The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00137

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
^Jewisti Florid tan
Vomme 6 Number 3
and SIIQFAll OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
[Hollywood, Florida Friday, January 30. 1976
FRIEDMAN IS KEYNOTER
Price 25 cents
Pacesetter Dinner Kicks Off 76 Campaign
\inrt- fhnn 450 leaders of th t;<>- ..!__ _,... *- **
More than 450 leaders of the
South Broward Jewish commu-
nity attended the annual Pace-
setter dinner officially open-
ing the 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign.
Sponsored by the Jewish Fed-
eration and chaired by Nathan
Pritcher, the cent was held
for SI.000 contributors at the
Diplomat Hotel in Hallandale.
Keynote speaker Rabbi Herb-
ert A. Friedman, former execu-
tive vice chairman of the
Un,ted Jewish Appeal, express-
ed his desire for American
Jewish solidarity with Israel.
Describing the recent UN
decision equating Zionism with
racism, Friedman said, "It is
an unbelievable outrage that
the traditions we stand for and
the history from which we come
and the turmoil and agony
through which we've passed
are all to be considered as vile
and infamous. They heaped
upon us once again the adjec-
tives and the nouns and the
adverbs which ring from the
fcv.l days of a third of a cen-
tury ago."
Continuing, Friedman said,
"We are locked in a struggle
for survival, for national iden-
tity, for religious aspiration."
"If the people of Israel feel
the warmth of your solidarity,
it will matter little whether we
have enemies, as long as we
have a friend in the U.S. and
one ally ... the American Jew,
which is you.
"We are striving under
crushing economic conditions to
provide the vast social and hu-
man needs which 8 percent of
our population desperately re-
quires. We are trying to ab-
sorb the ever new waves of
penniless people who long to
put their heads on a pillow
Of peace," Friedman said.
"Our most needed resources
Continued on Page 6
Rabbi Herbert A. Fried-
man, Pacesetter dinner
keynoter.
'Down on Knees,' Arab Solon Vows
J l:!,: .'
n. m-i.*. ;:.:.,
NEW YORK (JTA) Zuhayr Muhsin, "defense
minister" of the Palestine Liberation Organization and
second in command, a leader of the Syrian-supported
terrorist organization, As Saiqa (Thunderbolt), and a
leader of the ruling Ba'ath Party in Syria, was recent
ly interviewed in Damascus by Die Zeit, a widely read
weekly published in West Germany. The interview,
which appeared in the weekly's Dec. 12 issue, indi-
cated the position the PLO is expected to take dur-
ing the Security Council debate. What follows is an
excerpt of this interview as it was released here by
the American Jewish Committee
DIE ZEIT: What will be the PLO's objectives
when it participates in the Security Council's Middle
East debate?
__________ Continued on Pace 14
Eban's Return to Top
Gov't. Post Imminent
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) For the first time since Yit-
zhak Rabin set up his Cabinet 18 months ago, leaving Abba
Eban conspicuously out of it, the two men met for a long
friendly chat alone in Tel Aviv Friday. The Premier's aides
said they had reviewed the political situation in advance of
the Security Council debate
a dove who might help swing
Rabin away from Defense Min-
ister Shimon Peres' harder line.
Eban is also considered a
faithful Mapai man and such
men are at a premium among
the top office-holders in the
Rabin Cabinet. Finance Minis-
ter Yehoshua Rabinowitz has
reportedly led the campaign
for Cban's return to office.
EBAN himself has visibly
de-escalated his criticisms of
government policy. At a Labor
Party ideological debate two
weeks ago, be was assiduously
correct towards Rabin when
both of them appeared on the
platform.
Some observers link Eban's
projected return to what they
see as a shift towards the
doves' view in Rabin's Pales-
tinian policy.
Whereas only weeks ago
Rabin refused to entertain the
Continued on Page 9
Jews Cancel 2,000
Reservations in Top
Hotels of Brazil

However, they did not
deny rumors that their con-
versation presaged an immi-
nent return of the former
Foreign Minister to the gov-
ernment.
QUALIFIED sources in-
dicated that Eban's return was
now to be expected. His pre-
cise position, is still a matter
of speculation. Some sources
say Rabin will try to persuade
Foreign Minister Yigal Allon
to cede the Deputy Premier-
ship to Eban.
Eban meanwhile has left for
the U.S. on a United Jewish
Appeal speaking mission, and
he may meet with Rabin there
when the Premier makes an
official visit to the U.S. later
I this month.
I, Ebn's return to the Cabinet
"as been sought for some time
y the ex-Mapai wing of the
Labor Party which sees him as
RIO DE JANEIRO (JTA) Said Farhart, the
president of the government tourist organization, has
confirmed that some 2,000 American Jews have can-
celled their reservations in the five star hotels here as
a protest against Brazil's vote in the UN General As-
sembly for the resolution equating Zionism with racism.
Thomas Mendelsohn, manager of Rio's Sheraton
Hotel, said three American travel agencies cancelled
more than 600 reservations during the Christmas-New
Year's holiday and some 800 reservations for 1977.
The anti-Zionist vote by Brazil and the tourist
cancellations were reportedly discussed at meetings
between Javits and Gen. Golbery do Couto e Silva,
chief of President Ernesto Geisel's civil cabinet, and
Foreign Minister Azeredo da Silveira.
* ^ I X ''i
British Airways Apologizes
LONDON (JTA) British Airways has issued
an apology for "the regrettable omission of Israel from
the list of airlines' designation places" printed in its
1976 pocket diary. No other country was omitted. How-
ever, Tel Aviv does appear on the route map further
on in the diary.
- Gen. Gonen
Resigns
From Army
TEL AVIV (JTA) Gen
Shmuel Gonen, whom the
Agranat Committee held re-
sponsible for Israel's mili-
tary defeat at the outset of
the Yom Kippur War, re-
signed from the army last
week.
He refused to accept a
field command offered him
by the Defense Minister on
grounds that it would imply
that he accepted the Agra-
nat panel's conclusion that
he was unfit for a regional
command or to head a de-
partment at General Head-
quarters.
In his letter of resigna-
tion, Gonen reiterated his
charge that the Agranat
Committee made him a
scapegoat for errors on the
Egyptian front.
A HIGHLY regarded armored
division commander during the
1967 Six-Day War, Gonen was
commander of the southern re-
gion encompassing Sinai when
the Egyptians, in their surprise
attack of October, 1973, crossed
the Suez Canal and overran the
Barlev Line.
The Agranat Committee, ap-
pointed by then Premier Golda
Meir to investigate the conduct
of the Yom Kippur War and the
events leading up to it, pointed
the finger at Gonen as the sen-
ior officer most responsible for
Israel's setbacks.
Legal counsel indicated that
the Agranat verdict did not pre-
clude his assignment to com-
mand a field unit, but the Gen-
eral chose to resign instead.
U.S. to Cut Aid to 'Anti' Voters at UN
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The State Department
nas indicated that the United
Mates will reduce assistance
[to those nations which have
opposed the U.S. on issues
flt the United Nations.
I Responding to a report
I that Secretary of State Hen-
ry A. Kissinger had formal-
I.Llnitiated 8Uch Plicy.
|tn State Department said,
without confirming the re-
port explicitly, that "obvi-
ously our actions toward
other countries are based on
their actions toward us."
SPOKESMAN Robert Funseth
also said that this is a "diplo-
matic practice followed by this
country as well as by other
countries. Obviously, how a
country votes is an action."
He noted, however, that he
was unaware of any changes in
the foreign assistance program
that the State Department had
submitted for the current year,
a $4.4 billion program.
Funseth added that since the
program has not yet been adopt-
ed by the Congress, it was pos-
sible changes may take place in
it. According to published re-
ports, Kissinger has already de-
cided to defer assistance to Tan-
zania because of its vote in the
UN General Assembly to oppose
the Ford Administration's posi-
tion on Korea and because it
voted for the Anti-Zionist reso-
lution.
ON THE other hand, coun-
tries such as Malawi and the
Ivory Coast, which have backed
U.S. positions in the UN, are
understood to be given addition-
al assistance. Votes in the UN
which went contrary to U.S.
interests concerned Korea, the
call of independence for Puerto
Rico, the demand for removal
of American bases in Guam and
Zionism.
When a reporter asked Fun-
seth whether the anti-Zionist
resolution could be considered
an action against U.S. interest,
Funseth replied, "Our attitude
was made clear on this resolu-
tion" and, he added, regarding
the vote, "we regret it very
much."
In relation to attitudes in Con-
gress, the House International
Relations Committee last month
asked President Ford to provide
a report in 90 days that would
Continued on Page S


Page 2
t
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 30,
National Jewish Leaders Plan Thne Apartments Will share
Synagogue Council Meetings
Several of American Jewry's
foremost leaders met in Miami
Beach this week to plan a se-
ries of meetings in Dade, Brow-
an! and Palm Beach counties
to be held by the Synagogue
Council of America, umbrella
agency of Orthodox, Conserva-
tive and Reform Judaism in the
United States.
Rabbi Henry Siegman of New
York, executive vice president
of the Synagogue Council, is
coordinating the gatherings
with Dr. Joseph H. LooMtein.
Dr. Irving Lehrman and Moses
Hornstein.
Dr. Lookstein is national
president of the Synagogue-
Council while Dr. Lehrman and
Hornstein serve as national
chairmen of its Society or Fel-
lows. Hornstein is a Hollywood
business and feligtanis leader,
and Dr. Lehrman. rabbi of
Temple Emanu-El of Miami
Beach, is former national pres-
ident of the Synagogue Council.
The organization is expand-
ing the acti" ities of the first
national Jewish "think-tank,"
the Institute for Jewish Policy
Planning and Research. A ma-
jor arm of the Synagogue Coun-
cil, it is headed by Ambassador
Philip M. Klutznick, former
U.S. envoy to the UN and for-
mer national and international
president of B'nai B'rith.
The area of interfaith dia-
logue, in which the SCA has
been a pioneer also will be dis-
cussed, following a recent ob-
servance in Washington in
which Rabbi Siegman and Dr.
Lookstein participated. The con-
vocation marked the 10th anni-
versary of the revised Vatican
policy toward the Jews, consid-
ered a milestone in Catholic-
Jewish relations.
Jewish Family life Is Focus
Of Weekend Reform Seminars
Helping young parents deal
with Jewish family living in the
home is the focus of Professor
GERALD B. BUB1S
Gerald B. Bubis. director of the
School of Jewish Communal
Services of Hebrew Union Col-
lege-Jewish Institute of Religion.
He wiU meet with Reform tem-
ples in Dade and Broward Coun-
ties during the weekend of Jan.
29-31
Representatives df fi*e Dade
Reform temples will attend sem-
inars on Friday, Jan. 30. it 6
p.m. at Temple Israel, and Sat-
urday, Jan. 31, at 9:30 a.m. at
Temple Beth Sholom.
The coordinator is Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingsley of Temple
Sinai, and committee represen-
tatives include Nanci Goldstein
of Temple Beth Sholom. Bar-
bara Donshik of Temple Sinai.
Ronni Bermont of Temple Is-
rael and Marcia Reisman of
Temple Beth Am.
Professor Bubis will also
meet with educators and lay
committee members to discuss,
"The Jewish Family" and "The'
Changing Life Style for the I
American Jew." These meetings
will be at Temple Judea on'
Thursday, Jan. 29, at 6:30 p.m.
and at Temple Beth El. Holly
wood, on Saturday. Jan. 31.
Professor Bubis heads the
HUC-JIR school in Los Angeles
which educates communal work-
ers to serve in Jewish commu-
nities here and abroad.
Professor Bubis. who has a
BA and MSW from the Uni-
versity of Minnesota, did post-
graduate work at USC, Berk-
eley, and Hebrew University,
and is pursuing a Doctoral de-
gree.
He has been a visiting fac-
ulty member at the Hebrew
University and a guest lectur-
er at UCLA. Harbor College.
Loyola University and Haifa
University
He has puWJshed many ar-
ticles on subjects related to
contemporary Jewish Hft. He
coaothored a monograph on
Jewish Identity and edited a
book on die Jewish family
which wiM be paMUhed within
the year.
His articles have appeared in
"Reconstructiohlst." "Journal
of Jewish Conwrahal Service,"
"Journal of Central Conference
of American Rabins" and "Jew-
ish Spectator.
RABBI lir.NK. siboAlAN
Heating Lab
Offering Tests
The Hearing and Communi-
cation Disorders Laboratory of
Hollywood was recently estab-
lished by Martin R. Horwit,
MA, Clinical audiologist.
Since heat ing is the primary
sense used in communication,
any slight defect can cause a
problem.
It is the purpose of the cen-
ter to teat the hearing of South
Broward residents who have,
Or think they have, a hearing
problem. The service is also
a- ailable to any physician Who
needs assistance in diagnosing
any medical problem involved
with hearing.
According to Horwit. "Among
the many solutions for people
with hearing problems are
medical and or surgical treat-
ment or amplification (a hear-
ing aJfd).
"Only 9} having his hearing
tested, can a person discover
whether he has a hearing prob-
lem and whether it can be over-
come."
The Hearing Disorders
Laboratory is offering the com-
munity an opportunity to find
out about its hearing by pro-
tiding a free hearing screen-
ing evert Tuesday afternoon
during. February, between 1
aUd f p.m. Mo appointment is
necessary.
Rent-A-Car
LOW AS
$7 A DAY
7c Per Mile
(100 Ml. Rad.ui)
W* Hryr OniliAhtnclr*. Miitir
Chart*. Cart* Blanch* and
Dinars Club
CAR-BELL
MOTOtS
520 S. Dfada Mary.. Hollywood
1*41
-?A traditional^
JEWISH LIFE
AWAITS YOU IN
SOUTH FLORIDA
young Owatl
of czrfoLLijUJOoa
WILL WELCOME YOU
AND *ILL HELP YOU SETTLE
SYNAGOGUE RABBI iM RCSKfENCE
COMPLETE RECREATION FACILITIES
EDUCATIONAL & SOCIAL ACTIVITIES
KOSHfcR PROVISIONS NEARBY
A GROWING JEWISH GOWMlfNlTY
IN THE CENTER OF SOUTH FLCfftOA
THE OAKS
condominium
present home of
(Ijourty OitatC of cJfoCtytooJ
Moshe Bomzer. Rabbi
A'lmWed number of modestly priced
1. 2&3Ded*oom
fcdndomintum apartments are available.
For an appointment or further information,
Wrlfe err phone
THE OAKS
4111 Stirling Road
Fort Lauderdale. Florida33314
B/oward: 791-1870 Dade 944-0416
I
A
A 'Night in Israel,' Feb. 3
Beach Plaza, Twelve Pillars
and Aristocrat Apartments resi-
dents wrti pay tribute to their
fellow residents and help Is-
rael's important economic de-
velopment and apricuhural
program at a "Night in Israel"
on Tuesday, Feb. 3, at 8 p.m.
in the Beach Plaza Recreation
Room, on South Ocean Drive.
The featured speaker will be
American Jewish folk humor-
ist Bmt! Cohen, who will pre-
sent the Israel Solidarity
Award to Louis A. Jonas, a
past president of the Beach
Plaza Social Club; Max Beck-
erman, treasurer ani board
member of Twelve Pillars; and
Charles J. London, president of
the Aristocrat Social Club.
CHAIRMAN of the apart-
ments Israel Bonds committee
include Rabbi A. Alan Stein-
bach of Beach Plaza Mri S*A
n?y Gray. Mrs. Joel KruwZ
and Al Loewy. Twelve Piiu-
and Jerry Juran of Aristocrat
According to the chairmen.
This is a important occasion
for the members of our apart
ment complex. The time h*
come to stanJ up anj tell k
rael that we are behind he-
at this rime in her history
FaCCki with terrorist attack
turmoil and outrageous world
opinion, Israel must fed that
she can count on A-nerican
Jewry, and the men and wom-
en from our tares apartments
in Hollywood will reassure her
when they pledge their com-
mitments so that her economic
development programs and her
technological advancement can
be accomplished."
UJA Women's National Chairman
To Address Pacesetter Luncheon
The Women*.; Division of the
Jewish Federation Of Soirth
Broward will hold Its annual
Pacesetter luncheon on Feb.
19 at noon at the Diplomat
Hotel.
Guest speaker wWI be Ar-
lene Strelitz. national vice
chairman of the Women's Divi-
sion of the United Jewish Ap-
peal.
Pacesetter cochairmen are
Mrs. Sherman Katz and Mrs.
Paul Weiner.
Committee members are
Mrs. Lewis Conn, Mrs. Carolyn
Davis, Mrs. Sol Entin, Mn.
Arnold Goldstein, Mrs. Moset
Hornstein. Mrs. Paul Kraemer
Mrs. Robert Prttell, Mrs. Si*
ney Shenker. Mrs. Otto Stei-
ber.
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS-LABELS
BAGS-BOXES
WIPES
7 76-6771
ROWARD
IftPER 8.
ACKAGING
?0 N E 45 STREP
POB A.'DERDAIF
Riverside s
two new chapels in
Hollywood ana Sunrise
serve the needs of
the entire
Jewish community in
Broward County.
tn the Hollywood and HaHandale
dfQ$'
5801 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood.
920-1010
In the Fort LaudercUe area:
1171 Northwest 61st Ave.( Sunset Strip) .Sunrise
584-6060
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel. Inc./Funeral Directors
Other Riverside chapels in South Florida are located in
North Miami Bleach. Miami Beach and Mtemi.
ifmi *w Nw Yo* Metr.>{X>atan area *h chapel* irf ManhafUB.
BrooWyn BronaTar Roduuay anf WfecMUai
Hurray N RuNn ftt


riday
, January 30, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Mark Fried (left), Sam Haber and Helen Cohan
Sam Haber of JDC
Describes Its Work
Addressing members of the
young Leader's Council and
Women's Institute of the Jew-
sh Federation of South Brow
bi d Sam Haber, executive vice
president of the JDC, spoke of
be JDC's 61 years of service
the Jewish people in some
countries.
The JDC was established in
[1914. and its major task be-
fore Israel was formed was the
kid of Jews in Eastern Europe.
pt was in Poland during al-
nosi the entire Nazi occupa-
Haber stated,
jrx "s 3 R's were defined by
Haber as Rescue, Relief and
Rehabilitation.
Concerning the UN vote de-
Waring Zionism to be a form
bf Racism, Haber asserted,
[The UN is the world center
our destruction, taken over
by the worst enemies of Jew-
ish life that ever existed. We
in greater danger than we
ave been in a long time.
"Czechoslovakia and Poland
pre cemeteries of Jewish life.
Ve continue to help Jews in
Hungary, Rumania, as well as
Czechoslovakia and Poland."
In 1975 42,000 packages sent
to Russian Jews.
Concluding, Haber said, "Un-
like any other 'organization,'
there is no single organization
of American Jewry which has
as its sole mission the care of
those in desperate need, the
helping in the rescue of these
people and resettling and re-
organization of their lives."
Helen Cohan, president of
Women's Institute, and Mark
Fried, president of Young
Leaders Council, presided at
the meeting, which was held
on Thursday, Jan. IS, at the
Federation Building.
Temple Sinai Presenting
Nagel Revue at Barry
Temple Sinai of North Dade
wiu present "The First Two
Hundred Years are the Hard-
est, a revue, by Jack Nagel, at
the) Barry Coliege Auditorium
on (Feb. 7 at 8 p.m.
for information, please call
the Temple Sinai office.
\South Florida Israel Bond Organization paid tribute to
\Guildford Plaza, Hallandale, residents William and Es-
UherFreiman (feft), who received the State of Israel
{Solidarity Award at the Guildford Plaza "Night in Is-
yael" in mid-December. Making the presentation were
\chahman Israel Somach and cochairman Nathan Pasik
\ Herzog Attacks 50VKT mm mm cuiwral mammal
'Right to Identity' Project
Seeks Community Help
United Nations
PALM SfkRMGS, calif.
(JTA) Branding the United
Nations General Assembly as
a 'forum of intransigence ra-
ther than compromise,'' Chaim
Herzog. Israel's Ambassador to
the UN, declared here that
"our enemies are seeking to
legitimize any future actions
that they may want to take
against Israel and the Jewish
people."
Speaking to some 600 dele-
gates to the United Jewish Ap-
peal's Western Regional Lead-
ership Conference, Herzog at-
tacked the enemies of Israel
who are trying to legitimize
the terrorist Palestine Libera-
tion Organization.
"Can you imagine such a
murderous group being pro-
posed as a legitimate repre-
sentative?" he asked.
FRANK Lautenberg, UJA's
general chairman, reviewed
the campaign needs for the up-
coming national drive and
noted that Israel's humanitarian
responsibilities are greater than
ever.
"In 1976 we have the op-
portunity and the ability to
dedicate ourselves to perfect-
ing the American spirit of
idealism the spirit of dem-
ocracy and- for the Amer-
ican spirit of Zionism as. well,
for Zionism and democracy
are as one in principle and, in
practice."
Melvin M. Swig, of San Fran-
qisco, UJA West Coast Region-
al chairman and executive
committee member, who was
also dinner chairman, stated:
"In light of recent events ,at
the United Nations and in Is-
rael, this year's West Coast
regional conference takes on a
new and urgent meaning.
FOR US, it is the renewal,of f
a very special process: to share
in the responsibility for the
destiny of our people. There-
fore, the presence of every per-
son of conscience is extremely
vital. Our collective response
must be an act of support .
a positive expression of our
The Soviet Jewry Committee
has announced a mass com-
munity effort to provide So-
viet Jews with desperately
needed Jewish books, records
and cultural materials. The
project, "Right to Identity,"
began on Sunday at the He-
brew Academy in Miami Beach.
"Might to Identity" is a na-
tionwide answer to an urgent
.appeal from 36 Russian Jews,
based .on the Helsinki agree-
ment signed by the U.S. and
USSR in August, 1975. The
Final Act of the Helsinki Con-
ference assures all peoples the
right to receive non-political
cultural materials.
Residents of Hollywood and
, the neighboring commupities
are asked to bring Jewish
I books, magazines of non-
political interest, records and
tapes of Jewish music, and
.religious .and cultural articles
including Jewish jewelry to the
Hebrew Academy at 2400 Pine
Tree Drive from 11 a.m. and
3 p.m., to the nearest temple
in Hollywood or Miramar, or
to the Jewish Federation build-
ing at 2838 Hollywood Blvd. '
Donations to cover the cost
of postage will aUo be accept-
ed.
Each item will be sent to
individual Soviet Jews by regis-
tered mail with a return re-
ceipt requested. Careful rec-
ords will be kept regarding
delivery or pon-delivery to as-
sure compliance with the Hel-
sinki Declarations and inter-
national postal laws.
Please reach out to your
organizations and their mem-
bers with as much publicity as
possible, whether through an-
nouncements, bulletins, or word
of roopth.
Temple Sinai of Hollywood's first annual Cadillac dinner
dance will be held in the Regency Room of the Diplomat
Hotel on Saturday, Feb. 14. Purchase of a ticket entitles
each guest to a chance to win a 1976 Cadillac (shown
above with Max Chira) or .equivalent in cash. Every 25th
ticket-holder wins a TV set- A five-piece orchestra will
provide music for dancing. All proceeds will help fi-
nance Temple Sinai's educational program for children
and adults. For information, call Max Chira at 920-4032
or Mrs. Bertha Widlitz at 923-1375.
76 CADILLACS
(LEASE OR PURCHASE)
On diipiay in our wftov
r l. "howroom.
?'.* CouP. StiUw, Coup*
Oevniet, Sedan DeVIII...
E aorado Coupe.. Seville.,
Eldorado Convertible and
Fleetweod Brougham!
" tfrivan In. than ISO mile.
h|CcD FROM
$7997.77
76 SEVILLE
(demonetrator 7 mile.)
$3000 DISCOUNT
Nv $13,M7.7 law $3,000
jo* pay only
$10,997.67
ahXh" **"' ** ehooae from.
*" "riven !. than 100 mile..
75 LEFTOVERS
fcOLD COAST
AlTO BROKERS
lwLa W3'3777
L *""> 'til s Sunday. 1-5
wt
concern."
The three-day conference
took place to demonstrate
American Jewish unity and
strength on behalf of the world
Jewish community, and to in-
augurate the West .Coast's par-
ticipation in the 1976 UJA na-
tionwide fund raising cam-
paign.
---------------------------------n--------
i

Msrina SuppRoS
HARDWARE t fAINTJNC
HOUSEWARES A GIFTS
HOME DECOR
PATIO DINETTE FURNITURE
BATH/CLOSET SHOP
Basded Windows Room Divide*
Artificial Flowara
Mas*
Plants
Patio Fumitwro
Window Shades
8SCT1
Kay ft lock Work
Aora Hours 730 AM.. 6 P.M. Closed So*.
1M EAST BEACH BOULEVARtr
{.ALIAHDAIE, FLORIDA SHIS
PHONE S2T4MC
arnett
anJk
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
Nil-LI "E BODY SHOP
May I HAVt NfXt DN7S
COLLISION SPECIALISTS
INSURANCI WORM
SPICIALIZINC IN QUALITY
WQRK
30 YEARS SXPCRIf NCf
2111 S W 59 TERR.
1 L S. OF TREASURY
% Bl C. OF 441
989-6040
BEN BERMAN, Proprietor
Need a Nurse tcho cares?
Our ru'ses believe a genuine concern, an understanding
mile and a compaasionate attitude ar* important to a
patient. Almost as important as her professional sk
All Medici Pool RNs, IPNs, Aides, Companion Sitters
and Male Attendants have regiaiared nurse supeivision.
When someone you care about needs special attention
at home, in a hospital or nursing home,
call us, day or night.
MEDICAL
PERSON
NEL POOL
"A National Nursing SrviW
Suit. 206,
2500 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood- Ph. 920-4360


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, January
30.
197<
A New View of Chutzpah
The high point of United Nations chutzpah occur-
red shortly after the Middle East debate began on Mon-
day of last week.
Farouk Khaddoumi, foreign policy adviser to the
Palestine Liberation Organization and Yasir Arafat, be-
rated Israel with a viciousness of tone perhaps unparal-
leled in previous UN history.
The tragedy of Palestine, he told the Security Coun-
cil, began with the "iniquitous Balfour Declaration."
Furthermore, declared Khaddoumi, the United Nations
had no right "to partition our country" in the first place,
meaning the world organization's establishment of Israel
in 1947.
Referring to Jews as "usurpers," Khaddoumi charg-
ed them with "a sinister scheme against our people."
After diverting himself of such blatantly venomous
distortions of truth and history, Khaddoumi thereupon
criticized Israel for failing to attend the UN "debate."
THAT is chutzpah.
Self-Destructive Trip
French President Valery Giscard d'Estaing's re-
cent trip to Cairo was a disaster.
The French are going to give Egypt all the things
Egypt does not now have in sufficient quantity
fighter planes, guns, pressure on Europe to see Egypt
in an ever more favorable light as d'Estaing does what
he can to dampen even further the once favorable light
that shone on Israel.
This comes at a particularly bad time bad when
one thinks of the snag in relations between Egypt and
the Soviet Union, particularly Moscow's refusal to make
it easier for "Egypt to repay all the money Moscow bank-
rolled and Egypt blew in its attack on Israel in 1973.
One can easily argue that America is doing the
same for the Israelis that America is arming the Is-
raelis and supporting the Israelis in a world increasingly
determined to isolate them.
But the bald fact is that Israel is not attempting
to exterminate anyone whatever the phony Third
World-Communist bloc says. The Arabs are.
Furthermore, any rift between the Soviet Union
and any Arab state is worthwhile for western interests.
For a western nation to fill the breach is tantamount to
knitting the rift and thus to diminishing the benefit of
the rift to the West.
That is what France's President has .dona. k
In this sense, we see d'Estaing's visit* to Moscow^n
the same meddlesome way that we saw Gen. DeGaulle's
first meddlesome attacks on the American dollar and
American international prestige.
In the end, the French are gouging out a hole in
the hull of the boat they themselves are sailing.
Time to Act-Not Talk
Faye Schenk, president of the American Zionist
Federation, has announced the creation of a Commission
on Zionist Ideology made up of 31 Zionist scholars and
leaders- The commission will perform a needed service
by dealing with such questions as the contemporary
character of Zionism, the differences betwen Zionist and
pro-Israeli activity, and whether Zionist philosophy
needs updating and revision.
It is important that the efforts produced by the
commission not be kept to itself that they reach not
only Zionist and Jewish organizations, but also the gen-
eral public. Despite all that has happened in recent
years, proper information on Zionism still does not
reach a large public.
Most people, including many Jews, really do not
know what Zionism is. They are thus easy targets for
Arab propaganda.
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Wsskly.
Member of ths Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Sever Arts Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association. American Associa-
tion of English Jewish Nswspspers. and the Florida Press Association.
'Conscience9 Worries a 'Friend
wJewisti Fiendian
M UHU MIUIII SMlllMt
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 1-S71-400S
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone J73-46U5
P.O. Boi 297J. Miami. Plowda 33101
All P.O. J57 returns are to be forwarded to
The Jewish Floridian. P.O. Bo* 012S73, Miami. Fla. SS101.
FRED K SHOTHET Bl /.ANNE SHOCHET SKI.MA M. THOMP80N
Editor and Puhlixh.-r BMMtivo Editor Assistant to Publisher
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashrwth
Of Ths Merchandise Advertised in its Column*
/. .. ]Pu*lUUd BUWoekly
S. ,.*ji*;e V*1* aJ Miami. Ifla.
Jewish Federation of SoiiOj Br#War*. IoO. # 8HOTAR EDITORIAL
ADVI80RT COMMITTEE Nathan PrM.her. Chairman; Lewis E. Conn,
sfelvln H Baer; Dr. Samuel Mellne. D.M.D.
AST WEEK, I concluded with
the promise to take a clos-
er look in this column at Lau-
rens van der Post's recent book.
"Jung and the Story of Our
Time," with specific reference
to the sections dealing with
Psychiatrist Jung's alleged anti-
Semitism.
But a column the other day
by Garry Wills, of the Univer-
sal Press Syndicate, for the mo-
ment forces me to set my prom-
ise aside because the Wills piece
urgently demands a response.
COINCIDENTALLY, it has to
do, at least partially, with,
guess what?, anti Semitism:
that ubiquitous pain in the
backside of man which afflicts,
not his conscience (the seat of
his conscience is hopefully
elsewhere), but his brutal ani-
mal nature.
The subject of Wills" column
is Israel, and he has written
it with what he would have us
believe is profound regret.
For one thing, he arguev
every time he writes about
Jews or Israel, "the sicky hate
mail" arrives to congratulate
him "for at last seeing through
the Jewish plot to rule the
world."
COMPLAINS WILLS: "Once
I voiced a mild criticism of
something Leonard Bernstein
did and some people wrote
Mindlin
me fervent letters of embar-
rassing praise for attacking
"that Jew'."
Okay, he's made his point.
We are now on notice that Wills
is not an anti-Semite partic-
ularly when he observes with
some sympathy, "One of the
sadder side effects of this dis-
ease (anti-Semitism) is the Is-
raelis' own earned touchiness
about any criticism at all. They
have always seen how each
tiniest criticism was put to use
by the anti-Semites."
Wills thereupon proceeds to
criticize Israel, and in no "tin-
iest" way either, if not confi-
dent of immunity from charges
of anti-Semitism, then at least
certain that he has set the in-
tellectual ground rules for crit
icizjng Israel without having to
anticipate unreasonable (unin-
tellectual) counterattack.
AL !? ,he unfortu
blight of the liberal intel|
ual: he assumes the right to
anything he pleases, no m
how destructive, even self.
structive, so long as he cana
sure himself it is reasonable
Behind this "impenetr*
armor, where he sloughs offi
possibility by his own definitk
that he may be feeding gristi
the anti-Semitic mill. Wills ka
gins his argument that "ftJ
g-inc to be necessary tocrihjJ
Israel during the coming wTI
And what is his dispute\3
the Israelis? "The suspic
g ows, he writes, "that fo
does not intend ever to reto
the occupied territories''0pu
Wills in the end: Israel "ojb
find a way to give them up"]
IN BETWEEN this high}.!
decorated beginning dwinajl
to save his own carcass frail
contact with the blood-ai
arti-Semitism of the vuJaJ
masses (cocktail hour anti-3|
itism isn't really anti-Seminal
is it?, particularly if you (A
vrwtr even-handed drinking u
a book-lined study) and his
co lditional ending, what
Wills aver?
Why, nothing that Yasir
fat, or the Frenchman i
straightened Arafat's shirt
lar prior to his historic r.
packing appearance before
UN, would not absolutely i
For examo'e. "Israel
trouble," says Wills. To reofl
nize this, you have only to |
that her immigration has
en orf."
NOW, there is no doubt ftj j
Israel's immigration has lain
off," and that is a subject!]
ae ing profound study
might, indeed, tell us
about why Jews, histor
are wanderers; why they
were able to hold onto
homeland; why, in fact,
have managed to survive ...
lenia .of genopidal calamity.
But is Israel in trouble
cause of this negative popali
tion movement or because
ticians and industrial
polists with an cyle on An
oil, increasingly these djyi
joined by liberal intelli
with a penchant for
humanism, are preparing
the dismemberment of Israel? |
If Israel is in trouble, ini
feet Wills fails to say of wh
making, except to suggest it I
of Israel's own hence tt|
negative migration.
NEVER FEAR he poiu
Continued on Page 13
Prexy Hopefuls Talk on Israel
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) Jimmy Carter and Fred
Harris, two of the candidates for the Democratic Party's
Presidential nomination, while expressing support for Is-
rael, differed on how the United States should approach
the Arab-Israeli conflict.
They expresed their views on NBC's "Meet the Press"
program. Two other candidates on the program, Sen. Birch
Bayh of Indiana and Pennsylvania Governor Milton Shapp,
were not questioned about the Middle East.
CARTER, a former governor
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year00.00. Out of Town Upon
Request.
Volume 6
Friday, January 30, 1976
Number 3
28 SHEVAT 5736
of Georgia, said he thought the
United States should continue
with its step-by-step approach
to negotiations in the hope that
"Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and at
least Lebanon might come for-
ward to a negotiation with Is-
rael {hat would be fruitful"
Biff'Harris, a former U.S.
Senator from Oklahoma, said
that an "overall" Geneva con-
ference is now required. "We
have gone about as far as we
can in the step-by-step ap-
proach," Harris said.
"I think we have pushed Is-
rael awfully far up to now with
very little in return, and it is
going to make the next steps
very tough."
Carter said that "an integral
part" to the "ultimate solution"
in the Middle East is "re'-og-
nition of the Palestinians as an
entity with the right to have
their own nation, to choose
their own government, to exist
in'* territo
Wejt nor
dan River
," peither On the
ist Rank of the'Jor-
BUT HE said the U.S. should
not recognize the Palestine Li-
beration Organization ."until
they recognize the right of Is-
rael to exist in peace in their
present location."
While saying that Israel
might have to withdraw m
some of the territory occur
since 1967, Carter concr
that if he were Israels
mier, he would not with
from the Golan Heights orj
Jewish and Christian
places in Jerusalem.
Harris said that the V&<
not impose a peace <
Middle East and challenge
incentives President Fort
Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger are using to
agreements.
HE SAID the U.S. shot*
come financially inwlv*
regional development
Mideast rather than pro
arms and nuclear plants to
A"*s
He said irmade no s#*J
supply planes and tanks w,
rael and then talk abort
viding the Arabs with "
ticated arms to knoc*
out. He said he was n*
gesting that the 0*1
stop supplying arms to
but he ud they shou*
providing them to l$e **


Irriday. January 30, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
I '
[Sew American Friends of Hebrew U. t*zm*
Chapter Hears Ambassador Softer
A [-ledge that Israel will not
I yield to pressure regarding the
Palestine Liberation
i was made by Ovadia Staf-
fer, Israeli envoy to the United
tion
Nations, at the inaugural din-
ner of the Hollywood-Hallan-
dale Chapter of the American
KrfeiH* of t* H-h~w Uni-er-
fty held at the Diplomat Coun-
Principals in the inaugural dinner of the Hollywood-Hal-
landale Chapter of the American Friends of the Hebrew
University, held at the Diplomat Country Club, are ob-
viously pleased with the success of the function which
attracted 250 leaders of the South Broward Jewish com-
munity. From left are Otto Stieber, president of the new
chapter, which supports the Hebrew University of Jeru-
salem; Mrs. Jules Gordon of Hollywood; Mr. Gordon, vice
president of the chapter; and Ovadia Soffer, Israeli en-
to the United Nations, who was the guest speaker.
Congratulations are extended to the newest Founders
of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem by leaders of the
American Friends at the dinner at which officers of the
Hollywood-Hallandale Chapter were installed. From left
are Seymour Fishman of New York, executive vice pres-
ident of the American Friends of the Hebrew University;
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Weiner of Hollywood, Founders of
Israel's oldest and largest university; Dr. Max Kampel-
man of Washington, D.C., national president of the Amer-
ican Friends; and Moses Hornstein of Hollywood, honor-
ary president of the Hollywood-Hallandale Chapter who
served as dinner chairman.
DRS. GOULD, MILLER, and GURLAND, P.A.
Internal Medicine & Cardiology
announce the association of
STEWART 0. SHULL, M.D.
for the practice of
Internal Medicine A Gastroenterology
Suite 300, 2500 East Hallandalo loach Boulevard
Hallandale, Florida 33009
305-925-7766
NEW!
Acoustical Vinyl
CEILING SPRAY
ve New Life to OW er Cracked Ceiltoa*
*V OFFICES & HOMES # NEW CONSTRUCTION
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE 989-3983
Drywdl FtMtoftof Heme
BOWERS & SONS
Iked 1.1red
try Club.
Ambassador Soffer, a member
of the permanent Israeli delega-
tion to the UN since 1971, said,
"'The continuing slaughter of
innocent Christian civilians in
Lebanon by Palestinian terror-
ists and left-wing Moslems puts
the lie to the Arab myth which
calls for Israel to surrender her
statehood and be absorbed into
a secular country where Jews,
Christians and Moslems can live
together in peace and har-
mony."
Dr. Max Kampelman of Wash-
ington, D.C., national president
of the American Friends, said
that world Jewry is solidly be-
hind Israel's firm stance "in the
face of further obscene acts by
the United Nations.
"Recognition of the PLO and
the resolution equating Zionism
and racism were but a part of
the unfortunate pattern which
has marked the steady deterior-
ation of the UN," Kampelman
said.
Highlight of the evening was
the installation of Hallandale re-
ligious and civic leader Otto
Stieber as president of the new
Hallandale-Hollywood Chapter,
which will coordinate efforts
throughout the South Broward
area on behalf of the New He-
brew University of Jerusalem.
Others participating in the
program included Moses Horn-
stein, honorary president of the
chapter and national vice pres-
ident of the Synagogue Council
of America, who was dinner
chairman; Seymour Fishman of
New York, executive vice pres-
ident of the American Friends;
Max M. Low, executive commit-
tee chairman; Herbert Katz,
chairman of the chapter's board
of directors; and Albert A. Dor-
ner, southeastern regional di-
rector of the American Friends.
Stieber said the new organi-
zation will play a major role in
support of Israel's oldest and
largest university through a
year-round program.
Alien Residents
The United States Postal Serv-
ice is cooperating with the Im-
migration and Naturalization
Service in assisting all aliens to
comply with the Alien Address
Report requirements.
E. H. Daws, Sectional Center
Manager/Postmaster of Miami,
said that report cards (Form I-
53) are now available at local
post offices, branches and clas-
sified stations throughout South
F lorida.
In compliance with the 1952
Immigration and Naturalization
Act, each alien residing in the
United States as of January 1,
1976, must report his or her cur-
rent address not later than Jan-
uary 31, 1976.
IRVING EISENSTEIN
Accountant
Income Tax Services
Moved from 4525 Sheridan St
to 2514 Hollywood Blvd.
Dtvilopm tnt Corporation BMg.
Room 501
Telephone Numbers:
Residence Office
962-5529 920-3412
JM'S ONCE-A-YEAR OPPORTUNITY
OVER 263 DISCONTINUED STERLINl
SILVER FLATWARE PATTERNS
MADE-TO-ORDER FROM TOWLE,
GORHAM, INTERNATIONAL, LUNT,
REED & BARTON AND WALLACE
Now's the time to order additional pieces
of your inactive sterling silver flatware patterns.
Each piece will be made for you and you alone. .
To insure perfect duplication, please bring
in a sample piece of your silver. Order today
for delivery in October. Offer good through February 28th.
Silver, at alt jm stores except lauderhill



Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 30. i976
BIST RESULTS IVlR-lXCtPT DURING YOH KIPPU* WAR
Israel Bonds Provided Over $277 Million
In '75 for Israel's Economic Development
In 1975 the Israel Bond Or-
ganization produced in excess
of $277 million in cash for the
development of Israel's eco-
nomy. This represents the larg-
est amount obtained in one year
except for 1973, the year of the
Yom Kippur War. The an-
nouncement was made by Mil-
ton M. Parson, executive direc-
tor. South Florida Israel Bond
Organization.
Parson said the results of last
year's Israel Bond campaign
surpassed the figure realized in
1974 in communities in the
United Stales, Canada. Western
Europe and elsewhere in the
free world, and is considerably
in excess of the amount realized
in 1967, the year of the Six-Day
War.
THE MOST important single
event contributing to this year's
successful effort. Parson ex-
Dlainei, was the response by
the Jewish communities in the
countries where Israel Bonds
are sold. He observed that "the
heightened reaction to Israel's
crucial economic needs" by the
Jewish communities was "a con-
crete demonstration of their
determination to stand with
Israel in a critical period in her
historv."
Parson also pointed out that
another key element of the cam-
paign in 1975 was the "excep-
tional showing1* by the Institu-
tion*' seetoi, which *wss tesoon-
siMe for'tfce sate of S79 rnRTtan
worth of IsraeT-BOnds'to banks
funds, latter unions,
communal institutions and m
dowment funds.
Robert
campaign
Miami Israel
L- 6iegel is ^^
chairman. Greita
el Bond Organs
tion; William Liftman is chair'
man. Sooth Broward board of
gotwiaors; -Robert M. Utmnl
is chairman. North Browr*
board1 ot governors.
Pacesetters Dinner Kicks Off Foreign Correspondent Gervmi To Keynote
'76 Campaign
Combined from Page 1-
are you. Your sons are not
expected to die on our bor-
ders. We have chosen to live
in Israel, and this is our re-
sponsibility. We ask only that
you lend us your support, to
feel deeply the essence of the
slogan "We Are One," Fried-
man concluded.
Pacesetter cochainnan was
Melvin H. Baer. The arrange-
ments committee included Mrs.
Sherman Katz. Mrs. Stanley
Margulies. Mrs. Theodore New-
man, Sydney Holtzman, George
Paley and Otto Stieber.
Temple Beth El Dinner rof Sfctte
Journalist, foreign corres-
pondent and author Frank Ger- :
vasi will keynote the Temple
Beth El Israel Dinner of State
on Sunday, Peb. 1, at 7 p.m. in
the Tobin Auditorium at Tem-
ple Beth El in Hollywood.
i
Mr. and Mrs. Morse Ep-
stein of LaMer.
Civic and community leader
Melvin H. Baer, president of :
Baer's Furniture Stores in
Dania and Fort Lauderdale, will
receive the State of Israel Da- j
vid Ben-Gurion Award for his
service in advancing Israel's .
progress and welfare through
economic development pro-
grams made possible by State
of Israel Bonds.
i
Nathan Pritcher (left), dinner chairman; Herbert D.
Katz, Federation president; Lewis E. Cohn, general cam-
paign chairman.
GERVASI achieved promin- I
ence during World War II for!
his coverage of the major fight- '
ing fronts. He was associate
editor of "Collier's,' and after
the war served me State De-'
partment as chief of informa-'
tion in Rome tor theMarshall I
Plan. His syndicated column on 1
world affairs, distributed three!
----- -H
times a week by the World
Wide Press Service, has ap-
peared in major newspapers
throughout tha country.
A formerdirector of the
Motion Picture Export Asso-
ciation of America, he is au-
thor of "The Case for Israel,"
"War Has Seven Faces," "Bat
Soldiers Wondered," "Big Gov-
ernment" and "To Whom
Palestine." He Is at work on a
biography of Adolf' Hitler for
Hawthorn Books.
Dinner chairman Nathan
Pritcher' said that it is indeed
an honor to pay tribute to Mel
Baer. the recipient of the Scroll
of Honor at the Parker Phwa
*Night in IsraeP' and of the
Jewish ':ommunity Service
iAward from the American J?w-
Jsh Committee of Broward
County.
FRANK GERVASI
New BW B'rith Lodge
Elects Leon Moel President
Proofs of Pacesetter photos
are available at the Jewish
Federation of South Brow-
ard, Inc., or by calling the
Federation offices, t a la-
phone 921-8810.
Leon Moel was recently,
elected president of the newly
formed B'nai B'rith lodge at
LaMer Condominium.
Guest speaker was Burnett
Roth, vice chairman of the
Civil Rights Committee of the
Anti-Defamation
B'nai B'rith.
League d\
This is the first time in the!
historv of the Eastern Division
of B'rrai B'rith that a lodge w|
formed with 85 charter meo-j
bers.
Residents of Galahad Coatt.
i I,
Martin R. Horwit, M. A.
CLINICAL A0DIOLOGIST
. wishes to announce the opening of
the new
Hearing and Corrmtiimlcation Disorders

Laboratory of Hollywood
2122 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD
HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
(305) 923-4327
COMPLETE HEARING EVALUATIONS AVAILABLE
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY
READ THIS!!
ORDER BRAND NEW
CADILLAC
1
(THRU BROKW)
You pay close to dealers cost.
Trades Accepted. Contact Tom
Sawyer 943-3777 for further
Information.
South oldest Automobile
Brokers since 1945.
AKSOUXCim THE OPEXIXG OF]
UNIQUE CERAMICS
2930 S.W. 30th AVENUE
PEMBROKE PARK JUST WEST OF 1-95
ITALIAN A DOMESTIC TILES
MARBLE QUARRY TILE
HVEON STAGE-EVERYDAY is i.-r/
NEW SHOW EVERY FRIDAY
SRAELI INTERNATIONAL
*. M star
%% MAX
**' PERLMAN
and his International Revue
Ptu* EXTRA ADOEO ATTRACTIONS
L WOLF ORCHESTRA and A FEATURE FILM
ON SCREEN. 46 MAO ADVENTURES Of RABBI JACOBS
IBEACH
Theater :
26 i.rttuLi RD


Friday. January 30, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shoiar o1 Greater Hollywood
Page 7
'W'W'W'WrfWrfW'W^W'W-
? Ask Abe ?
Area Community Leaders Participate
In Conference wi th Yitzhak Rabin
Q_\Ve read in the Bible
many instances of our Bibli-
cal Patriarchs and others
having more than one wfe.
How long is it since mono-
gamy is in existence in Jew-
ish practice?
MARY BECKER
Hollywood
A -'.he Bible reflects a poly-
gamous society which was a
pa' aient custom in the ancient
Near East. Many instances are
cited of a man having more
than cne wife and concubines.
Hcwever. the household of
Isaac was monogamous. It is
regarded as a model home in
Jewish tradition. Indeed, the un-
derlying ethos of the Creation
story in Genesis is essentially
monogamous. Chapter 31 in the
Book of Proverbs pays tribute
to a 'Woman of Valor.'' reflect-
ing a monogamous practice.
Moreover, economic factors
applicable especially during the |
Fir: Temple perioa were re-1
tponsioie (or the increasing j
practice of monogamy. Acced-
ing ;o the Encyclopaedia Ju- ]
sorae men refrained
to :.u i:ig ir.ui'e than uiu wife |
because of an explicit agree-
ment they had made with thei
li..-: wife. This custom is re-1
beted in Babylonian and As-1
jnts of the era i
{Vol. 12, pp. 253, 259;.
POLYGAMY WAS p-acticed !
luxurious courts of the
first Jewish Kings, and the.
i of Solomon's concubi- \
Des is recorded.
However, the society reflect-
ed in the Talmud is essentially'
moryga-nous. Only a handful of'
rabbi? are recorded as having
more than one wife. Jewish life
I sr reflects the ideal of |
gamous society.
first official prohibition
on polygamy, promulgated ap-
prcv nately in the year 1000 of
the common era, is known in
Jewish life as "Cherem DRab-
benu Gershom" (a ban with a
threat of excommunication to
violators, promulgated by our
I'"Cher, Rabbi Gershom).
Rabbi Gershom ben Judah
M9<>5-1028 c.e.) was a leading
lalmudic authority fn Westers
Europe. He headed a rabbinic
academy in Mainz, where he
'"id the foundations of the tra-
ction of Ashkenazi scholarship.
Many ordinances regulating the
ilJe of European Jewry bear his
I Mme.
THE REGULATION (prohib-
" Polygamy; became the le-
- tatus of marriage is Ju-
'' was accepted by Ash-
; (Central and Eastern
I Halachic authorities
^s the accepted practice
me Ashkenazi communities.
I' ^e Sephardic communities,
C including Provence,
; North Africa and the
I -i.taj commiinitias. the prac-
i ot polygamy continued.
tab5shPmIe"!ine; prior to
""'.'snment of the State of Is-
hamv10 1948' P0'***"* or C
the l-Waf extn,elTrare in
I m 1951 g,v,ng equal rights
I women also contains a pro-
Ihibition against marrying more
(than one wife.
11 s interesting to note that
another of the regulations bv
Rabbi Gershom includes a ban
against reading letters address-
ed to others.
Editor's ncte:
Please send questions to
FrAbK ALSrt
c/o Jewish Federation of
South Broward
283S Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood. Florida 33020
A contingent of Jewish com-
munity leaoers from the South
Florida and Caribbean area are
participating in a conference
with Israel's Prime Minister
Yitzhak Rabin and other Cabi-
net leaders on the country's
economic needs and problems
in 1976. The opening session
was in Brussels on Jan. 11.
About ,250 Jewish leaders
from the United States, Canada
and the Caribbean are partici-
patinp in the Prime Minister's
Israel Bonds Conference. The
purpose is to plan a program
to increase *r participation of
foreign Jewish communities in
alleviating the pressures on Is-
rael's economy resulting from
a lecord high defense budget
and a $3.5 billion balance-of-
payments deficit, according to
Robert L. Sieg.-l, general cam-
paign chairman. Greater Miami
Israel Bond Organization.
The local leaders will meet
with the Prime Minister Rabin.
Deputy Prime Minister and For-
eign Minister Yigal Allon. Fi-
nance Minister Yehoshua Rabi-
nowitz. Defense Minister Shi-
mon Peres and other Israeli
leaders.
For the first time .n the 25-
year history of the Israel Bond
program tbe conference is meet-
ing in Europe, focusing atten-
tion on the ODDortunities for ex-
panded Israeli trade with Eu-
rope as a result of the 197S
tariff agreement with the Com-
mon Market that will lift all
barriers on Israeli goods by the
middle of 1977.
The principal objectives of the
conference are to cemonstrate
Israel's urgent need for exports
and energy and to maintain its
deterrent strength to prevent
any new outbreak of war, said
JSiegel.
New
Sensational
Cookbook
from
The Liqueur
of Israel
Now you, too, can discover tbe magic of Sabra
the international liqueur from Israelas a
delicious "secret" ingredient for some of the
most unique taste tempters ever created. In
the phenomenal response to the Sabra Inter-
national Recipe contest, over 8000 adventur-
ous and enthusiastic cooks throughout
America sent in recipes for unusual appetiz-
ers, entrees, snacks and desserts using Sabra.
The very best recipes were selected, after care-
ful study, by Gourmet Magazine experts for
inclusion in this exciting 112 page book. And
here it is! For just $1 you can get a copy to
start you on your way to fame for cuisine ala
Sabra! While you're waiting for your cook-
book to arrive, b-y this superb recipe as a pre-
view of what appetizing delights are in store!
Sabra Apple rntle.s
6 appks
1/4 cup Sabra
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1 egg. separated
2 teaspoons sugar
1/2 cup milk
I cup flour
r, teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon sail
Confectioners sugar
2 teaspoons sugar ^.Combine Sabra aft*
Pare .p,*, c* ^^STS.** TSl om
-sK^,-^i-*--'-,*""-",iM:
To: Sabra Cookbook, Depi. H,
P.O. Box 5263, Hicksvilk, N.Y. 11816
Enclosed is JI. (No stamps, please.) Please send-the exciting
new Sabra Cookbook to:
Dept.F
NAME.
AODKKSS.
CITY_____
STATE.
Nq proof of purchase atefssary. Void where prohibited
.2U>.
Sabra...tbe exotic liqueur from Israel.
With the distinctive flavor of ripe Jaffa
oranges, laced with rich chocolate.
mrucrao ano aomiD bv
AVtNUE IMfC*!*. JU FA** AVtNU*. N.Y*.. >J Hour


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 30
T 30. 197|
Jewish Federation Campaign Events
La Mer Honoring Feldman, Golden
On Sunday, Feb. 1, at 11 a.m.
;LaMer Condominium will honor
two of the Jewish community's
'most dedicated members with
< brunch.
Jceph Felcman, former De
troit businessman, who had
been active in United Jewish
Appeal campaigns in the city
of Detroit, continued that ded-
ication in South Florida. He
has worked hard for the sur-
vival and betterment of Jews
throughout the world.
Louis Golden was the recipi-
ent of -he Prime Minister's
Medal in 1973 and the Jewish
Theological Seminary Commu-
nity Service Award in 1974.
Golden works with commit-
ment and dedication for all
Jews.
High-Rise chairman is Otto
Steiber, general chairman for
LaMer Buildings is Reuben
Goldstein. Chairman for East
Building is Leo Lafer, chair-
man for the South Building is
Sydney Jacobs.
Speaker for the event will be
Dr. Avraham Avi-Hai.
Hemispheres
Brunch
A brunch will be held in the
Hemispheres Ocean South Ball
Room on Feb. 8 at 11 a.m.
Chairman is Abe Lewis, and
Henry Levy is to be guest
speaker.
Plaza Towers
Brunch
David Brecker and Sigmund
Rubin will be honored by the
Plaza Towers Condominium at
a brunch on Feb. 1 at 11:30 a.m.
Chairman for the event is
Joseph D e u 18 c h, honorary
chairman is Nathan Greenberg.
North Building chairmen are
Mrs. David Brecker, Mrs. Irv-
ing Suss and Max Taraza. South
Building chairmen are Isaac
Brcssler and Emanuel Prouse.
Plaza lowers guest speaker
will be Shlomo DJcel.
Diplomat Towers
Brunch
Diplomat Towers has planned
a brunch for Feb. 1 at ln.
Shlomo Dekel. \ *
' rhatar-an :s Samue;
cocnairmen are Ben AxelroJ
Mrs. Djris Clyman, Mrs. Kuta
Gering, Mrs. Florence Good,
man, Mrs. Tina Peyton 1
Mrs. Beatrice L. Weiss.
Aquarius
Brunch
The guest speaker at the
Aquarius Condominium bruo*
on Feb. 8 at 10 a.m. in fc
Aquarius Social Hall will h
Refey Blumenfeld. Chairman
Paul Weiner.
The Israel Emergency Fund-United Jew-
ish Appeal of the Jewish Federation of
South liroward met on Sunday at DeSoto
Park Condominium. Guest speaker was
Col. Moshe Diskin, former Israeli Army
officer. Pictured (from left) are DeSoto
chairman Carl Rosenkoff, cochairmen
Charles Walter and Leo Distenfield; also
shown are Rose Kessler, Bernice Kelner,
Celia Apat and Fritz Einstein. Joseph
Kleinman was honored at the event,
sponsored by the Jewish Federation of
South Broward.
Presidential Towers held a brunch on Sunday, Jan. 11.
Honored guest was Ann Wildstein. The speaker for Pres-
idential Towers was William Tannenbaum (2nd from
right). Also shown are cochairman Lou Rosen (left), Mrs.
Ruby and Carolyn Davis (right).
U.S. To Cut...,
Continued from Page 1
justify assistance to those coun-
tries which favored the anti-
Zionist resolution. Funseth said
be was unaware whether that
report has been completed.
THE RETURN of Congress!
last Sunday from its year-end j
recess was expected to bring'
about a clarification of the Ad-
ministration's position on the
aspects of aiding countries con-
sistently in opposition to the
U.S.
The foreign aid programs
have yet to run the gauntlet of
both authorization and appro-
priation legislation. In this pro-
cess, specific policy is expected
to be formu!atid by the Admin-
istration for Congressional ap-
proval.
Parker Plaza Condominium held a brunch honoring Mor-
ris Markman on Jan. 18. Chairmen were Lou Daniels,
Max Lieberman, Charles Pierson, Leo Schuster. Chair-
men of captains were Elias Baum (standing, right) and
Samuel Reckler. The guest speaker was Henry Levy
(seated, right). Also shown are Lewis Cohn (standing,
left) and Paul Nestel (seated, left).
ESCORTED TOUR
ISRAEL & LONDON APR. 26-MAY 17
SUPERIOR FOUR STAR HOTEIS
16 NIGHTS IN ISRAEL, 4 NIGHTS IN LONDON
Local transfers to and from Miami Airport, Round trip air via
British Airways, Full sightseeing in Israel and London by air-
conditioned bus, including entrance fees, Breakfast and dinner
in Israel, breakfast in London, All transfers and porterage.
per person, dbl. occupancy,
plus $3 tax
Above rate based
on 36 passengers
AVENTURA TRAVEL BOUTIQUE, INC.
2962A Aventura Blvd., North Miami Beach. FL 33180
Telephone: Dade 931-6600 Broward 525-0675
SKY LAKE TRAVEL, INC.
750 N.E. 195th St., North Miami Beech. Fl 33179
Telephone: Dade 653-1010 Broward 525-3163
$1339
Lake Point Towers will honor Judge Maxwell M. Stern
(2nd from left) at a breakfast on Sunday, Feb. IS, at the
Newport Pub Restaurant. Chairman is Seymour Moses
(2nd from right), cochairman is Jack Miller (left).
George Palcy (right) is Hallandale Area chairman.
Israeli Forces
In New Fullback
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israeli forces withdrew
without incident from a desert salient in Sinai at the
northern end of the Gulf of Suez. The area, which
consists of sand dunes and contains no military instal-
lations, is the first that will be handed back to Egyp-
tian military forces tinder the Israeli-Egyptian interim
accord signed in September.
Egyptian military units are expected to enter the
evacuated zone 48 hours after the Israeli departure.
The Ras Sudar and Abu Rodeis oilfields and the coastal
strip linking them were handed over to Egyptian civil-
ian administration several weeks ago. The next Israeli
withdrawal under terms of the interim agreement will
be carried out in 13 days when Israeli forces pull out
of the Balooza area in northern Sinai.
NOW SHIPPING
MINEOLA TANGELOS
ANGIE'S GROVES
BONDED GIFT FRUIT SHIPPERS
1328 SOUTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY
PHONE; 927-5447
1 LB. COCONUT PATTIES Shipping Pink and White Seedle*
Grapefruit, and Navel Oranges
Indian River Finest


priday, January 30, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9

\_...J.~


At a brunch at Imperial Towers on Jan. 18 Walter Gart-
ner (right) was honored for his service and commitment
:<> :kc Jewish community. Chairman jor the event was
Herman Salners. Cochairmcn were: North Building, Leon
Lear; East Building, Jacob Edwab; West Building, Herb-
ert Guild. The speaker was Col. Moshe Diskin.
DAIA Raps
Univ. Rector's
Statements
BUENOS AIRES (JTA)
DAIA has protested to the Rec-
tc- of Buenos Aires National
University, Eduardo Mangian-
te, a^inst the anti-Semitic
statements of Horacio Calde-
ron. the University's newly ap-
p inted press director.
Ir, ?. t.'legram to Manpiante.
Nehemiaj F.esnizky and
>. C amji, president and
acting secretary of the DAIA.
e>p:essed astonishment that;
the Rector 'did not repudiate
Calderon's statements -which.
thev said, were incitements to
cr ii strife.
The DAIA also protested to
th.' Argentine Interior Minis-
ter, Dr. Angel Federico Roble-
do. who is chairman of the
Ji:sticialist (Peronist) Party,
< <: the recent proliferation of
anti-Semitic acts.
CALDERON, who is a leader
ff the Peronist Youth organ-
ization, alleged that interna-
tional Judaism was a sinister
force behind disorders in Ar-
gentina and the world at large.
He made that charge in his
n w book 'Argentina Judia,"
(.It-wish Argentina) and in a
speech at a press reception
here two weeks ago where the
book \-rs formally introduced.
The reception was held at
the Eva Peron House, head-
quarters of the Justicialist
Party. The DAIA leaders said
lalderon was trying to create
the impression that the party
indorsed his views.
LEASE OR PURCHASE!!
76 CAD'LLAC CONVERTIBLES
"LAST OF THE BREED"
In our warehouse for immediate
"le or Mm th* following It
Eldorado Convertibles. Drivo ono
home today.
1 Firemist Red, Firemist
1 Crystal Blue, Whit*
1 Ivory, Ivory
1 Firemist Red, White
Also, on display In our warehouse
lor your Inspection the follow-
lnS '76 Eldorado Convertibles.
1 Metallic Blue, White
1 Black, Black
1 Firemist, White
1 Commodore Blue,White
Priced from S7SS7.77 or lease from
WS-tt p,,. month. n1
'< Convertibles)
GOLD COAST
AUTO BROKERS
WHOLESALER'S AND
LESSORS SINCE 1*48"
817 8. DIXIE HWV. EAST
r>0WfANO BEACH
Weekdays til S Sundsys 1 -S
4M777
Eban Due
To Join
Gov't. Again
Continued from Page I
question of a possible change
in PLO ideology, in his recent
interview with "Nouvel Ob-
senateur," he cautiously ad-
mitted that a radical change
in the PLO would prompt Is-
rael into a re-evaluation, too.
He said such a change would
have to include abandonment
of the "Palestine Covenant"
and was therefore "very, very
hypothetical."
NEVERTHELESS, the doves,
such as Aharon Yariv, saw the
Rabin statement as a significant
shift. Yariv's own "formula,"
which first broached the Pales-
tinian debate in Israeli politics,
also conditioned talks with the
PLO upon its abandonment of
those parts of the Covenant
that speak of Israel's destruc-
tion.
Eban. in an interview before
leaving for the U.S., in effect
esnoused the "Yariv formula"
but stressed that he, like Ra-
bin, firmly opposed a third
state between Israel and Jor-
dan.
Two coffees were held on Jan. 14. At the home of Linda
Levine (left) were Mrs. Harriet Wellikoff and Mrs.
Cherri Rothchild. At Golden Surf Condominium the host
committee included (seated, below) G. Lazier, F. Rosen,
M. Winner and (standing) A. Weissberg, E. Cohn, M.
Marmelstein, B. Eisenstat, P. Schwartz and M. Stander.
Established
1957
Published by Falls Poultry Corporation, South Falraburg, N.Y. 12779
MlWl
TODAYS WEATHER
Perlecl tor
Chicken Dinners
CONSUMER PRAISE SWAMPS
FALLS KOSHER CHICKEN
Kosher Clean Story
Scores With Consumers...
Th* overwhelming
praise Falls Kosher
Poultry has received
from the public Is proof
that Kashruth quality
and wholesomeness
are of #1 Importance to
the consumer.
Falls Kosher Poultry's
double guarantee of
quality and wholesome-
ness has duly impressed
the consumer public.
Few consumer prod-
ucts are put through the
rigorous testing every
Falls Kosher Chicken
must go through In or-
der to reach your mar-
ket Full-time Federal
Inspectors are con-
stantly on the premises
making sure that every
chicken meets the high
standards of the United
States Department of
Agriculture.
The highest stand-
ards of Kashruth are
guaranteed under the
exacting supervision of
Rabbi H. Solnica. Every
chicken is individually
examined Inside and
out before, during and
after slaughtering, in
accordance with the
strict laws of Kashruth,
by qualified, trained
and observant Shoctim.
BUBBA'S SOUP BACK
BY POPULAR DEMAND
Bubba Is kvelling (yiddish
tor very happy) everyone
is raving about hex chicken
soup recipe.
Mrs. Anne Glickman of
New York writes: "My hus-
band and I just moved here
from California and in all
our travels we have never
tssted a better soup."
Because Bubba feels
that some of you might
have missed her recipe, we
decided to offer It once
more. Bubba's soup made
with a Falls Kosher Chick-
en is not only wholesome
and nutritious, It tastes
good. Keep Bubba kvelling
- write now for your free
recipe._______________
fSffl less ftr litki's sld litk-
is.ts Ckkkta sej|s ftcist-
FsHt Ptstlnr etr. $. Fallsfcsri,
H.T. 12771 seta
REPORT
TO THE CONSUMER
Jewish law requires that
continuously flowing cojd
water be used fining 9
processing, soaking, salt-
ing, draining and the three
rinses.
Health experts consider
it highly praiseworthy that
every chicken is examined
for any sign of disease or
any other pathological
condition.
The two seals on every
. Falls-United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture ap-
proved Kosher chicken
means unsurpassed qual-
ity and whc4esoroeness.
It'8
Kosher
clean!
Fslb Poultry Corp. Se Fslhbwi. N.Y
Ask ter yssr Fate Kssktr Fssltry at year Iscal taker Market


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January
30,
IHF Financial Seminar To Hear
Fiscal Expert and Attorney
Experts in financial and es-
tate planning will participate
in a seminar sponsored by the
Israel Histadiut Foundation
(IHF) of South Florida on
Thursday. Feb. 12. at 8 p.m..
at the Holiday ban on South
Oc:an D.ive in Hollywood
Beach.
Rabbi Morton Malavsky,
chairman of the South Brow-
aid IHF Council, said the sem-
inar "Planning for Our Matur-
ing Years," is free and open to
the public, but reservations
must be made through the Hol-
lywood Histadnit office.
Sam Shulsly. financial expert
and nationally syndicated col-
umnist, will be among the par-
ticipants. His King Features
column. "Investors Guide." is
published locally by the "Fort
Lauderdale News."
9AM ti(JU>KV
BROTHERHOOD WEEK OBStXVANCE
Hillcrest B'nai B'rith Women
Planning Interfaith Panel
They are Father EJward A.
" 'i 'f St. .cU'nh?n\s Catholic
Chu-ch. Rabbi D-. Saivie] Z.
: IVmpL' Beth El. and
William Vassjy of ^irst
Presb; t..i..n Church.
On Monday. Feb. 16, at noon
ves and fri.'nds of merp-
ben of Hillcrest Chanter of
Bnai B'ikh Women will attend
a meeting in observance
:.'ierhood Month at tht Hill-
crest Playdium.
Rose (Mrs Leon I.' EhrHch,
Anti-Defamation League chair-
man, is planning and will serve
as moderator for an intorfaith
panel discussion in which H"l-
lywood clergy of three faiths
will participate.
The panel will rhfuusa the
rtn ni the Church to
n n-Ch istian religions and
hew to pro\ ide an opportunity
far baiter mutual understanding
.: oog all faii'ii.
A qU!Stion-and-answor period
wiil follow.
William Littman (2nd from right), chairman of the South
Broward board of governors, is $hawn with Mrs. Unman
wearing the Eleanor Roosevelt Humanities Award Medal
following the presentation to him by Milton M. Parson
(right), director of Israel Bonds for South Florida, at the
recent B'nai B'rith Israel Bonds "Night in Israel" at the
Hemispheres. More than $60,000 in sales were reported
that night. Also shown in the picture is Lou levitan
(left), president of Hemispheres Lodge, B'nai B'rith.
Rabbi David Shapiro (left), spiritual leader of Temple
Sinai, presented the State of Israel David Ben-Gurion
Award to Jacob and Beatrice MogUowitz on behalf of the
South Florida Israel Bond Organization campaign at the
Temple Sinai-Israel Dinner of State on Dec. 21 at the
Temple Sinai Auditorium. More than 200 congregants
paid tribute to the Mogilowitzes. The was president of
Temple Sinai for six years and she'has served on the
board of the Temple Sinai Sisterhood, .
ALSO 6N the program will
be Hollywood attorney Phyllis
Diickraan. A member of the
probate and trust commit-
sies of the Florida Bar As-
sociation. Mrs. Diickman will
speak on estate planning and
latfs affecting women.
Dr. Sol Stein, noted econo-
mist and authority on personal
financial planning, will discuss
taxation and deferred giving.
Or. Stein is national president
of the Histadrut Foundation.
Among some of the seminar
topics are "Stocks, Bonds and
Mutual Funds: Are They For
Me?", "How To Save Income
and Estate Taxes Through Trust
Funds," "How To Reduce Your
Taxes While Increasing Your
Income" and "How To Increase
Your .Spendable Income."
Letters To
The Editor
EDITOR, Floridinn-Shofar:
The presidents of our Jewish
national organizations are do-
ing their utmost, individually
and collectively, to help the
State of Israel. This applies to
public-relations efforts to win
the support of our country and
the finances so urgently need-
ed to maintain the economy of
lb: at'l.
However, ira spite of the econ-
omy of Israel, their government
is greatly concerned about the
falling off of emigration from
the Soviet Union and the West-
ern world, including the United
States. The time has come to
consider and promote Aliya as
well as public-relations and
fund-raising efforts.
In spite -of tire tact that Is-
rael is a democratic state with
its various political parties and
representatives here and in
other countries, it seems to me
tbat they should consult" with
our leaders on Israeli problems
besides finacial needs, etc.
After all, there are times
when news reports indicate a
possible low f the support of
tbe U.S. doe to misunderstand-
ings and actions of the Israeli
leadership.
SAM PRY
Cr -it it
January 12, 1976
EPITOR, Floridiau-Shofar:
Ku mania, a small country',
outsmarted the Giant, the huge,
powerful nation, the U.S.A.,
President Gerald Ford and Dr.
Henry Kijsioger, and the State
Department, by promising to
ease the emigration, not only
for Jews, but for other nation-
alities who wish to leave the
Spv iet-Runanian regime.
This treachery was done in
order to secure from our Com-
merce Department the much-
sought trade agreement. And to
secure the trade act, which ex-
tended "most favored nation"
status to Rumania.
As soon as this was accom-
plished, the Bucharest regime
changed their ssiiad and can-
celed all vitas previously giv-
en. Now all emigration from
Rumania is at a standstill.
My opinion is that you can-
not trust any government con-
nected with the Soviet Union.
EDWARD A. DINCHy
EDITOR, Die Jewish Fle/idjaru
In your issue of Friday Jan.
16, there appeared an article
under "Great Jewish Pers Duali-
ties" emitted The Establish-
ment aqd Jewish Youth."
In my opmiou, this article
really highlighted a situation
existing in American Jewish so-
ciety today.
. THEODORE LIFSET
Carlebach Will Sing At
Temple Sinui, February 1
Shlomo Carlebach will vit
Temple Sinai at 1201 Johnson
St., Hollywood, on Sunday. Feb.
SHLOMO CARLEBACH
1, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets for the
concert are on sale at the Tem-
ple. -
Shlomo Carlebach is a world-
famous folksinger and phil-
osopher. As an ordained rabbi
and a descendent of an illustri-
ous and centuriss-old line of
Chassidic rabbis, he soon found
that his true medium was song.
He w.Ues and composes all of
his songs, which are based on
the wo:ds of the Prophets, and
panies himself on .he
B-'Jtar.
As a composer he has e-verg-
Tas one of the most-,ffinB-_|l
apt creators of ChaMldl'mp*|
since the inception of the\!5l
*nt in the 18th cental
followers of Chassidism^
in eetobratmg the gion**
God through song and fa*
and are als, character^
their stnet obaei^anceTJI
ish ritual. J*J
For many years Rabri c
lebach has been entertaiajJ
people everywhere, tbrou2|
his stories and his wanmhTI
with 13 long-playing recoral
to his credit and with memorial
of past concerts still vibratol
in the souls of Americans. (J|
nadians. Israelis, Europem]
South Africans, Australians,
As a scholar of Torah, RaiJ
Carlebach has been invited d|
over The world to spend tnd
with educational groups so thl
they may benefit from hal
learning in all facets of "Yii|
dishkeit."
And because of the univl
sality of the Jewish message,!
sects of all religions and all
cults have been moved by thai
message he imparts on such
topics as "love,'' "joy," "M
rearing of Children," "strength,"!
meditation." the Jewish boM
days as well as on Chtssidinj
Kabbalah and the Zohar.
Shlomo Carlebach's reputaj
tion as the "soul-singing rabbi'f
the "father oi modern CutJ
sidic music." and the "sKiaaJ
ing rabbi" has been earmd bfl
the excellence of his per!or>|
*nce.
Area Family Has Operated
Summer Camps for Years
Ccp Wohelo for girls, Camp
iomet for Boys and Comet
Trails for teenage boys are lo-
cated in the Blue Ridge Moun-
tains of Pennsylvania. For the
past 48 years the camps have
been owned and operated by
the'Levy family of Miami. Ber-
tha-Levy founded Camp Wohelo
in '1929 and tooK many girls
from the Miami area each sum-
aaer.
"In those days it was a long
train ride to our camp from
Miami," recalls Morgan Levy,
the director. "Now we are
puoud to have over fifty girls
and boy* from the Miami area
Hying to our camps in just a
short four-hour trip by plane
and bus."
The camps have grown from
12 girls in 1929 to 75 girls at
Camp WohelB,'r80*>oys *t Camp
Comet and 75 boys at Comet
Trails. The camps are complete-
ly separate, each having its own
Pool. lake, mess hall, and ath-
letic facilities.
chines, instant-replay TV. pno-l
rice walls and nationally raatVl
ed players as rhst.-icto:. Thai
is not only a g.eat s; for I
young peopl?. They can cte-l
tinue it all through their adsk]
lives.
"We offer a chall nge It) cMJ-l
dren. ag s 7-41, to enjov tj
camring evpei-nc-' that is mil
totally orient :J t social life,I
Water f'WH activities includuM
water-si- iing, boating, casot |
trips, rubber" raftina and sain-l
ming are taught and supervueil
by 9 water-safety instructors a I
each camp. Mountaui-cuintuf|
and backpacking are enjoyed If |
our older campers."
The boys' camps have a sd>|
ence program involving hail
radio, photography, physics anil
chemistry, rocketry, aviatkil
and electronics ... all planneil
in program of "learning cd|
be fun."
"Each camper must juccttjl
at our camps in some area our program. This plus goojl
supervision and a fun-hllI
camping experience are thai
keys to our success," says Mftr
"Tennis is one of our activi-
ties that we stress in our eight-
wei* program." continued tin. tWv,
H* direc,, V. b.ve .jgSSZTlS*.
-r-'d cayrts with ball ma- ter. on dan 26.
Broward Support Urged By
United Way's '76 Chairman
"We need to impress upon
each Broward resident how
wry much we need their sup-
port .this year," said Larry
Adams. 1076 .United Way cam-
paign chairman.
"Been-if we reach oyr $169
jnilhon goal and I feel con-
fident we will we still will be
SI75.000 short of -meeting the
minimum operating budget
needs of our 40 United Way
Mencies," Adams pointed out.
"We are looking to the resi-
dents. th* condominiumtownere,
toe smatil husineu people and
the professional people v> 8*1
their pledge cards in the iWM
as soon as possible becauti|
they alone will make "^Jjl
erations of the United l
agencies successful in l'7*- .-
The $Ltf9 nuUion goal m
AM as a realistic amount tnal
could be raised in BrowJI
County in this time of econom*]
problems.
"I am sure many pepl< f\
tended to pledge funds to wj]|
ed Way who fust pot it tR ing toe hoBday rush, and *l
feel we need to remind |
to da it now." Adams concru*M


Friday. January 30, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
Help Is Needed
ART CANON
Public Relations Director
Hallandale Jewish Center
Committee -for-Israel -
Emergency Fund
Those who have not" yet
responded to" Israel's call for
help to meet needs that are
urgent and immediate can do
so by turning in an old Israel
Bond or by' bringing a check
or cash to the Hallandale Jew-
ish Center office as their con-
tribution to the UJA-Israel
Emergency Fund.
February has been proclaim-
ed by our Mayor as Israel
Emergency Fund Month, a time
for mobilization for one pur-
pose to save Israel.
Although we are-' separated
by thousands of miles, all Jews
must realize that we are one
anJ that our future is tied in-
exorably with that of Israel.
E' ery inch of Israeli soil has
b:en drenched' with Jewish
blood. We must not allow it to
have been shed'in \'aln.
The Jewish homeland is the
homeland of all hotrleless Jews
and it will be defended to the
b:"-'r end by Israelis' who will
lay their lives on the line again
if it becomes necessary to do
so.
Can we refuse to lay our
dollars on the line?
Can we refuse to help in a
battle to preserve democracy
and freedom?
Cart we'refuse to say to Is-
rael: "Here T am.' Count on' me,
brother; I will help you to be
free- sd 'that Jews of the world
can'he1'free in an uncertain
world?"
Israel still stands in spite of
efforts by its enemies to de-
stroy it, only because Jews of
the world have always respond-
ed to a call for aid from their
homeland. We must continue
to respond so that the' citadel
of democracy in the Middle
East ran continue to be a haven
for* .he' persecuted and the op-
p:cssed
Everyone Is invited to come
to the Emergency Fund break-
fast honoring Helen Schwartz,
the wife' of Rabbi Harry E.
Schwartz, to stand together
with follow Jews and to con-
tribute to a worthy cause.
The breakfast will take place
at the Hallandale Jewish Cen-
ter, 416 NE 8th Ave., on Sun-
day, Feb. 1, at 10 a.m.
The Emergency Fund Drive
is being chaired by Maxwell
Stern, with Art Canon and Bess
Seldrn as cochairmen.

From left: Harriet Bloom, Gertrude Entin, Gerda Klein,
Gloria Hess, Eleanor Rabins.
Hittcrett Bruncheon
Hears Holocaust Survivor
Over 500 women attended
the annual bruncheon on Jan.
19 at Hiilcrest Country Club,
sponsored by' the Women's Di-
\Uion, Jewish Federation of
South Broward, and Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emer-
gency Fund.
Mrs. Sol Entin, chairman for
Hiilcrest for the pfct two
years and extremely actrv# Id
Jewish affairs, was the hem-'
oree.
Speaker of the day was
Gerda Weissman |Clein, a sur-
vivor of the Holocaust and
author of "All Birt My Life**
and "The Blue Rose-." She Hves
in Buffalo with her husband
and three children.
Actively involved in com*
rnunity affairs and vice presi-
dent of the Silver Cjrcle of
Rosary Hill College, Mrs. Klein
was named "Women of- the
"r" last year by the Coun-
Ci- of Jewish Women.
"I will not talk- about titan's
fatality, but of another aspect
the beauty,' love, friendship
nd humanity of our people,"
Klein begaft. She -moving-
ly recounted her experiences
during the Holocaust.
Mrs. Klein' said she is deep-
ly grateful to the United States
government for its stand on
the UN Zionism reso'.;tion.
Chairmen for the bruncheon
were Mrs. Joseph Bloom. Mrs.
Sor Entin; Mrs. Alvin Hess,
Mrs W'illmm Rabins; luncheon
ch*fnian,'MVs. Sara Ottenstein;
decorations chairman, Mrs.
Sidney Lerner; three-story
buildings chairmen: Mrs. Louis
Breeher, Mrs. Ada Lerner, Mrs.
David Rabins; five-story build-
ings chairmen: Mrs. Irving
Krassner, Mrs. Zelda Rubin,
Mrs. William Weitz; high-rise
buildings chairmen: Mrs. David
Berezin, Mrs. Sidney Rosen-
blatt'and Mrs. Irving Shanler.
The Hiilcrest bruncheon is
one of the1 largest campaign
events-'held' by the Women's
Division to- raise funds for Is-
rael's human neds.
Thd 1976 Jewish Federation
of South Broward Campaign
is expected to be the largest in
the history of South Broward.
Abba Eban Will Speak At
Dinner Honoring. Bronfman
_j
Abba Eban',' Israel's former
foreign minister and its first
Ambassador to the United Na-
tions, will deliver the major
address at the Anti-Defamation
League of B'naiB'rith's Bicen-
tennial of Freedom Award din-
ner honoring Edgar M. Bronf-
man on Thursday Feb. 5, at
6:30 p.m. it the Breakers Ho-
tel.
Robert' Cummings, dinner
chairman, made the announce-
ment" and' said that the- Bicen-
tennial of Freedom Award will
be* presented to Bronfman,
chairman of the board and chief
executr-e officer of the Sea-
gram Company; Ltd.; for "his
significant corttribotions to
freedom and its institutions in
three nations the United
States, Israel* and Canada."
The Award dinner opens the
League's 1976 National Execu-
tive Meeting in the same hotel
and inaugurates the nationwide
ABBA EBAN
ADL appeal for funds to con-
tinue the programs and -=erv-
iefs if the human relations
agency.
Describing Eban as "one of
the world's most respected
statesmen," Cummings said that
it" is particularly fitting that he
speak on this occasion because
"all of us who are committed
to the ideals and values of in-
dividual liberty and national
independence remember him
with pride as one of freedom's
most eloquent advocates in the
United Nations."
Declaring that Eban "is one
of the great figures of our
times," Cummings said that "he
is a man prodigal gifts who is
known for his scholarship and
literary ability as well as his
statesmanship."
Cummings went on to say
that the award to Bronfman
and the presence of Eban had
excited great interest through-
out the Palm Beach community
and that he expected a capacity
attendance at the event.
We'll Nix Word Changes-Rabin
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Yitzhak Rabin said
here that Israel has a peace
plan, that it recognizes that a
Palestinian problem exists but
that it is not the heart of the
Middle East conflict and that
the interim accord Israel sign-
ed with Egypt last Sept. 1 con-
tains great hopes for peace and
might be the real beginning
of peace.
Addressing the Israel Bond
Organization convention here,
Rabin, who will visit Washing-
ton at the end of the month,
said he hoped the U.S. would
stand by its commitment to
Israel to block any attempts to
change Security Council Reso-
lutions 242 and 338 during the
Council'" present de' ate on
the Mi..dle East.
ANY CHANGES, he warned,
would create- poritical chaos
From left: Adriehne Fiske, Bobbie Gotkin, Helen Cohan,
Norma Becker.
From left: Eteanor Handelman, Sue Singer, Dee Gillon,
Sylvia Abram, Florence Roth, Barbara Buchwald, Audrey
Melint, Judi White, Lois Feinberg.
Parlor Meetings Planned
Members of the Contribu-
tor. Patron; and Vanguard Dl-
M<:ons held an organizational
mating to plan Feb. 2-5 parlor
meetings featuring Howard
5tone as guest speaker.
at a parlor meeting on Feb. 11.
Her cohostesses wffl be Beverly
Hollander and'teeverry Baron.
Joyce Newman, president of
the Women's Division:' will be
Toby Lipton will be hostess -the speaker.
Toby Ltptorr(r\gfny and Joyce Newman, Women's Divi-
sion president. j _^_
in the Middle East and in the
entire world and their effects
would be felt in this region not
in terms of years but within
the next few months.
Rabin said that if Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat was
quoted correctly, his reported
remark in Cairo today that
Egypt would not raise an is-
sue if the Palestine. Liberation
Organization is not represented
at the Geneva conference, was
a stand that resulted from
Egypt's interim agreement with
Israel. Ke said Arab extremists
feared that agreement because
of its implications for a peace-
ful settlement.
Rabin, briefly outlining Is-
rael's policy, said Israel clear-
ly rejected the recent testi-
mony before a Congressional
committee by Assistant Secre-
tary of State for Near Eastern
Affairs Harold Saunders that
the Palestinian issue was the
core of the Middle East prob-
lem:
The heart of the conflict is
the lack of readiness on the
Arabs' part to reconcile them-
selves "to the existence of the
State of Israel, Rabin said. Un-
til they cross that Rubicon,- the
conRtet will continue.
HE SAID that the answer-to
the question, does Israel have
an overall peace plan, was yes,
but peace had to be preceded
by reconciliation. Israel is
ready for territorial conces-
sions in return for real peace,
Rabin said.
Another question, the Pre-
mier continued, is what is Is-
rael's solution to the Palestin-
ian problem? Although that is
not at the heart of the conflict,
Israel recognizes that it is a
problem that must be solved.
It should be solved in the
context of negotiations with
Jordan and possibly with the
participation of Palestinians on
the West Bank, Rabin said.
HE SAID that what Israel
expected of Jewish communi-
ties throughout the world was
that they do whatever has to
be done in support of Israel. If
they do "we can withstand and
overcome this Arab offensive,"
the Premier said.
The more than 250 Bond
leaders from tne U.S. and Ca-
nada arrived here yesterday
for the convention. On their
arrival, Rabin issued a state-
ment declaring that the "Is-
rael Bond Organization has
been a source of increasing
importance in every phase of
our economic development dur-
ing the past 26 years."


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, Januar
m
i3
h>
^'gbfrtttttftl flage
co-ordinate^ by the _
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz Rabbi Robert J. Orkand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
Veto Votes
Foster Cool Heads
By RABBI JONAH E. CAPLAN
North Miami Beach
Can the Rabbinical Associa-
tion of Greater Miami Speak for
ttll of Miami's Jewish Commu-
nity?
I say "NO." Because there are
questions that will not satisfy
some of the constituent bodies,
the Synagogue of America has
a constitutional provision that
gives each constitutent body a
veto vote. Without this veto vote
the Synagogue Council of Amer-
ica would not have lasted this
long.
For the same reason the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion cannot speak with one voice
for Miami Jewry.
In the world we live in we
have more disagreements than
agreements. That's why the UN
Security Council gives a veto
vote to the permanent members
of the body. The President of
the U.S.A. has a veto vote over
Congress.
However, where religious dif-
ferences arise, it is even more
of a serious matter.
The Conservative and Reform
rabbis do not agree with the
Orthodox on Halacha. They
don't even agree among them-
selves. The chasm is sometimes
very big and unbridgeable.
In order that tne readers may
better understand the issues
and answers, let me illustrate
what happened recently at a
rabbinical meeting.
The question was: Should the
Rabbinical Association tape a
TV program before a major
holiday like Passover, Succos
and Shevuos to be shown on
the holiday?
The more traditional rabbis
said "Definitely NOT." To the
credit of the Rabbinical Asso-
ciation, cool heads prevailed,
and the vote was not to tape and
no damage was done to the
organization.
If the traditional rabbis had
had a veto vote, the hot issue
could have been avoided.
The next time cool heads may
not prevail because each side
feels aggrieved when forced to
yield to the so-called opposition.
The Southern Jewish Experience
t Is Theme of New Novel
For more than a century
Southern novelists have created
some of America's most endur-
RONALD L. BERN
ing literature from the rich
fabric of life in the South. But
one important cultural and so-
cial thread has been largely
overlooked or ignored: Jewish
life in the South.
"The Legacy," a novel by
Ronald L. Bern, captures and
details the Southern Jewish
experience in what one review-
er called "one of the best nov-
els to come out of the South
>n the 70s."
, An epic spanning four gen-
erations, "The Legacy" is the
bittersweet story of the life and
limes of David Harris. The au-
thor follows David, a six-year-
old boy in 1942, through child-
hood, adolescence and young
i.innhood as he seeks to under-
stand the meaning of his own
lieritage, and at the same time
to find a place for himself in
Southern society.
Growing up in a warm Jew-
i.ih family, David is confronted
with his first taste of anti-
Semitism as he enters school.
America's entry into the war
*nd a series of inflammatory
editorials in the local newspaper
blaming all Jews for the coun-
try's involvement overseas lead
to a daily "fight-to-survive"
existence for the small boy.
These early experiences leave
David troubled. As he grows
older, his compassionate father
introduces him to facets of
Southern life that help him
bridge the cultural gap.
But it is Isaac Shulman. his
tough, autocratic immigrant
grandfather, who bequeaths to
his grandson his own powerful
sense of destiny and heritage.
The reader is transported
back and forth between David's
experiences, his parents', and
the family's bitter beginnings
in the "Old Country."
Vivid scenes of Isaac Shul-
man's 19th-century Russia
which "Publishers' Weekly" call-
ed "the affecting ones," con-
trast with confrontations with
the Ku KIux Klan in this novel
of timeless significance for
everyone seeking his own sense
of identity and place.
A Nov. 19 review in "The
Detroit Free Press" summed up
the new novel, published by
Mason/Charter, this way:
"While Been deals with four
generations of a proud Jewish
family and the struggles of
maintaining their heritage and
legacy, he has writen with great
detail and understanding one
of the most accurate views of
the macho, bigoted South of the
'30s, '40s and SOs I have ever
read.
"The hunting, the fishing, the
sports, the drinking the ethic
and mentality, the mood and
temper of the people and the
times. It's all there."
Ronald Lawrence Bern, au-
thor of "The Legacy." has deep
roots in the South. He grew up
in Anderson, S.C., and was grad-
uated with Bachelor's and Mas-
ter's degrees from the Univer-
sity of South Carolina.
He is president of Ronald L.
Bern Company, a New York con-
sulting firm. He has published
two works of non-fiction.
Inside Judaica
Q. What is the Biblical at-
titude toward miracles?
A. Biblical Hebrew has no
word corresponding to the Eng-
lish "'miracle" (Ex. 3:20; Josh.
3:5; Ps. 78:11; etc.), but, says
the authoritative Encyclopaedia
Judaica, the meaning of "won-
der" is much broader than
"miracle." A particular class of
miracles, however, can be con-
sidered as a definite biblical
concept, since it is designated
by terms of its own. These are
the '"signs," i.e., extraordinary
and surprising events which
God brought about in order to
demonstrate His power and will
in particular situations, when
men had to be convinced. A
sign can be given as proof of
prophecy. Thus the altar of
Beth-El collapsed as a sign that
the prophecy of its future de-
struction was true (I Kings 13:
1-16). The more important signs
occurred in Egypt: the staff
turned into a serpent to show
that Moses was indeed sent by
God (Ex. 4:1-7); the ten plagues
coerced Pharaoh to accept the
divine command and let the peo-
ple go.
Some biblical miracles are
more than signs, in that their
purpose goes beyond the mere
proof of divine power. Israel
was saved and Egypt's army
destroyed by the parting of the
Red Sea, the people were given
water and food in the desert by
means of miraculous acts, and
so on. Both Samaria (II King*
6:7-7:20) and Jerusalem (II
Kings 19:35) miraculously es-
caped conquest by besieging
armies. Such miracles can be
viewed as direct divine inter-
vention at critical moments of
human history. Even in these
incidents the element of a
"sign" is never wholly absent.
Dathan and Abirara and their
followers were swallowed by the
earth; it was a just punishment,
whose suddenness was demand-
ed by the situation. Moses'
words (Num. 16:28-30), how-
ever, designate the event clear-
ly as a sign. It is also stated
that when Israel saw the mighty
deed of Egypt's destruction in
the sea they believed in God
and in Moses (Ex. 14:31). Evi- -
dently, says the Encyclopaedia *
Judaica, the Bible makes no
distinction between signs pro- J
per and miraculous divine inter- |
vention in human history.
There is a third type of mir- I
acle in the Bible in which the I
sheer admiration of the wonder- I
worker seems more important I
than both elements discussed
above. One cannot escape this f
impression when reading the I
stories about Elijah and, to an 1
even greater degree, about Eli- I
sha. Such stories are a regular
feature of popular religion of I
all times and in all places in i
the Bible they are almost en- I
tirely confined to the figures of I
these two "nonliterary" proph- :
ets.
The problem of whether mir- 5
acles are "natural" or "super- I
natural," which was of concern -
to scholars of later ages, does
not bother Bible writers. In one I
case (Num. 16:30) a miracle is I
described as a "creation," I
which indicates an awareness of
CANDL&ICHTING TIME
28 SHEVAT 5:43
Us
L
what moderns might call the
"suspension of natural laws'
(see also Ex. 34:10). On the
other hand, the miracle of the
descent of the quail (Num. 9:18-
23) is quite plainly and clearly
described as a "natural"
though unexpected occurence
and yet is treated as a full-scale
miracle. Bible writers simply do
not question God's ability to do
anything, by any means.
The intellectual's dislike of
miracles has furnished the
mainstream of Bible criticism
with a yardstick: some sources
contain more accounts of mir-
acles than others, and are there-
fore deemed less "valuable,"
Scholars with apologetic tenden-
cies tend to minimize the im-
portance of Bible miracles in
their endeavor to make biblical
religion less "crude" and more
"pure." This case can be based
on the preponderance of the
"sign" concept in the Bible, but
is nevertheless wrong, says the
Judaica.
The Bible does not, as a rule,
tell miracle stories for their own
sake but it does regard the
"signs and wonders" of God as
extremely important Man has
to know that God can do any-
thing, whenever and wherever
He chooses; that this has been
demonstrated in history many
times and the sacred history of
Israel has been shaped often
enough by direct and quite evi-
dent divine intervention. Faith
that can do without this notion
of miracles is possible, but un-
thinkable in biblical terms.
Q. What is reconstruction-
ism?
A. Reconstructionism is .an
ideology and a movement' in
U.S. Jewish life. According to
the authoritative Encyclopaedia
Judaica, both the idea and the
movement owe their inspiration
to Mordecai Menahem Kaplan.
Kaplan argues that with the
breakdown of certain tradition-
al beliefs, Jewish identity had
become attenuated. Jews remain
loyal to their faith despite hard-
ship and suffering because they
believe that adherence to Juda-
ism assures them of salvation,
the next world. But in Kaplan,
view, this is no longer credifc
Consequently, Judaism m
transform itself from a civ%
tion orientated toward the lift
hereafter into one which ca
help Jews to attain salvation j,
this world. Belief in the w
sibility of this salvation is 3
cial to Kaplan's thought ft
means the progressive impnwe.
ment of the human personality
and the establishment of a fin,
just, and cooperative social*
der. Kaplan maintains that then
are adequate resources in the
world and capacities in man I
achieve such salvation. He de-
fines God as the "power that
makes for salvation." The notia
of God conforms to our expert
ence, since man senses a pow
which orients him to his life
and elicits from him the best I
which he is able.
Some Reconstruct ionists, Mil-
ton Steinberg probably baa]
the best example, refused to ac-
cept Kaplan's theology, the h
daica reports. A more popular
notion of Kaplan's was his de-
finition of Judaism as
evolving religious civilizatia
whose standards of conduct an
established by the Jewish people
and whose common denominator
is neither beliefs, tenets, nor
practices, but rather the con-
tinuous life of the Jewish peo-
ple. The Jewish religion, said
Kjtplan, exists for the Jefish
people, not the Jewish peace
for the Jewish religion. Judaism
like any other civilization, com-
prises a history, a language, i
religion, a social organization,
standards of conduct, and spirit-
ual and social ideals. Under the
influence of the early French
sociologist, Emile Durkheia,
Kaplan stated that whatever a
an object of collective coocen
takes on all the traits of a reli-
gion, which in its turn funcMB
in order to hold up to the *
dividual the value of the groo
and the importance of his com-
plete identification with it. Reli-
gion, therefore, lies at the very
heart of every civilization.
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
itiiii
i
Moses instructs the Israelites in the divine Law.
"And he took the book of the covenant, and read
in the hearing of the people; and they said: 'All
that the Lord hath spoken will we do, and obey'"
(Exod. 24.7).
MISHPATIM The laws that Moses submitted to
the children of Israel after they had heard the Ten j
Commandments dealt with the following subjects:
The Hebrew servant; murder, filial aggression and ;
blasphemy; kidnapping, criminal assault; maiming of a j
servant; the butting bull; accidents and damages; theft; j
property damage; watchmen; seduction; proselytes, the |
orphaned and the widowed; lending and borrowing; the j
aanctification of God and man; relations with the enemy;
the Sabbatical year; the Sabbath; the three pilgrim fes- i
tivals; idolatry.
This portion concludes with the renewal of the }
covenant with God. The children of Israel accepted the \
covenant with the words: "All that the Lord hath spoken j
will we do, and obey" (Exodus 24.7). Moses then as-
cended Mount Sinai to receive the tablets of the Law.


Lay, January 30, 1976
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar o/ Greater Hollywood
Page 15
!0 MINWJN
kraeVs 'Bad Conscience9 Worries a 'Friend
Continued from Page 4
finger at the politician* in
shoots with the industrial
ionopolists. No finger at the
beral intellectuals, whose clas-
tcai blindness has never di-
minished from its monumental
[roportion. No finger at the
[rabs, whose propagandistic
njrit Wills falls prey to, I must
y in fairness to him, more out
If fear than conviction. No fin-
er at the anti-Semites tnem-
lves, who may hate the Arabs
lust as much as the Jews, but
Lho contain their feelings to-
ward the Arabs because it. is
asier and cheaper and more
faditional historically to hate
lews.
None of these things does
hills consider, except that a
rhkf reason that Israel is in
Iroubie is negative migration.
which somehow he links to the
fact that "something of the ma-
gic has gone out of this nation's
cause."
IT IS, he says, the "loud and
rising voice of a bad consci-
ence the one thing Israel can
not afford, the thing that de-
stroys its unique moral claim
among nations."
All of whichthe negative mi-
gration, the bad conscience
presumably for remaining indif-
ferent to Arab refugee travail
can only be ameliorated if only
Israel will give up the terri-
tories.
As I have already suggested,
from a purely logical point of
view. Wills' negative migration
argument is non sequitur. And
his medicine for Israel's ail-
ments generally is aoout as on-
tological as any medieval phi-
losopher's argument to "prove"
the existence of God by begin-
ning with the assertion that the
existence of God is "manifest"
and beyond doubt: the territo-
ries are at the root of Israel's
trouble; hence, give up the ter-
ritories.
AS FOR the "magic" that has
gone out of Israel's cause
for whom has it gone out? For
even-handed newspaper colum-
nists seated in their book-lined
studies? Must Israel give up
the territories to satisfy their
sudden sense of the loss of
"magic"?
In this, Wills falls prey to the
very anti-Semitism he establish-
es at his arm's length in the
beginning.
Assuming the "magic" HAS
left Israel's cause, why must
Israel be magical to the Gentile
in the first place? Is it to be-
witch the Gentile into forget-
ting his endemic anti-Semitism
for a brief moment in history
so that he will, against his na-
ture, PERMIT Israel to survive?
AND WHY must Israel have
a "unique moral claim among
the nations?" That is a suitable
argument for the Prophets, or
perhaps for Abba Eban in de-
bate. But surely there is no re-
quirement that Israel should be
any more moral than, say, the
Ford administration with Exx-
on and Gulf Oil at the helm of
the ship of state. Or the OPEC
nations in their squeeze play
against western civilization,
in a Gentile world whose own
morality would embarrass
beasts, and you are, by deny-
Demand morality from Jews
ing Jews the predominant in-
strument of political survival
(immorality), demanding their
extinction.
What enrages me about the
Wills piece and its ilk is that he
fails to see this. It is his sane-
A FIRST FOR H0UYW00D HALLANDAIE
srael Bond Campaign Exceeds $2 Million
For the first time the Hallan-
Bale and Hollywood Israel Bond
Organization campaign has ex-
ceeded $2 million to help ad-
vance Israel's progress and wel-
fare through urgently needed
conomic development pro-
grams. The annoucement was
nade by William Littman,
bhairman. South Broward board
c-f governors.
Littman, who stated that
South Broward once again had
purchased a record amount of
btatc of Israel Bonds, said, "In
197S, a time of anti-Zionist res-
olutions, backbreaking balance
of payment deficits and a rec-
ord high defense budget, it was
imperative that our community
respond with total commitments
and outstanding pledges to
continue to keep a strong and
viable Israel.
"It is hcaiTwarrrcng," Lit-
man added, "that our commu-
nity answered the challenge at
a time when South Florida
ranked number one in unem-
ployment and was confronted
with rampant inflation"
Milton M. Parson, executive
director, offered a special
"thank you" to the rabbis and
congregations of South Brow-
ard for their support and soli-
darity with Israel, and for their
profound generosity and assist-
ance.
He emphasized that their
spiritual support, strength and
inspiration were among the ba-
sic reasons for me success of
the campaign.
The Congregation officers
and directors were acknowledg-
ed, too, for their cooperation
and diligence at the Israel Din-
ners of State.
Littman anounced that for the
first time in the 25-year his-
tory of State of Israel Bond
programs, a Prime Minister's
IsraH Pond Conference is meet-
ing in Europe to plan a program
ot action to increase the par-
ticipation of foreign Jewish
communities in alleviating the
severe pressures on Israel's
economy and setting the theme
for the 1976 Israel Bond cam-
paign.
timoniousness his sanctimo-
nious requirement for super-
legality in Israel and his flaccid
acquiescence to blackmail in,
Araby that enrages me so.
A BONE of contention in the I
Soviet-Japanese meeting in To-
kyo the other week was Mos-.
cow's refusal to return a group
0( islands to the north of Ja |
pan that the Soviets seized dur-i
ing World War II and which-
they now possess, not occupy,
but possess, "by right of con-
quest."
Tell us about that Mr. Wills,
or about your absurd observa-
tion that Israel cuts down "any
Palestinian leader as too ex-
treme, even if that leads ... to
an escalation of Arab demands."
Nowhere does evenhanded
Wills concern himself with the
fact that not a single PLO
leader has yet come forth will-
ing to deal with Israel on any
basis other than that she must
first commit national suicide.
And since when (since Mu-
nich?) does one deal with tht
enemy because otherwise he
will escalate his demands?
WHAT I fail to see in Wills
is quid pro quo either from
the Arabs or the anti-Semites,
themselves. Even rf Israel were
to give up the territories, Wills
offers no vision of peace in
the Middle East, no relinquish-
ing up of anti-Semitic fulmina-
tion in whatever guise.
No, he will take all, leaving
those troublesome Jews with'
nothing but their "unique mor-
al claim among nations."
In overlaying his utter pros-
tration before Palestinian black-
mail with a glaze of phony
Brotherhood Week philo-Semi-
tism, Wills willy-nilly under-
writes the very anti-Semitism
the Arabs these days purvey.
ussian Tenor and Labor Zionist Leader
ill Headline Histadrut Conference
fALMEKS ~
MIAMI MONUMENT OOMrANYf
4
ELKIN
ftRSON AUZED MEMORIAL!
' CUSTOM CRAFTED
IN OUR WORKSHOP
444-0*21 Broward S2S-BM1
3279 S W. 8th ST.. MIAMI
A tenor with the Metropolitan
lOnera in New York who emi-
I grated from the Soviet Union
[and one of the nation's leading
[I.abor Zionist figures will head-
Nine the opening session of the
tenth annual Histadrut Eco-
nomic Conference for Israel,
I Sunday evening, Feb. 15.
According to Dr. Sol Stein,
[national president of the Israel
Histadrut Foundation (IHF),
Dr. Judah J. Shapiro, president
of the National Committee for
Labor Israel, will deliver the
| keynote address at the inaugural
session. Russian tenor Misha
Raitzin will present a musical
salute to Israel.
The four-day conference at
the Fontainebleau Hotel marks
the IHF's $40 million milestone,
the cumulative total of commit-
ments since the organization
was founded IS years ago.
Highlight of the conclave will
be the awards banquet on Wed-
nesday, Feb. 18, in tribute to
one of Israel's major diplomats.
Participants throughout the eco-
nomic conference will include
Israeli officials, Labor Zionist
movement leaders and delegates
from the United States and
Canada.
Moe Levin, a national vice
president of the Histadrut
Foundation and chairman of the
South Florida Advisory Com-
mittee, is host committee chair-
man for the Feb. 15-18 con-
clave. He will welcome dele-
gates at the inaugural dinner.
Dr. Morton Malvasky, rabbi of
Temple Beth. Shalom, Holly-
wood, and chairman of the
South Broward Council of IHF,
is host committee cochairman.
Raitzin, who emigrated to Is-
rael from the Soviet Union in
1972, was a star performer
with the Moscow and Lenin-
grad opera companies as well
as an acclaimed soloist with
the Moscow Philharmonic. He
made his American debut at
Town Hall in New York in Feb-
ruary, 1975. Raitzin will be ac-
companied by Israeli composer-
conductor Shmuel Fershko.
Dr. Shapiro, educator, lec-
turer and author, was elected
the first president of the Labor
Zionist Alliance in 1971. The
editor of the monthly Labor
Zionist publication "Jewish
Frontier," Dr. Shapiro is for-
mer national director of the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations
and past president of the Na-
tional Conference of Jewish
Communal Service.
'Napper Admits Anti-Semitism
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) An Italiai
who organized the kidnappint
of French businessman Louis
Hazan told police he acted out
of hatred of the head of the
"Phonogram" record company|
[ because he was Jewish.
Ugo Brunini, 35, who wasl
arrested with four other men
after' 53-year-old Casablanca-r
horn Hazan was found last
week gagged and bound in a
v'Ha some 60 miles from Paris,
also admitted he was respon-
sible for a bomb attack made
against the offices of the Pho-
nogram company in October,
BRUNINI, now crippled as a
result of a spinal disease, was
reported to have said that he
disliked Hazan. He told police
that he knew the head of the
"Phonogram" company was
Jewish.
"I was pleased to learn that
Hazan had been the victim of
a swindle an unidentified
person had managed to cash a
bad check for almost $1 mil-
lion a few months ago but
then I grew bitter wtane I aw
that he had surmounted -this
setback and that he was still
as wealthy as before. I had
then the idea of the attack,"
Brunini was quoted as saying
to police.
He said that he organized
the kidnapping to extort more
than $3 million .from "Phono-
gram" and Hazan's family.
BRUNINI'S motives appear-
ed somewhat different from
those of his accomplices who
told the police their action was
mainly politically motivated.
Nevertheless they all said they
had acted out of hatred of
Jews.
Daniel Moschini, who storm-
ed the "Phonogram" building
and seized Hazan with five
other armed, men on New
Year's Eve, said most of the
ransom would have served to
set up an extreme right-wing
party.
Moschini, who allegedly told
police "we are all anti-Semites,"
was also reported to have said:
"We were determined to kid-
nap other Jewish personalities
to obtain funds for our move-
ment."
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
Vempte 3etk C
Wemctiat
Garden*
The all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beau-
tifully landscaped, perpetual care, rea-
sonably priced.
For information call: 920-8225 or writ*:
13SI S. 14th AVE.-HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please and mt literaturt on th abova.
NAME:_______________________________________,
ADDRESS:
PHONE:


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, ^January 30, 19J
'Down on Knees,? Envoy Sees Israel Religious
Continued from Page 1-
MUHSIN: The positions of the PLO in the United
Nations must be strengthened, the legitimate and na-
tional rights of the Palestinians must be firmly ground-
ed, and all UN resolutions concerning Palestine back
to 1947 that is, back to the Partition Plan must
be mobilized against Israel. The Palestinian question
must never again be dealt with in the United Nations
as a mere refugee problem, but must be handled with
a view to a separate Palestinian state.
DIE ZEIT: Would this also create a basis for re-
cognition by the PLO of a separate Israeli state, of
Israel's right to exist?
MUHSIN: I don't like to answer this question.
If Israel remains what it is a racist, Zionist, impe-
rialist state all it will get from our side is bullets
and shells. Not until Israel has become something
different will the Jews see our faces and, indeed, our
outstretched hands not unless they are ready for
peaceful dialogue with us, so as to create with us the
democratic, secular State of Palestine. We want to co-
exist with them, in a unified state or a state with two
cantons. We don't want to throw them into the sea or
drive, them into the desert.
DIE /-KIT: But that really amounts to denying
them -the right of existence in a state of their own,
doesn't it?
MUHSIN: They will have to accept this eventual-
ly. Our right of existence in all of Palestine comes
first.
DIE ZEIT: And a Palestinian state confined to the
formerly Jordanian West Bank and Gaza would not
satisfy these juristic claims?
MUHSIN: No, never. We want back every piece
of land, every field, every village and every house that
was ever ours. We will not yield on that. Right, nat-
ural right, is on our side.
DIE ZEIT: Can one put it to the Israelis to com-
mit this sort of national suicide?
MUHSIN: They will have to learn to understand,
but they won't understand until they change their
outlook. That will happen when they are down on their
knees before us, when we have smashed them to pieces
by force of arms.
DIE ZEIT: In other words, .peace is not in sight?
MUHSIN: For now, neither war nor peace. And
in the future, war again, new wars. It's inevitable.
ervices
HAUAWOAU
Rabbi Marry r tcnwartjcl*
MMTM MJAMI BEACH
INAI (Temple) of NOR" H nJ
StstkL* *"** Cn* 53
NORTH HOWARD
CORAL SPRINGS HtBR|ju rnu I
CRCGATION. R*lorm. ", "M
Wth Ave. .tabb. Max W.,t .:!
TAMARAC JEWISH CCN Ej, -*
N.W. B?lti St.. .Centerve.ivei'
bl Milton J. Gro.a. '
VOUNG
NOUTWOOD
- .SRAKL or HOI Ywnruil
K>IU Hollywood Hill. HiBh UhM*
re.ident Or. Frank BUIn ^
Report Sheikh Yarnani is Jew
TEL AVIVThe highly-pub-
licized Minister for Petroleum
of Saudi Arabia. Ahmed Zaki el
Yamani, has a mother, a broth-
er and a sister living in Israel
in a suburb of Rehovoth. The
family, which comes from Saudi
Arabia, arrived in Israel via
Yemen some 25 years ago.
Yamani's brother explained
that Ahmed Zaki el Yamani's
real name is Yechieh Zecha-
riah. He said that when his
brother was 16 years old, he
caught the eye of the royal
court, and after converting to
the Moslem faith joined King
Faisal's retinue.
He later became a sheikh
and is, of course, bow the Min-
ister for Petroleum with an
1 enormous influence in the Arab
world. Yamani was one of the
OPEC bigwigs who were taken
as hostages by Arab terrorists
in Vienna.
b *
JNFs 75th YEAR
JERUSALEM The Jewish
National Funds 75th anniver-
sary year opened festively here
at the Jerusalem Theatre with
the participation of the Presi-
dent of Israel, Ephraim Katzir.
chairman of the Keren Keye-
meth; Jacob Tsur, president of
the JNF of America; Dr. Mau-
rice Sage, cabinet ministers,
members of the Knesset and the
Zionist Executive.
Katzir said in his greeting
that the occasion was a land-
mark in. the renascence of the
Jewish people in their land and
"a practical expression of the
solidarity of World Jewry with
the Zionist undertaking."
"At this time when Zionism
has become the target of the
venomous attacks of our ene-
mies, it is good to recall the
work of the JNF which turns
dry plains into flourishing
farms," said the President.
& -A
Seven Israelis 00 Trial
PARIS Seven Israelis, in-
cluding a former commando.
Shimon Rimon, went on trial
in a Frankfurt court last week
on charges of heroin-smuggling
and distribution in West Ger-
many. Only six Israelis are in
court.
A seventh, gang leader Yostf
Amiel, escaped. They face ten-
year sentences.
The prosecution charged the
seven snuggled several kilo-
grams of heroin and sold it
mainly to American soldiers,
but also to other Israelis. Four
of the seven, including a wom-
an, Mrs. JacaiiHjne Hosmy, are
self-confessed drug addicts.
The case hit the front pages
of the German press because
of Rimon*s presence among the
defendants. Rimon, known in
Israel as "Kushi," is a former
member of Israel's renowned
Commando Unit 101 and a leg-
endary figure in military cir-
cles. The German press head-
lined some of their reports "Is-
raeli War Hero Charged With
Drug Smuggling."
* Mizrachi Women Abroad
NBW YORK Three noted
American Mizrachi Women
leaders are in Israel to attend
special dedication ceremonies
of the new.AMW Wolf, and .Julia
Eisanberg Comprehensive High
School in North Tel Aviv.
The three are Mrs. Sarah
Shane, national president of
AMW, and a resident of Balti-
more; Mrs. Ruth Jacobson, hon-
orary president, of New York
City; and Mrs. Evelyn Schrei-
ber. honorary president, a resi-
dent of Lawrence, N.Y.
Jewish Families Have 'Address'
CARLISLE, PA. The 30
Jewish families of Carlisle,
home of Dickinson College, now
have a "Jewish address" in this
college town the B.'nai B'-rith
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH wONftM I
GATION. 400 South Nob riill SJ
Plantation. Rabbi Arthu, Abim. '
RTH SHALOM (Tompi.) -Tn,_|
Wve. 4401 Arthur St. R.bblnSSSA
Malavaky, Cantor irvlno. Gold.
----.---------
TEMPVR BETH 4HM (Conieryitlm
blO SW Uad AV*.. Hollywond.
--------------
rEMr-LE SINAI (Con.trvatv */
ohnoon St Rabbi Davltf ShioirT M\
AaaoeJat* itabbl Chalm I LlttfWil
Cantor v.huda Hallkraun
community
JANUARY 31
Bar Mitzvah of Jimmy Jaffee, son of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd
Jaffee. Temple Beth El, Hollywood11 a.m.
Bat Mitzvah of Lauri Berk, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Stanley Berk, at Temple Solel, Hollywood.
FEBRUARY 1
Shlomo Carlebach, folksinger, in concert at Temple Sinai,
Hollywood7:30 p.m.
FEBRUARY 2
Temple Beth El Brotherhood, Open Board Meeting8
p.m.
Temple Beth Shalom Sisterhood. General Meeting8 p.m.
Hillcrest Hadassah Meeting, Hillcrest Playdiumnoon
FEBRUARY 3
Shalom Group of Hollywood Hadassah, Meeting1 p.m.
Temple Sinai Sisterhood of Hollywood, General Meeting
8 p.m.
Temple Beth El Sisterhood, Board Meeting10 am
FEBRUARY 7
Temple Sinai of North Dade, "The First Two Hundred
Years Are The Hardest," Barry College Auditorium
& p.m.
'1 !

Hillel facility which has evolv-
ed as their synagogue, Talmud
Torah and community center.
In the past. Carlisle Jews had
to travel to Harrisburg for the
nearest Jewish institution. Now
they join with Jewish college
students for Sabbath and holi-
day services, adult study
TEMPLB SOLEL (Liberal,. 5100 Shw. I
idan St.. Hollywood Rabbi Rebwtl
frVB- < c
MWAaMR
rMPLE JMAEL (Corrviti||
S2C SW ttth St. R.od, Ar,,l
Dr.lit.
NMMMKi PINES
TSHPLE IN THE PINES (Center*. I
tlve) 1*00 N. Urtivenlty Dr. P,m,\
broke Piml Rabtx Sidney Latin.
course, lectures and socials on I
the college campus.
Some 20 Jewish students at-J
tend Dickinson and Dickinson |
law school.
The 300-year-old college town|
recently had its first Bar Mitz-
vah, the rite being conducted I
at a Hillel service, accordingI
to Prof. Stanley Rosenbaum,|
the Hillel counselor.
~
enmp ocnun
for Boys & Girla 6-16
A CAMPING PARADiSE IN THE HEART
OF THE POLLEN FREE, COOL HILLS
LAKES OF OCALA NATIONAL FOREST
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA
All Ljnd and Water Sports rYiUHvki.ua. ind Ridina Only
P10 Golf and Tennis Arts and Crafts Sailing. Scuba
Trips by Canot Horseback, Riding Spatial Teen Proerim
Reading and Math Clinics TrsdUieeial Friday & Sabbath
Services Bar Miuvah Lessons Ml Dietary Laws Observed
M.D. I. 2 R.N.'s Staff eur Mldtrn Infirmary at ALL Times.
Accredited Member American Camping Association
Your Camp Directors:
COACH J. I. MONTGOMERY
MORRIS SHEILA WALDMAN
1-2
Miami Beach Phone: 1-532-3152 Of Writ*:
P.O. Box 402648, Miami Beach, Florida 33140
SIGN UP NOW
9m?
OVER 70 SPORTS AN0 ACTIVITIES
Imaoinel Tennis on 13 lighted professional courts, staffed by 1
well known' Tennis 'Pro' and 10 instructors! private nine hole courf Riding on seven miles of trails spread
over 525 acres of breathtakingly beautiful scenery! A children!
Pjwad.se ... 25 sailboats, 3 motorboats, 4 indoor Brunswick
bowling lanes, canoe trips, baseball, basketball, waterskiing,
drama and dance, karate, fencing, rocketry, ham radio, archery,
photography and gymnastics art just some of the many fascinatini
activities available! Afles 5 to 16. Fee includes air fare allowance.
OUR 41ST YEAR!
ueoar Weinberg family direction
Dietary Lav* Observed Nationwide Enrollment
CALL OR WRITE FOR A BEAUTIFUL COLOR BROCHURE
Announcing limited apeninas i. the Rraword (Mil. areas.
far further iafarraatiaa caatact ear
Hollywood Re.resentative-Jars. $. Koacm
M01 H. 41st Ct Hollywood Tel 911-1545 (after S Ms.)
Mieau Office r 75-454 or R5R-11M
DIKlCrot LOUIS P. WEIMRf *C
9
Separate camps of distinction for Boys and Girls on beautiful Reflection
Lake ,n the Picturesque Pocono Mourwaias of N.E. Pennevlvan.e.
WINTER OFHCE: 6638 Castor Avanua. Philadelphia. Pennsylvania 19'*
Phene: (2)6) 33 1557


y_ January 30, 1976
The Jewish Floridian unu Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 15
,M**',J
M*m I**: >*.:
rihMNfthtirflMKWiMFu turn
riH-wm-'ms n-~
Federally-Financed Pro-am Averts Delinquency Among Hassidic Kids I
i FEDERALLY-FUNDED project to provide coun-
* seling and treatment to problem children of
Hasidic and ultra-Orthodox families to prevent them
from becoming juvenile delinquents has been fnne-
tioning since the start of November in Brooklyn's
Boro Park section, which has New York City's heav-
iest concentration of Orthodox Jews.
The project is part of a program of service to
the Orthodox community carried on by Jewish Par-
ents United, a member agency of the Council of
Jewish Organizations of Boro Park.
IT OPERATES on a one-year grant of S250.000
from the federal Safe Streets Act. funneled to the
JPU through New York State and the Mayor's Crim-
inal Justice Coordinating Council, according to Rabbi
Burton Jaffa, JPU director.
HE SAID JPU has a staff of four part-time psy-
chologists, as well as full-time social workers and
counselors, all Orthodox Jews.
He said the current caseload of the organization
"................. IIIIIUfflUMNMWi^n^
L^ a I lob
is 90 children, with a ratio of about seven boys to
three girls. The JUF office is in operation from 9
a.m to 5 p.m. weekdays, closing early on Fridays,
and is closed on Sundays.
Rabbi Jaffa said that until the project was started
last Nov. 5, parents of such children had nowhere
to co for help because they refused to go to a non-
Orthodox Jewish facility.
HE ADDED that the JPU policy is to work with
children and thus obtain the trust of the parents,
many of whom are initially hostile either because
they fear the problems of their children will be-
come known in the community, or because they re-
fuse to believe there is anything wrong with their
children.
The children are usually referred for treatment
by principals of yeshivas they attend. In situations
where parents, on being called for permission for
JPU professionals to see their children, refuse such
permission, the JPU turns to the rebbe of the sect
to which the parents belong, who orders parental
compliance.
In the Hasidic community, this is sufficient.
Rabbi Jaffa said. Among Orthodox families, the rabbi
of the congregation to which the parents belong is
called in for assistance.
HE SAID the children exhibit the whole range
of problems afflicting American children generally
educational, emotional, and family relations. They
include children with learning disabilitie',. One proj-
ect is the testing of 100 Boro Park children to locate
such functional disabilities.
\crtlperl
Herzl Canal
Problem Solved
Haifa
OLOGICALLY feasible. Economically worthwhile. Sub-
ject only to political considerations. Such is a summation
I the verdict of a committee of experts which for more than
i year has studied the possibility of channeling water from the
Ifcditerranean to the Dead Sea, and utilizing the difference in
evel to generate electric power.
The committee was appointed bv the Government of Israel
March. 1974. and for some reason its findings have been
[hen little publicity.
THE TOPOGRAPHICAL facts are simple. In the 34 miles
om the Mediterranean to the Dead Sea there is a droo of
i meters some 1.200 feet. By wav of comparison, the Nia-
Bra River carries water from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario for
i descent of about 326 feet m 36 miles.
The idea is not new. It was first proposed by Theodor Herri
i his book, "Altneuland." and if the waterway should ever be
niltit should obviously bear his name. The proposal was treated
rionsly and scientifically 37 years later by Prof. Walter C.
iilk, as part of his plan for a JVA Jordan Valley
try.
In the four oVcades that followed Israel and American en-
Mi have further studied the plan, and the report recently
Jed goes into the matter thoroughly.
BASIC FACTS: There is plenty of water in the source, the
Iterranean. How easily can ft he moved from there to the
Sea? And what would happen to the Dead Sea were it to
large amounts of water? The latter question was not
: to answer. Much of the water would be lost by evapora-
The face of the Dead Sea is shrinking in any event. By
intake, the level of the Dead Sea would be raised
inly about four meters, and this would do Httle harm to
existing potash plant and other facilities along the shores.
The latest proposal is for a pipe line from a point some-
between Ashkelon and Ashdod. The pipe would enter a
el under the Judean mountains and emerge not far from
Geddi. Estimated cost of the whole project, including con-
action of the hydro-electric plant, would be a minimum
MO,000,000 a figure which does hot sound fantastic in
days of astronomical budgets.
THE ECONOMICS of the plan would be dictated by the
^natives. Will the world price of oil go up? Indeed, will
1 ahvays be available to Israel? Present estimates are for a
"-megawatt plant going up to peak capacity of 600 mega-
vts. Side benefits were considered. Conventional nuclear po-
P plants require much water to cottl then* process, and hence
*y must be located in areas along the sea, which are thickly
"Elated. The ecological dangers are obvious.
The proposed pipe line water could be made available en
e. and before their final drop, lor use In nuclear plants.
*P* enable siting of such plants far oat in the wilderness,
"y from population centers.
From an engineering point of view there are few problems.
5 ^med visionary even in LowdermiBVs day is today pet-
Ttre.asibIe' wi,h new machinary and methods.
HE MAJOR problem remains prfHJcal Under Interna-
law the plan would requh-e approval of Jordan which
^ on the Dead Sea. The final thought of the committee
j.ers on that point. Despite all Oat other favorable consiJ-
* *- tf Jordan will net approve, and if we will not be
'o withstand international pressures, than perhaps there
" Pohit in our even beginning,
J"?** nnaaid was perhaps fc*Us: The enormous bene-
aui Jordan and ban* if sae- can**-1
^ uadsHakiag.
tJkLtdpSL
JZuft
'To Be Or Not To Be'
Stars Brooks, Bancroft
Hollywood
^/JEL FRANK wiH co-produce, write and direct
the musical remake of the Ernst Lubitseh
World War H screen comedv, "To Be or Not
to Be," with Mel Brooks and his wife, Anne
Bancroft, recreating the roles of a Polish stage
"Hamlet" and his actress-spouse, originally
portrayed by the late Jack Benny and Carole
Lombard, with Felix Bressart then contribut-
ing the character of an old Jewish performer
caught in Warsaw when the city is overrun by
the German military might.
"When Ernst Lubitseh asked me to play the
Polish Shakespearean actor," Jack once reveal-
ed to Louella Parsons, "I was afraid that he
needed a young, handsome leading man. Ernst
said he had written it with me in mind and
natui-ily I was flattered to do a picture with
the famed director and Carole Lombard."
THE SHAKESPEAREAN troupe, in the
original version, becomes involved with the Pol-
ish underground and they wind.up impersonat-
ing Nazi officers, Jack being made a "fake"
colonel.
Irving A. FCm, in his intimate Jack Benny
biography (Putnam's, 1976), relates that Meyer
Kubelsky, Jack's father an Orthodox Jew
from Russia objected to the picture, refusing
to speak to his son because he had seen him
in a Nazi umfor-u
It took Benny a great deal of persuasion
to convince his father that he was only play-
acting and actually on the screen fighting
against the Nazis.
"THE H1NDENBURG," now on the theater
screen throughout the country, deals with the
air disaster of the last dirigible a catas-
trophe foreshadowing a much larger tragedy,
Hitler's onslaught on Europe that was to cause
casualties a million times the number of 36
men devoured by nature at Lakehurst, N.J.,
on May 6. 1937.
The book by Michael M. Mooney and the
scenario extend the factual account of the
blow-up into the speculative sphere of sabo-
tage, though there are no records of a bem6
plot.
World Full of Strangers;
Two Other Important Novels
ft A WORLD Full of Strangers," bf Cynthia
Freeman (Arbor House, $8.95). ii a go-
thic novel in the mold of "The Pedloeks": the
trials and tribulations of a family "in search
of itself and the American dream-." That means
that David Resinetsky leaves the Lower East
Side to try and "make it" fn the neurotic, de-
pressed and anti-Semitic America of the 1930s.
fa order to achieve social and finacial sta-
tus, hC changes his name to Meid, abandons
his family and denies his birthright. Freeman
chronicles 450 pages of David's rise to power
and Ms ultimate denouement.
THE NOVEL is long and drawn out, and
I would prefer to recommend this genre to
gothic fans. However, the author presents a
valid and unfortunate consequence of assimi-
lation in America, admirably concluding with
a strong moral commitment to Judaism .
There has been little publicrty about Haas
Herlin's novel, "Commemorations'' (St. Mar-
tin's Press, $8.95). Perhaps this is because the
book is a translation from the German. Trans-
lations do net generally do well in the United
States. That's too bad.
Berlin has skillfully woven the threads of
a spy-thriller, a complicated love stery and a
classic manhunt into an exciting pattern of
intrigue and psychological drama.
THE NOVEL begins with Hans Plkola,
photographer par excellence, entering a bank
vault to pack up a quarter of a nstiMon doBars
.Prom this point, the reader is led
relationships with his daughter (is she his
daughter?); a multi-millionaire industrialist (is
he a Naai war criminal?); an infamous S.S.
doctor (is he really dead?), and himself (will
he take the money and become a killer?).
"Comnjemorttions*' succeeds precisely be-
cause it approaches the reader on many levels.
It invites us to probe our own feelings, not
just those of characters we read about .
One ot my favorite authors is Giorgio
Bassani of "The Garden of the Finzi-Continis"
tame. A recent Batsani novel, "Behind the
Door," is the beautiful story of an Italian Jew-
ish boy encountering and dealing with anti-
Semitism among his peers.
NOW IBS latest coUectton of stories, "The
Snssll of Hay" (Harcourt, $7.93), also takes
place in Bassanfs hometown of rerfara dur-
ing the 1930s arid 1940s of Fascist Italy. He
gently evokes memories of days gone by, and
painfully preserves the horror of Jews dis-
owned by their country and their fellowman.
Bassanfs style and themes are often com-
pared to those of Thomas Mann, especially in
the revised newly translated novella, 'The
Gold-rimmed Glasses."
THIS IS a tender yet powerful story of a
respected physician humiliated and victimised
for his homosexuality and Jewishness.
The author clearly parallels the impact of
fms aadMdual's expulsion from his conunu-
nSty wim the brutality of the Fascist govera-
i .Italian


Page 16
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January
American Friends of Hebrew U. 70,ooohraeii* Emigri
Plan Two-Day Founders Event
An historic National Foun-
ders Dinner and Academic
Conference of the American
Friends of the Hebrew Univer-
sity will be held at the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel on Feb. 21
and 22, climaxing the world-
wide celebration of the 50th
aniversary of the establish-
ment of Israel's oldest and
largest university.
Announcement of the two-
day session, which will bring
together education. govern-
ment, business, civic and reli-
gion leaders from throughout
the United States, Canada and
Israel, was made by Morris
Messing of Palm Beach, Flor-
ida State president of the Amer-
ican Friends of the Hebrew
University.
A highlight of the confer-
ence will be the acceptance by
American novelist Saul Bellow
of the S. Y. Agnon Gold Medal
Award from the Hebrew Uni-
versity.
Herbert Buchwald of Miami
Beach, president of the Great-
er Miami Chapter of the Amer-
ican Friends; Otto Stieber of
Hallandale, president of the
Hollywood-Hallandale Chapter,
and Dr. Sanford F. Kuvin,
president of the Palm Beach
Chapter, are working closely
with Messing in planning the
sessions.
Former New York State At-
torney General Nathaniel Gold-
stein will present a report on
the Harry S. Truman Research
Institute, one of Hebrew Uni-
versity's most important divi-
sion and the only facility in
Israel authorized by the late
President to bear his name.
Dr. Max M. Kampelman of
Washington, D.C., national
president of the American
Friends, and Seymour Fish-
man, executive vice president,
were in iMami Beach this week
to confer with Messing and
other Hebrew University lead-
ers.
Albert A. Dorner, Southeast-
ern regional director of the
American Friends, will coor-
dinate the Feb. 21-22 confer-
ence from the organization's
new offices in the City Nation-
al Bank Building.
AJC Seminar To Hear Hertzberg
On 'Zionism vs. Racism'
The Florida Women's Division
of the American Jewish Con-
gress will present a Jewish Af-
fairs seminar and brunch on
Thursday, Feb. 5, at 10 a.m. at
the Eden Roc Hotel. Judy (Mrs.
Murray, Tepper is chairperson
, of the day.
Speakers at the seminar in-
clude Rabbi Arthur Hertzberg,
who is serving his second term
as national president of the
American Jewish Congress.
Dr. Hertzberg is an officer
of the World Jewish Congress
and a lecturer and author. An
associate professor of religion
at Princeton University and a
visiting associate professor of
Jewish Studies at Rutgers Uni-
versity, he has taught at He-
brew University in Jerusalem.
Rabbi Hertzberg's topic Is
"Zionism Its Meaning to
American Jews in the 1970V
Sandra Anderson Garcia is a
graduate of the University ol
lexas at El Paso wliure she was
on the Dean's List. She received
her Ph.D. in psychology from
the University of Southern
California. Professor Garcia has
published numerous articles and
is the recipient of the Ford
Foundation Fellowship to con-
duct research in Israel.
Her topic will be "Racism."
Rabbi Sanford Marrin Sha-
pero is a graduate of the Uni-
versity of Dayton in Dayton.
Ohio. He received his Bachelor
of Letters degree from the He-
brew Union College-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion in Cincinnati.
He served as a chaplain in
the Navy and as special consul-
tant and chaplain for various
law enforcement agencies. He
was appointed by the governor
to the board of the New York
State Yocth Commission.
Rabbi Shapero lectured in the
Department of Fine Arts at El-
mira College for Women in New
York and at the Kapaun Reli
gious Retreat House in Oiso.
Japan. He has also lectured reg-
ularly at the state teachers col-
leges in New York, Connecticut
and Massachusetts.
A past president of the
Bridgeport and vicinity Pastors'
Association, he was secretary
and vice president of the New
England Region of the Central
Conference of American Rabbis,
and prior to his election as
Senior Rabbi of Temple Etna
nuel of Beverly Hills he was
selected to lead this six-state
group as president.
His topic will be "New Hope
for the Aged."
Australia's New Prime Minister
By SAM I.IPSKI
Australia's newly-elected Prime
Minister, Malcolm Fraser, has
declared that his government
will strongly support Israel in
the Middle East conflict.
"We would want to make
more plain our commitment to
the survival of Israel," he said
in his first major foreign policy
statement over the weekend.
Fraser rejected the claims of
the defeated Labor government
led by Gough Whitlam that it
had conducted "an even-hand-
ed" policy on the Middle East.
He described it as a pro-Russian
policy.
FRASER spoke on a Radio
Australia interview in which he
attacked the Whitlam govern-
ment for having neglected Aus-
tralia's traditional friends over
the past three years.
The Fraser government woald
try to strengthen relations with
Australia's traditional friends
which have "a clear philosoph-
ical commitment in common
with Australia," he added.
The first signs of a shift in
policy came when Australia
joined Israel, the United States,
Canada and eight West Euro-
pean nations in a walk-out pro-
test in a UNESCO conference in
Paris.
The walk-out followed the
conference's adoption of a reso-
lution "noting" the UN General
Assembly's recent equation of
Zionism with racism.
Prater's strong- declaration of
support for Israel, which fol-
lows similar commitments mad*
during the recent election cam-
paign here, has encouraged Jew-
ish communal leaders.
BUT THEY are waiting to see
how the Fraser government will
react when it will have to make
decisions on more specific is-
sues, such as allowing PLO rep-
resentatives to come to Austra-
lia.
ANOTHER aspect which is
being closely watched is the
degree to which the Fraser gov-
ernment's pro-Israel and ami-
PLO position could weaken it
the United States modifies its
own stand against the PLO.
As the new government in
Canberra is anxious to follow a
Washington line in the United
Nations and move away from
the Whitlam government's iden-
tification with the Third World,
much will depend on the lead
given by the U.S.
While the Dec. 13 landslide
win for Fraser's Liberal-Nation-
al Party coalition is expected to
produce a more sympathetic
understanding of Israel's posi-
tion by the new government.
Israel lost some of its friends
in the Parliament.
THE ANTI-LABOR swing
the Fraser government will
have a minimum 55-seat major-
ity in the 127-seat Parliament
swept two outstanding pro-
Israel spokesmen from federal
politics.
The Minister for Environment
in the Whitlam government, Joe
Berinsoa, lost his seat a* #d
the Minister for Housing. Joe
Riordan.
Berinson, a leading member
of Perth's Jewish community,
was a brilliant and articulate
pro-Israel advocate who often
found himself in conflict with
his own Prime Minister.
Riordan, who is not Jewish,
but represented a heavily Jew-
ish electorate, was a moving
force behind the Parliamentary
Labor Friends of Israel.
ON THE other hand. Austra-
lia's most outspoken supporter
of the PLO and an extreme left-
winger. Bill Hartley, failed in
an attempt to win a place in
the Senate on the Labor ticket
for the State of Victoria.
A widespread campaign
against Hartley was mounted
within the Jewish community
by both Labor and non-Labor
supporters. The Board of De-
puties took the unprecedented
step of calling on all Jewish
voters, regardless of party, to
reject Hartley.
In the new Parliament, which
will commence its session next
February, there will be four
Jewish parliamentarians. For
the Labor Party, Dr. Moss Cass,
the former Minister for the Me-
dia, retained his seat in Mel-
bourne as did Barry Cohen in
New South Wales.
For the Liberal Party, Senator
Peter Baume retained his seat
in New South Wales while his
cousin, Michael Baume, won a
seat for the first time in the
House of Representatives.
JERUSALEM (JTA) About 70,0001
emigrated during the past four years, and the
rate is coming perilously close to matching the
aliya, according to figures prepared b Ephrairi
advisor to the Finance Minister, which were
here last night.
The figures were appended to the Treasuj
posed IL 84.2 billion austerity budget for fiscal!
which was presented to the Cabinet.
The figures showed that in 1972, 12,000 1st
the country for good and in 1973, the year of |
Kippur War, 15,000 departed.
EMIGRATION REACHED a peak of 24,0001
when most reserve soldiers were demobilized.
it was down somewhat to 19,000.
According to Dovrat, the yordim rate wi|
to 16,000 in 1976 but since next year's aliyi
mated at only 24,000, Israel will have a net
only 8000 immigrants. Some economists who
ined the proposed budget are disputing Dov^
mates for next year. The say the increased
ment will result in a larger number of yoi
fewer olim.
Moynihan Warm
We'll Veto Worl
Change in Resol
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
The United States indicated
this week that it would exer-
cise its veto power in the Se-
debate with the adoption of res-
olutions that would attempt to
change Resolutions 242 and
338.
Addressing the Council, U.S.
Ambassador Daniel P. Moyni-
han said the U.S. believed it
would be a set-back for the
chances of a settlement if the
Council adopted resolutions
"which would have the effect
of leaving no commonly accept-
ed basis for further negotia-
tions." He warned that any im-
posed changes unacceptable to
any of the parties "will not
work."
MOYNIHAN SAID that "Our
actions both in the Council and
afterwards will be guided by
our best judgement of what is
necessary" to avoid impeding
chances for peace. The U.S.
had stated previously that it
would block any measures it
saw as endangering progress
toward a peace settlement.
Moynihan stressed that the
two Security Council resolu-
tions are the framework for
any progress toward ending
the Arab-Israeli conflict. "We
are aware." he said, "that there
can be no durable solution un-
less we make every effort to
promote a solution of the key
issues of a just and lasting
peace in that area on the basis
of Security Council Resolutions
242 and 338 taking into account
the legitimate interests of all
the people of the area including
the Palestinian people and re-
spect for the rights to inde-
pendent existence of all states
in the area."
MOYNIHANS USE of the
words "legitimate interests' as
applied to the Palestinians was
ee as a rebuff to the Arabs
who are seeking Security Coun-
cil recognition of the "rights"
of the Palestinian people.
The word "rights" signifies
curity Council if that body
ends its current Middle Bast
political rights which in tarn
impli.-s the right t|
"Legitimate interest
broader term and
have the same po|
tation, observers
Moynihan, howH
"the rights to ind
istence of all states'
which includes Isi
The U.S. envoy
two Security Counc
"have been the fa
the progress tha
made and they con
vide hope for the|
said the U.S. is
achieve progress ij
East this year.
MOYNIHAN DI
"We cannot escap
of the situation
parties have agree
work, all of them
changes in that fii
emphasized that
lenis of the Middl
be dealt with by
ing process
"changes that mtj
in our approach
ed out in the Get
He said that
cedures and the
additional partial
Mideast talks sh<
with at Geneva
aratory conferen^
position is shar
whose Ambassadd
Chaim Herzog, sa
conference last
rael was prepared,
Geneva conferenc
conditions and to]
the question of
ticipants.
The Arabs on t|
are pressing for
cil action that
PLO in advance
tion in the Genef
Moynihan said
succeeded in
agreed framewo(
ures and princifl
tlement and in
tions for the es
the Geneva
forum in which
tation of these
be negotiated,
should not now
judge the work


Full Text
L, January 30, 1976
The Jewish Floridian unu Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 15
flHMMuit'iaiiii:iMitlft>mi
i""*.....'"'Mmi mil ;i
ii.' i rn-.tr mnm
" "i fWfi.mt*i'im*f<':*kri*iiiiMMwifm::MriiHMU]lHii^
win:' jftrumnmuMMMiM
federally-Financed Program Averts Delinquency Among Hassidic Kids
FEDERALLY-FUNDED project to provide coun-
seling and treatment to problem children of
llasidic and ultra-Orthodox families to prevent them
rom becoming juvenile delinquents has been fune-
loning since the start of November in Brooklyn's
Joro Park section, which has New York City's heav-
est concentration of Orthodox Jews.
The project is part of a program of service to
he Orthodox community carried on by Jewish Par-
ents United, a member agency of the Council of
Jewish Organizations of Boro Park.
JT OPERATES on a one-year grant of $250,000
Irom the federal Safe Streets Act, funneled to the
}pU through New York State and the Mayor's Crim-
nal Justice Coordinating Council, according to Rabbi
Jurton Jaffa, JPU director.
HE SAID JPU has a staff of four part-time psy-
chologists, as well as full-time social workers and
ounselors, all Orthodox Jews.
He said the current caseload of the organization
Ml l.-i')BII-'1ITll':ilraih,.llllMB!'!llllIlllmill1IV. gMMBH ......
3
i^ful lob
is 90 children, with a ratio of about seven boys to
three girls. The JUF office is in operation from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays, closing early on Fridays,
and is closed on Sundays.
Rabbi Jaffa said that until the project was started
last Nov. 5, parents of such children had nowhere
to go for help because they refused to go to a non-
Orthodox Jewish facility.
HE ADDED that the JPU policy is to work with
children and thus obtain the trust of the parents,
many of whom are initially hostile either because
they fear the problems of their children will be-
come known in the community, or because they re-
fuse to believe there is anything wrong with their
children.
The children are usually referred for treatment
by principals of yeshivas they attend. In situations
where parents, on being called for permission for
JPU professionals to see their children, refuse such
permission, the JPU turns to the rebbe of the sect
to which the parents belong, who orders parental
compliance.
In the Hasidic community, this is sufficient.
Rabbi Jaffa said. Among Orthodox families, the rabbi
of the congregation to which the parents belong is
called in for assistance.
HE SAID the children exhibit the whole range
of problems afflicting American children generally
educational, emotional, and family relations. They
include children with learning disabilitie'.. One proj-
ect is the testing of 100 Boro Park children to locate
such functional disabilities.
.....HMMMHHMMMl
. u
/pert
Herzi Canal
Problem Solved
Haifa
ICHNOLOGICALLY feasible. Economically worthwhile. Sub-
ject only to political considerations. Such is a summation
he verdict of a committee of experts which for more than
kar has studied the possibility of channeling water from the
Jiterranean to the Dead Sea, and utilizing the difference in
to generate electric power.
jThe committee was appointed by the Government of Israel
plarch, 1974. and for some reason its findings have been
little publicity.
| THE TOPOGRAPHICAL facts are simple. In the 34 miles
the Mediterranean to the Dead Sea there is a droo of
|meters some 1,200 feet. By wav of comparison, the Nia-
River carries water from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario for
kscent of about 326 feet m 36 miles.
JThe idea is not new. It was first proposed by Theodor Herzl
|is book, "Altneuland." and if the waterway should ever be
lit should obviously bear his name. The proposal was treated
jrasly and scientifically 37 years later by Prof. Walter C.
dermilk, as part of his plan for a JVA Jordan Valley
kority.
pn the four decades that followed Israel and American en-
ers have further studied the plan, and the report recently
Bitted goes into the matter thoroughly.
IBASIC FACTS: There is plenty of water in the source, the
fterranean. How easily can ft he moved from there to the
Sea? And what would happen to the Dead Sea were it to
fn large amounts of water? The latter question was not
ah to answer. Much of the water would be lost by evapora-
|The face of the Dead Sea is shrinking in any event. By
oiled intake, the level of the Dead Sea would be raised
nly about four meters, and this would do little harm to
fisting potash plant and other facilities along the shores.
[The latest proposal is for a pipe line from a point some-
pe between Ashkelon and Ashdod. The pipe would enter a
el under the Judean mountains and emerge not far from
|Geddi. Estimated cost of the whole project, including con-
ion of the hydro-electric plant, would be a minimum
pOO.OOO.OOO a figure which does not sound fantaatic in
days of astronomical budgets.
[THE ECONOMICS of the plan would be dictated by the
natives. WO] the world price of oil go up? Indeed, will
r^ays he available to Israel? Present estimates are for a
negawatt plant going up to a peak capacity of 600 mega-
Side benefits were considered. Conventional nuclear po-
[plants require much water to cool then4 process, and hence
must be located in areas along the sea, which are thickly
Wated. The ecological dangers are obvious.
|The proposed pipe line water could be made available en
and before their final drop> for use in nuclear plants,
[thus enable siting of such plants far out in the wilderness,
from population centers.
from an engineering point of view there are few problems,
seemed visionary even in LowdermiBVs day is today pet-
ty feasible, with new machinery and methods.
[THE MAJOR problem remains political Under Interna-
^ law the plan would require approval of Jordan which
on the Dead Sea. The final thought of the cerfamrtee
N on that point Despite all the other favorable oonsid-
M if Jordan will net approve, and if we will net be
[to withstand international pressures, then perhaps there
Point in oar even beginning.
*h Jordan and.

JZuft
'To Be Or Not To Be'
Stars Brooks. Bancroft
Hollywood
j^JEL FRANK wiH co-produce, write and direct
the musical remake of the Ernst Lubitsch
World War n screen comedv, "To Be or Not
to Be," with Mel Brooks and his wife. Anne
Bancroft, recreating the roles of a Polish stage
"Hamlet" and his actress-spouse, originally
portrayed by the late Jack Benny and Carole
Lombard, with Felix Bressart then contribut-
ing the character of an old Jewish performer
caught in Warsaw when the city is overrun by
the German military might.
"When Ernst Lubitsch asked me to play the
Pohsti Shakespearean actor," Jack once reveal-
ed to Louella Parsons, "I was afraid that he
needed a young, handsome leading man. Ernst
said he had written it with me in mind and
naturally I was flattered to do a picture with
the famed director and Carole Lombard.''
THE SHAKESPEAREAN troupe, in the
original version, becomes involved with the Pol-
ish underground and they wind, up impersonat-
ing Nazi officers. Jack being made a "fate"
colonel.
Irving A. Fein, in his intimate Jack Benny
biography (Putnam's, 1976), relates that Meyer
Kttbelsky, Jack's father an Orthodox Jew
from Russia objected to the picture, refusing
to speak to his son because he had seen him
in a Nazi unifor-.i.
It took Benny a great deal of persuasion
to convince his father that he was only play-
acting and actually on the screen fighting
against the Nazis.
"THE HINDENBURG," now on the theater
screen throughout the country, deals with the
air disaster of the last dirigible a catas-
trophe foreshadowing a much larger tragedy,
Hitler's onslaught on Europe that was to cause
casualties a million times the number of 36
men devoured by nature at Lakehurst, N.J.,
on May 6. 1937.
The book by Michael M. Mooney and the
scenario extend the factual account of the
blow-up into the speculative sphere of sabo-
tage, though there are no records of a bemo
plot.
World Foil of Strangers.
Two Other Important Novels
Ul WORLD Full of Strangers," by Cynthia
Freeman (Arbor House, $8.95), is a go-
thic novel in the mold of "The Pedloeks": the
trials and tribulations of a family "in search
of itself and the American dream." That means
that David Resinetsky leaves the Lower East
Side to try and "make it" in the neurotic, de-
pressed and anti-Semitic America of the 1930s.
In order to achieve social and finacial sta-
tus, he changes hJs name to Reid, abandons
his family and denies his birthright. Freeman
chronicles 450 pages of David's rise to power
and his ultimate denouement.
THE NOVEL is long and drawn out, and
I would prefer to recommend this genre to
gothk fans. However, the author presents a
valid and unfortunate consequence of assimi-
lation in America, admirably concluding with
a strong moral commitment to Judaism .
There has been little publicity about Haas
Herlin's novel, "Commeaiorations" (St. Mar-
tin's Press, $8.95). Perhaps this is because the
book is a translation from the German. Trans-
lations do net generally do well in the United
States. That's too bad.
Herlin has skillfully woven the threads of
a spy-thriller, a complicated love story and a
classic manhant ktto an exciting pattern of
intrigue and psychological drama.
THE NOVEL begins with Hans Pitoota,
photographer par excellence, entering a bank
vault to pick up a quarter of a million dollars
a*d a gua. From that point, the reader is led
into Pikokts Hfc and grin* fa the
relationships with his daughter (is she his
daughter?); a multi-millionaire industrialist (is
he a Nazi war criminal?); an infamous S.S.
doctor (is he really dead?), and himself (will
he take the money and become a killer?).
"Cornmetnorations" succeeds precisely be-
cause it approaches the reader on many levels.
It invites us to probe our own feelings, not
just those of characters we read about .
One ot my favorite authors is Giorgio
Bassani of "The Garden of the Finzi-Continis"
tame. A recent Bassani novel, "Behind the
Door," is the beautiful story of an Italian Jew-
ish boy encountering and deahng with anti-
Semitism among his peers.
NOW H)S latest coUeetton of stories, "The
Smell of Hay" (Harcourt, $7.95), also takes
place in Bassam's hometown of Ferrara dur-
ing the 1930s and 1940s of Fascist Italy. He
gently evokes memories of days gene by, and
pain fully preserves the horror of Jews dis-
owned by their country and their fellowman.
Bassanl's style and themes are often com-
pared to those of Thomas Mann, especially in
the revised newly translated novella, 'The
Gold-rimmed Glasses."
THIS IS a tender yet powerful stary of a
respected physician humiliated and vietiiYueed
for his homosexuality and Jewishness.
The author clearly parallels the impact of
this individual's expulsion from his commu-
nity with aas brutality of the-Fascist govera-
ratenfr upon-Italian Jewry.


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ECKYRBDUH_ZSMQ6E INGEST_TIME 2013-05-24T22:31:33Z PACKAGE AA00014307_00137
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January
30,
'Down on Knees,' Envoy Sees Israel Reiigious
Continued from Page 1
MUHSIN': The positions of the PLO in- the United
Nations must be strengthened, the legitimate and na-
tional rights of the Palestinians must be firmly ground-
ed, and all UN resolutions concerning Palestine back
to 1947 that is, back to the Partition Plan must
be mobilized against Israel. The Palestinian question
must never again be dealt with in the United Nations
as a mere refugee problem, but must be handled with
a view to a separate Palestinian state.
DIE ZEIT: Would this also create a basis for re-
cognition by the PLO of a separate Israeli state, of
Israel's right to exist?
MUHSIN: I don't like to answer this question.
If Israel remains what it is a racist, Zionist, impe-
rialist state all it will get from our side is bullets
and shells. Not until Israel has become something
different will the Jews see our faces and, indeed, our
outstretched hands not unless they are ready for
peaceful dialogue with us, so as to create with us the
democratic, secular State of Palestine. We want to co-
exist with them, in a unified state or a state with two
cantons. We don't want to throw them into the sea or
drive them into the desert.
DIE 7.1-.IT: But that really amounts to denying
them the right of existence in a state of their own,
doesn't it?
MUHSIN: They will have to accept this eventual-
ly. Our right of existence in all of Palestine comes
first.
DIE ZEIT: And a Palestinian state confined to the
formerly Jordanian West Bank and Gaza would not
satisfy these juristic claims?
MUHSIN: No, never. We want back every piece
of land, every field, every village and every house that
was ever ours. We will not yield on that- Right, nat-
ural right, is on our side.
DIE ZEIT: Can one put it to the Israelis to com-
mit this sort of national suicide?
MUHSIN: They will have to learn to understand,
but they won't understand until they change their
outlook. That will happen when they are down on their
knees before us, when we have smashed them to pieces
by force of arms.
DIE ZEIT: In other words, peace is not in sight?
MUHSIN: For now, neither war nor peace. And
in the future, war again, new wars. It's inevitable.
Services
hiunqau
1AJ..-ANDALE Lv, tM ,
iBnervtiv, -s nJ e*1I
Rabbi Harry P <;, 1
..cot. Dn.i.r Scn""l
INAI (Temple, 0T nop
laMI NK s%:
NOtTH BKOWAtj
CORAL SPRINGS Htno.
GH SCAT ION. Rtfo,!8"'* I
OCth Avc. iUbb. Mm',"*
Mourwoot
Report Sheikh Yamani is Jew
TEL AVIVThe highly-pub-
licized Minister for Petroleum
of Saudi Arabia. Ahmed Zaki el
Yamani. has a mother, a broth-
er and a sister li\ing in Israel
in a suburb of Rehovoth. The
family, which comes from Saudi
Arabia, arrived in Israel via
Yemen some 25 years ago.
Yamani's brother explained
that Ahmed Zaki el Yamani's
real name is Yechieh Zecha-
riah. He said that when his
brother was 16 years old. he
caught the eye of the royal
court, and after converting to
the Moslem faith joined King
Faisal's retinue.
He later became a sheikh
ud is, of course, bow the Min-
ister for Petroleum with an
enormous influence in the Arab
world. Yamani was one of the
OPEC bigwigs who were taken
as hostages by Arab terrorists
in Vienna.
* t*
JNFs -Sth YEAR
JERUSALEM The Jewish
National Funds "5th anniver-
sary year opened festivelv here
at the Jerusalem Theatre with
the participation of the Presi-
dent of Israel. Ephraim Katzir.
chairman of the Keren Keye-
meth; Jacob Tsur. president of
the JNF of America; Dr. Mau
nee Sage, cabinet ministers.
members of the Knesset and the
Zionist Executive
Katzir said in his greeting
that the occasion was a land-
piark in. the renascence of the
Jewish people in their land and
"a practical expression of the
solidarity of World Jewry with
the Zionist undertaking."
"At this time when Zionism
has .become the target of the
venomous attacks of our ene-
mies, it is good to recall the
work of the JNF which turns
dry plains into flourishing
farms," said the President.
ir -it *
Seven Israelis on Trial
PARIS Seven Israelis, in-
cluding a former commando.
Saituoo Rimon. went on trial
in a Frankfurt court last week
on charges of heroin-smuggling
and distribution in West Ger-
many. Only six Israelis are in
.court.
A seventh, gang leader Yosti
Amiei, escaped. They face ten-
year sentences
The prosecution charged the
aeven snuggled several kilo-
grains of heroin and sold it
mainly to American soldiers,
but also to other Israelis Four
of the seven, including a wom-
an. Mrs. Jacauline Hosmy are
self-confessed drag, addicts.
The case hit the front pages
of the German press because
of Rimon's presence among the
defendants. Rimon. known in
Israel as "Kushi.'' is a former
member of Israel's renowned
Commando Unit 101 and a leg-
endary' figure in military cir-
cles. The German press head-
lined some of their reports "Is-
raeli War Hero Charged With
Drug Smuggling."
tr it -Cr
Uizrachi Women Abroad
NEW YORK Three noted
American Mizrachi Women
leaders are in Israel to attend
special dedication ceremonies
of the new AMW Wolf.and Julia
Easenberg Comprehensive High
School in North Tel Aviv.
The three are Mrs. Sarah
Shane, national president of
AMW, and a resident of Balti-
more: Mrs. Ruth Jacobson, hon-
orary president, of New York
City; and Mrs. Evelyn Schrei-
ber. honorary president, a. resi-
dent of Lawrence, N.Y.
Jewish Families Have Address'
CARLISLE. PA. The 30
Jewish families of Carlisle.
home of Dickinson Cellege, now
have a "Jewish address" in this
college town the Bnai B'-rith
"I!P JSRa*l of" HOI V
Orthodox). 181 surii.".-
HAW Aim
"LANTATION JEWISH j*
OATION. 400 South tiL ^
Plantation. Rabbi Artaw JM
f, *hai.oi rraaaaa.
Wv. 4*01 Arthur St. Ran ,
Malaveky. Cantor irvina oa*
TEMPLI SINAI (Conatrviti,,)
ortnoon St Rabbi Divir it.
Aaeocaate .label Ct-ilm a, Lll
Cantor vm,,,, M.iiana.
TEMPLe SOLEL *Libirao...
idar St.. Hollywood Rah..
Frejt.n.
MWAMAR
SS20 SW Sfctr. st Rico: t
Heats
MMBtOKIrWis
rtMPLEIN THE PINE* (Cm
tlva) 1*00 N. University Or
broke Pinoa. Rabbi Sidney
'-'II
community
JANUARY 31
Bar latevab of Jimmy Jaffee. son of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd
Jaffee. Temple Beth El. Hollywood11 a.m.
Bat Mitzvah of Lauri Berk, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Stanley Berk, at Temple Solel, Hollywood
FEBRUARY 1
Shlomo Carlebach, folksinger. in concert at Temple Sinai
Hollywood7:30 p.m.
FEBRUARY 2
Temple Beth El Brotherhood. Open Board Meeting8
p.m
Temple Beth Shalom Sisterhood. General Meeting-g p m.
Hillcrest Hadassah Meeting, HiUcrest Playdiumnoon
*.oKl AHY 3
Shalom Group of Hollywood Hadassah, Meeting1 pjn
Temple Sinai Sisterhoed of Hollywood. General Meeting
8 p.m.
Temple Beth El Sisterhood. Board Meeting10 a.m
FEBRUARY 7 ^^
Temple Sinai of North Dade. The First Two Hundred
Years Are The Hardest." Barry College Auditorium
& p-m.
Hiliel facility which has evolv-
ed as their synagogue, Talmud
Torah and community center.
In the past. Carlisle Jews had
to travel to Harrisburg for the
nearest Jewish institution. Now
they join with Jewish college
students for Sabbath and holi-
day .services. adult study
course, lectures and socialii
the college campus.
Some 20 Jewish students i_
tend Dickinson and DidaJ
law school.
The 300-year-old college!
recently had us first Bar I
van, the rite being
at a Hiliel service,
to Prof. Stanley Rosenh
, the Hiliel counselor.
enmp ocMifl
For Boys 4 Girls 6-16
A CAMPING PARADISE IN THE HEART
Of THE POLLEN FREE, COOL HILLS
LAKES OF OCALA NATIONAL FORES!
LAME COUNTY, FLORIDA
AM laatl ass Water Seeds Weunluiaa and Reftes Only
Pie Co* one Teems Am anal Crafts Sarfine. Sea ha
Triasby Caaet Horseback R*,H oSaasial Teen deara*.
RaasVatand Math Cimcs Trad.ueei Frasey A Saeesttj
Servces Bax Murvah Lessees Ml DaMary Laws U*Mrvea1
M.O. 2 RN.-s Staff star Msdem infirmary at ALL Tiase*.
Campinj Association
*i.t- ,. 'cv
safe W* |

Your Camp Directors:
COACH J. I. MONTGOMERY
MORRIS A SHEILA WALDMAN
Mieam Beach Phone: 1-532-3.52 or Write:
P.O. Bos 402M9. Miami Beach. Florida 33140
IN UP NOW
OVER 71 SPORTS AN0 ACTIVITIES
Imagine! Tennis on 13 lighted professional courts, staffed by I
'well known' Tennis 'Pro' and 10 instructors! Golf, on euros*
private nine hole courf Riding on seven miles of trails spaa*
over 525 acres of breathtakingly beautiful scenery! A chMn*
paradise ... 25 sailboats, 3 motorboatt, 4 indoor Brurwa*
bowling lanes, canoe trips, baseball, basketball, water***,
drama and dance, karats, fencing, rocketry, ham radio, an*mf,
photography, and gymnastic, art just sorne of the many fajcinaifl
actwmes available! Ages 5 to 16. Fee includes air fare ]*<***
OUt 41ST YEAR!
ueosr yveinberg family direction
D eury Laws Observed Nationwide Enrol*"*
CALL OR WRITE FOR A BEAUTIFUL COLOR BROCHURE
Aneseattif, liaaHrd >,. ts the treweH A
Fer *ertW tetweeaMsm cestett set
"ellyanaaat bpresMtetws^aars. $. Ragea
4ai N. 41st Ct. mOyweee Tel M,1S45 (after 5 FJU
Masaei OHka r 159-US4 er S5a-11M
wtfaat M*B P. W
Separata camps of distinction (or Boy* and CM* on beawtiM Reflet**
L**e m tne pktureeque Pocono Meunaaiea o* H&. Peoaawtv*"*
WMTER OFRC: CM Castor A^nu.. PhilMWphia. Pennsyl.*"- I*1*1
***: UI6I 633-1557