The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00148

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
vJentish ficridiann
6 Number 14
and SIIQFAU OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood, Florida Friday, July 2, 1976 o Fr.d k. snoch.t Fn<+y, mv 2, ten Price 25 cents
lonald Klein To Be New Jewish Federation Director
H. Klein, assistant ex
vice chairman of the
United Jewish Appeal
York City, has been
I to succeed Robert A.
t as executive director
[Jewish Federation of
Iroward.
king the announcement,
on president Lewi E.
d that Klein will as-
new position Aug. 1.
ire excited and delight-
Jon Klein will be join-
_ South Broward," said
pVi are sure that his
enence in Jewish com-
ife will bring us to even
greater, more dynamic heights
than in years past. He and his
wife, Thea, are welcome addi-
tions to our community."
Klein comes to Hollywood
with an impressive background
of experience in Jewish com-
munal life. From 1971 to 1973
his responsibilities at the UJA
office focused on general super-
vision and executive adminis-
tration. His most recent posi-
tion, as national campaign di-
rector, was to develop national
leadership, and coordinate fund-
raising.
Prior to his association with
the UJA, Klein was campaign
director of the Jewish Com-
munity Federation of Cleveland,
assistant executive director of
he Jewish Federation of
Youngstown in Ohio, and a fac-
ulty member of the Depart-
ment of Sociology of Youngs-
town University.
He received his Masters' in
social work from Columbia Uni-
versity and his Bachelor of Arts
from City College of New York.
He is a member of the Na-
tional Association of Social
Workers, the board of direc-
tors of the National Association
of Jewish Communal Organiza-
tion Professionals, and the In-
ternational Conference of Jew-
ish Communal Services.
"I see a tremendous poten-
tial for continued community
development in South Brow-
ard," Klein said. "Obviously
there is a concerned and com-
mitted population in the area.
I look forward to the challenge,
the responsibilities and the fur-
ther development of close vol-
unteer and professional part-
nerships in providing needed
services for our population in
South Broward and overseas."
Robert Pearlman leaves to
accept a position with UJA in
New York City, where he work-
ed before coming to South
Broward.
ft -
i
V
[rirnward children are off to an adventurous sum-
activities at the new Michael-Ann Russell Jew-
nmunity Center in North Miami Beach. Eight as-
piring dancers practiced under the direction of qualified
teenage counselors during one recent day's events.
NEW PIES/DEWT
Board of Rabbis Elects Dr. Malavsky
t
[MORTON MALAVSKY
Private
Dissent
^enOkay
'YORK (JTA) Rep-
rove members of the
*J> Jewish community
elmingly support "free
pion of the widest variety
"ntinued on Pace 2
The Broward County Board
of Rabbis has elected Dr. Mor-
ton Malavsky, spiritual leader
of Temple Beth Shalom, as pres-
ident for the coming year.
In accepting the presidency,
Dr. Malavsky, 49, said, "I look
forward to a very productive
year for the local Jewish spir-
itual leaders and their congre-
gations, working in a harmo-
nious and beneficial manner.
We shall continue the good
work begun by our predeces-
sors: emphasis will be placed
upon better understanding
among faiths, a closer rapport
and relationship with Israel
and, above all, a united voice
in our ever-growing commu-
nity."
Dr. Malavsky succeeds Rabbi
Robert Frazin of Temple Solel
His other oficers for this year
are Rabbi Samuel Jaffe of Tem-
ple Beth El, vice president;
Rabbi Avrom Drazin of Temple
Israel in Miramar, treasurer,
and Rabbi Morris Skop of Tem-
ple Sholom in Pom pa no Beach,
secretary
Dr. Malavsky soon begins his
14th year as spiritual head of
Temple Beth Shalom and his
congregation has grown to be
one of the prominent Conserva-
tive synagogues in Florida, with
600 families and more than
1,200 children.
In addition to his work at
Temple Beth Shalom, Dr. Mal-
avsky is a member of the Jew-
ish Federation of South Brow-
ard board of directors and its
education and day school com-
mittees. For the past five years
he has helped arrange tours to
Israel and a the teen tour
chairman for Broward County
Jewish youth. He has served
as president or tne Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami,
of Histadrut and of the Jewish
National Fund.
He and his wife, Celia, have
three children and six grand-
children.
Broward Jews to Attend
This Year in Jerusalem'
"To be with the people of Israel is to sense the
eternity of the Jewish people."
Abraham Joshua Heschel
Mo.e than 2,000 Jews from
the United States including
70 from South Broward are
expected to participate in the
"This Year in Jerusalem" mia-
: ion. Oct. 21 to 31, for the Doit-
ed Jewish Appeal national con-
ference.
According to local chairman
of the mission, Nat Pritcher, the
ob Pur 3
DONALD H. KLEIN
Robert HiUer
To Headline
Conference
Robert I. Miller, executive
vice president of the Jewish
Charities and Welfare Fund in
Baltimore and one of the na-
tion's leading experts in Jewish
communal service, will high-
light the leadership retreat of
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward next month, said pres-
ident Lewis E. Cohn.
The retreat, July 30 to Aug.
1 at Palm-Aire Spa and Coun-
try Club in Pompano Beach,
will be an intensive weekend
filled with evaluation of past
activities, development of fu-
ture campaigns and educational
forums.
"This is a very important
event in the community," said
Cohn. "We are very lucky to
have Robert HiUer and other
outstanding recognized national
personalities committed to our
retreat."
In addition to Hiller, three
other speakers will address the
Federation leadership group:
State Rep. Elaine Bloom (D.,
North Miami Beach), who is
credited with being an active
force behind major Florida Edu-
cation bills, will analyze the im-
plication of recent state and
national political events; Joel
Breslau, national chairman of
the United Jewish Appeal in
Washington, D.C., will head the
Saturday night session; and
Dr. Joseph Cohen, field service
consultant of the Council of
Jewish Federation and Welfare
Funds in New York City, will
talk on Jewish education.
Other participants include
Florida Regional Director of the
United Jewish Appeal, Sy Mar-
golis, local Federation president
Lewis E. Cohn, Dr. Meron Levi-
tats and Moses Hornstein, both
members of the Federation
Board of Directors, and Reva
Wexler, national United Jewish
Appeal campaign consultant and
director of the South Broward
Women's Division.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridum and Snotar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, July 2, 1976
Liiria G)chairing Bonds Business Seminars Students to Tour Israel
Business and community lead-
er Leonard Luria is to be co-
chairman of the "Businessman
to Businessman" seminars that
will highlight the Israel Bond
Organization's International Fall
Leadership Planning Conference
at the Beverly Hilton in Los
Angeles. Sept. 10 to 12.
Announcement of Luria's ap-
pointment was made by Gary
Gerson, Greater Miami general
campaign chairman, who said,
"The purpose of these Business-
man to Businessman seminars
is to bring together leaders of
major industries to consider in-
vestment possibilities in Israel
and to discuss participation
through corporate dinners and
other events in the Israel Bonds
program.
"Mr. Luria has demonstrated
his leadership in this import-
ant area of Israel Bond efforts
as a leading representative of
the catalogue industry, having
served as a national cochair-
man of that industry's successful
dinner on behalf of Israel Bonds
a few months ago."
OTHER ISRAEL Bond leaders
who will head the Miami dele-
gation are Robert L. Siegel,
executive committee chairman.
Rabbi Leon Kronish. Israel
Bonds national campaign co-
chairman, and Mihon M. Par-
son, executive director of the
South Florida Israel Bond Or-
ganization.
Businessman to Businessman
seminars will include panel dis-
cussions relating to such key
industries as apparel and tex-
tiles, construction and real es-
tate, food and beverage, metals
and machinery, department
stores, catalogue and finance.
The conference will open with
a luncheon plenary session on
Friday, Sept. 10, and will in-
clude Sabbath services and a
Sabbath dinner, and a banquet
on Saturday, Sept. 11. honoring
members of the Prime Minis-
ter's Club. The concluding ses-
sions will be on Sunday, Sept.
12, winding up with the Sunday
evening Ambassador's Gala.
Heading the International Fall
Leadership Planning Conference
are Sam Rothberg, State of Is-
rael Bonds national general
chairman, and Michael Arnon,
Israel Bonds worldwide presi-
dent.
Private Dissent Seen Okay
Continued from Page 1
of views and opinions on Israel's
policies." At the same time, they
believe such expressions should
be confined to the Jewiah com-
munity lest they "give aid and
comfort" to Israel's enemies.
That consensus was reported
here by Rabbi Alexander M.
Schindler, chairman of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations.
RABBI SCHINDLER disclos-
ed at a press conference at Jew-
ish Agency headquarters here
that the Presidents Conference
held a meeting last week with
more than 100 representatives
of Jewish groups, including
"hawks" and "doves," in an ef-
fort to ascertain the attitude
within the American Jewish
community with respect to Is-
'Seniors' Learn Defensive Driving
The American Association of
Retired Persons (AARP), chap-
ter 222S, will sponsor a Defen-
sive Driving Course at the
Jewish Community Center for
Senior Adults. 2838 Hollywood
JCC Adds
Free Movies
Something new has been add-
ed to the regular program at
the Jewish Community Center
for Senior Adults at 2838 Holly-
wood Blvd. It's free movies, to
be shown throughout the sum
mer from 1 to 3 p.m. on Wednes-
days.
Documentaries, travelogues
and other short films of inter-
eat are on schedule; the public
is invited.
Friday's regular "Seniors"
discussio.i group, which begins
at noon, has received good re-
sponse and will continue
throughout the summer, said
Elaine Goldstein, Senior Adults
program supervisor. Folk danc-
ing follows the talk, from 1 to
3 p.m.
For further information, call
921-6511.
Blvd. Four sessions, from 9:30
to 11:30 a.m.. will be given
Monday. July 12, Thursday.
July IS, Monday. July 19. and
Thursday. July 22.
Charge for the course is S3
for AARP members, $5 for non
members. Fees include a book
and certificate.
Reservations must be made
as space is limited. Call Elaine
Goldstein at 921-6511 for reg-
istration and additional infor-
mation.
rael's policies.
At that meeting, Rabbi Eu-
gene Borowitz, of Hebrew Union
College, a member of the "dove-
ish" Breira group, spoke in
favor of a policv that would
encourage dissent and criticism
of certain Israeli policies.
Rabbi FaJ)ian Schonfeld, for-
mer president of the Rabbinical
Council of America, who sup-
oorts the militant Gush Emu-
nim in Israel, argued against
that oosition. Rabbi Schindler
reported.
ACCORDING to Rabbi Schin-
dler, "The overwhelming opin-
ion of the more than 100 rep-
resentatives who attended was
to support free expression of
the widest variety of views and
opinions on Israel's policies
provided that such views were
voiced within the Jewish com-
munity."
In fact. Rabbi Schindler said,
American Jews have a "respon-
sibilitv to express their views
to their organizations so that
those views may. in turn, be
communicated to the govern-
ment and people of Israel."
Rabbi Schindler said, how-
ever, that "the near unanimous"
ooinion at the meeting was that
when Jewish dissent is made
miblic in the daily press or in
the halls of government.
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With Rabbis Malavsky, Jaffe
Twelve South Broward teen-
agers are participating in a
summer tour of Israel under the
direction of Rabbis Morton Mal-
avsky and Samuel Jaffe.
The tour left from Fort Laud-
erdale International Airport
June 28. After a short stopover
in New York, the students de-
parted for Tel Aviv and visits
to the Upper Galilee, Golan
Heights, Jerusalem, Haifa, Yad
Vashem. Mount Scopus. Reho-
voth, the Western Wall, Hebron,
Masada, TTestern Galilee, Cae-
sarea and Tiberias. The tour
will be completed with a trip to
Amsterdam and London. The
students will return home July
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DOES YOUR ORGANIZATION DO FUND RAISING??
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26.
Tour members include Beth
Ann, daughter of Mr. and Mrs
James Fox Miller; Michael, sen
of Mr. and Mrs. Robert M
Baer: Li.n, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Ross BeCKerman; Michael
jnd Frank, sons of Mr. and
Mrs. Jack Strick; Michel*
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Sam-
uel Jaffe; Valerie, daughter of
Dr. and Mrs. Rubin Klein; Da-
vid, son of Mr. and Mrs. Herb-
ert Topol; Roberto, son of M>.
and Mrs. Theodore Bollt; Bon-
nie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Irwin Goldstein, Donna, daught-
er of Mr. and Mrs. J. Nabridge;
and Karen, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Martin Bertman
Kissinger 'Okays'
French in Lebanon
-If They9re Wanted
PARIS (JTA) Secretary of State Henry A. Kij
singer said here that he approved the dispatch of French
troops to Lebanon as a peace-keeping force "if all factions
want this," and also favored holding a round-table confer-
Kissinger stated his views after an hour-long meetinj
ence in Paris to resolve the Lebanese conflict
with President Valery Giscard D'Estaing at the Elysee Palace
The French offer earlier this month to send troops to
Lebanon was rejected by all parties there.
Kissinger and Giscard discussed the Lebanese crisii
at length, official sources said here. They said the Secre
tary was generally non-committal and stressed that it wa
up to the Lebanese themselves to settle their problems.
Kissinger flew to Bonn Wednesday for talks with WesQ
German leaders and with Prime Minister John Vorster
South Africa who is visiting there.
American sources here said they knew of no plans fo
Kissinger to meet with Israeli Foreign Minister Yigal Allo
who was also due in West Germany this week.
Riverside's
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mr-t-w


cridav-July 2, 1976
The Jewish FloridUm and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Herman, Kaye Attend 'Community' Meeting
jack Berman, a member of
the Community Relations Com-
mittee of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward, and Sumner
G Kaye. assistant executive di-
rector of the Federation, repre-
sented this area at the National
Jewish Community Relations
Advisory Council meeting, June
27 and 30, in Louisville, Ky.
The conference was designed
to plan joint programming, on
a national scale for Federations
around the country.
A session on "Israel: The In-
ternational Situation and Pro-
spects for Peace" was held un-
der the direction of Simcha
Commerce Dept.
Will Delete Arab
Inspired Queries
NEW YORK (JTA) Rabbi
Arthur Hertzberg, president of
the American Jewish Congress,
announced that the Department
of Commerce will prohibit
American companies doing busi-
ness with Arab states from re-
sponding to questions about
whether they are involved in
pro-Israel activities, such as the
United Jewish Appeal.
Hemberg said the Depart-
ment acted in response to a let-
ter on the subject from Lois
Waldman, assistant director of
the AJCongress Commission on
Law and Social Action.
HE MADE public a letter of
Apr. 5 from Rauer H. Mayer,
director of the Commerce De-
partment's Office on Export
Administration, declaring that
"exporters and related service
organizations would be prohi-
bited from responding to such
inouiries."
Hertzberg said, "We are gra-
tified that our government has
responded positively to our re-
quest and nrohibited American
exporters from replying to
questions about Jewish meet-
ings they attend or Jewish or-
ganizations they support."
Hertzberg observed that Arab
discrimination against Jews and
their boycott of all who support
Israel "poses a dangerous threat
to the quality of citizenship of
American Jews and, indeed, to
all Americans."
HE WARNED that 'Tf the
Arab states are permitted to im-
pose their anti-Jewish and anti-
Israel policies on an American
economy eager for Arab trade,
the very principles of equality
and religious liberty which have
made our country great will be
gravely imperiled."
Hertzberg said that was the
reason President Ford promul-
gated his order last November
barring exporters from taking
any action that discriminates
against American citizens on
grounds of race, religion, ser
or national origin.
HE SAID some 3,000 Amer
ican firms are believed to be
cooperating in the boycott and
those doing so would lose their
eligibility for foreign tax credit,
tax deferral on foreign source
income and domestic interna-
tional corporation benefits for
one tax year if the bill becomes
law.
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MICHAEL J. HAIMO, M.D.
announces the relocation
of his office
for the practice of General Surgery
Medical-Dental Center Suite 210
2301 N. University Drive, Pembroke Pines, Fla.
Telephone 963-1800
Dinitz, Israel's Ambassador to
the United States.
Dr. Benjamin R. Epstein, na-
tional director of the Anti-De-
famation League of B'nai B'rith,
and Bertram H. Gold, executive
vice president of the American
Jewish Committee, spoke on
June 27 during a general ses-
sion.
Other discussions centered on
organizing support for endan-
gered Jews in the Soviet Union
and elsewhere, conflicts of
scheduled public events with
the Sabbath and Jewish holi-
days, and use of audiovisual
materials for community rela-
tions.
Betty Friedan, author of "The
Feminine Mystique," addressed
the conference June 29 with
Dr. Benjamin Z. Kreitman, of
the United Synagogue of Amer-
ica and Carol Dragul, president
of the Jewish Community Re-
lations Council of Cincinnati.
Their topic was "The Struggle
for Equality of Women's
Rights."
"We hope to integrate our lo
cal programs with national ob-
jectives," Kaye said.
Stars to Spark
Ambassador's Gala
Highlighting the Sept. 10 to
12 International Fall Leadership
Planning Conference in Los
Angeles will be the Ambassa-
dor's Gala on Sunday evening.
Sept. 12. under the patronage
of Israel's Ambassador to the
United States, Simcha Dinitz.
The announcement was made
by Gary Gerson, who pointed
out that "The Conference will
be held for the first time in Los
Angeles as a salute to that city's
Jewish community's stellar role
in the Israel Bond program."
Gerson also said that numerous
Hollywood celebrities will parti-
cipate in the event, including
Robert Alda, Jack Carter. Henry
Fonda. Glenn Ford. Zaa Zsa Ga-
bon Marilyn and Stacy Keach,
Gene Kellv. Cloris Leachman.
Ida Luninc. Groucho Marx and
Cesar Romero and others.
Purchasers of $10,000 or more
in Israel Bonds will be initiated
as Founder-Members of the
Ambassador's Society of Trus-
tees in a special ceremony.
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SUMNER G. KAYE
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Broward Jews to Attend
'This Year in Jerusalem'
Continued from Page 1
trip will be one that will be ex-
tremely memorable for those
attending.
"This is a great opportunity
for South Broward Jews to ex
perience their heritage in Is-
rael with fellow Jews from all
over the United States," said
Pritcher. "We are looking for-
ward to the trip with great an-
ticipation."
Activities of the Mission will
include a march to Jerusalem's
Liberty Bell Park for a greet-
ing by Mayor Teddy Kollek
symbolizing the historical link
between America and Israel in
America's Bicentennial year; a
lecture by Israel's foremost ar-
chaeologist, Yigael Yadin; and
a dialogue at Israeli universi-
ties on the Torah, Hasidism. ar-
chaeology, Jewish history, agri-
culture, the Holocaust, and con-
temporary world Jewry.
Besides meetings with na-
tional political leaders, tours
through Jerusalem are also
planned as well as trips to the
Western Wall, Yad Vashem Me-
morial, the Israel Museum and
small settlements in the coun-
try.
Reservations are still avail-
experience," said Pritcher. In-
dividuals as well as couples
are welcome. For more infor-
mation, contact Sumner Kaye
able for this "once-in-a-lifetime
or Nat Pritcher at 921-8810.
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Fridy July 2, 1976
French Opportunism
It is interesting to note that while President Kat-
zir was visiting Queen Elizabeth and Prime Minister
Callaghan in London last week, in Paris Israel's Health
Minister Victor Shemtov was being entertained by Pre-
mier Jacques Chirac.
On its face, this seems like a rosy diplomatic sit-
uation. Actually, the Shemtov visit was in lieu of a
trip to France by President Katzir after Katzir can-
celled it early in May.
The cancellation came when he made public the
plans for his arrival by President Valery Giscard
D'Estaing. To put it bluntly, Katzir accused D'Estaing
of snubbing him.
Of course, quite properly, the French denied that
any snub was intended. But the fact is that Katzir did
not change his mind.
The fact is that France continues her crude dip-
lomacy in Europe and the Middle East, betraying al-
lies left and right and cozying up to the Arabs when-
ever she can.
The Meloy Murder
Apart from the tragedy itself there is a lesson to
be learned in the senseless murder of U.S. Ambassador
Meloy in Lebanon last week.
For one thing it emphasizes what we have said in
these columns countless times before and that has still
to sink into the minds of observers of the civil war
there: that the war is not a religious war but a Leftist
revolution.
For another, it defines the extent of terrorism as
an instrument of the Arab activist.
If by now it is still not understood why Israel con-
tinues to occupy the territories she conquered in the
1967 war, if by now there still are flatulent politicians
around and opportunistic journalists who continue to
call Israel's position "intransigent," then surely the
Meloy murder, as well as the murders of his economic
advisor and chauffeur, ought to explain it.
The fact is that the Arab war against Israel is mere-
ly one arena in the larger Leftist struggle in the Middle
East. Israel has refused to evacuate territories without
a basic statement of principle from her Arab opponents
that they are finally willing to acknowledge the right of
Israel to exist as a free and independent nation.
Absurdists on the international political scene, in-
cluding diplomats and dense journalists, who fail to
recognize the relationship between the ceding of terri-
tory and the recognition principle, also fail to under-
stand the larger Arab revolutionary design for the Mid-
dle East that not even the Arab petrobillionaires, who
would fall like Israel would fall should the revolution-
aries win, are prepared to acknowledge publicly.
The Meloy murder teaches the lesson. Now it must
be learned. Those who fail to learn it, particularly the
Ford administration, do the Russians' work, for it is only
they who stand to gain from continuing terrorism in the
Middle East.
A United American Jewry
Rabbi Arthur Hertzberg, president of the American
Jewish Congress, has recently pointed out that Zionism
and support of Israel have become the "religion" of
American Jewry.
In fact, Hertzberg noted that being an anti-Zionist
Jew is almost "an excommunicable offense" in the Amer-
ican Jewish community. "You can eat 'chazir' on Yom
Kippur, but you can be excommunicated in any small
Jewish community for not giving to the UJA," he
quipped.
There is some truth in the last facetious remark.
While the majority of American Jews may be lacking in
the knowledge of Zionist ideology purists demand, there
is no question of their support for the State of Israel.
Port Authority Evangelism Here
*Jemsti Meridian
OKP1CE and IM^ANT 111 N E HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Trlsohon* I7S-4W5
P.O Box W.l. Miami. Florida 1*101
FKED K SHDCHKT SfZAXNE SHOCHET SEI>MA M THOMPSON
Editor nnd Publisher Executive Editor Assistant to Publisher
All P.O. 3.".7!< returns are to be forwarded to
The Jewish Flnrldlan. PO Box ll7I. Miami. Fla 31101.
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published Rl-Weekly
S'-rond Class J'nrtage Paid nt Miami. Fla
Jewish Federation of South Brouard. Inc. SHOFAR EDITORIAL
ADVISORY COMMITTEE Nathan Prltcher. Chairman: I,ewls E. Cohn:
Melvln H Baer; Dr. Samuel Meline. D.M.D
C Fred K. Shochot Friday. Jwlv 2. 1*70
The Jewish Floridian has sbsorbed tht Jewish Unity and the Jewish Wsskly
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Art* Feature syndicate.
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association. American Associa-
tion of English Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Pros* Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) OtM Yasr IS.00. OM of TawN Uaaw
| HAVE just read that "If you
pray to God, and you break
God's laws, He promises Hell."
On the other hand, "If you
pray thru (sic) Jesus, He prom-
ises Heaven and forgives you
for breaking God's laws."
Naively. I thought we were a
bit more enlightened these days
that we were beginning to
come through the darkness of
archaic medieval nightmares
intended to keep men bound to
the Great Chain of Being with
Leo
Mindlin
-menace 1*6.
h**gl!
Friday, July 2, 1976
Volume 6
4 TAMUZ S736
Number 14
Galileo, for daring to teach his
master's astrophysics defining
our solar system in mathemati-
cal terms rather than in the
jingoisms of casuistry.
THE TORQUEMADAS, the
inquisitors, the blind-eyed cru-
saders all of them always
and forever burned, imprison-
ed and tortured the Galileos
and the Brunos because they
could not tolerate real truth.
The princes of Christianity
took the Hand of God to use
as if it were their own hand to
punish those who saw God in
other than fairy tale terms for
the crib and for the swaddled
mind of the nursery.
They killed Jews by the un-
told millions throughout his-
tory.
To judge by these paragraphs
I have just read, Torquemada
is not dead. He and his hire-
lings are still trying to do their
thing.
THE TEXT in which I read
these paragraphs about God
and Jesus and Hell includes
several illustrations: among
them, a lone Star of David and
then a second Star of David,
miniaturized, upon a cross,
hangs crucified, we are meant
to understand, in the same way
that Jesus was crucified.
THE LESSON that emerges
is the lesson I was taught a
thousand times as a youngster
on the streets of northern cities
by the fists of a thousand name-
less, faceless, anonymous, hate
filled children themselves
taught the lesson by their par-
ents of the "new Judaism" cru-
cified upon a cross of Jewish
"obstinacy" that "rejected" Je-
sus who "promises Heaven and
forgives vou for breaking God's
laws."
God, of course, is Jehovah,
whom Christians in their zeal-
ous theft of our literature, his-
tory, customs, theology, phil-
osophy and religion, love to de-
fine for us as "wrathful," "pu-
nitive" and a whole bunch of
other nonsensical things.
The cllncner in the para-
graphs 1 read is this: "For fur-
ther research and development,
consult a modern version (writ-
ten in today's language rather
than a language not spoken
for hundreds of years) of the
Holy Bible, Old and New Tes-
tament."
I UNDERSTAND the refer-
ence to Latin for the New Tes-
tament unspoken not for
hundreds, but for thousands of
years (an example in itself of
the multituue of inaccuracies in
which Christian commentators
indulge when they talk about
the Bible).
But Hebrew for the Old? Is
Hebrew not spoken today? Is
it not the mucilage that for two
millenia and more bound Jews
to the very past that the thieves
thought they stole from us?
Are the writers of these par-
agraphs saying a modern ver-
sion is more faithful to the orig-
inal than the original itself?
THAT IS exactly what Chris-
tianity has been telling us, for
example, about Isaiah, their fa-
vorite prophet, since first
Christianity usurped him and
corrupted him to suit them-
selves.
Just as I have no intention
of attempting to deal with the
answer to the question of who
and what God is, I really have
no intention of fighting that old
fight here between Jewish and
Christian viewpoints concern
ing just what Judaism is.
All I want to say is that these
paragraphs, these sentiments I
have just read, offend me. They
are anti-Semitic, replete with
the shackles of fear, sun I
tion and downright ignoVaS"
I thought we had long sin*
given up on imprisoning th,l
minds of men. m "1
I DO not mean here to deni-j
grate the notion of God andl
man, which is one of the an-1
blest and most poetic in thel
history of intellectual thought I
The concept of God and man,
elevates humanity above menil
mere physical nature. It exahil
him to the limits of his imagj.1
nation. It is a way, if I may
say, to his most divine aspira-l
tion.
Man, through God and manj
creates the beauty of art. He I
dares, through science, to reach
into space and the cosmos. He
strives, through the acquisition!
of his own knowledge, to ap-
proach both the breadth and
the breath of revealed knowl-l
edge.
IN STRUGGLING toward God.l
man is annointed as a creature I
unique beyond all other crta
hires with which he shares his I
.-arthly existence.
The question is who andl
what is God. It is a question I
with which I do not intend to I
wrestle here other than to sayl
that the absurdities about Goal
which I have just read and quot-f
ed in my opening paragraphs!
have nothing to do with God ail
all. They have nothing to del
with inspiration and aspiration [
They are not truths; they are!
dogmas. They are the stuff oil
which the Spanish Inquisition!
was made. And TorquemadaT
And the fools who burned Joanl
at the stake. And who bumed|
Giordano Bruno, the student
all the mildew of anti-Semiti
lying on them like a fungus
what purports to be the humanj
intellect divinely inspired.
AND SO the crux of the mat
ter is not really what the par
agraphs say I have heart
that song before but witl
where I found them.
I was driving through thafl
exit gates of Miami Intern*
tional Airport on a lovely 7 am
morning the other day. I pai
my toll and was handed a fi
bilingual magazine calli
"Places" ("Lugares").
"Places" is published by In
formation Publication Corpora
tion and by "The Grace oi
God," who lives at PO Box
3178, Miami.
MIAMI International Airpori
is part of the Miami Port An
thority, which is financed
my taxes. I do not want
taxes to contribute to the dis
semination of such tomfoolery
I suspect the publishers mea
no offense in reproducing thes
ancient malevolent canards
"The Grace of God," they art
merely passing on His word i
they see it just like the kid
on the streets used to pass i
on with their fists, their knee
their feet when I was young
But not as I see it. and that
the point. "The Grace of God
is entitled to do what it choose!
on their own premises, not <^
the public's.
Since when has tne Mian
Port Authority gone evangel
ical?

Funeral Services
For Latin Jew
BUENOS AIRES (JTA) Funeral services werj
held at the Jewish cemetery here June 8 for Dr.
Akerman, a prominent physician who was kidnapped by ui
known persons June 4 and subsequently murdered, f
bullet-riddled body was thrown from a car.
His hands were tied behind his back. Dr. Akerman
resident of the suburb of Don Torcuato, was a gynecologic
who practiced at several private clinics and in the Jew*
hospital, Ezrah.


The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
P8C 5
This&ar
in Jerusalem
October 21-31,1976
ISRAEL a land a history a culture -
a people.
THIS YEAR IN JERUSALEM is more
than a Mission to Israel.Thousands of
Americans will join hands in a show oi
solidarity with the people o( Israel.
You can be there.The excitement begins
on Thursday, October 21 when our own 747
Jumbo Jet departs Miami for a direct flight to
Tel-Aviv.
Highlights of the Mission, which will also
be the United Jewish Appeal National
Conference, include special briefings, guided
tours, meetings with Golda Meir, Yitzhak Rabin,
Shimon Peres and others, university dialogues,
and an unprecedented coming together o(
thousands of Americans and Israelis to show
that WE ARE ONE.'
It could be the start o( the most memorable
ten days of your life.
A deposit check of 1100 per person
(payable to the Jewish Federation of
South Broward) is required to ensure
deluxe accommodations.
4%
For information and reservations contact the
JEWISH FEDERATION of South Broward, Inc.
2138 Hollywood Blvd.. Hollywood. Florido 3302C
I30SI 921-MtO Mtoml Ita* 94 5 0964


Page 6
The Jewish Floridianand Shofar of Greater HoUywood
Friday, July 2, i976
Cantor Mandel to Chant Liturgy
At JWV Convention Services
National Jewish War Veterans
Cantor Emanuel Mandel will
chant the liturgy at the JWV
State and National Conventions
at services on Friday evening,
June 25, and Saturday morning,
June 26, at the Americana Ho-
tel.
The National Convention serv-
ices will be on Friday evening
August 20. and Saturday morn-
ing, August 21, at the Diplomat
Hotel in Hollywood.
Cantor Mandel, of North Mi-
ami Beach, is the High Holiday
Cantor for the twelfth year at
Congregation Ohev Sholom in
Orlando. In- addition to his can-
tonal duties, he is the president
and administrator of the three
Levitt Memorial Chapels in
South Florida.
LETTO TO THE EDITOR
Editor: Jewish Floridian-Shofar:
I assume that many of your
readers heard Golda Meir in-
terviewed on the TV program
"Issues and Answers" on Chan-
nel 10, Sunday, May 30. Also
the report of the AFL-CIO meet-
ing in Washington, at which
she received great honors, just-
ly deserved.
Golda Meir, former Prime
Minister of Israel, handled her-
self extremely well during the
provocative questions present-
ed on the TV program.
In spite of the agreement
whereby Israel turned over the
oil wells and military passes
in the Sinai, Israel has not se-
cured peace offers from any
nation. As a matter of fact, it
is regrettable that more "real
estate" plus a meeting that
would include the PLO are con-
stantly suggested. Some of our
same ideas, putting Israel in a
government officials and news
commentators are repeating the
bad light.
Golda Meir pointed out that
Israel is a sovereign state and
would welcome meeting with
the heads of similar states but
not with the PLO. After all, the
latter group is simply an or-
ganization and its platform is
designed to eliminate Israel.
We need constant contact with
President Ford. Secretary Kis-
singer and our senators and
congressmen. When you consid-
er that 40 percent of the Is-
raeli budget is for defense and
that the Israelis are the heavi-
est taxed people in the world,
it is important that we help,
not only by writing, but by
working on other plans that are
available. It is urgent that we
keep up our efforts right now.
SAM J. PERRY
HOLLYWOOD
Young Leaders Elect Weiss
R. Joel Weiss, a Hollywood
attorney, has been elected
chairman of the Leadership
Development Council of the
Jewish Federation of South
ri reward.
A resident of Hollywood for
the past year, Weiss is a grad-
uate of University of Miami
School of Law and of Temple
University in Philadelphia
where he studied economics.
"Our goal next year is tp
train and educate the future
* leaders of our community and
Federation through exposure tn
influential and dedicated prr>
fessional and lay leaders' said
Weiss.
He is married to the former
Sally Barton of Scranton pa
and they are the parents of
Stefan Craig, 2.
"We are proud of our You
Leaders," said Lewis E. Cohn
president of the Federation'
"and we look forward to a pr^
ductive, creative year with Joel
Weiss as the president of this
vital and enthusiastic group."
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Two New
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Approved
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM ,JTA) The
Ministerial Settlement Commit-
tee has approved the establish-
ment of two new settlements in
the administered territories and
two in Israel proper. But "no
progress" was reported on find-
ing an alternative settlement
site for the illegal Gush Emu-
nim squatters at Kadum in
Samaria.
The Cabinet decided nearly
four weeks ago that the squat-
ters would be offered a site in
an area where new settlements
may be established in accord-
ance with government policy.
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There is no monthly charge beyond the regular basic
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A six-month warranty is included with your purchase
of the phone housing. To assure quality phone service,
the working parts remain the property and responsibility
of Southern Bell. So anytime these parts need repair,
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July 2, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Snojar of Greater Hoilywooa
P*8 7
Cut off and isolated from all knowledge of Jewish re-
a history, culture and traditions, Soviet Jews have
rned that they belong to the Jewish people only from
suits thrown at them on the streets or from conversa-
ons in personnel and staff-management offices.
The Soviet Authorities have deliberately created, and
consciously maintaining, an Institute of Refuseniks,
those who become members suffer a bitter existence.
be refuseniks are hostages and are an intimidating exam-
Lie held before the eyes of other Jews who might think of
oigrating to Israel."
Signed: 20 Leningrad Activists
(In a Message to the International
Conference on Soviet Jewry,
Brussels, Belgium)
it ir iz
Intimidation and anti-Semitism continue to be the
Is which Soviet authorities use.
" Zachar Tesker of Moscow was placed under house
lirrest after he sought to demonstrate with his wife, Rimma,
[against repeated refusals for exit to Israsi.
" Economist Ida Nudel reported an attempt by police
to beat her up and Ilya Shostekovsky of Leningrad was
dismissed from work for seeking a visa and was then
warned he might be tried as a "parasite."
Anti-Jewish articles attacking Israel and exit ap-
plicants by name have appeared in Derbent's local press
and the Jewish cemetery there has been vandalized.
Israeli broadcasts have been jammed. Perhaps
most significant of all is the news that a pardon asked for
Dr. Mikhail Shtern, sentenced to eight years' imprison-
ment and in seriously ill health, was turned down."
From "Soviet Jewry
Action" Newsletter
B'noiB'rrrii Women fleet
Aim Gorin President
Ann Gorin was installed as,
president of B'nai B'rith Wom-I
en of Hillcrest at a recent lunch-'
eon held at the County Club.
Other officers are Mrs. Mary
Dubner, Mrs. Hermina Russell,
Mrs. Kay Berman, Mrs. Rose
Ehrlick, Mrs. Selma Braunstein,
Mrs. Helma Roseno, Mrs. Rose
Glasser, Mrs. Rae Schneeweiss,
Mrs. Rose Ruff and Mrs. May
Wolf. y
Installing the officers was
Mrs. Gertrude Stencel, presi-
dent of Unity Council of Flor-
ida.
Mrs. Hilda Golden, pianist,
provided luncheon music and
Tony Allen entertained.
The Orthodox Rabbinical Council of Greater Miami
(Rabbi AA. Shapiro, Pres.) Proudly Announces That
Hills ORT Installs Mrs. Starr
Mrs. Ben Starr officially be-
came president of the Hillcrest
Hills ORT during a luncheon
it the Hillcrest Country Club.
Her vice presidents and oth-
er officers are Mrs. Maxwell
Rittenberg, honor roll; Mrs.
Harry Schulman, membership;
Mrs. Sidney Miller, education;
Mrs Donald Gravenmier, spe-
cial projects; Mrs. Nathan
Press, treasurer; Mrs. Samuel
Herzlinger, financial secretary;
Mrs. Abe Fellner, patiiamen-
*nan; Mrs. Max Goldman, re-
cording secretary; Mrs. Jade
Rubin, corresponding secretary.
Chairperson for the day was
ws Jack Kerner; cochairper-
M, Mrs. Seymour Shayne.
Hillcrest Bicentennial Singh
ers and Mrs. Harry Golden, pia-
nist, entertained. Mrs. Meyer
Diamond installed the officers.
Couple Honored
Mr. and Mrs. Curt J. Sch-
leimer were accorded a special
tribute at the recent dinner
dance and installation of offi-
cers of Temple Beth Shalom.
A plaque was presented to
the couple for their "untiring
and dedicated service to the
temple throughout the many
years."
NEW!
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CEILING SPRAY
Give New life to OW or Cracked Catting*
tromem HOMK ft NEW CONSTRUCTION
KTIMATf
BOWERS & SONS
Reserve Seats
Members of Temple Beth
Shalom are requested to call
Sylvia S. Gordon, at 981-6111, to
reserve seats for the High Holy
Days. Tickets will be available
during the summer for non-
members; all seats are reserv-
ed for members and non-mem-
bers.
Inquiries, regarding temple
membership are always invited.
Services are conducted in the
Jack Shapiro Chapel (west side
of the main building) at 8 a.m
weekdays; 9 a.m. Saturdays;
7:30 p.m. Fridays; and 7:30 p.m.
weekdays for Mincha Maariv.
K & K KOSHER
CATERERS
3579 Dixie Highway
Ft. Laodordale, Ha.
is now catering for all parties and affairs using only
GLATT KOSHER MEATS
Mike Kuperman, Formerly of
Burnside Caterers of N.Y.
Leonard's of Great Neck, N.Y. is now
bringing his famous catering talent to Florida
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rates are for base season sailing dates and
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Page 8
The Jewish Florithan dnd Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Frtday, July 2,
1971
fWAMA*W'\**WWW^^*^^*VW^VrfW^W*WWV
? Ask Abe ?
by ABE H ALTON
VWW^WV ^"VW^i^fV^*^*
QWhy do we have people
watching the corpse overnight?
Rose Kanowitz
Elizabeth, N.J.
AYour question implies
that the corpse is guarded only
during the night. Actually the
guarding is constant, day and
night, and begins before death.
According to the Kitzur
Schulchan Aruch (The Code of
Jewish Law) codified in the
16th century, "It is a religious
duty to stand near the person
at the time his soul is about to
depart from him" (Vol. 4, chap-
ter 194, paragraph 4).
The requirements for the
handling of the dying person
and the corpse immediately fol-
lowing death, up to and includ-
ing the funeral, is listed in
great detail in The Code of Jew-
ish Law.
Most authorities agree that
the origin and reasons for guar-
ing the corpse are not certain.
According to the Encyclo-
paedia Judaica, Jewish tradi-
tion emphasizes respect for the
dying and the dead.
"A dying person should not
be left alone and it is a great
Mitzvah to be present at the
departure of the soul ... A dead
body should not be left alone,
it must be guarded constantly
whether on week-days or the
Sabbath, until the funeral, and,
in pious circles the Book of
Psalms is continually recited
Various reasons have been ad-
vanced to explain the custom
of watching the dead, which is
apparently very ancient. It may
have originated in a desire to
keep away evil spirits, or to
protect the body from rodents
and body snatchers. It became
a mark of respect for the dead
who must not be left either de-
fenseless or unattended" (En-
cyclopaedia Judaica, Vol. 5, pp.
1425, 1426).
Rabbi Jack D. Spiro, in his
book, "A Time to Mourn, Ju-
daism and the Psychology of
Bereavement," in a paragraph
about guarding the corpse (p.
79), says, "So important was
this service that the person
guarding the body was exempt
from reciting the Shema. Al-
though the rationale given is
that this service was done to
prevent animals and insects
from touching the body, other
sources confirm that the real
purpose was to prevent evil de-
mons from harming the body,
for, should this happen, the
corpse might become angered
and take revenge on the mourn-
ers and attendants for not pro-
tecting it properly. During the
middle ages, a special prayer
was recited repeatedly, an
acrostic of the forty-two letter
name of God. The attendants
of the corpse believed that
through such obsessive repe-
tition, the corpse was protect-
ed from outside harm, and they,
too, were protected from the
dead person's ire.
"It was crucial to watch the
corpse closely from death to
burial, since it was during that
period when the spirits actual-
ly entered the corpse. It was
therefore necessary to take
great precautions. While the
original custom was based on
law, we see that it was gradual-
ly elaborated due to fear of the
dead."
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Mapam at Political Crossrom
By UZI BENZIMAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Knesset member Haika Gross-
man, who made her name as a
Jewish resistance fighter in the
Byalistok Ghetto, is one of the
leaders of an influential group
within Mapam which is fighting
for the dissolution of the "Align-
ment" with Labor.
The group, which Includes at
least two of the party's six MKs
as well as powerful figures In
its Hashomer Hatzair kibbutz
movement, believes that Mapam
must run independently In next
year's elections in order to join
the Cabinet in a stronger posi-
tion.
THE ANTI ALIGNMENT
forces tested their strength at
Mapam's national convention in
Tel Aviv last week.
In practice though, the con-
vention deciion-not-to-decide-
yet was pretty much a foregone
conclusion, Mapam's "political
committee" submitted a unanim-
ous recommendation "to pre-
pare" to run alone in the 1977
Knesset election.
If Labor adopts the kind of
oeace policy that Mapam could
live with, the party will step
back from the brink and con-
tinue in tandem with labor.
For Mrs. Grossman and her
group, the time spent waiting
is time wasted. In an interview
with the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, she said that as far as
she could see the "marriage'-
between Mapam and the Labor
Party had simply failed.
WHEN THE Alignment was
set ud. eight years ago, Mapam
had hooed to play a major role
in Cabinet policy-making. But
experience proved otherwise,
said Grossman, L abor refused
to adopt Mapam's social pol-
icies.
Poverty had not been sub-
stantially diminished, the so-
cial gaps had not been mean-
ingfully narrowed, income tax
dodgers had not been appre-
hended, the government's eco-
nomic policy perpetuated the
inferior status of industrial
workers.
Grossman pointed out that
the Labor Party had by and
large ignored Mapam's political
views too. The Cabinet encour-
aged the establishment of new
settlements in the administered
areas and had not been forth-
coming with diplomatic peace
initiatives.
GROSSMAN'S group objects
particularly to the Cabinet's
ongoing "surrender to Gush
Emunim's pressure."
Grossman and her political
allies believed all along that the
Alignment must adopt a clear
profile which would differ
sharply politically and ideol-
ogically from that of the Li-
kud bloc.
But in fact, the Alignment
has not proposed a comprehen-
sive peace plan (because of
deep differences within its own
ranks) and has ignored the
Palestinian problem. Grossman
says the Labor Party seeks to
postpone the hour of decision,
thus preferring factional con-
siderations to national interests,
Grossman charged.
"Mapam must no longer be-
long to an ideological super-
market." she declared. Gross-
man's reservations were valid
eight years ago too, when the
Alignment was establUh.
Nevertheless. Mapam went in
the deal.
ASKED ABOUT that Gr.
man explained that circ
stances have changed. "Tni
the problems are acute and
national moment of decision
at hand. It is ridiculous for 1
and Moshe Dayan to appear
the same ticket, when we
agree on almost every
she said.
Asked about the possib
that a go-it-alone Mapam <
weakenthe dovish repress
thereby aid the right, Grown
replied that dissolving the Ah
ment would strengthen
weaken the dovish repr
tion in the Knesset.
She believes that by run.
separately in the elections,
pam would force the
Party to define more pr__
its political platform, thus
nhasizing the ideological dis._
tion between the Labor and I
kud. According to Gr
scenario. Mapam would join 1
coalition Cabinet to be
lished by Labor after the ek
tion.
She added that Mapam
even be ready to create a "c
mon front" with Labor,
would insist on maintaininfi
separate political entity, thsj
increasing its bargaining
tion and its influence.

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July 2, 19/6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
iQermans Told Hitler Holocaust
Was a Pack of Big 'Lies9
By JON
3 BONN (JTA> A 45"yM*w
training coUege M*
L^sed last week after telling
Kudents the death cf.fac-
tion Jews under the Third
K"was "all lie.." Although
tacidents like this are by no
I means commonplace in west
Germany, they indicate a recent
I disturbing trend, namely an In-
ereasingly daring OP""***
E5 neo-N^ ^<^*;
right groups in the Federal
War Mitzvah
ROBERT MARK NESSELROTH
Robert, son of Mr. and Mrs.
|Melvin Nesselroth, celebrated
, ^ Bar Mitzvah on May 29 at
(Temple Beth Shalom.
Robert, a student at Attucks
Middle School, is also a student
in Hey Class at Beth Shalom
Religious School, and is active
I in United Synagogue Youth.
4 i ~
PAUL CIRULNICK
Mr and Mrs. Irving Cirul-
nick's son, Paul, became a Bar
Mitzvah on May 29 at Temple
I Beth Shalom.
Paul attends Attucks Middle
| School.
ix 6 it
CHARLES KONOVER
Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon Kono-
wr's son, Charles, observed his
Bar Mit/.vah on May 30 at Tem-
ple Beth Shalom.
Charles attends the Univer-
sitv School of Nova and is on
the Hollywood Hills baseball
learn.
Religious
Directory
I-A..LANDALE JIWIBH CINTII
(CMnnMv). *W MB Mk A*
akM Harry Sehwarta. OwpM
NOITM MIAMI MAOI
I "la1 BfK MOMTM OAOk
m\ SI mi Ava. Mirm I
"fe f. RtNaMnr. Omht i
rJOtTM ..
|t0"*L t^lNOa HIBNIW CON
OMOATtON. Rararm. !/1 N.W
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*"*"ac jbwim cin ran. am
M Milton J. Mm,
HOUTWOO*)
'OUNO ISRAEL OF HOL .VWOOO
_orihodo) San etarMiM *..
JMH. HathrarM* MM* Mia* S**a*t
mid.nt Or. Fran* %.
a---------
r!"fL tm it. nww.i tan a
MM Ay.. HanywaaS. M"
J"t AHlMHI Ra*M
aswMMl
nANTAINH
'CITATION ;IWIIH vONMI
OATION. 400 Savth Nafc Hill "
Raatatlon. Rabbi Arttan
Republic.
A report just issued by the
Bonn Interior Ministry goes
further: "At no time since the
collapse of 1945," it says, "has
National Socialism been glori-
fied so openly in speeches,
pamphlets and activities or
the democratic, law-based state
been so despised by its op-
ponents as today."
THE REPORT singles out as
"particularly striking" the ac-
tivities of right-wing attorney
Manfred Roeder, leader of the
"Deutsche Burger initiative"
(German Citizens Initiative),
and journalist Erwin Schoen-
born of the "Kampfbund Deuts-
cher Soldaten" (Battle Group of
German Soldiers).
The two were recently sen-
tenced to seven months' impris-
onment (suspended) and fines
of $1,200 each for "incitement"
after distribuing a pamphlet
called "The Auschwitz Lie"
which denied the existence of
gas chambers and the deaths of
six-million Jews under Nazi
rule.
Among other things, Roeder
has at various times described
the Federal Republic as "a riff-
raff state" (Lumpenstaat) and a
"republic of Freemasons and
Jews (Freimauer und Judenre-
oublic), asserting that "whoever
Is German cannot be a dem-
ocrat, and whoever is a dem-
ocrat cannot be a true German."
SCHOENBORN has described
Hitler as "one of the greatest
leaders of German history." Fol-
lowing the case. Roeder was
stricken from the roll of attor-
neys, but he is expected to ap-
peal. He is also standing trial
for alleged libel against the
Nazi-hunter Simon Wiessenthal.
He charged Wiesenthal had
never spent a day in a concen-
tration camp and had in fact
been a German security officer.
The trial has been frequently
interrupted by ieering and Nazi
slogans shouted by followers of
Roeder. After the judge allowed
Roeder to read aloud from anti-
Semitic pamphlets for half an
hour, the Hesse state prosecu-
tor ordered an investigation into
possible trial irregularities.
The findings, including recom-
mendations on how the case
P? !H.A'-0" crmmpm ...r......
*. MM AHJrar a*. Rabbi Mart.
Malavaky. Cantor MMMM
-------------a
SW Und Am.. m
vatrra)
laPLI SINAI (Caoaarvattva).
***"" Habbl Cfralm a
rJJ"L SOUL ffjL
Oraaln. mm *
va
i-e
tiai
8a!>LLLN TMt *'NB (Canaarva.
521. ^H N UnrraraHy Or.. Ra
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should proceed, are being
studied by the state's justice au-
thorities. Observers believe a
new Judge may be appointed to
hear the case.
ANOTHER court case that has
raised eyebrows is the trial of
nine men and six women charg-
ed with complicity in mass mur-
ders at the Maidanek concentra-
tion car.jp in Poland. The trial,
which began last November, has
been held up by a series of de-
fense objections, notably against
allowing German historian Wolf-
gang Schleffer, 46, an acknowl-
edged expert on the Nazi period,
to give evidence.
The defense claimed he was
too young to appreciate the
pressures Germans were sub-
jected to by the Nazis, that his
knowledge of the period had
been influenced by Jewish
teachers, and that he had con-
tact with Jewish people, or at
least people with Jewish-sound-
ing names.
Although the court has not
upheld the objections, it has not
rejected them out of hand. In-
stead, it has insisted that Dr.
Schleffer give detailed replies
to the defense claims. During
the trial, leaflets were circul-
ated entitled "Ann Frank's
Diary A Forgery."
A NEO-NAZI group whose
Roal is to end Nazi war crimes
trials held a special press con-
ference in Dusseldorf to declare
that all such trials up to now
had been based on forged evi-
dence.
The German-Polish Associa-
tion, a group dedicated to re-
storing normal relations be-
tween citizens of both countries,
said in a press statement that
the conduct of the trial was a
"scandal."
The defense attorneys "are
obviously seeking to delay the
trial indefinitely, and to make
more difficult if not prevent
the finding out of the truth."
It added: "The court's respon-
sibility is heavy. The eyes of
many nations are focused on
Dusseldorf."
IT IS difficult to gauge the
strength of neo-Nazi organiza-
tions in Germany. The maga-
zine "Der Spiegel" last year re-
ported the spread of the "New
Right," a "new look" neo-Nazi
group estimated to number
about 1,000 members, including
high school pupils and univer-
sity students.
The group was created by a
breakaway from the right-wing
National Democratic Parts
(NPD) in 1971, by younger
members who found the NPD
too old-fashioned and too pro-
capitalist. The group has adapt-
ed left wing slogans like "Down
with Soviet and U.S. imerialism"
and has links with Italian neo-
Fascists, France's banned "Or-
dre Nouveau," the IRA and
other extremist groans.
DESPITE such breakaways,
the NPD continues to attract a
solid core of support. In a re-
cent election in the conserva-
tive south German state of
Baden-Wuerttemberg, the NPD
slightly increased its Federal
election vote from 40,580 in
1972 to 42,860.
In fairness. It must be pointed
out that this is less than one
percent of the total vote, and
that the NPD is nowhere near
gaining a single seat in any
German state government, let
alone the Federal legislature.
But it is a saddening reminder
that more than 30 years after
the war's end a neo-Nazi party
can still publicly rally so many
votes.
It would be wrong to assume
from all this that Nazism is re-
viving and that a Fourth Reich
is in the making. The new
clamor of the neo-Nazis is fav-
ored by the current recession
and the presence of over one-
million unemployed in West
Germany.
THAT THIS one-million and
l heir families are not out beat-
ing up people in the streets
shows the taming effects of a
good social security system,
especially high unemployment
benefits, on public fears and
prejudices.
It also shows, however, that
the majority of Germans have
learned the lesson of the Nazi
and are unwilling to risk further
catastrophic experiments. But
extremist groups are favored
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by the fact that 30 years after
the war, taboos relating to the
Nazis have disappeared-
There are regular TV and
radio programs and magazine
articles which take a critical
look at all aspects of Hitler's
reich. A generation has grown
up which never experienced life
under that regime and feels no
guilt feelings about it.
THE DANGER is that if peo-
ple feel unrelated to those
events, or shrug them off as
mere history, they may not re-
act strongly enough to counter
die neo-Nazi offshoots.
A line must be drawn be-
tween more discussion of Nazi
rule and attempts by right-wing
groups to reactivate its policies.
West Germany has still to show
that it is prepared to take tough
action against such groups.

ffl
&_*
J -
d
"Mr. Senior Citizen of
Broward County," Fred
Holler, was guest of honor
at an Appreciation Day for
Foster Grandparents on
June 11. A Hollywood res-
ident, Holler is active in
United Way's fund-raising
drive.
The Right Way
Any funeral director can provide "The Right
Way" for most families; but at Levitt Memo-
rial Chapels, just providing "The Right Way"
is not enough. We are dedicated to the
JEWISH RIGHT WAY."
At Levitt Memorial Chap-
els, we fully understand
and strive to fulfill the
wishes of the family de-
manding Jewish tradition
and offer counseling for
the family requiring Jewish
funeral guidance.
L
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L.F.D.


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, July 2 ,
ije
^abMwcal |tag
co-ordinated by wta
Gnatr Miami Rabbinical AwockJion
auditors
Dr. Max A. Uptehitz Rbi Robart J. Orund
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life post and present
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
Alienation and Intermarriage
By RABBI SIMON APRIL
Why are so many Jews alienated from their Jewish
community?
What actions can we as parents take to lessen the
chances of our child's intermarrying?
Many Jewish parents claim
that they have given their chil-
dren everything that they did
not have as children. The prob-
lem is however, that the par-
ents did not give what they did
have as children a basically
religious nvironinent.
When you ask your child to
refrain from marrying a non-
Jew, you are making a life-
changing demand. The only way
such a request will make an im-
pression is if you back it up
with life-changing action on
your part. It is unfair (and fu-
tile) to ask your child to change
his or her life if you are not
willing to change your own.
Many Jewish parents assume
that their own deep attachment
to the Jewish people and Jew-
ish causes should suffice to in-
sure that their children will re-
tain a strong Jewish itentity.
Thus one often hears parents
lament: "We can't understand
how our child could intermar-
ry": "We gave so much to the
UJA." The mother cries, "I am
so devoted to many Jewish or-
ganizations "
IT IS difficult to explain to
the oarents the mistake they
have made for the last twenty
vears. But in order to help pre-
vent repetition of such prob-
lems, it is important to try to
understand where these parents
went wrong.
Let us acknowledge one fact
unequivocally. To insure the
Jewish identity of one's chil-
dren, it is not enough to con-
tribute to Jewish causes or to
possess a "Jewish heart." For
while these aspects of Jewish
life are noble and essential to
Jewish survival, they do not
suffice in implanting Jewish
identity in one's children; it
may have little meaning for the
child. The parents' entire Jew-
ish identity is at the Federation
office or at the other Zionist
organizations. What does the
child experience Jewishly him-
self at home?
Few gave thought to the basic
question of their children that
they were posing; Why should
the Jews survive?
The great majority of Jew-
ish parents who work for or
contribute to Jewish causes out
of a deep Jewish feeling ac-
quired that feeling by being
raised in a religious environ-
ment. Had they given more
thought to it, these parents
would have realized the neces-
sity of creating such an environ-
ment for their children.
AS A RESULT of the mate-
rially insecure existence of their
youth, many Jewish parents
concentrated on providing only
for the material needs of them-
selves and their children. How-
ever, affluence breeds at least
as many problems as it solves.
When people do not have to
worry about their next meal or
a roof over their heads, they
have time to worry about them-
selves and about such abstract
questions as "What is the mean-
ing of my life?" They begin to
realize that "not by bread alone
shall man live."
We are the most affluent gen-
eration in human history and
quite possibly the most neurotic,
since we cannot find meaning
in life. Once the needs for food
and companionship are fulfilled,
the greatest human craving is
for meaning.
The sad spectacle of youths
from affluent homes utterly lost
and prey to peddlers of pseudo-
spirituality (counter culture
hippies, Krishna devotees) or
misguided idealism confirms
this fact.
Though less frequent, aliena-
tion of children from observant
parents is not uncommon. It is
essential for observant Jewish
parents to fulfill at least two
requirements in order to insure
that their children will continue
to be observant. First, they
must exemplify the ideals which
Jewish law seeks to realize.
Otherwise, their children may
regard their observance and
their Judaism in general as ir-
relevant or even as a barrier
to moral or meaningful life.
Second, observant parents
must be prepared to offer rea-
soned and meaningful answers
to their children's questions.
Once a child reaches his teens,
it is not enough to answer ques-
tions with "Because that's what
the Torah says." There are an-
swers to the questions which
voung Jews ask, and it is the
responsibility of every concern-
ed parent to learn those an-
swers.
WE ARE living in a free so-
ciety. American Jewish young
people are free to choose from
among the many ways of life
and ideals offered to them. We
believe that Jews should deeply
welcome this development, for
Judaism is the most powerful
idea in history, as well as a
beautiful way or life. Until a
great many more Jews, old and
voung. share this appreciation,
however, the problem of aliena-
tion will continue to be a crip-
pling one.
An outstanding rabbi wrote
that he had been called about
300 times in the last decade by
frantic parents imploring him
to break up the impending in
termarriaee of their son or
daughter. He agreed to meet the
child, vet he succeeded exactly
once in dissuading the person
from marrving the non-Jew. He
tells that the number of young
Jews he has attracted to Juda-
ism is staggering. How, then,
does one account for the in-
ability to break up prospective
intermarriages?
The answer, sadly, is simple.
Parents who approach a rabbi
concerning the imminent inter-
marriage of their child are us-
ually showing serious interest
happiness may be a guilty feel-
ing that if he or she intermar-
with a non-Jew, and the only
obstacle to the child's complete
in their child's Judaism about
twenty years too late. By this
time the child is already in love
ries "my parents would be dis-
traught." But this will not ulti-
mately affect the decision to
intermarry because he or she
will quite logically refuse to
sacrifice real feelings of love
for vague feelings of guilt.
Of course, one can point to
the exceptional cases in which
children of actively Jewish
homes have intermarried, but
such pointing has no point. One
can also point to instances in
which seat belts failed to save
the lives of passengers in auto-
mobile accidents. But as these
instances do not negate the fact
that seat belts save lives, so
the former exceptions do not
negate the fact that actively
Jewish homes save Jews.
THE OBSERVANT Jew con-
tends that it is Judaism which
is superior for generating bet-
ter people to be more likely to
be a moral persons. Thus
whereas the traditionalist can
use logical arguments to appeal
to a young person to perpetuate
ties rooted in ideals, other Jews
can only make an emotional
appeal to perpetuate ties rooted
in blood.
If your son or daughter is
planning to marry a non-Jew,
it may not be too late to begin
to study and live Judaism and
thereby eventually influence
your child not to intermarry. If
you are asking your child to
make a life-changing decision,
von must be fully prepared to
do the same, otherwise
words will be futile.
YOUR RABBI SPEAKS
Jews by Adoption
your
We cannot promise miracles.
We can only promise you that
if vou show no commitment to
change your life, you will be
offering little reason to your
children .to change their lives.
isj
CANDLEIIGHTING TIME
4 TAMUZ 7:57
By RABBI SOL LANDAU
Beth David Congregation
It is estimated that in the next
five years, 75,000 converts will
join the Jewish people in the
United States. Most of these will
have been motivated to their
new spiritual-ethnic community
through marriage.
In terms of cold statistics,
this means that a quarter of a
million (immediate family only)
of the 6 million American Jews
will have at least one Jewish
member by adoption among
them. This does not begin to
take into consideration the thou-
sands among us who have been
converted previously, many of
whom live full Jewish lives.
Recently a number of major
Jewish publications and nation-
al Jewish organizations have
addressed themselves to this
new phenomenon. It appears
crucial that a problem of such
magnitude and of such import-
ance to the American Jew and
the future of Judaism requires
the full and immediate atten-
tion of the entire Jewish com-
munity.
The May issue of "Hadassah"
magazine carried three articles
on conversion and acceptance,
both in Israel and in the United
States; an article in "Judaism"
magazine: the recently held
workshop in New York on that
Question by the American Jew-
ish Committee, evidence of the
realization by Jewish leadership
to articulate that oroblem; above
all. it seems to consist of a
myth of "Judaism as a non-mis-
sionizing religion" and a rejec-
tion by the community of the
New Jews.
IT SEEMS that the reluctance
of the Jewish community to ac-
cept Jews-by-adoption as full
Jews is both a block for many
to become converts and those
who have already taken this
milestone step find it a barrier
in their daily conta'-* with fel-
Korah
'
"And the earth opened her mouth, and swal-
lowed them up and all the men that appertain-
ed unto Korah" (Num. 16:32).
KORAH Korah, son of Izhar, and Dathan and
Abiram, sons of Eliab, led a rebellion of 250 men who
refused to accept the leadership of Moses and Aaron.
Moses tried in vain to persuade them that all was being
done according to God's will. Finally, God Himself acted.
"And it came to pass that the ground did cleave as-
under that was under them. And the earth opened her
mouth, and swallowed them up, and their households,
and all men that appertained unto Korah, and all their
goods. So they went down alive into the pit; and the
earth closed upon them, and they perished from among
the assembly And fire came forth from the Lord,
and devoured the two hundred and fifty men" (Num-
bers 16:31-35). To prove that Aaron had indeed been
chosen by God for his priestly function, Moses instruct-
ed every tribe to place its rod near the Ark of the Cove- j
nant; miraculously, Aaron's rod sprouted. Thus ended !
the controversy over the priesthood. The portion pro-
ceeds to describe the various emoluments that the priests !
and Levites received.
J
low-Jews. "You surely ar-
Jewish, are you?" is an alma
daily encounter as the "Had*
sah" magazine relates it.
The Zionist magazine rurthi
puts it in the following wort
"The Quandary of the Conver
a major problem for the conve
is that she is not looked upon a
a 'real Jew' either by her Chri
tian relatives or by her Jevrii
family and friends Christian
think that one can be a k
only by birth, while Jews doul
that convert's sincerity pu
ticularly if conversion precede)
marriage to a born Jew."
As to missionizing zeal itsel
it should be recalled that Judi
ism considered the challenge t
Abraham "to be a blessing unt
all the families of mankind
their mission. God was picture
as having a singlular love ft
proselytes, and Abraham n
not only a proselyte who can
over from heathenism to th
true religion, but proved to ha
been a great maker of proa
lytes himself. At the same, th
proselyte was classified as
child newly born into the com
munity of Israel.
At the height of these mis
sionary activities during th
second Jewish CommonweaM
non-Jews who were not ore
pared to accept the full obliga
tions of Jewish discipline, na
tional fellowship and ceremonia
laws were welcomed as Yir"
Shamayim. Some of them wer
ultimately converted and be
came Jews, accepting full cit
izenship in the religious house
hold of Israel.
THE INCLUSION of the Boo
of Ruth In the Biblical cam
is another indication of the ac
ceptance of a trust proselyu
The ideal convert was one wh
could say, like Ruth. "Whithe
thou goest, I shall go; thy Go
will be my God, thy people wil
be my people."
In a later period, particular!
when the early Christians mad
inroads among many of the nei
converts, the genuineness o
would-be proselytes was seri
ous questioned. Professor Sal
Baron reports in his "Social an
Religious History of the Jewis
People" the various tests t
determine genuineness of th
converts' motives. He quotes th
tannaitic source, which he say
evidently dates after Bar Koch
ba: "The man who in these day
wishes to undergo conversion i
asked: What has impelled vo
to be converted? Dont vo
know that we are downtroddei
beaten, persecuted, and inflicl
ed with manv sorrows?"
In ootions offered in a fre
land like the United States as
similation is a major threat t
the future of any minority. i
elusive of the Jews. Numberin
no more than 3 percent of th
total Dopulation of the Unite
States, the survival of the Amet
ican Jewish community require
a constant dynamic reliR*
cultural commitment to Judi
ism.
The large number of N*
Jews, on the other hand, wit
genuinely identify and becom
part of God: Torah and peopl
of Israel, need to be welcome'
for the fulfillment of the Spirit
ual Covenant.


ridav. July 2> 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hnil^^,
Page 11
tdminisi
oac'K IN March, when true seekers after peace
- the Middle East were dismayed by President
in
Fords clear willingness to sell military equipment
to Egypt, Mr. Ford was quick to assure a B'nai
B'rith audience that the United States, with a long
history of supporting Israel, will defend the secur-
ity and survival of Israel.
In mid-May, after vetoing the $9.4 billion for-
eign aid bill, which embraced promise of nearly
half that huge amount for Israel over a 27-month
period, the President quickly mounted the rostrum
of a Jewish meeting again (this time the American
Jewish Committee) to provide reassurances simi-
lar to those given in March.
WHETHER PAVING the way for Egypt to get
more military aid from the U.S. or darkening the
hopes for Israel to obtain vitally needed economic
assistance, Mr. Ford is obliged, of course, to keep
firmly in mind the election-year whims of Amer-
ican voters.
Certainly, in putting his stamp of disapproval
on the foreign aid bill, on which Congress had la-
wUh Mr SSftt (WUh COMtant exultation
moL^H d' V!eu,eMm>. President was
RonaM R '" flS "^ him8elf "Wh will
*?? "^ d do if I sign the bill?"
a ,i/ir meMUre contained Provision for
asix-month suspension of the trade embargo
against Vietnam an item sure to be scooped up
and capitalized upon by the jingoistic Reagan camp
While Israel and her friends the world over
wait for repair of the damage done by the Presi-
dential veto, it is instructive to look back on the
Administration's actual score card.
Thus we need to recall that in March a CIA
spokesman told the American Institute of Aero-
nautics and Astronautics that Israel has 10 to 20
- But Doing Another
nuclear weapons. Would the CIA spokesman have
offered this controversial tidbit without approval
of the Defense Department? and why give the Arabs
a handle for their ax in this bumbling way?
A COUPLE of days later, the President let the
aews media people know that he was irked when
Jewish leaders in America protested his projected
sale of six C-120 military transport planes to Egypt,
joon thereafter, our representative to the UN, Bill
Scranton, scolded Israel for promoting Jewish set-
tlements in occupied Arab territory.
This rebuke was administered at the time Scran-
ton as decency dictates cast the U.S. veto in
the Security Council against an Arab-structured
resolution deploring Israeli policies in Jerusalem
and on the West Bank.
Not long after that episode, former Defense
Secretary James R. Schlesinger openly accused the
Administration he had served so energetically of
undermining American moral support for Israel and
pressuring Israel to make concessions to those foes
who have vowed to decimate the 28-year-old state.
s
usan
r*"*ff
New Books
Of Major
Jewish Interest
th
ahl
m
;lif
Ylr
loo
mo
! K
lyte
at
the
Go
Sal

ft 4 TEXTBOOK of I-raeli Hebrew," by Haiim B. Rosen (Uni-
versity of Chicago, $7.95, 404 pp.), aims to enable a stu-
dent to read "moderately difficult" Israeli Hebrew and to
write and converse in current Hebrew. This emphasis on
teaching current Israeli Hebrew is in no uncertain terms. The
author indicates that special care has been taken to present
only authentic types of speech, unquestionably acceptable to
the native speaker of Hebrew.
To accommodate everyone, Rosen has devised his lessons
so as to suit the needs of students of classical Hebrew as well.
Special sections of Biblical text are included, with adequate
discussion of classical lnguage.
EACH OF the 60 sections includes extensive explanation
of the material included. Rosen provides both translation and
transliteration, pronunciation aids, vocabulary lists and in-
creasingly more difficult essays to read and comprehend.
In fact, an Israeli educator to whom I showed the text
commented upon the excellent progression in degrees of dif-
ficulty and how this is a challenge for the competent student
of Hebrew.
LEO ROSTEN'S latest compilation of vignettes, jokes, and
double-entendres is "The 3:10 to Anywhere" (McGraw-Hill,
$8.95, 323pp.). It is directed toward "anyone who loves or
dreams of travel." On the contrary, most of the anecdotes
have less to do with the countries in which they take place
than with poking fun at accents, foreign expressions and com-
mon human foibles.
The first trip which Rosten recalls, however, is an effec-
tive piece. It is his arrival at the age of three at Ellis Island.
In four pages he all too briefly describes a meaningful and
touching scene. He captures the flavor of the "magic island":
"The wire-screened waring chambers were packed with
Greeks in funny skirts and leggings, forever fingering their
heads; Swedes with celluloid collars; stolid Dutchmen; Turks
with fierce mustaches; Romany gypsies with blazing eyes, who
live me candy; and Jews with thick beards and unshorn ear
ringlets ."
LATER, Rosten recounts an episode of his youth in Chi-
cago going to the Yiddish theater and the Cafe Royal. It
* a memorable and well-told glimpse into one of the most
colorful periods of American Jewish history.
While Irving Howe and Abraham Karp have recently
written scholarly works on the Jewish experience in America
'or the Bicentennial, Rosten should have entertained us with
his anecdotal first-hand experiences of same.
"Mottele," by Gertrude Samuels (Harper ft Row, $8.95,
17*PP>, is a new novel about the true story of Mottele Shlayan,
J young boy who joined the partisans of the Soviet Ukraine
during the Holocaust.
MOTTELE IS known to us already through the accounts
Misha Gildenman (Uncle Misha), the legendary commander
<* this detachment of Jewish partisans which numbered in the
hundreds Yuri Suhl, author of several important books on
distance during the Holocaust, compiled a number of stories
jbout Uncle Misha and Mottele in his now famous work, "They
'ought Back."
Samuels became fascinated with the young Jew who did
."to back. She fictionalizes true episodes which can be found
' SuhTs book, adding a dimension of exploration into the
cn*racter s motivations and ideas. This is a worthwhile addi-
00 t0 the reading lists of all young adults.
*4,
rno
<-HerzL
en
The Role of the Jew
In a Lawless World
rJMIERE ARE many ominous signs that our
civilization is in the grip of a malaise for
which we do not have a cure. We realized it
quite suddenly. It broke like a wave over our
heads although the danger signals were there.
Now we stand, disoriented and dissatisfied,
helpless and dazed in the face of all problems
that have been opened up by Vietnam and
Watergate. It is as if the walls are crumbling
down. There is nothing to keep them from fall-
ing
The spreading lawlessness in all spheres
of society seems to be without limits and
without promise that it will ever recede or
abate in our days. Confidence in the law itself
has been eroded. The great abstractions and
ideas about "the rights of man," the great de-
signs of the law have come to naught when
confronted with the necessity of keeping our
society functioning.
THEY HAVE not brought the millennium.
They have only shown the imperfection of our
age and the lack of accountability we see all
around us.
The same problem is haunting the family
of nations. For many years dominant powers
promoted lawlessness, undermined the tiny be-
ginnings of stability wherever they could find
them and clothed it all in a fine and appealing
rhetoric.
It was a simple design to establish an or-
der of disorder and to cow the so-called West-
ern World into accepting terror as a legitimate
form of politics. It came to a fitting climax
when a gun-carrying terrorist lectured the rep-
resentatives of more than 100 nations about
his peaceful designs and the good life he want-
ed to create for everybody, Jew and Arab
ilike.
THESE ARE regrettable developments for
all those wh. thought the United Nations would
bring the realization of a dream. As on the na-
tional level, great ideas have shown their limi-
tations when set into practice. Beyond that
the clanger exists that, while we live under the
terror of national and international lawless-
ness, we are becoming so used to it, that we
are inclined to accept it as a way of life.
The Jew with the knowledge of "his law"
should know better. He might have the tend-
ency to "understand" certain acts of lawless-
ness. But he should know that the moment we
try to "understand" lawlessness, we are not
far from giving it oar approval.
There are no excuses for the excuses
made every day. Poverty does not justify law-
breaking. Demonstrations do not establish a
new order; nor do judicial decisions that have
the imprint of reality and provoke lawlessness.
THE END does not justify the means. Big
corporations should not be ripped off because
i hey rip off the people. The old and the feeble
should not be exploited, even if the profit mo-
live calls for it or even if Jews do it to a
! How Jew.
The Man Who Said No'
Is Now Clearly Saying Yes'
CZarf
o4lpert
Haifa
INCE the retirement of the late David Ben
Gurion from active political leadership, the
Israel public has been looking for a personality
whom it could follow with enthusiasm. And
inevitably, for years, the finger has pointed to
the soldier-archeologist, Yigal Yadin. For more
than 20 years Yadin rejected all invitations to
go into politics, but the more he demurred,
the more appealing he became in the eyes of
the public.
And only a few weeks ago the mystery
man stepped out of the shadows and formally
innojnced that if there were indeed popular
support for him and his ideas, he would con
rent to offer his candidacy.
YADIN IS a man of great ability. He is
nerhaps best known as the archeologist who
places' names live again in Jewish history. Yet
places names live again in Jewish history. Yet
he also has a brilliant military background. On
him the story is told that in 1948, whan ha was
Chief of Operations for the Israel army in the
Negev, he was faced with the problem of stop-
ping the Egyptian forces which were invading.
Their flanks were protected by the track-
less wastes of the desert. Yadin recalled from
lus knowledge of archeology and ancient his
tory that there had been an old Roman road,
southwest of Beersheba, now barely covered
by sand. His armored column swept around,
cut the Egyptian supply route to the south!
and halted the advance.
LATER HE became Chief of Staff of the
Israel Defense Forces, but when he shed his
uniform he went back to his first love, ar-
cheology. He has great personal charm. At the
moment he conducts a television series on Is-
rael's antiquities, which is increasing his char-
isma even more.
Whenever the possibility of his assuming
national leadership was suggested, questions
were raised. What are his policies?
Previously he had been known to have
strong opinions on only one major issue: he
firmly believes that Israel must change its cum-
bersome electoral system, which makes a farce
oat of nomocracy, while preserving its external
forma. Recently he spent over a year aa a
member of the Agranat Commission, which in-
vestigated the faults and weaknesses that re-
sulted in the Yom Kippur War surprise.


Page 12
The Jewish Florutian and Shofar of Greater MoBywoed
Frtdy. July 2. i J
Vy^^SintA^/4mfUea,l
FOR YOUR SHOPPING CONVENIENCE ALL PANTRY PRIDE STORES WILL K
SAVE
PANTRY ftlOf
WITH THESE
cBasicBarKains
AMERICAN KOSHER
Moat Franks
Franks Knocks
59? 95e
r IIMIT TWO PKGS EITMBR MANO. PLEASE WITH OTHtR
^PURCHASES OE $700 OR MORE. EXCLUDING CIGARETTES .
t^SAVE33
Pantry Pride
Margarine
iQTRS.) BVM
* tIMIT FOU MGS PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
Of 1700 OR MORE. EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
A$^*fc* you to odd to your service, we art ropeoting
the cycle of weekly features of this beautiful
PORCELAIN CHINA
SCULPTURED
this weeks Bread and
FEATURED
PIECE
Butler Plate
49
EACH ^ew
WITH
4k. EACH
^PURCHASE
2p 3p f "Basic
pBarirain
SAVE 30
Refreshing
Pepsi Cola
ass v9
* IIMIT ONE SIX TACK. PIE AM. WITH OTHfR PURCHASES
Of S7 00 CR WORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU
SATURDAY. JULY 3rd.
AT ALL
PANTRY PRIDE STORES
IN DADE COUNTY.
HOLLYWOOD AND
HALLANDALE
t US tOrAIR ma y purkma ,i one
+ OR All ST ARRIO ITEMS WITH
ONI 17 00 PuaCHASI OR MOtl
INCLUDING CtCARITTII
nin
r^fflSAVE 33
Pantry Pride
Coffee
$J06
I-IB.
BAG
REGULAR
OR
ELECTRIC
PERK
+ LIMIT ONE RAG PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
^^^^^Q^fOC^^AOt^MCLUOJNGCIGAIITlts^

6
BORDEN LITE LINE OR
Les Cal Yogurt
74 99c
W ^W cups %*r %|F r
ASK
UKtm
ALL
FLAVORS
P ANTt T MIOt
Cream Cheese l.V 49*
hui woim auniM wai __
ii oj JIM
Swiss Cheese
CWH1IWI
...p.*.
Cheese Spread Li, 59*
MAHL.At.NI Qt IS
Blue Bonnet 2 ;: An chmw rooe
American Singles Si', *4**
PAMnTPMt .*~m. -------
Drinks iaL 4t2? 39*
umiMM
Pretzels or Stix V4.V 59*
.........xrtf
..........:.3f-89
FruiTcocktail3 1
Kosher Dills
Pretzel Gems
AMnirptiM
Peanuts fist.
ATf CaUHI Peanut Butter 'S5f99c
NWKO
Fig Newtons
11 'l"MI
"^'59'
99'
79*
It-Ol
...p.
11 'lAimi ^ <
Libby's Nectar 6*^*1 *
CUU PtAMK lOl POO
Glad Wrap
ias x> e ah on
Trash Bags
cum PtAtnc o ioob iiia
Glad Wrap Sf79*
u,-"ttuo" SOll
.......___*.
All RAI ATS SlrCIO TO OROER AT STORES WITH SIRtfKI COUNTRSt
KAHNS
Braunsch weiger L. 79c
-------"'"----VA1UU
AMERICAN KOSHfR
AAtHICAN BHMi
Salami or Bologna V 89c
HAN NIT PAST*AMU OR
Peppered Beef
JB 59*
Pantry
Pride
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[6BarRTain
I U > \Jf\ I Our litlCull mi oil U S Co. I ln,pttf*d and
PUn I PC \ S'0"*"* Our U S D A CKolc. t..f cli on IS. (In.. I
V U U I U L / P* '' "> obloln and or* guo.onl.id lo
^ "'-'^-^^X n)ufH)f 'ndmi jultf and dmlicloully flavorful'
U.S.D.A. CHOICE WESTERN CORN FED
Beef Rib ^
VH n\ BONELESS BBV LB.
'BOZEN
99c
SMALL END
BONELESS
GRADE A' QUICK FROZEN
Turkey p*
Breasts
SAVE 40
Pantry Pride
Potato Chips
29*
REGULAR
OR
DIP N
B-OZ.
BAG
WITH
RIBS
U l.O.A CHOKI Will COIN IID Mil
Round Rump Roast_...* I4*
UMA CHOKI Witt COIN IID Mil LOIN
Sirloin Steaks .. sl79
UiOA CHOKI Will COIN 110
..It 1
UtOA CHOKI wist COIN 110 till BOUND
Btm. Round Roast
LB.
Beef Brisket
S|2S
USOA CHOKI SHE CHUCK UNOIRBl ADI
Pot Roast Bnls SS .. *13*
USOa CHOKI WISE CORN f 10 MII __
Chuck Blade Steak ,. 89
'ISM ^^
Ground Beef____ _, 89*
* LIMIT ONE RAG, PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
Of $7.00 OR MORE. tXdUOINO CIGARETTES
mm SAVE 24
Hudson
Flair Napkins
29c
'l A SHIPPED PIIMIUM WHO! I
ri* jhippio PIIMIUM WMOll
Fresh Fryers 48*
IU.IHWII PIIMIUM IIItH
Fryer Quarters 59*
Fryer PartoSsOSlw 99*
u.i..A. own win. com no mi iouno
Eye Round Roast__^ $ 1
USB A CHOKI BMf IOUNO
Btm. Round Steak ~7 %V*
U.S.D.A. CHOICE WESTERN CORN PED
Beef Chuck *>/v
Blade Boast, / *J
PKG.OF
140
LIMIT ONE PKG PLEASE. WITH OTHER PURCHASES
Of S> POOR MORE. EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
TOP QUALITY SWEET EATING
Red Plums
39e
LB.
PICK
YOUR
OWN
TOP QUALITY WESTERN
Cantaloupes
%0T ^tT EACH
Ol A MAIM MIAl U t "I
Red Bliss Potatoes V'.'. 69*
TOR QuAiif EtORtDA
Fresh Limes____8II 59*
'Ht. RIO WHO. I
Watermelons ...^ 1
TOP OU Al IIT 11 AIM I IIII
Florida Mangoes .*. 49*
"ItM WttIMN
PANTRY PRIDE
Wide Bologna
Is9y Ul
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CHUt W
SLICED
DAB MAPOBIIO DAMtSH
Smoked Salami
'ni limn
Liverwurst..............................2 49*
MUIW NAIIOHAl .OWII
Franks or Knocks W*lm
Beef Franks ttt $1M
HIHIMIIIUIUIMUHM ^
Franks or Knocks ftM
"Ol MMtl 14-AACAI
PIJTM.....S=........._
IJ-OI
...PR.
Sauerkraut
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89*
43*
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Romaine Lettuce .... 29*
Hltmi. IUI WIN > Hill lllll MMkl <**t
Smith Apples'"-''--".. 39
IACH 59
IO OUAIIM PUtllO IK1K
Pineapples
GARDEN FRESH
Green Bound Beans
29'
PICK
YOUR OWN
MINUTE MAID FROZEN
Orange A
Juice
IM. Ill ItoUN
Pound Cake____
4-OZ.
CANS
ic.
$1
.89*
in our 'pn&je*
MASTARKBLANOKPHRO R^
Fish Sticks
OSCAR MA rtU
MtAl'OR
PANIK < PID( hk ..'.. ik..
Bologna
Dinner
Rolls
WE RESERVE THE RMSMT TO LIMIT QUANTITHS NONE SOLD TO DEALERS


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