The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00146

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
pJewisti Floridian
and SHOP All OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Ime
6 Number 12
HoUywood, Florida Friday, June 4, 1976
O Frd K. Shochat Friday, Join 4, 197 Price 25 CdltS
South Broward Federation Installs President Colin
**
%
LEWIS E. COHN
\\% E. Cohn was elected
retailed as president of
irish Federation of South
Ird at the Federation's an-
bieeting, May 16 at Tem-
bth Shalom.
has lived in the area
past 17 years and is well
for his continued activ-
lor Jewish welfare. Just
lonth he was named the
km of the Jewish Com-
[Service Award, presented
Broward County Chap-
thc American Jewish
|ttt of which he is a
president. Last year he
Bmed "Man of the Year"
Federation.
has been president of
mien Install
>. Newman
Newman was installed
csident for a second term
Women's Division of the
Federation of South
ird.
in(? with her for 1976-77
Ann Katz, vice president
ampaign; Nancy Brizel,
[president for education:
In Levitats, vice president
fc-service; Ina Linda, secre-
lSylvia Abram, parliamen-
f, Phyllis Kraemer, nomi-
committee chairwoman;
Karen Margulies. regional
woman. UJA Women's Dl-
missions.
nbers of the board of di-
N are Frances Briefer,
Bra Buchwald. Helen Co-
Ann Cohn, Louise Dia-
J. Meral Ehrenstein, Ron-
fFields. Mina Finkelstein,
Fleisher.
Esther Gordon, Alice
nberRer, Brenda Greenman,
nor Handelman, Gloria
Betty Kail, Marilyn Kap-
|Elhe Katz, Rochelle Koen-
o. Gertrude Lazier, Marci
o. Audrey Meline, Elaine
Delia Rosenberg. Lee
"berg, Freda Rosen, Ma-
iSalter, Sylvia Salter, Reesa
frchter.
po, Rachel Shapiro, Char-
' Shenker, Susan Singer,
pvn Stieber. Eleanor Weiner
, Weisberg. Sally Weiss and
fon Wolfson.
*va Wexler, Women's Dfvi-
Mirector, installed the board
P'rectors memberi and other
"Jirectors and other officers
M at Temple Beth El.
DR. SAMUEL M. MELINE
Temple Beth El and general
campaign chairman of the Jew-
ish Federation. His wife, Ann,
is a member of the board of
directors of the Women's Divi-
sion. Their son. Dr. Lawrence,
is a psychiatrist in Kendall
Cohn succeeds attorney-busi-
nessman .Herbert Katz, who held
the Federation presidency for
the past two years.
OTHER officers include: Dr.
Samuel M. Meline, vice presi-
dent for social planning; Dr.
Stanley I. Margulies, vice presi-
dent for campaign: Allan Gor-
don, treasurer; and Dr. Robert
S. Pittell. secretary.
Dr. Meline is a graduate of
Boston Latin School. Tufts Col-
DR. STANLEY I. MARGULIES
lege and Tufts University
School of Dental Medicine. An
orthodontist, he is a member of
the American Association of
Orthodontists and the Greater
Hollywood Dental Association,
of which he is past president.
He is vice president of Tem-
ple Beth Shalom, a member of
the Jewish Welfare Board, Chai
Lodge B'nai B'rith and a reci-
pient of the Federation Lead-
ership Development Award.
Samuel and Audrey Meline are
the parents of four children:
Daniel, 16; Deborah, 14; David,
12. and Dana, 8.
Dr. Stanley Margulies, win-
ner of the Hy and Belle Schlaf-
ler Award in 1975. is a graduate
ALLEN GORDON
of Johns Hopkins University
and its School of Medicine. He
is chief of radiology at Holly-
wood Memorial Hospital and he
and Karen, who was campaign
chairman for the Women's Divi-
sion, are the parents of Robin,
9, who attends Pine Crest
School. They are members of
Temple Solel.
Allen Gordon, president of
Port Everglades Steel Corp., has
been active in Federation for
many years as a member of the
board of directors and chair-
man of the administrative com-
mittee. He and his wife. Esther,
members of Temple Sinai, are
the parents of three children:
Robin, 19; Robert, 17; and
DR. ROBERT S. PITTELL
Brian, 14.
Esther Gordon, a vice presi-
dent of the United Way of
Broward Countv, is also a mem-
ber of the board of directors of
the Jewish Family Service.
Dr. Robert Pittell is a grad-
uate of the University of Buf-
falo and the University of Buf-
falo School of Medicine. He
practices in Hollywood with
Pediatlriic Associates. He and
his wife. Elaine, who is chair-
man of the Soviet Jewry Com-
mittee of Federation and a very
active member of the Women's
Division, are the parents of
three children: Scott, 16; Jeff.
15; and Lynn, 13. They are
members of Temple Sinai.
Bernstein Challenges Federation
To Higher Goals Next Year
JOYCE NEWMAN
R1
Newly elected Federation
president Lewis E. Cohn
presents 2,000-year-old map
of Jerusalem to outgoing
president Herbert Katz "for
his inspirational efforts and
dedication to the Jewish
community."
Additional pictures pp. 2,8, 9
"Good friends, my purpose
today is to praise you for your
achievements to raise your
gifts to greater goals but not
to raise your spirits," said Irv-
ing Bernstein, executive vice
chairman of the national United
Jewish Appeal in New York,
who was guest speaker at the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's annual meeting on
May 16.
"I believe," said Bernstein,
"that if we together face real-
ity, one day we will dream again
and our nightmare that started
in 1973 will come to an end .
"But if we refuse to accept
the facts of life, as we did prior
to Yom Kippur, 1973, if we
figuratively dance, as some lit-
erally did in the cabarets of
Budapest as the Nazis marched
on Hungary, we too will have
no one to blame but ourselves."
Bernstein praised the South
Broward Federation leadership
for surpassing its 1975-76 goal
of $3.5 million (the amount
raised exceeded $3.7 million).
But he also challenged next
year's leaders to set an even
higher goal.
"Ladles and gentlemen .
vou didn't waste time in tears
and empty dreams yours was
a course of deeds since August
16 (when the goal was set) .
vou listened, understood that
your actions not only affect
your own lives but also the des-
tiny of your community a
sovereign state and the fu-
ture of a people.
"If I leave a message with
you today it is that time
alone is not the answer. What
is also reauired is men and
women of vision, and men and
women of action, who live with
a sense of history, who can
translate vision into reality.
"Because we are a people of
memory yes, we are a part-
nership, a unique partnership,
with an historic purpose .
this vision so meaningful to so
many generations will be-
come a reality if we in this
room rededicate ourselves and
renew the oath we took long
ago:
" 'For the sake of Zion I will
not be silent.
For the sake of Jerusalem I
will not be still.
Till her victory emerges re-
splendent
And her triumph like a flam-
ing torch'." (Isaiah 62:1)
JCC Center To Be Dedicated
Through the combined ef-
forts of the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida, the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion and the Jewish Federation
of South Broward, a multifacet-
ed Jewish Community Center
facility is now under way for
Dade and South Broward.
The Michael Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center, a
15-acre riverfront site at 18900
NE 25th Ave. In Nor* "
Beach, will be dedicated Sun-
day, June 6, 4 p.m. Erected in 4
phases, the center was designed
by Reiff-Fellman and Associates.
The construction will be made
possible through the success of
a $5.5 million communitywide
capital fund campaign, also to
be launched June 6.
Robert Russell of Miami,
president of Russell Anaconda
Aluminum, is chairman of the
JCC Campaign. He is a past
president of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, a national
chairman of United Jewish An-
neal, and chairman of the Hous-
ing Committee for the Jewish
Agencv in Israel.
"DURING the past decade."
Russell said. "South Florida's
Jewish community began to
unite more and more.
"Our synagogues, agencies
Continued on Page 2


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 4, 1975

t
t
t
l
i
t
T

C
I
i
1
JCC Center To Be Dedicated
Continued from Page 1
and schools are numerous, and
their influence is felt by all of
us. Yet we realized that some-
thing was missing. Something
vital to unity and strength, and
perpetuation of our heritage.
"That something was a com-
munity center," he said, "to en-
rich our lives. A place that will
be the hub of our social, edu-
cational, recreational and cul-
tural activities. A central facil-
ity to bring us together, coun-
teracting the disruptive pres-
sures of our modern, mobile
society. To develop each of us
to our fullest potential, and to
assure the cohesiveness and
continuity of our community's
growth."
Much of the planning which
has helped bring about the cen-
tralized Michael Ann Russell
facility has been made possible
through a unique regional
board of directors. This pro-
gressive leadership group is
composed of American and
Latin Jews from North Dade
and South Broward, Miami
Beach and South Dade.
PHASE ONE of the construc-
tion is the most extensive of
the four parts. Its total is esti-
mated at S3 million, and its con-
tents have been divided into
two distinct segments.
Part (A) of Phase One is al-
ready complete. This includes
lighted tennis courts, parking
lot. ball fields, a pro shop, and
a multipurpose camp building.
While the building has been
made ready for the extensive
JCC summer camping, programs,
it is also suitable for use as
classrooms and a small audito-
rium.
"More than 1,200 children
between the ages of 3 and 17
enjoyed JCC summer camps
last year," said Russell. "This
year an even larger number
can be served. And the capacity
will continue to grow, as more
of the Center's facilities are
completed."
Part (B) involves construc-
tion for a gymnasium, four in-
door handball courts, an exer-
cise room, gymnastic facilities,
men's and women's locker
rooms, indoor and outdoor
pools, an indoor running track
and meeting room office space.
The JCCs of South Florida are
a member of the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward family
of agencies.
Local Residents Attend 'Solidarity Day9
Many Hollywood residents at-
tended the march on "Solidarity
Day with Soviet Jews," May 23,
in Miami Beach.
Lewis E. Cohn, president of
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward. presented rally organ-
izers with a replica of a blue
and white Freedom Flag, simi-
lar to one brought from Russia
by an American in sympathy
with Prisoners of Conscience
behind the Iron Curtain.
The Rev. George Dunn, presi-
dent of the Greater Hollywood
Ministerial Association, read a
case history of Ida Nudel, a
Muscovite who sees that need-
ed medical supplies reach Jew-
ish Prisoners of Conscience.
Also in attendance at "Soli-
darity Day" was Hollywood
Mayor David Keating, who par-
ticipated in the march and
spoke in support of Soviet Jew-
ry.
Guest speaker was Dr. Alexan-
der Luntz, a Russia Jewish
mathematician and a leader of
the "Refusniks" who appealed
to American Jews to help Rus-
sian brothers and sisters. He
was permitted to emigrate, with
his wife and son, to Israel ear-
lier this year.
Money-Management Is IHF Seminar Theme
A seminar for women who
want to know more about man-
aging their money will be held
by the Israel Histadrut Foun-
dation (IHF) of South Florida
as part of its Day of Solidarity
with the Women of Israel on
Wednesday, June 9, at the Holi-
day Inn, 4000 South Ocean Dr.
"Women's Economics 1976"
will offer women of the com-
munity an opportunity for guid-
ance in understanding the com-
plex problems of financial
management today, said Dr.
Morton Malavsky, chairman of
the IHF South Broward Coun-
cil. Self-interest should motivate
today's woman to participate
since she is called upon to make
so many money management
decisions, he added.
The 10.30 a.m. seminar will
be followed by a luncheon fea-
turing an address by Vivian
(Mrs. Simcha) Dinitz, wife of
Israel's Ambassador to the
United States. Her topic is
"The Modern Woman in Israel."
Heading the panel of finan-
cial specialists at the June 9
seminar is Carol Rutgers Ma-
thews, financial columnist of
MRS. DRICKMAN
The New York Post. Sharing the
platform will be Mrs. Phyllis
Drickman, Hollywood attorney
who will discuss family estate
planning, and Dr. Sol Stein, na-
tional IHF president and per-
sonal financial planning consult-
ant.
Anne (Mrs. Irving) Acker-
Florida Banks Encouraged
To Buy Israel Bonds
TALLAHASSEE Florida
banks and savings associations
would be permitted to invest in
State of Israel Bonds if an
amendment to the Florida Stat-
ute regulating financial institu-
tions becomes law.
Introduced by Sen. Jack Gor-
don (D., Miami Beach) and
co-sponsored by Senators My-
ers, Winn, Graham, Firestone
and others, the bill would au-
thorize state banks and savings
associations to invest up to 5
percent of their capital in such
bonds.
Pointing out that State of Is-
rael Bonds "have a top rating
as secure investments," Gordon
said the legislation would allow
Florida banks and savings asso-
ciations to consider investments
of this kind which the present
statute does not allow. The bill,
SB 1344, has been referred to
the Senate Commerce Commit-
tee.
H.4.7
A BILL aimed at business or-
ganizations cooperating with the
Arab boycott of Israel has also
been introduced into the Florida
Senate by Gordon.
MRS. ACKERMAN
man. North Dade and South
Broward civic leader and noted
book reviewer, will moderate
the seminar panel, which will
deal with such topics as "Man-
aging One's Savings," "Search-
ing for Financial Security,"
"The Lure of Wall Street," "Es-
tate and Tax Problems for To-
day's Woman" and "Women's
Will Power."
The June 9 Women's Day has
been organized by Mordecai
Paldiel, IHF South Broward
field director, and Mrs. Char-
lotte Teller. IHF coordinator.
Reservations, at $4 per per-
son, must be made in advance
through the Histadrut office.
1747 Van Buren St., Suite 840,
Hollywood, phone 927-1656.
Annual meeting guest speaker Irving Bernstein (center),
executive vice chairman of the national United Jewish
Appeal in New York, talks with Federation leaders Lewis
E. Cohn (left) and Herbert Katz.
Riverside's
two new chapels in
Hollywood ana Sunrise
serve the needs of
the entire
Jewish community in
Broward County.
In the Hollywood and Halkmdale area:
5801 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood.
920-1010
In the Fort Lauderdale area:
1171 Northwest 61st Ave.(Sunset Strtp),Sunrise
584-6060
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel. Inc/Funeral Director*
Other Riverside chapels in South Florida are located In
North Miami Beach. Miami Beach and Miami.
Riverikk Kiun the New York Metropoatan area with chaprb In Manhattan,
tJrookVn. Bronx Far Rockaway and Weslchntcr
Murray N Rubin FD.
1-4.71
47i


Friday
June 4, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Dr. Robert Better, a Hollywood optometrist, examines a
child in the Vista Vision Clinic program supported by
the Hollywood Section of the National Council of Jewish
Women.
Vision Clinic Operates
With Help from NCJW
The Hollywood section of the
National Council of Je w i s h
Women (NCJW), in conjunction
with representatives of the
Broward County Optometric As-
sociation, formed the non-profit
Vista Vision Clinic five years
ago to help give care to people
from underprivileged families.
"This is a very important
program for children who need
their eyes examined and who
mav need Rlasses," said Ber-
nice Greene of the NCJW and
secretary of the Vision Clinic,
which still operates in Brow-
ard County.
Money for the clinic comes
from substantial contributions
from the National Council of
Jewish Women, the federal gov-
ernment and local optometrists
and ophthalmologists who volun-
teer their offices, time and
services
The clinic, says'Dr. Robert
Better, organizer of the pro-
gram and now the clinic's vice
president, was housed in a 27-
foot van that was driven around
town. Approximately 20 people
a week were examined.
Plans are under way to sell
the van to Nova University's
Human Development Center for
research and study and hu-
manitarian efforts in the com-
munity.
Dr. Georgia Reynolds, a
pediatrician, and Dr. Marilyn
Segal, a former president of the
NCJW and now a director of
the Institute of Child Centered
Education at Nova University,
are planning to head the proj-
ect there.
The Vision Clink operates
through individual doctor's of-
ficers in Broward County. Ar-
thur Hawlev is the clinic's presi-
dent and the Rev. Stewart Aus-
tin is treasurer. Mrs. Lois San-
ford is the school system's co-
ordinator of the clinic.
Women's League
Regional Meeting
The Women's League for Is-
rael held a regional planning
meeting on May. 18 at the Mi-
ami Beach home of Mrs. Betty
Dreier, with the officers of the
six South Florida Chapters. Mrs.
Florence Strier chaired the
meeting, which was attended by
Muriel Lunden, Celia Engel-
meyer. Adele Adler, Rose Koch,
Pauline Brander, Shirley Schu-
pak. Rose Hochstim, Lillian
Kronheim and Viola Minkoff.
The first annual Harvest
luncheon has been scheduled
for November, when each chap-
ter will honor its Woman of the
Year. Other items on the agenda
were fund-raising methods, cul-
tural actixCties, life member-
ship and the 500 Club, which
includes $500 contributors to
the Natanva National Vocation-
al and Rehabilitation Center.
The regional board will meet
three times annually to plan the
Women's League's overall pro-
grams. Clifford Straus. Florida
representative, was consultant
for the group.
Temple Beth Shalom Confirms Youth
Temple Beth Shalom held
confirmation exercises May 23.
Dr. Morton Malavsky conduct-
ed the services, assisted by Can-
tor Irving Gold.
Rent-
LOW AS
$7 A DAY
7r Per Mile
"oo Ml. ruiw
" Honor Bank Amarlcard. Milt"
Chiroa. Cart* SMawelia and
Dinar* Clvb
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
M0S 0ixi*Hwv..
WO-4141
Confirmands were Jeffrey
Alan Barenberg, Mindy Bhi-
menthal. Sherri Jean Bluth,
Andrea Beth Davidson, Barbara
Gorlin. Laurel Ivy Greenspan,
Amy Beth Lefkowitz. Michael
H. Levin. Jeffrey Marcus, Lanny
Marks, Pamella Innette Nehle-
ber, Brian D. Pasternak, Scott
B. Roberts. Howard Newton
Schoem. Martin Lee Shapiro.
June Paula Siegel, Dale Meri
Smith, Susan Jo Smith, Harry
Mark Stern, Bonnie Topfer and
Michael White.
Following the services there
was a reception sponsored by
the oarents. Cochairing the par-
ents' committee were Mrs. Fred
Blumenthal and Mrs. Rena
Stern.
HAtDWAM ft PAINT.
HOUSEWARES ft GffrTS
MOM! DfCOt
FA HO ft IMMIH FURNITUM
BATH/CIOSET SHOP
BaacUd Window. Room DM**
Window Stud** AriMdal HiwW
Roy Udi Wo**
mm feHMI aja ft rJA
m east beach immpt
MALLADDALE, FL0HIDA MM
PHONEtn-
Howard Chanin will cele-
brate his Bar Mitzvah at the
Western Wall during a tour
to Israel led by Dr. Morton
Malavsky.
Dr. Malavsky
Leading Tour
Dr. Morton Malavsky, rabbi
of Temple Beth Shalom, will
lead a two-week tour to Israel
beginning June 28. During the
tour the Herman Chanin family
will celebrate the Bar Mitzvah
of their son, Howard, at the
Western Wall in Jerusalem on
Saturday, July 3. The members
of the tour group will partici-
pate in the kiddush.
Howard will receive an of-
ficial Bar Mitzvah certificate
from the State of Israel, com-
memorating the occasion.
This Year in Jerusalem
I would like to register for "This Year In Jerusalem."
Please use the enclosed deposit of $100 (per person), made
payable to the Jewish Federation of South Broward, as a firm
reservation.
Name
Spouse (if accompanying)
Home Address
City
Business Phone
....... Zip
Home Phone
I wish to participate in a university dialogue at
Please send more information.
Previous visits to Israel:
( ) Yes ( ) No UJA Missions: ( ) Yes ( ) No
Return To:
MISSION DEPARTMENT
JEWISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD
2838 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
HOLLYWOOD, FLA. 33020
Awards Made to Beth El Students
Awards were presented to the
following students at the clos-
ing assembly of the Temple
Beth El Religjous School:
KINDERGARTEN: Attend-
ance: Jennifer Gross, Paul Ler-
ner, David Spector. Scholar-
ship: Paul Lerner, Jennifer
Gross.
FIRST GRADE: Attendance:
Jeffrey Berke. Scott Fleishman,
Sara Klein, Heather Langel.
Scholarship: Caryn Butwin.
Heather Langel, Scot* Fleish-
man.
SECOND GRADE: Attend-
ance: Emily Klein, Jack Goldin,
Alison Weiss. Robin Stone, Amy
Finegold, Peter Stein, Scholar-
ship: Amy Finegold.
THIRD GRADE: Attendance:
Wendy Berke, Judy Gunzburg-
er. Felicia Langel, Marc Lerner,
Jimmy Lewis, Diane Linda,
Howard Spector. Michael Stein.
Scholarship: Michael Stein.
Marker Lerner, Howard Spector.
FOURTH GRADE: Attend-
ance: Barry Schinder, Charles
Miller. Amy Blake. Brian Fleish-
man. Scholarship: Barry Schin-
der, David Weiss, Charles Mil-
ler. Army Blake. Jill Lefkowitz,
Brian Fleishman.
FIFTH GRADE: Attendance:
Cvnthia Gunzburger. Scholar-
snin: Jonathan Finegold, Ca-
rolvn Robbins
SIXTH GRADE: Attendance:
Dana Klein, Lawrence Loman,
Brett Stone. Roger Gould. Scho-
larship: Jill Blake. Roger Gould.
Ronald Lefkowitz, Lisa Strick.
Philip Weiss.
SEVENTH GRADE: Attend-
ance: Sally Lewis, David May,
Glenn Cousins, Melissa Stein-
feld, Mark Tobin. Scholarship:
Nancy Manulkin, Mark Tobin.
Rhonda Light. Melissa Steinfeld.
EIGHTH GRADE: Attendance:
Michele Jaffe, Valerie Klein.
Scholarship: Michele Jaffe, Va-
lerie Klein, Susan Weinstein,
Beth Miller. Lisa Beckerman.
NINTH GRADE: Scholarship:
Jill Burnstine.
The President's Award, initi-
ated by Mr. and Mrs. Milton
Forman. for outstanding achie-
vement, which encompasses
scholarship, attendance and
character, was awarded to Mi-
chele Jaffe. daughter of Dr. and
Mrs. Samuel Z. Jaffe, and Susan
Weinstein. daughter of Dr. and
Mrs. Philip Weinstein. Jr.
DYNAMIC RABBI
WANTED
By Newly roc me d Woootn
Conservative Synagogue in
rforfti Palm Bvoecfi County
Aroa.
teas* Writ* to
RITUAL COMMITTEE
TEMPLE BITH DAVID
321 Northlaka Blvd.
North Palm Beach, Fla 33408
arnett
anK
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200


*>age 4
-
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 4, 1976
The Slutvnoth Holiday
As we celebrate Shavuoth June 4, we will be more
than ever conscious of the relationship between this
holiday and Passover.
Shavuoth is the "fiftieth day," or the seventh week
after the Exodus from Egypt. It is a festival in remem-
brance of the 40 years of wandering in the Sinai, and of
the giving of the Law to Moses on Mount Sinai.
Customarily, we adorn the synagogue with plants
and flowers on Shavuoth. And at home, we eat dairy
products.
The adornment of the synagogue is in recollection
of the traditional belief that Mt. Sinai, where Moses re-
ceived the Ten Commandments, was a mountain cover-
ed by trees. The emphasis on dairy foods comes from
the historic comparison between the Torah and milk.
Quite naturally, these traditions and beliefs reach
back to Jewry's ancient past, and it is through Shavuoth
that this historic continuity of custom and tradition is
preserved.
But in the larger sense, we are still wanderers in
the desert. Though the Exodus has ended for many, there
are still countless numbers of Jews, in Russia and other
lands of oppression, trying to get to Israel.
As for Israel herself, the future remains perilous
and uncertain.
Shavuoth emphasizes this "incompleteness" of so
many millions of Jews across the world, who are at
home, but have not yet ended their wandering.
Dr. Belkin Memorial
The recent death of Dr. Samuel Belkin leaves a
void in the spiritual and intellectual leadership of the
American Jewish community. Dr. Belkin will be sorely
missed in the leadership echelons of higher education
generally.
Under Dr. Belkin's forceful direction, Yeshiva
University, which he led as chancellor and president
for 32 years, rose from its modest beginnings as a rab-
binic seminary to become one of the nation's major
educational institutions incorporating schools of social
work, social science, science, the humanities, law, and
the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.
Over the years, Dr. Belkin saw Yeshiva grow from
a student body of 850 to 7,000. In equivalent manner,
the faculty enlarged from 94 to 1,500, and its annual
operating budget from $440,000 to $100 million.
Impressive though these are, they are mere statis-
tics. It is the man behind them who counts the man
behind them who will be missed.
A memorial service to Dr. Belkin will be held on
Tuesday evening at the Hebrew Academy on Miami
Beach. On that occasion, we will be afforded the op-
portunity to join in the tribute to this distinguished
educator and to show just how much we will miss him.
Award to Mrs. Meir
We are not quite sure what the AFL-CIO's honor-
ing of Golda Meir in Washington portends for Novem-
ber, but the turnout was surely a brilliant one over
the weekend.
It was nice to hear President George Meany punc-
ture the by-now flatulent myth that Israel is "too rigid,
not flexible enough" in negotiating with the Arabs
a myth Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and Presi-
dent Gerald Ford are increasingly recounting these
days. ./
It was also nice to see the tremendous outpouring
of affection for Mrs. Meir, who declared that never has
Israel demanded negotiations with the Arabs "as vic-
tors or losers" but as equals.
Mrs. Meir received the Murray-Green Award ol
the AFL-CIO before some 1,700 celebrants of the occa-
sion. But millions of Americans across the nation are
joining in to offer their congratulations.
wJemsfrFtcridiari
OFFICE and PI-ANT ISO N K. tth 81., Miami, Fla M1I2 i Phone 171-4
HOLLYWOOD OFFICK Telephone 171 MM
P.O. Bos if.i. Miami. Florida 11101
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Editor and Publisher BxecaUe Editor Aaalatant to Pnbliahar
All P.O. 1ST* returni an to b forwarded to
Th Jewish Floridian. P.O. Box 011*11. Miami. Fla 111*1.
The Jewish Flondlsn Do** Nat OuirinlM The Ksehrwth
Of The Merchandise Advertise* In It. Cetvmae
Published Bl-Weekly
Second Class Postage Paid at Miami. Fla.
Jewish Federation of South Broward. Inc. SHOFAR EDITORIAL
ADVISORY COMMITTEE Nathan Prltcher, Chairman; Lewis R Conn;
Melrla H. Baer; Dr. limns! Metlne. D.M.D.
O Frew K Miaahe*. Friday. Jama 4. im
The Jewish FlerisUan has
rfceo the Jewish Uerty and the Jewish Weekly
Member of the Jowl** TiUnranhlc Agency, Savon Arts Fan taws Syndics**,
e, National Saltsrisl AsossHMsn, Ai
Worldwide News Ssrvfas,
tier, of CndUsh
and *h* Florida
French Sauce on Lebanese Mess
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (LeonI Area) One Year BESS. On* of Town Upon
Volume 6"
Friday, June 4, 1976
Number 12
6 SIVAN 5736
DRESIDENT Valery Giscard
D'Estaing's offer to send
French troops to Lftanon to
mediate in the civil war there
raises two possibilities:
Among all of Europe's
western nations, France has the
least humor about its bankrupt-
cy as a world power and still
proposes for itself a meaningful
role in international affairs;
The French offer was at
least in part the brainchild of
Henry Kissinger, who would
like Giscard to act as a surro-
gate for western interests in
the present Lebanese agony.
IN EITHER CASE, what is
occurring in Lebanon particu-
larly, and in the Middle East
generally, demonstrates that we
have no understanding of, and
what is worse, no plan for
dealing with the forces at
work there.
French egomania may be ex-
cused on the ground that it is
the only way left to French na-
tional survival.
But American ignorance can
not be excused; we have not
yet fallen, although our decline
has long since begun and will
run its course to a bitter end if
we do not learn to reverse it.
THE FRENCH proposal,
whether it is merely with our
approval, or whether it was in
fact our idea, is based on the
erroneous view that what is oc-
curring in Lebanon is little
more than a family quarrel ag-
gravated by the admittedly
serious fact that the opposing
forces there are of different re-
ligions.
And so, the view goes, all we
have to do is knock some heads
together in private: to tell the
Moslems and the Catholics that
in a modern world religious
wars are an absurdity that a
decent respect for the opinions
of mankind finds intolerable if
not entirely inadmissible.
This is Gallic, indeed, a posi-
tion the French are easily able
to afford to propose and
from which they may well prof-
it personally if given the op-
portunity to meddle in the Mid-
dle East in the same way that
Le Grand Charles de Gaulle
once meddled as a self-appoint-
ed surrogate for the West in
our affairs with the Soviet
Union.
BUT FOR us to accept this
view would not only add fur-
ther proof to the growing
mountain of evidence that we
are giving up our role as lead-
er of the free world without
so much as a whimper.
It would also underscore our
failure to see the civil war in
Lebanon for what it is beyond
any confession we may, by our
inactions, have acknowledged
thus far.
Tne religious struggle, real
though it may be, is in fact a
disguise for the far more pow-
erful struggle beneath it: the
struggle between have and
have-not, between East and
West, between capitalism and
communism.
WHAT OBSCURES this cold
reality is that Lebanon's Cath-
olic majority are the haves; the
Moslem minority are the have-
nots. As the Moslem minority
have grown in numbers, they
have risen in rebellion to chal-
lenge their Catholic masters.
What obscures it all evwa
further is that the heretofore
Catholic majority are western
generally and European specif-
ically, who see themselves as
constituting an exotic Switzer-
land in the Middle East
For their part, die Moslem
have-nots can see themselves
as oppressed Arabs only.
AND SO, the civil war is not
a reUgious war bat, in the end,
a political war, a social war, aa
economic war whose object Is
to change the lebsnese order
of things in short, whose ob-
ject is revolution.
Mindlin
Furthermore, the have Cath-
olics are aware of their reli-
gious ties in the same sense
historically that the western
Christian bourgeois is aware of
his own religious ties. That is
to say, Christianity is a system
that confirm God's design, the
bourgeois order.
But for the beleaguered
Moslem in Lebanon, his reli-
gious ties can not confirm
God's design; if they did, they
would confirm his oppression.
For the beleaguered Moslem in
Lebanon, his convictions are
far more hotly revolutionary
than religious.
THE BELEAGUERED Mos-
lem in Lebanon wants to oust
the "foreign" Catholic "west-
erner" from his midst, Arab
though the Catholic "western-
er" be, in precisely the same
way that he wants to oust the
foreign Jewish westerner from
Israel.
Indeeu, in Lebanon his task
is harder than in Israel. In Is-
rael, he can speak of Jews as
foreigners and as westerners
without having to explain the
terms in the same way that he
must explain them in Lebanon,
where they seem to be mere
doggerel, hence religious, which
they are not, rather than rev-
olutionary, which they are.
UNTIL WE come to see
the war in these terms, then
we can not, for example, un-
derstand the OPEC meeting in
Vienna last menth, when Arab
oil producers split off from La-
tin American and African oil
producers to discuss in private
sessions ways in which the Mos-
lem world can ultimately con-
front and triumph nver Chris-
tian and other non-Moslem na-
tions.
(It wojid be interesting t0
speculate on how the Christian
and other non-Moslem member*
of OPEC felt about this.)
What is worse, we will con-
tinue to regard tne Arabs as a
monolithic force in essence
the French proposal does pre-
cisely this when the truth is
that there are differences
among Arabs as sharp as the
differences between, say, m
and the Soviet Union.
FROM A logistical point of
view, this deprives us of ex-
ploiting the split among the
OPEC members themselves or,
say, the antagonisms that Lyb-
ia's Qaddafi feels for Egypt's
Sadat, or that Syria's Assad
surely feels for Saudi Arabia's
Khalid.
All of this has meaning not
only for U.S. policy in the Mid-
dle East generally, but in Is-
rael specifically.
Similarly, this has meaning
for Israeli policy, as well, par-
ticularly since there are sig-
nificant signs that Israel suf-
fers from the same lack of in-
sight with respect to the Arabs
and the alleged monolithic Arab
entity that also plagues our
State Department.
HOW CAN it be that we do
not understand that the revo-
lution being fought in Lebanon
today is surely odious to the
monarchic petrobillionaire Kha-
lid?
But the fact is that we believe
all Arabs are Khalids, and our
foreign policy is shaped to ac-
commodate this belief Like
Khalid, we conceive of all
Arabs as petrobilionaires and
the war in Lebanon as a reli-
gious war.
When we retail that the word
is already out that whoever
wins the presidency in Novem-
ber, Israel must be prepared
for radical American amputa-
tion of her borders, America's
incompetence in foreign affair
is especially frightening.
And Giscard's French sauce
that he has cooked up to pour
over our stinking Middle East
melange makes none of it even
a whit more savory.
Red Magen David
In Aid to Italy
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel's Red Magen David dis-
patched four tons of emergency supplies for the earthquake
victims in northern Italy over the weekend.
Prof. Moshe Many, chairman of the Red Magen David,
said additional supplies would be sent when the Italian
Red Cross, consisted of tents, cots and blankets, items given
THE FIRST RELIEF shipment, consigned to the Italian
Red Cross, consisted of tents cots and blankets, items given
top priority by the Italian authorities. The Red Magen David
has offered medical equipment and blood plasma.
Last year the Red Magen David sent relief supplies
to disaster areas in Turkey, Thailand and Guatemala.
Arabs Held On
Suspicion Of Terror
JERUSALEM (JTA) Six-
ty East Jerusalem Arabs have
been arrested on suspicion of in-
citing to riot, a police spokes-
man said. One of them, report-
edly, is Rassan Tahbub, editor
of the pro-PLO East Jerusalem
daily. Al-Shaab. n>
Jerusalem Police Chief David
Kraus has warned last Jerusa-
lem Bwirfihanui that if their
shoos in the Old City are not
reopened, they would be coo,
necatedey the ponce and shut
down for a mnlis^inl period.
Kraus summoned nTaToTswasnl of
the East Jerusalem Chamber of
Commerce and Mukhtsrun (lo-
cal chiefs) to hto office to con
vsy Us
MOST OLD City shops were
closed in protest against the
shooting of Arabs by Israeli
forces during recent disturb-
ances in East Jerusalem and the
West Bank.
Meanwhile, IS Arabs from
Tarkumiyeh village in the He-
bron district were detained by
security forces on charges <*
membership in El Fatah. Aa
army spokesman said that st
least two acts of sabotage were
committed by this group
ONE WAS the placing of si
explosive charge ender s Unttw
Nation, car last Nov. 2, sndtw
other was planting explostwJ
at a house on the Bethlehem
la


-iday
June 4, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
Joseph Kleiman (2nd from left) presents a check from
Temple Sinai to Rabbi Robert Liberles of Israel for his
congregation. With them are Seymour Mann, past pres-
ident of the Southeast Region of the United Synagogue
of America and also of Temple Sinai, and Rabbi David
Shapiro of Temple Sinai.
Israeli Congregation Adopted
The Southeast Region of the
United Synagogue of America
had adopted the new Conserva-
tive congregation, Kehilat Etz
Chaim. in Ashdod, Israel.
The spiritual leaders of the
congregation, Rabbi Robert Li-
berles. was recently in the Mi-
ami area and visited Temple
Sinai in Hollywood.
Rabbi Liberles was appointed
rabbi of the congregation in
August, 1975, and with his in-
duction the activities and mem-
bership multiplied. In addition
to Shabbat services, there are
classes for sixth-, seventh- and
eighth-graders and Bar and Bat
Mitzvah groups.
Every Friday evening there
is an Oneg Shabbat, a philos-
ophy discussion group and a
voung adult group. More than
70 families are being reached
bv the congregation's activities.
Attending a recent campaign event held by the resi-
dents of Sea Edge for the United Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund at the Riviera Motel were (from left)
cochairman Bert Shapiro, Hollywood Hi-Rise chairman
Otto Stieber, chairman Herman Schulman, University of
Miami student Amy Chanson, and Louis Ludwig.
ISRAEL DECLARES:
UNDOF
Conditions
Are Out
JERUSALEM (JTA) For-
eign Minister Yigal Allon warn-
ed Sunday that Israel would not
agree to any conditions impos-
ed by Syria in return for re-
newing the Golan UNDOF man-
date (due to lapse at the end
of May).
Reporting to the cabinet on
political developments, Allon
said Israel would not agree to
any anti-Israel resolutions at
the Security Council as the
price to be paid for Syria's con-
sent to the renewal.
ON THE whole, officials here
seem fairly confident that the
mandate renewal will go
through without much trouble
mainly because Syria is so
heavily involved in the Leba-
non crisis.
But no one will make a hard
prediction there is too much
experience of Syria's unpre-
dictability.
On a related suoject, Allon
warned that if Israel were sus-
pended or ousted from the UN
general assembly it would re-
act by suspending UN activ-
ities in the Middle East. He
did not elaborate.
He noted, though, that a
growing number of countries
had put on record their oppo-
sition to any move to oust or
suspend Israel.
Hadassah Elects Officers
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Milton Friedman (right), executive vice president of
B'nai B'rith Bernard Baruch Lodge in the Pembroke
pines Miramar area, received the Chainmaker Award,
a national B'nai B'rith membership honor. He was rec-
ognized for outstanding efforts and service in the dev-
elopment and growth of a new B'nai B'rith lodge. Mak-
ing the presentation was David L. Goodman, national
^nai B'rith membership field director.
Expect Golda Will Meet Ford Here
JERUSALEM (JTA) Local newspapers reported
'hat former Premier Golda Meir will meet with President
Ford when she visits the U.S. at the end of this month as
,he guest of the AFL-CIO.
She is also scheduled to meet with Vice President Nel-
sn Rockefeller and leading members of Congress, the re-
Ports said. Mrs. Meir was invited by the trade union's presi-
*nt, George Meany.
She received the AFL-CIO "Person of the Year" award
st weekend.
\ Jaffa |
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The Hollywood Chapter of
Hadassah recently held its 30th
installation luncheon in the
Garden Room of the Reef Res-
taurant, Fort Lauderdale.
Mrs. Louise Gould sang the
anthems and the invocation was
offered by Mrs. Leona Brauser.
The following elected officers
dium presidents: Mrs. Helen
were installed by Mrs. Burt
Lutz, chapter advisor: presi-
Kamer and Mrs. Frances Vizen-
thal; program vice president:
Mrs. Ethel Schwartz; fund-rais-
ing vice president: Mrs. Shirley
Green; membership vice presi-
dent: Mrs. Lillian Packer: and
education vice president: Mrs.
Etta Scheinbaum.
Other officers installed were
Mrs. Ruth Steyer, recording
secretary, Mrs. Minnie Robin-
son and Mrs. Frances Briefer,
financial secretaries; and Mrs.
Sophie Taylor, treasurer.
Special honors were bestowed
upon three-term president Mrs.
Helen Kamer, who was given a
presidential plaque; Mrs. Sophie
Taylor, as Woman of the Year;
Mrs. Leda Strong with a Life
Membership Award; and Mrs.
Maxine Heichen with a plaque
for Devotion Beyond Duty.
Sisterhood Installs Officers
Installation ceremonies were
held by Temple Sinai Sisterhood
at the Carillon Hotel on May 5.
Mrs. Barbara Stein conducted
the ceremony and Mrs. Marcy
Levin, president of the Florida
Branch of Women's League for
Conservative Judaism, was in-
stalling officer.
Inducted for the coming year
were Mrs. Melvina Freeman,
president; Mrs. Ina Wachman.
ways and means vice president:
Mrs. Bess Pierson, membership
vice president; Mrs. Vivian
Klein, CEAC vice president;
Mrs. Fannie Cantor, recording
secretary; Mrs. Rose Stockel.
corresponding secretary; Mrs.
Sonia Kleiman, treasurer; and
Mrs. Rita Goldman, financial
secretary.
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Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 4, 197$

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Pioneer Women Council Honors Volunteers Ackerman Speaks on CIA
Lillian (Mrs. Sam) Davis and
Bertha (Mrs. George) Lieb-
mann, both of Miami Beach,
have been named the outstand-
ing volunteers for 1975-76 of
the Pioneer Women Council of
Florida, representing 19 chap-
ters in Dade, Broward and Palm
Beach Counties.
Mrs. Davis, past president of
the Sharon Chapter, and Mrs.
Liebmann, president of the
Masada Chapter, were honored
with perpetual scholarships in
their names at Pioneer Women
vocational high schools in Is-
rael.
Nathan Bergthal, husband of
Mrs. Margot Bergthal, treasurer
of the Pioneer Women Council,
was named the "Husband of the
Year" for his activities in sup-
port of the organization.
Mrs. Harriet Green, president
of the Council, made the pres-
entations during the annual
awards luncheon at the Eden
Roc Hotel, at which time merit
awards were presented to out-
standing volunteers by most
Pioneer Women clubs and chap-
ters.
AWARD RECIPIENTS includ-
ed Kinneret Chapter: Anna Sha-
mes. Bettv Citron. Rae Home,
Tobi Gruber, Sheva Berland,
Bea Markowitz, Rose Libidinsky
and Sally Lisker. Club 1: Ida
Denmark, Rose Mann, Ruth Bu-
dofsky. Frieda Kaufman and
Tillie Rabinowitz. Shalom Pem-
broke Pines: Pauline Reece. Syl-
via Miller, Miriam Lesser. Lil-
lian Lehr and Goldye Kramer.
Masada: Rose Becker, Kfollie
Press, Margot Bergthal and
Viola Charcowsky.
Also Miramar: Sadye Kramer.
Emma Rosen, Nellie Fine and
Philip Gladstone. Hi-Rise Ttk-
vah: Ann Kaplan, Hilda Kimmel,
Sally Gersten and Ann Webber.
Chai: Tilly Bloomfield, Frances
Brouser, Rose Reiger, Rica
Tamny, Bertha Miller and Betty
Klein. Beba Idelson: Bertha
Bregman, Tillie Fraydman.
Helen Ingbar, Rose Luchter and
Gussie Markowitz. EUat: Freda
Levitan, Faye Brucker, Helen
Sassover, Hilda Leifer. Paula
Schochet, Rose Rubin, Rose
Ringel and Goldie Rubenstein.
A viva: Dorothy Goldman, Etta
Seiden, Sylvia H. Cohen, Eliza-
beth Mongin, Regina Zimmer-
man and Helen Fisher.
Also Club 2: Mary Salmirs,
Bess Bresky, Sally Greenberg
and Lisa Hoffman. Goida Meir:
Dora Halpern, Anne Caplan,
Frances Seligman and Dora
Rayman. Sharon: Betty Fisch.
Negev: Hannah Levine, Martha
Rosenfeldt, Sylvia Yudin and
Bettv Waga. Dimona Beth: Min-
nie Rubin, Bertha Habib and
Rose Weiner.
E. C. "Mike" Ackerman was
the cues! speaker at the Hal-
landale Jewish Center-Congre-
gation Beth Telfila on May 21.
Ackerman, who for 11 years
served in the Central Intelli-
gence Agency as a professional
espionage agent, worked in 20
European, African, and Latin
American countries and special-
ized in intelligence operations
against the Soviet Union and
Cuba. Also active in operations
against terrorist groups, in-
cluding the PLO, he was one
of the voungest officers in CIA
history to become a senior op-
erations officer, roughly equi-
valent to lieutenant colonel in
the military.
Since his resignation. Acker
man has devoted himself to
writing and lecturing, and has
aooeared on television and col
lege campuses. His book, "Street
Man." will be published in the
Iall.
The religious service before
his talk was conducted by Rab-
bi Harry E. Schwartz, assisted
by Cantor Jacob Danziger
A In other temple news: Daniel
Marcus celebrated his Bar Mitz-
vah this month. He is 83 years
old.
Austria Considering Purchase
Of Israeli 'Kfir9 Fighter
APPROVED EMISSION
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Thrt Increases Gas Mileage and Horsepower
VIENNA (JTA) Chan-
cellor Bruno Kreisky has con-
firmed that Austria was con-
sidering the purchase of the
Israel-made j e t interceptor
"Kfir" as part of a program to
modernize its obsolete air force.
"We are thinking over an of-
fer to buy Israeli fighters of the
Kfir type" but "these plans,
however, are still in the plan-
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added that "there is a lot of
other equipment we need more
urgently for our army but we
will check the Israeli offer very
closely."
THE "KFIR" is the first com-
bat plane designed and manu-
factured in Israel. It was plan-
ned after the Six-Day War to
replace Mirage jets cut off by
the French embargo and is pro-
duced by Israel Aircraft Indus-
tries.
Reports that Austria may buy
the Diane appeared this week
in Kronen Zeitung. According
to the paper, a three-man Au-
strian delegation would visit
Israel shortly to inspect the
Kfir.
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June 4. 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
Shavuoth History
Steeped in Ancient
Tradition, Custom
DR. FREDERICK LACHMAN
Encyclopaedia Judaic*
The festival of Shavuot takes
name from the Hebrew for
-eks" "Pentecost" and also
He 50th day" It is celebrated
the 6th day of Sivan (which
-- year falls on June 4). Ac-
ting to Orthodox and Con-
servative tradition, it is also
celebrated on the 7th Sivan
(June 5, this year) outside of
Israel.
One of the three so-called
"pilgrim festivals," Shavuot
marked the end of the barley
and the beginning of the wheat
harvest.
ACCORDING to the Encyclo-
!
? Ask Abe ?
fcy ABE HALPFRN
/WVWWWV
r*~\t*~\H
J
lion:
[What is the significance of
Eternal Lamp before the
i
Carl Mintz
Hallandale
er:
[The Eternal Lamp or Eternal
lit (Heb: Ner Tamid) is a
which burns continually
front of the Ark in syna-
ues. It is a symbolic re-
itoder of the menorah, the
ren branched candelabrum
hich burned perpetually in the
tabernacle in the wilderness
in the First and Second
temples. The origin of this
enorah is Biblical.
"Command the children of Is-
1, that they bring unto you
olive oil beaten for the
Jit, to cause a lamp to burn
ntinua!lv from evening to
ominR before the Lord:, it
be a statute for ever
ffoughout their generations"
iodus 27:20, 21).
I The Ner I amid consisted of
)wick burning in the olive oil.
priests were designated to
: to it that it was kept burn-
constantly, day and night.
ever-burning lamp was
en bv some scholars to sym-
the eternal watchfulness
God over his neople.
[Some rabbis interpret the
Ural Lamp as a symbol of
el whose mission it was to
ne "a light of the nations"
42.6).
[After the destruction of the
Temple the menorah
taken to Rome by Vespa-
and is portrayed on the
i of Titus.
[kany scholars believe that
| svnai?of?ue developed during
" Babylonian captivity. Ac-
nng to the Encyclopaedia
jw, the svnagogue as an
*ution in Judaism is con-
fw eoual in importance
1 with Temple in Jerusalem.
P. the ProDhetic Book of
wi. the third of the major
"nets said to have been de-
"M to Babvlonia in 597 BCE,
P the following passage:
^s saith the Lord God: Al-
I have removed them
off
among the nations, and
*1 have scattered them
j the countries, vet have I
been to them as a little sanc-
tuary in the countries where
they are come" (Ezekiel 11:16).
The key Hebrew words in the
text are L'mikdash M*at.
Because the rabbis of the
Talmud (Megillah 29a) inter-
pret the phrase little sanctuary
in Isaiah to refer to the syna-
gogue, it subsequently became
customary to incorporate an
Eternal Lamp in the synagogue.
Originally because the Ner
Tamid in the sanctuary was
placed near the Western Wall,
the Eternal Lamp was put into
a niche in the Western Wall of
the synagogue. Later on it be-
came customary to suspend it
in front of the Ark. This is the
universal practice now. In mod-
ern times the Ner Tamid con-
sists of an electric bulb en-
closed in an ornamental lamp.
In the preface to a Heritage
Album of Jewish inspiration and
wisdom entitled "The Eternal
Light," Charles L. Wallis, gen-
eral editor, states:
"The Eternal Light or Per-
petual Lamp (Ner Tamid)
epitomizes the glow and ra-
diance of the faith of our
fathers.
"Not only before the Ark but
also within the mind and spirit
has the flame of faith and truth
and righteousness burned con-
tinually and brightly, bringing
the promise of hope to troubled
minds and the assurance of di-
vine guidance to questioning
hearts."
In the same volume, Baruch
Silverstein gives the following
opinion:
"The Eternal Light reminds
us to hold tight to those aspects
of life which are of eternal
value.
'It warns us that if we would
transcend the fleeting nature of
human existence, we must at-
tach ourselves to values that
are of enduring significance. It
admonishes us to acquire treas-
ures that do not corrode and
cannot be stolen."
Editor's note: Please send all
auestions to:
??? ASK ABE ???
c/o Jewish Federation
of South Broward
2R38 Hollvwood Boulevard
Hollywood. Florida 33020
FALLS KOSHER
POULTRY PRODUCTS
available at your
LOCAL KOSHER BUTCHER
or contact
Arthur Horowitz
Poultry SalM Manager
Zion Corporation
1717 NW Seventh Avanua
Miami. Fla 33136
Tu, -v Tal 324-1859
fWHlTE NATURAL KOSHER CLEAN CHICKEN
paedia Judaica, it was probably
a midsummer festival in origin
and taken over from the Ca-
naanites. It is stated in Leviti-
cus: "From the day after the
Sabbath, the day that you bring
the sheaf of wave-offering you
shall count fifty days, until the
day after the seventh week; then
you shall bring an offering of
new grain to the" Lord." Leviti-
cus also states that the sheaf
was waved on the day after the
Sabbath on the festival of Pas-
sover. Thus Shavuot falls 50
days after this day.
In rabbinic times a remark-
able transformation of the fes-
for the fruit of the tree. Some
authorities disapproved of the
custom because of its similarity
to certain church rite*.
In former time girls deco-
rated the windows, and boys
brought field flowers and ivy
from the forest and adorned the
doors, windows and lamps on
Shavuot.
THERE WAS also a custom
of piercing eggs, emptying them
of their contents, drawing a
string through the empty shells,
gluing feathers to them, and
hanging them up in the open to
swing in the wind like birds.
It is a home custom to eat
dairy products on Shavuot be-
cause the Torah is compared to
milk (Songs 4:11) and because
the law of the first fruit is
placed in juxtaposition to a law
concerning milk (Ex. 23:19).
In some communities it is
customary to eat triangular
pancakes stuffed with meat or
cheese because the Torah is of
three parts (Pentateuch, Proph-
ets, and Hagiographa) and was
given to a people of three parts
(priests, Leyites. and Israelites)
on the third month through
Moses who was the third child
of his parents.
IN ISRAEL, modern social life
has stimulated the adaptation
of religious ceremonies to a
secular society which wants to
keep the traditional national
folk ways. This is evident, for
example, in the Bar Mitzvah
ceremoqy whose religious signi-
ficance in a secular society is
reduced but not eliminated.
Under the initial impetus of the
Reform movement, the individ-
ual ceremony has been substi-
tuted by a collective "confirma-
tion" ceremony similar to that
of the Christian rite.
This takes place at the Sha-
vuot festival, chosen because
the traditional date of the giv-
ing of the law on Mount Sinai,
it seems the proper season for
adblescent boys and girls to
celebrate their initiation into
full Jewish adulthood.
As the Shavuot festival coin-
cides with the end of the school
year, the Judaica relates, the
ceremony, at times, beari the
character of a graduation.
IN ISRAEL the collective Bar
Mitzvah has been introduced in
non-religious kibbutzim.
The ceremony takes place
after the children have per-
formed some task, usually socic-
educationai, which was imposed
upon each individual child (or
pair) by the community, school,
or youth movement (e.g.. a
week's stay in a new settlement
with a newcomer's family in
order to help them; or in a
religious yeshivah in order to
learn Jewish ways strange to
them).
The Bar Mitzvah child then
has to write a composition on
his experiences. He further re-
lates his adventures during the
performance of the task at the
"confirmation" and the lessons
derived therefrom are discussed
by the whole assembly.
WANTID
GOOD MALE SINGE*
TO PARTICIPATE AND LIAD
TIMPLI LITUROICAL
QUARTIT
axparlance and baefcaroama' hate-
ful Call far Intarvlaw
Miami 9494501
Hollywood 911-6119
Letter to the Community
Dear Hollywood Resident
and JCC Participant:
Effective June 1, 1976, the
administrative offices of the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida, Hollywood Ex-
tension (located at 2838 Holly-
wood Blvd.), will move to the
new Michael-Ann Russell JCC
at 18900 NE 25th Ave.. North
Miami Beach. The new phone
number will be 932-4200.
With the completion of the
first phase of the new JCC
building, which will serve Hol-
lywood and North Dade, we feel
that moving the staff into one
facility will make a better cross-
fertilization of ideas and, we
hope, better service to both
communities. It will also pro-
vide very much needed addi-
tional space to the expanding
needs of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward, which H now
housed with the Center at 2838
Hollywood Blvd.
We want to assure all JCC
participants that all programs
for grade school children, teen-
agers and senior adults will con-
tinue at the 2838 Hollywood
Blvd. building this coming sum-
mer and throughout the year.
The Senior Adult Activities Cen-
ter and staff will remain in
Hollywood at the present fa-
cility and operate throughout
the summer and the coming
year as usual. When programs
resume in the fall for all other
age groups, staff will be on
hand at the Hollywood building
during all program times.
AH of us associated with the
Michael-Ann Russell JCC are
very proud of our new facility
and I would like to invite all
of you to visit the new site at
NE 25th Ave. I would be very
happy to escort you through the
new facility all you have to
do is call my office at 932-4200
and arrange for such a tour.
If some of you who are inter-
ested in seeing the site would
like transportation from Holly-
wood, please call our office and
we will be happy to arrange for
such transportation.
We look forward to serving
you in the future as in the past.
Sincerely,
Myrna Amsel
Director
Delta Players Hold Auditions
Delta Players, who perform-
ed "Der Shirtz" ("H.M.S. Pina-
fore," in Yiddish), are planning
a new production, Gilbert and
Sullivan's "The Mikado" tran-
slated into Yiddish by Mims
Walowit.
All those interested in this
dramatic experience, and those
who have musical talent, are
asked to call for an audition:
927-5291 or 940-3711.
Performances are scheduled
for January, February and
March. 1977.
^ It Rays You To ^
MAKE RESERVATIONS EARLY.
Save On Our Special Holiday Rates!
A CffiBBEM
STRICTLY
KOSHER
HOTEL
YOM **"
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Phone: 531-0061
Sam Schechter
Owner Manager
Mta st MIAMI BEACH
r

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For Group Outings and Conferences call 212-563-3704
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Groseinger, N. Y. 12734 / Tal. 914 292 5000


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 4
Nathan Pritcher (left) and Herbert D. Katz with this
year's recipient of the Arlene Pritcher Memorial Award,
Jo Ann Katz. The award is made to the woman who ex-
emplifies "the essence of Jewish womanhood."
Lewis E. Cohn, president of
the Jewish Federation of
South Broward (right), pre-
sented the Hy and Jelle
Schlafer Young Leadership
Award to Helen Cohan. The
award is "In recognition of
service, interest and devo-
tion to the betterment of our
community." This year for
the first time the award was
presented to a woman.
Norman Atkin (left) presented Moses Hornstein with
the Norman and Nancy Atkin Outstanding Leadership
Award while immediate past Federation president Her-
bert D. Katz looked on. The award is presented for
"leadership service and dedication to the Jewish com-
munity."
Herbert D. Katz, outgoing
president of the Jewish Fed-
eration of South Broward,
presented Karen Margulies
with an award for "devo-
tion and service to the Jew-
ish cause." The award says,
"This 2,000-year-old per-
fume bottle, uncovered from
the soil of modern Israel,
symbolizes the historic con-
tinuity of Jewish life." Mrs.
Margulies was chairman of
this year's Women's Divi-
sion campaign, which raised
more than $500,000.
( JEFFER
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
WttCTORS
kwi Jeflet Me*miJeffei NvwJtfto
11*11 MUSK m. MOWS. U. NY
12t3 COWY BUM Ml. BHYN, NT
212/776-8100
(HOE COUNTY 133*5 W DM* HWY
947-1185 Re* Or SuntlMi FO
MMMO COUNTY Id WMI NO
928-2743 N kismiiMiFo
nUMKMH COUNTY -CSS OUVfM
1-928-2743 > o
Serwn MMk i com
i n Nea York end irioughou
ihe bum Hjm u ,
Newly elected president of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward Lewis E. Cohn was presented with an
award for outstanding campaign leadership by outgo-
ing president Herbert D. Katz. The award reads, "This
2,000-year-old vase, uncovered from the soil of mod-
ern Israel, symbolizes the historic continuity of Jewish
life."
rALMEAs
MUM MONUMENT COMPANY/
ION AUZID MEMORIAL*
currtM craptid
momeomuHOf
BROWARD 525-5961
Dad* 4444921
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis E. Cohn and Irving Bernstein, guest
speaker at Federation's annual meeting. Mrs. Cohn is
holding the 2,000-year-old Israeli vase presented to her
husband for his outstanding work during last year's cam-
paign, of which he was general chairman.
Demos, GOP Seek
Anti-Boycott Plank
In Both Platforms
PHILADELPHIA (JTA) The B'nai B'rith will al
the Democratic and Republican parties to give "forthrig
and unambiguous" support in their 1976 Presidential pli
forms to federal legislation that would make it illegal f
American firms to comply with the Arab boycott again
Israel, the B'nai B'rith's administrative committee
nounced at its semiannual meeting here.
The action was one of a series of proposals on forei
and domestic issues in which B'nai B'rith will seek bi-pa
tisan support during this election year.
DAVID M. BLUMBERG, president of B'nai B'rith, sa
that "a strong and enforceable" anti-boycott law is need
"to put a damper on Arab economic warfare which has c
erced American corporations and banks into flouting U
policies and interests."
Blumberg added that the "foreign policy plans by
ther party which call for Middle East peace measures bi
ignore the Arab boycott's subversion of American natior
interests would be self-weakening and open to challenge
4400 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
7empte 3etA&
WemotuU
CtCLtdtMA
The all-Jewiih cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surrounding*, beau-
tifully landscaped, perpetual care,
aonably priced.
For information call: 920-4225 or
TEMPLE BETH EL
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOO. FLORIDA 33020
Flea** *nd a** liUrator* on tk* aba**.
NAME:
AO DRESS:
FHONE:


June 4, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
x K)
\Honored at the annual meeting of the Jew-
ish Federation of South Broward for their
Outstanding contributions to the United
\lewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund
\umpaign are (from left) Marian Levitats,
[jtancy Brizel, Ann Cohn, Elaine Fleisher,
Karen Margulies, Elaine Pittell, Eleanor
Weiner, Jo Ann Katz and Sylvia Abram.
The Federation provides service to the
community by funding more than 30 social
welfare agencies in the United States and
abroad.
\
E. Cohn, newly elect-
president of the Jewish
federation of South Brow-
id, presented Elaine Pittell
Iwith the June Gordon
d for Young Women's
srship, "In recognition
exceptional service to the
ilomen's Division and fu-
me potential to the better-
ent of our community."
I Town
and Mrs. Alex Morninjt-
were members of a recent
nelers' mission to Israel,
fcere they studied means of
etinR the American market's
creasing demand for diamond-
crusted jewelry.
Religious
Services
RAUANMU
-LANDALE JEWISH CSNTBk
J9"X*I*>. 1 NB Bth Avo
|WN>i Hirry l. tchwarti. Canto.
|iicth Danilaar.
WITH MIAMI BUCK
JAI (Ttrnplc) of NORTH OAOI
J* HI 22nd Ah. Rrf.rm. RafeM
|JJJ-F Klnoaley. Cancor Irvln*
NOITH MOWAJB
flrn.T^NQ8 HBBRI.W CON
"EQATION. R.fortn. /*1 N.W
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HOUTWOM
KgJ**KL OW HOL -VWOOD
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nANTATMN
JMAI.OM
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rvattv)

- MHw^. RaM4
Community Calendar
JUNE
10
17
Temple Solel Senior Youth Group installation of officers
6:30 p.m.
Senior Adult Lecture series: Nicholas ladone, author and
lecturer: "We are sociably Unsociable" JCC, 10:30
a.m.
Senior Adult Movie Specials: "Golda Meir" and Herschel
Bernardi in "May It Be" JCC, 10:30 a.m.
Beth El Elects Officers
At the 20th annual meeting
of Temple Beth El the follow-
ing officers were elected: James
Fox Miller, president; Milton
H. Jacobs, executive vice presi-
dent; Dr. Philip R. Gould and
Owen Lewis Wyman, vice presi-
dents; Theodore Lifset, treas-
urer; Jules B. Gordon, financial
secretary; and Alfred Golden,
secretary.
The following were elected to
one-year terms on the board of
trustees: Gladys Abram. Jack J.
Alexander, Melvin H. Baer.
Isaac Benwitt, Dr. Robert Blank,
Gertrude Firestone, Dr. Abra-
ham S. Fischler, Alfred Golden,
Jules B. Gordon, Dr. Philip R.
Gould, Irving H. Green, Abra-
ham Halnern. Sanford B. Heims,
Milton H. Jacobs, Thalia Ja-
cobs, Stuart Kallman, Myer
Kirsner, Benjamin Klein, Dr.
Rubin Klein, Hyman Kones, R.
Mitchell Lewis, Theodore Lifset,
James Fox Miller, L. Paul Nes-
tel. Dr. Saul Nitzberg, Nathan
Pritcher. Leo Salzstein, Samuel
Schwartzman, Bernard Schin-
der. Stanley Spector, A. Pettie
Weinberg, Charles S. Wolfe and
Owen Lewis Wyman.
BRIEF REPORTS reviewing
the past year were given by Dr.
Samuel Z. Jaffe, president Rob-
ert M. Baer, and administrator
Sydney D. Kronish. Rabbi Jaffe
underscored the central role of
the synagogue in Jewish life,
the dimensions of temple affilia-
tion and the progressive ap-
proach of the Reform move-
ment to meet the changing
times. _' vi
He commented on the intro-
duction to Temple Beth El of
the new prayerbook, "Gates of
Prayer."
President Baer emphasized
the temple's all family aspect
and its cooperation with the
Jewish community. He also
noted that the temple has been
the site of many activities and
functions previously held else-
where.
Kronish reported that the
nast 12 months have seen the
temples emergence as a major
congregation in the Southeast
region. and praised its unique-
ness as a synagogue for all ages
working together with a stead-
fast faith in one another and in
Judaism.
Team Building-What Is It?
Management skills what
are they?
"I'm a leader" what does
that mean?
The Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward board of directors met
with a management consultant
recently and discovered for
themselves that group proces-
ses, in order to be effective,
must be carefully thought-out
and scientific in execution
Gail Silverman, a specialist
In organizational development,
spent the day with the leader-
ship of the Women's Division
and took them through the steps
and methods of communicating
effectively with others.
It was an intellectual and
emotional awakening and
brought new insights into how
and why individuals assume
leadership and how well they
perform in their responsibili-
ties," said Joyce Newman, presi-
dent.
If the feedback is any in-
dication of the success of this
initial effort in consciousness
raising, then the activity was
well worth the time spent"
The day ended with almost
total agreement that more such
should be scheduled
Marian Levitats, vice presi-
dent for in-service training who
organized the day's encounter,
said this was the first of many
"training" programs to develop
"exciting, vital leaders" in the
Women's Division.
Bar Mitzvdh
SHARON ERENBAUM
Sharon, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Merwin Erenbaum, cele-
brated her Bat Mitzvah on May
21 at Temple Beth Shalom.
Sharon attends Olsen Middle
School, is interested in gym-
nastic intermurals and is a
teacher's aide. She is enrolled
in Beth Shalom Religious
School, Hey Class.
it to to
MARK S. GLAZER
Dr. and Mrs. Victor Glazer's
son, Mark S., observed his Bar
Mitzvah on May 22 at Temple
Beth Shalom.
Mark is a student at Lehr-
man Day School, where he is
on the basketball team and
Rabbi's Honor Roll. He is also
interested in student govern-
ment.
to to to
ROBIN CRANE
Dr. and Mrs. George Crane's
daughter, Robin, will celebrate
her Bat Mitzvah at Temple Si-
nai this evening.
Robin is an active member in
the seventh grade at Nova Mid-
dle School, where she is on the
basketball team.
to to to
JAY SULTAN
Jay, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Bernard Sultan, will observe
his Bar Mitzvah on June 5 at
Temple Sinai.
Jay attends John F. Kennedy
Middle School. He is active in
school and temple activities.
to to to
LINDA HABER
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Haber's
daughter, Linda., a student in
the seventh grade at Nova Mid-
dle School, will celebrate her
Bat Mitzvah on June 11 at Tem-
ple Sinai.
to to to
KEVIN D. ROMER
Mr. and Mrs. Wilham Ro-
mer's son, Kevin Douglas, be-
came a Bar Mitzvah on May 20
at Temple Beth El.
Kevin is a seventh-grade stu-
dent at John F. Kennedy Junior
High School, where he is a mem-
ber of the National Junior Hon-
or Society.
Guests at the service includ-
ed his grandmother, Mrs. Anne
Romer of North Miami Beach,
Ms. S. Cohen of New York, Dr.
and Mrs. B. Conway and Mrs.
Ethel Tate of Toronto, Mrs. M.
Krangle of Vancouver, Mrs. Ida
Lustig of Bridgeport, Conn., and
Mrs. S. Sussman of Houston,
Tex.
^ ^ V
DAVID SHAVELL
Mr. and Mrs. Morton Sha-
vell's son, David, became a Bar
Mitzvah on May 29 at Temple
Beth El. He is a student in the
seventh grade at McNicol Mid-
dle School.
Guests included his grand
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Leon Le-
vitt and Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Shavell of Miami, the Jerry
Berman family of Altamonte
Springs, and Lee Krick of At-
lanta. ^
We regret the error in a caption with a photograph pub-
lished in The Jewish Floridian-Shofar on May 21 show-
ing James Fox Miller handing his gavel to Mark Fried,
the new president of the Jewish Family Service of South
Broward. Miller is at right, Fried is at left. Family Serv-
ice executive director Esther Lowenthal looks on.
YEVGENCY LEVICH TOUR
Yevgency Levich, the young-
est son of Dr. Benjamin Levich,
a member of the Soviet Acad-
emy of Sciences and highest-
ranking .Soviet Jewish scientist
to apply to emigrate, recently
toured the United States on his
father's behalf under the au-
spices of the National Confer-
ence on Soviet Jewry and the
Committee for Concerned Sci-
entists.
Scientific meetings at univer-
sities and such facilities as the
National Institute of Health
were among his stops in IS
American and Canadian cities.
He visited Washington, New
York, Boston, San Francisco,
Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Seat-
tle and San Diego.
In Washington Levich met
with Congressmen William
Green (Pa.) and James O'Hara
(Mich.), Senators Walter Mon-
dale (Minn.), Abraham Ribicoff
(Conn.), and Alan Cranston
(Calif.), as well as with aides
to Senators Daniel Inouye
(Haw), George McGovern (S.
Dak.) and Hugh Scott (Pa.).
REFUSENIKS
In a recent survey of 500
families refused exit visas by
officials of the local OVIR of-
fices, the following reasons
were given for refusals: state
security or secrecy, 210 per-
sons; service in the Soviet
Army, 160 persons; emigration
is inexpedient, 27 persons;
question of family reunification,
10 persons; secrecy clearance
of remaining relatives. 22 per-
sons; lack of parental consent,
16 persons; relatives left USSR
without permission, 4 persons;
applicant is a valuable special-
ist, 3 persons; and reasons not
given, 48 persons. *
Reasons for refusing the
granting of exit visas continue
to be arbitrary and the terms
of validity can rarely be ex-
plained. The procedure for con-
sidering applicants is kept
strictly secret. The seriousness
of the situation is heightened
bv the facts that the widely ap-
plied concept of secrecy in the
USSR and that officials who de-
cide on the degree of secrecy
possessed by an applicant often
exaggerate their conclusions.
The following people were
refused exit permits: Piotr Krik-
sunov (Kiev), Vadim Sheinis
(Kiev), Mark Azbel (Moscow),
Boris Levitas (Kiev), Yevgeny
Yakir (Moscow), Vladimir Drot
(Vilnius), Ilya Essas (Moscow),
former POC's Mark Lutsker.
Yuri Pokh and Yuri Berkovsky.
to to -to
For information about local
Soviet Jewry action, call Elaine
Pittell at 921-8810.
jccopmSm*?
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Centers are open on
Sundays.
By now yon most have heard
that the North Dade- South
Broward Communities have a
new JCC facility at 18900 NE
25th Ave., North Miami Beach.
They are showing off and are
open for inquiries, camp regis-
tration, tours and general in-
formation on Sundays between
I and 4 p.m. each week from
now until camp begins on June
21.
Bring the family over to visit
For further information, call
932-4200.


Page 1C
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 4,
je
^abbimcal flag*
co-ordinated by tfto
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
coditors
Dr. Max A. lipachitz Rabbi Robert J. Orkand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
YOUR RABBI SPEAKS
Children Must Know and Do
By RABBI ALEXANDER GROSS
Temple Beth El
Having been involved in Jew-
ish education for some time, I
have observed some brusque
wrestling matchtes waged be-
tween parents and educators on
many issues. An ongoing con-
troversy that seems to be get-
ting more intensified through
the years is exactly what should
we expect from Jewish educa-
tion.
Parents perceive the Jewish
school as a place where one
acquires knowledge and intel-
lectual stimulation, but educa-
tors want more than that. They
emphasize practice, observance,
ritual performance, and a com-
bination of doing and teaching.
Teachers are outraged and
disturbed by the attitude of
those parents who doggedly re-
fuse to cooperate and imple-
ment the school's philosophy
at home. Parents want the
school to develop a Jew who is
feeling, ethnic and educated,
but these fine idealistic goals
will never be achieved unless
they are reinforced at home by
practice and observance
IF WE want to restore the
Jewish family, and we do, there
is no way of accomplishing that
goal without becoming Jewish.
And being Jewish means prac-
ticing kashruth. Shebbat, Jew-
ish learning and all the dis-
ciplines demanded of us as
Jews.
In a sense, Judaism's position
on this question was settled at
Sinai when the Jewish people
declared "naase" we will do,
even before we understand,
"nishma." Note that the lan-
guage of Judaism is not express-
ed in abstract ethics but in prac-
tice of the Commandments and
in commitments to Jewish life,
to Jewish laws and to Jewish
values.
A theologian of another faith
may have said, "The law killeth,
and the spirit giveth life," but
this statement has no validity in
Judaism. Judaism is not a reli-
gion of the spirit; it is a system
of law. Its soul does not lie in
its ideals; its soul lies in its
practices.
PARENTS MUST be made
aware that Judaism cannot exist
in a vacuum. The home must
provide the environment for a
child to live that which he has
learned. Jewish identity was
never intended to be an intel-
lectual exercise. Jewish identity
is a stature, achieved by living
Jewishly.
Learning without practice is
fleeting; abetted by parental
reinforcement, it becomes per-
manent. This is the educators'
goal; it should be the parents'
goal as well. For without learn-
ing and doing, our children will
live in a purposeless void.
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
Jewishness and Judaism
By DR. MAXWELL BERGER
Rabbi of Temple Tlkva
What do you suppose would
happen to our society if all at
once we were to find that at-
torneys practice medicine and
prescribe medication; that phy-
sicians give legal advice and
argue cases in court; that ac-
countants perform surgery; that
druggists treat psychotics, and
so on down the line?
Wouldn't that be one great
big horrible state of confusion?
Of course, this cannot hap-
pen in our society because there
are laws to prevent it. But k
does happen in our religion and,
unfortunately, there are no laws
to prevent it. No greater li-
berties in abuse and misconcep-
tion exist then those taken in
the name of religion by individ-
uals who may be acclaimed as
experts in other fields bat know
nothing, or next to nothing,
about Judaism.
TO BE SURE, "Jewishness"
it more prevalent today than
ever before. There is a great
deal of Jewish awareness and
Jewish mindedness. Whereas
some years ago it was not un-
common for many people to
sidestep the question, today they
freely admit being Jewish and
even dare to be proud of it.
It took 6 million lives and
two bloody wars filled with un-
believable Jewish heroism to
create that conscience.
And what is the result of this
awareness? Jewish country
clubs have more members.:
books on Jewish life and con-
tent hit the best-seller lists;
Jewish caterers make the
mounds of chopped liver higher
and higher not necessarily
kosher but higher; and the
kishka and knishes are being
devoured by the ton with great-
er' zeal and zest.
But what about Judaism? This
association of Jews with Jew-
ishness is not the same as be-
ing interested in and concerned
with and influenced by Juda-
ism. While everyone is busy be-
ing- Jewish, it has yet to be
demonstrated that all this ex-
citement of clubs and organiza-
tions and societies and agencies
all this network of overlap-
ping, duplicating, serf-perpet-
uating, feverish officiousness
that has gripped the Jewish
consciousness into a strangle-
hold relates to Judaism.
WE LIVE in an era of distor-
tions in Jewish life. Like circus
mirrors placed in positions that
reflect ghastly shapes to anyone
aooroaching and become fun-
nier in each succeeding aisle,
we have allowed groups and in-
dividuals to place themselves in
positions where they reflect
ghastly shapes of Judaism.
Only these reflections are not
funny. They are tragic. They
are pathetic caricatures of our
faith and our heritage. We have
a generation of statistics to
prove that unless we do some-
thing about it, and do it soon,
we may win the battle and lose
the war God forbid.
Being a Jew means much
more than being called a Jew.
It means of much more than
eating knoedlach and matzo
balls..much more than lust re-
membering that our parents
used to observe the rituals. It
means that, in addition to re-
auired observances, we sub-
scribe to a Quality of conduct
that cannot be compromised
That Quality is one of ethics
and morality and behavior that
is true and sincere and honest
not in words but in deeds.
Read the Torah from beginning
to end. and vou will find that
the emphasis is laid not upon
Jewishness but upon Judaism
not on what a man says but
unon what a man does and how
he lives.
GREAT AMERICAN JEWISH PERSONALITIES
Rosanna Osterman
It was quiet on the Missis-
sippi River at 3 a.m. that Feb-
ruary night in 1866. The steam-
boat W. R. Carter was proceed-
ing slowly upstream, her en-
gines running smoothly, her en-
gineer said later. She had just
passed Island 98, near Vicks-
burg. Most of her passengers
were asleep. There was no hint
of anything amiss. Suddenly,
without warning, she exploded
her boilers.
When the news reached Gal-
veston that Mrs. Rosanna Oster-
man (1809-1866) was among
those lost, the outpourings from
all who knew her made clear
that here was a woman who had
rightly earned an honored place
in the history of the Jews of
America.
Arriving in Galveston when
Texas was still a republic, Ros-
anna Osterman, by her indefa-
tigable efforts and personal ex-
ample, had enriched the lives of
her community's citizens to the
HI
CANDIEIIGHTING TIME
6 SIVAN 7:49
extent that they called her "a
mother in Israel." Nothwith-
standing Rosanna Osterman's
contributions to the growing up
of her adopted country, her
place in American Jewish his-
tory has received scant atten-
tion until now.*
ROSANNA DYER, who was
born in Mainz, Germany, was
only about five years old when
her parents emigrated to Balti-
more. She was given a careful
and thorough education. She
showed extraordinary literary
talents and might have gained
a name in literature had she
had literary ambitions.
Sometime between 1830 and
193S, Rosanna married Joseph
Osterman. Holland-born (1796)
Baltimore silversmith and jew-
eler. When her husband's busi-
ness failed, in 1839, Rosanna's
brother. Major Leon Dyer, of
the army of Texas, urged the
couple to move to Galveston.
With financial aid from Major
Dyer, the couple set out for Gal-
veston with a load of general
merchandise. Joseph Osterman
secured a frame shack, opened
for business and began the
building of what became a
healthy fortune.
Texas, at the time, was an
independent republic, the war
with Mexico having ended only
three vears before. For Rosan-
na Osterman it must have been
ouite a change to leave the
thriving seaport city of Balti-
more for the sleepy "Mexican"
village of Galveston with its
weed-filled streets kept mowed
by the householders' slaves with
their long-handled scythes.
DEVOUT JEWESS as she was.
Rosanna must have steeled her
soul as she walked ankle deep
in the sand of her new home
town, meditating on the reality
that there were too few Jews
for a congregation for public
worship and the fact that Jews
who died had to be laid to rest
in non-Jewish cemeteries.
It turned out to be Rosanna
(1809-66)
who led the successful move to
secure land for a Jewish ceme-
tery and it fell to the Ostermans
and the Dyers to bring the min-
ister of the Portuguese congre-
gation of New Orleans to per-
form the consecration rites on
August 29, 1852, possibly the
first instance of a Jewish clergy-
man officiating in Texas.
The Osterman mule pack
trains wound their ways into
the Texas interior as their ener-
getic and enterprising owner
became increasing by successful
in business, building the fortune
that Rosanna was destined to
share so wisely with her own
and other American Jewish
communities.
Joseph Osterman's men trad-
ed with nearly all the Indian
tribes. He was one of the first
exporters of cotton to Holland
and one of the first to advance
money to the planter on grow-
ing crops. His schooner made
periodic trips to Jamaica for
rum and sugar and brought the
first palms and oleanders to
Galveston in 1842.
Joseph Osterman met a tragic
death in 1861 when he was
killed in an accident during a
visit to a gunsmith's shop.
WHEN THE Civil War hit Gal-
veston, the Federal occupation
and subsequent blockade
brought business to a virtual
standstill. During the war, Ros-
anna Osterman stood out as the
outstanding Jew on the island.
She threw open her home to the
sick and wounded who crowded
every room. She spent her days
and nights caring for and sup-
plying necessities to soldiers of
both sides. It was said that Ros-
anna transmitted to the Confed-
rat authorities in Houston in-
formation which enabled them
to retake Galveston on New
Year's Day. 1863.
After the war, Galveston be-
gan to thrive again. Jews flock-
ed to the island from Germany,
from Alsace, from Poland, from
Russia. Rosanna devoted her-
self to make them feel at home,
settling them and caring for
them when they were ill.
Following Rosanna Oster-
man's untimely and tragic death
on the Mississippi it was found
that her care for her people
was by no means limited to her
own community. Influenced
probably by the example of Ju-
dah Touro, Rosanna Osterman
left beouests from her large
estate to Jewish organizations
in Philadelphia. New York, New
Orleans. Cincinnati. Houston
and Galveston.
INCLUDED were such institu-
tions as the Jewish foster home,
the Jewish hospital, the ladies'
benevolent society, the Hebrew
foreign mission society, the He-
brew educational society, the
Hebrew school, the benevolent
association and the indigent
Jews of Palestine.
In setting aside funds for the
founding of a widow's and or-
phan's home in Galveston, Ros-
anna stipulated that it was to
be nondenominational. "for are
not all men brothers before
God?" Funds for the support of
indigent Israelites of Galveston
were to be used for those of
anv denomination in the ab-
sence of indigent Jews.
Rosanna left funds toward
the building of synagogues in
Galveston and Houston, for
first Jewish benevolent soci
to be established in Galve
and Houston, for a Galve
sailors' home, for the foun
of a "school fund" for the
cation of poor Jewish chili
of Galveston and Houston.
What spiritual strength
tiny Galveston community
sessed, derived, it was i
from "a true woman of
Rosanna Osterman, Texas
neer and patriot, ardent
devout Jewess."
The information for
monograph was garnered {
manuscript material in
American Jewish Archived
Cincinnati and from volumi
Galveston newspaper art
from 1866 and later and
an address lauding Mrs. 0
man's exemplary life.
Her probated will contai
some 67 items or individual
quests in on file in the Gal
ton County Clerk's office.
securing the Galveston mate]
the Society is indebted to L
J. Wygant, Archivst of the
enberg Library, Galveston.
Question Bo
By RABBI DR. SAMUEL J. |
Question: Why is a Jew L
bidden to labor on the S
bath?
Answer Of course, the
hibition is of Biblical oi
since the Bible expressly
hibits work on the Sab
(Exodus 20:9). A variety of
sons are offered by rabb
sources. One of these ck
that the Sabbath prohibi
from labor was meant to ren
man that the world is the c
tion of the Almighty.
The Bible actually states
the Sabbath is thus observed
cause the Almighty created
world in six days and restet
the seventh. On the one hi
man is asked to follow the
ample of his creator, i.e.,
doing and creating during
week and resting on the I
bath. On the other hand,
is asked to realize that be
it a creation of the Almi*
and not an absolute ere
himself. He therefore cm
gain mastery over the Almi(
upon whom he has to dep
always.
Some indicate that the 4
bath is a reminder of the f
dus from Egypt. The Bible
plies this also. In this respl
the Sabbath Is an opportu
for man to achieve freo
from the pressures of the evi
dav working world and ri
spiritual heights The Sabt
is the day for the full exp
slon and freedom of the
which is often suppressed
ing the week because of
bodilv activities that pro*
the basis for man's ohvi
sustenance.
The Sabbath has also 4
regarded as a sign of the
nant between the Jew and
Almighty. By observing-the-
bath, the Jew demonstrates
covenantal tie with the
mighty, i.e.. not working on
Sabbath was part of the m*
agreement.


June 4, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11

On Television
LEVRAL ATTEMPTS have been made to create television
* series focusing on Jewish characters but they have gen-
erally not reached even the stage of test runs, according to
1 expert on American commercial mass entertainment.
I" pr. Howard Suber. president of the Society for Cinema
I Studies, said the "considerable success" of the Goldbergs in
larlv television did not disprove his point since that series had
[originated in radi0 and, like many other successful radio series,
had been transferred to television.
I DR. SUBER, a member of the motion picture/television
Ihculty of the University of California at Los Angeles, offered
Ibis analysis in an issue of Davka, the quarterly journal pub-
lished by the Los Angeles Hillel Council.
Dr. Suber contrasted the relative scarcity of Jewish char-
lacters on commercial TV "With the clearly-established pop-
lilarity of virtually every other ethnic group on television"
lind suggested it was probably due to fears of Jewish execu-
tes in the mass entertainment field about becoming "too
Ivisible" as Jews.
He declared that until the appearance of The Law, which
[featured a Jewish lawyer, Judd Hirsch, and Bridget Loves
[Bernie, Jewish characters had not been given starring roles
I in American television series "and Bridget Loves Bernie was
I only half Jewish That program had been sharply criticized
|jy Jewish groups.
HE ASSERTED that Kung Fu had originally been created
I is a Hasidic creature "who walked around spouting pseudo-
Talmudic aphorisms. When he was brought to life in the tele-
liision scries starring David Carradine, however, he was changed
[to a character who walks around spouting pseudo-Chinese
[iphorisms."
Dr. Suber commented that the purported aphorisms "still
I unded Talmudic but evidently the producers were convinced
[that Americans would identify more easily with a bald Oriental
| than they would with a hairy Jew."
HE REPORTED that, more recently, Lee Rich, who pro-
Iduced The Waltons "and therefore might be expected to know
I something about what would appeal to the mass American
! audience, tried to put together a series entitled Enter Horowitz,
but was unsuccessful." He reported there had been other at-
tempts to feature Jewish characters in a television series, such
[is Grandpa Max, "but they have so far failed."
He said Rhoda was "nominally Jewish," as played by Va-
llerie Harper, a gentile actress who "assures us that 'in my
[heart, I'm Jewish'." Dr. Suber suggested that the fact that Miss
[Harper is not Jewish "is seen by many in Hollywood as be-
[ing a positive point, just as Gregory Peck's playing a Jew in
] jentlemen's Agreement was seen" by nervous Jewish producers
"as preferable to a Jewish actor portraying a Jew."
Dr. Suber stressed that while Jews "do indeed dominate
[in many occupational categories in Hollywood, most notably
I among executives, producers and writers." they are "virtually
|ibsent" as Jewish characters in television.
HE CITED as evidence for his belief that the two situa-
ffons were related the "metamorphosis" in the Jewishness of
[Rhoda in the transition from supporting character to central
| character.
He declared that when Rhoda Morgenstern was a support-
ling member on the Mary Tyler Moore Show, "her Jewishness
*as clearly established, perhaps to balance the otherwise
I WASPish cast of characters." But when she started her own
mat, 'he Jewish aspect was diluted.
"While Rhoda's mother is still a first-class 'nudge', and
lr sister is as good a 'yenta' as we're likely to get on televi-
[son, Rhoda's own Jewishness has been deliberately down-
IMyed. She wasn't even permitted to have a nice Jewish wed-
|ing."
HE NOTED that "there are a few other supporting Jewish
ttaracters on television currently," listing "Fish" on Barney
I "wer and "Juan Epstein" on Welcome Back Kotter, remark-
' *ryly about the latter that "half a Jew is better than none."
And that, he added, with a few minor exceptions, "pretty
oucn ends the list of Jewish chearacters on television."
One Central Body ?
No Way in Our Time
iKob
ert
S^ccjal
QUIXOTIC is the idea, but Rabbi Mordecai
x VVaxman of Great Neck, N.Y., deserves a
high mark for still another effort. In his re-
cent Presidential address before the Rabbinical
Assembly, the rabbi called for "the creation of
a central, democratic, deliberative national
Jewish organization that can make definitive
policy for all of American Jewry."
In proposing his idea, Rabbi Waxman paid
passing tribute to the three organizations
which, in his judgment, have been making a
stab at his objective. The Big 3, in his book,
are the Conference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations, the Syna-
gogue Council, and the Council of Jewish Fed-
erations and Welfare Funds.
MORE THAN 100 years ago, 17 Jewish lead-
ers of Paris had the same idea Rabbi Waxman
now tries to float anew. In creating the Al-
liance Israelite Univeraelle, the determined
French Jews stirred into action by such out-
rages as the Damascus Affair and the Mor-
tara incident felt certain they were setting
up a representative Jewish body "which could
authoritatively speak in behalf of the Jewish
communities of all lands."
This was long before Hitler, long before
the emergence of Israel, and even earlier than
the murder of Czar Alexander II and the Drey-
fus Affair. The Alliance has been a factor for
considerable good, but who dares say now it
;ould or does speak for Jews everywhere?
HISTORY HAS favored us with a variety
Df leaders desiring to bring all Jewish aspira-
tions, philosophical yearnings, dreams, plans,
Hid activities under one great tabernacle roof.
But always something went awry.
Maybe the trouble was that each Moses
i;id a different concept of leadership. And oh,
what despair over the idea of uniting. Louis
Marshall, American Jewish Committee pioneer,
>s recorded, for example, as having once ut-
ered this anxiety: "The very thought of the
nass of Jews in America having a voice in
he matter of deciding the welfare of the Jews
in the world makes me shrink in horror."
WELL, IT really hasn't been that much of
a nightmare
So we find our way back to Rabbi Wax-
man's new appeal; and it is instructive to
-eexamine the purposes of the three national
)iganizations he cites:
1Th Conference of Presidents of Major
\merican Jewish Organizations: With emphasis
abroad, this 21-year-old Conference aims "to
coordinate the activities of 32 major organ-
izations on the American scene as they relate
to American-Israeli affairs and problems af-
fecting Jews in other lands."
2Synagogue Council of America: This um-
brella group serves as spokesman for, and co-
irdin;>tes, policies of national rabbinical and
lay synagogal organizations of Conservative,
Orthodox and Reform branches of American
ludaism. Again, valuable, but Jews beyond the
boundaries of synagogues are scarcely affected.
3Council of Jewish Federations and Wel-
fare Funds: By now definitely looked upon as
the American Jewish Establishment, this ap-
paratus helps in fund raising, community or-
ganization, health and welfare planning, per-
sonnel recruitment, and public relations. It
brings into its ample fold 235 associated Jew-
sh Community organizations.
6;
usan
Voff
A Potpourri of Books
For Good Reading This Week
ItfE HAVE a potpourri this week. Raymond
A. Zwerin's "For One Another: Jewish
Drganizations That Help Us AH" (Union of
American Hebrew Congregations and American
Association of Jewish Education, 175 pp.) is an
excellent text for junior high schoolers to learn
ibout the important community agencies which
ierve American Jewry.
The illustrated, sturdily-bound paperback
is full of charts and diagrams identifying many
tranches of each organization. For example,
Zwerin lists the 12 major national Jewish edu-
cational agencies with their services, publica-
tions and sponsorship.
ORGANIZATIONS such as Jewish Family
Service, Jewish Vocational Service and the JCC
are dealt with in individual chapters. The his-
tory of each, how it operates, and a sample
'case" study are offered. The author has pro-
tided the reader with passages from Jewish
writings in both English and Hebrew which
relate to the work of each agency.
At the conclusion of each chapter are sug-
gestions for students of "things to think about
and do." In addition to its value as a classroom
text, this is a handy ready-reference tool for
all ages to familiarize themselves with the
structure and function of Jewish communal
service.
"SO WHAT Is a Mensch?" and "Family
Mystique" by Vivian T. Johnson (Vantage,
$3.95, 61 pp.) are two trite, corny stories about
Jewish families struggling to make it in Amer-
ica in the early part of this century. The
stories, boring with stilted dialogue, are un-
believably simplistic, a waste of time for chil-
dren as well as adults. The blurb on the back
cover in which Ms. Johnson describes herself
is pathetic and embarrassing. A poor sample of
'vanity press" publishing.
Elaine Larsen's "Israel" (Hastings House,
$4.95, 176 pp.) is a historical perspective of the
mportant cities and geographical areas of the
country. The orientation is basic.
In fact, it assumes so little knowledge of
Judaism and Jewish history, and includes such
a large number of passages from the New
Testament, that I would characterize this book
as a Christian presentation.
Historical landmarks of all religions are
mentioned. Larsen offers her historical infor-
mation clearly and accurately. She includes a
chapter on the economic importance of the
kibbutz, as well as its significance as a so-
ciological experiment. This is a weU-written,
Drief and informative introduction to the land
and people of Israel for our non-Jewish neigh-
Mrs.
New American Jewish History Was Recently Made at Valley Forge
^MERICAN-JEWISH history was made recently
near Valley Forge, Pennsylvania.
for the first time, a Jew was elected president
lf 'he Military Chaplains Association.
AT ITS 51st annual gathering, the association,
Uprising clergymen who serve or who have served
ln uniform elevated Rabbi Simeon Kobrinetz to its
v 1 spot.
A graduate of the Jewish Theological Seminary,
be rabbi is also the youngest man ever to head
n- organization.
'he association is truly ecumenical, comprising
jWerj of all faiths also from all over the world
,vh0 have served in the U.S. as military ministers.
RahhFVERAL HUNDRED f the clergymen gave
_ Kobrinetz a standing ovation at their convoca-
lon fie night he was installed was also the same
4-J^antmel Q<
vcr
night the association conferred its annual citizen-
ship Award on President Ford.
In his inaugural address, the new president called
for clergymen truly to proclaim freedom by speak-
ing out boldly on the moral issues of our day.
From 9 to 5, Rabbi Kobrinetz is on Uncle Sam's
payroll in a most important and lofty post: deputy
national chaplain of the Veterans Administration.
THE ELECTION of the first rabbi as head of
the Military Chaplains Association is like a Bicen-
ennial gift by the U.S. to the American Jewish
community.
Mazel tov, MCA. Mazel tov, Rabbi Kobrinetz.
-fr -A- &
Hurrah for Donald McGannon!
President of Westinghouse Broadcasting, the
largest cluster of non-network radio and TV outlets,
McGannon has surrendered about five million dol-
lars a year because he doesn't want to overcommer-
cialize his stations. He objects to 30-second com-
mercials.
More than that McGannon reduces to a mini-
mum programs that glorify vileness, viciousness and
vulgarity.
He blacks out smut. To him this is not censor-
ship but an act of obligation to serve the needs of
the community.


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 4, 1$
about the Spirit of Savings 76
DURING OUR
Pantry Pride wants you to
jlilijll'tiili:
Jump on our Notionol Brand Wagon
for eatra-ipeclal savings. W ve
tnmm*d our prices on scores of
bst-slling nami brands all through
th store "Brand-Aid for" ailing budgets '.
f we want you to feel good about
this unique opportunity to
own a 40-piece set of imported
porcelain china
Waldorf
Bath Tissue
ASSORTED
ROIL PKG
49
* UMlT ONE 4 tOU PUG PIE Ali WITH OTHER
'UtCHASIS Ot %7 00 Ot KOI! EXCIUCHNG CIGARETTES
Pantry
Pride
Vi
Tour Basic lir|iw Sttrt
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY.
JUNE 5th AT ALL PANTRY PRIDE
STORES IN DADE COUNTY. ALSO IN
HOLLYWOOD AND HALLANDALE
TOUR EOOO STAMPS
CO FURTHER AT YOU*
PANTRY PRIDE STOM
IIMIHIW
I SHRPS I
Ft
This week's feature a
Beautiful Cup 49c
with each $5 purchase!
ACH
CUStOMftMAT PURCHASE ONI Ot All STARRED ITIMS WITH ONI $7 00
PURCHASE Ot MORE IHC1UDINC CIGARETTES'
Star-Kist
Light Tuna
CHUNK
STYLE
39
4%-OZ.
CAN
IIMHT TWO CANS PtIASI WITH OTHER PURCHASIS
^* OE %7 POOR MORE mquOING CIGARETTES J
SCOTT ASSORTED OH DECORATED
Paper
Towels
2 JUMBO 9 |
140 SHEET
ROILS IM
USDA
; C H 01C E
All ot ov be*t tu't or* U i Go.' ln\pt<'ed
Old Q'od*d C*0>C* fh#s; Off '" """d
'o pf'rc'ion by out *ip*'M *o ovoid *oiff
W quo'ontr* thtm >o b pioIvmi"* 'rdr'
v>< f "d tfrlKiOwilf >lo*0'*<,l '
U.S.DA CHOICE WESTERN CORN FED
W% if WHOIE OR POINT HAIF
KOQTr^n boneless
Brisket$l09
USDA CHOICE WESTERN COtN fEO
Sirloin,..^
Steak $179
nil- vim
Prune Juice
Lemon Juice
CORflAORMA
Tomato Sauce
cimimi
Tomato Paste
67*
53
3s2s99
ll-OI
. Ill
CAMS A
Coffee-mate
CAIMATrOM nesiAMT
Dry Milk

MtOIKtlM All HAVOe*
10
Diet Drinks 4^,99*
Kosher Dills ",..'59'
Stewed Tomatoes ?.. 27'
SUMSMIMf
Hydrox Cookies 55? 79*
IRIMCM 1 iNM*Nl ^^
Mashed Potatoes %T 85c
IANQUET FROZEN
BEEF
CHICKEN
TURKEY
Meat Pies
4.o$1
PKOS IBB
tpttjm Seafood
69
MA STAR tCUANCC FtKO
Fish Sticks

Str?464 in Senvicc Afifutijei
flu mai scmiiu ukio TooeotiA'SfoetsN*tfMtocouitie
AMIRiCAN KOi-'tRR" -<.' *
Salami s 89c
LB.
USOA CMOiCI WISMRN CORN MO HI' ROUND
Eye Round Roast ,. *1M
UW* (MOKI Will COIN MO SIM (NuCl
Blade Roast 79
USOA CHOiCI WIST CORN MO |f* IOUNO RIM
Round Roast ,.sl"
USOA CMOiCI WIStiaN COON MO til* IOUN0
Rump Roast
UtOA ("OKI Will CORN MR Ml' ("uC>
Pot Roast =r
Great Ground ,. 69*
..$149
MA OR IRHPPM RRIMiu
Fresh Fryers
ia oe iMteeieveiMiuaa *ri$m
Fryer Qtrs
MA CM \mimo minium fRI.M
Fryer Parts uBf.tasSx99*
USDA CHOICE WESTERN CORN FED
48
.59'
Beef
Rib Steak$l"
SMAll END
ONEIESS
H SAVE 14
Pantry Pride
Margarine
19c
GOLDEN
QTRS.
I IB.
PKG.
UMITONEPKG PHASE WITH OTHII PURCHASES
OE S7 00 OR MORI EXClUOtNG CIGARETTES
Del Monte
Drink
PINEAPPLE
GRAPEFRUIT
25
44-OZ.
CAN
LIMIT 1WO CANS 'IEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF S7 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CICAREtTES
FIRST OF THE SEASON
Bing Cherries
SWEET
EATING
RED DELICIOUS
All FIAVORS
Les Calyi qac
Yogurt 4^99
IDDl WHrP
Cream Topping '< 73'
RoeoRMt auiDOR tamc* -,->.
Cheez Kisses 69
MMMMP CRiAasie m
Cottage Cheese 2 1b*lm
Margarine Qtrs. ..'.' 45'
Sw.sTcheVse" IS 9S*
Apples
3*1
16.0.1
.a 69*
^
f
TOP QUALITY
WASHINGTON
JTATI
EXTRA FANCY
MMCT tWlll lAI4tOSJII>
Fla. Oranges
MllCMtu VAtNTV.lAtW i] \,u
Fla. Mangoes
VI I All PuftPOM
Maine Potatoes 5..79t
MM ..I
Tomatoes HC 8 r.:45'
Yellow Onions Ss~ ,.15*
WAi DIN LOW CAlORM
Salad Dressing '.? 69'
TO OUllli DOll HANO >D1H P^f
Pineapples:: O"..
12-OZ.
CHUR
$109
PANTRY PRIDE
Beef
Salami
OSCAR mill iMWt OR INKS m ^
Sliced Bologna \Jo73'
1
Creamed Herring
ctAustRM % wsKHi oe saiARt
Kosher Pickles
ai
.89'
99'
TROPICANA
Orange
|,,;__ HALF GAL
JUIOt? CONTAINER
PANTRY PRIDE SUCED
Meat
Bologna
99
PANTRY PRIDE HAMBURGER OR
C Hot Dog
Rolls
OlD MILWAUKEE C ARl ING Bl AC K I ABft
OVEN^^PKGS
'RlSM^dR OE 8
Schaefer
Beer 6
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO UMIT QUANTITIES. NONE SOLD TO DEAIIRS


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