The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00140

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
unrf S1IOFAR OF GRKATER HOLLYWOOD
6 Number 6
Hollywood, Florida Friday, March 12, 1976
Fred K. Shochet March 12, 1978
Price 25 cents
'acesetter Luncheon a Success
nnstrating the true spirit
ing and concern for their
>nan, the Women's Pace-
Divlslon responded en-
stically with a marked in-
in pledges at the Feb. 19
|eon.
nailing the successful
ere Mrs. Sherman Katz
Is. Paul Weiner.
>tr A'lme Strelitz, na-
vice chairman of the
Division of the UJA,
reid a letter from a mother who
had lost two sons in the six-day
Yom Kioour War. "I feel as
though I have joined the ranks
of the Mothers in the Bible."
the woman wrote.
"Yes. the terrible price was
wnrthvMle. so that our Jewish
grandchildren, sons, fathers,
and grandfathers might bathe
in peace, even if only for a
short while, in their pool in the
htfll of cottonfields. lucerne
and the grass of natural pas-
tures, cultivated with the hands
of Jewish villagers who teach
their children to be heroes and
persons of high moral values."
Serving on the luncheon com-
mittee were Mrs. Lewis Cohn,
Mrs. Carolyn Davis, Mrs. Sol
Entin, Mrs. Arnold Goldstein.
Mrs. Moses Hornstein, Mrs.
Paul Kraemer. Mrs. Robert Pit-
tell. Mrs. Siuney Shenker and
Mrv Otto Steiber.
From left, Karen Margulies, JoAnn Katz, Arlene Stre-
litz, Joyce Newman and Eleanor Weiner.
lAPAMSt VItmilS TO SU JUDAISM IN ACTION
Federation Focusing
to Feature Religion in U.S. Qn Mobilization
' YORK (JTA) An
fit 20 million Japanese
will watch a one-houl
ii.iiy film on religion
jJniR'd States, at the end
i. which will feature a
filmed by a Japanese
at a Conservative syna-
Manhattan and a He-
lv School in Brooklyn,
Jctor of the Japanese
network NHK office
>rted.
U;hida. the director
a five-man crew came
jn to film material for
lentarv. one of five
ions throughout the
the documentary on
ed Stifs would also
lolics. Protestants and
and oerhans some
fcts. He explained he
be more specific be-
raw film was being
to Japan for editing.
The film or the United States,
iike the otner four, will have
Japanese subtitles. Uchida also
said he could not give a more
exact date for the time of the
t beast of the American docu-
mentary. NHK is a public serv-
ice network, he said.
Arrangements for the crew to
shoot film at the Magen David
School, described as the largest
and oldest of six Sephardic day
schools in the United States,
were made through Torah Ume-
sorah, the National Society for
Hebrew Day Schools.
Rabbi Moshe Greenes, princi-
pal of the day school, said the
TV crew filmed a Torah lesson
in grade five, filmed the chil-
dren in the school playground
and interviewed the principal.
Filming wis done on Jan. 7.
THE SYNAGOGUE visited by
the TV crew was Congregation
Shaare Zedek in uooer Manhat-
tan, on recommendation of the
Jewish Theological Seminary.
ayh Gtes U.S.
y
rael 'Obligation'
1ESTER. N.H.
Sen. Birch Bayh
declared here thai
ligation" of the
ates "is to ensure
sfenses are suffi-
Irong to leave ab-
ino doubt in the
her adversaries
wisdom of laun-
ittack upon her."
connection, Bayh
President Ford
rcss to grant Israel
iing" in her re-
>r military aid to
serious threat to
rity posed by "al-
score of hostile
G at Temple Adath
|here. Sen. Bayh, a
for the 1976 Dem-
lidential nomination,
lie reality of the ait-
He Middle East also
this country must
tide Israel to defeat
resolutions" that
out of the UN Gen-
eral Assembly and other UN
bodies.
"These are not harmless reso-
lutions," Bayh said. "They are
racist slanders that abuse his-
torical truth and trivialize the
suffering of the very people in
whom the light of civilized
humanity burns.'*
Bayh referred to his visit to
Israel and his inspection of that
country's front line position.
He said, "every military con-
flict must be decided in Israel's
favor because the first war that
Israel loses will also be her
last.
"THE UNREMITTING hos-
tility of her neighbors and the
vow by Yasir Arafat and tho
PLO that success for them
means dismantling the State of
Israel gives no latitude.
"What choices are open to
a state whose only alternatives
are victory or political oblivion?
What costs must be borne by
a people for whom failure
means national oblivion?
"What costs must be borne
by a people for whom failure
means national oblivion? The
range of choices for Israel are
perilously narrow. The best pro-
spects are for a tense, protract-
ed armed coexistence with her
neighbors.
the Conservative institution.
Rabbi Shlomo Baiter, spirit-
ual leader, told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that the crew,
two members of which were
fluent in English, asked to film
a regular Saturday morning
service but was told this was
not permitted.
Instead the crew attended a
regular morning service on Jan.
5 in a downstairs room at which
some 60 worshippers were pre-
sent. The camera at one point
was angled to shoot over the
reader's shoulder, focusing on
the pointer as it was moved
across the Torah Scroll.
BALTER SAID he had called
to the attention of one of the
cameramen a wall designed by
Sol Nodel, president of the con-
gregation who is a well-known
artist and miniaturist to com-
memorate the Holocaust. The
rabbi said that the cameraman
interrupted his explanation to
say "I have been in Auschwitz."
Uchida was asked how much
of the one-hour documentary
could be devoted to any one
religion. He said that while this
would be determined by the
technicians in Japan, he ex-
pected that about 12 to 15 min-
utes of the hour-long documen-
tary would deal with the Jew-
ish material filmed here.
He said he had been inform-
ed the documentary will not be
shown in this country.
As of March 16 the Jewish
Federation will center all ac-
tivities and working committees
LEWIS E. COHN
on the CJA-IEF Campaign Mo-
bilization Effort.
The moratorium on activities
not related to the fund-raising
effort will enable campaign lead-
ership, under the direction of
Lewis E. Cohn, to join forces
and work to meet South Brow-
ard's $3.5 million goal.
THE $2.5 billion in U.S. for-
eign aid to Israel should not be
confused with Jewish giving.
U.S. aid is for F-16 warplanes.
Lance missiles, laser-guided
bombs, tanks, armored person-
nel carriers, missiles, "smart"
bombs, electronic surveillance
equipment, and antitank mis-
siles.
The tools of war can only pro-
tect, they cannot create.
U.S. foreign aid does not build
schools, libraries, or provide
funds for health care and hous-
ing.
U.S. aid does not pay for
building Jewish life and rescuing
those in desnair. These are still
our responsibilities.
WITHOUT that money, many
of Israel's social problems will
not be solved indeed, they
will be aggravated.
In addition to providing aid
for critical humanitarian needs
in Israel, campaign dollars are
apportioned to local Jewish
agenies to service the needs of
the community.
Federation efforts foster local
health and welfare agencies,
supply counseling and help for
emotionally troubled individuals
and families, help to support
agencies for the care of chil-
dren and the aged, and main-
tain Jewish schools, recreation
centers and summer camps.
On Thursday, March 25, Hol-
lywood and Miami contributors
to Federation of $1,000 or more
will attend a CAJ-IEF campaign
dinner at the Carillon Hotel,
where Moshe Dayan will be
guest speaker.
RABBI TANENBAUM YOKES PLEA
Bring Swindlers to Justice
NEW YORK (JTA) Rabbi
Marc Tanenbaum. director of
interreligious affairs for the
American Jewish Committee
commenting on reports that
records of a number of Hebrew
day schools have been sub-
poenaed on suspicion of involve-
ment in nursing home Medicaid
swindles, said that guilty Jews
should "be exposed and punish-
ed regardless of who they are
and what may be their titles or
positions."
He said the AJCommittee "to-
gether with every responsible
Jewish group" condemns "prac-
tices of a few individuals in the
Jewish community who have re-
portedly engaged in illegal and
immoral financial transactions
with nursing homes for private
gains."
ACCORDING to Jewish
sources, the day school records
have been subppoenaed by Char-
les J. Hynes, the special prosecu-
tor for nursing homes, whose ef-
forts have led to indictments of
Rabbi Bernard Bergman and
Eugene Hollander, two leading
Orthodox Jews, on state and
federal charges of misuse of
Medicaid funds in their nursing
home operations.
Hollander has pleaded guilty
and is awaiting sentence.
The sources said the ned de-
velopment went beyond the
earlier disclosures concerning
Bergman and Hollander, who
reportedly had made contribu-
tions to religious organizations
and to leading rabbis under the
guise of nursing home costs
which were subsequently reim-
bursed with Medicaid funds.
TANENBAUM said that "the
fact that ostensibly religious
Jews or rabbis have allegedly
been involved and that such"
exploitation takes place at the
expense of poor and elderly peo-
ple many of whom are Jews
only compounds the scandal.
Such reprehensible behavior
violates every moral and ethical
canon of Judaism and of the
Jewish people.
"If the reports are true," he
continued, "the Jewish commu-
nity surely wants this scandal-
ous business investigated tho-
roughly and completely. We
urge that the guilty be exposed
and punished regardless of who
they are and what may be their
titles or positions."


The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 12, 197J
1
<
Second Brussels Conference Marks Start
Of Worldwide Action for Soviet Jews
Nearly 1,000 Jewish leaders from some 50 countries,
along with Protestant and Catholic spokesmen, gathered in
Brussels on Feb. 17-19 for the Second World Conference
on Soviet Jewry.
The. meeting comes just five years after the first Brus-
sels Conference, which touched off a worldwide response
and marked the beginning of large-scale intensive action on
behalf of Soviet Jews.
Mrs. Elaine PittelL chairman
of the Interfaith aod Soviet
Jewry committees of the Jew-
ish Federation of South B tow-
ard, joined 300 other Americans
of all faiths and delegates from
27 other countries in a world
assembly called to mobilize in-
ternational action against the
increasingly harsh treatment of
Jews in the Soviet Union.
Among the prominent Amer-
icans attending the extraordi-
nary conclave were Sen. Frank
Church 11).-Idaho), a ranking
member of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee, Repre-
sentatives Robert Drinan (D.-
Mass). Joshua Eilberg fife-Fa.).
Hamilton Fish (R.-N.Y ). Ste-
phen Solarz (D.-N.Y.) and Sid-
ney Yates (D.-ni).
Golds Meir, farmer Israeli
Prime Minister and honorary
chairman of the conference,
sooke of Jewish conciousness in
the Soviet Union. "We refuse
to disappear. Our spirit is not
broken, we've gone through the
pogroms, the holocaust, bat we
minaged to survive," Mrs. Meir
asserted.
Mrs. Paul Kapelow. who at-
tended tho conference with Mrs
Pittell. spoke of the workshop
of wo-ld scientists which she at-
tended "The Soviet Union is a
participating member of the
World Organization of Scien-
tist*! When the Russians have
a Jewish scientist who is asked
to attend the symoosium. the
Russian scientist either does not
show, or they send someone in
his nlace. It was decided at this
conference to reouire an assur-
ance m writing that the invited
scientist' will attend and if this
is not complied with, the World
Org-inization of Scientists will
refuse to hold a symposium in
that country," concluded Mrs.
Kapelow.
Jack Berraaa of Hollywood,
national chairman of Soviet
Jewrv. represented the Jewish
Wir Veterans at the conference.
Berman stated. "It was a
most exciting and moving ex-
perience. More than UN dele-
frw*s from Tl countries from all
points of the world wore ore-
sent. Approximately 350 dle-
zites were from the United
States."
The conference brought the
foremost Christian leaders to-
gether Notable among the par-
ticipants were Christian reore-
sntat'ves. Catholic. Protestant
and Evangelical, from many
parts of the world; and 'hey
m->de cl-ar bv speech and ac-
tion and show of unquestionable
sincerity that thev are profound-
ly an1 genuin"lv committed to
work fo*- Soviet Jewry and Pre-
pared to snend their energies in
that work.
Indeed, nanv of the Aw-
ic*i amor* them will be re-
eeedea to hvitations to speak
0r h* "the-wise en*ag**d in s*>-
viet !* orP to Christian Conscience" anb-
"*'ttid on rVar b-hilf or the
Nsrionsl Tm>rrelifrious Task
Fore nn So'"'-"* Jewv. of efMc'l
SM- \nn ^il*n of the U
peaitive dir"cto*. is a tag
d rst etrexbeioa ;n tea rv^stian
iii'eoniuit* m th Unlaad tares
Pmoseh II thus comes at a
cwi4 ~ent in the carapaigi
for Soviet Jewry.
From it. Jews within Soviet
Risi will take fresh inspira-
tion for their courageous strug-
gle, confident that in the
words of Brussels I the Jew-
ish people "will not rest until
the Jews of the USSR are free
to choose their own destiny."
For Jews in the SO countries
represented at Brussels n the
i:aoaWaui:i provided an inter-
national forum for 1 uaiswii de-
ad strengthened com
mitment to the cause of Soviet
Jaws.
And to the Kremlin, the World
Conference for Soviet Jewry
served notice that the civilized
world expects Moscow to abide
by all the international treaties
and declarations of human
rights to which it has subscrib-
ed including the Helsinki
Declaration of August, 197S.
sisjn*d hr Leonid Brezhnev for
the USSR in its treatment cf
Soviet Jews and in its response
to their demand to lain their
brothers in Israel and to live as
Jews.
'Christopher Bean!
In Hallandale
Hollywood Hadassah Plans
a/
Donor Luncheon and Meeting
The Hollywood Chapter of
Hadassah. which includes ten
groups, will hold its 39th an-
nual donor luncheon at noon.
March 25. in the Beaux Arts
Ballroara of the Diplomat Hotel.
Mrs. William Schulman, chap-
ter fund-raising vice president
and donor chairman, has an-
nounced that this will be a very
gala affair and the program will
include the American Balalaika
Ceooauy. They will play be
Jewish Russian. Russian Rus-
sian. Ukrainian Gypsy music,
and the perfarmaoce includes
Pussies folk and Cossack dan-
cu%e.
Usually the audience com-
rhes with the musicians' re-
ruest that thev nsrtirieota in
the dancing and hilaritr
as the oeocle sing alone in 1
hey h*'n"t heard since they
were children.
Chairman of the day is Mrs
Chartea Walk.: program vice
president is Mrs. Ethel K.
Schwartz. The anthems will be
su'rbr Mrs Abe Cokes, ac
cemnanied by Mrs. Betty Co-
han. The invocation. "Hamotzi."
will be ewes bv Mrs Alex Pack-
er and the benediction by Mrs.
Evelyn Simon.
The chanter erestdwt. Mrs.
Archie Kamer. will bring greet-
ings as w'l Mrs. Irving Marks,
National Hdassah board mem-
ber, who will also present cer-
tificates.
Honors will be bestowed uoon
the hard-working donor chair-
man- Beach Group. Mrs Joseph
Beth El Sisterhood Plans Luncheon
"An Affair To Remember" is
the theme of Temple Beth El
Sisterhood's March 16 donor
luncheon, which begins at noon
in the Regency Room of the
Diplomat Hotel
AH donors, sponsors and pat-
rons will be listed in a program
book, and all proceeds from the
project wiTI benefit Sisterhood
programs including special
events for the religious school,
sernces to the Mini, and s'at.-
and national projects.
A fashion show by Nat Msaa
and entertainment by Lydia
Kmg hu-hkejs* the afternoon
Mrs Samuel L Sezrin is the
doner chairman, with Mrs. Mor-
ton Abran- as cochairrnao Cam-
M "tembers include Mrs.
Miri-m Kessler. Mrs. Harold
Parner. Mrs Charles Wolfe.
Mrs Jnlius Haloern, Mrs. Aaron
RaMnewitt. Mrs- Harry Prus-
sack. Mrs. Charles Schwat. Mrs.
Joseph Shmeteer. Mrs Bernard
Price and Mrs. David Megar.
xt^s Hjrrv Fmer is president
of the Sisterhood, an affiliate ot
the NaJseaal Federation of Tem-
ple Sistchoods.
When audiences in New York,
London. Paris and Berlin ap-
plaud a play, it is fair to as-
sume that play worthy of seri-
ous attention Such was the re-
ception accorded The Late
Christopher Bean" by Sidney
Howard, Pulitzer Prize-winner.
In a Bicentennial tribute. Hal-
1 an dale Civic Theatre in -the -
Round will present "Christopher
Bean" at the Hallandale Recrea-
tion Center on March 13. 14 and
20 at S p.m. and on March 20
and 21 at 2 p.m.
The play is directed by Flor-
ence Rose. Appearing in the
22 are/nn* Mirie Minna M
Abby. Angelo Ross 'fonner
opera star and film director) *,
Dr. Haggett. Kitty Schwed as
Mrs. Haggett, Michael SnindeQ 1
(WKAT announcer) as Mr. Til.
lant. Joseph Ryan ("Fifth Sea-
son") as Mr. Ros^n. Chuck How! 1
erin ("Nude Awakening")
the art critic. Dona Ray (editor
of "Newsical") as Ada. Man
Ann Sisto and Rusty Howerin
supply the love interest.
Tickets are available at Ban! |
of H-Ilandale and Trust Co. and
the Hallandale Recreation Cen-
ter.
Perlstein: Golda Meir, Mrs. fry-
ing Hertz: Hallmark, Mrs. Geor-
n.. Vtzemhal: Henrietta Szold,
Mrs. Murray Kranser: HiUcrest,
Mrs. Charles WoUc. Mt. Scopus,
M'-s. Frances Briefer, Sabra.
Mrs. Marvin Kramer; Shalom.
Mm. Nat Singer; Tel Chai. Mrs.
OUa Porter and Mrs. Ben
Sharp.
Also honored wilt be the fund-
raising chairmen: Beech Group.
Mrs. Charles Seigal; Golda Meir.
Mrs. David Shane; Hallmark,
Mrs. Morris Prusanskv and Mrs.
Louis Gampel; H'Arid. Mrs.
Sheldon Miller; Hillcrest. Mrs.
Chart-s Wen-: Henrietta Srold.
M-*. Paul Cohen: Mt. Scopus.
M*-s. Fran*"* Bri-fer: Shalom.
M-e Nit Smger: Tel Chai. Mrs
Olit Porter and Mrs. Ben
Sharp.
Proceeds from the donor
1 n:kwa will go to the Hadas-
sih Medicil Organization, which
sunoerrs th* Hadassah Hebrew
TT'Tivig'tv Medical center and
Mt. Scopus Hospital.
it ir -tr
The tre^t session of the chan-
r"~^s Program of Great Jewish
Woo*-*- ans" Issues will be on
Tuesday. March 23. at 1 p.m. in
.w. j,-,- avAVeral Bank Build-
ing Holfywood.
The sub*ect is The Contribu-
rien of Jews to American Life,"
and the sneaker win be Mrs.
F*i*v* King, oast president of
the Intoeastal Council of B*nai
B'rfth Women and a Hadassah
Rent-A-Car
IOW AS
$7 A DAY
* Per Mile
"W Ml u,
W H* BiatAnMetH. Muf-
Cnmrtt. C*rt- MmM f*
D-n-rm Clwb
CAR-BELL
MOfOMS
$20 S. Dili* Hwv Heiyweed
920-4141
Temple Beth Shalom bunny hostesses for the Monte
Carlo affair are (standing, from left) Bobby Fertman,
Rita Buschel, Elaine Bryer, Gail Gelfant and Jeanette
Newirth, and (seated) Barbara Rosen and Uimi Wach-
frf. The event mil be in the Grand Ballroom at 46th
Avenue and Arthur St. at 8 p.m.
Riverside's
two new chapels in
Hollywood and Sunrise
serve the needs of
the entire
Jewish community in
Broward County.
In the Ho%uood and HaUmndale ones:
5801 Hollywood Boulevard. Hoflywood.
920-1010
In the Fort Lauderdale area:
1171 Northwest 61st Ave.( Sunset Stripl.Sunrise
584-6060
RIVERSIDE
M*nimMCh*pel Inc 'Funeral Dtrectott
Other R North Miami Beach. Miami Beach and Miami.
RiwniS. v iw *m tW, Yo* Mm. wu. h chi^ak in M*akla,
B'**** BioonF., Rodw-w wdMnfcfmur
Muim-N Rubn.FO.
ks-u-fe
HS-IS-7S
M-
W.7S


Friday, March 12, 1976
Sam Tischler Is Named
Hospital Administrator
The Jewish Floridien and Shofar o) Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Women's Division Campaign
Sam Tiscfcler, son of Dr. and
m-s. Stanley Kessel of Hallan-
dale has been named assistant
administrator at Community
Hospital of South Broward, it
was announced by administra-
tor Erwin Abrams.
Tischler, a Nova High School
gnd University of Florida alum-
nus, did his master's work in
hospital administration at Geor-
ge Washington University in
Washington, D.C., and an ad-
ministrative residence at Chi-
cagos South Suburban Hospital.
Seniors Hold
Open House
The Senior Adult Activities
Center, at 2838 Hollywood Blvd.,
had an informal open house on
Feb. 25. Representatives from
the various community services
were present to disperse infor-
mation and answer questions.
The participants included rep-
resentatives from Social Secu-
rity. Fire Department, Red
Cross. Consumer Affairs, Legal
Services, American Cancer So-
ciety, and the Agricultural Ex-
tension.
Volunteers Molly Siegel. Dia-
na Weiss, Cile Margoles, Janet-
te Schwartz. Etta Schultz, Abra-
ham Wolf. Milton Rolf and Lee
Dubow assisted the staff with
registration for classes and gen-
eral information.
Attendance was good despite
inclement weather. Refresh-
ments were served.
For further information about
activities and classes, contact
Bonnie Wolf, director, or Elaine
Goldstein, group coordinator.
m Hk 4gabfijfl 1 ^ M
V W^9^^ mm
SAM TISCHLER
The women of Aquarius held
a successful luncheon in can-
junction with the CJA-rEF on
March 3 in the Cascade Room.
The guest speaker was the
assistant director of General
Foreign Ministry, Asher Nairn.
The co-chairmen were Ann
Conn. Ronnie Fields and Mina
Finkelstein.
d March 3 was the date of the
Emerald Hills apartments, vil-
las and townhouses luncheon.
Chaired by Lee Rosenberg, as-
sisted by Jean Kruger, Esther
Knoiver, Gertrude Subrin, Rho-
da Marcus and Ruth Gillman,
the event proved to be most
Temple Sinai Plans
Jewish Home Experience
Susan Singer and Donna
Steinberg, cochairpersons for
Temple Sinai's "Sabbath on the
Lakes," are finalizing their plans
for a Family Home Shabbat to
be held March 12 and 13 under
the leadership of Rabbi David
Shapiro and Associate Rabbi
Stephen C. Listfield.
The Family Shabbat series
was instituted last year by Rab-
bi Listfield. The program, which
takes place entirely in mem-
bers' homes, emphasizes a num-
ber of Jewish values which, ac-
cording to Rabbi Listfield, are
being lost in today's society.
"We try to have parents and
children share their thoughts,
feelings, and spiritual needs to-
gether and that ta something
that hanpens all too rarely. We
want people to recognize that
the home is a vital arena for
Jewish expression. We want to
bring back the Sabbath as the
cornerstone of Jewish life," ex-
plained Rabbi Listfield.
PARTICIPANTS in the pro-
gram will Join together Friday
evening for a family service,
followed by kiddush and Oneg
Shabbat.
Saturday morning they will
again join in creative services
and discussion, after which they
win all eat lunch.
On Saturday evening parents
and children will came together
again for a brief HavdaLah serv-
ice.
Hosts for the weekend are
Dr. and Mrs. SanT Singer and
Dr. and Mrs. Marvin Shuster.
HOLLYWOOD'S LABORATORY
PROCESSING KODAK'S COLOR FILMS
Main Store and Plant
2000 NORTH DIXIE HIGHWAY
PHONE, 920-8021
Monday thru Friday 8 to 5:30
HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
BRANCH STORES
'1551 Hollywood Blvd.
Phone: 981-8555
6lOAHonHcSho Blvd.
Phone: 92(
TTSonTuruver
Phone: 962-
successful for CJA-IEF. The
guest speaker was Mathilda
(Mrs. S. Alexander) Braflove.
Cr is -Cr
Ceil Weiner opened her home
on Feb. 25 to the women of
Olympus. A lovely buffet was
served and a Federation movie
shown. Chairman was Elaine
Fleisher. 1
fr -it
Matilda Kimelblot opened
her home on March 11, for cof-
fee and the film "May It Be."
Chairmen are Matilda Kimel-
blot, Mrs. Jeanette Sussman, and
building coordinator Fritzie
Kimball. |
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Page 4
The Jewish Flondian and Shcfar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 12, 1975
Editorials
You Make the Difference
Mar. 18 will be a date for South Floridians to reckon
with. "You Make the Difference" Month begins on that
date.
The 1976 Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emer-
gency Fund will be launching an all-out drive between
Punm and Passover to meet critical needs in Israel to-
day.
What CJA will be saying is that each one of us can
spell the difference between meeting these needs and
failing to do so. The message is a simple one: Each of
us must participate.
We are not sure that an editorial repetition of Is-
rael's current critical condition will make our readers
any more aware of the problems facing the Jewish State
than they already are.
We all know them education, inflation, medical
care, the growing fear of unemployment, a back-break-
ing tax bite oa the average wage-earner, one of the pro-
portionally largest military budgets in the world.
The point is that all of us can help Israel meet these
problems. And. as L. Jules Arkin. Greater Miami's CJA-
IEF general chairman, declared this week, our contribu-
tions "can mean the difference between wasted time
and years of productivity for local retirees "
Arkin was reminding us that our gifts are used
right here at home, too.
Our gifts, indeed, help deal with a whole range of
human concerns All of us can "Make the Difference."
That's what Mar. 18 and the month-long drive after it
are all about
Aid for Guatemala
With all of the problems faoag world Jewry. Jews
in the United States and in Israel can be proud that they
have taken tune out to help the earthquake stricken
people of Guatemala The Jewish populauon of that Cen-
tral American republic is small so the aid is not just for
Jews but all of the victims.
The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee
with its long record of aid to needy Jews donated $10,000
to help the disaster victims in Guatemala and offered
to lend its relief workers to aid Guatemala.
B'nai B'rith has been gathering funds, supplies and
volunteers to help Guatemala. It has also adopted China-
a small rural town where about 80 percent of the
aorr.es were destroyed, leaving 4.500 people hAeless
In addition many individual American Jews have offered
. funds and other services
The people of Israel, who are suffering under a
crushing economic burden, have also donated aid for
- Guatemala.
This is a fulfillment of the ancient teaching of Hillel.
who said: "If I am not for myself, who will be; If I am
onlv for mvself. what am I?"
Mrs. Green Is Coehairing
March 21 Bar-Han Dinner
Mrs Harriet Green, president
of the South Florida Zionist
Federation, has been named co-
. chairman of the Bar-Dan Uni-
-v national 20th anniver-
sary dinner, to be held at the
Fontamebleau Hotel. March 21
Acceptance by Mrs. Green,
who is president of the Pioneer
Women Council of South Flor-
ida, was announced here this
week by Dr Joseph H Look-
nem. chancellor of Bar-flan,
just prior to his departure for
Israel.
Mrs. Green will serve with
Mayor Harold Rosen of Miami
Beach, dinner chairman and co-
man of the Florida com-
ic for Bar-Can University
Mrs Green, former national
per of the national board of the
Pioneer Women, serves on the
American and Florida boards of
\ice president of the American
Zionist Federation and a mem-
directors of Bar-Dan She is a
top leader of the Labor Zionist
division of State of Israel Bonds
and a former vice president of
the women's division of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion.
wjenist Fierilian
.....

aiaa Malta
TMENT
* P O WT rrxmrm
T* JtVMt FWoaaan. PO Box la, Muou. F!*. ::
rBED K. SH-^'HET STZAXNE SH- -CHBT SEI-MA M THOMPSON
Eafetor aajal Pi Ex~-:it* Editor 1 Minn to
Tt Jeaaah riri Daw Nt Oanraattaa Ttac Kasnnrt*
Of Tfca mrcliiaawi A*nftma ,m rta Cia.ni i I
Bf-Wafetr
Pud at M]aa>i. Phv
da*) f Mrmtk Braaraj* lac aaKMTAK KDITOfUAl
ADvisear o v -rrwm. Katha* p-vrr caakmi
aOtv.a H. flavar Dr .! I Maw. DUD
r Frval K. SAacAtt Mara* aaaaj
Taa) JaanaA FlanaJ-aa ttam Haaratal Oaa tiaiiaa Kifxty aaaa) tfc
"ar a* tfta Jan "a* TtMyaaHiic Aaanacjr tw Aa r(
Wx- wMta Nm tamct. Malta***! Eabtanal A
Hal
S-SSCHIPTlOH RATES: (Lac** Aru) o- V
Here, Saul Bellowed Naught
XfT FATHE* used to refer fb
iWK the -umerlekker- with a
bitter irony he reserved for al-
most no one else. "Unterlek-
ker." I took him to mean, was
his Yiddish bilingual pun on
the intellectual.
Literally, an "unterlekker"
would be one who "licks un-
der." It takes little imagination
to recognize what my father had
in mind.
THE FACT c that he wasn't
so much talking about intellec-
tuals as he was about the ex-
tent to which Jews go to fawn
on intellectuals as symbolic of
their own pretense to inteUec-
tuaksrc.
la this sense, my father saw
the "unterlekker" as an indis-
crixinate camp-follower of an
ideal and with httle capacity
to distinguish between the
phony and the real McCoy.
The American novelist. Saul
Bellow, brings this memory of
my father to mind specific-
ally. Bellow's appearance the
other w;*k before a convoca-
tion here of the A-nerican
ds of the Hebrew L'ni<.er-
a m
Mindlin
sity.
THE FRIENDS group had ob-
vioos'y in-.it i-d Bellow to their
p-'<:r*dings to say rmethfng
stirring about Israel, the He-
brew Uai ersity at J?rusal3-n.
the "People of the Book" 'a
phrase that used to r*t ny fa-
ther's teeth on edge'. Jewish
culture and fa iti n. t'*e
American Jewish he itag- wit!-.
himself as one cf its most dis-
tinguished era-^ples.
Instead. Beuow give them a
ra--d cf buiL The gath-rirg
g.t exactly what it des.Ted.
Fir year* now. I have been
then
waging an unsuccessful war to
get Jewish organizations to
knock off inviting "big starr
to their functions for big fe
so that the stars. Jewish and
n on-Jewish, should sa some-
thing nice about them It short
I have been attempting to erect
a bariicade to the "unterlekker"
route.
WHEN YOU think that Ger-
aid Ford not too long ago w,
an .iTaaJ Boodnik, it really
o -ght 11 put the whole problem
in:o us proper perspective.
And if Ford doesn t
Saul Bellow should.
The thing about Bcll^v is that
the Hebrew Universit;. Friends
sho-.'li have Inown better, and
if t*vv didn't th;y could at
hast hae asked. There is noth-
ing Jewish in his writings -
f o-i "A'lgie M.-irch" zn-1 'Hum-
boldt's Gift" to "Herzog" and
"Mi. Sammlers Planet
CRIITCS WHO see serious
Jewish concern in Bellow
other than disaffeo >n and
ehetto alienation turned big-
titic have been looking for
a nxrile in a haystack Or else,
they are exceedingly poor crit-
ics.
And. indeed, that is what Bel-
low hi-nscl! told toe Hebrew
Utar e sity gathering about the
Jewish seizing upon him as a
Jewisn w.iter that Jews are
w.-ong in thsir evaluati jr. of his
work.
I would ha\e put it that he
is no "ore Jewish than, say,
.'.'or^isn Pndhoretz and his
"Ccr-nm*ntary"* crowd In line
with his own feelings of disaf-
fection. Bellow was leas paro-
chial: he does not like to be cut
from the same Hart Schaffner
an 1 Mint boh of cloth as. say,
Bernard Malamud and Philip
Roth.
AND HERE, one must give
Bellow bis doe. although he is
wrong along with the other
Jews on thesp writers if he
thinVs they arewnf s>ore Jew-
ia than he is. Bit at L-ast he
is fir superior to then as a
writer, as a silled craftsmen,
and th*t was Bellow's message
here in Mian:. But that's not
what he'd been paid to siv
The presence of the ru
appointed director general of
Ihe Isra.-I Min-stry of Defense,
Continaed on Page 13
Voice Fear for Free Inquiry
Volume 6
Number
10 2 ADAR 6:08
NEW YORK tJTA)
Scientists from eight coun-
tries who attended the Sec-
cod World Conference on
Soviet Jewry have formed
an International Federation
of Concerned Scientists, to
be located in Pans.
The purpose of the Fed-
eration will be to gather and
disseminate information and
to coordinate the activities
of its affiliates in all coun-
tries where committees on
behalf of ostracized Soviet
scientists already exists or
are in process of formation.
THE FEDERATION win en-
courage its affiliates to increase
their efforts and activities on
behalf of Soviet scientists who
are denied fundamental scien-
tific and personal rights.
The announcement was made
et a pram conference at the
Palais de Congres, Brussels, by
Dr. Dennis Ciama. of Oxford
University. f-ngUnd. on behalf
of scientists from England, the
USA. France, Israel. Italy.
Sweden, the Netherlands and
Belgium, following a
devot-d to the exploration of
ways to assist Soviet coHeag-ies.
Also present was Nobel lau-
reat- Dr. Polyrarr K'isch (1955-
physics University of Texas at
Dallas, who said that in his view
cooperation by U.S. scientists
to exchange programs between
the V.S and USSR was inter-
preted by the Soviet govern-
ment to mean support of their
repressive measures against dis-
sident Soviet scientists, and he
advised his American colleagues
to think carefully before en-
gaging in such cooperation.
DR KUSCH had earlier ad-
dressed more than 1.000 dele-
gates at a plenary session of the
conference In an expression of
solidarity, he declared. "If more
demonstrations such as this one
had been held in the 1930s. I
am convinced that many lives
could have been saved.''
As its first official act. the
affiliates of the Federation ha-e
daapted a motion which sup-
ports the resolution on the free
circulation of scientists adopt-
ed by the 15th General Assem-
bly of the International Coun-
cil of Scientific Unions which
asserts the right of scientists to
participate in international con-
ferences without hindrances of
a political nature.
Each affiliate will urge its
national representatives to ICSU
to ensure that this resolution
bo implemented.
AS AN essential element of
the free circulation of scientists,
the Federation will also ask the
executive board of ICSU to af-
firm the right of scientists to
migrate to the country of ,he!r
choice, especially when their
country of residence does not
g've them the opportunity to
pursue their scientific career.
The RJl Committee of Con-
cerned Scientists deleeation
was headed by its national co-
chairman. Dr. Jack Cohen. Na-
tional Institutes of Health.
Bethesda. l*d.. and included Dr.
Kusch: Dr. Edward A Stern,
University of Washington. Seat-
tle; Dr. N. S. Wall. University
of Maryland: Dr. Leo Diesen-
druck. Queens College. N.Y.;
and Dr. Robert Gerber. of Los
Angeles. Calif.
The Conaninee of Concerned
Scientists consists of over 4.000
U.S. scientists. It is an independ-
ent national organization com-
mitted to constructive action on
behalf of colleagues in the
USSR and elsewhere who are
denied fundamental scientific
and human rights.


Friday, March 12, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

Page 5
Ceanpaign Events

The lilTi "May It Be" will be
shown on March 14 at Golden
jails. Chairpersons for the event
are Mrs. Larry Aigen, Dr. Ema-
nuel Newman, Mrs. Rose Orszag,
Mrs. Jack Perrin. Mrs. Alex
Beyer and Mrs. William Kauf-
man will be the hostess-s. Re-
freshments will be served.
it it it
Clifton Apartments will hold
a brunch on March 14. with spe-
cial suest speaker Col. Moshe
Diskin. The event will honor
Abraham and Jessie Melter.
Chairman is Harold Singer, as-
sisted by Abe Slifka, cochair-
man.
it it it
March 14 will be the special
day for Sea Afar Towers. The
residents will gather for a
brunch featuring guest speaker
Harrv Rosen of the Joint Dis-
tribution Committee. Chairman
is Herman Gilman and cochair-
man is Steve Greenfield.
it it it
The Riviera Motel Conven-
tion Room will be reserved by
the residents of Sea Edge on
March 14 for a viewing of "May
It Be." A delightful brunch has
been planned by chairman Her-
man Schulman and cochairmen
Mrs. Moe Greenwald and Bert
Shapiro.
it it it
Sam Salt will be honored for
his dedicated work on behalf of
Jewish life at the Fairways
amrtTi?nts campaign meeting
March 16, Cochniring the effort
are Gladys Goodman tnd Paula
Jacobs. Women's Division Cam-
paign Chairman Karen Margu-
l'--s will be the keynote speaker.
ft 4
Movie night was held at Avant
Garde on Feb. 26. chaired by
Josenh LeBow and Boris Kozba
and in conjunction with the
CJA-IEF drive.
it it it
Gathering at Temple Sinai on
F"b. 25 in a joint fund-raising
effort were residents of Cam-
bridge Towers, chaired by Hen-
ry E'senbsrn and Joseph Reiss;
O-tford Tower*, chaired by Har-
ry Scheiner; Darby HalL chair-
ed by Mrs. Joseph Kaolan; Hyde
Park Towers, chaired by Abe
Bressman and Bill Westerman;
Stratford Towers, chaired by
Din Pollin and Perry Simmons;
Twelve Pillars chaired by Mack
Sepler.
General chairman was Philip
Ol-nder. and John Myers was
honored at the event. The film
"May It Be" was shown.
ft ft ft
Harry Sussman was honored
by neighbors and friends at the
Feb. 22 brunch held at Galahad
Court. Henry Levy, former di-
rector of European operations
for the United Hias Service and
previously in charge of the
Joint Distribution Committee's
Latin American operations, ad-
dressed the group.
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for further information contact Mr. Tim T. Harris,
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Milton Kritzer chaired the
event along with Archie Wilder,
Murry Kimball, Joe Greenberg,
Leonard Marcus, Max Toplitz,
Joe Perlstein, Matilda Kimel-
blot, Bernard Schwartz, Barney
Meye;-s and Ben Sandner.
ir ir it
Irving Feldman was honored
at a brunch held by the Hall-
mark Grono on March 7. Chair-
man was Milton Seitles and co-
chairmen were Dr. Robert Pol-
lack. Maxwell Porster, Jack
Scharf, William Seitles and
Herman Sumars.
A distinguished member of
the community, David Yorra,
was the speaker.
it it ii
Quadomain held a CJA-IEF
brunch on March 7 honoring
the untiring efforts on behalf of
Jewish life of Jack and Ann
Leffel. Chairman was Joseph
Ehrlich, assisted by cochairmen
Sidney Hoff and Dr. Harry Ur-
stein.
Coordinating chairman was
Samuel Koffler. The coordinat-
ing cochairmen were Murray
Silverstein and Samuel EdL'l-
man.
it it it
Trafalgar Towers I and II held
a brunch on March 7, honoring
Louis Ballin and Abraham Gold-
berg. The film "May It Be" was
shown. Chairmen were Mrs.
Adeline Davis and Mrs. Sara
Schecter.
Blaustein, BB President,
To Chair Passover Breakfast
Alan J. Blaustein, who will be
installed this month aa presi-
dent of the B'nai B'rith Coun-
cil of Broward-Palm Beach
Lodges, has been selected as
chairman of the Passover break-
fist on behalf of the B'nai B'rith
National Youth Services Appeal,
Sunday, April 18, at 9:30 a.m. at
the Diplomat Hotel in Holly-
wood.
Blaustein, a resident of Hol-
lywood and oast president of
the B'nai B'rith Hallandale
Lodge, will work with general
chairman Malcolm H. Fromberg
of Miami, who is chairman of
Religions
Services
AUAN8AU
4ALLANDA4.K JEWISH C8NTH
tConeor.eOtvo). 41* NE Sth Ave
Rabbi Hnrrr B. Suhwarta. Canto
./cob Daiuiaer.
frOtT* MAM! IIACH
MNAI (Temple) Of NOftVH DADt
M0S1 MB a*nd Ave. Reform. Rtbb
Ralph P. Klngaley, Caniar Irvine
Shanxe*.
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CORAL SPRINGS HEBRt N CON
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rAMARAC JEWISH CEN ER. S7SI
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bi Milton J. Oroee.
Hourwooo
'OUNO ISRAEL OF HOI .VWOOC
rOrthooo). SSSi Marline Rd. op
poeite Hollywood Hill. Hlh School
Preeldent Or. Frank Stein.
B'nai B'rith's South Florida
Fund Raising Cabinet.
The April 18 breakfast will be
a traditional kosher Passover
meal, and will benefit the na-
tional youth services of B'nai
B'rith, which support the B'nai
B'rith Hillel Foundations. B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization
(BBYO) and Career and Coun-
seling Services.
Members of the breakfast
committee include Rubin Bin-
der, Samuel Blair, William Bro-
der. Ira Catz, Sol Entin, Joseph
Fink. Julius Freilich. Benjamin
Haibhim, Robert Hoffman, Jay
Kaye, Sol Kenner, William Litt-
man, Paul Lobl and Kelly Mann.
Also, Stephen Marlowe, Dr.
Max Meiselman, Hank Meyer,
Benjamin Mishler, Nathan
Schlanger, Jerry Sherman, Sam-
uel Sherwood, Hy Sirota, Louis
Sobrin, Ed Starr, Benjamin
Strauss, Milton Strauss, Milton
Winograd, Irving Zucker and
Lou Zutler.
Reservations for the B'nai
B'rith Passover breakfast, at
M.?3 per person, may be made
through the B'nai B'rith Re-
gional Office in Hollywood.
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Pace 6
The Jewish Floridim and Shofar ot Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 12. ig76
-A^--W^^^WA.
<
? Ask Abe ?
by ABE UALPFE.N
^olel-Emerald Hills Israeli to Keynote
Israel Dinner of State, March 14
flan Cohen, a young Israeli
who is playing a vital role in
assuring the future of the Jew-
l-^~^JS^-*+S-^>^'
Quewion:
What is the meaning of the
ritual called Tashlkh?
D. T.
North Miami Beach
Answer:
Tashlich is a Hebrew word
meaning "Thou Shalt Cast "
It is the name given to the
ceremony held near a sea or a
running stream, usually late in
the afternoon on the first day
of Rosh Hashana. If the first
day should fall on the Sabbath,
the ceremony is deferred to
the second day.
The origin of this custom is
not certain. It is not mentioned
by Talmuriic or early author-
ities. Some sources suggest that
the ritual originated in Germany
durum the Hth century', pos-
sibly adopted from non-Jewish
environment.
The ceremony consists of the
recitation of verses from Scrip-
ture, concerning repentence and
the forgiveness of sin. The term
is derived from a passage of one
of the verses recited: "He will
agaM have compassion upon us*
Ha will subdue our iniquities:
and Thou wilt cast all their sins
into the depths of the sea."
(Micah 7:19)
According ta> the Cad* of
Jewish Law (Kioaw Gcwulchan
Aruch), a Compile fieri of Jew-
ish Laws aad Customs by Rabbi
Solomon Ganzfried, Volume 3.
chapter 129. paragraph 21.
there are several interpreta-
tions for this ceremony.
pockets of one's garments dur-
ing the ceremony is popularly
taken as a rite of transfering
the sins to the fish, but other
authorities connect it with the
Taiiuudic saying that cleanliness
of a garment is a sign of moral
purity i Tractate Shehhat 153a)
(Encvclopaedia Judaica. Vol.
15. pp. 829. 830).
It is interesting to note that
all authorities state that the
lony should be performed
on the banks of a river or a
stream where fish are found.
They also sa ythat if this is im-
possible, the ceremony may be
performed by a well of water,
as is customary in Jerusalem.
The ceremony is performed
with some variations in differ-
ent communities In some com-
munities pieces of bread are
thrown into the stream.
Editor's note:
I'lease send your questions
to.
>?> ASK ABE >?>
Jewish FTondian and Shofar
Jewish Federation of
South B reward
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood. Florida 33020
Other authorities see the i
mony as a tribwae to the Creator
to whose work of creation the
fish were the first wit
ILAN COHEN
ish homeland, and codirecter.
Mm Leadership. State of Israel
Bonds, will be the keynote
speaker at the Temple Solel-
Emerald Hills Israel Dinner of
State on Sunday March 14. at
8 p.m. at the Emerald Hills
Country Club in Hollywood.
A sabra who fought in the
front lines during the Sbc-Day
War in 1967 and the Yom Kip-
Some of the sources state that
this ceremony of going to a
stream b to Wgabjj as af the
merit of the "Akedah" (the bind-
ing of Isaac). According to a
Mid rash. Satan tried many devi-
ous ways to prevent Abraham
from going through with the
sacrifice of Isaac Because Abra-
ham considered that the sacri-
fice of Isaac was a command-
ment from God. at every ob-
stacle he rebuked Satan, was
not deterred and continued on
his journey.
Finally. Satan transformed .
himself into a river as a final
insurmountable obstacle But
Abraham want into the riser
and when the water reached to
his neck he said. "Help O Lord,
for the water has come to the
very soul."
Many sources say it is pre-
ferable that the streams con-
tain fish as a reminder thai we
are likened to the Bring fish
who are caught in a net. So are
we caught in the net of judg-
ment and death, and thus we
will meditate and repent.
Another reason given for this
ceremony i< to prevent the evil
eye from having an effect on
us just as it has no effect on 4|
.fish. Also that we may be as
fruitful and multiply as the fish.
Still another reason given is
that fish have no eyelids and
their eyes are always open, so
this is to remind as that the eye
of the Almighty above is always
open and watches over us.
community
ocuenoor
FUDAY. MARCH 12
Punra Cantata. Temple Sinai, evening
SATURDAY. MARCH 13
Hope HoUiday Bat Mitzvah. Temple Sole!
USY'ers Purim Ball, Temple Sinai
MONDAY. MARCH IS
Council of Jewish Women Discussion Group, Hallandale Home
Federal Bldg 1 p.m.
TUESDAY, MARCH 23
Hollywood Hadassah Board Meeting. Home Federal Building
10 a.m.
Hadassah Sabra Group Board Meeting, Washington Federal
Building 10 a.m.
THURSDAY. MARCH 2S
Hollywood Hadassah Donor Luncheon, Diplomat Hotelnoon
Israel
ilan
pur War in 1973, Cohen is for-
mer chief adviser to the Mayor
of Natanya. He has served as
chairman of the Young Leader-
ship of the Liberal Party of Is-
rael and represents Israel's Min-
istry of Finance in s develop-
ment program for State of Is-
rael Bonds.
The dinner meeting, on be-
half of the South Florida Israel
Bond Organization campaign,
will feature the presentation of
the State of Israel David Ben-
Gurion Award to Hollywood
residents Alan and Joyce Roa-
man.
According to dinner chair-
men Ahe Durbin and Moses
Horn,ein. "the members of
Temple Sold and Emerald Holl.
will pay tribute to two devote
Broward County leaders T0
have served unstintingly J*
untiringly the men. women
and children of Israel. The or>
portunity to help Israels brave
people and show our support
for that country is now. we
must all pledge to make I5nie|
Bond purchases, in honor of
Alan and Jovce and to aid Is.
reel's urgentiv Deeded economi-
development and agricultural
proeram." William Littman U
South Broward board of gov-
ernors chairman and Milton M.
Parson is executive director,
South Florida Israel Bond Or-
ganisation.
Dr. Malavsky Is Chairing
JNF April Dinner Dance
Dr. Malavsky is chairing the
Jewish National Fund of Brow-
ard Council's second annual din-
ner dance on Sunday evening.
April 4. in the ballroom of Tem-
ple Beth Shalom. Cocktails will
be served at..6 p.m. and dinner
at 7 p.m.
The affair will salute Israel's
28th anniversary and Broward
county's participation in the
American Bicentennial Nation-
al Park in Jerusalem
Tickets are available at the
temple administration office and
inquiries are being handled by
Sylvia S. Gordon. This Rala din-
ner dance is open to the entire
community.
Ameriean Savings Relocates
Two Broward County Offices
in
American Savins* and Loan
Association of Florida has mov-
ed tw* of its Broward County
offices, Hallandale and Pom-
pano Beach, to new locations.
according to an announcement
by Thomas R. Bomar, presi-
dent
The Hallandale office is
the front plaza of the
Amen can Savings Building at
2500 E Hallandale Beach Blvd.
The Pompano Beach office is at
2SS1 E. Atlantic Blvd. adjacent
ta the Publix supermarket.
Each office has been doubled
ia size to provide improved
and additional facilities and
services for as customers. A
major new service ia both fa-
cilities is safe-deposit boxes,
and in the Pompano Beach of-
fice, a payment station for elec-
tric bills
Manager of the Hallandale
office is Emanual Grossman, an
assistant rice president of
American Savings. Grossman
joined American Savings in
March. M7.5, and served as
manager of the Deexfield
Beach office before moving to
Hallandale.
Mrs. Jane WHham. was ap-
pointed manager of the Pom-
pano Reach office whea it
opened in December. 1975. Mrs.
Williams has been associated
with American Savings since
1972 and has been assistant
manager of the Deerfield Beach
and Fort Lauderdale offices.
American Savings was found-
ed in 1950 by Shepard Broad,
who is chairman emeritus.
Morris N. Bread is chairman
of the board.
American Savings ranks
107th of 5,000 savings and lorn
association in the United State*.
United Way af Broward frui-
ty has put out the welcome nut
for a new agency.
Consumer Credit Counseling
Service of South Florida offi-
cially opened its Broward Coun-
ty office in the United Way
Building. 1300 & Andrews Ave.,
Fort Lauderdale on March 3.
CCCS ia a free counseling
service for people in debt and
for those who want to keep their
credit slate clean In addition
to providing advice on budget-
ing and family money manage-
r
you.
"The custom of shaking the
Denence
[."mi fa
i >'e style
n a aa- of you it e>
"31 c Hera prom i I (bound sM Ui
aic tfM
o"-car^cjs
"at s
vows c~.aiT
IrMJergradueta *, fee
I < to, -ee
...
*Spe ...
it :n
Of'icec'- Bar-Han ur .<"s .
, York. N l2Yt
bar-iIan university...
... .... .. _...
i-cotRege 's
!>ar ilaii universiu..... <.
@
HW-W
^-<^W^>W^A^Vyu^^VXw^>wM

FLORIDA
SCHOOL OF
ELECTROLYSIS
COMMENCING CLASSES-
TAUGHT. AT HOME
INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION
Call today for information
652-9606
*'*V"*'VVV
v^^^v^^^

Ljday. March 12, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
!(//,
9
dt~s
*. .
a
By NORM A BARACH
VEGETABLE CASSBROLE
Here's a thought for a one-dish vegetable meal, served
either by hseli or with the addition of chunks of meat to make
it a more complete meal.
1 lb. zucchini, thinly sliced marjoram to taate
u lb long yellow squash, salt
thinly sliced pepper
g to 10 sm. potatoes (whole) 1 *-oz. package frown
8 sm. white onions 1 1 lb can stewed tomatoes
C-rease a baking pan or casserole. Add all ingredients
except frozen vegetables. Bake covered at 350 degrees for V*
hour Add frozen vegetables and bake 20 minutes more. Un-
cover and bake an additional five minutes to brown. Chunks
cf bee! may be served on top, making it a complete meal.
CHEESEY RED SNAPPER
I am always looking for new and interesting ways to pre-
pa fish. I did a little experimenting and came up with this
fish recipe, which makes a tasy meal -served with spaghetti
and salad.
2 ibs red snanper
'in two slices)
1 cup sour cream
1 oz cheddar cheese grated
1 large eaten sliced
Grease a baking pan- gut in fish and ton with onions and
mushrooms. Mix the sour cream, cheese, salt and' lemon juice
to make a sauce and pour over fish and vegetables. Place in
350-degree preheated oven for 45 minutes. Serves 4-5.
1
4-oz. car, mushrooms,
drained
tsp. salt
tsp. lemon juice
TUNA-TATO CASSEROLE

Food prices remain high although tuna is still one of the
most economical of feeds. For thoe concerned about economy
in the kitchen, here is a fine main dish made with any type
if canned tunaflsh.
1 12l:--oz. can tuna (drained) 1 tsp. onion flakes
1 10*4 -oz. can cream of 1 e
potato soun '* lb. muenster cheese
% cup corn flakes crumbs (grated)
Mix tuna, soup, egg. corn flakes crumbs and onion flakes.
Put into a greased casserole. Top with grated muenster cheese.
Bake at 350 degrees about 40 minutes or until done.
LEFTOVER TURKEY IN GRAVY -
Who can serve turkey without having leftovers? I've never
heard of it being done. As a result, one is always faced with
the prospect of "dressing up" the turkey leftovers to make
them seem- tike a fresh meal.
3 cups leftover turkey
cut in chunks
u cup diced ereen pepper
'. cun chopped onion
1 clove minced garlic
4 thlsps. flour
1 1-lb. can stewed tomatoes
2 tsns. Worcestershire sauce
1 tsn. salt
3 tblsps. margarine
Melt margarine in medium saucepan. Add green pepper,
onion and minced garlic and sautee about five minutes or
until tender. Stir in flour and cook for one minute until
smooth. Blend in tomatoes, salt and Worcestershire sauce.
t and stir until mixture thickens. Add turkey chunks, mix
gently and simmer covered for 10 minutes, stirring occaslon-
a!!y. Serve over fluffy rice, mashed potatoes or toast.
MARINATED FLANK STEAK
Always on the lookout for a new way to prepare meat. I
tried this method of cooking kosher flank steak, which also
miht be known to your butcher as "the top of the flanken."
It is a aaaoa of meat connected to the rib steak. I round it to
be under and flavorful and served it with rice and a tossed
N.lad.
1 lb. kosher flank steak 1 tblsp. vinegar
'; cup soy sauce '* cup onion flakes (soaked
1 tbfcm. brown sugar in cold water nntil soft)
Mix sov sauce, vinegar, brown sugar and drained onion
flakes. Pour over maat aad marinate five hours. Turn meat
several times. Brail on both sides. SMce in fkm stices against
rain of the meat. Serves three adults or two adults and
two children.
OATMEAL SQUARES
With cooler weather, baking at home becomes more nop-
"'ar. I have here a suggestion for a nourishing treat for adults
as well as children.
1 stick margarine
;: cup white sugar
:i cup brown sugar
- tsp. vanflla
1 large egg
1'.
cups fleur
1 tsp. baking soda
i tsp. sah
V cap oatmeal
*4 cup chopped nuts
':> cup chocolate chaps
^ cup butterscotch chips
Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Cream margarine, sugar.
e Then blend in nuts and chips. Oreese a 13*f-toch pan. Spread
dURh into pan evenly. Bake for 15 minutes. Cool and cut into
squares.
sludge Friedman to Speak At
BB Installation Brunch
... IV .
The Ben. Milton A. Friedman.
Justice of the Circuit Court.
Miami, will be the guest speak-
er at the installation of officers
brunch of the B'nai B'rith Coun-
cil of Broward-Palm Beach
Lodges Sunday, March 14. at
10 a.m. at the Hillcrest Country
Club in Hollywood.
Judge Friedman, a past presi-
dent of B'nai B'rith District
Five, is a member of the inter-
national board of governors of
B'nai B'rith. the largest Jewish
service organization in the
world.
Officers to be installed for
one-year terms are Alan Bhro-
stein (Willcrest Lodge), presi-
dent: Rubin Binder (Margate),
president-elect: Saul Hechtkopf
(Inverrary). Norman Karr {Blue
Start. Samuel S. Sherwood (MU1-
crest; and Irving Zucker (Blue
Star), vice presidents: Samuel
Sihverberg (Hillcrejt), record
ing secretary; Hank Meyer
(Sunrise*, corresponding secre-
tary; William Broder (David
Ben-Gurion), treasurer; and
Robert Hoffman (Herzl), chap-
lain.
Trustees are Ben Goldberg
(Hollybrook). SoJ Kenner (Ha-
waiian Gardens). Louis Rosen
.Kings) Herman Sirota (Sun
rise). Jay' Kaye (Haifa), Nor-
man Weinstein (Hallandale) and
Louis Zutler (Lauderhill).
Other speakers at Sunday's
installation of officers will in-
clude Barry T. Gurland, presi-
dent-elect of the Florida State
Association of B'nai B'rith, Hol-
lywood Mayor David Keating.
Broward Commissioner Jack L.
Moss and Rabbi Israel Zimmer-
man of the Tamarac Jewish
Center, who will offer the in-
vocation.
Master of ceremonies will be
Bert S. Brown, third vice presi-
dent of B'nai B'rith District
Five. Discharging officers will
be past president Ira H. Catz;
Alfred Golden will be installing
officer.
HistadrtitlSecretary Fears
Rise1 of ^Unemployment
JERUSALEM (JTA) Histadrut Secretary
General Yeruham Meshel warned here that unemploy-
ment in Israel could reach 70,000 by the end of 1976
unices the government takes urgent measures to find
jobs and to increase investments that would create
more jobs.
Meshel ateo warned that Israel faced serious so-
cial unrest if the poorer classes feel the wealthier peo-
ple are not bearing their fair share of the economic
burden.
The presidents of the T)ade and Broward
Chapters of the Women's League for Is-
rael met at the home of Betty Dreier, na-
tional honorary vice president, to plan a
campaign on behalf of the National Voca-
tional and Rehabilitation Training Center
in Natanya. The Israeli government is
matching funds with the League, which
will work with the Ministries of labor and
Welfare on this project for the handi-
capped and blind. Above (from left) are
Celia Engelmeyer, Margate; Rose Koch,
Aventura; Delia Slater, Florida; Shirley
Nathanson, Shalom; Muriel Lunden,
Woodlands; and Fran Rcsnick, Lincoln
Miami Beach.
HEARING TESTS SET FOR
NORTH DADE and
SOUTH BROWARD AREA
Electronic Hearing Tests will
be niven free at the MIAMI
GARDENS HEARING CENTER,
1708-A Miami Gardens
Drive, Skylake Mall/West
North Miami Beach
on Monday thru Friday.
TiD VURRARO. Licensed Con.
eulunt will be in the o*rTee to por.
form th toot For inyono vho
has tfoufclt hearing or understand -
ing it wo'como to have teat us-
ing t*e lartosT electronic eaulpment
tc determine hia or her particular
Iom.
Everyone should have a hearing
teat at Wait once a year if there la
any trouble at all hewrftg clearly.
Even people now wearing a hear-
ing aid or thoae who have been
tcW nothing could be done for them
should have a hearing tett d fin*f
out about tre la'eet methoda of
hearing corrections.
THE FBKE HEASINO TCST
WILL BE GIVEN MONDAY
THRU rfllWV NEXT WEEK
AT THE OFFICE LISTED
BLOW.
CALL THE NUMBER BELOW
AN-D AWRAhMSE FOR AN
APFOINTMBNT OR DROP IN
AT YOUR CONVENIENCE
MIAMI GARDENS
HEARING AW CENTER
1708-A MfAM!
GARDENS DRIVE
SKYLAKE MALL/WEST
NORTH M AMI Of ACH
Ph.: WO-nW
MEYER
AIR CONDITIONING
"Ask Your Neighbor About Meyei"
Since 1952
CUT YOUR ELECTRIC BILL
Have your system tuned up by a professional
923-4710 -PHONES- 925-0112
NEW.
Acoustical Vinyl
CEILING SPRAY
"wit* or without diamond Ant"
Give New Lite to Old or Cracked Ceilings
ft OFFICES ft HOMES
NEW CONSTRUCTION
CALL FOR FREE ESTIAAATE 989-3983
DrywoH Hcirerlncj Home Iwpr o ** |
BOWERS & SONS
m MeWff M#wyw##o, r ton CM


Page 8
The Jewvm Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 12, 1974
<
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Potok at
Temple Sinai
Chaim Potok, author of "The
Chosen," "The Promise," "My
Name Is Asher Lev" and "In
the Beginning," will speak at
Temple Sinai on Sunday, March
21, at 7:30 p.m.
Tickets are available at the
temple office, 1201 Johnson St.
Meeting Topic:
Sense in the Sun
Judy Rappaport. National
Council of Jewish Women, Hol-
lywood Section, has arranged a
discussion group meeting in
conjunction with the American
Cancer Society.
The topic, "Sense In The
Sun." is extremely important to
us in sunny South Florida.
All will be welcome on March
15, 1 p.m.. at the Home Fed-
eral Building. 2100 W. Hallan-
dale Beach Blvd.
Beth Shalom
Plans Seder
Temple Beth Shalom. Holly-
wood, will have its annual com-
munity Passover seder on the
first seder night. April 14, 7
p.m., in the ballroom at 1400 N.
46th Ave.
Officiating will be Dr. Malav-
sky, assisted by Cantor Gold. A
catered full course strictly
Kosher traditional dinner will
and served, and non-members as
well as members can attend.
Sylvia S. Gordon, executive
secretary, is handling the res-
ervations and tickets. Group
reservations will be honored.
Chairman Morey Hirsch and cochairman Judy Rappa-
port presented the film "May It Be" to residents of
Paradise Towers at the Feb. 18 campaign meeting. Above
are the chairmen and some of the workers who made
this a successful afternoon.
Residents of De Soto Park condominium gathered for a
CJA-IEF campaign brunch last month. Karl Rosenkopf
chaired the event, assisted by cochairmen Charles Wal-
ter and Leo Dis'.enf eld. Joseph Kleiman was honored
for his d-Aica:cd efforts toward preservation of Jewish
life. Guest speaker was Col. Moshe Diskin.
An enthusiastic campaign meeting was held at Golden
Horn north and south on Feb. 26. Chairing the effort
were Murray Lefson, North building; Joseph Austin,
North cochairman; and Judge Samuel W. Weintraub,
South building. William Tanenbaum (left) was the speak-
er, who is ihown with Lefson and Isidore Bookbinder
(right).
The Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida
announce summer job open-
ings for counselors and unit
heads in the teen travel
camp.
Applicants should be ma-
ture, responsible and ex-
perienced in working with
teenagers.
The camp will include
some out of town travel
with the campers.
Call Jewish Community
Center, 920-2089. for appli-
cation and information.
Hollywood Towers held a brunch in support of this
years fund-raising effort on Feb. 29. Chairman was
Jack Gold with Dr. John Askin as cochairman. Benja-
min Neisner was honored at the brunch at which Henry
Levy spoke. Shown (from left) are Max Kalman, Ben
Neisner, Jack Gold, Cantor Shulkes, Henry Levy and
Puul Kraemer.
ifTTft TO TMf INTO*
Why Should Israel Debate with Men
Who Would Like to Destroy Her?
Editor, Jewish Floridian-Shofar:
... As Mr. Farouk Al Kad-
domi of the PLO said in "News-
week." January 5, 1976, "THIS
ZIONIST GHETTO OF ISRAEL
MUST BE DESTROYED." He
also propagandized, "MY ARABS
ARE GETTING BILLIONS OF
OIL MONEY. THE FUTURE IS
MINE. SO WHY SHOULD I
WORRY?" He also repeated sev-
eral times at the PLO conven-
tions. "THE ESTABLISHMENT
OF ISRAEL IS FUNDAMEN-
TALLY NULL AND VOID."
Mr. Yasir Arafat, chief of the
PLO. said "WE SHALL NOT
ALLOW ANY PALESTINIAN
OR ARAB SIDE TO RECOGN-
IZE ISRAEL OR CONCILIATE
WITH HER." Again Arafat re-
peated. "THERE WOULD BE
NO PRESENCE IN THE RE-
GION EXCEPT THE ARAB
PRESENCE."
Why should Israel trust to
these men with their future as
a country?
REGARDING the refugees,
Israel is the only country in the
world that feels and knows what
"it means to be refugees, since
she Jews have ever been refu-
gees themselves. Therefore, in
1948, Israel told, asked, pleaded
with, the Palestinians not to
run away.
Israel invited the Palestinians
to stay and live in Israel in
peace. But the Arab countries
actually forced them to be-
come refugees, in orde: to have
a political reason and pawn in
order to demand large sums of
money from the UN and the
United States.
Israel ennnot depend on the
Arab 1-^ders and PLO. since
none of the Arabs seek any
peaceful solution to the Middle
East problems. It is a fact, as
the worl.l knows, that the PLO
was organized expressly for the
elimination of Israel as a coun-
try. It refused to even consider
alternatives.
Israel proposed a fair solution
to the problems as long ago as
1948. but unfortunately, the ?
Arab countries, now rich with
petroleum dollars, do not wish
to sit down at the peace table
with Israel.
SO WHAT SHALL ISRAEL
DO? SHOULD SHE ALLOW
HERSELF TO BE DESTROYED
BY THE PLO? THIS WILL j
NEVER COME.
Edward A. Dincin 1
Hallaodale
PASSOVER GIFT
SABS' ATM and FESTIVALS
N*W MEMBER TOKENS
WEPOtNOS, ENGAGEMENTS,
HOUSE GIFTS
KIDDUSH
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QUANTITY DISCOUNTS
William Meister (right), Abe Edelste'n and Dr. Snl Rin-
koff (left) organized a meeting for Golden View resi-
dents Feb. 17 at which Edwin Ginaburg icente- was
the honoree. Thtf Federation film "May 'ft Be" was
shown.
Use Deluxe Cruise Ship to the Bahamas f ram Miami
lUnrrytoSteCiaMll
Super-spacious staterooms, each with
private facilities, phone, music console,
individually controlled air conditioning,
(and. 92% of rooms are outside doubles).
A magnificent dining room with
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C.


Friday, March 12, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
William Tanenbaum, editor and publisher, addressed
a gathering of Galahad West residents at the Feb. 22
brunch. Richard Neuman chaired the event, assisted by
Leo Klauber and George Schneider. Honored for his un-
tiring service on behalf of the Jewish community was
Sidney Hodes. Shown above are George Schneider, Sid-
S. Hodes, Richard Neuman, Lea Klauber, Sydney
Holtzman and William Tanenbaum.
Harry N. Grossman was honored by residents of Mead-
owbrook Phase V at the Feb. 29 CJA-IEF breakfast.
Chairing the drive was Alex Rubin, assisted by Nathan
Goldman, Arthur Singer, Sol Sacks, and Jack Mintz.
Above are Art Canon, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Grossman
and Alex Rubin.
Residents of Galahad South heard Rabbi I. Sobel (left)
at the CJA-IEF event on Feb. 29. The brunch was
chaired by Jacob D. Geller (right), cochairmen were
Mrs. Ethel Endler (2nd from right) and Dr. Max Pri-
mayow (2nd from left).
"May It Be" was shown to residents of Allington Tow-
ers who gathered to honor Eli A. Stiftel (center) at the
February 29 brunch. Chairmen were Jack Rosenblatt
(left) and Dr. Harry Newman. Co-chairing the effort
were Murray Beck, William Newman, Aaron Toxin and
Henry Weinberg.
Retinitis
Pigmentosa
There will be a general meti-
ing of the Dadc-Broward Chr.
ter of the Retinitis Pigmentc-a
Foundation at 8 p.m. on Fridiy
March 19, at the First Feder..l
Savings and Loan, 18301 Bis-
cayne.
The guest speaker is Dr. Mer-
ry Sue Haber. a psychologic,
who can be heard every Satin -
day on WKAT.
All members and interest* persons are invited to attend
this meeting.
Hemispheres
Hadassah
The annual donor luncherr.
will be held at the Diplomat
Hotel on March 11. There la
still time to make reservatier"-
with Jeanne Freint, don ,r
chairman, at 925-3811.
Program vice president Fran-
ces Littman has planned an in-
usual program for the meetinn
scheduled for March 16 at 1
p.m. in the Hemispheres Bt 1-
room.
Thomas Cook Travel Service
has provided a travel film. In
color, which will be shov-n
through the courtesy of Holly-
wood Federal Savings.
Five Hollywood Federal &/-
ings account certificates will be
given as door prizes and every-
one attending will receive ent: y
cards for a Hollywood Feder <1
plus account grand prize.
Stiebers to Receive Ben-Gurion Award
At La Mer Night in Israel, March 22
Cn ic and community leaders
.Otto and Bvelyn Stieber have
^.cn named by the State of Is-
rael to receive the David Ben-
Gurion Award, it was an-
nounced by Louis B. Golden.
rhairman. and Leon A. Moel and
B n Schwab, cochairmen, of the
La Mr Israel Bonds Com-
mittee.
Presentation of the plaque, on
behalf of the South Florida Israel
Bond Organization campaign,
will be made at the La Mer
"Night in Israel," Monday,
M-rch 22, at 8 p.m. in the Social
Hall.
Tadmore to Entertain At
Watergate Night in Israel
Ira'.'!i entertainer Danny
Tvnore will highlight the Wa-
t at- condominium "Night in
I- 3 1" on behalf of the 1976
South Florida Israel Bond Or-
- '"on ("'npaign, Wednes-
day, March 17, at 8 p.m. in the
^> :nate Recreation Hall.
TV ?nmunc"ient was made
bv rhai<-ntan Mike Fogel and
f "hai-man Mix Fichtenbaum
.'--. .tlt ' ns is being sponsored by
t W?trgaie Women's and
- Clubs.
Mn-i. \\%t\ S3.2 billion in Is-
' 1 Bonds have been sold since
nception of the campaign
n 19;I. with 85 percent of the
'. *" ,,; comhv from the
I sited ?tites. Israel Bonds are
ba-Vbone of Israel's eco-
""nrtc framework, stimulating
"! c-owth of agriculture, com-
**rce, industry, mining and
j7*. Bonds have also created
rS opportunities for hundreds
of thousands of Russian Jewish
and other immigrants.
AccordiBB to Milton M. Par-
son, executive director, South
M H. |srae| Bond Organiza-
tion. "Our needs this year are:
II Is-ael must establish new in-
"'istrial enterprise* based on
'to most sophisticated know-
w and technology in order to
"j-rease the volume and variety
0 ?oods for export to attain a
"ore favorable balance of trade;
''Israel muat discover and de-
)e'op local sources of energy,
'" order to reduce its depend-
en on other countries for its
fuel needs; 3) Israel must pre-
vent an economic slowdown and
avoid the growing danger of
mass unemployment."
Otto Stieber, president, Amer-
ican Friends of Hebrew Univer-
sity in the Hallandale-HoUywood
area, was chairman of the suc-
cessful Israel Bond campaign at
La Mer last year. Extremely ac-
tive in the Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration High-Rise Division in
South Broward, he is a former
chairman of the Federation of
Jewish Philanthropies and UJA
campaign in Rockville Centre,
N.Y.
Evelyn Stieber, who serves on
the Board of the Women's Divi-
sion, Jewish Welfare Federation
of Greater Hollywood area, is
also active in the Federation,
UTA. Hadassah, B'nai B'rith
Women and ORT in Rockville
Centre.
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Page 10
The Jewish Flortdian and Shofar r/ Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 12
Black and a Jew.byChoiee, He Shares Kiiig^ 'Dream'
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"Mm* in the Black* comiittiaay over
whether to support Israel or the Arabs
in their conflict in the Mideast has grown
increasingly heated and bitter in recent
years. As Black Muslim influence has
spread, one Black American who took sides
with Israel went all the way. A Talladega
College graduate, Larry Lewis converted
to JodaWi, and went to Israel where he
not only became part of a kibbutz but
also served in the Israel army as soldier.
His remarkable story of transition from
the civil rights movement of the '60's to
wearing the uniform of the Israel army
for six months is told here.
By LARRY LEWIS
People have often asked me.
"Why do you warn to live in
Israel?" My standard reply is:
'"Because I am an unrecon-
structed idealist by nature, a
Jew by choice and a Zionist by
conviction." Although this ex-
planation usually brings a host
of additional questions 1 never
tire of saying it.
My journey to Israel really
btgan the day cf my conver-
sion to Judaism ten pat
ago in September. 1965. at
Temple Israel in Boston In the
summer of 1064, ; was i .-oung
19-vear-oJd college student "up
from the South, working, in
boston as a veterinarian nurse
at the Angel Memorial Animal
Hospital.
HAVING read many books
and attended the services of
various religions over the
yers. the precepts and beliefs
of Judaism had the greatest
appeal for me for they coin-
cided with my own outlook on
life and toward God. Religion.
I believe, is a matter of private
introspection and personal ex-
perience. After much thought
and reflection. I contacted
Rabbi Fields, who at that time
was Maitant rabbi at iemple
Israel, and arranged formal
conversion studies.
There is a concept in ail
Asian religions "Many moun-
tains up to God. with many
roads up each mountain." 1 be-
came a Jew because m Juda-
ism I found the theological
perspective lor me.
I REMEMBER the early 'Mrs
as a period of Ma turmoil:
civil rights demonstration"!,
strikes, a new lifestyle, new
values. It was a ume when
members of the Ku Klux Klan
in my hometown of Tuscaloosa.
Alabama, were proclaiming:
"We dont hate Negroes. We
love 'em, in their place hi*
shining shoes. beflhopping,
strtetsweeping. picking cotton.
digging ditches, eating possum,
and serving tune"
Like so many other college
students during *hat turbulent
era. I was "involved." When
i e lots Dr. Mamr. Luther
King Jr. chanted. "I have a
cream. I shartd that dream
j worked to see it realized
by participating in the cr.il
rights movement. 1 also .oined
t-. Student Zionist Organisa-
tion S20' whose ... v.ere:
"the unity of I .-h pec-
I the :ngatnering of I
people in its historic
r sneiand, the '.and of Israel.
through aliyah (immigration I
from all countries the
lening of Israel, which
Is rased on the prophetic
r. of justice and peace .
I wholeheartedly in
I -e goals.
AS A member of the SZO's
Aliyah Committee. I promoted
imarily through in-
formal discii-sion with Jewish
college Students. One student,
had recently visited I^iael.
upon hearing that I planned to
settle in Israel said to me:
"Life in Israel is very hard.
tjr.Iy strong idealists or eco-
nomic masochists move there "
"That's okay.' I answered.
"I'm a little of both."
As a Zionist 1 decided that
19" 2 would be my year for
aliyah (emigrating) to Israel.
In early February. I -eat no
the Israel Aliyah Ceaker in
downtown San Francisco to ar-
range the trip. I didn ; anti-
cipate any racial problems in
Israel because of the color of
my skia. There are Jews in
Israel from all over the world
and the variation of their skin
coloring ranges from black to
white.
II" TOOK several more inter-
views at the center before all
arrangements were completed:
\isa. medical examination, a
reduced-fare ticket for travel
to Israel ordered through the
Israel Aliyah Center
Kibbutz Gat is a collective
community baaed on equality
in everything: work, housing,
food, clothing, commodities and
raising of children. "Front each
accaroing to his ability and to
each according to his need"
is the ideal. Most activities at
Kibbutz Gat are carried out in
the communal centers. There
is a dming hall and kitchen
(we're building a new one;; a
common laundry and clothes-
sorting center, where the wash-
ing is done by a work team for
the whole kibbutz and then
ironed and mended if neces-
sary.
There are the children's
quarters, the clubhouse, and of
ceurss, the various branches of
work: the fields icottoo, sugar,
beets, wheat): orchards (or-
anges, grapefruits, lemons, avo-
caoos); wood factory; deary;
chicken hatchery; and chhifceu
houses for laying hens.
PROBABLY the moat toter-
esting feature of kibbutz life
is the raising at children Since
everything is done on collec-
tive Bees, crukdren are taken
care of and educated in that
light. The burden of feeding,
cleaning, clothing and training
the small rhfiH does not fall
on the working mother, but on
the nannies and saattoas as-
signed to the children houses.
The chfhtren are divided by
age groups, so that att ctilhlien
born ia one year go through
baby house, nursery, kinder-
garten, primary school and
high school together. Each
group has its common sleep-
ing, aating. learning and re-
creation quarters.
Fince coming to Gat I've
picked oranges and grapefruits,
tramplsd cotton in cotton bins,
weeded sugar beets, washed
pots and pans and operated
the wheat cleaning machine.
Now I work eight hours a day,
snt days a week (normal for
Israel) in the chicken houses
where we have over 16,000
laying hens.
KIBBUTZ GAT is a self-gov-
erning entity, democratically
organised and responsible for
its own social, cultural and
economic development The
general meeting of all mem-
bers (which generally takes
place every Saturday nignt)
ides on matters of principle
in ali phases of kibbutz life.
These decisions are executed
by a network of committees,
elected annually, and by a
small number of full-time "ex-
ecutive officers" the secre-
tariat (secretary, work-coor-
dinator, treasurer, fram man-
aer > who ere elected for
periods ranging from one to
two years.
Almost all kibbutz members
have a permanent job in a
particular work branch Perma-
nent places of work are as-
signed by a special committee.
The day-to-day assignment of
workers as between branches
is the job of the work coor-
dinator, who plans each day
according to special needs and
problems.
I LUCE the life-style, the
spirit, and the people of Kib-
butz Gat. In February of this
year I applied for membership
and was accepted as a can-
didate. There is a mandatory
one-year probationary period
for candidates so that the mem-
bers can get to know the per-
son. A favorable vote by two-
thirds of the membership is
necessary for election. I've
been hare for over three years
and I'm known and well liked
by the kibbetrnjks When the
vote is taken on my member-
ship. I don't think there will
be a single "no" vote.
There are about 450 people
Hung here at Gat and half are
under the age of 30. We have
members from Poland, Ger-
many, Yugoslavia. Austria,
Prance, England, Brazil and
the U.S.A
APART from the weekly film
(sometimes two), the weekly
general meeting, and the Shab-
bat meal on Friday evening
usually followed by some cul-
tural activity after-work oc-
cupations which take place at
Gat or our regional center in
Ashkelon are folk-dancing,
choir, lectures on almos* am
thing, trips throughout the
country (with special emphasis
on its history, geography, and
archaeology), handicrafts les-
sons, pottery classes, and so
forth. We also have a swim-
ming pool, library and a small
museum.
Usually in the evenings,
when I'm not attending a kib-
butz function. I spend my time
talking with friends (on and
off the kibbutz), go to small
informal parties or lounge in
the clubhouse, where soft
drinks, coffee. games and
magazines in a relaxed atmos-
phere help to form a pleasant
background for socializing. I
am also writing a book of
poetry and philosophy ("The
Poetry and Sayings of an Ex-
cogitist") which I hope to com-
plete soon.
I HAVE founj in Israel a
sense of togetherness some-
times displayed in strange
ways. One day after visiting
Tel Aviv, I was on my way
back to the kibbutz on a bus.
We made a stop at the Rehovot
bus station where in appro:::-
mately three minutes the bus
was filled to capacity. How-
ever, one man insisted on en-
tering the bus even when told
by the bus driver that he
wouldn't drive the bus with
him in the door. The man said
he was in a hurry' and would
not move. The dri-.er cut off
the engine and began reading
a newspaper.
It was a very hot da<
the bus didn't have air ocn i-
tioning. The passengers were
becoming restless. To my sur-
prise, a scholarly looking man
in the front of the bus organ-
ized a committee among the
passengers to negotiate with
the man standing in the door.
Most of the committee mem-
bers were from the front of the
bus since it was the scene tf
the action.
The committee offered to
buy the man a ticket on -.e
next bus. He refused. But w n
one of the committee me~
bers, a projectionist at a Tel
Aviv cinema, inrhaktd a free
ticket to the movie. "The Exor-
cist." along with the first of-
fer, he quickly announced has
acceptance. The passengers
cheered and we all began sing-
ing Israeli folk songs. I think
if there luM geen-*noo*h~rfJeTn
on the bus we would have
danced.
IN AUGUST of 1973 (two
months before the October
War), I received my draft no-
tice from the Israel Defense
Forces instructing me to re-
port for induction in October
I'm a deal national and held
both American and Israeli
citizenships. As an Israeli
citizen I'm subject to coaspul-
sory mlbtsry service, both reg-
ular and reserve duty.
I came to Israel under the
Law of Return under which
Israeli citizenship law is grant-
ed automatically to any Jew
who acquires the status of im-
mig.-ant three months after ar-
rival in Israel. Israel recog-
nizes dual citizenship, as does
the United States, and a citizen
of Israel can also bo a citizen
of any other country that al-
lows dual citizenship.
When the fourth Arab-Israeli
war began on October 6. 19~3.
I thought it would be over in
a tew days with the usual Is-
raeli victory. After that proved
to be erroneous Thinking en
my part, I went to the Induc-
tion center and asked to be
catted up early. I was told come
on October 24 (the da'' of the
final ceasefire) as instructed.
MY BASH? training tmrt con-
sisted of other new immigrants
that were from such diverse
countries as South Africa. Rus-
sia. India, England, Argentina.
France and the United States.
Since I ha in the U.S. Armed Forces (pe-
riods of regular army service
actively served in a foreign
army is taken into account by
the Israel Defense Forces when
computing length of national
service), my Israeli military
obligation in the regular army
was for three months. How-
ever, due to the October War,
it was extended an additional
three months.
I was one of the best marks-
men in my basic training com-
pany. After basic training. 1
served as a private with a
small supply unit in the Engi-
neers Corps where we issued
everything from sugar to sub-
machine guns.
During my travels around
Israel in uniform. I was often
mistaken for an African in Is-
rael for military training), a
Black Jew from Ethiopia (Fa-
lasfaa). an American tourist,
but most frequently a Black
Hebrew.
I GOT along with the other
soldiers and mad" "lanv
friends in the army. I received
my discharge from gas reguiar
army in April 19~4 and was
assigned to a reserve unit
M*x<*-dke *rrny tensftu J
reserve units and nvtn K j
in the reserves until they ,[
55. J-hnn women until th-
ere 34 years eld. I ^fj
war. the Israel Defense ForcJ
can be swiftly transformed
from a ssnall army of reguhJ
end national servicemen ks J
large army of citizen reservkn
As a private in the ream-
I'm subject to a can-up }J
50 to 70 days of active duty (
year.
An ancient Jewish legend
has it (hat when the Almighty
decided it was time to give In
to humanity. He handed the f
Book over together with i
sword and He said: "If you ljy, I
by the book, well and good; if
" ""* *" V forced to iivn
by the sword." J
el has fought four win
with "her Arab neighbors and
during the October War
here ar Kibbutz Gat. Ion fin
dear friends (Yossi, Dan. Adam,
Kami and Shai). I dont hot
Arab* but I do hate war and
no heart longs for peace u
much as mine.
IT WAS Mohammed who
first defined Jews as "the pee-
Tie #-he Book." I believe that
if we can learn unashamedly
to see ourselves as Mohammed
in his day saw us, and if our
Arab neighbors would abo
share that vision, together n
could find the strength to fam-
ish the sword and all that it
represents in the Middle East
I know that in America It-
day there is an increasing pit-1
Arab sentiment within the I
Black community. The reason
for this are well known
Black Muslim influence, sever-
ing of diplomatic links with
Israel by most Black Africa
nations, and the economic sit-
uation brought on by the oil I
crisis.
There re those Blacks who
condemn Zionism as a "tool
of the impe iaIHt" without j
knowing that the early chain- j
pions of th: Af icon cause wen
also influence I by the example
of Zionism and leaders of the
!ir-t Pan-African movement, ,
tech as Marcus Garvey aid
W. E. B. DuBois. preached I
"Black Zionism."
t think Blacks should lot*
beyond the anti-Israel slogan* |
being tossed around and find I
out the facts for themselves. It
is my belief Scat once th-.: ve j
done this. Black support for
Israel will be second to none
kje of the Jewish comm*
JUDAH H. KURTZBARD
REPmmATm or
BANK LEUMI LE ISRAEL
B.M.
WI 0WST AMD UUtGlST BANK M IS* Att
Wishes You and Your Family
A Happy Purim
531 3378
407 UNCOIN wOAD
MIAMI BEACH FlOWD*


riday, March 12, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
Iban: Hebrew Academy's 'Voice'
Former Israel Foreign Minis-
Lr Abba F.ban is the narrator
B a new film on the Greater
iMiami Hebrew Academy which
I will be released this spring..it
|ff3S announced this week by
[judge Norman Ciment, presi-
dent of the Miami Beach school.
,i Eban. former Israeli Ambas-
[sador to the United States and
Ijhe United Nations, first visited
I the Hebrew Academy 25 years
Iggj when he came here to help
I launch the State of Israel drive
Ifor South Florida. He and Rab-
|bi Alexander S. Gross, princi-
pal of the Miami Beach school,
[have maintained a close rela-
Iticnship since.
Judge Ciment said the Tech-
nicolor film will be shown
[throughout Florida and the
|South to "better acquaint the
[communities of our entire re-
|gion with this focal point of
|Jewish education in the South-
eastern United States."
Interviews with Hebrew
I Academy alumni who have as-
sured leadership roles in the
I business, religious and civic
[worlds will be featured. Doc-
tors, dentists, lawyers, engi-
neers, businessmen and rabbis
[will reflect upon their experi-
ences at the school, a benefi-
ciary agency of the Greater Mi-
a: Jewish Federation and its
|CJA-IEF campaign-
Former students will discuss
[such topics as moving to Israel,
studying at various Israeli uni-
[versities and yeshivot, and car-
rying on their heritage in adult
I life.
All of the Hebrew Academy's
I facilities, from nursery school
and kindergarten through sen-
ior high, are being filmed.
Such activities an music, art,
drama, speech, junior and sen-
ior choirs and athletics wili be
shown together with studies, in
Hebrew, English and the ma-
jor departments of general and
Jewish studies.
Students visiting old age
horns, Shabbat and holiday
programs for the sick, tours of
facilities in South Miami Beach
will also be included m the
film, the most ambitious under-
taking in the Hebrew Acad-
emy's community-relations and
public-relations programs in its
28-year history.
Photographed while looking over the script of a color
film about the Greater Miami Hebrew Academy which
will be narrated by former Israeli Foreign Minister
Abba Eban (center) are Judge Norman Ciment and Rab-
bi Alexander S. Gross (right). Eban, who first visited
the Hebrew Academy 25 years ago, when he was Israel's
Ambassador to the U.S., agreed to become "The Voice
of the Hebrew Academy" for the film, which is being
produced here for use throughout the South.
'Kissinger Lied'-Jackson
WASHINGTON(JTA)Sen.
[Henry M. Jackson (D.-Wash.)
charged here that Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger "lied to
us'' in their exchange of letters
Oct. 18, 1974, in which Kissin-
ger declared he had Soviet as-
surances for relaxation of its
emigration restrictions for Jews
I and other Soviet citizens.
On the strength of that letter
I and Kissinger's testimony after-
wards before the Senate Fi-
nance Committee, the senate
adopted the Jackson Vanik
Amendment to the Trade Act of
1974 by a vote of 88 to 0 on
Dec. 13 of that year. President
| Ford signed it into law.
JACKSON, a candidate for the
I Democratic nomination for
I President, made his charge on
I ABC's "Issues and Answers"
I nationally-televised program in
I response to a reporter's question
[that alleged Jackson's amend-
ment "deprived the U.S. of a
very positive bargainship with
I the Soviet Union" and had the
effect of fewer Jews being able
to "get out as a result of it."
"Of course, Henry Kissinger
lied to us," Jackson responded.
"He gave us the letter by say-
ing that the Russians had agreed
to all the provisions relat-
ing to relaxation of the rules
regarding emigration, and he
told the congress that was the
case when he had a letter from
the Russians, from Gromyko, in
which he had recanted on all of
it."
"But worse than that" Jack-
son continued, "Gerald Ford,
within three weeks after the
congress had voted 88 to 0 to
support the Jackson amend-
ment, announced he was going
to vote for the repeal of it. Why
should the Russians pay any at-
tention to the amendment when
you have an administration that
wants to do away with it? They
Just want to wait."
WHEN the reporter said "the
fact is some 30,000 Jews were
getting out before the amend-
ment, and now many fewer
are," Jackson, having noted that
the law applies to "all human
beings," including Jews, re-
plied that "it will be that way
until we get a new administra-
tion because Mr. Ford and Mr.
Kissinger say they are going to
ask congress to repeal it Con-
gress will not repeal it.
"Why si.old we subsidize the
Soviet Union, give them credit,
give them Most Favored Nation
treatment when they are violat-
ing international law? The Jack-
son Amendment is based on the
international decision on human
rights adopted in 1969 by over
100 nations, ratified by the So-
viet Union, and it provides that
a person has the right to leave a
country freely and return free-
ly. And finally, it was ratified
again at Helsinki.
' 1 believe the time has come
wheat they should live up to
these agreements before we
even talk about granting any
ecosMoaic concessions or help."
WU101VE T
on
V
Jhe Israel Histadrut Foundation (IHF)
"tld a successful seminar in personal and
financial planning "Planning for our
Maturing Years" recently at the Holi-
foy Inn in Hollywood. Above (from left)
ore Mordecai Paldiel, IHF South Broward
feld director; Sam Shulsky, investment

columnist and financial expert; Hollywood
attorney Mrs. Phyllis Drickman, estate
planning consultant; entertainer Emil
Cohen; Dr. Sol Stein, national IHF presi-
dent; and Mrs. Charlotte Teller, IHF
South Broward coordinator.
Chilean Government Aiding
In Search far SUberman
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) A
Chilean Embassy official has
claimed that David SUberman
was abducted by known persons
from a jail in Antofagasta in
northern Chile and that the
Chilean government is cooperat-
ing with the human rights com-
mission of the Organization of
American States (OAS) in an in-
vestigation of his disappearance
18 months ago.
Rafael Otero, Counsellor at
the Embassy, made that state-
ment to the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency in response to an in-
quiry as to the fate of the 35-
year-old Chilean-Jewish mining
engineer.
SILBERMAN served in the
regime of the late President
Salvador Allende and was sen-
tenced bv the Chilean military
junta to 13 years' imprisonment
for alleged treason after Allende
was deposed in the 1974 coup.
Otero's statement was be-
lieved to have been the first to
mention abduction in the case
in which the Chilean govern-
ment has provided virtually no
information despite nersistent
inquiries from Sllberman's
father and sister who live in
Israel.
HIS WIFE and three children
remained in Chile. The Embas-
sy official told the JTA that "the
government began an investiga-
tion and iound no evidence
where he (SUberman) is and
what happened."
He said the human rights
commission of the OAS was con-
ducting its own investigation
"with the cooperation of the
Chilean government" and that
the Chilean Minister of Justice.
Miguel Schweitaer was "making
a personal investigation." Otero
volunteered the information that
Schweitzer is Jewish.
Silberman was deputy minis-
ter for mines in the Allende ad-
ministration and was general
manager of the Cobre Chuque
cooper mines in Antofbgasta.
The mines, once operated by
the American Anaconda Cop-
per Co., were nationalized by
the Allende regime.
OTERO SAID he was "guess-
ing" thnt "some people intended
to get him out of the country"
and they could be "a terro-ist
grotto from the left or the right.
Really, we don't know what hap-
penn'd. He simply disappear-
ed" Otero said. He claimed that
SUberman was tried for treason
because he "give secret pro-
cesses" to engineers in t Soviet
commission that wi insoecring
Production at the Cobre Chuque
mines.
Otero also alleged that SU-
berman was "a top executive"
of the Chilean Communist Party.
Silberman's father and sister
ha'e sought assistance from the
International Red Cross, Amer-
ican legislators and various
worid oersonages to determine
his whereabouts or confirm
whether he is dead or alive
THEY HAVE pointed out that
of the many Chilean political
prisoners who disappeared
when the military regime took
over that country, Silberman
was the only one who vanished
after he was tried and sen-
tenced.
Chief Rabbi Angel Kreiman
of Chile, who has Dressed in-
quiries on behalf of the Silber-
man family, "was reportedly or-
dered bv President Augusto Pi-
nochet last year fb Stop asking
Questions about Silberman.
Paradise Towers, Herzl Lodge
Plan Israel Bonds Events
Two "Bonds for Israel" cam-
paign events on behalf of the
South Florida Israel Bond Or-
ganization campaign are sched-
uled for this month, it was an-
nounced by William Liftman,
South Broward board of gover-
nors chairmans.
On Tuesday, March 16, a
"Cocktail in Israel" will be held
at Paradise Towers at 3:30 p.m.
in the Social Hall. Danny Tad-
more, Israeli ei/srtainer, will
present the State of Israel Soli-
darity Award to Paradise Tow-
ers Co-Owners for their dedi-
cated devotion to Israel and out-
standing communal leadership.
Chairman of the Israel Bonds
Committee is Nathan Solomon
and working on the committee
are Stanley Deitschman, Morris
Levinsohn. Mrs. William Morse
and Mrs. Nathan Solomon.
According to Milton M. Par-
son, executive directors, mem-
bers of the Herzl Lodge No.
2764, B'nai B'rith, wiU receive
the Israel Solidarity Award for
their untiring efforts in ad-
vancing Israel's progress and
welfare through the State of
Israel Bonds.
The presentation wiU be made
at the Herzl Lodge "Night in
Israel" on Thursday, March 18,
at 8 p.m. in the Haber-Karp
Hall of Temple Sinai, Holly-
wood. Guest entertainer wiU be
Eddie Schaffer, American Jew-
ish folk humorist Cochairmen
are Sam Albert and Steve Mar-
lowe.
Parson said that in 1976 "Is-
rael Bonds for economic de-
velopment will be bonds of Jew-
ish solidarity to counteract the
unprecedented political and
economic Arab offensive against
Israel. It is organizations and
complexes like Paradise Towers
and Herzl Lodge that will help
us achieve this ultimate objec-
tive."
The second annual Quadomain luncheon was held at the
Emerald HtUs Country Club on Feb. 25. UN correspond-
ent Moses Schonfeld was the guest speaker. Building
chairman are Shirley Cole, Ceil Orenstein and Ann Lef-
fel. Honorary chairman was Etta Becker. Shown above
are (from left) Shirley Cole, Ann Leffel, Karen Mar-
gulies, Moses Schonfeld, Leah Frankle, Belle Wolfe,
Etta Becker and Ceil Orenstein.


12
af Greater HcBywood
Fnday. larch

t
^abhtmtal |Jage
Hid *c i 'wamim =r
and issues
OnUt ***w MMtVracil .ftwafliMai
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Dr. Mm A. LptcKfz B*
i.Orur^l
to Jewish life past and preset*
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'QUESTION BOX?
i "3 7mraer t a-axan
mi as aeans in sato
lea nau samt
XilTT.
:as IS. jS
"VlBSI ?ae iirninini Tf>ir^ >"
ae 2m .ew*.sa -Tjiiumunn n
AaatB-aam > Tars
JB nurn.ii .ijaersan
r3urs ji jeaosnotsr ".*54. ras*
BBS TBU IX 3U itr. i~ r^if T-rrre
.ar* woHMt Bt"e a ase are n
Taru~-
:aur-ces.
ubci t sec asea*
7i toe siniic Tovr^vHDc.
MnMB
7as rurca Tfssr am Jan-
s tint I la"-"- MH^erat a
--ajian tns inij^ta 1 nu Secfe.
i rszi. Jars a" rre ti
lea Trirrirai gpimrain tar
-' In 3 lai Tees tar-i -n ease, toe
am ant 1 wsJ-
tartoe
tar
rbd. *
Ti nJarTans toe
n "ae '""' is ar *e se
ran a anr int mr as ana.
Ti ji.himl a Tanma Ian pj-
-iar ^] lie *^g pnn a? toe
Twraauar snauui a: tan
5r inr if toe 7-isrees af a*
atari- paeans
1 referred to in j.j
flwah 45:1),
rf the
w rile AJtmptt
t a ffiga Priest ar a
ar n Tear ai
Var a irna>m4 "as-*
a aar .ok toe nurnaui
af Vttwi- tar -as .teas af toar
TeraaL Tie nrae *axau-s Tas
i' m'i auT5. Teems rar ti
>'BH7i ar ~i* Tansiaii m tae
AM nar iw. |
..rat. Mrsnc. ^as ^mar? am
i 3tr r^e .-lux.iumai af Mt_a
ar-asnun 3iear~Ci
I "* am t
a n
:s=arstf ftar -Unae jaar a
"* iaasr-ararim Har and v
ea or iaaaaa oal w aaaaaac
is m irau fc -rre *nai am
s aaucBBS tr.ail tnnx "rtt. *
taazai t wff'r-'if n
Solomon Ibn Gahi
r-an 3 -in.
On aor-
^eTn navies M jwii'npim^ js.
uduski irTTaanaaes. nam i tar
Ac bi aiiuBAe^~ a" .ewai
tte Jnupir'
aas ~ae :i an- a af ?"auu
a aar vmen a aiali aruu s tae
nL ue par-
Tim a* tae Tirm ana
tj aeware af taw aat a r-au
an at MMaal tasnrs ?nrai.
Snce taaa larsaa mtma wrttt
-
rucx 3i wluat
*:r^-v
ar taa iaooarn a amen vr
B>
^*"J V* aso a cs
;sut a' tasr aaM M*aal tar
r "Titr; 3war-ta Vnefi rw-
=r 'ltfaiariiuiqa nu-ua tat 5ra
'-af taa tHttr siamr- "'a* ^
i tara ti i tnrz a ts
A-aisn -iaiu imaa 31
tii "ajv n *"w n 3ncB
leaems a toe "iMBJine __
secanas ^ssassmlv racaeaxaaa
nu r w 'i I 7v tie Jan-
TT1lttlf"T
"tie Jew ana
a aivmn ciax-
js aa a -nznae mum mil
anst' Tail lj r-ne=. "ic
_a Tot ncc r tbt ts aan
-uie an." tar toe aaa- t af-
-rrj tae aaur-unare. T*kts
r'lers ars a tura-
aar af -ananaaa nhimniu tar toe
aani a toe ?smm m. ?ar-m.
Janaa 'aim rnac ton aaa p^Ty
ai toat toe saapat aanut aw a
x toar toe lim taanii 418s a
toe iatJit^ Tarr a* toe iap 9k*-
' toe taaar a ton are- aAer-
m tr'na <'! *fte *ramT a
MM
One af at
-Vae'nt
3actnL >rra in
a afianr ITS. Of a
s raon Frant tan
>srs toar he anas left wm
?5b am anal Ha
ii 1 ii w~t a-*nWT toe
I af toe- junuu-- rananachnrr
toar -Jaiacri-'jjgn as sne-rs. C
asm ait"r a tanan; :uiuum.iaB
*'to ras Mercatai Faa1 r>ac
ami 7e .anAnad
TV- *"-^aCHn .i lj#V ww
3m -cjoimT canana w cae
^earrm
ft
5iina; tar Ji-nta* tradftvat ai
toe jrifa- rf rS* an-, ft
^anri nan Lana. Tan M>
*-*rf T-nAr staJkAi
kj EMMMM jcrwatrs.
IT B K.\THOt as a met ran
a inaiunl. .t taai ana Gn-
5 -"
ffaaaV rCSCUSS
B Uktorcw.
Ga-nrol died
that
nftttJeaf
af aana. aaa
tan barf vneath
af a tree TVtreebor
aaca sanassii
m anusuallT
an earraardnuriifl
aboie dtytalkf
an ai nf toe aanmei
Ana* aa aaaae af toe peopul
i- aanhr the tree and foxA\
r^a> hathj nf Me aamtared paft.1
his cnmel
STXOPSB OF THE WEEKLT TOBAH PORTION
Leviticus
> sal
toe Ticai
aaa wtlnnu s*-
n i ana nca
fines m ts
Te csew an>
1 -nn n tte rae=
Ta 'tints Tn l"'"
aax jjuwvcan Tim.
n-ioea nhers sa ttar ae
aoaT hat anittrsr anrar a; a=a-
fie" aanut ennr anna toe
auur- a tasr tathnn
~aiin toar
inauTea Tar-rail*
rile aaac a
aaacft. Means* nvinar lie i~mt
an "^innnii 2sr aaac 3am.
aaca a ton are ateamt t-
=aiae ai %raa sane taamat Tm-
aias jbphs ant she Mf sat Tar
aaxrare n toe taaar imrl aht
anr Tan aasxa af ton mr

toe
au-"ai a >e
r af Asjii
air acot Fannc ai
inni
rnna
Prws3
*.-Mas Meats MatafM AiroKS
3*xm arceft aMncx onaf fiaMfct sMtth
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unrmos tw m>sm
.ts aatft QaaTs Casl 14***
a? lanes at*
iwar fiveft Ooai
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tienccB IftH. Sahwtf
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teas Mart.
Snas-tuarf.
mmi cuxhei
>y'- BBS
Lasni naar-iwd-
n! Mr Pentateachj
.f Meetog
EMeManM
ton as* rnrmint a af Tar ar-
a" Tataii > anaanac
r a-anacto asnar toe
tun at as- jaaaa
a ^:ina.


,. March 12, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
IJINDUN
Saul BelUnved, but He Knew Naught
Continued from Page 4
wno Aunc'i, notwithstand-
, Bdlow told the gathering
*, he had been advised that
" needed 'a good press',"
Slowly he did not accert
, Friends' invitation to give
cm one.
I fact, he used the occasion
a public forum to set every-
, straight on just how un-
ish he is no matter what
cost to the cause he neither
louses nor understands, which
mical f-f intellectuals: they
always more concerned
j principles than with peo-
IND SO, not only did Bellow
he was a Jewish writer.
alsa argued that his pref-
aces were Hawthorne, Mel-
Poe. D. H. I-wreace,
Dreiser and Sherwood Ander-
son "I didn't bring home the
wisdom of Maimonides" his
argument b.-ing more of a chal-
lenge than a declaration of
preference.
Not only did Bellow deny
that "only as a Jew in Israel
can I be whole." He also argued
that he is a loyal American who
is loyal to the experience and
culture of America.
In short. Bellow set up straw-
man after strawman, which he
then proceeded to Knock down
with the tatterdemalion senti-
mentality of a Don Quixote, but
without the Don's intuitive un-
derstanding that his mission
was after all a mere gesture.
ADDRESSING HIMSELF to
the proposition that "My cul-
ture, my language is Amer-
Hallywood Jewish community leader Moses Hornstein
Heft), the chairman of the Prime Minister's Club for
the South Florida Israel Bond Organization campaign in
South Broward, discusses Israel's economic development
pogroms with Simcha Dinitz, Israel's Ambassador to
the United States. The two met with more than 1,500
n communal leaders from throughout the United
States and Canada at the 1976 Inaugural Conference
dinner.
Wore than 1,500 people heard an address by Yigal Allon
U "ie 1976 International Inaugural Conference, Feb.
M at the Fontainebleau Hotel. Among the Jewish com-
munity leaders who played an important role in the suc-
cess of the dinner was William Littman (right), chair-
"ton of the board of governors of South Broward Coun-
ty for the South Florida Israel Bond Organization cam-
pain Allon, Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Min-
mer of Israel, focused the attention on the need to
*"ie/i the scope of the 1976 Israel Bond drive in order
ccelerata the country's development program.
ican," and "I can't reject 60
years (his age) of life in Amer-
ica," Bellow sent his lance into
the dead side of David Ben
Gurion's dead belief that Jews
living outside of Israel have a
"split personality" that can only
be made whole by living inside
Israel.
Poor man. At least Don Quix-
ote knew his knight's gear was
of a bygone day. The Ben Gur-
ion argument has long since
been shot down. It is not that
Bellow was attempting to re-
surrect anything, but that he
was demonstrating his ignor-
ance of Jews, Jewishness, Ju-
daism, Israel, the diaspora.
If he could use this as the
core of his whole "shtik," then
he was not qualified to speak
in the first place. He was, in
terms of contemporary history,
a quarter of a century behind
the times, a fossil.
AND TO whom was he de-
fending his Americanism as an
ALTERNATIVE to Judaism
as if they were ever at odds?
And to whom was he setting
forth his favorite writers (Haw-
thorne, et al.), like a pig his
kosher foot, as an ALTERNA-
TIVE to Maimonidesas if they
were ever at odds, too? Who
needed this gross insensitivity,
this gross display of ignorance,
this pandering to popular prej-
udices about the alleged order
of Jewish priorities?
Is there anyone, Jew or Gen-
tile, who would see a Jewish
intrigue in a preference for
Hawthorne, Melville or Poe
from which he would want to
be pvhlicly dissociatedother
than r Bellow fearful of the
anti-Semitic implications upon
himself personally of a ques-
tion long since discussed, dis-
solved and discarded?
Obviously, no one, except
perhaps the morning Tageblatt,
which reported his comments
with such gusto the next day.
In all fairness, I should not
abuse Bellow so mercilessly in.
this. He was after all an invited'
guest, and so he spoke his
mind although it does seem:
that a more understanding soul
than Bellow, who confessed j
here that Israel "is not essen-
tial to me" and that "I should i
have been more sensitive to the
events of this age," might have
refused the invitation no mat-
ter how foolishly his hosts
pressed it upon him.
BUT THE American Friends
can not be excused. Forget the
platform they gave Bellow he
should not have been given. I
am more concerned with the
next morning's headline, "Writ-
er's Defense: He's First an
American."
Which means the rest of us,
who do not share Bellow's ig-
norance, are not. Which means
Zionism is dualism (at least),
even if it isn't, as the- so-called |
United Nations says, racism.
The "reporter' who heard Bel-
low's "emotional plea" against
the Ben Gurion strawman knows
no more about Jewish history
than Bellow does himself. Nei-
ther does the headline writer
who came up with his snide
gem.
Yet that's what the American
Friends unleashed upon the
land when they decided to go
and catch a star for themselves
in whose reflected light they
could bask, and who caught a
mandrake root instead. When
they decided to be an "unter-
lekker."
Releases for Publication
TO ALL PUBLIC-RELATIONS OFFICES, PUBLICITY CHAIR-
MEN, AND CORRESPONDENTS:
Copy submitted to The Jewish Floridian for publication
should be typed in upper and lower case (not in all capitals),
double-spaced, on one side only of the paper.
FOR SALE
ABOVE GROUND CRYPTS
in Mt. Nebo's Garden
Mausoleum. Information
Mrs. Miller -756-7231
rALMEft'S ~
MIAMI MONUMENT COMPANY/
rSRSON AUIED MEMORIALS
CUSTOM CRAFTED
IN Wl WORKSHOP
444-0*21 Broward S2S-SM1
3^79 S.W. Sth ST.. MIAMI
JEFFER
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
DIRECTORS
IrMJtftei Mtx*.Jtr Nwnjiflw
MRCWYORK:
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1283 CONEY ISIANO AW. BUYN. Mt
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Straus avaUMt-fl a* com-
muranei i Me* tort wd Ihroughoul
it* (ye** Mum *m J
Womtn from the Hollywood and HallandaXe Chapters of
Hadassah attended the South Broward Hadassah Israel
Bond Luncheon on Feb. 25 at Temple Beth Shalom in
Hollywood. Among the dais leaders were- (from left)
William Littman, South Broward board of governors
chairman; Irma Rochlin, South Broward Women's Divi-
sion chairman; Ida Klmbrig, Hadassah Haltandale Chap-
ter chairman, big gifts, wills and bequests, who receiv-
ed the David Ben-Gurion Award from the State of Is-
rael; and guest speaker Dr. Miriam Freund, Hadassah
leader.
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
7mpte 3etkl
Wanotiat
CjazcUtu
The all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beau-
tifully landscaped, perpetual care, rea-
sonably priced.
For information call: 920-8225 or write:
/#%#
TEMPLE BETH EL
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOO. FLORIDA 33020
Please nd me literature on the above.
NAME.________---------------------------------------------------
ADDRESS:
, PHONE:


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian ana Shofur of Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 12,
To Honor the Dead, and Remind the Living

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Bv JACK S1EGEL
. i., ri. .
DACHAU (JTA) It
was a grey, gloomy and
somehow very fitting day. I
and a friend, armed with a
35 mm. camera and driving
the rented Opel, left Munich
for Dachau about 20 miles
away. As we left, I thought
of the story in the Interna-
tional Herald Tribune just
several days earlier about
the people in Dachau, now
a city of 33,000 (13,000 be-
fore World War II), who
were not interested in and
even hostile to the existence
of the memorial camp site,
its history and everpresent
reminder.
I thought, on the contrary,
it should be exposed again
and again and made visible
wherever possible "to honor
the dead and remind the
living."
MUNICH'S grand streets, the
well-built houses and well-fed
and clothed people were traf-
ficking in their clean streets-
Munich the birthplace of Ger-
man fascism where in Novem-
ber, 1923, Hitler attempted a
coup d'etat beginning at the
Buergerbraeu and ending at the
I eldhemhalle, and where 11 of
his "genossen" (comrades) were
killed while he fled in ignominy.
Now, however, that was an-
other history as we drove up
Ifland Strasse to Ise Ring, fol-
lowed the Mittlerer Ring and
finally found ourselves on Da-
chauer Strasse heading towards
that medieval town.
But the roads were heavy
with modern traffic, and on
either side was all the evidence
of a city well-heeled. Farther
out. the landscape thinned, and
after 25 kilometers, we saw the
KZ (Konzentrationslaagercon-
centration camp), sign right too
late and passed it.
WE MADE an illegal U-turn
and "topped to ask a gas at-
tendant where the KZ was. He
muttered an unfriendly direc-
tion in his thick Bavarian ac-
cent, and we took off to the
l an "Gedenkstaette" (memorial
s-te). A bare road led us to a
parkinc area iust outside the
barbed wire of the camp.
My friend and I nulled up
almost simultaneously with an-
other car driven by a German,
and when we Rot out together,
I asked him if he were visiting
the citv, and he said he was
from Munich. He was about 45.
and I asked what he thought for
Dachau and its times. He call-
ed it a "dirtv history."
I said as we stood there in the
biting winter cold where likely,
hundreds-of "Kazettlings" (in-
mates) must have marched into
the camp and their ultimate
death, that this would never
happen again.
THE MAN said, shruggire.
Who knows? The Nazis will
on me a pa in because there iso
much 'communismus' in the
country." He cited the Bader-
Metnhof gang, and I said they
were anarchists not commun-
ists, and the man said, no, they
are communists and that the
high schools were full of Reds.
His words had the smell of
Hitler again, and they depress-
ed me. My friend and I walked
past the barbed wire, and I
could almost visualize the
gaunt, sickened faces and claw-
like fingers pressed to and grip-
ping the interstices.
Ahead were some buHdines;
one was a museum, and inside
a sleeny guard in a green uni-
form sat at the door. We didn't
stay long; the effect of putting
such things together was not
real, and we moved into the
long and wide field where,
flanked by watch-towers once
machine gun manned, there
were two sections of oblong-
numbered areas where the bar-
racks housing the inmates used
to be.
~ OS' THE right, as we moved
in. was a moat, now a dry ditch
with patches of snow, which
separated the field from the
fence shielded by trees. They
were bare of foliage in the win-
ter and hardly shielded the
camp of whose activities peo-
ple used to say, we didn't know
what was happening.
A plaque, somehow aged and
ageless, said, "Plus Jamais, Nie
Wieder. Never Again," and the
same, I guessed, in Russian
which I couldn't read.
Two young men passed our
way and turned out to be Aus-
tralians on their way to Inns-
bruck for the Olympics. I stop-
ped briefly to talk to them.
Dachau was before their time,
and they were at a loss for
words and one could only mut-
ter, "What a horrible mess."
ONCE AGAIN, I surveyed the
field and invoked from my own
memory and experience in the
time, the rows of barracks, the
guttural German commands, the
frenetic activity for those still
then among the living.
At the opposite end of the
field, were three monuments
Protestant. Catholic and Jewish
symbolic of the religion of all
the people who were annihilated
there. Some nuns, who stopped
to pray over one barracks she,
moved in the Catholic memorial
which had a church in the rear.
It was called Heilige Brut
(holy blood). I and my friend,
a non-Jew. stopped before the
Jewish memorial, built in 1965,
for a quick moment, not as
much in prayei as in recall. We
mowed on past another moat
and met two^young men coming
our way. dressed in winter
sport doming.
I stopped them, too, and ask-
ed where they were from. Nor-
way, one said, and I asked what
they thought of the camp. "Gro-
tesque.'' one said. We talked
very briefly and went our sep-
arate wavs, they away from the
crematoria and we towards
them.
BIT THE word "grotesque"
rani in My ears. My friend and
I pass?d the "Grave of the Ten
Thousand Unknown," to an area
once used as a shooting range
and where executions were per-
formed. In back of the range
was the blood ditch. Turning
around again and surveying the
area, it was all so difficult to
believe. The surroundings were
now so bland, even Christmasy,
with the snow.
The term, '"moving," which
a woman used about the memo-
rial as she left, hardly began to
reach the enormity of the bes-
tiality. It escaped comprehen-
sion as though momentarily it
would be necessary for the
jack-booted Nazi janissaries to
come out of that history com-
manding respect for their real-
ity.
Nevertheless, a religious etate-
ment stood in defense of the
truth: "But the souls of the
righteous-are-as-The hand of
God and there shall no torment
touch them." Now ahead were
the crematoria and we advanced
towards them, I with some dis-
taste, and my friend with a
kind of professional eagerness
to record its details as well as
absorb it for the first time as a
phenomenon which had occur-
red before her birthdate.
The "Brausebad" (shower),
which was need as a decoy to
get inmates to enter, ultimately
to be gassed, was just a bare
room. Further in ware the
ovens themselves, standing
there so benignly as though
they once had baked bread.
OVERHEAD were solid beams
with hanging cord where, I
learned for the first time, some
inmates were hung to death,
perhaps simultaneously with the
burning of others. The clatter
of wooden boots suddenly
sounded echoinglv. and for a
frightening moment I thought it
was the SS coming, but it was
just the police guard having a
look around.
There were faint scratchings
on the wall, and I didn't bother
to read them because I knew
what they would say. The cam-
era clicked repeatedly, and I
tried to personalize thi6, in the
Germany I knew after the war
as a soldier, in the memory of
two of my late wife's sisters,
one of whom was killed in Aus-
chwitz.
I BECAME impatient and
wanted to leave, uncomfortable
and frightened in the square,
bare block buildings, but I had
to wait until the pictures were
taken. The interest superseded
my needs, although I asked for
one special shot.
Outside, there were now two
German guards, one young, one
older, a Czech. We talked, and
the Czech said he had been a
POW in the Soviet Union during
the war, as though that would
get my sympathy.
The young man was from Da-
chau and said all this had hap-
pned before he was born and
knew nothing of the times. The
older cop said, "We knew no-
thing. Those who did and talk-
ed, ended up here."
HE WANTED to put a happy
note on the proceedings. "Three
of them stayed on in Dachau
and became rich." I thought I
heard a familiar theme. "Jews?"
"No," he said. "Communists.
They made business. But one
died recently from too much
drinking." We talked on farther.
The afternoon was drawing to
an end. The camp closed at five,
and it was a quarter to.
I looked for my friend who
was nowhere to be seen. I look-
ed down the long grey field
wljere _the barracks once stood
and became scared ill over
again as if the jack-boots would
suddenly appear, and I would
be locked in, to remain and suf-
fer the same fate, with body as
well as mind.
FINALLY, running and cam-
era swinging, my friend appear-
ed, and we left the camp.
took ane last look, h
with unremembered hi
tbry. and I said, one must 1
this again and again and k
this death alive. "
We walked to the car an
across the lot wag a ball fid
where some young Germu
were playing soccer as if 2
thing had ever happened
Question Box
Question: What is "Purim
Katan" (which occurred this
year on Feb. IS)?
Answer: "Purim Katan," the
"miniature Purim," is a day
which is celebrated as a minor
festival in the case of a leap
year in the Hebrew calendar
such as this year happens to
be.
Traditionally, the festival of
Purim is destined to take place
every year on the 14th day of
the Hebrew month Adar. In a
leap year, there happen to be
two consecutive months called
Adar. The question arises as to
which of these two months
should be designated as the
month in which Purim Is to be
celebrated on the 14th day.
Since the event of the original
Purim is claimed to have taken
place on a leap year and in the
second of the two months called
Adar, it has been ordained that
Purim shall always be cele-
brated in the second of the two
Adars.
Still, because the 14th day of
Adar generally became known'
as a day of good fortune for the
Jewish people, even the occur-
rence of die 14th day of the
first Adar in a leap year
marked by some spirit of re]
joicmg even though none of &
mitzvoth and practices of Pt
rim are observed on that da;
We thus eliminate penitenti*
prayers from the service on tha
dav.
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March 12, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Sholar of Greater Hollywood
Page IS
Washington's Mideast
Problem Goes Back
f
WASHINGTON TODAY has its Middle East
problem. Way bank let us remember
in these bicentennial daya George Washing-
ton had the same problem.
The U.S. in Gf* day was a little smaller.
It had only three million people then. We have
almost that many running for President to-
day and there were only 13 states. Yet small
as the country was. the entire world was af-
fected by its establishment.
WASHINGTON NOT only had to fight the
British, but the Germans. The British, it will
be recalled, hired an army of 30,000 German
soldiers from the province of Hesse to fight
for them. Russia came into the picture, too.
The Czar took advantage of the British pre-
occupation with America to seize the Crimea.
The United Nations have never asked Russia
to give it back.
The American problem as tar as the Mid-
dle East is concerned didn't emerge until after
the winning of independence.
THE SO-CALLED Barbery or Arab States,
Algeria, Turds, Tripoli, Morocco, practiced
piracy kidnapping the crews of ships going
through the Mediterranean. Now, they say
they own all the land of the Middle East, in-
cluding the land of Israel, but then they went
further and said they owned all the water of
the Mediterranean too.
Up to 17JB, this was no problem, as the
British paid the annual tribute, but after the
Revolutionary War, Adams, the first Ambassa-
dor to Englnd. and Jefferson, the first Ambas-
sador o Fiance, were confronted by it.
JEFERSON'S TIME was largely spent ran-
soming captives. Ho finally proposed to his
fellow, envoys the estaoUshmeot of an inter-
national naval force to deal with piracy, but
nothiag came of the proposal.
Washington as President saw the United
States humiliated by being forced to pay the
Bey of Algiers almost a million dollars a
huge sum for the release of some captives and
the U.S. also agreed to pay an annual tribute.
But m a abort time, the Bey wanted mom
and in the next administration. Commander
Preble headed a little float -of vessels to teach
the Bey a lesson.
IT IS interesting that Commander Prebte's
flagship was named The George Washington,
but the piracy was not ended until Commo-
dore Decatur in 1815 grabbed the Bey by the
neck so to speak, giving him the option of hav-
ing his harbor city and all of his fleet destroy-
ed unless he promised to stop his guerrilla
activities. It was a good day for America after
that although European nations continued to
contribute to the Bey for the use of the water
until about 1830.
Jewish Immigrant Romp;
Literary Contest Obsession
Si
tsan
r*noff
i.^ABRJEL" by Harry Pollock (McGraw-Hill.
' .95). is a romp through the lives of
Jewish immigrants in Toronto of the 1930s.
Canadian and American immigrants are a pop-
ular subject for literary and cinematic writers
today.
First, Mordechai Richler's "The Apprentice-
ship of Duddy Kravta" canght on. then it was
made into a movie. This year, wo have seen
Jan Radar's film "Lies My Father Told Me"
followed by the spin-off paperback. Now the
film "Hester Street" Is showing; and of course
E. L. Doctorow's best-selling novel "Ragtime"
fits into the immigrant scheme as well.
"GABRIEL" is in the aaane genre as "Dud-
dy Kravitz" and Salinger's "Catcher in the
Rye It is the story of the personal and sex-
ual maturation of a young boy thrust into a
new and strange environment abounding in
unusual and colorful characters.
They boy works hard at becoming Amer-
icanized, as do his Irish and Polish Immigrant
friends. This is a sprightly and erotic portrayal,
occasionally developing themes of family unity
through faith, and the rituals of marriage and
death m different ethnic groups.
THE BOOK is at times artful, frequently
fJlgar and mane often -than not sopsmmsric.
No doubt, it will become a movie-
The history of PMHp J. Simon's "Cleft
Roots'" (Chicago: Priam Press, $7.5 > is un-
usual. The book was written 25 years ago for
a contest whose purpose was to "focus atten-
tion upon Jewish survival hi the United States."
The book was selected for publication as a
finalist and a few months later ems denied its
award and refused publication.
With this 1975 publication, Simon offers his
own "contest." He asks readers to write letters
to Priam Press indicating whether or net the
judges 25 years ago were justified in their de-
cision to reject t. The best lettem wftl reeeive
cash awards.
Tins WORK of fiction appears to bo basical-
.y autobiographical, describing a Jewish boy
bom into a dial heritage of Puritenisni and
Judaism which thoroughly confuses hiss. Ho
later marries a nan-Jew. The book primarily
deals with the problems which may result from
intermarriage.
The story is faidy interesting. However, its
impost is marred by the author's crusade to
have his book published.
Nst only is ha supporting the above-men-
tioned "contest." but also he desci fbes his book
as a "refreshing departure from the flood of
pornography being spewed into the reader's
mariett" not a tasteful or annealing way to
oresont the merits of one's work.
rs~7
Philanthropy
Crossroads
WASHINGTON has crawled with the speed of a turtle to res-
cue near-bankrupt New York with a S2.3 billion reprieve
loan, but some lasting good may came from the financial melo-
drama.
Beyond frightening Gotham's politicians and other power
broken into reforms having to do with pensions, college tui-
tions, aad swollen bureaucracies, the Manhattan Scare should
serve to awaken the uninformed to the modern plight of social
service agencies heavily dependent for survival on private phi-
lanthropy and government.
A SECOND gain will be a more compassionate look at the
fiscal plight of America's big cities, increasingly burdened with
providing for the posr now crowding Megalopolis. And a third
possibility is s new burst of spend for sax reform.
Leaders of Jewish federations, preparing for their annual
round of conferences at the height of the New York crisis, led
off With a timely and urgent call for an understanding of dam-
age to human service programs certain to result if New York
defaulted.
THE MEATIEST burden, federation leaders pointed nut
wonM sail on the poorest and most defenseless people in Man-
hattan. Already the victims of a two-headed monstrosity cre-
ated by the peculiar union of inflation and recession striking
at the same time, elderly and jobless victims of the crisis
would suffer even more.
And if banks were weakened while bonds sank in value,
philanthropic giving would certainly plunge sharply.
SPOKESMAN FOR New York Catholic Charities quickly
telegraphed a similar message of despair. Is a comprehensive
appeal published in the New York Times, Msgr. James J. Mur-
ray, executive director of Catholic Charities of New York, de-
clared that each day was bringtag cries for help from the poor,
the hungry, the newly jobless.
He counted off vka) agencies vulnerable in the hour of
municipal financial darkness: neighborhood self-help projects,
youth services in high delinquency areas, homemaker programs,
nursing homes, hospitals.
Slowly, those who may have been too preoccupied with
their personal problems to worry about help' supplied by pri-
vate and governmental suppliers of human services came to
realize what was happening to millions subsisting en welfare
and unemployment allotments, inflation-riddled pensions, food
stamps, and soeial security checks
HARSH JUDGMENTS on such remedies for hard times
were softened, at least to a degree, during the New York crisis.
Meanwhile, Mayor Abraham Beame of New York and
mayors of many other large American cities found listeners
at last for the story of urban dilemma so long neglected. Those
same Congressmen end. White Mease functionaries who bad
been damning and downgrading New York for fiscal misanan-
agjenent (which certainly was a factor in the drama) al too
easily overlooked the fact that they had helped to mandate a
large portion of the big city financial bbgatien.
"No urbaa community can meet its own problems these
daya with its own tax base while meeting those responsibilities
which the federal government should shoulder," Mayor Beame
said with full right to speak as he did.
-m EVERY area from social services to the environment
to municipal labor relations, federal policies have imposed new
strains on local resources."
Fedsraluatios of our welfare system, reform of our gen-
eral revenue-sharing program, aad an intensive educational
effort obliging nil residents of she United States to take a fresh
look at problems created by the unending trek of our people
to sur largest cities all merit advocacy aad heightened atten-
tion
. .
Miliwwwi" mmytifitna
*
This h Surely the Rind, of Intermarriage Ym Like to Read About
Haifa
THE DAILY newspaper. "Itnginn a," publishes a
list of couples who have registered for marriage
"i the various rabbinical oaftces throughout the
country. At first-glance the two columns of fits
Print which appear each day look like little more
* a reprint from the telephone directory. Yet a
doser inspection reveals that ths-drp, formal listing
c>a be a tiuenurs house of imaginative, dramatic
Roriesi
duccd to statistics and -digested by compg-
l information can undoubtedly cast mush
>n tread* in the s all sag oompositioo of Is-
rssi *->ciety.
THE RECUTXY identifies the coigns by piece
' :h, as well as by present city of rssuhsaae. I
m the early daps sf the Smts. vahen the vast
""toruy of brides aatd *
Carl
*4lr
ert
today are fur the most part already native bars
[sraeiisi
*
YET IT is not difficult to identify Nissim Sums*
or Ssnanne Turgeman or Yaakov Bazegle as being
undoubtedly membem of what is variously .ailed
rhs Oriental or Sephsrdi or Eastern Jewish corneas-
------- ii u .....---------------------------------
"ore than a quarter century has elapsed since the
'kys of mass immigration, and those getting married
And when we read that Israel Bsrkoudtz is tak-
ing as his bride Mimi Shitrit, the exact place of
thdir birth need not be recorded for us to realize
that this is one of the happy cases of a weloome
"intermarriage*"
The number of such snatches between the com-
munities is growing. Israel's Bureau of Statistics
resorts that in 195.! only 9 percent of all marriages
were between Ashkenazi and Sephardi. By 1955, the
f.gere had grown to U.s percent, and in 1962 it was
15 percent.
I HAVEN'T seen mare recent figures, but my
own rough calculation based on the "Hatsofeh" ta-
ble* kads me to gdum tiiat the figure is already
around 18 percent.
Certain baste premises can be made on the
basis of the daily lists. New immigrants tend to j
nuxry matja from the same -country. Almost ail of I
the Russiarvborn are choosing Russian-born. And
sure enough the statistics of twenty and more years |
ago confirm that in those days the newly arrived
Rumanians or Moroccans were at that time each
marrying for the most part within their community.


Page 16
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hottywood
Friday, March lj
,19
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t Florida
t Celery
25
JUST RIGHT SIZE
FOR SALADS
Firm Ripe
Tomatoes
3PKGS. P
OF* X
Lemons 11 49c
'The
Gantry ^ridel
GWoman
SAVE 22
SHE KNOWS PRICE ..
SNE KNOWS QUALITY
AND
SNE WON'T TAKE ONE
'I* WITHOUT THE OTHER!
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU
SATURDAY. MARCH 13
AT AU PANTRY PRIDES
IN DADE. HOLLYWOOD
AND HAUANDALE
____ GET MORE
.HNllimii f*m
I'tHUHOM] DOUARAT
I SIMPS J PANTRY PRIDE
< CUJfOHMutC~M Ml tMlltfOi'lMv.llHO>l % HMMIOiaOII
iKHMcaMam
U.S. MO I All mnH
Maine Potatoes 5 .." 69c
bimniiiiu.0,1.
Red Radishes 3 tSt 29c
'M MUM GUHNIHW
Finger Carrettes 2 ',1.?.'s35<
mm
Gladiolas ?~?r .0*cm 79c
mm iiK'.iiiuhiiih
Valencia Oranges 16.1
inCi TOUR OWN)
INDIAN RIVER PICK YOUR OWN
Seedless White
Grapefruit
6 $1
EXTRA
LARGE
23 SIZE
_
Sw^eufc* cm Seuxee Atfxtqe*
AU MtAll CMIU UlCM TO CMO* Al UMIWVM COUNT l*t
Skandor Cheese SC 89*
ncirs camiNC
'99'
Turkey Breast
BORDEN WHITE OR COLORED CHEESE FOOD

American
Singles 98
ll-Ol
39*
49e
ma S f 39
CAN A
ATlfMGtltM
Muffins
MIHtti RtlO< 'LA ftISM 1MAU
Grade 'A' Eggs
Klt GtAIIO
Parmesan Cheese
IIO-SUN
Grapefruit Juice eg. 19c
ah riAvoas
Les Cal Yogurt 4 SSS 99*
MR
Citrus Punch *' 59'
KRAFT iNOiVIDUAll. WRAPPED
Muenster
Cheese I
AMERICAN KOSHER
Franks or I20
Knocks p*c
Roast
(CHOIXEJ # Jy
Bottom ^A.ouN; jdi 29
Round Roast X "
MM OHIO|
Eye Round Roast ,. s 17'
UMA CHOICI llll I OIK
Sirloin Steak u.$lM
UA [MCBCI
Rib Steak SSS? .. $1M
UMA CMOKI ll> CMUC* IHOU.WI________
Arm Pot Roast $12*
UMA CMOKI Mil
Chuck Blade Steak ,. 89*
UMA CMOKI (lit LOW.
Porterhouse Steak u $179
UMA CMOKI CHUCK
Pot Roast m $12*
MA CMOKI HH CMUC* AOMiUM
Shoulder Steak %V*
BOOf usoAoma (4 39
Rump Roast X *
Young Turkey* -^ 59*
IA CM 1H4..I0 nimnim IIIW
Fryer Quarters u 59*
IA. CM IWNt FtlAOUM f.ISM
Fryer Parts J!SrSKS^. 99'..
Premium a e\c
"1CMI0AO* ^Fw\ ^BJ F ^
Fryers **0
PANTRY PRIDE SLICED
Meat QAc
Bologna- o9
OSCAR M>'|l ttiCIO
Cotto Salami IS 79*
Dry Salami its? *23*
ANN S
Sandwich Spread Si 39*
Ti '
1-
DISH
DETERGENT
UMITOMt.T. P. I Al. WirMOTHMrutCHAv
onmotnim inaucwNccicAwrin

PANTP i PRiot HAMBURGER OR
Rolls
Hi SAVE 34
Heinz
Ketchup
49
uroSfJl 32 OZ
(BOTTLE
*lUA.ONf in mAMW.7MOTMBPU.tMAi.
O* 7 90 CM MOMJliauOMO CJGAIf TICS
ggm SAVE 40
^" /"" fc_l T4Aif\ f A tif
ON TWO CANS
Pantry Pride
Fruit Drinks
ORANGE
CRAPE
FRUIT
PUNCH
44-OZ.
CAN
umiI I CANS IIAM WITM OTMf* ru*CMAMt 0>
S'OeOCAtOM IKUtOMS CGAMTUS
PANTRY PRIDE
Fruit m
Cocktail O
IZOZ.
CANS
$
1
'AMI....(
Tomato Sauce 6 & $1
Creamed Corn 4 SSS $1
MNRf riiot WMOtl oi iikii
White Potatoes 5 Stf $1
MM
Facial Tissues 2 oT $1
AMfT mm rmow cimo
Peaches 2 SSJ 1
Cranberry Sauce 3 &$1
MN'lltlitl
Stewed Tomatoes 3 ci2*l
Whole Tomatoes 'Sff-39*
'""l" MM iaiiiiii
Pear Halves 3 S $1
Mixed Vegetables 4 8*1
Sliced Carrots 4 tti $1
PANTRY PRIDE FROZEN
Broccoli <> -
Spears Oss. 1
sozin r-iii.
Fruit Pies :--~ 4 % $1
UN ill ho/in
Pound Cake JBT89'
HIGH LINER BONELESS AND SKINLESS
Haddock
Fillets
12-OZ.
PKG.
$129
OR
CARllNC hAC*
LAWl HII
1
NOT
.OTT'lS


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