough to deter any
potential aggression."
"AN EQUALLY important
component of our commitment to
Israel lies in committing our
efforts to secure a just and
durable peace for all nations in
that complex region," the plank
says. "Peace in the Middle East
now requires face-to-face direct
negotiations between the states
involved with the recognition of
safe, secure and defensible orders
for Israel."
Scoring the Arab oil embargo
that came with the 1973 Yom
Kippur War, the plank declares
that "the United States would
view any attempt to reimpose an
embargo as an essentially hostile
act."
About the Arab boycott of
Jews Buying
Work Permits
BONN (JTA) The
state prosecutor in the
West German city of Of fen-
bach, near Frankfurt, is
investigating allegations
that more than 1,000 Soviet
Jews with Israeli citizen-
ship have paid large sums
to obtain work and
residence permits in the
city.
This followed a report in
the Israeli paper Yediot
Achronot claiming that the
emigres were paying inter-
mediaries up to $1,000 to
obtain the necessary
permits.
THE OFFENBACH local
authorities have conceded that
there has been a rapid rise in the
number of Israeli citizens in the
area, from 458 at the start of 1974
to 1,100 presently.
A spokesman said there was
"no doubt that a carefully
planned action is underway." The
immigrants are almost all from
the Soviet Union and other East
Kuropean bloc countries.
They reportedly first went to
Israel but soon after came to
Germany. Under the guise of
being German descendants
("ehemalige Volksdeutsche"),
they then applied for refugee
papers which entitled them to
immediate social security
benefits.
Many are reportedly forced,
because of the high unem-
ployment in the region, to work
illegally for cutrate wages, part of
which is paid as "commission" to
the intermediary.
Soviet Jewry Is
Program Subject
The Soviet Jewry Committee
of the Community Relations
Committee of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward has
planned an educational program
in September. The public is
welcome to attend on Sunday,
Sept. 12, at 7:30 p.m. at Temple
Beth Shalom, 4601 Arthur
Street.
The program mchidea Prof.
Leon Goure, director of Soviet
studies and professor of inter-
national studies at the University
of Miami, who will apeak on
Soviet Jewry and US-USSR
relationa. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky of Temple Beth
Shalom will describe the latest
happenings to Soviet Jews in an
update. Rabbi Malavsky has just
returned from Russia and has
many experiences to relate. A
discussion and refreshment hour
will follow.
Please bring all interested
persons to this timely and vital
meeting.
Israel and American companies
that trade with Israel or have
Jews in high administrative or
ownership capacities, the
platform says that the
Republican Party "will oppose
discriminatory practices, in-
cluding boycotts of any type."
THE MIDEAST plank credits
Republican administratisns with
having "succeeded in re-
establishing communications
with the Arab countries" and
having made "extensive progress
in our diplomatic and commercial
relations with the more moderate
Arab nations."
An implied warning is given to
tne Soviet Union in the phrasing,
that because of America's
"fundamental interests" in the
Middle East, the Republicans
would "continue our ettorts to
maintain the balance of power in
the Mediterranean region" and
not permit "any attempt to
disturb valued alliance relation-
ships in the eastern
Mediterranean."
It said the GOP would con-
tinue to support peace initiatives
in Lebanon and provide
humanitarian assistance there.
THE PLANK made no
mention of Palestinians or
refugees. A possibly subtle effort
in this direction was wiped out in
the discussions of the plank by
.he full committee last week
when Sen. Hugh Scott of Penn-
sylvania, the Republican leader
in the Senate, demanded changes
of language in two places form
"all parties" to "all nations" and
"between the parties" to
"between the states" involved.
"We do not want to be in-
terpreted as negotiating with the
PLO and Yasir Arafat," Scott
declared. "We do not want to
negotiate with parties but with
nations."
Scott, who is retiring from the
Senate at the end of the year, said
the word, "parties," instead of
"nations." in Middle East ter-
minology "is highly offensive to
American Jews." When Scott
was questioned within the com-
mittee about his change, he
declared that he wanted the word
nation,' so that it would be
very clear we do not mean the
PLO."
Scott has been in favor of
Israel since his first term in the
House 30 years ago from a Phila-
delphia district that had few
Jewish residents.
SCOTT, Rep. Millicent
Fenwick of New Jersey and
Richard Rosenbaum, chairman of
the New York State Republican
Party, were credited with being
the chief movers for the language
in the Middle East plank in the
subcommittee led by Sen. Roman
Hruska of Nebraska. The plank
does not refer to moving the
American Embassy from Tel
Aviv to Israel's capital,
Jerusalem.
In another section, the plat-
form calls for a fight on
terrorism, both domestic and
international. "Collective action
must come from all nations," the
draft says in urging "sanctions
against countries that aid
terrorists." It said "We applaud
the daring rescue by Israel of
innocent civilian hostages who
were kidnapped by terrorists,"
and while regretting the loss of
lives involved, "the courageous
manner in which the hostages
were freed speaks eloquently to
our abhorrence of world bandits."
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, Augut27,197
S
P
G
P
d
ti
n
P
o,
Terrorists Were Out to KillNot Hijack
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two terrorists killed four
persons and wounded 24, 14 of them seriously, at
Istanbul's Yasilkov Airport Aug. 11 minutes before they
were to board a Tel Aviv-bound El Al plane.
Eighty-two passengers were already on the plane
when the killers opened their machine-gun and hand
grenade attack on the remaining passengers in the
departure lounge.
Two of the dead
passengers were identified
as Dr. Harold Rosen thai.
an assistant to U.S. Sen.
Jacob K. Javits (R.. N.Y.),
who was on his way to
men and an Israeli security of-
ficer. Many of the injured were
hit by splinters from the
grenades and shattered window-
panes.
Two terrorists, a Palestinian
and a Pakistani, were captured.
Israel to participate in an The captured killers identified
academic seminar at the JJBjj" Mohamed Mehdi
,, and Mohamed Mu.sein al-Rashid
Van Leer Institute, and a and admitted thev were members
Japanese tourist guide, of the Popular Front for the
Yakao Hiramo. who was in Liberation of Palestine led
charge of a group of bv Geor8* Habash and that they
tourists from Japan on were in the pay of Libya.
their way to Israel.
THE SERIOUSLY injured
passengers were taken to
The two were traveling with
false Kuwaiti passports. The
story of the attack was pieced
together by passengers who
hospitals in Istanbul. The other ^^^^ fc f^ Gurion Airport,
leas seriously injured were flown the uin of the E1 A, plane
back to Tel Aviv Among the YaakoC- Roman, the Israeli Vice
injured were two Turkish police- Consu, in isUnbu], Ephraim
Changes in Found Approved
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Cabinet has approved two
major changes in monetary policy, both aimed at strengthening
the marketability of Israel's exports. The most far-reaching
decision was to link the Israel pound to a "basket" of foreign
currencies instead of solely to the U.S. dollar as heretofore.
The Cabinet also accelerated the so-called "creeping
devaluation." The pound was devalued by another two per-
cent, and will stand at IL 8.12 to SI.
Disabled Israeli Athletes
Win 32 Gold Medals
TORONTO (JTA) Israeli
athletes at the Olympics for the
disabled held here won 32 gold
medals, eight silver and five
bronze. Israel was in second place
in the wheelchair events, with the
U.S. in first place, and was fifth
in the all-round competitions
The Israelis have two gold
medals in the pentathlon com-
petition, one for amputees and
one for those confined to wheel-
chairs. One gold medal was won
in the fencing division, another
gold medal for amputee volley-
ball and a third gold medal for
women's basketball.
IN THE men's final, the Israeli
wheelchair basketball team
played against the American
team Israel baa also won 15 gold
medals in the swimming events
setting 10 world records.
Uri Bergman of Kibbutz Givat
Brenner won the 100-meter free-
style men's swimming contest,
setting a world record
Mazor, who was at the airport
when the attack occurred, the
governor of Istanbul and a
representative of the Turkish
Ministry of Justice who were at
the airport and conducted an
investigation of the tragedy.
FROM SOME of the accounts,
it appeared that the terrorists
were not trying to hijack the
plane but to kill or capture as
hostages as many of the
passengers as possible in
retaliation for the Israeli rescue
of more than 100 hostages held
by terrorists at Entebbe Airport
in Uganda.
One passenger told reporters at
Ben Gurion Airport the attack
occurred as the passengers were
emerging from the terminal
building toward the bus that was
to drive him to the plane. The
terrorists opened fire, aiming
directly at the passengers, she
said.
The killers appeared to be
coming from the terminal
building. The passengers
scattered, screaming. Another
passenger said he heard a loud
explosion followed by machine-
gun fire and people falling all
around him. crying in agony and
bleeding. The explosion was
apparently that of a hand
grenade.
Two other passengers, Abra-
ham Papou, and his wife, Rachel,
said the gunmen tossed grenades
and opened fire when the Turkish
police thwarted their attempt to
seize hostages.
PAUL BARKER of England,
another passenger, reported that
the entire incident took about 20
minutes. He said he was in the
group that was about to board
the plane when he heard two loud
blasts.
"We were ordered out of the
bus and told to lie flat on the
ground. We heard a lot of auto-
matic fire. But the El Al security
agents and the Turkish police
seemed to have gained quick
control of things.''
Another aspect of the attack
was pieced together from various
accounts, namely, how the 82
passengers aboard the plane were
saved. Credit was given to the
quick thinking of the captain who
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decided to take off as soon as
possible after the attack began.
HE ORDERED the doors of
the plane closed as soon as the
last of the earlier groups of
passengers, who had been bused
to the plane, were aboard. Those
left behind were the injured, the
dead and several others who were
waiting to board the bus taking
them to the plane.
At a midnight press con-
ference, about an hour after the
El Al plane landed at Ben Gurion
Airport. Gad Yaacobi, Minister
of Transportation, and Mot-
dechai Ben Ari. General Director
of El Al. said they supported the
captain's decision.
Yaacobi said the attack was
the continuation by terrorists of
their war against Israel. He
added that the attack was further
proof that Israel's national airline
must be constantly on the alert
for terrorists. He said that since
the hijacking of the Air France
plane. Israel has taken extra
special security measures to
thwart terrorist attacks.
THE TRANSPORT Minister
added that in spite of the Air
France hijacking the world hag
still not grasped the awesome
meaning of air piracy and
terrorism. Premier Yitzhak
Rabin, who received the news of
the latest tragedy as he was ad-
dressing a delegation of Israel
Bond leaders from the U.S. and
Canada, said he doubted that the
world was fully aware of the con-
sequences of continuing air
terrorism.
There were conflicting reports.
official and unofficial, as to how
the terrorists gained access to the
terminal building. One report was
that they arrived earlier in the
day aboard a Pakistani plane
from Libya.
ANOTHER was that they
arrived from Pakistan on an
Italian airliner. A third report,
deemed most authentic, was that
they arrived in the morning in
Rome from Benghazi, then took
an Alitalia plane to Istanbul
where they remained in transit,
thus having access to the
departing passengers lounge.
Meanwhile. Yaacobi announced
Aug. 12 that Israel would seek to
extradite the two captured ter-
rorists if the law allowed.
He said he had already
discussed this with foreign
ministry officials.

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Frktay. Aiigqrt37.1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Ortater Hollywood
Mideast, Palestine High On Assembly Agenda
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
The "Situation in the
Mideast" and the "Question of
Palestine" are among the first
issues to be discussed by the up-
coming General Assembly sched-
uled to convene Sept. 21. The
provisjonal agenda of the 31st
General Assembly contains so far
119 items for consideration. The
"Question of Palestine" is item
27 and the "Situation in the Mid
east item 29.
In discussing the Palestinian
question, the Assembly will be
presented with the Report of the
Committee on the Exercise of the
Inalienable Rights of the Pales-
tinian People, which recommends
the creation of a Palestinian state
under the rule of the PLO. It also
calls for Israeli withdrawal from
all Arab territories by June, 1977.
Meanwhile, Israeli and
Western diplomats are waiting to
see what sort of action the Arabs
will take at the conference of the
Non-Aligned countries in Colom-
bo later this month.
The PLO hat already started a
campaign calling on Third World
Page9
countries to impose economic and
political sanctions against Israel.
Diplomats hare aay that the
Arabs will also seek support at
the conference for their drive to
oust Israel from the UN. Last
year the Arabs did not succeed in
their effort to obtain the Non-
Aligned countries' support to
suspend Israel's UN
bership.
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Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. August 27.1975 -
1
'Legion Fever' Seen
As Act of Terrorism
iackenderson
There is a distinct possibility,
say intelligence analysts, that the
mysterious "Legion fever" which
swept through Pennsylvania
recently may have been the result
of an act of terrorism.
The epidemic killed 27 people
and hospitalized 128 others who
attended an American Legion
convention in Philadelphia late
last month.
FEDERAL EXPERTS en
tered the case as soon as it was
detected. The Pentagon, for
example, quietly checked the
employes and stocks at Fort
Detrick, Maryland. This is where
the secret laboratories are located
that developed deadly germs for
biological warfare.
Biological weapons were out-
lawed in 1969. But some virus
and bacteria strains are still kept
at Fort Detrick for immunology
studies. The Pentagon in-
vestigators discovered. with
great relief, that all the deadly
cultures were intact.
There was concern that
radicals might have stolen some
disease germs and infected the
I-egionnairs This possibility
hasn't been completely
dismissed. The American I^egion
supported the Vietnam war. the
draft and military spending. This
makes the Legion a tempting
target for a leftwing terrorist
attack.
INVESTIGATORS have
learned, for example, that most
of the fever victims attended an
American Legion parade in
Philadelphia. It is conceivable,
one source told us. that a toxic
substance could have been hand-
sprayed here and there along the
parade route.
But there is no hard eveidence.
Most organized terrorists want
publicity for their outrages. And
no one has stepped forward to
claim responsibility for the
outbreak in Philadelphia. So the
malady is still a mystery.
As we previously reported,
however, terrorists are trying to
get their hands on nuclear
weapons. This would give them
the ultimate weapon to blackmail
nations. We nave reported,
nevertheless, that our nuclear
security is sloppy.
NOW WE have obtained a
classified government study
confirming this. The General
Accounting Office, in a con-
fidential report, warns that our
ability to keep track of nuclear
materials is poor. Our physical
security systems, the report
adds, are weak.
The report explains what this
could mean: "In addition to
being suitable for the fabrication
of bombs, plutonium is an ex-
tremely toxic substance .
"Such materials could be used
in an explosive device or as a
radioactive poison by terrorists,
criminals or agents of other
countries."
CARTER'S COMING: The
Democratic Presidential can-
didate. Jimmy Carter, already is
affecting legislation. Both
congressmen and lobbyists are
now basing their strategy on the
odds that Carter will be the next
president. Therefore, some bills
are being delayed, others with-
held, in anticipation of a Carter
administration.
Maine's Sen. Edmund Muskie.
for example, has introduced a
zero-based budgeting bill. This
would require the review of all
federal programs every five
years. But Muskie is quietly
holding the bill back until next
year, in the hope that he can get
stronger legislation if he waits
until Carter is in the White
House.
THE SENATE Government
Operations Committee has also
GOP Urges Soviets
To Act on Rights
KANSAS CITY (JTA) The Republican Party's
platform, drafted by a committee of 108 delegates, calls on
the Soviet Union to "implement" the United Nations
Declaration on Human Rights and the 1975 Helsinki
Agreement that "guarantee" emigration rights and the
termination of "all forms of harassment" of those wishing
to emigrate.
The UN and Helsinki agreements, the draft said,
include the right of "emigration of Soviet Jews,
Christians, Moslems and others who wish to join close
relatives abroad. In this spirit, we shall expect the im-
mediate end of aU forms of harassment including im-
prisonment and military service, aimed at preventing
such emigration."
THE DRAFT of this section makes no mention of the
Jackson Vanik provision of the U.S. Trade Reform Act of
1974 that underpins U.S. government actions toward
inducing the Soviet Union to modify its emigration policy
In dealing with equal rights and ending
discrimination, the platform calls for "vigorous en-
forcement of laws to assure equal treatment" in job
recruitment, hiring, promotion, pay credit, mortgage
access and housing, but "the way to end" discrimination
"is not by resurrecting the discredited quota system and
attempting to cloak it in an aura of new respectability,"
the plank said.
It recommended "alternative means of assisting the
victims of past discriminations," including educational
opportunites. Saying "diversity in education has great
value," the platform recommends "Public schools and
non-public schools should share in education funds on a
constitutionally acceptable basis." It also says that
private colleges and universities should be assisted.
been investigating how to
streamline the federal regulatory
agencies. But no legislation will
be introduced until the new
administration takes office next
year.
Environmentalists are also
trying to hold up a bill that would
allow private manufacturers to
produce nuclear fuel for the first
time.
If they can delay it long
enough, the environmentalists
believe Carter as president would
veto it.
BYRON'S BOYS: An itinerant
legislator, Rep. Goodloe Byron
II).. Md.l, traveled all the way to
Alaska last month to inspect the
trans-Alaskan pipeline com-
munications network.
His report to the House
Commerce Committee is
probably one of the shortest and
most expensive ever submitted.
It runs only a page and a half. It
contains no information that
couldn't have been obtained by a
telephone call.
The report also omits one key
factor, which may explain the
real reason Byron flew to Alaska.
His two sons, Goodloe, Jr.. and
Barton, are working on the
Alaska pipeline this summer.
The congressman spent more
time visiting his sons than in-
specting the pipeline.
AMBASSADOR in-Exile:
Turner Shelton, our former
ambassador to Nicaragua, has
finally found a home. His per-
formance in Nicaragua was so
poor that he was rebuked and
recalled by the State Depart-
ment.
But he has powerful friends on
Capitol Hill. They twisted
Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger's arm to give him
another job. Shelton even showed
up at the State Department to
examine pictures of am-
bassadorial residences he would
like to live in.
First he was appointed am-
bassador to the Bahamas. But
both the U.S. Senate and the
Bahama government turned him
down. Then he was nominated
Consul General to Bermuda.
Again the host government
rejected him. Then he wangled an
appointment to the romantic, old
Moroccan city of Casablanca.
Once more, he was denied the job.
NOW IT LOOKS as if he has
found a safe haven. He has been
assigned as "Diplomat In
Residence" at the Navy war
college in Newport, Rhode
Island. His duty will be to make
occasional talks to military
classes on the subject of foreign
affairs.
He will have no official
residence, no staff, no respon-
sibilities. But at least Shelton
will have a title.
Shiff Seeks
Senate Seat
Minneapolia-born Michael
Alan Shiff, president of A.S.A.
Architects, Inc., and a consulting
city planner for Lauderdale
Lakes and Oakland Park, has an-
nounced his candidacy for the
State Senate in District 31.
A graduate of the University of
Minnesota with a degree in archi-
tecture, he is on the Lauderhill
Planning and Zoning Board, a
member of the Broward County
Citizens and Technical Advisory
Commissions' Planning Councils,
and on the Broward Democratic
Executive Committee.
Shiff is a past PTA president
and past chairman of the parents
advisory committee at Royal
Palm Elementary, and a member
of the North Central Advisory
l Board of Broward County
Schools.
Workmen's Circle Labor Day |
Conference Being Mapped
"Two Hundred Years U.S.A."
and "76 Years Workmen's
Circle" will be the themes of the
57th Southern regional Work-
men's Circle Conference.
Announcement of this year's
event was made by Joseph
Jacobs, Southern regional
president, of Atlanta, Ga., and
Max Gleiberman, Miami Beach
regional secretary.
Delegates and guests repre-
senting 10 southern cities from
Texas to Florida will attend the
three-day Labor Day weekend
conference at the Di Lido Hotel.
THE WORKMEN'S Circle is
the oldest and largest Jewish
fraternal order in the United
States and Canada, chartered in
1900 in the State of New York.
Formed as a mutual aid society
at a time when group insurance,
medical services and other neces-
sary health, education and
welfare benefits were unheard of,
the organization was one of the
first to offer these services to its
members and their families.
Known within the trade union
movement as the "Red Cross of
Labor," the "Arbeiter Ring" as
it was affectionately called
championed such early pro-labor
legislation as a minimum wage,
minimum hours, anti-child labor
legislation and a social security
program for all Americans.
Thousands of early immigrants
received their basic education in
democracy and Americanism at
the many citizenship schools
sponsored by the Workmen's
Circle.
PRESENTLY, there are 13
chapters in South Florida with a
membership of over 2,000, in-
volved in all facets of Jewish and
general community life.
Two conference highlights will
be the Jewish Labor Committee
banquet and the Yiddish and
Hebrew concert.
Israel Denies Sinking
CypriotArms Ship
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel denied any knowledge
about the sinking of a Cypriot ship carrying arms outside
of the southern Lebanese port of Tyre Aug. 9. "We know
nothing about it," an army spokesman said. Palestinian
sources in Lebanon charged that Israeli frogmen caused
the explosion of the ship. "Athens," outside the entrance
of the port at Tyre causing the port to be blocked.
However, another source in Lebanon said the ship
was sunk by a torpedo. A report from Cyprus said that
the Athens was sunk by the same elements responsible for
the sinking of another arms ship near Sidon last week.
PALESTINIANS and Moslem leftists reacting to
the reports from Israel that its navy patrols have been
intensified near Sidon and Tyre are blaming Israel for the
sinking of the ships. But the Syrians and Lebanese
Christians have also been conducting a siege of these
ports to prevent the Palestinian and Lebanese Moslem
forces from receiving arms.
However, arms have been getting through and the
Christians recently claimed that a Libyan ship unloaded a
number of dismantled Mirage fighters which were
reassembled on improvised airstrips built in Moslem-held
territory in south Lebanon.
The sinking of the ships at Tyre and Sidon will no
doubt undermine the supply route for the Palestinian-
Moslem forces.
MEANWHILE, the tobacco trade along Israels
border with Lebanon has been temporarily suspended.
While there is a rumor that Libya has offered to buy the
tobacco from the south Lebanon growers at a higher price
than the Israelis pay, the suspension is actually due to the
lack of a final decision on the price that Israel's Dubek
Cigarette Co. will pay for the tobacco.
Israel Keeps Watchful
Eye on Colombo Meet
By UZI BE NZI MAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israeli officials and
diplomats were focusing their sights on the conference of
nonaligned countries which opened in Colombo Monday
to see what sort of moves the Arabs will take there in their
continuing efforts to win support for their drive to oust
Israel from the United Nations.
The general feeling among pected to demand action on the
political circles here is that the
Arab bloc will fail in this bid.
At the same time, political
circles pointed out that Egypt
would most likely present itself
as the radical spokesman for the
Arab world and mount a militant
attack against Israel in support
of her ouster from the UN.
SmOULD THIS happen.
Israeli circles note it will con-
stitute a violation of the spirit of
the second interim Sinai accord in
which Egypt agreed to refrain
from engaging in hostile
propaganda against Israel.
The Arab bloc was also ex-
recommendation of the UN Com-
mittee on the Exercise of the In-
alienable Rights of the
Palestinian People ("Committee
of 20") calling for the creation of
a Palestinian state under the rule
of the Palestine Liberation
Organization and Israeli with-
draws! from all Arab territories
by June. 1977.
AS A RESULT, political
circles here expect that the Arab
bloc would seek support for this
recommendation of the non-
aligned conference in order to put
some pressure on the General
Assembly when it convenes next
month.


Friday, Auguat27,19T6
The Jewish Floridian andShofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
^Got Th Spirit of Savings 76
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by popular demand...
JL. CUSTOMER MAY PURCHASE ONE OR All STARRED ITEMS WITH OTHER
" PURCHASES OF $7.00 OR MORE, EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
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Pantry Pride
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WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES NONE SOLO TO DIALERS


12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. Augut 27.1976
I
C
1
By &Be halpepn
Question: Why is it forbidden
to eat meat or poultry during the
first nine days of the month of
Av?
Ben Berg
Hallandale
Answer: The first nine days of
the month of Av. the fifth month
of the Jewish religious calendar
and the'eleventh month of the
civil calendar, is the concluding
period of mourning which begins
with the fast of the seventeenth
day of the month of Tammuz,
"Shiva asar b'Tammuz" (Heb).
This period of mourning,
known as the three weeks,
becomes more severe from the
first day of the month of Av and
ends with the fast of "Tisha
b'Av," which is the ninth day of
the month of Av.
This three-week period of
mourning is called in Hebrew
"Bein ha-Mezarim," which
means between the straits, i.e.,
the two fasts.
Traditionally during these
three weeks some of the mourn-
ing rites are:
not to buy or wear new
garments;
to abstain from music and
entertainment, pleasure or sport:
0 to abstain from eating the
new fruits of the season over
which the blessing of the "She-
hecheyanu" is pronounced:
no weddings are celebrated;
some very pious Jews also
abstain from the consumption of
meat or poultry and the drinking
of wine except on the Sabbath.
GENERALLY, these rites are
observed only from the first of
Av onward. "When Av comes in,
joy is diminished" iMishna
Taanit4:6).
The fast of the seventeenth day
of the month of Tammuz com-
memorates the breaching of the
walls of Jerusalem by King
Nebuchadnezzar of Babylonia in
586 B.C.E. and Titus in 70 C.E.
The fast of Tisha b'Av is com-
memorated as the destruction of
the First Temple by Nebuchad-
nezzar in 586 B.C.E. and the
destruction of the Second Temple
by the Romans in 70 C.E.
The Mishna Taanit {ibid.)
enumerates an additional list of
calamities which occurred on the
ninth of Av throughout Jewish
history.
On the ninth of Av it was
decreed that after the Exodus
from Egypt the children of Israel
should not enter the Promised
Land.
Betar, the last stronghold of
the leaders of the Bar Kochba
war, was captured on the ninth of
Av in the year 135 C.E.
C On the same day, one year
later in 136 C.E.. the Roman Em-
peror Hadrian established a
heathen temple on the site of the
Temple and rebuilt Jerusalem as
a pagan city.
"The expulsion of the Jews
from Spain in 1492 is said also to
have occurred on the ninth of Av.
The ninth of Av thus became a
symbol for all the persecutions
and misfortunes of the Jewish
people, for the loss of national in-
dependence and the sufferings in
exile. The massacres of whole
communities during the Crusade?
intensified this association" (En
cyclopaedia Judaica, Vol. 3, p.
936).
THE FAST OF Tisha b'Av is
the only one aside from the Bib-
lical fast of the Day of Atone-
ment which is observed from the
start of nightfall and lasts for 24
hours.
The special features of the
liturgy for the day are: the
reading of the Book of Lamenta-
tions, the recital of "kinot"
(dirges), composed not only in
commemoration of the events of
that day but for all the tragic oc-
casions of Jewish history. In
many synagogues these are read
by dim candlelight, while sitting
on the floor or low benches, as a
sign of mourning.
Editor's note: Please send all
questions to:
ASK ABE
c / o Jewish Federation
of South Hroward
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood. Florida 33020
Our
Readers
Write
Let Thy Words Be Brief
Koheleth (Eeclesiastes)
Editor. Jewish Floridian-Shofar:
Two anniversaries within a
span of ten days in early August
call to mind painful historical
associations between the
Stalinist murder of leading Jew-
ish intellectuals on August 12.
1952. and the signing of the Hel-
sinki Final Act on August 2.
1975.
One year later it is plain that
the Brezhnev signature to the
Helsinki Accord was a mere
nodding of the head to human
rights by beautiful words, but
with few deeds. One year after
the meeting in Finland com-
pliance on the reunification of
families has been woefully in-
adequate, with literally hundreds
of mothers and fathers separated
from their children and husbands
and wives living lonely lives
separated by miles with no
answer to their repeated requests
to the Kremlin for joining their
loved ones in Israel.
There has been no significant
change with respect to freedom of
religion or the rights of minority
groups, which the Helsinki
Accord trumpeted last August.
In a country which only 60
years ago produced the most
flourishing Jewish culture in the
world there is the deathlike
silence of hundreds of closed
synagogues and destroyed
printing presses. Not one Jewish
school or seminary is in session:
not one Jewish theater, and for
3.5 million Jews there is a
handful of aged rabbis who have
no hope for successors. The
spirits of those 24 murdered
poets, writers and intellectuals
hover over Moscow, calling for
justice.
The hopes that America had
for the Helsinki Accord one year
ago have been shattered. In
signing the document. President
Ford said "To my country,
human rights are not cliches or
empty phrases. We had better
say what we mean and mean
what we say or we will have the
anger of our citizens to answer."
Obviously, Brezhnev wasn't
listening. While a complete score
sheet is impossible at this time
the evaluation for the 35 nations
to match words and deeds being
set for Belgrade in 1977 one
thing is certain: the promises
that were made a year ago remain
promises .and the memories
of the murdered poets still haunt.
ELAINE PITTELL
Soviet Jewry Committee
Temple Sinai Has
New Education,
Youth Director
Joseph Kleiman, president of
Temple Sinai, has announced
that the board of governors has
appointed Roslyn Z. Seidel as
educational director of the
temple's Religious School. She
will also assume the respon-
sibility for youth programs as
youth director.
Mrs. Seidel s extensive ex-
perience encompasses many
facets of Jewish education. She
has taught in afternoon religious
schools and at day schools, and
was principal at the Lincoln Park
Jewish Center in Yonkers, N.Y.
Camp Monroe and the West-
chester Day School gave Mrs.
Seidel experience in sleep-away
and day-camp head counseling.
She has also lectured at a Leader-
ship Training Institute for
United Synagogue Youth.
Mrs. Seidel heads the course to
train future Sunday school
teachers conducted by the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education and has lectured to
parent-teacher groups in New
York under the auspices of the
Jewish Education Committee.
She is a noted book reviewer
and has been active in B'nai
B'rith. ORT. Hadassah, Tech-
nion and for senior citizens'
groups.
A graduate of Hunter College,
with a major in psychology and
education, her continuing
education was at Columbia Uni-
versity and the University of
Colorado's University Without
Walls. She has studied also at the
Jewish Theological Seminary, the
Hebrew University and the Col-
lege of Jewish Studies of Miami.
JOHN H. DONACHIE
Donachie Named
By United Way
John H. Donachie, manager of
Burdines at Pompano Fashion
Square, has been named a
division chairman for the 1976-77
United Way campaign.
A resident of Coral Springs, he
is organizing and coordinating
the annual fund-raising drive
among employees of department
stores throughout Broward
County.
Donachie has served on the
board of directors of Community
Service Council and Woman in
Distress, and is a past district
commissioner of Lighthouse
District, Boy Scouts.
He is a director of Pompano
Beach Chamber of Commerce,
vice president and director of
Pompano Fashion Square
Merchants Association and a
member of Junior Achievement.
v
NEWS OF REFUSENIKS
Shmuel Bronfman, a
metallurgical engineer from
Odessa, has had his visa refused
since 1971 on the grounds of
"State Security" referring to
his work during 1967-70.
Bronfman claims that in his case
"regime considerations" do not
apply and that it. is only the KGB
who are obstructing his per-
mission to emigrate. He further
asserts that the KGB offered him
a deal that "I was to cooperate
with them and in return they
would allow me to join my
parents, brothers and sister, all of
whom live in Israel." He was
threatened with "grave con-
sequences" if he continued to
demand his exit visa.
The term of five years since
being "classified" lapsed on July
5 and Bronfman, on the advice of
the local OVIR official, reapplied.
Two weeks ago he heard from the
OVIR that his application is not
even being considered. -"I so
much hoped that after the 5th mv
waiting would end. I am quite
heartbroken."
A dim Sheinia, an engineer
from Kiev, has been refused
permission on the grounds of his
air force service nine years ago.
Last week he said goodbye to his
wife. Beba Gonikman. and his
two children. Igor, 7. and Leonid.
20 months. They have arrived in
Israel. Sheinis insisted they leave
without him for Igor is seriously
ill and the Sheinises felt he would
receive better treatment in an
Israeli hospital. Sheinis, who has
for three years been waiting to go
to Israel, explained why he
struggled so persistently to
emigrate: "The Ukraine has been
steeped in anti-Semitism for cen
turies. My child was even struck
by a teacher in nursery school
and told to go back to his
country.'
"I cannot bear to have my
children grow up in such a place "
NO CHARGE. NO TRIAL, BUT MINSK WOMAN
HELD AS POSSIBLE WITNESS
Berta Azarkevirh of Minsk
was due to leave for Israel nearly
three months ago. She vacated
her flat and sent her luggage off.
but four days before she was due
at the airport, police searched her
belongings on the allegation that
she had been helping a fellow
worker in the Ministry of Edu-
cation to place children in nur-
sery schools for money.
Although no evidence of any
kind was found to substantiate
the charge, her departure was
canceled, The official explanation
Is that if and when the police
divide to prosecute someone, she
might possibly be called as a
material witness
Her protest about whether or
not any charge is ever going to be
made and her questions as to
what connection she could
possibly have to the case have so
far fallen on deaf ears.
WE NEED YOUR HELP
I'lease volunteer U) work on the
Soviet Jewry Committee. Call the
Jewish Federation. 921-8810. and
ask for a Soviet Jewry Com-
mittee memhi i
Non-Aligned Chiefs
Urged to Curb
Terrorist Acts
Throughout World
COLOMBO, Sri Lanka The leaders of 85 "non
aligned" nations meeting in conference here were urged
early this week by UN Secretary General Kurt Waldheim
to put an end to international terrorism.
Meeting here were mainly nations from the Middle
East, Africa and Asia, most if not all sympathetic to the
"Palestine" cause.
"INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM has taken on a
new and more frightening dimension and requires our
urgent attention." Waldheim told the fifth summit
conterence here.
*w Te conYention was opened earlier with an attack on
the West, its financial institutions, from which it
demanded assistance, and on Israel, South Africa and the
United States.
WALDHEIM was referring to the United Nations
inaction on terrorism, particularly following the hijacking
of an Air Prance plane late in June filled with Israeli
travelers. It was the July 4 raid on Entebbe in Uganda
that saved travelers held hostage by Arab terrorists and
that led to a Third World-Communist-Arab attempt to
condemn Israel for the raid while remaining silent about
the skyjacking itself.
Prime Minister Sirimavo Bandaranaike, of Sri
Lanka, opened the conference.
In a reference to the Entebbe raid, she said, "While
actions of hijacking cannot be condoned, actions against
hijackers and in defense of those hijacked cannot justify a
violation of international law and of the sovereignty of a
nation in any circumstance^ '
J


Friday, August 27,1976
LEO MEVKLITC
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
Buckley Hoped to Startle
N. Y. Electorate
Continued from Page 4
Moynihan Democratic can-
didacy.
Would Javits get the nod
from them over Moynihan on
the basis of sheer sectarian
predilection?
THE FACT is that Javits
has had a singularly undis-
tinguished career as one of
several Court Jews in the Senate.
He is a member in good standing
of that vast club of senatorial
mediocrity that lies like a blob
upon Capitol Hill.
Still, arguments would be
raised that to lose him would
mean to the Senate, from a Jew-
ish point of view, what the un-
scrupulous Johnson "elevation"
of Arthur Goldberg and the
brutal Nixon demotion of Abe
Fortas meant to the Supreme
Court.
All of this would be
predicated on the assumption
that "it is good for the Jews" to
have Jews in high places.
I WONDER if that is always
true. Few Jews in high places
have been eloquent defenders of
their faith in the same sense that,
say, a Herbert Lehman was;
more frequently, they are like a
Henry Kissinger, who is not.
From an empirical rather
than a speculative point of view,
the issue for Jewish voters here is
the five-way Democratic primary.
In addition to Moynihan and
Abzug, it features Ramsay Clark,
a former U.S. Attorney General;
Paul O'Dwyer, president of the
City Council here, who was urged
to run as the best way to get him
out of the Council, which has just
about had its fill of him; and Abe
Hirschfeld, who made a similar
trip three years ago and was
swamped.
Hirschfeld and O'Dwyer can
be easily discounted. Abzug,
whose capacity to chatter can
sometimes be enchanting, most
often carping and cheeky, must
nevertheless be taken more
seriously precisely because she is
in the U.S. House of Representa-
tives right now and has at least
some political base.
GIVEN THE what if again,
in a choice between an Abzug and
a Javits, or indeed between an
Abzug and any other Jewish
candidate, distinguished or
undistinguished, there would be
no sectarian problem.
Abzug, it might be argued,
would be a far greater asset to the
Senate than Javits and certainly
Buckley, himself, if only because
her need to function verbally
would never permit her to become
a part of the kind of Senate
"respectability" that demands
the eloquence of silent politics,
that moat revolting form of rule
that keeps the government's
business from being the peoples
business.
For Jewish voters, this
'would be especially true, par-
ticularly when one considers the
question of traditional Jewish
political liberalism. But it would
also be true on grounds of Jewish
self-interest.
ABZUG's identification
with Jewish causes is legion. By
contrast, Javits stars on the
knish and kishke circuit mainly
during his own election cam-
paigns, a poor substitute for
Jewish causes.
Given that former Attorney
General Clark would be less likely
to enchant a Jewish New Yorker
in the isolation of his voting
booth, what about a choice
between Moynihan and Abzug?
Here, sectarianism is an issue.
Moynihan is a superb
refutation of the dictum that "it
>a good for the Jews" to have
' Jews in high places. Even on the
gut level of self-interest, can one
imagine Dr. Kissinger arguing
the Israeli position at the United
Nations as effectively as
Moynihan did as U.S.
Ambassador there?
PERHAPS because of her
multitudinous Jewish iden-
tifications, even if for no other
reason, it would certainly be a
sheer absurdity to contemplate
Abzug in that role a piece of
satire in the best tradition of the
political cartoon.
And so, what faces the
Jewish voter here in the
Democratic primary who resolves
to choose between Moynihan and
Abzug will be effective per-
formance and proven distinction
vs. the alleged need for Jews to
have Jews in high places. My
own hope is that it will not be a
sectarian choice the voter makes
but a choice governed by quality
of political potential.
That should always be the
paramount principle in American
political life for all of us. A
corruption of that principle is
what keeps so much mediocrity
in the Senate, and indeed in
government office generally,
term after term. It is what has
kept Javits interred there.
I RATHER suspect that
Sen. Buckley, in proposing
himself for the presidency, had
many of these thoughts about
Jewish voters in mind.
The major obstacle to his
reelection come November may
well be shaped by how Jewish
voters performed in the
Democratic primary whether
they succumbed to the ex-
pediency of sectarianism or
avoided it by aspiring toward the
larger issue of political ex-
cellence.
Reckoned in these terms,
hopes for Buckley's incumbency
may well have been weakened.
For his presidential ploy was in
no way characteristic of the
larger issue of political ex-
cellence.
Warner Bros. Will Film
Official Entebbe Version
JERUSALEM (JTA) Warner Brothers will
produce the official version of the Entebbe story, the
Ministry of Commerce and Industry has announced here.
An agreement to that effect was signed between Com-
merce and Industry Minister Haim Barlev and Ted
Ashley, chairman of the film company's board of direc-
tors.
The government will assist the producers with official
information on the operation, and will provide them with
army units and rent military aircraft and vehicles.
IN RETURN, Warner Brothers promised to use local
production services as much as possible. The director will
be Franklin Sheffner and the script writer is Kenn Ross.
The two chief photographers are already in Israel.
More than 12 film companies competed for govern-
ment assistance in the production of a film on Entebbe.
Warner Brothers will donate part of the revenues of
the film to an Israeli soldier benevolent fund.
Satz Candidate for State Attorney
On the staff of the Broward
State Attorney's Office since
graduation from the University
of Miami Law School in 1967,
Michael Joseph Satz has an-
nounced his candidacy for the
Army Orders
Court-Martial
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
army has ordered a court-martial
for a soldier on charges of man-
slaughter through negligence in
the shooting death of a Nablus
girl during the May rioting in
that West Bank city.
In accordance with what was
described as a routine army
procedure of investigating every
case of death and injury in such
circumstances, an investigation
was promised to the family of 16-
year-old Lena Nabulsi, member
of a family of considerable
influence in Nablus.
THE GUNSHOT death of the
girl was given widespread
publicity outside Israel and
caused an uproar in Israel. The
girl was hit by a bullet only two
weeks after she returned from eye
surgery in London.
According to one eyewitness
account of the incident, the girl
happened to be a member of a
group of Nablus youngsters who
staged a riotous demonstration in
Nablus.
Israeli soldiers called on the
youngsters tc desist and the girl
panicked and ran up the stairs of
a nearby house.
position of State Attorney. The
current Chief Assistant State
Attorney in charge of homicides
and special prosecutions, Satz
has been a Fort Lauderdale
resident since 1968.
He received a B.S. degree from
Temple University in Phila-
delphia, his home town, and is a
member of the Florida and
American Bar Associations and
the National District Attorneys
Association. Satz became head of
all trial divisions in the Broward
County Attorney's Office when
the County Attorney's and
Solicitor's offices were merged.
El Al Captain's
Quick Decision
Saved Lives
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Yaacov Roman, the El Al
pilot who was captain of the
El Al plane whose pas-
sengers were attacked Aug.
11 at the Istanbul airport
terminal, said here he had
decided to taxi the plane to
a far side of the airport
because the landing site
was an excellent target for
the attackers.
He said that when the
attack began, the plane was
parked exactly opposite the
terminal, so his first
reaction was to move the
plane in a hurry. He started
two of his four engines and
taxied to a far end of the
airfield, well out of the
range of small fire.
IT IS El Al practice to move
passengers from an airport
terminal to its planes by bus. One
busload of passengers had
boarded the plane when the
attack began.
After he moved the plane,
Roman said he decided not to
take off until he knew what was
happening to the rest of the pas-
sengers. Then a second busload
of passengers came to the plane,
including several of the injured,
but because of the confusion that
accompanied the attack, it was
impossible to locate the final
group of passengers due to board
the plane, so he decided to take
off for Tel Aviv, Roman said.
Meanwhile, Israeli officials at
Istanbul reported by telephone to
the army broadcasting station
that the Turkish authorities were
demonstrating efficiency in
handling the aftermath of the
attack.
THE INJURED are now in
several hospitals in Istanbul.
Israeli Legation personnel have
visited all of them. It was
reported that there are 12 Israelis
among the 14 seriously injured
passengers in Istanbul hospitals.
The two others are a Swiss
national and a Spanish national.
Another less seriously injured
victim is a Turkish Jew employed
by El Al in Istanbul.
Almost all of the injured
brought to Israel on the El Al
plane had suffered superficial
wounds caused by splinters
hitting them in the legs and other
lower parts of the body, ac-
cording to Dr. Itzhak Shani,
director of the Sheba Medical
Center, who examined them.
The names of six injured
Israelis brought here were given
as Levi Zahav, Uri Ron, whose
condition was found to be much
better than had been initially
reported. Miriam Yahav, Nina
Sheinman. Rivka Basin and
Israel Malchi.
TWO OR three members of a
family named Manesowitz were
injured in the assault, and are
hospitalized in Istanbul.
Turkish officials are
questioning the captured
terrorists and were to bring them
before a judge this week, it was
reported here.
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Page 14
The .Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. August 27,1976
i Otye Ti
Eabbtnical Page
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
editor
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz
Inside Judaica
By Dr. Frederick Lachman
Q. How were the Danish Jews
rescued during the Holocaust?
A. For almost three and a half
years, from the day of Denmark's
occupation by Nazi Germany on
April 9. 1940, the nearly 10,000
Danish Jews and Jewish refugees
were not molested. The Danes,
while collaborating with the Ger-
mans in the so-called policy of
negotiation, simultaneously
extended full political, social,
juridical, and personal protection
to thte Jews and their property.
The behavior of the Danish
authorities and the population
was so steadfast that the Ger-
mans did not think it profitable
to injure the Danish Jewish
population, the Encyclopaedia,
Judaica states
Things changed when Ger-
many, on August 28, 1943.
abolished the Danish-German
agreement. In September. 1943.
martial law was declared. The
representative of the German
Keich. the Nazi Werner Best, ad-
vocated using the opportunity to
deport the Jews.
The attache for shipping af-
fairs. F. G. Dukwitz. who main
tained good relations with
leading Danish Social Demo-
crats, informed them of the i. i-
pending danger for the Jews. His
warning was quickly spread by
Danish citizens, organizations
and by the Jews themselves, and
overnight a rescue organization
sprank up that helped 7,200 Jews
and about 700 non-Jewish rela-
tives escape to Sweden in less
than three weeks.
Danish captains and fishermen
carried out this operation. What
began as a spontaneous popular
movement was developed into an
organized action by the Danish
resistance movement. The cost of
the transfer amounted to about
12 million Danish kroner, of
which the Jews themselves paid
approximately 6.5-7 million. The
rest was provided out of private
and public Danish contributions.
During the night of the per-
secution (October 1-2. 1943) and
following it. fewer than 500 Jews
were seized by the Germans.
They were sent to Theresienstadt
and remained there until the
spring of 1945, when they too
were brought to Sweden by the
action of the Swedish Red Cross
headed by Count Bernadotte.
Upon their return from Sweden
to Denmark at the end of the war
most of the Jews found theii
property intact, the EJ notes.
It may be estimated that ap
proximal el y 120 people perished
because of the persecution: about
50 in Teresienst adt and a few
more in other camps. Close to the
same number committed suicide
or were drowned on their way to
Sweden. Less than 2 percent of
the Jewish population of Den-
mark perished.
Denmark, during the Holo-
caust, was a beacon that the rest
of Europe should have followed
. but did not, so that the
Holocaust came to represent the
European attitude toward Jews
and the humane love of the Danes
for their fellow men was simply a
benevolent postscript in a brutal
and inhuman time.
Q. Why ia the dance such an
important element of H asidism?
A. In the communal and re-
ligious life of the Jewish people,
says the Encyclopaedia Judaica,
dance waa^hay regarded as an
expression Of joy and religious
ecstasy In summarizing the
activities of man. Eccleaiastes
Judaism Views Death and Burial
observes: "To everything there is
a season ... A time to mourn,
and a time to dance" (3:1,4).
The symbolic role of dance is
evident in the poet's description
of the destruction of Jerusalem:
"The joy of our heart is ceased:
our dancing is turned into
mourning" (Lamentations 5:15);
and in Jeremiah's vision of its
reconstruction: Again
shall thou be adorned with thy
tabrets. And shalt go forth in the
dances of them that make merry
. .." and in his words of com-
fort: "Then shall the virgin
rejoice in the dance" (Jeremiah
31:4,13). Bible literature abounds
in references to dance and in
descriptions of dance festivities,
showing how deeply rooted was
dance in the ancient culture of the
Jewish people.
With the rise of Hasidism in
Eastern Europe in the 18th cen-
tury, dance assumed great im-
portance for the Jewish masses.
Israel ben Eliezer Baal Shem
Tov. the founder of IIasidism,
used dance to attain religious en-
thusiasm and communion with
(iod, the EJ scutes He taught his
followers that "the dances of the
Jew before his Creator are
prayers" and quoted the Psalm-
ist: "All my bones shall say:
Ixird, who is like unto Thee?' "
(Psalms 35:10).
Hasidic dance assumed the
form of the circle, symbolic of the
Hasidic philosophy that "every-
one is equal, each one being a link
in the chain, the circle having no
front or rear, no beginning or
ending." The Hasidim would
start their dancing in slow tempo,
and as the music became faster
they held arms upward and leapt
in the air in an effort to reach
spiritual ecstasy. The ac-
companying melodies were com-
posed to brief texts from either
the Bible or the Talmud.
Nahman of Bratzlav, great-
grandson of the Ba'al Shem Tov,
believed that to dance in prayer
was a sacred command, and he
composed a prayer which he re-
cited before dancing. He and
other Hasidic rabbis, says the
Judaica, called for dancing on all
festive occasions and even on the
solemn days of the Ninth of Av.
Rosh Ha-Shanah and the Day of
Atonement.
During the celebrations on
Simhat Torah, the usual proces-
sions with the scrolls reached a
climax in the rabbi's own dance.
Wrapped in a prayer shawl, with
a scroll held high in his hands,
the rabbi danced with spiritual
ecstasy as the Hasidim sang id
clapped hands in a circle an .nd
him.
By RABBI GERALD KAPLAN
Temple Zamora
During the year I receive many
inquiries concerning the Jewish
attitude toward death and burial.
Hence, through this column I will
explain three ancient traditions
of Judaism pertaining to death
and burial to indicate why they
were initially instituted and also
indicate why they are still
relevant.
The first one deals with the
casket. According to traditional
Jewish belief the casket "must"
be of wood not metal, but
wood. The reason for this is that
traditional Judaism has always
believed "Dust thou art and to
dust thou shalt return" (Genesis
3:19). Traditional Judaism has
always believed that we are here
on this earth for only a limited
amount of time and we should
use that time to the best of our
ability however, we are here
for only a limited amount of time.
Death is inevitable even
though it is very difficult to
accept, especially when it in-
passed away, "Grandpa has gone
away on a long trip," or "Grand-
pa has gone to sleep for a long
period of time," or "God liked
Grandpa so much that He has
taken him away from us and
taken him for Himself."
In the first two cases we fool
the youngster by implying that
Grandpa will eventually return.
This is untrue and eventually it
will be very difficult for the child
to accept his Grandpa's death. In
the third case, we once again fool
the child because we precipitate
in him a hatred for God.
The child loves his Grandpa as
much as God loves him. "What
right does God have to take my
Grandpa away?" he says to him-
self. God must therefore be
selfish and cruel, and sub-
consciously or consciously the
child hopes that God will change
his mind and eventually return
his Grandpa. All these ex-
planations therefore make it more
difficult for the child to accept
the death of his beloved Grandpa.
So, too, it is with the death of
an adult's parent, spouse or child.
volves a close relative. However, rhis is difficult to accept. In fact.
for some it is almost impossible
to accept and they have
trouble adjusting to normal life
after the funeral.
we must eventually accept it if we
are to continue living normal
lives.
UNFORTUNATELY, our
contemporary society attempts
to hide the fact that a beloved one
has passed away. Many embalm
the body (contrary to Jewish
tradition) so that the body may
be "placed on view" (also con-
trary to Jewish tradition) and
many people pass the bier and
comment, "He looks just like he
did when he was alive."
Likewise, some undertaking
establishments suggest metal
caskets that will not rust, that
will resist inclement weather,
that are hermetically sealed, that
will withstand the rains, etc. --
as if the deceased were merely
resting and had not actually
passed away.
However, traditional Judaism
has always felt, and still feels,
that this is an unrealistic and
misleading approach to death. It
is difficult enough to accept the
death of a beloved one; however,
when one "colors" the situation
in the previously mentioned
manner, one actually makes it
more difficult for the mourner
at least in the long run.
Death is like an amputation,
and the sooner the patient ac-
cepts the fact that an amputation
has occurred, the better he will
be.
IN FACT, I am always upset
when I hear a parent or a relative
tell a child of five or six years of
age when his grandfather has
WITH THIS IN mind the
Bible stated. "The days of our
years are 70" (Psalms 90:10) to
indicate that life is transient. It is
only temporary.
So, too, we all know that wood
is only temporary. We make no
pretense about the wood lasting
50 or 100 years, or not rusting, or
being resistant to inclement
weather, and similarly it was felt
that all subterfuges implying
that the body would remain the
same as it was while alive should
also be discouraged.
Traditional Judaism has
always proclaimed that the flesh
eventually withers away, but one
lives on in the memories of be-
loved ones and through the good
deeds that children perform
because that way of life was
taught them by the deceased
father or mother.
However, in addition to this
psychological aspect of the
wooden casket there is also a
practical aspect. Traditional
Judaism has always suggested
that the casket should be a
simple wooden casket. Large
sums of money should not be
spent on caskets. On the con-
trary, that money should be used
to benefit the living. "The dead
no longer praise God" (Psalms
115:17), the Bible tells us. It is
the living to whom we must turn
our attention and our help.
Instead of spending several
thousand dollars on a metal cas-
ket, traditional Judaism has
always suggested that that ad-
ditional money be given to a
worthwhile charity such as the
synagogue that attempts to help
the living.
Religious Directory
NORTH IROWARO
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW
CONGREGATION. 3711 NW 100th
Avt. Reform. Rabbi Mai Weitt. (44)
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. tl04
57th St. Conservative Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman (44AI
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 4*20 SW 35th St.
Conservative Rabbi Avrom Drailn.
Cantor Abraham Kester 141)
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES, til* Taft St
Conservative Rabbi Sidney I. Lubin
urn
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH
CONGREGATION. 400 S. Neb Hill Rd.
Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr. ( mi
RECONSTRUCTIONIST
SYNAGOGUE. 7471 NW 41tl St. (*)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE Of NORTH DADE
1BW1 NE llnd Avt. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph f. KhSOSftJr- Cantor Irvine
Sbutkes. (17)
HOLLYWOOD
3ETH AHM TEMPLE. 110 SW find
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max
Landman. (47B)
BETH EL TEMPLE. 11S1 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa.
Assistant Rabbi Harvey M. Rosen
fold. (45)
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4401 Arthur
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (44)
SINAI temple, iioi Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Associate Rabbi Chalm S. LisHield.
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun. (*si
SOLEL TEMPLE. SIM Sheridan St.
Liberal. RabM Robert Frarin. (47C)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
Mfi Stirling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
Moshe Bomier. (SI)
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER 414
NE tth Av*. Conservative Rabbi
Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Daiuiger. (11)
SYNOPSIS Of THE WFEKLY TORAH PORTION
Shofetim
Thou shall set him kinx over thee, whom the Lord
thy God shall choose: one from among thy brethren" (I)eitt.
17. 151.
Shofetim 'Judges find officers shalt thou in.ike thee in ail
thy gates, which the I,ord thv God giveth thee, tribe by
tribe; and they shall judge the people with righteous
judgment Thou shalt not plant thee an Asherah of any
kind of tree In-side the altar of the Ix>rd thy (Jod. which
ihou shalt make thee. Neither shalt thou set thee up a
pillar, which the Ixird thy God hateth" (Deuteronomy
16.18-22). "At the mouth of two witnesses, or three wit-
nesses, shjill he that is to die he put to death; at the mouth
of one witness he shall not he put to death" (Deuteronomy
17.(i). "If there arise a matter ten)hard for thee in judgment
. thou shall arise, and get thee up unto the place which
the Ixird thy God shall choose And thou shalt do
according to the tenor of the sentence, which they shall
declare unto thee from that place which the I^ord shall
choose" (Deuteronomy 17.8-9).
If. like the other nations, the children of Israel in
Canaan should desire a king. "Thou shalt in any wise ?
him king over thee, whom the Lord {.KVtpCy 'set King Y?T
one from among thy brethren shalt www ^ ^^ ^^
thee: thou mayest not put a foreigner over thee, who is not
thy brother. Only he shall not multiply horses to himself
. Neither shall he multiply wives to himself .Neither
shall he greatly multiply to himself silver and gold ... He
shall write a co"y of this law in a book, out of that which is
before the priests the Levites. And it shall be with him, and
he shall read therein all the days of his life: that he may
learn to fear the Lord his God" (Deuteronomy 17.15-19).
The children of Israel may expect prophets to rise in the
Promised Land, men of God like Moses himself. "And it
shall come to pass, that whosoever will not hearken unto
My words which he shall speak in My name. I will require it
of him" (Deuteronomy 18.19). How may the Israelites
distinguish a true prophet from a false one? "When a
prophet speaketh in the name of the Lord, if the thing
follow not. nor come to pass, that is the thing which the
Ixrd hath not spoken: the prophet hath spoken it
presumptuously, thou shalt not be afraid of him"
(Deuteronomy 18.22).
The portion also treats of the cities of refuge. It cites
the speech that the priest and officers are to make to troops
before battle, and states the laws of warfare that apply to
any city not of the seven Canaanite nations. The portion
ends with the regulations dealing with the heifer offered as
atonement when a slain person is found in the field and the
identity of the murderer is not known.


','
' '' .
Friday. August 27, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 15
i
Jewish Women Qm*
An6 Baeast Cancep ^^
ROSE KUSHNER. Breast Cancer: a personal
history and an investigative report. Harcourt
Brace Jovanovich, $10.400 pp.
ROSE KUSHNER has written a very im
portant book. "Breast Cancer" attempts U
alert all women to the importance of early detec-
tion and to get the best care possible pre- and
post-operative.
This not a book for doctors. It is for the
layperson, and Mrs. Kushner, a medical jour-
nalist, purports to inform women about all
surgical alternatives which she has found many
oncologists (cancer specialists) are not willing to
inform or perform.
SHE EMPHASIZES the importance of BSE
(Breast Self-Examination), and she charts breast
cancer risks for American women. Among those
in the high risk group are Jews of European an-
cestry, whereas Jews of North African or Asian
ancestries are in the low risk group. The point is
to help women determine their risk on the chart,
and thereby take advantage of finding a breast
cancer early enough to be cured.
Kushner has done extensive research, as in-
dicated by her bibliography, which has been
prepared with the average woman in mind. It
includes articles of substance and authority, but
which can be read and understood without a
medical background.
CHOOSING A doctor is of the utmost im-
portance, preferably an oncologist a doctor
who deals exclusively with cancer patients; and
even more preferably one who deals with breast
cancer. Kushner is adamant on this point.
She insists that women who may have breast

cancer should see a cancer specialist and not rely
on family doctors or general surgeons to either
"wait and see" or to perform the surgery itself.
There are only twenty-two oncology or cancer
centers in the country. One of them is the
University of Miami School of Medicine.
"BREAST CANCER" has caused stirs this
year in the medical community for the reason that
the author challenges the quality of care women
receive in America. After comparing our
procedures with those in a variety of European
countries, she concludes that American women
with breast cancer are usually the victims of a
blind one-step biopsy-mastectomy procedure
they do not need.
Kushner provides the mastectomee with
personal observations and informative data on
postoperative recovery, a little discussed aspect
of breast cancer surgery; shopping for clothes;
and the psychological reactions of family and
friends. Kushner's expertise and interest in this
traumatic and oftimes shattering operation
comes from her own experience.
Upon going through a mastectomy herself, she
discovered the need to provide women with
certain basic information which she, as a medical
writer, could research, but which was and is not
easily forthcoming to most breast cancer
patients.
One out of every 15 women will develop a
breast cancer sometime in her life. "Breast
Cancer" is a significant step in helping women
determine, understand and be part of their fates
on the surgical table.
^Robert
SegaG
Air piRacy must Be enbeb
JEFFERSON'S FELICITOUS line, "a
decent respect for the opinions of
mankind," has jumped out of historical context
these past few days for application to Israel's
miraculous rescue of 103 hostages at Uganda's
Entebbe International Airport.
To be sure, Israel has not won respect from the
national blocs that insist on treating the Jewish
State with disdain at all times; but it is en-
heartening to note that Chaim Herzog, Israel's
principal delegate to the UN, has reported that
among congratulatory messages pouring into
Jerusalem were several from countries that had
severed diplomatic relations with Israel because
of Arab economic and political pressure.
PLAYWRIGHTS WILL be hard put to
fashion dramas more electrifying than Israel's
rescue in 63 minutes flat of innocent Jews
held prisoner by Arab and West German
terrorists who were assisted by Ugandan guards.
And for Americans marveling at the escapade,
the date of rescue carried an added satisfaction
the weekend of celebration of this nation's
Bicentennial.
Now the international community faces stem
challenges growing out of the latest skyjacking.
. A secondary problem is to keep the record
straight about Uganda's share of responsibility
for the outrage. Far more important is the job of
putting a decisive end to jet-age kidnapping.
AS TO the minor issue: Uganda. The scorn
directed by officials of Kenya against Uganda's
president, General Idi Amin, should serve to
awaken other Third World leaders to the
hypocrisy and cruelty attending so many of
Amin's actions. Stung by Amin's sharp criticism
of any assistance neighboring Kenya may have
given the Israeli rescuers, the Nairobi govern-
ment has openly branded Amin "the world's
greatest dictator, a fascist, a warmonger, and a
sadist."
The statement out of Nairobi further assailed
the blustering Amin as a troublemaker "whose
meaning of leadership for the last five years has
been savagery, torture and mass murders of
innocent people."
BRANDED "a racist murderer" in the UN by
Daniel Patrick Moynihan last October, Amin has
to his shame put to death at least 100,000 of his
compatriots, according to the boasts of his own
ministers.
Of far more consequence than the sickening
matter of Gen. Amin's cruelty and duplicity is the
urgent call to the international community to get
on at last with a practical and effective plan for
frustrating potential hijackers, putting an end to
blackmail, designing techniques for rescuing
prisoners of the outlaws, and imposing sanctions
against nations that continue to cooperate with
this new breed of pirates.
ninety
minutes
At enteBBe

IN
INETY MINUTES at Entebbe," announced by
Paramount on July 12, based on the factual novel by Uri
Dan and William Stevenson, and written while the events of the
rescue operation by the daring Israeli commandos unravelled only a
week earlier, has a screenplay by Paddy Chayefsky with Sidney
Lumet set to direct. The book by Dan and Stevenson was published
by Bantam Books July 19.
In making the announcement, David V. Picker admitted that
the Paramount version will be the fourth picture dealing with the
freeing of the hijacked hostages from the Air France plane in
Uganda, but one based on extensive interviews with key Israeli and
military sources who were behind the Entebbe rescue mission.
UNIVERSAL STUDIOS came up with their project "Rescue
at Entebbe" within 24 hours after the news broke on the wire
service. Their epic is being produced and directed by George Roy
Hill, winner of an Academy Award for "The Sting," previously
lauded for "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," "Slaughter-
house Five" and "Hawaii."
Hill is just completing post-production at Universal on "Slap
Shot" starring Paul Newman, but is already at work developing his
dramatization of the commando raid termed the most daring rescue
operation in recent military history.
ANOTHER FEATURE film is being planned by Murray
Schwartz, president of Merv Griffin Production, who by chance
happened to be on the hijacked Air France plane from Athens to
Paris. His epic is being labeled "Odyssey of 139" and should be the
most revealing one since he actually was a bystander to the crime of
the hijackers.
"Assault on Entebbe" is the title of a picture the enterprising
Elliott Kastner is preparing at this time. Producer of many suc-
cessful pictures, Kastner currently is represented on the screen
with "The Missouri Breaks," the Marlon Brando-Jack Nicholson
Western. Kastner employs the services of Shmuel Erde and Geoff
Berkin for the story with Erde joined by Kastner associate Jerry
Gershwin during the actual production of the film. .
UN IVERS AI.'S GEORGE Eckstein is producing a three-hour
television film dealing with the shenanigans of the late U.S.
Senator Joseph E. McCarthy and his alleged relations with Joseph
Kennedy and Richard Nixon. NBC is televising the epic entitled,
"Tall Gunner Joe," budgeted at SI.5 million and written by Lane
Slate as a strange contribution to our Bicentennial. .
Lionel Sunder, a near-victim of the McCarthy period of
hysteria and a voluntary exile for almost a quarter of a century,
makes his Hollywood comeback in Robert Chartoff and Irwin
Winkler's production for United Artists, "New York, New York,"
thereby joining Liza Minelli who portrays the central character.
Sunder plays the part of an artist's agent, almost the same type of
role for which he won an Oscar nomination in the Janet Gaynor-
Frederic March film, "A Star is Born". .
HITLER RIDES AGAIN in the 20th Century-Fox television
spectacular, a three-hour epic for ABC written by Lionel Chetwynd
for executive producer Jack Haley, Jr. The teleplay is based on the
premise that Hitler was captured trying to escape from Berlin in
1945 and subsequently tried for war crimes by an international
court of justice. The intriguing yarn, from a story idea by Haley
and Ronald Lyon, is titled "The Capture and Trial of Adolf Hitler."
It will do well in Germany. .
Bette Midler, who rose to fame in the Broadway production of
"Fiddler on the Roof," then dazzled theater and concert audiences
with her renditions of the 1940s, '50s and '60s song hits, and is
today the top singer headlining in nightclubs and television as the
nation's top moneymaker in the recording field, has gone Holly-
wood. She is opening an office at the Burbank studios and
developing her own screenplays fashioned by her and her
production executive Aaron Russo. .
LEE STRASBERG, the almost legendary head of Actors
Studio, upon return from his motion picture assignment in
"Cassandra Crossing" abroad, has joined 20th Century-Fox TV
and Four Star International in a joint production deal to present a
series of major plays on Broadway.
diveming Attention to the Sins of Otheps
ONE MAN who certainly would have approved
the Israeli action was Thomas Jefferson. He
wrote the Declaration of Independence, which was
adopted on July 4, and he no doubt would have been
very pleased at the saving of the innocent hostages
from the hijackers on that day. What batter way could
there be for celebrating the day dedicated to "life,
liberty and the pursuit of happiness?"
Jefferson knew all about these hijackers. In his day,
it flourished in the same section of the world as today.
It was highly popular among the so-called Barbery
sutes Algeria, Tunis, Morocco and Tripoli. Any ship
^David ScfcwaAtg
going through the Mediterranean faced the likelihood of
its crew and passengers being kidnapped and held for
ransom unless regular tribute was paid to the Barbery
sUtes.
THE BARBARY hijackings were not ended until
1816, when Commodore Decatur paid a visit to Algeria
and Uught it the kind of lesson Uganda has just
received.
Some at the United Nations say that while the
rescuing of the hostages is to be commended, the Israeli
action was an aggression against the sovereignty of an
independent stote, and so it is to be condemned.
Actually, the beauty of the Israeli action lies in this
very thing. It is the governments who allow
hijackers to land and function on their soil who are as
culpable as the hijackers. They make the hijacking
possible Without the government sanction, most of
them would find it impossible to operate.
In the case of Idi Amin, the collusion between his
government and the hijackers is more palpable. Amin
has not only praised Hitler, but imiUted him in his
killing of thousands of his own people.


Page 16
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, Augmt27 197
5
ISRAEL WILL LIVE!
Charlie Friedman-ATRUE Friend of Israel
V
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7th
ELECT CHARLIE FRIEDMAN
TO CONGRESS12th DISTRICT
CHARLIE FRIEDMAN IS DEDICATED TO ISRAEL
Hollywood Federation, 1960,1976
B'nai B'rith
South Florida Conference for Soviet Jewery
Jewish Welfare Federation of South
Broward, Board of Trustees
Temple Sinai, Education Committee
Temple Solel, Education Committee
Temple Beth Shalom, Past Board Member
Young Israel, Member
Jewish Family Service, Board Membej
Lived One Year in Israel
Visited Jewish Communities in Russh
and Eastern Europe
Zionist Organization of America
Touro Synagogue National Shrine,
Board of Directors
CHARLIE FRIEDMAN IS DEDICATED TO AMERICA
CONDOMINIMUM REFORM -
ENFORCE ANTITRUST LAWS
FULL EMPLOYMENT-PUT PEOPLE
BACK TO WORK
TREAT CRIMINALS LIKE CRIMINALS
DEVELOP NATIONAL ENERGY
POLICY AND ELIMINATE FOREIGN
OIL IMPORTS
FRIEDMAN
REALISTIC HEALTH CARE
PROGRAM FOR ALL AMERICANS
STOP GIVING MONEY TO
OUR ENEMIES
TAX BREAKS FOR THE ELDERLY-
WORK WITHOUT PENALTY
STOP CHEATING IN GOVERNMENT,
ADOPT FEDERAL SUNSHINE LAWS
THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY'S NOMINEE IN 1974 OVER ALL OTHER CANDIDATES
Pr,NHh,M*.c-liH.f.iha*i.hUfc- ^NUIDATES
VOTE SEPT. 7th DEMOCRAT


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