The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00151

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
* Jewish Florid tan
and Molar of Greater Hollywood
i6 Number 17
Hollywood, Florida Friday, August 13,1976
I Frd K. ShothH- fnday, August u, iw | Price 25 cents
1 Exciting Experience,'Says Cohn
Palm-Aire Weekend Conference
Attended by 70 Local Leaders
Lrding to Lewis E. Cohn,
|nt of the Jewish Fed-
of South Broward, the
weekend conference held
i-Aire Country Club was
|by far the most exciting
thought-provoking ex-
te of its kind."
, he said, "an oppor
I for the more than 70 com
leaders who attended tc
igether while discussing
^ure of the South Browan
ttion with leading experti
{round the country."
plar-in-Residence Robert I
J executive vice president o.
associated Jewish Charities
%lfare Funds in Baltimore,
bed his feeling that the
population in the future
leavily concentrate in the
I Florida area.
L'TH BROWARD is dis-
tig its needs for the future.
Identifying its population and
the services that Federation can
best develop through the de-
liberative processes of growth-
planning has become a priority.
Miller added that the money
given during the campaign is not
so much a contribution, but be-
comes, rather, the donor's share
in the development of a viable
community, as well as his per-
sonal link to the survival and
building of Israel.
Dr. Stanley Margulies, general
campaign chairman, discussed
with the group the statistics of
last year's campaign and how
they relate to an approach for
this year's Jewish Federation of
South Broward campaign.
Saturday morning focused on
Jewish education. Moses Horn-
stein, of the South Broward com-
munity, spoke about what is
Continued on Page 6
[cGovern Denies Finances
ifluence His Israel Views
WASHINGTON (JTA) Sen. George McGovern
>.D.) has denounced a report in the Washington Post
i, he said, implied that "my public position on the
of Israel is influenced by the fact that a piece of
i'rty I own has been rented to the Syrian
kassador."
ke implication was contained in a story last week
fer the by-line of Eugene L. Meyer who noted that
tavern has been receiving rental income from Syrian
>assador Sabaah Kabani since March, 1975, and "has
under increasing criticism from pro-Israel groups
for what they consider stands more sympathetic to
irab cause and critical of Israeli policies."
Moses Hornstein (left), Lewis E. Cohn and Dr. Stanley
Margulies
potential vice president
Schweiker Has Good
Record on Israel Issues
^GOVERN, who has asked
six-member non-partisan
te Ethics Committee headed
en. Howard Cannon (D.
to determine whether h
done "anything unethical oi
oper," was vigorously de-
ed on the Senate floor by two
nchly pro-Israel Senators,
kham Ribicoff (D., Conn.)
(Hubert H. Humphrey (D.,
v).
|bicoff declared, "It is un-
able to me that George
(overn would permit any
ncial consideration to de-
fine his position on any issue
1'iing the welfare of this
iury or the peace of the
|d."
ie said he rejected the Post's
y "completely."
lumphrey, associating himself
n Ribicoff s remarks, said
Govern "has had the courage
speak with people of different
[suasions in the Middle East"
"that does not in any way
an that he is the captive of any
group or that he has an
iance or alliance with any
pup that would in any way
Mate his own sense of what is
fht for the national interest of
t United State*."
icGOVERN, who is chairman
the Senate Foreign Relations
^mmittee's Subcommittee on
Near Eastern Affairs, called
Meyer's story in the Post "the
crudest example of yellow jour-
nalism that I have witnessed in
many years."
The story quoted Hyman
Bookbinder, Washington
representative of the American
Jewish Committee, as saying
that while McGovern's record on
aid to Israel is "generally good,"
he has "more often than others
. indicated some less than
total support for the current
Israeli position."
The AJCommittee official was
also quoted as saying that plenti-
ful Arab money developed "a
potentially general softness and
attitude about your client."
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Sen. Richard Schweiker of Penn-
sylvania, selected by Ronald
Reagan to be bis running-mate if
he wins the Republican
nomination for the Presidency, is
easily one of the strongest sup-
porters of Congressional legis-
lation in support of Israel's
requirements and Soviet Jewry.
Frequently honored by Jewish
organizations for his activities on
liberal causes and issues affecting
the Jewish community during his
16 years in the House and Senate,
Schweiker has been outspoken in
insisting on economic and
military assistance for Israel and
in providing teeth in laws to help
the emigration of Jews and
others from the Soviet Union.
The 50-year-old Schweiker,
who was reelected two years ago
to his second Senate term, was
one of 34 Senators who last
month opposed the retention of
Air Force General George S.
Brown as chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff.
SCHWEIKER also authored
the ethnic studies program to
bring national attention to the
contributions to America of im-
migrant peoples, including Jews.
In his consistent voting record
for aid to Israel and in exhorting
the President to maintain Israel's
needs, Schweiker backed the
amendment by Sen. Henry M.
Jackson (D., Wash.) to the
Defense Procurement Act that
provides unlimited loan credit
until Dec. 13, 1977, that Israel
finds necessary to buy American
aircraft and related equipment.
Russians
Don't Match
Peace Moves
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The United States
has often tried to persuade
Israel to go beyond its
established position in
American efforts toward a
Middle East settlement,
but the Soviet Union has
not taken a similar step
with any Arab leader,
according to former Under-
secretary of State Joseph J.
Sisco.
In an interview here with
CBS, the former diplomat
said the "commitment" of
the U.S. and of the West is
for a "practical solution" of
the Arab-Israeli dispute.
"WHAT I have found wan-
ting." Sisco observed, "in Soviet
policy based on my own ex-
perience has been this: that when
there has been a negotiation, and
when the United States has
played a role. I have never found
that the Soviet Union has been
willing to apply its own per-
suasion vis-a-vis those with
whom it is close that would go
beyond a position that a given
Arab leader or a given Arab state
was taking at the time.'"
Continuing, Sisco said; "There
are many occasions in our re-
lationship, special as it is, with
Israel, where we have tended to
try to encourage them (Israelis)
to go perhaps beyond where their
established position may be" but
' I cannot find any really concrete
jvidence where the Soviet has
taken this sort of position."
Sisco, now president of the
American University here, said
the U.S. and the Soviet Union
"have always agreed to disgree
when it comes to the substance of
a settlement."
HE SAID he has always felt
that the U.S. and the West have
much more to gain from a peace-
ful resolution than does the
Soviet Union.
"We can out-compete the
Soviet Union in circumstances of
peace," Sisco said.
Sisco's remarks followed CBS
interviewer Richard Hottelot's
comment that some in Washing-
ton think Soviet public support
for the PLO and coolness toward
Svria in the Lebanese situation.
Were Three Terrorists Captured Alive?
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Israeli commandos who rescued
more than 100 hostages at En-
tebbe Airport, Uganda, captured
three of the terrorists alive and
have taken them to Israel for in-
terrogation, according to a book,
"90 Minutes at Entebbe," pub-
lished here.
The book, authored by William
Stevenson and published by
Bantam Books, disclosed that
"Out of 10 terrorists seven were
killed and their fingerprints and
photographs recorded. Three
other terrorists, it would seem,
despite Israeli denials, were
taken alive for interrogation."
ACCORDING TO the pub-
lisher, the 216-page book is based
on interviews with Premier Yitz-
hak Rabin, members of the rescue
team, hostages and intelligence
sources. ,
Stevenson, a Canadian who
had served as a reporter in Kenya
and Uganda from 1962 to 1964.
spent 11 days in Israel gathering
information for his book.
According to Stevenson, an
intelligence group of 50 Israeli
agents, disguised as business-
men, flew to Nairobi three days
before the raid at Entebbe and
set up a headquarters at the
private house of an Israeli trader
for the upcoming operation.
THE BOOK also claims that
once in Nairobi, the Israeli agents
made contact with Lionel Bryn
Daviea, chief of Nairobi police.
and Bruce McKenzie, a former
British commander with close
ties to Kenyan President Jomo
Kenyatta.
The Stevenson account also
makes the following claims:
Israeli Cabinet ministers listened
to live transmissions of the
rescue operation, relayed over a
prearranged radio channel from
Entebbe to Tel Aviv; President
Idi Amin slept at his house, not
far from Entebbe, throughout the
raid;


n
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. August 13,1976
A Dream Can Become Reality Haiiandaie Goes
To Convention
By ESTHER LOWENTHAL
Executive Director,
Jewish Family Services
Her sadness was haunting and despair was etched in
the lines of her face. A sense of hopelessness was conveyed
by her walk and dress. It was hard to believe that this
aged woman had not yet reached her 70th birthday.
On a lonely walk she observed the
agency's name on an office building
directory. She chanced coming into
Jewish Family Service of Broward
County.
Mrs. R. had had a hard life simil-
ar to that experienced by many immi-
grants coming to the United States at
the turn of the century. She struggled
and coped with the crises in her life
serious illness of her husband; fairly
early widowhood; supporting a
family; educating children. Fre-
quently, sustenance came only
from the dream of what life might
be like in her later years when
these major burdens lifted.
Unfortunately, relocation here
was fraught with disap-
pointment. A meager income
could not buy comfortable
housing. She also missed the
many community resources
previously available in the North.
Unhappiness began to express
tself in a deep and pervasive
Icpress ion accompanied by many
physical symptoms.
CONSISTENT acceptance and
understanding by a professional
counselor of her hurt and dis-
appointment made her feel some-
what better about herself. As she
sensed that someone cared and
she did have worth, she began to
share some of her previous ac-
complishments. Together, they
ESTHER
LOWENTHAL
explored how these might be put
to use in her present situation.
Information was also given about
recreational opportunities and
groups which might offer some
social contact.
Today, there is a spring to
Mrs. R's walk and a sparkle in
her eye. Her figure is trim and her
clothing stylish. She has part-
time employment, a small but at-
tractive apartment, and perhaps
most important, has developed a
devoted circle of friends.
It took time a year of weekly
interviews a year to make a
dream become a reality.
Funded through the Jewish
Federation of South Broward, the
Jewish Family Service of Brow-
ard County has a special interest
in our older residents. Telephone
for an appointment. Maybe they
can help you. too. ,
TEMPLE SOLEL
A LIBERAL REFORM CONGREGATION
5100 SHERIDAN ST., HOLLYWOOD
W'LL RE HAVING AN
SUNDAY, AUGUST 29, 1976
AT 7:00 P.M.
FOR PROSPECTIVE MEMBERS
Refreshments will be served
OUR RELIGIOUS SCHOOL IS NOW
ACCEPTING REGISTRATIONS FOR
THE FALL SEMESTER FOR
AGES 5 THRU 15
FOR MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION
CALL
989-0205
Mrs. Casper Alman, president
of the eight-group Haiiandaie
Chapter of Hadassah, will lead a
delegation to the organization's
62nd national convention at the
Washington Hilton, Aug. 15 to
18.
Delegates the women are life
members and the men belong to
Hadassah Associates, the men-
only affiliate are: presidents
and their groups: N. Acker-man,
Imperial: H. Auerbach. Three
Island: A. Carchman, Parker: L.
Dank, Hemispheres: M. Gelles.
Meadowbrook: C. Goodman and
her husband, Chai; W. Light.
Plaza Towers.
Also N. Greenberg and her
husband. Plaza Towers; I.
Kimbrig, public relations chair-
man, Chai: A. Tolins and her
husband, Fairway; L. Wise and
R. Tulin, Chai.
The delegates will present a
full report on their return.
Beth Shalom School
Holding Open House
Temple Beth Shalom is holding
an open house in the school
building, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m..
Thursday. Aug. 12, and Friday.
Teachers will be on hand to
answer questions about cur-
riculum and classrooms will be
open for inspection.
The preschool department in-
cludes pre-nursery (2'/i-year-
oldsl, nursery (3-year-olds), pre-
kindergarten (4-year-olds) and
kindergarten (5-year-olds).
Day school begins with kin-
dergarten and continues through
fifth grade.
AFOHANlSTAN BAA2H DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Teach Overseas
in the 70s
International School* Services. Inc..
seeks lo register experienced
teachers as competitive candidates
tor positions in American elementary
and secondary schools abroad ISS
currently anticipates needs in these
Mate
f AHIVCMK.DMOOO MUSIC
INOUSlfHAlARTS ART
MOMf eCONOMfcS RfAOWG
SCNCE GUOANCt
MATH RMVSICAI EDUCATION
IIBRARY MUlTl MEDIA SPECIAL EDUCATION
Please mite no* and send resume
INTERNATIONAL
SCHOOLS SERVICES
EOUAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM
PO Box 5910
126 Aieiandei Street. Princeton N J 08S40
A non-prolit organization serving
independent American-sponsored
educational institutions overseas
Single teachers and teaching couples
Modest registration and placement lee
An Equal Opportunity
M7F Affirmative Action Employer
PAKISTAN-PHIILIPINCS POlANO* ImAH AND
IO^^^">#^""B^*
M M
M M II
HILLEL COMMUNITY
DAY SCHOOL
PIE KINDEIGARTfN THIU 9TH GRADE
SERVICING FROM MIAMI LAKES TO TAMARAC
AT 19000 N.E. 25AVE.
MIAMI REACH ADJACENT TO NEW
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER.
CERTIFIED TEACHERS
SMALL CLASSES
INDIVIDUAL ATTENTION
STRICTLY KOSHER NOT LUNCHES
FINEST JUDAIC A SICULAR EDUCATION
HALF DAT PRE SCHOOL 8:30 A.M. NOON
FULL DAY 3 TRS. A UP 1:30 A.M. 3:30 P.M.
DOOR TO DOOR TRANSPORTATION
t
FOR REGISTRATION
APPOINTMENTS
call
931-2831
LIMITED
ENROLLMENT
Community Mission:
"Holocaust to Rebirth'
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward has scheduled its
second annual community
mission, "Holocaust to Rebirth,"
for Nov. 14 to 28.
"The two weeks in Poland,
Rumania, and Israel will be a
turning point in the adult Jewish
lives of all who attend," said
Lewis E. Cohn, president of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward. "It was in areas such as
Poland and Rumania where Jews
developed a pride in their heri-
tage, one of dignity and culture;
likewise this area was a source of
deep suffering and shame during
the Holocaust. Thus we will be
visiting the beginnings and end-
ings of one of Jewish history's
most intricate chapters," Cohn
noted.
The mission participants will
be able to interact with the rem-
nants of Rumania's Jewish com-
munity. They will have the op-
portunity to see the courage of
the people who elected to remain
steadfast throughout their
smoldering past. In Poland the
mission will review the history of
the Holocaust and gain more
understanding of this period in
history.
FOLLOWING two days each
in Poland and Rumania, the
mission members will travel to
Israel. "How fortunate it is that
we can spend Thanksgiving Day
in Israel, where firsthand we can
give thanks to those who have
given us pride in Judaism," said
Melvin H. Baer, chairman of the
community mission. "How in-
spiring that we will recite our
prayers of thanksgiving at the
Western Wall."
Jerusalem is the highlight of
any mission to Israel. Visiting
the Western Wall and touring the
Old City, Mount Scopus, the new
developments in Ramat Eshkok,
the Mount of Olives and the
Knesset will give the mission *
participants a knowledge of the
historic city's past and future.
A trip to Yad Vashem, the
memorial to those who died in the
Holocaust, will be especially
memorable after the visit to Po-
land and Rumania.
According to the preliminary
itinerary, the mission will also be
going to an absorption center, the
mystical city of Safed, well-
established and struggling Leba-
nese border communities, and
communities in the south and
defense bases.
"As we move through Poland,
Rumania and Israel, we will be
experiencing the Holocaust, the
struggling survivors and our Ran
birth in Israel," said Cohn.
COST FOR THE mission is
$750 per person predicated on
a minimum tl,500 family con-
tribution plus a t500 Women's
Division commitment which
includes confirmed reservations
for deluxe accommodations and
meals, as well as all round-trip
transportation from New York.
Reservations should be made
now, as visas must be procured
for some countries and confirma-
tions established. Please call
Sum net- G. Kaye at the Jewish
Federation of South Broward,
921-8810. Photo on Page 3
RELG0, INC.
Roligious Goods, Gifts,
Books I Records
1507 Washington Avenur*
AAiomi Beach
PHONE 532-5912
-v
When we put
our name on
achapel,
it's exclusively s
Riverside chapel.
a
Unlike many other Jewish funeral
directors in Florida, Riverside is not
represented by any other organization.
Each Riverside Chapel serving Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach counties is
exclusively a Riverside Chapel, manned by
the largest Jewish staff available in the
State. They are people who understand
Jewish tradition and honor it. And in that
tradition we serve every family, regardless
of financial circumstance.

=e
H-IJ-7*
M.
H
HOLLYWOOD:
5801 Hollywood Boulevard/920-1010
SUNRISE:
1171 Northwest 61st Avenue (Sunset Strip) / 584 6060
North Miami Beach. Miami Beach and Miami.
Five chapels serving the New York City Metropolitan area
Riverside
Memorial Chapel. Inc / Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
* Gro$sbert.L F.O

11-7*
11-H


V, August 13.1976
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far ofpreater Hollywood
:e3
,lunteers Help United Way
mefit Many in Community
Each year one person in five in Broward County is
ed directly by a United Way agency," according to a
tat United Way survey. County Commissioner Jack L.
3. the organization's president, comments that "this
,ey shows the far-reaching benefit of the United Way
Lin our community."
J I Business; Stewart A. Kester,
Jilng three dozen agencies Professional; Joseph N. Scott.
_ ..___inn/nn Professional Health Care.
ing three dozen agencies
\T-lping more than 190,000
Ys annually. United Way is
ned by volunteers from all
of life who study programs,
mend funding and handle
raising, staff the organ-
ns day-to-day operations
help fill gaps in many
illy funded programs.
a July 29 press conference
to announce United Way's
f! campaign goals, S. Kelly
. manager of Sears, Roe-
and general campaign
an this year for United
nnounced that the cam-
Nim has committed itself
pbjwtive of $2,022,250. an
of 19.5 percent over last
contribution. This, Jordan
is one of the largest and
mbitious increases in the
States."
noted that in order to
this goal "for human ser-
Hmward County ... an
ficd campaign must be
m meet the needs of our
S AND JORDAN have
n active in community
Moss as chairman of the
fl County Energy Con-
Committee and vice
of the Broward Man-
onncil, and Jordan as
resident of the Fort
lie Chamber of Com-
and board of directors
lor Century Banks and
th Florida Boy Scouts
r of a Bachelor's in
r> Irom the University of
and a Master's in public
[ration from Nova Uni-
Moss is a candidate for a
ate in public ed-
ition at Nova. Jordan is a
eoi Duke University.
an I Countians who have
BJMd their services to this
United Way campaign are
flow with their particular
i.
CHAIRMEN ARE:
K Dickey, Communica
James F. Phillips, Labor;
Mil I saps, Loaned Exec-
Philip N. Cheaney, Major
Profit); David H. Rush,
Iroup (Nonprofit); Helen
on, Condominiums;
C Abel, Jr., Individual
Wilier A. Ketcham, Small
DIVISION CHAIRMEN
ARE: Herbert Yardley, Auto
Dealers; H. Eugene Nace,
Banks; John H. Donachie, De-
partment Stores; Alvin Sherman.
Development & Construction:
Walter Banks, Hotels & Restau-
rants; Joseph M. Byrd, Media:
James M. Mian/. Savings &
Loan; I^ee Wagener, Utilities:
James E. Maurer. Education;
Sheriff Edward J. Stack, Gov-
ernment Employees; Dr. Paul W.
Hughes. Health Care Facilities;
Jack L. Moss, United Way
Agencies.
Also Robert D. Johnston.
Clubs & Community Organiza-
tions: Howard Lytle. South
County Condominiums; Virginia
Young. Residential: Robert C.
Abel. Jr., Special Gifts; James C.
Bell. Jr.. Small Business (Area
1); AY. McConnell. Small
Business (Area 2); I^ee Blitch,
Small Business (Area 3); Charles
Nelson. Small Business (Area 4);
C. Edward Keiler. Architects
(Building and Landscape); Wil-
liam 0. Miller. Attorneys; Ed-
ward J. Manning. CPAs; Charles
H. Bolton. Jr., Engineers.
Also J. Ray Kraeer, Funeral
Directors; Peter W. White. In-
surance (Casualty): Walker R.
Ellis, Insurance (Life): Robert C.
Fuller, Investments; John F.
Ring. Real Estate; Dr. Sheldon
Widens, Podiatrists; Dr. Law-
rence Burch, Chiropractors; Dr.
Kenneth E. Whitson, Dentists;
Dr. Anthony J. Vento, Medical
Doctors; Dr. Alexander C. Wil-
helm. Optometrists; Dr. Howard
L. Neer and Dr. Joseph Stella,
Osteopaths; Dr. Charles Glicks-
berg. Veterinarians.____________
yp
l*Wf >4<4/*e*t
A contemporary group t
Jawlsh Singers and Instrumantallsfs
oorforming Israeli and American
music are new accepting a limited
number el engagements Contact
Bud reitoart, l -Mi-72i 2 or 1-4**-
2a-..or Howard Neu.l-its-JMO.
Hardware A Paiat, Inc.
lAGtrtS
Patio tMaatta
BEADED WINDOWS
WINDOW SHADES
DRAPERY RODS
WALLPAPER
KEY A LOCK WORK
Store Hours: 7:30 a
100 East
Bath/ OototSbo*
ROOM DIVIDERS
ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS
FOLIAGE
PLANTS
PATIO FURNITURE
.-opjr. CloiodSonday
Beach Bootevord
Florida 33009
927 0566
BrowardORT
Installs Officers
The Broward Region of Wom-
en's American ORT which in
four years has grown from 11 to
30 chapters with almost 4,000
members recently held their
fifth installation of officers.
Installing officer was Mrs.
Edward Light, vice president of
District VI, which serves nine
Southeast states. Mrs. Melvin
Talbert was installation chair-
man.
Officers for the coming year are
Mrs. Herbert Wormser,
president; Mrs. Samuel Press,
chairman of the executive com-
mittee; Mrs. Lawrence Chait,
Mrs. Jay Rosen and Mrs. Melvin
Talberg, vice presidents; Mrs.
Eric Golden, treasurer; Mrs.
Selwyn Kent, financial secretary;
Mrs. Harry Woldman, recording
secretary; Mrs. Sy Dorn, cor-
responding secretary; Mrs.
Bernie Chazin, parliamentarian.
Representatives to the national
board are Mrs. Chazin, Mrs. Ber-
nard Goldman, Mrs. Bernard
Plotkin. Mrs. Press, Mrs. Rosen
and Mrs. Wormser.
Mrs. Wormser said, "We
intend to enlarge our membership
through the formation of new
chapters in Margate, Emerald
Hills and Three Islands. We in-
tend also to become more active
in community service and will
continue our support of the
Sheridan and the Atlantic Voca-
tional Schools."
Joyce Newman, president of the Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of South Broward, was photographed at Yad
Vashem during last year's community mission.
Sen. Winn Heads Lehman's Campaign
District.
"I've seen how hard Bill Leh-
man has worked for the people of
North Dade and South Broward
and I'm proud to be heading up
his reelection effort," said Sen.
Winn.
Congressman Bill Lehman has
announced that State Senator
Sherman Winn will serve as his
reelection campaign chairman.
Sen. Winn, a 5th-term legis-
lator, represents the 34th
arnett
anK
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-820C
ELECT
SHERMAN A.
KATZ
BROWARD COUNTY
CIRCUIT COURT
JUDGE
Admitted to Bar of State of Florida 1951
Admitted to Bar of State of Pennsylvania 1956
Admitted to Bar of United States Supreme Court 1964
Member of American Bar Association
Bachelor of Arts la Economics, University of
Pittsburgh 1949
Juris Doctor, Law School, George Washington University
1955, Law Review
JBMDAJ
Ciafcaliw
rift*
iMsMat
an
t knmmi, Mm itiaji Hitiht **! Caaaty
MHiaa | Mai ftrajaaaa BaMM
I Ha" I laji rupnCHy
.CiaiaWlnt miiCaaat
? mmm mmm
a Aiaialii awiitaaa ajMHaaV
<*
TO MAINTAIN
IMPARTIAL
INDPENDNCf
MO
CAMPAIGN
cowrt/tuTfows
AtfBffNG
ACCfPTFD.
U.S. ARMY
1*S*-S*
X Corp.
Kara*
Sft.-Firsi
Claa*
Bronx*
Star
Modal
QUALIFIED BY TEAMING
EXPERIENCE AND SERVICE
DURING 70 YEARS AS A TRIAL
LAWYER
>
aAartaoryCo
aft*
aWaatai
OKaMZaTtOM JHVI0
Hcl.fl.
lijatOHlMi
TrWLaayari Aimc.
aKiawirii
aaaaaicOrear
ftooarj
raatriM
ftjWjMRf al Rata Mat Lavrara
PO. POl. ADV. PAID FOR BY SHERMAN A KATZ CAMPAIGN FUND
i


Page 4 \
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August n
Agnew's New Bigotry
It is sad to see the extent to which a former high
American official has fallen, not only in his persona
lite, but in his new and vengeful ways.
We mean, of course, Spiro T. Agnew.
**** not be forgotten: Agnew is a convicted'
felon. The unhappy fact is that, in addition, he has
taken up a new life of anti-Semitic activity.
So far as he, himself, is concerned, we could care
less. One variety of anti-Semite is neither better nor
worse than another. That Agnew is a former Vice
President of the United States makes his bigotry all
the more breathtaking, but not particularly more
virulent or dangerous.
With one exception: And that is that the in-
creasing incidence of his anti-Semitic activity gives
credence to the anti-Semites general conviction that
Jews are especially untrustworthy because they are in
aUeged control of mass communications and have an
allegedly inordinate amount of power in the high halls
of government.
These are the basic premises of Agnew's anti
Semitism today, and because he is a former Vice
President, the premises in the mind of the uninformed
take on a torn- of authority they would not otherwise
have.
We can only hope that most Americans are not
fooled by Agnew's statements and that they recognize
I hem as spiteful attempts to justify his own felony.
The Fruit of Anger
Anger and resentment can often be creative anc
fruitful. An example is New York Timesman Willian
Safin\
Safire is a former speech writer for formei
President Nixon and former Vice President Agnew.
Satire is one of those Americans who still cannot
believe that the Nixon-Agnew tragedy ever took place.
Satire's adulation of Nixon and Agnew is well-
documented Whether he can believe the tragedy or
not. he lives day-to-day in the cold reality of its af-
termath.
The result has been a sense of personal betrayal in
him hailing to a series of brilliant journalistic tri-
umphs mainly centering on exposing Agnew's recent
anti Semitic- movements.
Now, i lie Times columnist has set his sights on
newer fields, and the latest fruit of his work is the
expose involving Democratic hopeful Jimmy Carter's
pollster. Patrick ("addell.
It turns out that Caddell owns 35 percent of an
organization doing public relations work for Saudi
Arabia Other ("addell clients are such oil-rich Amer-
ican enterprises as Kxxon. Arco, Shell and Sun.
Praise for a Newsman
Carter, who at least publicly has shown explicit
concern for the so-called Jewish vote, insists that
( addell's highly-specialized clientele (to say the least)
can have no ideological effect either on his owr
Presidential aspirations or on the campaign
generally.
But Safire observes that any Carter decision
either as a nominee or in the event of his election in
November might readily be purchased "to help lay
the basis for Arab propaganda in America" should
Carter continue to insist that Caddell's extra
curricular activity can have no ideological effect oi
him.
We agree with Safire. Carter's stand is in
comprehensible. And Safire must be praised foi
having dug out the information in the first place.
kmsl Ikn 11 ii
and SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
OFFICE and PLANT- 120 N.E (thSt Miami. Fla a 132 PhonemMoe
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone TORSOS
P.O. Box 27S. Miami. FloridaIS101
KKKIlK SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SEI.MA M THOMPSON
Kdllor and Publisher Executive Editor Assistant to Publisher
AUP O. S6T9 returns are to be forwarded to
The Jewish Floridian. P O Box 01 7S Miami, Fla. U101
Th Jewish Floridian Dees Not Guarantee The Kashrurh
Of The MerchandiM Advert lied In Irs Columns
Published Bl Weekly
Second Class Postaf e Paid at Miami. Fla.
Jewish Federation of South Broward. Inc. SHOFAR EDITORIAL
ADVISORY COMMITTEE- Nathan PrHcher. Chart man Lewis E Conn;
Melvln H. Baer. Samuel Mellne. DUD.
___________________ Proem. SMcRot FrMay, August 13. 107*_________
The Jewish Floridian hat absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate.
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association
of English- Jewish New spa per i, and the F lortda Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Request
(local Area) One Year e so Out of Town Upon
Kreisky Cries for Cronies
By ROBERT E.SEGAL
"These stories from long ago
must finally come to an end."
It is the exasperated cry of
Chancellor Bruno Kreisky, the
popular Jewish-born, now as-
similated, Austrian leader. The
cry arose in the course of a bitter
fight between Kreisky and Simon
Wiesenthal, who gives most of
his waking hours to hunting
down old Nazis. Wiesenthal had
claimed that Priedrich Peter,
whom Chancellor Kreisky was
thinking of selecting as his
deputy in a coalition move, had
served in the infamous Nazi SS.
KREISKY, now firmly in-
stalled in his Vienna post, and
Wiesenthal, who had been sued
for slander by Kreisky, seem to
have reached a truce; but
Kreisky'8 words about the need
to forget are by no means for-
gotten.
New OLYMPIC SPIRJT
fWjKH'fe
il Mu
jm
SEE
MONTREAL'76
The words linger been
not heeding them, Rota
world over forced the wit
of Wolfgang Wick from
International's top pna
wealthy Austrian indu
and tireless worker for
good deeds, Wick accord"
Wiesenthal had alsfrT
member of Hitler's blacks!
elite corps, the SchutzstafU
WICK DID not del
charge. Indeed, he adnuj
had been an active Nazi,
version of service to Hj|
one time tag, Wigs.
another. The Rotarian said
not until February. 19 months before Hitler's _
was shattered, that he ion
SS.
The law required t
rollment. Wick said, ol
those born after 1906 to ed
SS lists. Yet accords
Wiesenthal, it was way b
1933 that Wick joined th
Party in Austria.
Wick's rise to emirs!
Rotary International, his
nation as President to-bl
withdrawal in light oi W
thal's revelations, the dece
the Rotary powerstnn tun;
accept his withdrawal.
Wick's ultimate decision
take the post are all ol too
significance to dissa
abruptly from the th-.uj
people who care.
"THESE STORIES fr
ago" must not be forgntti^
children and grandchildn
never learn too much
Hitler, the power hi
over the mind.s of mil 1
Continued on Pni^eY


Jewish Participation in Olympii
Friday, August 13. 197f
Vnulme 6
Number 17
'7AR57H?
ByHASKELLCOHEN
While the Jewish male athletes
have made their mark in Olympic
competition, they have not out
done the accomplishments of
their female counterparts in
many instances. As a matter of
fact, it was the Jewish female
athlete who played an important
role in the pioneer work of paving
the road into sports for women as
a whole.
When female swimming was
first introduced in the Stockholm
Olympics, the Austrian team,
which won the bronze medals in
the 4x100 meter relay, introduced
three Jewish swimmers. Many
years later, swimmers like Kva
Szekely of Hungary and Marilyn
Ramenovsky of the United
States, a Maccabiah Games
champion, carried on the same
winning tradition.
FEMALE participants were
first permitted to compete in
tracft and field in the Amsterdam
Olympics, and Fanny Rosenfeld
of Canada became the only-
winner of two gold medals. Also
in those Games found among the
medal winners was the late Lil-
lian Copeland of the United
States, who came back in 1932 to
win the discus throw gold medal
at the Los Angeles Games.
So far as numbers of medals
won by female Jewish athletes is
concerned, Agnes Keleti of
Czechoslovakia ranks second to
Mark Spitz in the number of total
medals won by an individual per-
former. Mis* Keleti won five
gold, three silver and two bronze
medals in gymnastics at the
Games in Helsinki and Mel-
bourne.
Her achievement at these two
sets of Olympics has been out
done only by Spitz's total of nine
gold medals, one silver medal and
one bronze medal. Spitz, in-
cidentally, ranks fourth among
Olympic medal winners, serving
as a runner-up of Ray Ewry,
Lariasa Latynina and Paavo
Nurmi.
MI8S KELETI'S achieve-
ments have served her well since
at this moment she serves on 'he
staff of the Wingate Institute of
Physical Education in Netanya.
where for the past 16 years she
has headed up her segment of the
physical education staff. Today
she is known as Mrs. Keleti-Biro.
The honor of being the best
Jewish female athlete in recent
years belongs to Irena Kirszen-
stein of Poland. Miss Kirs/.11
stein, known as Szewinska today.
Ls one of the best sprinters in the
world and has stayed at the top
in the 100 and 200 meter sprints
for close to a decade.
At that time, considerable
pressure was exerted on the late
Avery Brundage, the Olympic
czar, to have the Games trans-
ferred out of Germanv.
TODAY, of course, the Olym-
pic Games possibly serve little
purpose, and, quite frankly, may
be on the way out. There is no
question that the Games have
become a political football, and
students of the history of the
Games realize now that the first
political disturbances began with
the Olympic Games in Berlin in
1936, when they actually became
a means toward political ends
and where discrimination on the
basis of creed was practiced
openly.
IN ORDER to overcome the
avalanche of protests which came
in from all over the world, the
Nazis at that point nominated 21
Jewish athletes for training
camps to participate in the Ger-
man Olympic Games in 1934. Ac-
tually, none of the 21 were ever
invited to attend the camps.
In desperation, in order to
show their impartially th
finally selected a r.i.!
fencer. Helene Mayer
studying in Calit
ticip;ite as a femv -
of the finest femai>
time, and her presence wai
sitated by the Nazis to pr 1
they did not dbcriminal 1
Jews just as they had don
preceding winter games
Rudi Ball, a hockey playi
included on the German --i,
MISS MAYER, to ha
lasting discredit, salutyd
on the victory stand k'M
Nazi greeting of the it1'
raised right hand
The height of lud'
was reached in the >
ceding World War 11
United States pro-Fascist
Charles H. Sherrill. went si
to justify the discrunfl
against the Jewish peo,
stating, "There never
prominent Jewish a,l
history."

MEDICAL
EQUIPMENT POOL, ,l>
25 YEARS EXPERIFNCE
PHYSICAL THd
**?*<. HOSPITAL I
WHEELCH*!
OXYGEN*
WE ACCEPT
MEDICARE & MEDIC
PROMPT DELIVERY
566-5441
2536 N. Fed.
Ft. LauderdJ
Marion Nev ins Salter's
BOOK BAZAAR
Coming to
Post Haste Shopping Center
Personal Service Book Store
___
____


Friday, August 13,1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Protest NaziFibn-Maker at Olympics
|Page5
MONTREAL (JTAI The
Canadian Jewish Congress
strongly protested to the
Organizational Committee for the
Olympic Games for its invitation
to Leni Riefenstahl, who was a
leading Nazi film propagandist,
to attend the games.
The CJC demanded that
Robert Andras, Minister of Man-
power and Immigration, have her
"'deported forthwith."
IN TELEGRAMS signed by
Alan Rose, the CJC's national
executive director, the repre-
sentative organization of Can-
adian Jewry said Riefenstahl was
a "leading Nazi propagandist
employed by Goebbels and
producer of films glorifying
Hitler, genocide and hateful
Hitlerite master race
philosophy."
The CJC said it was "ap-
palled" that the Olympic com-
mittee should invite Riefenstahl
and termed the invitation "action
Canadian Jewry regards as
grievous insult" as well as "ab-
horrent to the Olympic spirit."
At National, weVe noticed
something new. People are walking
up to us at ticket counters and
saying, "National Airlines, take me,
I'm yours."
They're saying, "National
Airlines, take me, I'm yours," for a
lot of reasons. They're finding a hot
meal is still hot, even in the back
row. There's complimentary cham-
pagne when they fly to New York,
Washington, Houston, Los Angeles
and San Franciscoeven in coach.
And baggage marked "handle
with care," is handled with care.
But we hear, "National Airlines,
take me, I'm yours," for other
reasons, too.
Like our Birthday Fares.
They're our way of celebrating
America's 200th birthday. And
they let you fly everywhere we
fly for 15%-20%* less, round trip.
All so you can see more of what
America's about for less.
Wherever National flies, there's
almost always a flight going when
you want to go. Including non-stop
DC-10 service to London from
Miami.
And National thinks about
your vacation even before you do.
We call your travel agent's office
The Vacation Store because he's
stocked with hundreds of exciting
vacations all over the world.
We're doing so much to make
flying a breeze, people are saying,
"Take me, I'm yours," over and
over. It underscores the fact that
three out of four of our passengers
have flown with us before.
Next time you're flying where
National flies, find out why so
many people are saying, "National
Airlines, take me, I'm yours."
For reserva-
tions, call your
travel agent or
National Airlines
at 525-6601.
'There are advance purchase
and reservation requirements,
restrictions on travel
duration and times.
National Airlines



Pe 6
The Jewish Floridian and Skofar. of Greater Hollywood
Palm-Aire Weekend Conference
Attended by 70 Local Leaders
Continued from Page 1
being done in the community and
the trends South Broward might
wish to develop.
Joseph Cohen, consultant to
the Department of Field Services
of the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions and Welfare Funds, dis-
cussed what other communities
throughout the nation have been
doing to develop comprehensive
Jewish education for the total
community. He emphasized that
educating the entire family must
be the starting point and the root
of education in Jewish communal
life.
AN EDUCATIONAL
paign clinic, held by
Robert I. Hiller (left), EUie Katz, Herbert D. Katz, Ann Cohn and Lewis E. Cohn
cam-
Reva
Wexler, director of the Women's
Division of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward, dealt with
campaign problems and how
to solve them.
Rep. Elaine Bloom spoke about
the legislative process and the
social welfare concerns of the
South Broward community.
Saturday evening was devoted
to discussing "Holocaust to Re-
birth" the Nov. 14-28 com-
munity mission to Poland,
Rumania and Israel. The session,
led by Melvin H. Baer, com-
munity mission chairman, in-
cluded a dialogue with Joel
Breslau of Washington, D.C., na-
tional chairman of the United
Jewish Appeal.
Sunday, the final day of the
leadership conference, was de-
voted to the specific roles
Federation will play in the future
of Jewish life in South Broward.
to the development of leadership
and to the community's need for
and development of total pur
ticipation in serving its own
needs.
Dr. Malavsky Leads Tour to Israel
Joel Breslau and Abe Halpern
Don Klein and Nat Pritcher
Jo Ann Katz and Karen Margulies
Blanche Halpern and Moses Hornstein
Dr. Morton Malavsky, spir-
itual leader of Temple Beth
Shalom, recently led 42 people on
a tour to Israel. The 18 teen-agers
from various schools in Holly-
wood, Fort Lauderdale and
Miami Beach, and 23 adults
the parents and grandparents of
some of the youngsters headed
for Kfar Giladi, an outpost on the
Lebanese border, where soldiers
guarded every area of the kibbutz
and the children were housed in
underground sleeping quarters.
After two days in Haifa the
group proceeded to Jerusalem,
where they attended the July 4
dedication of the Bicentennial
Park. It was a day of great re-
joicing, for before dawn that
morning the Israelis had rescued
the hostages at Entebbe airport
in Uganda. President Ephraim
Katzir, U.S. Ambassador to
Israel Malcolm Toon and Presi-
dent Ford's special envoy Milton
Hoffman attended the cere-
monies.
The singing of Cantor Saul
Breeh of Miami Beach enlivened
the Bar Mitzvah of group mem-
ber Howard Chanin at the
Western Wall.
Nat Pritcher (left), Joel Breslau and Robert A. Pearlman Moses Hornstein (left), Joseph Cohen and Lewis ECohn
Joyce Newman
Dr. Stanley Margulies
DR. MALAVSKY
Our
Readers
Write
"l*t Thy Words Be Brief"
Koheleth lEcclesiastes)
EDITOR. Jewish Floridian-
Shofar:
Here is an interesting question
posed by Mr. Simon Wiesenthal,
famed hunter of Nazi criminals. I
am sure our readers will be in-
terested. I quote from his novel.
"The Sunflower." "A young Jew
is taken from a death camp to the
bedside of a dying Nazi soldier
In a cracked whisper the soldier
confesses to having participated
in the burning alive of an entire
village of Jews. The soldier, ter-
rified of dying with the burden of
his guilt, begs absolution from
the Jew. Torn between horror and
compassion, he listens in silence:
then walks away from the room
The soldier dies unforgiven."
Can evil be forgiven? What
would you have done?
IDA F. KIMBRIG
RENT-A-CAR
$6
A DAY
6c Per M.U-100 Mile Radius
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
520 S. DIXIE HWY., HI WD
920-4141
i


^
The Jewish Floridian and Shofdr of Greater Hollywood
iPae7
JWV Auxiliary Convent/on Theme
'Stars, Stripes, Service9
i
At the National Ladies
Auxiliary Jewish War Veterans
of the U.S.A. convention, Aug.
15 to 22 a tithe Diplomat Hotel in
Hollywood, the theme is "Stars,
Stripes and Service."
The National Ladies Auxiliary,
together with the Jewish War
Veterans, who will hold their 81st
mnual convention, expects the
largest gathering in the organiza-
tion's history: thousands of dele-
gates from all over the United
States are to attend.
Operation Re-Entry will be the
recipient of a child welfare pre-
sentation on Sunday. Aug. 15,
and the VA Hospital at Riviera
Beach will have a presentation on
Monday. Committee meetings,
workshops, an insurance sym-
posium and many important
recommendations and resolutions
are also on the agenda.
NATIONAL PRESIDENT
Mrs. Elaine Mass, of Skokie, 111.,
will formally open the convention
and bring greetings from the na-
ANNOUNCINGa!
:
~^
a new addition to the
Falls Signature Collection.
Consumers, in our opinion, should be label
conscious, and we at Falls are very proud
of what we call our signature collection of
labels.
First, we have the Falls name, recognized
nationwide as one of the finest all natural.
Kosher, clean Chickens.
Next, we have the signature of the United
States Department of Agriculture, assuring
you of unrivaled wholesomeness.
And now, we have added the signature of
the most respected name in National
Kosher supervision, the granted by the
Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations.
The Falls Signature Collection....
a status symbol for your table
THE NATURAL KOSHER CLEAN CHICKEN
^&
FALLS KOSHER POULTRY
SOUTH FALLSBURG MY 12779

BRUCE TRAVEL
Hours: 9-5:30; M on.-Fri. 10-2 Sat.
1801 S. OCEAN DR.
H ALLAN DALE, FLORIDA 33009
miami 944-2603 broward 921 -2400
IMPERIALTOWERSNO.BLDG.
JOIN OUR GROUP:
NINE DAY TOUR OF THE
JEWISH UFE OF
AMSTERDAM AND LONDON
OCT. 13Oct.21
VISITS IN EACH CUT TO PIACJS Of JIWISM IHTKBT
OW WIICOMI DMMfl M KOWII HSUIHIAMT IN EACH CfTT.
CONTINWTAl MEAIFAST IN TOUt HOTEl EACH MOtMNG.
MAT RIM OH THE CAMAIS Of AABTTIDAM
lraimWUMOONIYMOTOKMOi
I TOUt Of AAttTEtOA* IT AWTOtCOACH
TAHEIT0MIAAIAfOTANOnUN
TIANWEK IN EACH CITT IH illtOft
I AGO AM NANKING ANO HOTEl TAXES INCIOWD
HKTClAHNOTHSWrTHrfllVATEIAT*
lOONOTtlf AltfAIEVIA NATIONAl AJIUNB
AUNT OTHER SXTAS
PERSONALLY ESCORTED IT MACK ANO WINE
COSSIN. YOU KNOW YOU WILL NAVE A 0000 TIME
?747.00
DOUSli OCCUfANCT
WNGIE IATI AT SMS H
11
LIMITED SPACE AVAILABLE
CALL MR IESEIVAY10NS AND IHFOR*ATION
Tel: 921-2400
tional organization on Wednes-
day, and a banquet honoring her
is scheduled for Thursday
evening.
Public-relations executive and
women's rights activist Nikki
Beare has accepted an invitation
to speak at the opening cere-
monies Wednesday. Her topic
"Why Be Equal Under the
Law?" examines a volatile
issue in Florida, one of the few
states that has not yet given
women legal equality. Ms. Beare,
producer of the Miami radio pro-
gram "Women's Power Line," is
listed in the 1975-76 "Who's Who
of American Women."
Congressman Bill Lehman,
who has focused on utility rate
reform, vocational education and
legislation of interest to senior
citizen, consumer, environmental
and labor groups, will be a guest
speaker during the Aug. 20 Dis-
tinguished Guests segment of the
convention. A longtime business-
man and former president of the
Dade County School Board, from
which he resigned in 1966 to run
for Congress, Lehman was ap-
pointed by Speaker Carl Albert
to several House-Senate Con-
ference committees.
Reserve Now For The
rtttNmi IAYSISICCBTK
Services by
Renowned Cantor
Reserve lor Synagogue
Service* Holiday Meals
HIGH HOLY DAYS
12 days ft 11 nights
.195
pet pet son double occ
SPLIT STAY
6 days & 5 nights
M35
per person double occ
Including Gum KOSHER Cumne
Your Hosts MENASHE HIRSCH
V
.ind RABBI NATHAN GOODMAN
MURRAY ENGEL Can Mar
1 131*431
Phone
OH OCEANT ?
'mt.
itiL
The
KOSHER
lAIR CONOtTIONeO
Cftoum
OCEMMMT I
40th to
HOTEL 41sl Streets
RESERVE NOW for the HIGH HOLY DAYS
SUMMER SPECIAL
17
daily (Mr pcnon doubt* occ
loSpl 6 132 01 JSO.oomi
INCLUDING GLATT KOSHER CUISINE
Tennis Facilities Hand Ball Volleyball
Olympic Swimming Pool Entertainment
Full Block of Private Beach TV in Rooms
Daily Synaoooue Services
For Reservations Phone: I" S 5 I "D 7 7 I
SSB==K3=
Service*
Conducted
By Cantor
LEIB RASKIN
=
1
The Ittwyi
S50 '
Family Sail
Children under 16.
in tame room witn
2 aduMs, on cruises oi
.lune. July, August
3 NIGHTS to
NASSAU from MIAMI
$140 to $250 -"..-on
$155 10 $290 o" <->
f very Friday Year Round
4 NIGHTS to FREEPORT
6 NASSAU from MIAMI
$170 to $295 o hm>
$190 to $345 <-
f nry Man*** Vaav AWJ
pan* port laa'tomca
Group ratoe on mum
B,,a.olo ... y-niC
liSLaiBMi I
The Deluxe Cruise Ship
to the Bahamas from Miami
Elegance and Luxury in the Grand Manner
You never have had the opportunity to
all on 3 night and 4 night cruises to the
Bahamas In such splendid style! And, it
Is likely that you have seldom seen such
a beautiful ship, specifically designed
lor world cruising. For spaciousness, lor
luxury, lor service, lor attention, lor
magnificent facilities and
accommodations It s the Monarch Sun!
Super-spacious staterooms, each with
private facilities, phone, music console,
individually controlled air conditioning
(and, 92% of rooms are outside
doubles). A magnificent dining room
with superlative continental cuisine and
service. Theater. Lounge. Night Clubs.
5 Bars. 3 Elevators. Swimming Pool.
Outy-Free Shops. Gymnasium...and,
Casino Facilities! Entertainment. Shows.
Revues and world-renowned Cruise
Director and Staff
' SEE YOUR TRAVEL AGENT --
n.iini.iu.M muim Lints
MLiryuriift'ti
142B RrichoM MkWVM Florid}* J3U1
[305|374-n
SS twor-jrc* S" **0 -
<~~J
MONARCH CRUISE LINES INC
I42.BBICKEH AVENUE
MIAMI. FLORIDA 11111
Pleat* aand mo brochure* and inlormalion
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY STATE
MY TRAVEL AGENT 1$
HOLLYWOOD'S LABORATORY
FOR PROCESSING KODAK'S COLOR FILMS
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
Bremck Stores
AAAIN STORE ANO PLANT
2000 HORTH DIXIE HIGHWAY
PHONE: 920-8021
Anondoy thru Friday 8 to 5:30
Saturday 9:00 to 1:00
4551 Hollywood Blvd.
981 1555
610 Athmtk Shores Blvd.
920-3719
"\
1804 H. University Drive
9620999
f


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 13,1976
ask&Be
By&BehaipeRn
Question: What is the sig-
nificance of the coat of many
colors given to Joseph by Jacob?
Erwin Schneider
Miramar
Answer: There is nothing in
the Bible about Joseph's early
youth. There is only a brief ac-
count of his birth.
"Now God remembered
Rachel; God heeded her and
opened her womb. She conceived
and bore a son, and said, 'God
has taken away my disgrace.' So
she named him Joseph, which is
to say, 'May the Lord add
another son for me' (Genesis
30:22-24).
Following this short notice
there is a brief reference to
Joseph as one of the twelve sons
of Jacob (Genesis 35:24).
Starting with Genesis 37, the
Bible begins the saga of Joseph
at the age of seventeen: his sell-
ing by his brothers to the Ish-
maelites, his journey to Egypt,
his rise to power, his reunification
with his brothers and his father,
and his sojourn in Egypt. It con-
cludes with his death at the end
of chapter 50, the end of the first
book of Genesis.
IT IS AT THE beginning of
Genesis 37 that the reference to
the coat of many colors appears:
"And Israel loved Joseph best of
all his sons, for he was the child
of his old age: and he made him a
coat of many colors" (Genesis
37:3).
The key Hebrew phrase in the
quotation is "K'tonet passim."
While traditionally this phrase is
translated as "a coat of many
colors,'' some modern trans-
lations of the Five Books of
Moses translate it as "an orna-
mented tunic" or "a robe with
sleeves."
While "K'tonet" is understood
to be a robe, tunic, shirt or coat,
all authorities agree that the
meaning of "passim" is not
known. They also agree that the
significance of this coat or tunic
is not certain. Some scholars say
that this term signifies special
distinction: perhaps it marked
those who did not have to work.
The commentary of the Son-
cino Edition of the Pentateuch
and Haftorahs has on page 142
the following passage: "In the
patriarchal age. Semitic chiefs
wore coats of many colors as in-
Mrs. Gross Seeks
School Board Seat
Broward County substitute
teacher Fran Gross has an-
nounced her candidacy for an at-
large Group 1 seat on the Brow-
ard County School Board.
Mrs. Gross, a Democrat who
has long been active in Women's
American ORT, which is involved
in vocational education for
thousands of students worldwide,
believes that the most important
priority facing the school system
is "the necessity to improve sig-
nificantly the quality of educa-
tion in the county. A Back to
Basics approach would be a key
step in such an effort," she said.
Mrs. Gross also has stressed
the need for more responsiveness
on the part of the school board
toward the needs of children and
the concerns of parents.
Mrs. Gross and her husband,
Norman, and their family are
members of Temple Beth El.
CANDLEUGHTING
y?
TIME
7:39
17AB-5736
*
signia of rulership. Joseph had
made himself disliked by his
brothers for reporting on them:
and Jacob in giving him a coat of
many colors marked him for
chieftainship of the tribes at his
father's death."
IN THE NOTES on the new
translation of the Five Books of
Moses edited by Harry M. Or-
linsky, published by the Jewish
Publication Society, the follow-
ing explanation appears with
reference to the translation of
"K'tonet passim" as "orna-
mented tunic" (p.l 19):
"The etymology and meaning
of Heb. passim are unknown and
all renderings are but guesses. In
addition to 'many colors' and
ornamented,' other renderings
have been proposed, such as
'with sleeves' and 'a long gar-
ment with sleeves' ... Ibn
Ezra's comment is as good as
any; passim means 'orna-
mented'; and Radak explained
our term as a garment 'made up
of multicolored strips.'
"In 11 Samuel 13:18-19, our
K'tonet passim is worn by
daughters of royal birth. Perhaps
one day the wall paintings in the
19th-century B.C.E. tomb at
Beni-hasan in Egypt, depicting
richly colored, striped garments,
may shed some specific light on
our passim."
Editor's note: Please send
questions to:
??? ASK ABE m
c o Jewish Federation
of South Broward
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
Seniors Are Busy
in Hollywood
A new Social Action Group, led
by Victor Springer, has begun.
What kind of problems can they
help solve? Medicare Social
Security Car Insurance? Join
the group on Friday mornings at
10 and find out.
Bring lunch and ideas to the
Luncheon Discussion Group, Fri-
days at noon at the JCC. Led by
Edith Saperstein, the stimulating
and lively discussions have at-
tracted many seniors to the Cen-
ter. Topics include Women's Lib,
Politics, Living Away from Our
Children and many others.
The Senior Adult Activity
Center is supported by the Jew-
ish Federation of South Broward.
For information about programs
and available services, see Elaine
Goldstein at the Center, 2838
Hollywood Blvd.
Tay -Sachs Disease
Is Preventable
Tay-Sachs Disease, a de-
generative hereditary disorder
that leads to blindness, motor
disorders and early death, is 100
times more common among Ash-
kenazi (Central European and
Russian) Jewish children than
any other group
But the disease can be
eliminated. Testing programs at
the University of Miami's Mail-
man Center for Child Develop-
ment. Mount Sinai Medical Cen-
ter. Community Hospital of
South Broward and North Beach
Medical Center in Fort Lauder-
dale screen individuals of child-
bearing age to identify carriers of
the defective gene and monitor
pregnancies where risk has been
determined.
NEW!
Acoustical Vinyl
CEILING SPRAY
Ova Hmw Life to Otd or Cracked Ceiling*
fromem RHOMBS NEW construction
- Y
Uf
CAU. FOt FW BTIMATi 9tft*M9
BOWERS & SONS
APPROVED EiilSSK
CONTROL MODIFICATION
H* hunmi Qm Mwp 1 Mimp wwr
THE 0YN0M0METER TUNE-UP SPECIALIST
PERFORMANCE NEW CAR WARRANTIES NOpAF?
FECTED EMISSION STANDARDS MET
AUTO TECHNICAL
ASSOCIATES
Tun.
Minor Tuna
Every Monday afternoon the JCC Senior Adult Activities
Center smells of charcoal and turpentine as the sketching ami
painting class gets under way. Talent blossoms as people who
have never sketched or worked in oils begin a new and
stimulating hobby and prepare for a Senior Art Show. Here
Annette Shapiro (seated) gets advice from instructor Stephanie
Pincus.________________________________________________
f
le
is
d
's
is
*
e
le
y

lo
n

is
:
R.B. KUNKENBERG. M.D.
TAKES PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING
THE LOCATION OF HIS NEW
OFFICE FOR THE PRACTICE OF
INTERNAL MEDICINE
STARTING MON. AUG. 2
AT
3891 STIRLING RD.
FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA.
mmatm auu-1717
(Opposite Sterling Etemantefy School)

TEMPLE SINAI
I Th Oldst Cons orvativo
Congregation in Broward County
1201 Johnson Strtet
Hollywood
OFFERS THE
LARGEST UBRARY
0FJUDAICA
IN
BROWARD COUNTY
A MULTUIEDiA LISTENING
a LEARNING CENTER
AUDIO VISUAL AIDS
* CASETTE t TAPED LESSONS
FILMS-FILM STRIPS
RECORDS
CARRELS
FOR RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
AND SUNDAY SCHOOL
Rabbi David Shapiro CanmcYahudah Hailbraun
Roaalayn 2 Saidal Educational Doctor
Call Tempi* Office 920-1577


Friday, August 13,1976
The Jewish Floridian and Skofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
Broward Showcase Aim:
Community Interaction
The Broward Showcase, a countywide exposi-
tion that will provide a comprehensive display of the
county's significant and varied resources, talents and
achievements, will be held Oct. 8 to 17 at the Pom-
pano Park Harness Raceway.
The purpose is to demonstrate to the state and
the area what Broward County has, what it is and its
promise for the future. It is intended to become an
important tradition, constantly expanding and
improving.
Chairman of the event is Ansel
Wittenstein, president of United
Horsemen of Florida, Inc., who
has been notified by William R
Adams, executive director of the
Bicentennial Commission of
Florida, that the Showcase has
been recognized as an official
Bicentennial event. Similar
recognition has been conferred by
the Broward County Bicentennial
Commission chaired by Sheriff
Edward J. Stack.
Gerald F. Thompson, chairman
of the Broward Board of County
Commissioners, has proclaimed
Oct. 16 as Broward Showcase
Day. and such organizations as
the United Way, Living and
Learning Center of Nova Uni-
versity and the Boys' Clubs of
Broward County have become
involved in the planning and will
receive portions of the first year's
proceeds.
According to Wittenstein. "the
Showcase is a nonprofit
organization requiring no
government funding and is in-
tended to create a major vehicle
for lasting and beneficial con-
tributions by county agriculture,
charities, commerce, education,
industry and nonprofit service
organizations, offering each
rit i/cn the opportunity to become
involved in the community and to
create a bond among various
romnnintfkin
Kntertainment. special
features and exhibits demon-
strating Broward's diversity are
planned and a special highlight is
the annual Florida All-Breed
Horse Exposition, Oct. 14 to 17,
AHH simultaneous classes in five
rings and one of the largest horse
shows anywhere. There will also
be a carnival midway with rides
and other attractions.
OTHER OFFICERS in ad-
dition to Wittenstein are
president, Kevin Sullivan, pres-
ident of the Restaurant As-
sociation of Broward County;
vice president, Dudley Tichenor,
vice president of WGMA Radio;
secretary, attorney Jack
Musselman; and acting
treasurer, CPA Milton Friedman.
Many distinguished business,
civic and educational leaders,
representing a professional and
geographic cross-section of the
county and its interests, are
members of the founding board of
directors. Among them are:
Maynard Abrams, Dr. Hugh
Adams. Paul E. Basye. James
Bell, Ms. Marietta Benevento,
Mrs. Marlis Bonura, Duncan
Bossle. Irving Cowan. Marge
(Mrs. Irving) Cowan, Mrs. Ann
Cramer. Willard Dover, Robert
E. Ferris. Jr., and Dr. Abraham
Kischler.
Also Hamilton C. Forman.
Milton Friedman, Alfred D.
Griffin, Sr., Jack W. Harris. Julia
(Mrs. Robert) Huebner, William
Markham, Al Morland, Com-
missioner Jack Moss. Jack
Musselman. A. J. W. Novak.
Judge George L. I'allotto. John
I'rimeau. Joe N. Scott and Sheriff
Edward Stack.
And Angelique (Mrs.
Steadman) Stahl. Fred Stevens.
Kevin Sullivan. Commissioner
Gerald Thompson, Dudley
Tichenor, Hector V an Lennep.
Ed Wentworth. Elmer Weigle,
Ansel Wittenstein. Zebedoo
Wright, M. It. (Cyl Young. Vice
Mayor Virginia Young and Sen.
William Zinkil.
Florida Medical Center Giving
Course in Computer Diagnostics
Radiology and nuclear medical
technologists from throughout
the nation will travel to Florida
Medical Center in Lauderdale
Lakes later this month to par-
ticipate in a 16-week educational
program designed by the
hospital.
The Diagnostic Ultrasound
and Computed Tomography
Technical Training Program
course, established to supply the
community with trained tech-
nologists in these medical areas,
is the first in the nation to
combine these recent diagnostic
developments requiring special
equipment and thoroughly
trained operators, according to
Dick Munson. hospital assistant
administrator.
Computed tomography is
familiar to the public as a head or
body "scanner." The ultrasound
procedure utilizes sound waves to
develop a picture of part or all of
the human body.
Without training programs
such as the Florida Medical Cen-
ter course, Munson sees a sub-
stantial void in personnel able to
operate the equipment.
From a group of 20 applicants,
six have been selected to par-
ticipata in the program. Sessions
will be taught by Florida Medical
Center staff physicians, who are
donating their time.
Munson expects to receive a
sanction for the course from the
American Society of Ultrasound
Technical Specialists, an arm of
the American Institute of Ultra-
sonic Met) aduale* of the
16-week course, which begins
Sept. 1. will receive certificates
attesting to their time and
participation.
The second course will begin
early in January, 1977. and
Munson already has received ap
plications from prospective
students. He is also developing a
nuclear medicine technology
course and a radiological tech-
nology training program.
Officials of Broward Com-
munity College have contacted
Florida Medical Center regarding
its educational activites, and
have indicated an interest in
tying together related under-
takings of the two institutions.
IEVITT
memorial chapels
IWl Pembroke Rd.
Hollywood. Fla.
BIMW
Sonny Levitt, F.D.
I1MSW. Dixie Mwy.
Norm Miami. Fla.
MM11I
Albart Layton. F.O.
Kreisky
Cries for
Cronies
Continued from Page 4
maneuvers by which he achieved
the legalization of anarchy and
the approval of genocide.
The Chancellor born a Jew
Bruno Kreisky may recom-
mend that we forget. Wolfgang
Wick may prefer that we forget.
The hundreds of neo-Nazis scat-
tered about the world today may
expect us to forget. But senti-
ment to the contrary must
prevail in the end.
Those members of Rotary who
vowed they could not forget and
insisted that Wick's identifi-
cation with the SS precluded final
consideration of this election as
world leader of Rotary deserve
full credit for adhering to a
precious principle.
THE SS was not just another
squad of Hitler's skillfully or-
ganized machinery for conquest.
Heinrich Himmler, shrewd archi-
tect of Jewish destruction, was
Hitler's ultimate choice as com-
mander-in-chief of the SS. That
body came eventually to
dominate Germany, to terrorize
anti-Nazis in many lands, to
serve as Hitler's and Himmler's
battering ram against defenseless
Jews.
In Brian Connell's "A Watcher
on the Rhine." the author asserts
that he was not disturbed so
much by the 40 percent of the
Germans who followed Hitler as
by the 60 percent who tolerated
him.
"In the whole of my years in
Germany," he writes, "I do not
think I have heard more than half
a dozen honestly admitted con-
fessions of responsibility for
Hitler."
ALBERT SPEER, who took
charge of some two million slave
laborers for Hitler and was sent
eventually to Spandau Prison,
illustrates this tendency of some
Germans to skim over the
deepest meaning of those tragic
vears.
Palmer's Miami
Monument Company
IVrsonahzed Mi-mortals
Cuitnm Crafted
In Our Workshop
BROWARD 525-5961
Dade 444-0921
JEFFER
FUNERAL HOMES. INC
amctods
Irwin Jfflti Medwin Jetter Iwr> Jetle'
mm tosh
!MM WUSIOI AVI HOUISU NT
1783 COW VlSlANOWt BUlTMNr
212/776-8100
wnaMOA
DAM COUNTY 1338S W Hilt MWY
947-1185 fee tKSam.lnw T,
BHOWMtt) COUNTY 1921 PtMBMM SO
925-2743 Hmtnymoiw* to
MUM MttH C0UN1T 624 S 01 Iff Vt
1-925-2743 m. m>
Seiwcet i.w**Dit- m ilk corn
. (>i tad hfiktoM'.''
ROTHAUS MONUMENT CO., INC.
11
16300 Waat 0i*Hi Hghwoy
North Miami Baoch,
Florida 33160
|(306i mi-an Q
BRONZE & GRANITE
PLAQUES
MONUMENTS
MEMORIALS
ALL Ml AMI AND
NY. CEMETERIES
Ron & Barbara Rothaui
Scene Around
___________I By MARION NEVINS SALTER_____________
In the midst of a quiet sum-
mer, the officers of South Brow-
ard's Jewish Federation planned
a super weekend retreat for all its
campaign leadership at Palm
Aire in Pompano. Lew Conn, the
newly installed president, chaired
the sessions, while Stan Mar-
gulies, 1977 campaign chairman,
gave out with some of his plans
for next season. Robert Hiller,
executive VP of the Jewish
Charities and Welfare Funds of
Baltimore, was the Scholar-
in Residence.
It was a beautiful weekend and
everyone had fun in addition to
learning a great deal from the
various speakers. In between
sessions some of us gals had time
to catch up on each other's sum-
mer activites and that's always
interesting.
Joyce Newman (Women's Di-
vision Prez) was telling me that
her not-quite-16-year-old, Beth,
wanted a job badly this summer
but found her age a deterrent as
of course she can't drive a car yet.
Joyce and I both decided that
there are worse things than being
on the sunny side of 16, even
though I'm sure Beth wouldn't
agree at this point.
Mary Zinn was there with her
daughter, Esther Gordon, and
son-in-law, Allan. Granddaughter
Robin, on summer vacation from
Tulane. brought a young friend
with her to join her family for
Friday night dinner. Esther is
really busy these days, what with
her work at Federation and also
being a board member of United
Way. In any case, it must agree
with her as she looked par-
ticularly well and very pretty.
A FEW MORE people we
managed to chat with over the
weekend included Ann Cohn.
Lew's attractive wife. Nat
Pritcher. Elly and Herb Katz.
Karen and Stan Margulies.
Marion and Meron Levitats,
Lucile and Mel Baer. Gertrude
and Moe Hornstein. incoming
ezecutiva director Don Klein and
his wife. I'hea. Jo Ann and
Sherman Katz and quite a few-
others. Meron I-evitats con-
ducted the services on Friday
night and really proved himsel
to be a most interesting ant
capable lay leader. Shermai
Katz, incidentally, is one of th<
candidates for a judgeship it
Broward and is in the midst of hi
campaign.
Another evening recently w
dined with Harriet and Mauru
Levinson and Dorothy and Jesst
Fine. Harriet and Maurie, wh<
have been snowbirds up till nov.
and were my neighbors at th<
Mariposa Apartments during
winter seasons for many years
have given up their home in Utici
and are becoming all-year-rounc
residents here. They have bough
a condominium in Bay Harbo:
and Murray has opened an off ici
in Hollywood. Their daughter
Jane, has also moved dowr> inc
with her young family has move<
into a home in Emerald Hills.
Dorothy Fine, who just re
turned from a wilderness tri|
through Alaska, was telling u:
about the magnificent scenery t<
be seen in parts of the nortl
country. She is busy getting he
slides of the trip in order and wi
all made reservations to see then
when they are ready.
WHILE DOROTHY was i
Alaska. Jesse spent his time i
his home town of Evansvilli
Indiana, renewing old acquain'
ances and playing golf with som
of his old cronies. Their daughte
Norma. is in Rome on a fellov
ship after finishing up a year t
law school. Older sister Jane is
budding journalist, holding dow
a job on a daily in New England.
Other returning travelers ir
elude Ann and Al Yorra. who jus
returned from a trip which ir
eluded Sebago in Maine, Bosto
and New York. The Yorras live
in Maine years back so that the
spent a good deal of time wit
some of their old friends. The
also managed to get in some go
and Ann was telling me the
when she teed off from some c
the high points on the moui
tainous golf courses, the ba
really traveled. That's one way t
get distance but she never tol
me how she did coming back u
the hills.
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
JempCe 3etkt
Wemotiai
(jazdetu
The pll-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beau-
tifully landscaped, perpetual care, rea-
sonably priced.
For information call: 920-8225 or writ*:
TEMPLE BETH EL~ /?.l*:V~-*
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Plejte MRd mi literature on the above.
NAME: ___
ADDRESS:
PHONE:
ASK YOUR
RABBI ABOUT US
JOHNSON-FOSTER
FUNERAL HOME, INC.
1650 HARRISON ST. HOLLYWOOD, FLA. PHONE: 922-7511
Paul J. Houlihan,
L.F.D.


PagelOf
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. August 13,1976
Sam Reinhard (3rd from left), Florida chairman of the American Red Magen David for Ijrael,
presented a plaque on behalf of the organization to Gladys Tickton and Philip Mintz, chorus; Dr.
Gforge Tickton, president; Alex Zele, vice president; Milton Sarner, "the Captain of the
Pinafore"; and Leon Zudoff, "Admiral of the Pinafore," acknowledging the Delta Players'
donation of an ambulance to Israefs Red Cross agency. The nonprofit group's production of
"Der Shirtz" a Yiddish version of Gilbert and Sullivan's "H.M.S. Pinafore" earned enough
money for the purchase. The company is rehearsing a Yiddish "Mikado" by Mims Walowit and
people with musical talent are asked to call Sennie Hurowitz, director, for an audition (927-5291),
or Mary Wolfe (962-9637).
Tennis at JCC
IMU-LIFE BODY SHOP
MAY I HAVf JHl Nt*J MNT%
COLLISION SOCIALISTS
INSURANCE WORK
SPECIALIZING IN QUALITY
WORK
30 YEARS EXPERIENCE
2111 S.W. 59 TERR.
1 BL S OF TREASURY
Bl E. OF 441
989-6040
BEN BERMAN, Proprietor


MEYER
AIR CONDITIONING
"Ask Your Neighbor About Moyor"
Sine. 1952
CUT YOUR ELECTRIC BILL
Have your system tuned up by professional
923-4710 -PHONES- 925-0112
r~
We invite you to visit our new
full-service Hollywood office
located at
Post Haste Shopping Center
( Corner of Sheridan St, 4 46th Ave.)
4415 Sheridan Street
Hollywood, Florida 33021
i
Or coll
Alvin B. Epstein
Resident Manager, Hollywood
Browaxd: 963-4970 Dads: 621-1234
Laurence Hunter
Vice President, Miami Beach
Dada: 8650522 Browaid: 925-7517
Shields Model Roland
Incorporates1
MEMBERS | PRINCIPAL) SECURITIES EXCHANGES
4113 Sheridan St., Hollywood, Fla. 33021
7300 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, Fla. 33141
Another happening at the new
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center, 18900 NE
25th Ave., North Miami Beach:
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Florida invite you
to make full use of the newly
lighted tennis courts. The direc-
tor of tennis activities is Ray
Mitchell.
For information about tennis
and the many other JCC pro-
grams, see Evelyn Freilich, mem-
bership registrar, at the Center.
Religious Directory
HOLLYWOOD
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 3)0 SW 62nd
Awe. Conservative. Rabbi Mar
Landman. (47B)
BETH EL TEMPLE. 13S1 S. MMl Ave
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa.
Assistant Rabbi Harvey M. Rosen
(eld. (4S)
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4*01 Arthur
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold (44)
SINAI TEMPLE. 120! Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi Oavid Shapiro.
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield.
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun. (OS)
SOLEL TEMPLE. 5100 Sheridan St.
Liberal. Rabbi Robert Frailn. (47C)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
Mtl Stirling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
Moshe Bomier. (SI)
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 4U
NE 1th Ava. Conservative. Rabbi
Harry E. Schwarti. Cantor Jacob
Oaniiger. (II)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
1H01 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingsiey. Cantor Irving
Shu Ikes. (17)
NORTH BROWARD
CORAL SPRINOS HEBREW
CONGREGATION 1721 NW ISOth
A. Reform Rabbi Max Weitl. (44)
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER, tie*
9th St. Conservative, Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. (44A)
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. efM SW 35tti St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrem Draiin.
Canter Abraham Hester (4U
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. IMS N.
University Or. Conservative RabM
Sidney I. LubM. (*])
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH
CONOREOATION 444 S Neb Hill R4
Rabbi ISllS-IR J. Marr (44)
RE CONST RUCTIONIST
JY NAOOU B. 7471 NW em St. (4t)
Mr. and Mrs. Morse Epstein of La Mer will celebrate their 50th
wedding anniversary on Sunday, Aug. 15. Their children and
many friends have gathered from around the country to honor
the Epsteins, who have shown their commitment to Jewish life
through their dedication to the development of Hebrew
University and the Jewish Federation of South Broward.
Community CalendaR
August 18
Films: "Beit Shan Valley" and "Tree of Life" Senior
Adult Activity Center, 1-3 p.m.
August 19
Hadassah Sabra Group membership tea 12:30 p.m.
Slide presentation: "Why You Pay What You Pay for
Electricity" 10:30 a.m.-noon.
August 25
B'nai B'rith Women Aviva Chapter membership tea .8
p.m.
Films: "Rendezvous to Freedom" and "The Moshav" 1-
3 p.m.
August 26
Dr. Charlie Friedman on "What It's Like To Be a Can-
didate" Senior Adult Activity Center. 10:30 a.m.-12:30
p.m.
r
"i
Losing
Weight
Doesn't
Make Sense
...if you gain it back again!
I
I
I
I
I


1

I
Dietary Behavioral Center _
P.0 BWX01JS4.rlAN.|4lAna.^C4WAliM1
a I 'nique Weight Reduction Program
under the direction and auspices of
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
An "in residence" program
at the prestigious Everglades
Hotel
Utilizing behavioral
modification" a modern
concept in weight reduction
and control
Includes thorough medical
examination at the University
of Miami School of Medicine
Diet, educational and
exercise programs under
direction of our doctors,
psychologists, therapists and
nutritionists
Families welcome special
programs available
Health insurance and
Medicare counselor on staff
.....POP) COeJPLETE DETAJLS
Call 374-6100
UNIVERSITY Of MAMI SCHOOL OF MCDICtNC
I
I
I
I
I
I
I

I

I
I
NOW OPEN
WORLD BACKGAMMON CLUB
611 AtkNitk Sberes ktneverd
(Eost of Federal Highwayacross from Hollywood Dog Track)
Free ce|Me.ib Lassoes for Chw Members
DepHcett leckfowiMOR, Ckoeottos ft TownMMtorrts every iTinimj
Fei Ueo of U*mm [seme! ft Oortm
7 Deys woek from 1 P.M. TIL CLOSING ?
- _______________


Friday, August 13,1976
Thejgwirh Fiorithan and Shofarpf Greater Hollywood
Page 11
Jewish Women &
And BReast CanceR cph< [
ROSE KUSHNER. Breast Cancer: personal
history and an investigative report. Harcourt
Brace Jovanovich, S10. 400 pp.
ROSE KUSHNER has written a very im-
portant book. "Breast Cancer" attempts to
alert all women to the importance of early detec-
tion and to get the best care possible pre- and
post-operative.
This not a book for doctors. It is for the
layperson, and Mrs. Kushner, a medical jour-
nalist, purports to inform women about all
surgical alternatives which she has found many
oncologists (cancer specialists) are not willing to
inform or perform.
SHE EMPHASIZES the importance of BSE
(Breast Self-Examination), and she charts breast
cancer risks for American women. Among those
in the high risk group are Jews of European an-
cestry, whereas Jews of North African or Asian
ancestries are in the low risk group. The point is
to help women determine their risk on the chart,
and thereby take advantage of finding a breast
cancer early enough to be cured.
Kushner has done extensive research, as in-
dicated by her bibliography, which has been
prepared with the average woman in mind. It
includes articles of substance and authority, but
which can be read and understood without a
medical background.
CHOOSING A doctor is of the utmost im-
portance, preferably at> oncologist a doctor
who deals exclusively with cancer patients; and
even more preferably one who deals with breast
cancer. Kushner is adamant on this point.
She insists that women who may have breast
cancer should see a cancer specialist and not rely
on family doctors or general surgeons to either
"wait and see" or to perform the surgery itself.
There are only twenty-two oncology or cancer
centers in the country. One of them is the
University of Miami School of Medicine.
"BREAST CANCER" has caused stirs this
year in the medical community for the reason that
the author challenges the quality of care women
receive in America. After comparing our
procedures with those in a variety of European
countries, she concludes that American women
with breast cancer are usually the victims of a
blind one-step biopsy-mastectomy procedure
they do not need.
Kushner provides the maatectomee with
personal observations and informative data on
postoperative recovery, a little discussed aspect
of breast cancer surgery; shopping for clothes;
and the psychological reactions of family and
friends. Kushner s expertise and interest in this
traumatic and oftimes shattering operation
comes from her own experience.
Upon going through a mastectomy herself, she
discovered the need to provide women with
certain basic information which she, as a medical
writer, could research, but which was and is not
easily forthcoming to most breast cancer
patients.
One out of every 15 women will develop a
breast cancer sometime in her life. "Breast
Cancer" is a significant step in helping women
determine, understand and be part of their fates
on the surgical table.
<&>bert
SegaC
Air piracy must Be en6e&
JEFFERSON'S FELICITOUS line, "a
decent respect for the opinions of
mankind," has jumped out of historical context
these past few days for application to Israel's
miraculous rescue of 103 hostages at Uganda's
Entebbe International Airport.
To be sure, Israel has not won respect from the
national blocs that insist on treating the Jewish
State with disdain at all times; but it is en-
heartening to note that Chaim Herzog, Israel's
principal delegate to the UN, has reported that
among congratulatory messages pouring into
Jerusalem were several from countries that had
severed diplomatic relations with Israel because
of Arab economic and political pressure.
PLAYWRIGHTS WILL be hard put to
fashion dramas more electrifying than Israel's
rescue in 53 minutes flat of innocent Jews
held prisoner by Arab and West German
terrorists who were assisted by Ugandan guards.
And for Americans marveling at the escapade,
the date of rescue carried an added satisfaction
the weekend of celebration of this nation's
Bicentennial.
Now the international community faces stern
challenges growing out of the latest skyjacking.
A secondary problem is to keep the record
straight about Uganda's share of responsibility
for the outrage. Far more important is the job of
putting a decisive end to jet-age kidnapping.
AS TO the minor issue: Uganda. The scorn
directed by officials of Kenya against Uganda's
president. General Idi Amin, should serve to
awaken other Third World leaders to the
hypocrisy and cruelty attending so many of
Amin's actions. Stung by Amin's sharp criticism
of any assistance neighboring Kenya may have
given the Israeli rescuers, the Nairobi govern-
ment has openly branded Amin "the world's
greatest dictator, a fascist, a warmonger, and a
sadist."
The statement out of Nairobi further assailed
the blustering Amin as a troublemaker "whose
meaning of leadership for the last five years has
been savagery, torture and mass murders of
innocent people.''
BRANDED "a racist murderer" in the UN by
Daniel Patrick Moynihan last October, Amin has
to his shame put to death at least 100,000 of his
compatriots, according to the boasts of his own
ministers.
Of far more consequence than the sickening
matter of Gen. Amin's cruelty and duplicity is the
urgent call to the international community to get
on at last with a practical and effective plan for
frustrating potential hijackers, putting an end to
blackmail, designing techniques for rescuing
prisoners of the outlaws, and imposing sanctions
against nations that continue to cooperate with
this new breed of pirates.
ninety
minutes
At enteBBe
Sft*
"TkT'INETY MINUTES at Entebbe," announced by
ll Paramount on July 12, based on the factual novel by Uri
Dan and William Stevenson, and written while the events of the
-escue operation by the daring Israeli commandos unravelled only a
week earlier, has a screenplay by Paddy Chayefsky with Sidney
Lumet set to direct. The book by Dan and Stevenson was published
by Bantam Books July 19.
In making the announcement, David V. Picker admitted that
the Paramount version will be the fourth picture dealing with the
freeing of the hijacked hostages from the Air France plane in
Uganda, but one based on extensive interviews with key Israeli and
military sources who were behind the Entebbe rescue mission.
UNIVERSAL STUDIOS came up with their project "Rescue
at Entebbe" within 24 hours after the news broke on the wire
service. Their epic is being produced and directed by George Roy
Hill, winner of an Academy Award for "The Sting," previously
lauded for "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," "Slaughter-
house Five" and "Hawaii."
Hill is just completing post-production at Universal on "Slap
Shot" starring Paul Newman, but is already at work developing his
dramatization of the commando raid termed the most daring rescue
operation in recent military history.
ANOTHER FEATURE film is being planned by Murray
Schwartz, president of Merv Griffin Production, who by chance
happened to be on the hijacked Air France plane from Athens to
Paris. His epic is being labeled "Odyssey of 139" and should be the
most revealing one since he actually was a bystander to the crime of
the hijackers.
"Assault on Entebbe" is the title of a picture the enterprising
Elliott Kastner is preparing at this time. Producer of many suc-
cessful pictures, Kastner currently is represented on the screen
with "The Missouri Breaks," the Marlon Brando-Jack Nicholson
Western. Kastner employs the services of Shmuel Erde and Geoff
Berkin for the story with Erde joined by Kastner associate Jerry
Gershwin during the actual production of the film .
UNIVERSAL'S GEORGE Eckstein is producing a three-hour
television film dealing with the shenanigans of the late U.S.
Senator Joseph E. McCarthy and his alleged relations with Joseph
Kennedy and Richard Nixon. NBC is televising the epic entitled,
"Tall Gunner Joe," budgeted at $1.5 million and written by Lane
Slate as a strange contribution to our Bicentennial. .
Lionel Stander. a near-victim of the McCarthy period of
hysteria and a voluntary exile for almost a quarter of a century,
makes his Hollywood comeback in Robert Chartoff and Irwin
Winkler's production for United Artists, "New York, New York,"
thereby joining Liza Minelli who portrays the central character.
Stander plays the part of an artist's agent, almost the same type of
role for which he won an Oscar nomination in the Janet Gaynor-
Frederic March film, "A Star is Bom". .
HITLER RIDES AGAIN in the 20th Century-Fox television
spectacular, a three-hour epic for ABC written by Lionel Chetwynd
for executive producer Jack Haley, Jr. The teleplay is based on the
premise that Hitler was captured trying to escape from Berlin in
1945 and subsequently tried for war crimes by an international
court of justice. The intriguing yam. from a story idea by Haley
and Ronald Lyon. is titled "The Capture and Trial of Adolf Hitler."
It will do well in Germany. .
Bette Midler, who rose to fame in the Broadway production of
"Fiddler on the Roof," then dazzled theater and concert audiences
with her renditions of the 1940s, '50s and '60s song hits, and is
today the top singer headlining in nightclubs and television as the
nation's top moneymaker in the recording field, has gone Holly-
wood. She is opening an office at the Burbank studios and
developing her own screenplays fashioned by her and her
production executive Aaron Russo. .
LEE STRASBERG, the almost legendary head of Actors
Studio, upon return from his motion picture assignment in
"Cassandra Crossing" abroad, has joined 20th Century-Fox TV
and Four Star International in a joint production deal to present a
series of major plays on Broadway.
fciveRtinq Attention to the Sins of OtheRS
ONE MAN who certainly would have approved
the Iaraeli action was Thomas Jefferson. He
wrote the Declaration of Independence, which was
I adopted on July 4, and he no doubt would have been
very pleased at the saving of the innocent hostages
from the hijackers on that day. What better way could
there be far celebrating the day dedicated to "life,
liberty and the pursuit of happiness?"
Jefferson knew all about these hijackers. In his day,
it flourished in the same section of the world as today.
It was highly popular among the so-called Barbery
states Algeria, Tunis. Morocco and Tripoli. Any ship
^ai/id fickuaAtg
going through the Mediterranean faced the likelihood of
its crew and passsngeri being kidnapped and held for
ransom unless regular tribute was paid to the Barbery
states.
THE BARBARY hijackings were not ended until
1815, when Commodore Decatur paid a visit to Algeria
and taught it the kind of lesson Uganda has just
received.
Some at the United Nations say that while the
rescuing of the hostages is to be commended, the Israeli
action was an aggression against the sovereignty of an
independent state, and so it is to be condemned.
Actually, the beauty of the Iaraeli action lies in this
very thing. It is the governments who allow
hijackers to land and function on their soil who are as
culpable as the hijackers. They make the hijacking
possible Without the government sanction, most of
them would find it impossible to operate.
In the case of Idi Amin, the collusion between his
government and the hijackers is more palpable. Amin
has not only praised Hitler, but imitated him in his
killing of thousands of his own people.


Page 12)
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. August IS, 1976
S
P
C
F
n
P
o
Get
Spirit of Savings '76
at.

ADD TO OR COMPLETE YOUR SERVICE
WITH WEEKLY FEATURES OF THIS
EXQUISITE CHINAWARE OFFER I
EAUTIFUl IMPORTED PORCELAIN CHINA
THIS WEEK'S
FEATURE I
BEAUTIFUL
CUP
0***
0*
49*
I^^EACH
WITH IACM
ss purchase
MATCHING ACCESSOR. PIECES ANOCO ORDINATFI
L- OVENWARE AVAILABLE Al LOW PRICES
FLORIDA LAW
Roquirai all children to bo immuniitd
ogainti; Polio, Moailoi. Diphtheria.
Totanut. Whooping Cough Gorman
Moatloi. boforo ontoring flrtt grado or
kindorgoiion In Saptombor 174.
DON7 WAIT I SEE YOUR DOCTOR
OR HEALTH DfPT. NOW I
Florida's Public Private. School
Immunization law HB 157
Meat or Beef
Franks or Knocks
HYGRADE
BALLPARK
99
i-is.
PKG.
LIMIT TWO PKGS PHASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
k Of $7 00 OH MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES s
REGULAR
OR
DIET
Refreshing
Pepsi-Cola
A BUS.M ^V Dl
PLUS
DEPOSIT
* LIMIT ONE 4 PACK PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASE I
k OE 17 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
/fern Utk wish StsrsNJ
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU
SAT. AUGUST 14 AT ALL
PANTRY PRIDE STORES FROM
FT. PEIRCE TO KEY WEST
c
[Basic
rBantain
+ CUSTOMER MAY PURCHASE ONE OR All THE STARRED ITEMS WITH OTHER
" PURCHASES OF $7.00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
WITH OUR
U.S. GOV'T. GRADE. U.S.D.A. CHOICE BEEF CUTS
USDA
[choice!
Our U.S.D.A. Choice Beef Cuts are guaranteed to be naturally tender and
juicy, nature's own woy. never chemically treated In any mannerl
U.S.D.A. CHOICE WESTERN CORN FED ^
Beef Rib Steak *
Small End Bnls. "
U.S.D.A. CHOICE BEEF CHUCK
Blade Steak
79
WESTERN
CORN FED
USDA
CHOICE
U.S.D.A. CHOICE BEEF ROUND
Btm. Round Roast
$119
WESTERN
CORN FED
SAVE 20
Pantry Pride
Saltines
29
I-LB.
BOX
* LIMIT ONE SOX PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
Of S' 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES 1
Purex
Bleach
49'
GALION
JUG
* LIMIT ONE GALLON PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
Of $7 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
CARNATION NON-DAIRY
Coffee-Mate
$J49
22-OZ.
JAR
(urn 1
(umumj
II illII PIN! loan ^.
Disinfectant '.,' 39c
$e27
IA-OI > % i
CAN A
' o; $ %
. CAN A
05
ft PSA* A WASH
Soil A Stain Remover
Dli KiOuft MMM
Nestle's Quik
Fi.iNOI Ml I^INC
Gold Medal Flour b..' 79
iiiiii
Rich n Chips ;.o'97c
Vanilla Hydrox V..r69*
SOP I INI AUIOIA
Bath Tissue 2 r49c
ai toil ant
Gala Towels \tt 59c
ftfOtmv
Sauerkraut
IA-OI
CAM
33*
MtPAa _
Waste Basket Bags ^ 89(
Hefty Waste Bags SS' 79*
Hefty Kitchen Bags?.V 1"
CIAMIIIIT IUKI COOIAU m ^ --
Ocean Spray............. V *249
u 1 0 A CHOKI Wf tl COIN 110
Beef Brisket -
29
Shoulder Steak Bnls .$149
U.t O.A. CHOICI Wl 51 COIN no. Illl IOUNO _
Eye Round Roast ,. '1
U 5 a A CHOKI WIST. COIN MO HI! LOW _
Sirloin Steaks ... $17
89
U.S.D.A. CHOKI Will. COIN MO. Ill' LOW
Porterhouse Steaks.
U.t.O.A CHOKI WIST. COIN MO llll C #
Round Rump Roast 1
HntH
Ground Beef Chuck 99*
U.I.O.A. CHOKI *lll COIN MO
Cuba Steak Bnls flw
HA. CM UMPPIC piimhim llliM
Whole Fryers n 49*
HA OO UMPPIO PIIMHIM III1H
Fryer Parts 99*
im*iii Met
. 59*
IMAM* W1IIKII wwoti mini W MAI
HA. CM 1HWMD PIIMIUM III 1H
Fryer Quarters
PANTRY PRIDE COLORED PROCESS CHEESE FOOD
American Singles
99'
A v All AH I Al STOMl WITH SllVICf COO%llll
All lUNCM MIATt AMD CHUMS tl ICIO tO
SLACK FOREST GERMAN STYLE SOLOCNA
Cooked Salami, .r.iA69c
ritCOHlIM tMII COIOMO CM ll ^^ .
American Cheese 5T 85*
Iinn IQtHH AT***,
Salami or Bologna Hr.'89*
IMIUIIC IMPORT!* MOIWIWAM _, _
Swiss Cheese 3! $1 '*
ICH > All WM1I AM A I
Chicken Roll_______it* 89*
Muenster Cheese IB 89*
TOP QUALITY WESTERN
Cantaloupes
2t95c
GARDEN FRESH U.S. NO. I YELLOW
Onions... 3.-49
OAIMN III1M |IOCCMINI)
Green Squash ..
All PUtPOM U.t. I
Potatoes !
TOP OUA1IIT IAIOI till
Florida Avocados
flRST Of THE SEASON C All!
Bartlett Pears
TOP OUAIIIr llltM Af*>4*A#
Florida Limes 8--* 69*
tOP OUAIIIT IOI IAIHM Ol COOHMMJ OIANNT tMIIH
..........................____3 us A
iAIAO till IUM
Ripe Tomatoes 6 Sst 39*
ii
AO
69*
49*
39*
Apples
mm
eT
Nectarines
2*1
TOP QUALITY
CALIFORNIA
EXTRA LARGE
70 SERIES
PICK
YOUR
OWN
ot.
CONI
rlMNOSMIP MIKIOUt
Buttermilk
powm w ....
Low Fat Milk St *ln
HO-tUNCIAPlllUII Ol -
Orange Juice 4 con'. 1
IAI1 COIOMO C Al I o
American Singles ST*!
All HAVCMI
Kraft's Ready Dips
MA XI C UP SO I _.
Parkay Margarine 59*
AllllOO 1 CIIAAUD J iq
Cottage Cheese Vti 13"
IOI
CUP
LAND O FROST SLICED
Smoked Meats
39'
i
ssnc
IIKI i
ALL VARIETIES
30Z.
PKG.
OKA* MATH WMMIt AMD
Franks....................
i4i| !
no A
OKAO MATH tlKIO Mil Ol
l|.e
Beef Bologna ST.' 69*
SlAllt* OINUHtl
Sliced Dried Beef p?.' 79*
I IW NAIIOMA1 HOtHII MKKMT
Salami or Bologna Wrlm
IICH1IU1.I1
Leaner Wieners HT 69*
Braunschweiger___^89*
SARA LEE
Frozen Pound Cake
89c
10V.-OZ.
PKG.
1INOII All VAINIHt | IN A PIC
Frozen Bagels
10 IIOIIN
Hawaiian Punch
iioriN mm mi*
Enchilada Dinner
PAIIO IIOIIN
Combination Dinner
ll-OI.
PUS
u-oi
CAN
II Ol
P*
39*
65*
65*
65*
*?ieJt WUtd 0*uto/
MEYER'S ENGLISH ^-. -^ -^
Bunin$..3T870
""ill MMM
Split Top Bread 3 S.I 1
All FIAVORS
Les Cal
PANTRY PRIDE WIDE
Sliced
Old Milwaukee
' -
' API
FROZtNSKINlFSS ft BONIIISS
Perch Fillets
Wl RESERVE THE RIOMT TO LMMT QUANTITIES MONI SOLD TO DEALERS


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EHK0WEVI8_DGU0BL INGEST_TIME 2013-05-24T21:23:44Z PACKAGE AA00014307_00151
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES