The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00147

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
0eJewi5ti Floridlam
and MIOFAIt OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Volume
6 __ Number 13
Hollywood, Florida Friday, June 18, 1976
r> Frtd K. Shochat Friday, Jun 18. 1*76 Price 25 CdltS
ARTISTS RENDERING OF MICHAEL-ANN RUSSELL JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center Dedicated;
#5.5 Million Capital Fund Campaign Is Launched
More than 200 dignitaries and
guests from all over South Flor-
ida participated June 6 in
the dedication of the Michael-
Ann Jewish Community Center
in North Miami Beach.
The Center, a joint project
of the Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Florida, the Great-
er Miami Jewish Federation and
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward, is being made possible
by a $5.5 million Capital Fund
Campaign, headed by chairman
Robert Russell.
Other Jewish Community
leaders assisting Russell as
members of the campaign cabi-
net are Dr. Norman Atkin.
Richard Collins. Matthew Bt-
tinger, Solomon Garazi. Merton
Gettis, JCC past president Stan-
ley R. Gilbert, Allan Ghickstern,
Mrs. Alan Gordan, Herbert D.
Continued on Page 2
Pearlman Accepts U JA Executive Post
LEWIS E. COHN
ROBERT I. FULLER
Broward Federation Plans
Annual Leadership Retreat
Robert A. Pearlman, who has
been executive director of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward for the past year,
leaves Sept. 1 to accept an exe-
cutive appointment with the
national United Jewish Appeal
in New York City.
Pearlman, 30, will be work-
ing in the major gifts area.
"Though I am leaving, I have
thoroughly enjoyed my year in
South Broward," said Pearlman.
"I think we have made tremen-
dous progress in terms of rais-
ing money for humanitarian
work here and abroad, and we
have grown and developed into
a substantial and important Jew-
ish community. I would like to
feel I had something to do with
it"
Pearlman is graduate of the
University of California at Los
Angeles. He joined the UJA
staff in August of 1969, and par-
ticipated in more than 20 mis-
sions to Israel, leading eight of
them. He had been associate
national campaign director for
the United Jewish Appeal and
a regional director before com-
ing to Hollywood.
Federation president Lewis E.
Cohn, said, "The year we have
had with Bob Pearlman was en-
riching to our community. Un-
der his dynamic and forceful
leadership, we made great pro-
gress. Unfortunately, national
United Jewish Appeal beckons
with great responsibilities and
a very important leadership
position. Their gain is our loss."
Pearlman is married to the
former Penny Meltzer of New
York City and they are the par-
ents of Joshua, five months, and
Andrew, five years.
The Leadership of the Jew-
ish Federation of South Brow-
trd will hold their second an-
nual retreat at Palm-Aire Spa
UHi Country Club, July 30 to
August 1.
Robert I. Hiller. executive
vice president of the Albed
Jewish Charities and Welfare
Funds of Baltimore, aid., will
be the scholar-in-reaidence and
* featured guest speaker.
. Dr. Joseph Cohen, field serv-
ice consultant for the Council
Jewish Federations and Wel-
fare Funds, will head a session
on Jewish Education.
Joel Breslau of Washington,
-C. a national United Jewiah
Appeal leader, will be the Sat-
urday evening banquet speaker.
THERE WILL also be a ses-
sion on campaign techniques.
Dr. Meroo J. Levitats will
lead the group in weIcoraing tike
Shabbat on Friday, the first
night of the retreat.
Lewis E. Coon, president of
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward. said the retreat will
not only analyze last year's ac-
tivities, but will deal :rfth the
challenges presented to the Jew-
ish community in providing for
human needs in the year ahead.
"The retreat is an important
one for our community," Cohn
emphasized.
Kissinger. Golda
Meet in Gotham
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) Sec-
retary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer said here that the United
States is waiting for replies
from the Arab governments to
its proposal some months ago
that they enter into non-belli-
gerency agreements with Israel.
He made the disclosure to
reporters when asked if the
Plans Continue for Israel Mission
Approximately 70 people from
" South Broward area are ex-
pected to join in the "This Year
"Jerusalem" mission to Israel,
"ct. 21 to Nov. 1, for the United
Jewish Appeal national confer-
ence
Nt Pritcher locally is mak-
olans that will take the par-
nciDants on tours through Jeru-
"Jem and visits to the Western
Wall, Yad Vashem memorial,
the Israel Museum and small
settlements in the country.
"Our This Year in Jerusalem'
mission provides the opportu-
nity for this community to come
together with many other Jew-
ish communities throughout the
country to express our soli-
darity Americans with Is-
raelis and to share our
dreams, traditions, values and
hooes," said Pritcher. "We want
to share this once-in-a-lifetime
experience with as many peo-
ple in South Broward as pos-
sible."
Reservations are still avail-
able. For information, call 921-
8810.
U.S. is planning a major initia-
tive in the Middle East before
the Presidential elections in
November. Kissinger said the
U.S. view was that the non-bel-
ligerency proposal was a major
initiative.
HE MADE his remarks fol-
lowing a 90-minute meeting
with Israel's former Premier
Golda Meir at her Waldorf As-
toria Hotel suite here. Mrs.
Meir is currently on a speaking
tour of the U.S. Kissinger told
reporters that they had "ex-
changed ideas" on the Middle
East situation but nothing spe-
cific was discussed.
Israel's Ambassador to Wash-
ington, Simcha Dinitz. was pre-
sent for part of the meeting.
Later, it was learned, Kissinger
and Mrs. Meir had a private
talk.
ROBERT A. PEARLMAN
Kreisky
Clears PLO
Of Charges
VIENNA (JTA) Chan-
cellor Bruno Kreisky said here
that the Palestine Liberation
Organization is "not at all in-
volved" in a recent terrorist
bomb attack apparently aimed
at air communications between
Vienna and Tel Aviv.
He made that statement on a
television interview after the
Popular Front for the Libera-
tion of Palestine (PFLP) warn-
ed of new attacks to disrupt
the flow of Jewish immigrants
from the Soviet Union. The
PFLP claimed credit for the
explosion of a booby-trapped
suitcase at Ben Gurion airport.
KREISKY said that Austria
would continue to keep its bor-
ders open to Jewish emigres in
transit to Israel or other coun-
tries. "A closure is out of tile
question," he said.


Hage 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center Dedicated;
#5.5 Million Capital Fund Campaign Is Launched
Friday, June 18, 1976
Continued from Page 1
Katz. Allan B. Margolis, Nathan
Pritcher, JCC president Donald
Reiff. and Pat E. Segall. These
men and women, representing
Dade and South Broward Coun-
ties, have been active leaders
in the Centers' planning and
prograwning for nearly two
years. Their agency and com-
munity efforts have helped
make the Michael-Ann Russell
Center a reality.
Russell led the dedication
ceremony, which opened with a
blessing by Rabbi Solomon
Schiff. executive vice president
of the Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami and director of
GMJF's Community Chaplaincy
Service. Other dignitaries bring-
ing greetings and personal ex-
pressions on the new facility
included Metro Dade County
Mayor Steve Clark and Miami
Commissioner the Rev. Theo-
dore Gibson.
GMJF president Morton Sil-
berman added meaning to the
occasion by stating that the new
Center "will not be just the
home for another agency, or a
structure where all age groups
can enjoy productive activities
with a Jewish theme ... It will
be part of our identity as a com-
munity."
JCC PRESIDENT Reiff, whose
firm of Reiff-Fellman & Asso-
ciates were architects of the
new facility, observed that it is
the culmination of many years
of dedicated work and involve-
ment by a significant number
of community leaders.
Jewish Federation of South
Broward president Lewis E.
Cohn added that the joint Dade-
South Broward nature of the
nroject added to its importance.
The capital fund campaign ef-
fort to provide additional facil-
ities at the Jewish Community
Rabbinical Association Installs Officers
Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin, spirit-
ual leader of Temple Israel of
Miramar, was installed as presi-
dent of the Rabbinical Associa-
tion of Greater Miami at the
annual installation and lunch-
eon on June 9.
Rabbi Drazin succeeds Rabbi
Ralph P Kingsley, of Temple
Sinai of North Dade. who was
president for an unprecedented
two vears.
Other officers installed on
June 9 are Association vice
president Rabbi Sol Landau of
Beth David Congregation, Asso-
ciation secretary Rabbi Mich-
ael Eisenstat of Temple Judea.
and Association treasurer Rab-
bi Victor D. Zwelling of Congre-
gation B'nai Raphael. Rabbi
Solomon Schiff is executive vice
president of the Rabbinical As-
RABBI AVROM
DRAZIN
sociation and director of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
Hadassah Hemispheres Group
Holds Year's Final Meeting
America's Bicentennial and
the role of the Jewish people in
building the nation were themes
of the final meeting of the Hem-
ispheres Group of Hadassah on
May 18. A brunch was served
by the members of the hospi-
tality committee on tables
decorated in red, white and
blue.
Mrs. Gertrude Dank, who
presided, set the tone of the
meeting by reporting on what
Hadassah has done to help build
another land and on the open-
ing of a much-needed medical
center.
She also expressed pride in
the accomplishments of the
group in its five-year existence.
Hemispheres Group is one of
the largest in this area.
Vice president Frances Lift-
man introduced the presenta-
tion designed to describe Jew-
ish patriots of the past 200
years.
Isabel Abelson provided ac-
companying background mu-
sic and the following mem-
bers participated: Jean Wein-
berg as Jacob Barsimson, Freda
Alexander as Mordecai Sheftal,
Sally Ambrose as Abigail Mimis,
Lillian Tesser as Col. Solomon
Bush, Dorothy Levine as Aaron
Lopez. Ann Brody as Isaac
Touro, Rae Massell as Haym
Salomon. Rose Vermont as Hay-
man Levy, Lillian Rado as Maj.
Benjamin Nones and Hassie
Lichtenstein as David Cardozo.
Rabbi Morton Malavsky urged
the newly elected officers, who
were installed at the meeting,
to continue in their devotion to
Hadassah and its projects, and
he thanked the outgoing offi-
cers. He then offered anecdotes
and described experiences dur-
ing his frequent trips to Israel.
tion's Community Chaplaincy
Service.
The installation was preced-
ed by a presentation by Rabbi
Zwelling on "The Relationship
of the Jew to the Civil Author-
ities."
Rabbi Drazin has been spirit-
ual leader of Temple Israel of
Miramar for five years, follow-
ing six years with the Israelite
Center in Miami. Before com-
ing to South Florida, he served
congregations in Iowa and Mis-
souri.
Rabbi Drazin received h i s
BHL and ordination from the
Hebrew Theological College in
Chicago in 1959. He holds a
B.A. in educational psychology
from Roosevelt University and
nn M.A. in educational admin-
istration from Northwestern
University. He is a past presi-
dent of the Broward Board of
Rabbis, an adjunct of the Rab
binicM Association of Greater
Miami.
"1 am deeply moved by this
great honor which has been ac-
corded me by my colleagues and
peers, and orav that I will be
worthv of the trust they have
"laced in me." said Rabbi Dra-
7tn unon being elected presi-
dent of the Associaion.
"It is my hope that we can
continue to build on the founda-
tions which have been set in the
nast. and provide meaningful
communal leadership in our
raoidlv developing community,"
he added.
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Centers of South Florida is the
first of its kind, with the coop-
eration of three major Jewish
community organizations.
Among the major activities
to be housed at the facility, on
a 15-acre site at 18900 NE 25th
Ave., are extensive summer
camping programs. These begin
June 21. with more than 1,000
JCC-north campers using the
Michael-Ann Russell Center.
Future center development will
add a wing for the JCC's pop-
ular Early Childhood Develop-
ment programs, located adja-
cent to a specially designed
Senior Citizens Wing.
RUSSELL noted the essential
nature of the Center in "bring-
ing together" a Jewish popula-
tion of more than 250,000 He
recalled the importance of
Jewish Community Center to
his own growing-up years in
New York, and anticipated that
rhis facility would be the home
for the strength and develop-
ment of thousands of South
Florida Jews. U,h
"Our community has many
formalized religious and social
service institutions," Russel]
said. "Our synagogues, day
schools and social agencies
rank among the finest in the
country- But there was some-
thing missing. Now, with the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center, we have an
informal complement to these
institutions. I realize from my
own experience how much I
benefited from this informal
setting from which I could take
awav a meaningful Jewish as
well as social experience. This,
fKi. is oart of the meaning of
a Jewish Community Centrr for
South Florida."
Rabbi Solomon Schiff (top) offered a blessing as Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Russell (center) cut the ribbon to dedicate
the new Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center
in North Miami Beach. Metro Mayor Steve Clark (right)
participated along with Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion president Morton Silberman (2nd from left) and
executive vice president Myron J. Brodie.
Riverside's
two new chapels in
Hollywood ana Sunrise
serve the needs of
the entire
Jewish community in
Broward County.
In the Hollywood and HaBandafet
5801 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood.
920-1010
/n the Fort LoudenUe
1171 Northwest 61st /We.( Sunset Strip),Sunrise
584-6060
RIVERSIDE
Memorial ChapeL Inc/Funeral Dbectoa
Other, Riverside chapek in South Florida are located in
North Miami Beach. Miami Beach and Miami.
A. Oroubrs, L.F.D.
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T"
Friday,
June 18, 1976
The Jewish Floridian ana Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Blumenthal Becomes Beth Shalom President
Temple Beth Shalom held its
installation dinner dance on
May 30 in the Grand Ballroom
Installed were Dr. Fred Bhi-
menthal, president; Dr. Samuel
Meline. Jack Berman and Leon-
ard Orand, vice presidents; Dr
Mort0n Diamond, treasurer
Curt J. Schleimer, financial sec
retary; Maurice Segall, secre
tary; Jerome Friedman, record
ing secretary; and Jack Kleiner,
assistant secretary.
The three-year trustees are
Murray Cohen. Walter Gray,
Edward J. Kaplan, Morton Le-
vin, Jack Ruderman, Reuben
Schneider and Ted Tittman.
One year trustees are How-
ard Friedman, Stanley Margolis,
Barbara Peretz, Harold Polis]
Philip Rosenberg, Dr. Joel
Schneider and Alan Silverman.
The Men's Club officers are
Norman Bryer, president; Irv-
ing Belson, membership vice
president; Larry Bober, vice
president for orogramming; Ed-
ward Hoffman, vice president,
fund-raising; Martin Sklar, rec-
ording secretary; Jack Ruder-
man, corresponding secretary;
Albert Robert, financial secre-
tary; and Art Levy, treasurer.
The Senior Friendship Club
officers are Dorothy Kowitt,
president; Louis Bernstein, first
vice president; Betty Miller,
membership vice president;
Rose Bayard, recording secre-
tary; Morris Axinn, treasurer;
Max Weiss, financial secretary;
Mae Bernstein, corresponding
and social secretary; and Adele
Gerber, hospitality chairlady.
Bomb Rorks Rothschild Bank
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) A pow-
erful bomb exploded out-
side a branch of the Roth-
schild Bank injuring two
people and causing exten-
sive damage to the bank and
to adjacent buildings on the
fashionable Rue du Fau-
bourg St. Honore.
Police Chief Pierre Som-
meville said there were no
clues as to the perpetrators
yet. But police investigators
are considering the possibil-
ity that the bombing was the
work of an Arab group in
retaliation for a pro-Israel
rally held at the Paris fair-
grounds.
A 24-hour police guard has
been placed around other
branches of the Rothschild
Bank and at buildings housing
Jewish organizations as a pre-
cautionary measure.
THE NEWSPAPER Le Monde
reported that it received an
anonymous telephone call from
a man who said the bombing
was directed "against those who
support Zionism." The caller
claimed to represent a hitherto
unknown group calling itself
"The International Revolution-
ary Front."
Police say the bombers could
be a leftist anarchist group.
nossiblv working with the
Arabs.
The explosion occurred at
10:30 D.m. The bank was empty
it the time. It is owned by Guy.
Elie and Alain de Rothschild.
ill active in Jewish affairs.
Baron Guy de Rothschild is
president of the Central Jew-
ish Welfare Funds (FSJU) and
Baron Alain de Rothschild is
president of the Council of Jew-
ish Organizations of France
(CRIF).
BARON ELIE de Rothschild
is chairman of the French
United Jewish Appeal.
The Bank Is located only a
few biocks from the Elysee Pa-
lace, the official residence of
French Presidents. The neigh-
borhood is normally patrolled
around the clock by police cars
and plainclothes detectives.
Beth Shalom Holds Graduation
Forty-five students were grad-
uated from Temple Beth Shalom
Religious School on May 28.
They include Susan Appel, Amy
Bardasch, Michelee Bloom, Sha-
ron Erenbaum, Kurtis Fertman,
Robin Frvdman, Lawrence Gar-
ter and An Gelfant.
Also, B a m b i Graf, Sheryl
Graubart. David Greenberger,
Robin Haber, Bryan Hirsch,
Ralf Kamins, Douglas Kleiner,
Kenneth Koplin, Vaughn Lane,
Lee Mandel, Marcia Matalon,
Matthew Mayper, Shari Meyer
and Larry Miller.
Also, Michael Morris, Ennio
Murroni, David Natelson, Rob-
ert Nesselroth, Mark Pistiner,
Caryn Portnoy, Todd Rachles,
Mark Reinstein, Michele Rosen-
stein, Cynthia Ross, Cindy Roth,
Kenneth Schulman and Arthur
Shifrin.
Also, Lisa Siegel, Andrew
Sklar, Liza Sluchak. Louis Smith,
Shawn Spiers, Sandy Strauss,
Cindy Tonkin, Sanford Wilk and
Paul Zoldan.
JOINING in the graduation
ceremonies were students in the
first-year of the Junior Hebrew
High School class, taught by
Edith Grossman and David Se-
gal: Randi Bachman, Deborah
Baumgarten. Elyse Berg, Barry
FALLS KOSHER
POULTRY PRODUCTS
available at your
LOCAL KOSHER BUTCHER
or contact
Arthur Horowitz
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Zion Corporation
1717 N.W Seventh Avenue
Miami. Fia 33136
Tel 324 1855
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Blitz, Paul Cirulnick, Mark Eis-
enberg, Robert Flayman, Roger
Golden, Michael Hoffman, Nan-
cy Ketover. Robert Robert,
Charles Konover, Jacqueline
Mintz, Sheryl Natelson and
Scott Stern.
Dr. Fred Blumenthal and Rab-
bi Morton Malavsky honored
Shirley Cohen for her role as
coordinator and instructor of
the Hey Class program.
The ore-school department
held kindergarten graduation on
May 26. Ruth Spitzer was the
teacher of graduates Russell
Ellis. Keith Fleischer. Aesop
Hantman, Lee Kaplan,. Janine
Katz. Debbi Knee, Koesenko Ze-
nia. Melissa Rashbaum, Melanie
Schwartz and Philip Scuderi.
Delta Auditions
The Delta Players, whose
presentation of "Der Shirtz"
"H.M.S. Pinafore" in Yiddish
ran successfully for two sea-
sons, are planning a new pro-
duction: Gilbert and Sullivan's
'The Mikado" in a Yiddish
translation by Minis Walowit.
Since a large cast is required,
all who are interested in this
production or those with mu-
sical talent are asked to call
927-5291, 940-3711 or 929-1081.
Auditions are scheduled for
June 21 at Trafalgar Towers.
1400 South Ocean Dr.
All proceeds from perform-
ances will go to Israel.
Volpert Named Regional Manager
For Burdines Central Florida
Howard Volpert, manager of
Burdines' Hollywood store since
its opening in 1970, has been
promoted to vice president and
regional manager, Burdines Cen-
tral Florida, responsible for
Burdines Orlando and Burdines
Altamonte Springs. Volpert has
been with Burdines for 11 years.
Volpert. who is president-
elect of the Greater Hollywood
Chamber of Commerce, presi-
dent of Hollywood Fashion Cen-
ter Merchants Associations,
chairman of the advisory board
of Hollywood National Bank, is
listed in "Who's Who in Busi-
ness and Finance" and is a
board member of Seven Lively
Arts, Hollywood Philharmonic
and Temple Beth Shalom. He is
also a Mason and a Rotarian.
The Volperts and their two
children will make their home
in Longwood.
HOWARD VOLPERT
KGB Threatens Emigrants
LONDON(JTA)Twenty of the most active would-
be emigrants to Israel in Moscow have been warned by the
KGB that they will be liable to prosecution on charges of
parasitism unless they find jobs within a month. Among
them are Ilya Essas, Victor Barilovsky, Vladimir Prestin,
Zahar Tesker and Pavel Abramovich.
The warnings have been interpreted here as a sign that
the KGB is cracking down on the leading activists in the
Soviet capital.
These are all people who lost their jobs after unsuc-
cessfully applying to emigrate to Israel. This is the first
time they have been threatened with prosecution over their
work situ'lor.
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
arnett
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thru Friday 8 to
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Phona: 981-8555
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Phona: 920-37t9
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962-0*99


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
t riday, June 18, 1976
Dissent or Deference?
There is a growing uneasiness within the American
Jewish community at the recent willingness of some
American Jews to publicly criticize Israel. Some Jewish
leaders have attacked the critics and urged them to be
silent.
Israeli Ambassador Simcha Dinitz said that while
he supports a frank dialogue between American Jews
and Israelis he does not believe the vehicle for it is
the American news media. Rose Matzkin, president of
Hadassah, lashed out "at Jewish personalities who have
taken it upon themselves to publicly criticize certain
policies of the State of Israel at this critical juncture."
Both Mrs. Matzkin and Dinitz said the criticism pro-
vides ammunition for Israel's enemies.
This position is very disturbing. Many of the Jews
who have criticized Israel have just as good Zionist and
pro-Israel credentials as those who go down the line
with the government.
The Zionist movement has never been a monolithic
force. Zionists have always expressed divergent views.
Neither have Jews in th United States or Israel been
of one mind. After all both live in democracies.
Silencing criticism will not make the issues disap-
pear. But it will do more harm than open discussion
since it will force many persons out of the pro-Israel
cause, especially young people who need and want open
discussion. In the long run,
JDL Threat is Irresponsible
Rabbi Meir Kahane and his Jewish Defense Leagut
have exceeded their usual level of irresponsibility in
trying to be bad boys of the Jewish world. Kahane threat-
ened at a Tel Aviv news conference that, unless the
American government takes stronger action on behalf
of Soviet Jewry, there will be "kidnaping and possibly
worse" of Soviet diplomats in New York. This endan-
gers the Soviet Jewry movement as well as Jews in the
USSR itself.
Of course, Kahane will claim that he is not advo
eating kidnaping, only pointing out that it could happen.
The JDL, after every shooting or bombing at a Soviet
installation in New York, has denied responsibility ad
ding, however, that "we applaud it." But Kahane is re-
sponsible for leading young impressionable people intc
violence even if he does not commit any himself
It is therefore welcome that Israeli Foreign Minis
ter Yigal AJlon has stronglv condemned Kahane's threat
Allon correctly pointed out that violence will harm the
efforts being made for Soviet Jewry and will alienate
the non-Jewish support that the cause has won.
Perhaps most important was a statement issued
by six Orthodox rabbis and yeshiva deans that "vio-
lence and terror" by Jews are "contrary to halacha"
and a violation of Torah Law. The JDL has received
much of its support and membership from the Orthodox
cemmunity. Perhaps this community has finally realized
that the JDL is a liability in the important struggle for
.he right of Soviet Jews to emigrate.
Day of Solidarity
The Jewish woman as mother, wife, daughter
has played a major role in the history of the Jewish
people. Today, the Jewish woman, both in the United
States and in Israel, continues to play a vital part in
the enrichment of Jewish life and in the perpetuation
of the Jewish heritage.
Under the sponsorship of the Israel Histadrut Foun-
dation, Jewish woman in South Florida gathered this
week with the women of Israel once again to express
'he steadfast loyalty of American Jews with kin in Is-
rael.
Quality Education Costs Money
fJewisti Flcridian
. > MMAtia MUinw
OFFICE and HI-ANT 120 N.K 6th St.. Miami. Flu 23132 Phone 173-4605
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 273-4M5
P.O. Box *;?3. Miami. Florida 33101
I l;i:i> K. SHOCHKT 8UZANNK SHOCHBT SKI.MA M THOMPSON
Editor and Puhllxher Executive Editor Ajmintant to Publisher
All P.O. -ir.79 returns are to be forwarded to
The Jewish Floridian. P.O. Box 012973. Miami. Fla 33101.
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published Mi -Weekly
Second CIhmh Portage Paid at Miami. Fin
Jewish Federation of South liroward. Inc. SHOPAK EDITORIAL
ADVISORY COMMITTEE Nathan Prltcher. Chairman; Lewis K. Cohn;
Melvln.H. Baer; Dr. Samuel Meliue.-D.M l>
O Fred K. Shothe* Friday. June IS. 17
I HAVE not yet sorted out all
of the information pertinent
to the late lamented legislative
session, particularly as it re-
lates to education. But I do re-
call at least one distinguished
senatorial sentiment.
And that is that there is no
necessary relationship between
quality education and money.
It was said by several legisla-
tors in defense of the offensive
they joined against those who
wanted more funds for Florida
schools.
I SUPPOSE that as a mem-
ber in good standing of the
American middle class, nothing
will ever convince me that
there is no necessary relation-
Mindlin
ship between quality ANY-
THING and money.
It is not always true that
money wili necessarily buy
quality. But it is always true
ACMEERRJL^
that quality can not be bought
without money.
Anyone who thinks otherwise
knows nothing about quality
Or else, particularly as quality
relates to education, they have
contempt for educators because
in their view educators aren't
really doing anything impor.
tant anyway that a baby-sitter
couldn't do only slightly ie,5
effectively, and therefore they
believe that educators ought to
be available for hire almost as
cheaply.
CERTAINLY, it is true that
up until the recent past, educa-
tors HAVE been available for
hire cheaply.
There are two melancholy
considerations that go with this
One is that educators teach-
ers are a strange breed who
have only recently permitted
themselves the experience of a
higher level of self-esteem.
Until recently, they have
bought the view, in which the
public has a vested interest
that they are "dedicated" to a
"higher calling," like ministers
for example, and therefore
should be above demanding
proper payment for their serv-
ices, an error which, say, no
physician or attorney would
permit himself to make.
TEACHERS HAVE accepted
this estimation of themselves
without so much as a whimper
that they are important all
right, but that payment com-
mensurate with that importance
might somehow diminish it be-
cause, in Max Weber terms, a
"calling" is distinguishable from
a trade or a profession primar-
ily by the spiritual quality in
it. Hence, money is an irrelev-
ancy.
Or else, that they are im-
portant, all righ., but really
don't work very hard. They
have all that free time, all those
vacations no one else has, all
Continued on Page 9
Columnist Tagged Spiro Then
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weakly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Art* Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association, American Associa-
tion of English Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Arsa) One Yaar $4.00. Out of Town Upon
Request.
Volume 6
Friday, June 18, 1976
Number 13
20 SIVAN 5736
Back in those good old days
an Elizabeth Rqy-type would
gun down her prominent lover
and, immediately upon acquit-
tal, go out on a tour of the
vaudeville circuit as penance. I
think it was Damon Runyon who
commented somewhat wryly
how these innocent, helpless
little ladies holding a gun in
their hands for the first time
managed to get all five bullets
in a vital srx)t while the cops
consistently missed the robbers
at eqi'"' distance.
Whether or not this type of
"entertainment" ultimately kill-
ed vaudeville, it is a wish de-
voutly to be desired that crook-
ed clown, Spiro Agnew, may be
instrumental in killing off pres-
ent-day radio and television
talk shows.
THE PRESENTATION may
be updated, but trotting out this
thief, this corrupter of public
trust and his colleagues of
the Nixon administration is
as crass and as vulgar as em-
bracing the female killers of
yesteryear. At least, if there is
an excuse, they were found in-
nocent of their crime.
Besides, crime in America
ar>nears to be a matter of taste,
not law or some ancient, dis-
carded moral code. At the re-
cent meeting of the stockhold-
ers of the Northrop Corp., there
was tumultuous applause for the
company's chairman who had
; pleaded guilty to felottfr.ehaYn**
of making illegal contributions
'to Nixon (AgMw), ar least
$50,000 of which was used to
buv the silence of the Water-
gate burglars
The same outfit also paid
over $450,000 in bribes to the
Saudi Arabia thieves, Agnew's
tVDical clients. Of course. North-
rop is not alone you all know
EDWARD
COHEN
about Lockheed, Gulf Oil, 3M
and the like.
AND THE chairman of the
SEC, guardian of corporate
sanctity (appointed by Gerald
Ford), just a few weeks ago
came out in opposition to leg-
islation which would prohibit
American corporations from
paying bribes abroad to pro-
mote their business interests.'
Would be nice to hear from
Agnew on one of those talk
shows plugging his book (?) on
his views about bribing Amer-
ican public officials to "pro-
mote their business interests."
The man's an expert, having
been on the take for a long
time, all the way from Balti-
more to Washington.
How could Jews and other
nice oeonle have been so wrong
about this guy? I was rummag-
ing through those old files of
mine and ran across an undated
clipping.
ALL IT says is: "Miami Beach
Mayor Chuck Hall saw a plan-
ned maneuver by someone to
get rid of Nixon and Agnew. It
is no accident this happened
right now." Hall said. "Tve
known him (Agnew) for years
I think history will prove he
was a great man." Thafs all
there is. and I have no idea
how. when or where the re-
ference.
But I do have a dated clip-
ping, parts of which I will im-
modestly share with you: a
column I wrote that appeared
on October 16. 1970:
'Tor some time I have been
troubled with a desire to ban
the Vice President of the United
States as an obscene object
a political pornographer, if you
please Over the years the
once-laughed-at office has been
built to one of responsibility,
but Agnew has done more to
denigrate it than Victor Moore
as Vice President Throttlebot-
tom in 'Of Thee I Sing.' The dif-
ference and this is basic
is that Throttlebottom was a
lovable character, and one
could laugh at his idiocies and
share his frustrations as a
nonentity .
"IN SOME ways, Agnew's re-
semblance to the late, unla-
mented Joe McCarthy is un-
canny and, in my belief, he is
like McCarthy in that he has
finally over-reached himself."
If I hadn't come across those
two clippings, I doubt that I
would have added this to the
anti-Agnew outpouring. If the
"Jewish dominated media"
(what a sad laugh that is) arent
strong enough, or are so venal.
to keen him out of the press and
off the air how many other
bums and crooks do they pay
so much attention to? then
at least our Jewish leaders and
the defense aoencies ought to
stop the Dublicitv provided by
their expressions of outrage
Enough. We ought to let this
blight on America find his way
into that section of history re-
served for the other nerty
thieves and anti-Semites who
passed through, leaving only
small stench


vriday. June 18, 1976
m -.o^^^^^>...^ ^iA.-vy\i,nJaJ(
The Jewish Ftoridum and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
? M Abe ?
by ABE HALPRRN
-V^V^-k^-v^-i^~v-/--v
"fSTk the significance of
tot head covering known aa
Yirmolke?
Carol Schrolbcr
Montreal
^Yarmulke is a Yiddish word
of Slavic derivation. It is a
small peakless cap, a skullcap
made of various materials and
differing shapes. It Is a head
covering worn by many Jewish
people during services, meals
and study. Sometimes the name
Kappal is used, derived from
the Italian word Cappelo. which
means hat. The Hebrew word
for Yarmulke is "Kippah." .
According to the Encyclopae-
dia Judaica, Jewish tradition
requires men to cover the head
as a sign of modesty before
God, and women to do so as
evidence of modesty before
men. In Biblical times women
covered their heads with veils
or scarves as a sign of chastity
or modesty.
Some authorities claim that
the head covering or skullcap
may be traced to the mitre, a
cone-shaped headgear worn by
the HiRh Priest in the Temple
(Hebrew. Mitznefet, Exodus 28:
4).
MOST authorities agree vthat
there is no Biblical or Talmudic
law concerning the covering of
the head. Some sources state
that the oractice seems to have
originated in Babylonia during
the Talmudic period. It was
onlv during Medieval times.
however, that this custom (Heb.
Minhag) became binding
through the acceptance by tra-
ditional Jews of the Shulchan
Amch (the Code of Jewish
I
Paragraph six of chapter three
a the Code of Jewish Law cod-
ified in the 16th century states:
It is forbidden to walk four
cubits or utter a single word
of holiness with uncovered head.
AIm the little ones must be
accustomed to have their heads
covered in order that the fear
f God may be upon them.
"Prior to official codification
there was widespread diver-
stnce in the observance of the
custom. The Talmud (Nedarim
30b) says: 'Men sometimes have
their heads covered and some-
times go bareheaded. Women
ilwavs cover their heads: chil-
dren always go bareheaded.'
nus would imply freedom of
choice and involved many op-
inions and interpretations by
the Rabbis. Maimonides (12th
c:nturv) commenting on the
oractice, said that scholars and
"achers should not study or
'"eh while bareheaded and
JfKgested that worshipers
outfit1 to keep their heads cov-
(Albert M. Shubnan,
T-atewavi to Judaism." VoL 2.
no. W-4).
Rabbi Solomon ben Yehiel
SX" ,known M the Maharshal
"510-73). Russian Talmudist
*nd ^holar, in response to a
question whether it is permitted
fat without covering the
wa. stated: "I do not know of
v Prohibition against pro-
wxncmg the blessing without
wvenng the head... But .what
taL since other teachers
SiKvready UuRht tt
"rahlbition (to pray with un-
RS hcad)? II "tonishe.
omhH?. l)ev are accustomed to
52"* the uncovering of the
5ilen wFifn not pyer-
oroh h.v not know whnce this
, JWUon comes to them. For
H.L flnd anv Prohibition
"" "ncovering the head
except in the case of women"
(Ibid, Vol. 1. pp. 231-2).
IN MODERN times Orthodox
Jewry regards the covering of
the head, outside and inside the
synagogue, as a sign of alle-
giance to Jewish tradition. Ul-
trapious Jews wear the head
covering constantly. The wear-
ing of the skullcap or Yarmulke
during worship services is the
accepted rule in Conservative
synagogues. In Reform congre-
gations, however, it is not re-
quired; there is no uniformity
and the wearing of a head cov-
ering is optional.
In "Gateway to Judaism,"
Vol. 2, p. 60S. there is a long
list of explanations for the cov-
ering of heads. Following are
a few examples:
Covering the head was a sign
of humility, respect and rever-
ence among ancient peoples.
To go uncovered exposed the
individual to the dangers of the
desert sun and wind.
Bareheadedness was regard-
ed as a form of nakedness and
an imitation of the ways of the
heathen.
The imposition of wearing the
"Jew hat" as a badge of hu-
miliation, demanded of most
Jews in the Diaspora, became
an emblem of self-identification
and a crown of distinction.
Editor's note: Please send all
questions to:
??? ASK ABE ???
c/o Jewish Federation
of South Broward
2838 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood. Florida 33020
Lippman's Work
On Drug Bill
Pays Off
Fred Lippman. Democratic
candidate for the 12th Congres-
sional District seat, was present
on June 3. at the invitation of
Gov. Reubin Askew, when the
Generic Drug Bill was signed
into law.
CSSB 2740 and 2950 "is a
perfect example of what can be
done when the principles of
good business are brought to
bear on government," Lippman
said. It is estimated that the bill
will permit Florida residents to
save $40 million on the cost of
prescription drugs. The savings
for senior citizens, whose drug
bills are high, will be even
greater.
Lippman has committed him-
self to initiating a National
Generic Drug Bill, patterned on
the Florida law, if he is elected
to Congress. He believes that
"the miblic interest in served
bv lowering the costs of pro-
ducts essential to health and
welfare."
Medical Tests Set
For Senior Adults
Senior adults, associated with
the Jewish Community Center
and the Jewish Federation of
South Broward, may participate
in a free day-long health clinic
on June 30 from 9:30 a.m. to 4
p.m. at the Center, 2838 Holly-
wood Blvd.
Broward County Health De-
partment officials will test for
diabetes, glaucoma and hearing
dysfunction.
If anyone wishes to be tested,
contact the Center at 921-6511.
, WANTED
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Excellent opportunity in
growing temple. Contact
Mr. Cohn at 735-4040 or
7100 West Oakland Park
Blvd. Sunrise, Fla., 33313
Reserve Now For The
NtY IAYS t SUCCOTH
Services by
Renowned Cantor
Reserve lor Synagogue
Services & Holiday Meals
HIGH HOLY DAYS
12 days* 11 nights
imS|95 "' P*0" ***'
SPLIT STAY
6 days & 5 nights
,m ] 35 "" ""*on aoob4 occ
IncludingGLATT KOSHER Cuitmt
Yout Hosts MENASME MIRSCM
and RABBI NATHAN GOODMAN
MURRAV ENGEL. Gen Mar
OH OCUM I j?IT MwWmACH
IMU-LIFE BODY SHOP
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COLLISION SPECIALISTS
INSURANCE WORM
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JO VIARS EXPERII NCI
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1 OL. S. OF TREASURY
V, OL. S. OF 441
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BEN BERMAN, Proprietor
lAir Conditioning Sale
EVAPORATORS
COMPRESSORS
All Parts and Laker Mast American Cars
AMERICAN AUTOMOTIVE
6201 PEMBROKE RD.
966-6706
Sinai Invites Clergymen
For Brotherhood Sabbath
Clergymen of the Greater
Hollywood area and their con-
gregants are invited to join
Temple Sinai on Friday eve-
ning, June 18, for the annual
Brotherhood Sabbath.
A highlight of this special
Sabbath will be the presenta-
tion of the Temple Sinai Annual
Journal in honor of Mr. and
Mrs. S. Joe Perry.
On June 25 Rabbi David Sha-
piro of the Temple will honor
the 40 members of his Good-
Will Committees. These include
all those people who visit the
ill in private homes, nursing
homes, hospitals in the local
area and in Miami, and those
who are on telephone and sec-
retarial committees. The follow-
ing people are to be recognized
through the various commit-
tees: *'*!
Telephone Committee: Sadie
Berkelhammer, Sarah Albert,
Anna Dehls, Bertha Horowitz.
Elsie Schleifer. Mr. and Mrs.
Isidore Spector, Bertha Widlitz.
Betty Oberman. Daniel Janow-
skv and Jack Harari.
Shut-in Visitations: Mr. and
Mrs. Isidore Spector, Israel Sha-
piro and Mrs. Elsie Schleifer.
New Member visitation Com-
mittee: Mr. and Mrs. Sidney
Burd, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Gar-
ber, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Tam-
ler, Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Wid-
litz, Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Stol-
ler and Mr. and Mrs. Morris
Horowitz.
Hospital Committee: Sam
Bernstein. Marvin Carrell, Anna
Dehls, Sol Cooper. Jack Price,
G. Ben Levinson, Eli A. Stiftel.
David Podvesker. Perry Sim-
mons and Wolf Rosenblum.
Flower Committee: H e n r ?
Frankel and Helen Jakubowski

CiniUnt Rabbinical
Supervision Michfiach
m Priartti
RESERVE NOW
CALL
305-866-0121
On the Ocean
t 67ih Street
MiMi Such,
Fltriii 33141
Include These Names
The following names were
inadvertently omitted from the
list of Temple Beth El's board
of trustees for 1976-77: imme-
diate oast president, Robert M.
Baer: Sisterhood president, Hil-
da Ratner. Brotherhood presi-
dent. Harry Prussack.
Past nresidents of temple
who arc automatic board mem-
bers with full voting Drivileges
are Judge Morton L. Abram,
Lwis E. Cohn. Milton Forman,
Robert W. Gordon. Dr. Harry
Permslev and A. L. Mailman.
YOU WILL ENJOY A
BETTER VACATION
IN MIAMI BEACH
DAVID ROSMinS
root. e
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SUPERVISED DAY CAMP
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cars
AIR CONDITIONING
RECHARGED I SERVICED
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59.95
Now is the time to lot US recharge, service and chock
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GEORGE'S AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRS
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Visit us now or call for free transportation
2800 N.W. 56th Avenue
Lauderhiil. Florida, 33313
Telephone (305) 484 3044


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Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Snofar of Greater Holtywooa
Friday, June 18, 1976
Militarists Will Take Helm Mr* PUteU Acc*V* Award F"
BOSTON (JTA) An Amer-
ican Zionist leader and social
analyst has offered a picture of
Israeli society in the next ten
years in which persons with
military training and outlook
will hold dominant positions
and the majority of the popula-
tion, born in Israel, "will no
longer be reflective of the ad-
vocacy of the Jewish State and
Kodak Vows
No Bowing
To Arab
Boycott
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Eastman Kodak Company, in
response to actions brought by
the American Jewish Congress,
has announced that it would
"reaffirm" its opposition to the
Arab boycott at its annual meet-
ing this week.
The giant camera and film
corporation had faced a lawsuit
brought by Mr. and Mrs. Martin
K. Baiter Kodak sharehold-
ers and members of the Amer-
ica Jewish Congress for its
initial refusal to submit a reso-
lution to stockholders requiring
disclosure of any involvement
in the Arab boycott.
THE SUIT was filed as part
of a massive nationwide cam-
paign, sponsored by the AJCon-
aress, using stockholder action
against the Arab boycott. It
sought to have Kodak's annual
meeting postponed until the
resolution was restored to the
agenda for consideration.
Faced with the possible post-
ponement of its annual meet-
ing. Kodak agreed to reaffirm
its opposition to the boycott.
The suit was then withdrawn.
Will Maslow, general counsel
to the AJCongress. and attorney
for the stockholders, said that
the suit was filed against Kodak
following An opinion by the Se-
cirities and Exchange Commis-
sion that Kodak's activities in
the Arab countries and Israel
-'instituted "too insignificant"
n oart of its overall business to
rnuire including the AJCon-
gress resolution in its proxy
statement to stockholders.
ALTHOUGH Kodak's dealings
in the Middle East are only 4.3
nercent of Kodak's business.
Maslow said, they still amount
to more than SIS million each
vear. .
In response to its filing of the
stockholder resolution on the
Arab boycott, the AJCongTess
has received written assurances
from 22 of the country's largest
corporations including Gen-
eral Motors, Scott Paper and
Xerox that they will refuse
to submit to Arab boycott de-
mands.
the aspirations to attain it."
For them, according to Dr.
Judah J. Shapiro, president of
the Labor Zionist Alliance, "Is-
rael will be their country of
birth and its realities will shape
their views as citizens of that
state and as Jews."
DR. SHAPIRO made his com-
ments at a luncheon meeting of
the National Jewish Communal
Workers Division of the LZA.
His topic was "Contemporary
Social Issues Facing Israel" in
the decade ahead.
"This will be the first Jewish
society in history with military
training and outlook for a maj-
ority of its members. That is
bound to affect the pace, the
methods and the objectives of
those who conduct Israel's af-
fairs," Dr. Shapiro said.
1
He observed that "Unfortun-
ately, the constant pressures of
war and the international com-
munity and the economic strains
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will have eliminated any proj-
ection of a state of normalcy
and peace."
"FEW in Israel in the next de-
cade will have been raised to
a vision of a Jewish State liv-
ing at peace with its neighbors
and evolving a Jewish society
in relation to the local environ-
ment and culture."
Dr. Shapiro predicted that
"The suspicion of the Arab
neighbors will not easily allow
an adaptation to the culture of
the Middle East milieu and
there will be a self-imposed for-
eign quality to the Jew in the
Middle East.
"The Israelis will see them-
selves as Westerners, related to
the larger or affluent Jewish
communities and thereby mo-
tivate the Arabs to charge the
Israelis with being an intruding
element, though the Arabs are
responsible for Israeli aliena-
tion." Dr. Shapiro said.
SILBNT NO
EDITOR'S NOTE: The Jewish Federation of South Broward has
an active Soviet Jewry Committee, headed by Elaine Pittell.
For information about current projects, including letter-writ-
ing to help free Soviet Jews, call 921-8810.
Following are excerpts from
a letter to the Bendry Prosecu-
tor regarding POC Sender Le-
vinzon:
"... The six-year sentence
handed down to Sender Levin-
'.011 for selling six pairs of trous-
ers was too light for you. From
the beginning you told lies and
twisted facts, thus lighting a
fire which exudes the terrible
odor of anti-Semitism.
"Why don't you write about
the unjust fate of the Soviet
Jews, such as Sender Levinzon
and his family, who are denied
permission to go to Israel? The
refusal is so top secret' that we
are never told the reason for it.
You write nothing about the in-
human meetings at which Jews
have to request their references,
dismissals from work, expulsion
from institutions of higher
learning, tapping and discon-
nected phones, etc.
"You neglect to mention that
Sender was decorated with a
military medal at age 22. The
IS days during which he was
illegally detained by the MVD
in February, 1974, you call 'ab-
senteeism from work.' Your
morality is a lie. Your morality
has nothing to do with human-
ity."
From "Soviet Jewry
ACTION Newsletter,"
/*
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Community Relations Work
Hollywood civic leader and
Jewish Federation worker Elaine
(Mrs. Robert) Pittell was hon-
ored recently by the Broward
County Community Relations
Committee during its annual
awards ceremonies recognizing
outstanding community citizens.
Mrs. Pittell, whose award was
in the area of "Religion," was
cited as a ""modest lady who
has helped develop Interfaith
groups of Christians and Jews
. and who has worked in the
total community through the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward. Stemming from her
own Jewish faith she has pro-
moted better understanding and
increased respect for all faiths."
Just last month Mrs. Pittell
was honored by Federation for
her continued efforts. She re-
ceived the June Gordon Award
for Young Women's Leadership
"in recognition of exceptional
service to the Women's Divi-
sion and future potential to the
betterment of our community."
ELAINE PITTELL
At Federation she is chair-
man of the Soviet Jewry Com-
mittee.
Sisterhood Installs Rose Pritsker
Rose Pritsker has been in-
stalled as president of the Sis-
terhood of the Hallandale Jew-
ish Center. Congregation Beth
Tefila.
Other officers are Rose Es-
terson. vice president in charge
of programming; Minnie Drey-
fuss, vice president in charge
of fund-raising; Estelle Gordon,
vice president in charge of
membership; Sara Paskow,
treasurer; Jean Frank, financial
secretary; Bess Schneider, rec-
ording secretary; and Ann Katz,
corresponding secretary.
Board members-at-large are
Rose Azerrad. Rose Deutsch,
Rose Cohen. Ann Golden, Helen
Leveson. Lil Weissman,. Pearl
Hockheiser and Mildred Sud-
now.
Chairman of the installations
was Essie Mendelsohn.
The New,-,
$50
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ChMdcon undor 1
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Juno, July, Augut
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June 18, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shotar of Greater Hollywood
Hadassah Planting Trees in JNF Park
Pae 7
^e
mbers of Hadassah. Amer-
, Mizrachi Women and Pio-
L, Women participated with
Women for the Jewish Na-
ai Fund at the Bicentennial
on sponsored by the JNF
Tiune 2.
ln honor of America's 200th
Lrthday. the JNF plans to build
American Bicentennial Na-
] Park 25 miles southwest
(Jerusalem This once-desolate
5tch of land, rich in historical
I Biblical significance, is be-
reclaimed for agriculture,
station, tourism and rel-
ation.
The park will contain a Pavi-
j of States a million trees
honor the SO United States
heroes of the American
evolution Hadassah, largest
otributor to the JNF since its
eDtion in 1926, will develop
[Hadassah Plaza in the park.
SOPHIA PRESSMAN, chair-
man of Hollywood Hadassah
Jotnen for the JNF, announced
that Anita and Herman Yorks
have made a contribution for
the planting of a 3,000 tree
jrove in memory of his par-
Bits, Abraham and Rose Yorks.
Anita Yorks is an "Ima," a
JJother in Israel supporting the
education and welfare of an Is-
raeli child. Herman Yorks is a
Hidassah Associate.
Contributions for other trees
were made by Lillian Goldberg
Ami chairman of Hillcrest. and
Rose Blumenstein, also of Hill-
crest.
There will be a dedication
ceremony for the park in Israel
on July 4, attended by delegates
from the 50 states.
Hollywood Hadassah Holds
Leadership Training Seminar
Under the direction of Sophia
Pressman, Hollywood Chapter
leadership chairman, the chap-
ter recently held a four-day
leadership training seminar at
the Hillcrest Playdium. The
seminar, which provided an in-
tensive investigation of the lat-
est methods in leadership train-
ing, resulted in a dynamic new
approach reflecting the exper-
tise of nrofessionals and the
practical experience of season-
ed Hadassah leaders.
Officers who participated in
the sessions were Helen Simon,
president. Beach; Louise Gould,
president and Helene Mjller,
membership chairman. H'Atid;
Birdie Fishman, president Hill-
crest; Evelyn Wilpon, president,
and Melvia Toll, donor chair-
man. Sabra; Helen D. Storfer.
nast president. Pearl Yellen and
Rose Gross, presidium presi-
dents. Florence Ravitsky. mem-
bership chairman; and Lily Her-
man, financial secretary, Sha-
lom.
Mrs. Pressman announced
that Certificates of Leadership
will be awarded to all those who
successfully completed the
course and that leadership ses-
sions will resume in the fall.
Sole! Men Elect Jim Kronengold
Jim Kronengold was elected
president of the Temple Solel
Men's Club on June 11. Other
officers elected are Joel Mish.
first vice president; Stanley
Katlin, second vice president;
Myles Scher, fund-raising vice
president; Robert Gelfand, pro-
gram vice president; Morris
Cook, membership vice presi-
dent; Leo Maltzman .treasurer;
and Jerome Schlosher, secre-
tary.
The two-year members are
Dr. Michael Rush. Norman Eat-
on. Harvey Soufrine, Charles
Bloch, Marvin Malkiel. The one-
vear members are Arnold Se-
del. Donald Samuels, Sam Man-
del. Herbert Silverman, Dr.
Steve Ordet. Jim Edwards and
William Wallace.
Rabbi Robert Frazin was the
installing officer.
The Orthodox Rabbinical Council of Greater Miami
(Rabbi M. Shapiro. Pres.) Proudly Announces That
K & K KOSHER
CATERERS
3579 Dixie Highway
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
is now catering for all parties and affairs using only
GLATT KOSHER MEATS
Mike Kuperman, Formerly of
Burnside Caterers of N.Y.
Gem Caterers of N.Y.
Leonard's of Great Neck, N.Y.
is now bringing his famous catering
talent to Florida serving temples
homes
office parties
Bar Mitzvahs
CALL
DADE 940-0197
BROWARD 561-3500
PALM BEACH 842-2889
Helen (Mrs. Harry) Simons (center), new president of
fhe Hollywood Beach Group of Hadassah, chatted with
outgoing president Sadye (Mrs. Harry) Bagdan (left)
and Youth Aliyah chairman Lillian (Mrs. Charles) Siegal.
ANNOUNCING..
54500 Tons Of fun!
a new addition to the
Consumers, in our opinion, should be label
conscious, and we at Falls are very proud
of what we call our signature collection of
labels.
First, we have the Falls name, recognized
nationwide as one of the finest all natural,
Kosher, clean Chickens.
Next, we have the signature of the United
States Department of Agriculture, assuring
you of unrivaled wholesomeness.
And now, we have added the signature of
he most respected name in National
Kosher supervision, the granted by the
Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations.
The Falls Signature Collection....
a status symbol for your table
THE NATURAL KOSHER CLEAN CHICKEN
(t^\ FALLS KOSHER POULTRY
SOUTH FALLSBURG, N.Y 12779
TV "Fun Ship*" <: \K\IV U.K. and
MARIM <;KA>, 27,230 fum ions .a. I..
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liavc metre swimming pools (even in-
door pools), more lounge*, more ship-
Itoaril activities, more entertainment
(including two different show* each
night), more public ileek .spate and the
largest staterooms. The reason we have
so much space is that each of the "fun
tss CARNIVALE, Depart*
Every Saturday From Miami
For San Juan, St. Maarten
And St Thomas
ship,' are IIM.r \<;\l\ I.AKCKK
than an) other 7-day mttor ship out of
Miami! Wr also offer the fine,! Inter-
national and \merieau cuisine, full
gambling casino*, the most popular
itorls-of-call. and we're the only 7-day
fleet that docks at cverv port.
W In ii y on think altoul going on a
mis.', think of "the Fun Ships". Ire
offer more bnmcr hi the ounce. More
fun to the Ion!
tss MAROI GRAS, Departs
Every Sunday From Miami
For Nassau, San Juan And
St Thomas
For information or reservations see your Travel Agent
Carnival Tours, 820 Biacayne Blvd., Miami, Florida 33132

H
Cruise "the Fun Ship*"
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K.'MaiulGEfe

each 27.250 grow tona registered in Panama
$365-$565
per person double occupancy
rate* are for base season sailing dates and
are higher for certain peak season sailing data*.


Up,!
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar oj Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 18, 197J
%e
^aMmtkai flag*
co-ordinated by ifw
Greater Miami Rabbinical Assooatio*
coditor
Dr. Mix A. liptchitz Rastbi Robert j. Oritand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
JEWISH HISTORY IN AMERICA
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
Lincoln and the JeWS Should Women Be Ordained as Rabbis?
Abraham Lincoln (1809-65),
the 16th President of the United
States, entered the White House
at a time when Jewish self-
consciousness in America was
Retting ready to test Jewish
recognition and status. In his
first inaugural address, Lincoln
referred to Christianity as one
of the principal supports of the
nation in its davs of crisis.
The intimation that Christian-
ity was the American state reli-
gion aroused many Jews, in-
cluding Isaac Mayer Wise, edi-
tor of "The Israelite," a power-
ful force in the formation of
Jewish public opinion on Jew-
ish and national problems. Wise
wrote most patronizingly of
"Poor old Abe Lincoln ... the
country squire":
"We have only to say for Mr.
Lincoln, that his style of writ-
ing is so careless and without
anv successful attempt at either
correctness or elegance that he
must not be criticized in using
this or that word to express an
idea. He takes domestic words,
as used in Springfield and vi-
cinity, to express familiar ideas.
In Springfield religion is called
Christianity, because people
there do not think of any other
form of worship, hence Mr. Lin-
coln uses the same word to ex-
press the same sentiment. Mr.
Lincoln received the heaviest
vote of infidels ever given to
any man in this country. We do
not believe there is a German
infidel, American eccentric,
spiritual rapper or atheist in the
northern states that did not vote
for Mr. Lincoln. Let us see how
much benefit he will derive
from their Christianity, or how
he will settle the political trou-
bles with such piety. He does
not care for words. By and by
he will learn the precise use
and import of terms."
President Lincoln had several
Jewish friends and contacts with
individual Jews. He was the first
president to become officially
involved in national questions
of Jewish equality and ami
J?"'ish discrimination.
TWO SUCH questions are of
historic significance. One was
related to the appointment of
Jewish chaplains for the army
and for military hospitals Leg-
islation passed by the House of
Representatives in July, 1861,
required regimental chaplains
to be "regularly ordained min-
isters of some Christian denomi-
nation." An active campaign
was mounted to have the law
changed.
Th- Rev. Arnold Fischel of
New York went to Washington
as a representative of the Board
of Delegates of American Is-
raelites to lobby and act aa civil-
ian chaplain. In a letter to Rev.
Fischel, Lincoln wrote:
"I find that there are several
particulars in which the present
1'iw in regard to Chaplains is
supoosed to be deficient, all of
which I now design presenting
to the appropriate Committee
of Congress. I shall try to have
a new law broad enough to cov-
er what is desired by you in be-
half of the Israelites."
Bv Julv. 1862, a new law
made it possible for rabbis to
srve as military chaplains
Innid* Protestant ministers
an-1 Catholic priests. In May,
1*62. before regimental chap-
laincy Qualifications were
changed, a bill was passed with-
out anv demoninational quali-
fications' authorizing the ap-
pointment of hospital chaplains.
The same pay, rank and regu-
lations applied to both the field
and hospital chaplains. In the
case of the latter. Lincoln did
not wait for Congressional ac-
tion but requested certain
clergymen to act as hoapital
chaplains, pledging to press
Congress to legalize their ap-
pointments, which he did.
ANOTHER serious matter of
anti-Jewish discrimination was
General Grant's notorious Or-
der No. 11, in which all Jews
were ordered expelled, within
24 hours, from the crea of
Grant's command on the alleged
grounds they were, engaging in
illegal trade. Jews were furious.
The first to set out for Wash-
ington was a delegation from
Paducah. Kentucky, led by Ce-
sar Kaskel. Arriving on the eve-
ning of January 3, 1863, they
went immediately to the White
House, accompanied by Repre-
sentative Gurley of Ohio. Des-
pite the hour, the President re-
ceived them and, learning the
object of their visit, penned an
order instructing that Grant's
order be revoked.
Before the result of Kaskel's
mission became known, Isaac
Mayer Wise was on his way to
the White House with another
delegation. They learned of Lin-
coln's order but decided to com-
plete their journey and thank
the President for his prompt
action.
Telling of the interview, in
"The Israelite." Wise wrote:
". the President gave ut-
terance to his surprise that such
an order should have been is-
sued. "I don't like to see a class
or nationality condemned on
account of a few sinners," he
said. The President fully con-
vinced us that he knows of no
distinction between Jews and
Gentiles and that he feels no
prejudice against any national-
ity and especially against the
Israelites. We had little chance
to say anything, the President
being so splendidly eloquent on
this occasion. He spoke like a
simple, plain citizen and tried
in various forms to convince us
of the sincerity of hia words on
this matter."
When the President was as-
sassinated, Wise spoke of "the
generous, genial and honest
man. who stood at the head of
our people in this unprecedent-
ed struggle for national exist-
ence and popular liberty; whose
words and deeds speak alike
and aloud of his unsophisticated
mind, purity of heart, honesty
of purpose, confidence in the
great cause, and implicit faith
in the justice of Providence,
which inspired him to consist-
ency, courage and self-denial;
this Abraham Lincoln, who en-
deared himself to so many mil-
lions of hearts, and gained the
admiration of other millions of
people, both at home and
abroad: whom the myriads of
freedmen considered their sav-
ior .. the man who stood at
the head of affairs during this
gigantic struggle ."
By STEPHEN C. USTFTELD,
Associate Rabbi
Temple Sinai of Hollywood
Full and equal participation
of women has become a major
social question. In th- past few
years the number of women be-
ing admitted to professional ca-
reers has increased geometric-
ally. The dramatic changes in
all aspects of the status o. wom-
en necessitate that we confront
the question of whether we ap-
prove of women rabbis.
A little background informa-
tion may be of interest. A few
years ago Hebrew Union Col-
lege (Reform) ordained a wom-
an who is now serving as as-
sistant rabbi in a large New
York City congregation.
Since then, Hebrew Union as
well as the Reconstructionist
Rabbinical College have confer-
red the title of rabbi on a hand-
Jewish Theological Seminary
(Conservative) and all the Or-
thodox rabbinical schools have
thus far not accepted female
ful of female candidates. The
students into their ordination
programs.
My own feeling is that we
should encourage and support
the ordination of women as
Question Box ? ?
By RABBI DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
Question: Why la carry in*
prohibited on the Sabbath?
Answer: The act of carrying
is one of the 39 major categories
of work that are prohibited on
the Sabbath. What is involved
in this prohibition is carrying
an object from the private to
the public domain, or from the
public to the private domain, or
from one location in the public
domain to another location in
the public domain.
The rabbis in the Talmud at-
tempt to derive this prohibition
from the destription of the pro-
vision of two portions of Manna
on Friday in the wilderness
Religious
Directory
rt*u*rDAir
"-LANDALI JEWISH CINTII
(Coneervatlve). 41* NB Sth Av
Rabbi Harry Schwartz. Canto-
co* Oanstoar.
NORTH MIAMI If ACM
'NAl iTtmpIti of NORTH OADI
ISS01 ni Una Ave. Raferm. Rabbi
Ralph P. Klngalrv. Cancer irvlna
fMha*
NORTH HOWARD
CORAL SPRINOa HIBR1 +1 CON
OR EG AT ION. R.form. I /*1 N.W
100th Avt. Rabbi Man W. it. 44
-AMARAC JEWISH CEN CKR, STM
N.W. 57th St.. .ConHrvi.iv.) Rab
bl M/iton j. Qrsaa.
HOUTWOOt)
"MNO ISRAEL OF HOI .VWOOD
Orthodox), Mat Starling Rd. op
peeKe Hollywood Hill* High achoo'
realdent Or. Frank ataln.
' EMPLE BETH EL (R.form) IMl I
Mth Av. Hollywood Rabbi IllnH
Jaffa. Aaalatant Rabbi Harvay M
nANiATION
PLANTATION JEWISH .ONQRI
oation. 400 Sevth Nab Hill R..
Plantation Rabbi ArtM. Abram
BETH IHAI.OM (T ample) oafiaerve
tlve. 4*01 Arthar art. Rabbi Merle-
Nalavaky. Cantor irvlna Oat*.
a
-EMF-LE BITM AHM (Coneervatlv.
110 AW tn* Aye.. Hollywood
EM-LB AINAI (Coneervatlvj). 1
eemeen at Rabbi Davlf ahaolro
Aeeeclat. Ilabbl Cbalm a. Lletfltf i
Canter VKwai Heilbraan
rCMFLtl aOLCL (Liberal). B100 Sher
idan t.. Hollywood Rabbi Robert
Frailn ai-c
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Korn. Rabbi Bertram W.,
"Eventful Years and Experi-
ences." The American Jewish
Archives. Cincinnati. 1954.
Korn. Rabbi Bertram W.,
"Lincoln. Abraham," Encyclo-
paedia Judaica. Jerusalem 1971.
Marten*. Isaac. "Lincoln and
the Jews." Publications of The
American Jewish Historical So-
ciety. Vol. 17, 1909.
'BMRl-a aatAEL (Corsorvativ.
*e*0 SW abth *. Raael Avren-
jrnmtt.
'MFLK IN THE PINE* (Canaerva
live) 1*00 N. Unlyerelty Dr., fix
reko Plneo RabM Sidney Ltrhln
ill
CANLHEIIGHTING TIME
20 SIVAN 7:53
m
makine it unnecessary to cross
the threshold between one's
home and the street to gather
the Manna so "that a person not
go out from his place on the
Seventh day" (Erubin 17b).
Another Talmudic source tries
to derive the prohibition against
carrying to the Biblical passage
where Moses tells the people
not to bring any more contribu-
tions to him for the sanctuary
(Exodus 36:6). Some claim that
the prohibition generally war
ordained to separate the person
from the public domain of the
market place on the Sabbath, so
that he can enjoy the spiritual
benefit of privacy on the Sab-
bath.
It is also to be noted that the
transport of objects from one
domain to another is a creative
act since the change of loca-
tion of objects is a productive
and purposeful objective. Since
the Sabbath requires us to re-
frain from creative and pur-
poseful acts, as the Almighty
did on the first Sabbath of crea-
tion, carrying objects across
such borderlines is included.
Indeed our economy has
show* how vital transportation
of Kooda can be from a com-
mercial poi
>ew.
rabbis. I say this because I
lieve that women are fuD
equal to men in all matters
spiritual and intellectual cap,
city. My female congreganti
and particularly the your
women who are my studen
are no less devoted to the ..
and traditions of Judaism
their male counterparts.
JUDAISM RECOGNIZES tl
sexual differences between
and women, but I am not peij
suaded that those differ
must be reflected by a
tion of career choices imp
upon those potential leader
who were not prudent enoug
to be born male.
Women constitute more th
half the Jewish population,
we deny such a large portion i
our people the opportunity
develop their fullest inner eX
pression as Jews? If that ex
pression leads some of them
the rabbinate, so be it.
In articulating these feeling
I am guided by one important
caveat: Judaism is not a fad
I am sensitive to those who
gard the ordination of womerj
as a strange and sudden ph
nomenon. Some even protesi
that it is an unhealthy cone
sion to the feminist movemen
But I strongly believe thiflf
women who enter the rabbin
will undoubtedly do so out of I
sincere commitment to
Torah and the Jewish peopk
I believe that the acceptance
women rabbis represents a nat|
ural evolution of the highesl
Jewish ideals of human equalit;
and dignity.
If we accept female rabbis
a means of broadening the
sibilities for full Jewish livin
then all Jews male and fe
-nale -- will be enriched.
Behaalotekha
"When thou lightest the lamps, the seven lamps
shall give light in front of the candlestick" (Num. 8.2).
BEHAALOTEKHA "And the Lord spoke unto
Moses, saying: 'Speak unto Aaron, and say unto him:
When thou lightest the lamps, the seven lamps shall
give light in front of the candlestick.' And this was
the work of the candlestick, beaten work of gold; unto
the base thereof, and unto the flowers thereof, it was
beaten work; according unto the pattern which the
Lord had shown Moses, so he made the candlestick"
(Numbers 8.1-4). After the Levites had been purified,
they who were between their twenty-fifth (Numbers
8.24) and their fiftieth years, came to the tent of meet-
ing to take the place of the first-born in the holy serv-
ice. In the second year after the Israelites had departed
from Egypt, they observed the Passover festival on the
14th day of the first month, Nissan. Those who having
touched a corpse were deemed impure, were required
to wait a month to observe the festival. On the 20th
day of the second month, the cloud rose from the
tabernacle, and the children of Israel journeyed from
Mount Sinai, each tribe grouped around its standard,
three days' distance behind the Ark. At this time, the
Israelites began burdening Moses with their complaints
To ease the burden, 70 elders, on whom Moses' spirit
rested, were delegated to serve under him.


June 18, 1976
'
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
til MINDLIN
wlity Education Has a High Price Tag
Continued from Page 4
i stress-fref and sheltered
Ktence. and so don't deserve
fcv more money a view that
lLVs an abysmal public ig-
--x of the real and ta-
ngly brutal world in
the teacher these days
secont. melancholy con-
ation that goes with the
er's cheap availability un-
recent past is that low
h\e in fact brought low
oty.
; EVIDENCE is, of course,
ting that things are chang-
ing in the self-esteem of teach-
ers themselves.
For the first time, they are
beginning to dare to believe
that their expertise is worth the
same remuneration as the re-
muneration enjoyed by, say,
plumbers, is unplugging a
stopped-up sink any more
worthy than unplugging a
stopped-up mind?
Someday, teachers may even
dare see a worthiness equiva-
lency between themselves and
lawyers. Or doctors. Or per-
haps legislators.
THIS 15 a critical psychologi-
longer prefer the enslavement
of praise for their calling to
cal change in teachers, who no
wages for their worth.
That the legislature in Tal-
lahassee had such an incredi-
bly difficult session, with its
primary pork-chop polemics di-
rected against the education
budget, in'cates a clear nw-re-
ness of this change.
Those legislators who argued
that there is no necesscry rela-
tionship between education and
money were simply whistling
in the dark simply giving
one final tug on the public
Iieartstrir.ji, which would like to
continue to believe it, too.
A GROWING awareness of
the relationship between qual-
ity education and money, and
the growing public resistance
to the awareness, is best ex-
emplified by the stunning news
item fror Clearwater last week
that t.n of IS applicants for
Pinellas County teaching posts
failed to do better in reading,
writing and other qualifying
examinations than three-fourths
of the eighth grade students
they would be teaching if they
were hired.
This can be explained by the
fact that expert teachers have
long since begun to rebel
against the cheap exploitation
of their expertise at the same
time that functional illiterates
are hired to fill their ranks be-
cause 1) they are not likely to
make too much trouble about
pay; and 2) their acquiescence
to slave wages and slave condi
tions would dilute the demands
of top flight t.jchers for re-
muneration commensurate with
their skills.
Is theii any w-.nder tnat at
week's beginning there was a
bill on Gov. Askew's desk
which, if impleme ted, would
deny Florida high ochool grad-
uates their diplomas unless they
can pass an eightn grade lit-
eracy test? We shouldn't ex-
pect more from cut-rate educa-
tion.
Carter Vows Belief in Church and State Separation
ELIZABETH, N.J. In a bid to beef up his support
nong American Jewish voters, Democratic candidate Jim-
Carter appeared before a crowd of 2,000 persons at the
vish Educational Institute here Sunday.
In a move reminiscent of Catholic nominee John F.
ennedy's appearance at a Baptist convention in Dallas,
in 1960, Carter affirmed his absolute belief in the total
ration of church and state.
|CARTER ATTEMPTED to al-
movement" toward a ren.-ved
step-by-step diplomacy toward
pjace in the Middle East if
elected to the presidency.
In a question-an-answer ses-
sion fallowing his presentation,
Carter said that "One of the
concerned Jewish feelings
ut his "hard-shell" South-
Baptist 'born again" reli-
convictions.
Jling for "unswerving" sup-
tf Israel's right to exist,
rter said he would seek "early
major problems that I have
faced in this election is because
of my own religious beliefs I
am a Baptist. I am a deeply re-
ligious person, and particularly
among Jewish v-ters this has
been a cause for some concern.
I think it is the kind of issue
that should bt addressed frank-
ly."
CARTER WAS responding to
a statement from the audience
that said "Jimmy Carter is
identified with many members
of his church who have a long
history of anti Catholicism,
anti-Semii ism, and anti-Commu-
nism. Do you think ;his applies
to you. and how do your be-
liefs and how do your feelings
relate to ia" members of your
church?"
Carter declared: T worship
the same God you do. We study
the taaa Pi St" vom do."
He ontinuetf. Thsre are
good Baptists and bad Baptists
ihere are gooj Jews and bad
j.ws. ihere are good Catho-
lics anc1 bad Catholics. But the
judgment of who's bad is one
that is best left to God."
fftBIM SAiJ that "I learn-
ed from my early years that
you should not judge other peo-
ple because while you look at
the mote in your brother's eye,
vou should be more concerned
..bout the beam that is in your
I also oeiievc that this s a
country where anyone's own re-
ligious beliefs should not be a
matter of prejudice or concern
and of all the people in the
world who should have the
least prejudice because of an-
other's religious faith, it should
certainly be fob "
Carter spoke marina a Mae
velvet yarmuire.
tiro Closes Damascus Embassy in Wake of Attack
| CAIRO Egypt has ordered
i withdrawal of its diplomatic
sion in Syria. At the same
t, it demanded the closing
he Syrian embassy in Cairo.
apparently reacted in
onse to the attack Saturday
its embassy in Damascus,
I Damascus declared that the
ck was provoked by a simi-
incident against its own
Wassy in Cairo.
|Observers here note that the
uring of relations between
two countries has grown
I of Syria's invasion of Le-
r ft ft |BEIRTJT Syrian troops this
^ closed in on Lebanon's
*U1 city under cover of
lies in attacks on Palestin-
[_commando areas.
Dlanes rocketed and
the city. Shortly after
strafinc, forces of Yasir
a' s Palestine Liberation
V equipped with anti-tank
Biles toured the Moslem
"r of the city.
Pwgjng here is the ap-
p fact that Syria intends
to control the commando move-
ment in Lebanon in the same
way that King Hussein did in
Jordan in 1970. essentially by
eliminating it
ft ft ft
TEL AVTV Israeli circles
are keeping a careful watch on
the build-up of Soviet naval
strength in the Eastern Mediter-
ranean. While the Russians
normally deploy about 40 to 50
units in the region, recent re-
enforcements have increased
the number to 75 vessels, ap-
proaching the size of the fleet
en the evr oi toe iom Kip
Ford Vows There
Will Be No
Policy Change
JERUSALEM (JTA) President Ford told an I*-
J! newsPaPer editor that there will be no changes in his
*>" towards Israel after the American Presidential elec-
next November. He made that pledge in an otherwise
j, e record" interview with Moshe Zak, deputy editor
"nv, m the Oval Office of the White House last week.
wterview was published here.
/wd by Zak for an "on-the-record" message to hi
,chs',he ''resident said: "After the election there will be
"thp ln the direction of my pcy-
,s, jJERF- WILL be no change in my devotion to the
ions C several times defined momentum, good re-
bin Thth Israe'' my own friendly relations with Premier
ihere win be no shift from the fundamentals of my
i policy."
Dur War when Moscow ap-
parently had advance intel-
ligence of the impending
Egyptian-Syrian attack on Is-
rael.
Most significant, perhaps, is
the arrival of the Russian mis-
sile cruiser Uchakov in Eastern
Mediterranean waters *|th the
Soviet Chief of Staff, Gen. Vic-
tor Kulakov, aboard.
The beefing up of Soviet
naval strength is seen as a
warning against any unwar-
ranted internvention in the Le-
banese conflict, Adm. (Res.)
Abraham Botzer, former com-
mander of the Israeli navy,
said here.
6 ft ft
NEW YORK Alfred Brit-
tain m. chairman of the board
of Bankers Trust Co., denied in
a letter to the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that Bankers
Trust is engaged in a boycott
of Israel, or that the company
discriminates in its employ-
ment "on any basis against any
grouo."
The letter also denied that
commercial banks are respon-
sible for the "terms and condi-
tions" contained in letters of
credit. Bankers Trust was one
of 25 major American commer-
cial banks named by the B'nai
B'rith Anti-Defamation League
on Mar. 11, along with "more
than 200 U.S. corporations," as
"waging economic war against
Israel in collaboration with the
Arabs."
ft
PHILADELPHIA Dr. Abra-
ham I. Katsh, renowned Hebrai-
ca scholar, author and educator.
announced his retirement as
president of the Dropsie Uni-
versity here effective Aug. 31.
However, he will continue his
association with the university,
engaging in writing, teaching
and research
President Katsh, who intro-
duced the teaching of modern
Hebrew at the university level
in the United States at New
York University in 1933, has
served for nine years as presi-
dent of Dropsie and as its Re-
search Professor of Hebraica.
He is the third president of
Droosie, which was founded in
1909. and the first alumnus to
become the unive-sity's presi-
dent, having received his Doc-
tor of Philosophy degree from
DroDsie in 1944
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Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June
Hadassah Prexy Flays Critics of Israel
NEW YORK (JTA) Rose E. Matzkin, president
of Hadassah, lashed out "at Jewish personalities who have
taken it upon themselves to publicly criticize certain pol-
icies of the State of Israel at this critical juncture. Their
statements are being picked up and exploited by organized
dissidents within the Jewish community as well as by mem-
bers of Congress and the Administration who would like to
decrease various types of aid to Israel," she said.
Mrs. Matzkin made her
remarks at a press confer-
ence held before the house-
warming of the new nation-
al headquarters, Hadassah
House here.
She also condemned the
politicization of the World
Canadians Deplore Olim Status
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
three-man committee sent here
by the Zionist Organization of
Canada to investigate the prob-
lems of Canadian olim has con-
cluded a week of hearings.
While most of the immigrants
appearing before the panel
spoke of difficulties they en-
countered with bureaucratic
red tape, they stressed the posi-
tive aspects of life in Israel and
made it clear that they had no
thoughts of returning to Ca-
nada.
GERALD N. F. Charness, of
Montreal, chairman of the com-
mittee, said that the body was
formed to pinpoint certain prob-
lems and find solutions, not to
heap criticism on Israeli au-
thorities.- The hearings were
boycotted by the Jewish Agen-
cy which had been invited to
participate or to send observers
with "special status."
Josef Almofi, chairman of the
Jewish Agency Executive, told
newsmen that the invitation was
rejected because the ZOC is a
political organization and not
representative of the Canadian
Zionist Federation.
However, almost all immi-
grant federations and Zionist
groups in Israel sent observers
to the hearings.
THEY WERE also attended
by a representative of the re-
cently formed government-Jew-
ish Agency joint committee on
immigration and absorption
problems headed by Amos Ho-
rev, president of the Haifa
Technion.
At the outset of the hearings,
Charness explained that the
ZOC decided to establish the
committee following its 41st an-
nual convention in Jerusalem
last year during which many
Canadian olim asked for help
from Canadian Jewry in over-
coming their problems here.
He said the inquiry was also
prompted by a statistical survey
which showed that 40 percent
of Canadian olim returned to
Canada within five years of
their arrival in Israel.
A FEW of the witnesses com-
plained of low living standards,
a poor quality of life in Israel
and difficulties educating their
children. Others were satisfied
with the educational faciUties.
Most of the problems involved
bureaucratic snarls, especially
In housing, loan applications
and mortgages. They seemed to
feel that if settled Canadians
handled this paper work it
would proceed more efficiently.
Rosalind Ami, who came to
Israel from Montreal in 1972
Soviets Destroy
Films, Tapes
Of Newsmen
<
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) Two
-nembers of the American Jew-
ish Press Association and a free-
lance photographer had their
film and tapes destroyed as
they left the Soviet Union last
week at the end of the eight-
day First Editorial Conference
to the Soviet Union.
David Henschel, a St. Louis
free lance photographer who
was pool photographer for the
AJPA on the trip, told the Jew-
ish Telegraphic Agency that of
the some 180 persons boarding
the plane at Leningrad Airport.
Soviet customs officials only
searched the luggage of Joseph
Samue! 'Wisher of the Hou-
ton Jewish Voice; Anne Sha-
piro, associate editor of the
Kansas City Jewish Chronicle,
and himself.
HENSCHEL said the Soviet
officials destroyed negatives
and erased tape recordings
taken at a meeting with 35 Jew-
ish "refusniks" in Moscow.
The Jewish newsmen were
part of a group that included
members of the Overseas Press
Club of America and the News-
women's Club of New York.
Henschel said that at official
press conferences in Leningrad
and Moscow representatives of
the Soviet press said they want-
ed a free and open exchange.
But he said when he and Mrs.
Shapiro asked questions about
Jewish emigration they receiv-
ed no answers.
HENSCHEL said that he had
studied up on the Soviet Jew-
ish situation before going to the
an amateur photographer from
St. Louis.
THEY WERE not searched
and returned with tape and film,
according to Henschel. Hens-
chel noted that many of the
non Jewish journalists after
viewing the search at Leningrad
Airport said they now realized
for the first time the ordeal of
Soviet Jews.
Robert A. Cohn. editor of the
St. Louis Jewish Light and presi-
USSR and had made arrange-
ments to meet some of the Jew-
ish activists.
He said he met Mrs. Shapiro
on the plane to the USSR and
learned she had done the same
thing.
Others at the meeting with
the activists in addition to the
three who were searched were
Doris Sky, managing editor of
the Intermountain Jewish News
in Denver; and Milton Movitz.
dent of the AJPA. told the JTA
the AJPA is investigating these
incidents as well as the last min-
ute refusal of the Soviet Union
to allow four others to join the
press, tour.
They were Steve Lipman,
editor of the Buffalo Jewish Re-
view, two members of the news-
paper's advisory board, and
William Pages, public relations
director of the Jewish Commu-
nity Federation of New Jersey
and a columnist for the Jewish
News of New Jersey.
with her husband and daughter,
charged that the Jewish Agency
neglected immigrants from
Western countries because their
attitude was that all Western
olim had the necessary finan-
cial resources to get along.
BY AND large, the com-
plaints voiced by the Canadians
stemmed from conditions en-
countered by olim from all parts
of the world and, in fact, by
many native-born Israelis.
The Jewish Agency's attitude
toward the hearings apparently
generated more attention here
than the testimony heard.
Almogi complained that the
press was playing up the in-
quiry beyond its true propor-
tions. He noted that the Agency
is in touch with immigrants and
tn contact with organizations
and Zionist federations with re-
gard to their problems._______
Bar Mitzvah
GLENN R. COUSINS
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Cousins'
son, Glenn Robert, will become
a Bar Mitzvah on Saturday
morning at Temple Beth El.
Glenn is in the seventh grade
at John F. Kennedy Junior High
School.
Attending the celebration will
be Glenn's sisters, Andrea and
Jill; his grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. Arthur Smith; Lloyd Smith
and Mr. and Mrs. Abe Ritten
berg of Miami; the Herbert Cou-
sins family of Somerset, N.J.;
Mrs. Lily Snyder and Mrs.
Myrtle Strauss of New York.
V V V
RONALD M. GUNZBURGER
Mr. and Mrs. Gerard J. Gunz-
burger's son, Ronald Marc, be-
came a Bar Mitzvah on June 11
at Temple Beth El.
Ronald is an eighth-grader at
Nova Middle School, where he
is a member of the Quest group
and works on the school news-
paper.
Guests at the ceremony in-
cluded Ronald's grandparents,
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Gunzburg-
er of Hallandale and Vienna,
and Mr. and Mrs. Laurence E.
Nathan. Sr., of Oak Park, Mich.;
the Dr. Laurence E. Nathan.
Jr.. family. Dr. and Mrs. A. M.
Bookstein. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel
Hoffman, all of Michigan, and
Mr. and Mrs. Leon Antin of the
Bronx.
Health Organization, with
which Hadassah as a medi-
cal organization is affiliated,
and described the improved
health conditions of the pop-
ulation in the West Bank
and Gaza, and the extensive
medical assistance Hadassah
and Israel have given to
those Third World countries
who now condemn Israel.
MARY BEAME, the wife of
New York City Mayor Abraham
Beame, joined Mrs. Matzkin in
the ceremony affixing the me-
zuzah to the entrance of the
new building. About 300 guests
representing other organiza-
tions attended a reception to
which Uri Ben-Ari, Consul Gen-
eral of Israel, brought greetings
from the government of Israel.
In assailing the "Jewish per-
sonalities," Mrs. Matzkin de-
clared, without identifying them,
"Their statements are being
picked up and exploited by or-
ganized dissidents within the
Jewish community as well as bv
members of Congress and the
Administration."
The Hadassah leader said that
American Jews have numerous
vital obligations such as sup-
port of education, health, wel-
fare and land reclamation
"which we willingly perform as
our responsibility for the prac-
tical programs of Zionism which
is essential for Israel's surviv-
al."
HOWEVER, she added. "Not
amongst these is the right to

dictate foreign policy or do
estic stances to the governm,
or the people of Israel. Thau
been and should continue to
main the sovereign duty of i
State's citizenry." '
Mrs. Matzkin observed t J
more productive ends would
reached "by a concerted eff
amongst these dissidents
work toward the first ster,
ward permanent and just bm
in the Middle East; namely ,
recognition by the Arab stai
of Israel's inalienable rieht
exist." w
Focusing on the move
WHO to condemn Israel for t
quality of medical and pub
health care it provides the p
pie of the West Bank and Gi
in contravention of a report
their own representatives w
said that health conditions h
improved, Mrs. Matzkin |
clared that since 1960 nun*
ous medical assistance prognJ
have been provided bv HadJ
sah and Israel's Ministry |
Health "to those Third WoJ
countries which have joined
condemning Israel."
THESE included: more thi
100 Hadassah doctors
nurses serving in develop
countries, mainly in Afrii
more than 300 doctors, nun
public health workers and to
nicians graduating from or ti
ing post-graduate courses
Hadassah in the areas of ocJ
national therapy, public heal
dentistry, pharmacy, medici
and nursing; and the treat
of all. "regardless of race
religion, friend or foe." at 1
dassah Hospital.
DR. CHARLES IAN KLUGE
OPTOMETRIST
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING Of HIS
OFFICE FOR THE PRACTICE OP
GENERAL OPTOMETRY
FINES BANK PLAZA
7867 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD
PEMBROKE PINES, FLORIDA 33024
TEL. 989-7677
Hours By Appointment
WARREN G. FELDMAN, M.D.
announces the opening of of his
office
for the practice of
Family Medicine
at
3700 Washington Street
Suite 503
Hollywood, Florida
By Appointment
Telephone
989-3100
Attention Organizations!!!
DOES YOUR ORGANIZATION NEED $$$. .
DOES YOUR ORGANIZATION DO FUND RAISING??
We have a variety of plans that will not only
raise funds but serve as splendid
MORALE BVILDERS!
Wrltt MHS c/o Jewish Floridian Box 01-2973, Miami, Florida 33101
Give name of organization and mimbt of
far* long in existence.


nHv. June 18, 1976
The Jewish FloridUm and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
Proposal Considered to Change Tactics in Negotiations With Arabs
Haifa
yEHOSHAFAT Harkabi, perhaps Israels leading
authority on Israel-Arab relations, and analyst
cf Arab strategy, recently discussed the touchy
subject of Israel's policy in the Middle East. There
has been much criticism of late that Israel seems
m have no fixed policy on how to bring peace
closer, but merely marks time or responds to ex-
ternal events as they occur. Harkabi analyzes three
policy programs in his article in the columns of
Haaretz.
First is that proposed by the doves. They as-
sume that there are in the Arab world elements
which are seriously interested in peace with Israel
and have given up the idea of wiping Israel off the
map
ISRAEL SHOULD therefore meet these ele-
ments half way, withdraw from territories, recog-
nize a Palestinian state and by these very acts
strengthen the influence of the Arab doves.
The weakness of this policy, Harkabi says, is
that in the realities of the Arab world there are only
hawks. The doves are but a product of the wishful
n.lcrS> the,,sr*eli ** who, by their inter-
wnr.H H ,SFael "* *** the
world the impressing that it is we who are obstacles
to peace in the Middle East.
THE SECOND policy program goes to the oth-
er extreme. Under this policy, since there are no
Arab intentions to make peace, Israel can not com-
promise, withdraw or yield up any position of stra-
tegic importance, geographic or political.
We can withstand any pressures from anyone,
and m the end the Arabs will have to reconcile
themselves both to our existence and to our con-
tinued occupation of lands. Our stand may be right
in our own eyes, but it is losing us the support of
the world, comments Harkabi. Furthermore, such
supreme confidence is not warranted
HARKABI PROPOSES a realistic policy dic-
tated by the tactical needs o fthe moment. We ack-
nowledge to ourselves that the Arab attitude is in-
deed hawkish and extremist, but this need not be
met by Israel extremism. A policy of flexibility on
our part can produce favorable results. Zionism has
traditionally been tolerant.
We never dreamed of banishing the Arabs or
conquering their lands. It was this tolerance, mis-
interpreted as weakness, that triggered off Arab
extremism which boomeranged and brought about
establishment of the State of Israel.
THE TROUBLE is, concludes Harkabi, that
whereas there are political parties and organized
groups in Israel dedicated to each of the two ex-
tremes, there is no organization to press for adop-
tion of the tactical policy which he advocates.
He feels that if courageous leadership in the
Israel government were to chart such a course and
skilfully navigate the ship of state accordingly,
even the two extremes would find in it elements
which would command their support. This is not
the time to fix final strategies, but it is the time
to plan tactics wisely.
Singles Units
Mainly Draw
Women Visitors
"|i WIDE-RANGING program in Queens to meet the needs of
divorced, widowed, separated and unmarried young par-
bb, the first in the history of the Gustav Hartman YM-YWHA
I Far Kockaway, is meeting those needs but only for women;
en have failed to show up, according to a Y official.
Michael Edelstein, a. special program assistant at the Y,
ho is coordinator of the singles program, said the program
started in January. It has two functioning groups one
t single parents and one for college students and singles aged
3 to 25.
ON THE average, 15 to 20 single parents attend every-
her-week meetings of their group. Edelstein said the pur-
of the group was to "strike a balance between the social
rap elements, while maintaining a strong sense of Jewish
Iture and identity."
He said the single parents program had two phases. One
counseling for the problems which often afflict single par-
For members of the Y group, all of whom are women,
*o are usually granted custody of the children, child-raising
(ten presents problems for which counseling is needed.
IT IS provided by the Jewish Community Services of Long
Od The JCS, like the Y, is an affiliate of the Federation of
kwish Philanthropies. The other phase is to provide opportu-
iwies for socializing, Edelstein said. Single women parents
ive great difficulties in finding opportunities for normal so-
1 life.
Another problem for some women is getting a Jewish di-
Ke (Get), for which referrals are made to the Rabbinical
uncil of America. Edelstein said four such referrals had
*n made since the program was started.
HELP ALSO is provided for parents seeking a Jewish edu-
m for their children. For those needing financial help, the
mrects them to agencies providing such help. There are no
>ees for these services.
Edelstein said the program was started for residents of
area, based in the Hartman Y and serving adjacent Queens
Long Island areas, because there were no such programs
angle adults in the south Queens area.
uHe Mid a special effort is being planned to bring single
Parents into the program.
THE TECHNIQUE is a social event, the first for the group,
U|y or August, which will probably be a wine and cheese
the Y. Flyers announcing the event and inviting sin-
iWml p*rents are being prepared to be posted in apartment
* throughout the heavily Jewish Kockaway section.
Another action, he said, was a decision to open member-
the group, now comprised entirely of single parents
110 v year *** *TOUP' t0 "Ingle men and women 25
years old, whether they are single parents or not.
f TE,N' asked if there was any information to ac-
.J ,he ^ck of male response to the services of the Y
ge Parents, said, that the Rockaways are widely coiv
a family-oriented community. Men. having more fi-
resources than women, and therefore more mobility.
0 move away after the break-up of their marriages.
Worn
bile
en> less financially independent and accordingly less
" 'Part from the fact that they are generally awarded
y tf 'he children tend to stay, attracted also by rela-
ty low
Jewish
rents in the area and services available to them
aocuri agencies.
vtsan
Tranoff
The Vibrant Jewish
Life of Vilna Recalled
JERUSALEM OF LITHUANIA. Collected and
arranged by Leyzer Ran. New York:
Vilno in Pictures, 3 volumes, 1,000 pp..
$40. H
ABRAHAM JOSHUA Heschel asked "how
has the city of Vilna acquired such a
sacred name?" While other Jewish commu-
nities were rich in rabbis, scholars, authors
and artists, Vilna possessed all this and more.
The Jerusalem of Lithuania, as the city is
fondly and justly known, was the largest Jew-
ish printing and publishing center in the
world in the middle of the nineteenth century.
It produced the most beautiful editions of the
Talmud, prayer books and other sifrei kodesh.
VILNA WAS the residence of one the
Greatest scholars of East European Jewry
the Gaon of Vilna. And it served as the cen-
ter for the development of the most impor-
tant Jewish movements of the nineteenth and
twentieth centuries: Haskalah, the Bund, and
Zionism. YIVO was established here as well
as the PEN Club, and dozens of groups of
Hebraists and Yiddishists.
Vilna's enormous contribution to world
Jewry is equaled only by the immeasurable
effect of the destruction of the city during
the Holocaust.
ROMAN VISHNIAC photographed the
twilight of East European Jewry during the
late 1930s, so that we would have something
with which to remember what was there.
Now, Leyzer Ran, editor of Vilno in Pictures,
has published three exquisite, illustrated and
documented volumes of the way it was, with
introductions and captions in English, He-
brew, Yiddish and Russian.
Ran has poignantly reflected the vibrant
Jewish life of Vilna. We see that most of Vil-
na's Jews were tragically poor, but not in
spirit or Jewish education. The common la-
borer studied Talmud, went to synagogue, lis-
tened to the sermons of itinerant lecturers
and writers, and sang liturgical music. Con-
trasting ideologies may have brought to Vilna
Jews of disparate orientation, but all of them
had high cultural and intellectual ideals.
THIS WAS a life that can never be re-
placed. It must be remembered and perpe-
tuated. I strongly recommend the purchase
of this set for the synagogue, library and
home. The price is modest for the richness
t offers.
"Jerusalem of Lithuania" represents the
kind of feeling toward Judaism we want our
young people, born and brought up in the
sterility of American spiritual life, to know
about, to yearn after and to emulate.
There Seems to be No Clear
Respite from Violent Experience
ert

Y'OL CAN use a flagpole for both glorious
and dastardly purposes, as many people
living through violent days in Boston now
realize: At I wo Jima, a handful of Marines
used it to raise a flag proclaiming victory
against great odds. In Boston, a handful of
young fellows used it as a battering ram
pgainst a Black businessman who was making
his way peacefully into City Hall when as-
saulted.
When passions blaze, those who wield
flagpoles in efforts to protest "forced" busing
can end up indicted by a grand jury for "as-
sault with a dangerous weapon."
THIS IS the same Boston wherein Wil-
liam Lloyd Garrison, standing ready 145 years
ago to give his life to end slavery, declared,
"I will be as harsh as truth and as uncom-
promising as justice ... I am in earnest I
Will not equivocate I will not excuse I
will not retreat a single inch; and I will be
heard!"
It was during that same era that Elijah
Lovejoy, another abolitionist, was killed by
an Illinois mob violently opposed to his edi-
torials that shared Garrison's views.
BOSTON'S RESISTANCE to public school
integration seems certain to be entered as'
an American historical footnote constituting
a bizarre way to mark the nation's Bicenten-
nial. Resistance to busing has so mounted,
disruption of the educational process has
spread so violently, and the politics of inte-
gration efforts have burst bonds of civility to
such a degree that the city once cele-
brated as a citadel of learning and wisdom
is sick to its civic marrow.
Case histories of violence in Boston grow
week by week. Richard Poleet, 34 and white,
has suffered such a severe injury at the hands
of Black youths armed with a concrete cin-
der block, that his life is nearly ended.
HIS BROTHER, deeply grieving, pleads
not for revenge but for peace to be restored
to Boston. Other whites and a number of'
Blacks have been victimized by the fury of
enraged partisans. Yellow school buses, sym-
bolizing the central issue of the controversy,
have been stoned; their young passengers'
lives endangered, their drivers harassed.
Marches and counter-marches, protest
meetings and protests to protest meetings con-
sume the energies of those determined to sub-
stitute violent acts for reasonable debate.
-
*


jj


Page 12
The Jewish Ftoridimn and Shofar of Greater HoUywood
Friday, June 11
r<
PANTRY PRIDE SALUTES
JUNE IS DAIRY MONTH'
COME HELP US CELEBRATE ... WE HAVE
A WONDERFUL SELECTION OF THE
FINEST QUALITY PRODUCTS BOTH DOMESTIC
AND IMPORTED TO DELIGHT EVERY TASTE!
fcBasic
SAVE 40
Friendship
Sour Cream
49
CONTAINER ^kw
jt LIMIT TWO PINTS PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF $7 00 OH MOH EXCLUDING CIGARETTES!
^USAYE 28
Pantry Pride
Cream Cheese
jf LIMIT TWO PKGS. PHASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF S7 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
Power 99
Low Fat Milk
^T^^ GALLON
JUG
American Singles 88 79*
Soft Margarine **&!, 59c
we want you to feel good about
this unique opportunity to
own a 40-piece set of imported
porcelain china
[^Basic
^Bargain
SAVE 43
Maxwell
House
$106
ALL GRINDS
COFFEE
l
l-LB.
BAG
jr LIMIT ONE IAG PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF f 7 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
f6Basic
bargain j
SAVE 68
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU
SATURDAY. JUNE 19th AT
ALL PANTRV PRIDE STORES
FROM FT PIERCE TO
KEY WEST
^L- (UIIOMII MAI FUUCMAll ONI
" OA All IIAMID IIIMI WITH
[mmmj
AMPS
T YOUR
STORE'
64-OZ.
BOTTLE
4f LIMIT ONE ITl PELASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF S7 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
mm SAVE 36
RINIlt PtlOl COlOtlO CHUM FOOD
DOtMANS IMPOI1ID AUMOIAN SuCIO
Swiss Cheese iSi 75'
IIIMOnI S1AT N SHAPE
Cottage Cheese
OIOIN CMOCOl At| DeiNR OH
Milk Shakes 4
IJ OI
CUP
If Ol
CANS
PANTRY PRIDE
Beef Salami
(MIDGET)
12 OZ. CHUB
17 oi s s
CMLM M>
( UIK )
(MKMl/
*NI|' PRlOl MIOGK
Liverwurst
AMI IK AN lOSHtl MlOGI
Salami Or Bologna
OtCAR MA 'It Ml.' t Mlf
SHced Bologna g 73*
CARNATION
Instant Dry Milk
10 '$239
."1
itamsmj
QUART
PKG.
9 ANtll #IOt
Tomatoes -3
PAN1IT PMM WMOli KIRNM OR
Creamed Corn 4
PANTRV PRIDE FRENCH CUT OR REG
Green Beans 5
o so
CAM1 A
ioi so
CAMS A>
II-.-OI S 0
CANt a
HOI
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PANTRT PRM*
Mayonnaise nSWB*
59<
89
catVood B-= 5 \& 99*
Foamy Liquid
c
HI IN I
Kosher Dills
PARAOIM PUtl IT1AWM11T
Preserves...........................2
DISH
DETERGENT
FLO SUN GRAPE ERUIT OR
3202
BOTTIE
U S DA (vr *Cu,% a" "u j Gv' '"p**'rf "n<<
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L H U I L L Jp0,,'k'* r obtain and ore guaron'etd to be
L i^-^ m^S notyrolly lender tuny ond flavorful'
U.S.D.A. CHOICE BEEF LOIN
Sirloin o>
Steak^$l79
U.S.D.A. CHOICE WESTERN CORN FED
Beef Chuck
Blade Steak ,
USD* C moiCI WISt COIN 'ID
Beef Rib Steak -- ,. 1"
USD A tHOICI III ROUND _
Btm. Round Roast 1
U.1.0 A CMOICI HIT 1OUN0
Rump Roast .. 1 '
U 1 D A CMOICI Will COIN MO till c miic _
Pot Roast "" _*|*
Beef Liver ..69'
U I A CMOICI Will CORN 110
Beef Brisket &- w *12*
RAMA IUMIU1I Mll-lAlUMCllOl. A.| I
Turkeys zzzz 59l
h M wrm law wmxi __
Fresh Fryers 4o*
KA OR llUPPlR rilMHJM TRI1H
Fryer Qtrs. u 59*
LA OR 1IWPPH PHMMIM ItllM
Fryer Parts
GALLON
BOTTLE
4f LIMIT ONE tTl PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASE:
OF S' 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES I
. -. mi mai imiiii <%
U I D A CMOICI Ml' IOUND
n
MWMIIMCI
99*
Eye Round Roast ulM
USD* CMOICI Mlf ROUND
Bottom Round Steak .*149
NEW ZEALAND FROZEN
Lamb Shldr.
Blade Chops
LB.
u
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fT
#
WSSEu U Service ^CSSSS
All Ml Al 1 CMtlll IHCID TO OIMI AT IIORII WITH IIIVICI COUNIIII
RICH S GOURMET DELIGHT
Turkey Roll t 99*
'Ml"l' tMOMO HUK.ION OS
Kippered Salmon
OUAIIII
J~
t-
t?

tt
Southern
Peaches
TOP
QUALITY
PICK YOUR OWN
3 7
Nectarine
2 $1
FIRST
OF THE
SEASON
IMIN HIM MjiC i -I'.l SO M/l
Fla. Oranges ]
us no i oaaetNfeitMaieants
Potatoes
FOR A SALAD CHANCE
Artichokes "'
OP OUAlll I llll"
Florida Limes
TENOtR OtllN
Round Beans........
ceisa a no cauoecMT
Celery Hearts 2 S:4|
W1M FARM lO C Al
Salad Dressing
W1M FARM LO C Al
IVOI.
....JAR
itlNCM IIAIIAN IIM IHANO *14UI CMIItl f 11 OM
Dill CONIIOI ONI WOMIMOPI AM* UAH ..Ml Cl
FIRM RIPE
SALAD SIZE
Tomatoes
3 r. n
DELICIOUS FROZEN
Banquet Dini
lAlilluIr HIAIIOAI
viai 'aimiciana
ookiomii.iiw
AN. AMOUANt
^_. : iio t mi oa cmihi
IN OUR
HICHIINIR
SKINlifs 1 IONELESS
CASE
Haddock Fillet
i i-oz.'
PRO.
PANTRY PRIDE SLICED WIDE
Meat
COUNTRY SQUIRE OVIN IRSSH
White
AKl ITji H1 A' k I Aiil l-
Schaefer
Beer "

I RESfRVE THE RIGHT TO IWMT QUANTITIES NONE SOLO TO DEALERS


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