The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00133

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewisli flofgc/ff&ffi
n
|ume5 Number 25
and SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood, Florida Friday, December 5, 1975
Two Section Price 25 cents
Pacesetters9 Ball To Launch '76 CJA-IEF Campaign
Irhe Pacesetters' Ball, one of
year's major events, will be
Fan. 10 at the Diplomat
btel. Tha affair is for $1,000
btributors and involves the
Itire co-imur.ity in la'tnching
1T6 Combined Jewish Ap-
jl-I-iael Emergency Fund
i for the Jewish Fed-
i South Broward.
expect more than 400
-. to attend the dinner,"
Nathan Pritcher. Paceset-
chairman. "It is extremely
portant that our community
work together to help raise
funds to BUDport Jewish me
here an.i in Israel."
Rabbi Herbe t A. Friedman,
farmer executive \ice chdir-
mm of r*e United Jewish Ap-
peal, will be the keynote
speaker. He is an authority on
Jewish overseas n?eds and Is-
rael's refugees and immigrants.
A n-w resident of Israe!. Rab-
hi Fiielman provides a \ital
linl; between fund-raising ef-
forts in the United States and
the programs made possible by
these funds. As chairman of
the UJA Speaker's Bureau, he
was an outspoken supporter of
th" UJA national campaign. He
became executive vice chair-
man in 1955 and executive
chairman in 1970.
Just before the outbreak of
hostilities in 1967, Rabbi Fried-
man \isitcJ Israel for talks
with Jewish Agency leaders and
government officials that re-
sulted in the historic Israel
E-norgen?V Funi'.
>kay for Saudis to Use U.S. Arms
Middle East Military Operations
fey JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
\e State Department has
imowledged that Saudi
labia may use the vast
lantities of military equip-
ent it has purchased in the
aited States in regional mil-
Iry operations without vio-
[ing the terms of the U.S.
[litary Sales Act.
)epartment spokesman
^bert Funseth said, in reply
a question by the Jewish
[legraphic Agency, that the
litary "exercises" just
iducted by a Saudian bri-
kie in Syria which employ-
C-ntinu"'! on Pag? 2-A
Concern Voiced We're
Shifting Toward PLO
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israel has expressed serious
concern that the United
States is embarking on a
new policy approach in the
Middle East that would im-
ply support for the PLO un-
der certain conditions as a
means of leverage on Svria
to negotiate a second disen-
gagement agreement with
Israel on the Golan Heights.
President Hafez Assad of
Syria has stated repeatedly
that he will make no further
political moves if the Pales-
tinian problem is not taken
up and the U.S., which con-
Continued on Page 3-A
ADL STUDY PROPOSES MEASURES
rejudice at Andrews AFB
NEW YORKA major attack
| the problem of anti-Semitism
the armed forces has been
dertaken by the U.S. Depert-
fnt of Defense "Race Rela-
ns Institute" at Patrick Air
rce Base, Fla., Col. Robert W.
|ws. the Institute's director.
lounced here.
'..!dressing a session of the
nd annual meeting of the
k'.i-Defamation League of B'nai
Vith at the Waldorf-Astoria.
}l. Dews cited ADL for its
upport and cooperation" in
|veloping the comprehensive
jrse on anti-Semitism which
has been added to the Institute's
11-week training programs for
officers and non-commissioned
personnel responsible for race
relations throughout the armed
forces.
ALL BUT THREE of the sec-
tions of a 32-page resource text,
"Anti-Semitism," published by
the Institute, consist of materi-
als from ADL publications. In
addition, the League has pre-
pared a teachers' guide and
course outline on Jews and Ju-
daism to be used beginning in
1976, and Theodore Freedman,
director of ADL's program and
community service divisions,
State Dep't. Approves
Saunders' Statement
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) The State Department af-
rmed that it "stands on" testimony given by Deputy As-
sistant Secretary of State Harold Saunders to a subcommit-
pe of the House International Relations Committee last
peek which is viewed in Is-
aeli circles as indicating a
ossible shift of U.S. policy
Joward the Palestine Liber-
ation Organization.
Department spokesman
fobert Funseth told report-
's that Saunders' state-
ment "represented only a
re-statement" of U.S. policy
and is not a change of posi-
tion. He said he could not
understand why the Israelis
were disturbed by it.
THE ISRAELI LaDinet issued
a statement at its weekly ses-
sion Sunday saying that a tran-
Continued on Page 13-A
will serve as guest instructor.
The goal of the Institute,
which was opened in 1971, Col.
Dews said, is to create aware-
ness and understanding of dif-
ferences among armed forces
personnel in order to help them
work together more effectively.
ACCORDING to Col. Dews,
the Institute "perceived a need
for the inclusion of anti-
Semitism" in its courses but
"had serious concern over just
how to present the problem hon-
estly and totally."
The Anti-Defamation League,
he went on to say, has "provid-
ed us with factual data which
we are using to effectively pre-
sent even the most potentially
controversial issues."
In an introduction to the
"Anri-Semitism" text, Maj. Alan
M. Osur, an instructor at the
Institute, points out that be-
cause Jews are "highly visible"
in local businesses, teaching and
other professions, they are made
"scapegoats," particularly dur-
ing times of crises.
MAJOR OSUR cites today's
economic recession and "the re-
cent Arab oil boycott" as crises.
He goes on to say that a special
concern of the armed forces is
"strained relations between
Blacks and Jews."
"Since the military is a cross
section of American attitudes
and beliefs," Maj. Osur declares,
"it is important that race rela-
tions instructors be informed
Continued on Page 13-A
NAT PRITCHER
RABBI FRIEDMAN
Jews, Blacks, Women
Barred from Arab Jobs
SACRAMENTO (JTA) The California State
Department of Transportation has announced that Jews,
Blacks and women will be excluded from a plan to send
as many as 500 soon-to-be jobless highway engineers to
build roads in Saudi Arabia.
Robert Best, chief deputy of the Transportation De-
partment, said that under the program in which the state
will technically keep the engineers on the payroll while
Saudi Arabia pays their salaries, they will comply with
Saudi Arabia's policy "not to issue a visa to anyone con-
nected with the Israeli government."
He said to the Saudis this means anyone who is
Jewish.
"Another aspect of the situation is we would want
to protect Jewish people by not sending them there be-
cause it is a very emotional issue," Best said. Another
department official reportedly said that in addition to
Jews, Blacks are not welcome in Saudi Arabia and wom-
en don't participate in the country's business life.______
FIRST CANDLE FRIDAY EVE
Chanukah: Our
Ancient Festival
Of the Lights
/""HANUKAH is known as the
*~* "Festival of Lights," a name
rooted in the practice of light-
ing candles on eight successive
nights. The name of the holiday
"dedication" in Hebrew
stems from Judah the Macca-
bee's rededication of the Second
Temple in Jerusalem about 165
BCE.
The festival also marks his
victory some three years earlier
over the Greek king Antiochus
Eoiphanes a tryant of the House
of Seleucus who had plundered
the Temple while seeking to
forcibly Hellenize Judea.
HIS CRUEL excesses against
the Jews which included efforts
to the compel them to parti-
cipate in pagan rites ignited the
Hasmonean uprising. The Has-
moneans were a priestly dynasty
founded by Mattathias of Modin,
and his five sons, Judah among
them, led the popular rebellion
in Palestine against Antiochus.
The celebration takes place
between Kislev 25 and Tevet 2
I
t

I

on the Jewish calendar. The
foundation of this is the next
of I Maccabees 4:59: "And Ju-
dah and his brethren and the
whole congregation of Israel
ordained that the days of the
dedication of the altar should be
kept in their seasons from year
to vear for eight days from the
25th day of Kislev."
This became embellished by
the Talmud (Shabbat 21b) which
states that the festival contin-
ued for eight davs because the
oil discovered in the Temple,
though enough onlv for one day,
burned miraculously for eight
until new sunnlies were located.
CHANUKAH candles are light-
ed in an eieht-branch candela-
brum known as a menorah from
a ninth candle known as the
shammash. The Maoz Tzur
(Fortress Rock), a song believed
to have been composed by Mor-
decai. a 13th Century liturgical
poet, is sung. This practice
Continued on Page 10-A


fV^^I


Page 2-A
The Jmwith F lor man aruLShofar o] Hollywood
Friday, -December
L Hollywood Hi-Rises Plan
J Events for Israel Bonds
Three Hollywood oceanfront
hi vise buildings have announc-
ed btate of Israel Bond cam-
l>uan events- ducing December
to help raise $20 million for
the Sooth Florida Israel Bond
Organization drive.
'At the first event on-SuOilay,
Dec. 7. atJ.8"p.ni...at Itbe-lt^iplo-
mat Towers, JSenAAsftJaodvwill'
recci e the State of: IiuraelsSol-
idariry Award. Sponsored by
the Diplomat Towers Israel
Bonds Committee. Ibe cereat
Will feature Israeli entertain
r Danny Tadmore. \AccoitdiiiK
to. chairman Joeeph "*;\'., Pmter-
een, "it is indeed.iiciin^:.that at
1'iis 'Night in Is*eeTBBen.\Axel-
rtkl be feted for Itfcis :jeurhless
Nk as a humanitarian mnd
philanthropist.'"
Chairman of the 'Hollywood
J wish Federation...rcampaiiin at
Diplomat Towers |s ygear.
Sen Axeleod has iHmadc ttwo
ri ips to Israel :;aad hhas *#een
.first-hand how 'Israel POond
#--*nds a-e used to-akf-HT'the
c matoy's economic develop-
ment pri.tvam.
On Sunday. Dae 14. Le-m
Ackerman will receive the Is-
r->-1 Solidarity Awud at the
Hallmark tNisM in Israel," -at
8 p.. in the Sochi Hall. Ac-
cording to chairman Jac?b
faharl, it is indue;' fJttklg tft
Lean Ackerman accept this
h nil-. Leon, a cbartsi member
<>f fie.Harry ,s. 9mtm$a ft'au
'' Iflfi m-WoHvwaed. ws
J.F.
Jewish
Civilization
It"> all there in the
I m-N t'loparilia
ludaiea.
>\*r free crolor
'rorhiir*-.
m (:W.>> 38-MB5-1
or wHti:"C-.l., "Suite SOS.
I2 I coVn Rd.. M R. W1.1*
PAYMENT ArrKPTFD
IX ISRAEL BQ.MJS
a National Commrtteeman for
the Democratic -Party in .Now
^York '.City. \Ameiicun .Jewish
-itlikvhnmoLJt t Emiri Cohen' will
.-repot t-ori cm i cut cortditiiMs in
MMhi
On Tuesday, Dec. 16. at 8
iipim. am She. rocxaonin u residents
and ,u-U-'. ts will .attend the Hol-
lywood Towers "Night in Is-
rael" tiibcts to chic and com-
munity leader Leo Herman.
Actee in a nai h nth in C"i-
.cag> tend IkJHy.wood for the
past 43 years. Berinan Is a mum-
bar of Temple Beth Shalom.
where he parti cipates in Char-
itabL.' acri iti s. A msiKber of
Temple Emanu-El in Miami
Beach, U; initiued the li.st
Israel B,ii! campaign at Hol-
h/weod Tbwei'a.
.-pon^oved by the Hollywood
Tow-is ferae] Bonds Commit-
tee under the guidance of Dr.
H nry !-'..BIoo-->, cliai man, and
D\ John As'in, cechakrean,
the meeting wi'l play a part in
helping raise Isiael Bond sub-
-( i -tmns.

Rent~A-Car
LOW AS
%J -A DAY
7c Per Mile
(10p Mi. Rad us,
Wt w-.-.--- ^--t-'rirr -S'-l. Matter
C*f.Qe. Carte. Blanche ami
D-n'r Ctoh
CAR-BFIL
.MOTORS
520 S. Dixi- Hwv.. Hollywood
920-4141
US. Gives
Saudis OK
To Use Arms
ton iu.-d from Page 1-A
ad Anteaican V-S jets .based
at a Jordanian airfield, was
proper under the terms of
the Act and of the Saudi-
American mutual defense
agreement signed 24 years
ago.
Fl'NSETH said th:U under the
Military Sale* Act. the recipient
of American equipment can use
it for internal security; "ie^itim
ate self-defense" and to "parti-
cipate in regional or collective
arrangements or measures con-
sistent with the United Nations
Charter."
Asked Whether American
equipment supplied the Saudinn
brigade in Svh was used by
the Saudis alone or by Svrian
forces as wll. Fnnseth said he
understood that the maneuvers
have been comr-I-tod and that
about 15 F-5 iets in Saudin
hands were used in "the annual
training cycle" of th- b'-igade
which has b-Wfl stationed in
Svrfa since the Yom Kippur
War.
Funs?th siid th" aircaft
were staged "through'' Jordan
vi'h pbn -s landiag and taking
off in Jordan. He did not know
wtv't .^i'-tiei'! >n Jordan was used
and said Israel wis n^t advis.-'
of the use of U.S. planes by
the Saudis in Syria.
HF. jJPBP, "I'. the b"st of
our know! u'. ,v,e oin-"ip'
was entirely Saudi" and did "not
constit"t" a vieht'Wn of the en-1
use of the KsMotion i-"-os"(l
bv U.S. law under the Military
Sales Act."'
Jordan and Syria have ostab-
lislted a unified co-ruand and
the use of a Jordanian base for
Saudian elanes anneuvering in
Syria was rfewed bv nb*>rvem
here as a form of psychological
warfare against Israel by the
combined Saudian-SyiiaH-Jtn-
danian forces.
I'Hiwth t^ict.-jT* had no con-
firmation af ijeaoits ,attrib.ted
Pi U:S.-4nt-eUiWTiv sou*cas thar
the Soviet Union has sent a
s.quadron of advanced MIG-25
iets .to Syria.
1
W
m "--------- *
nation
Israel
lives!
As concerned Jews and
Americans, we join others of
all Faiths in condemning the
recent obscene act of the
U.N., equating Zionism with
racism. We also feel that it is
the special responsibility of all
'Americans to speak out a-
gainst this outrageous reso-
lution. Contact your elected
officials and let them know
how you feel.
As the great Rabbi Hillel once
said:
"If I am not for myself, then
who is for me, but if I am only
for myself then what am I, and
if not now WHENi"
MURRAY B^ESKY
President
FALLS POULTRY CORP. South FeJJsbucg. NY, 12779
Two Hallandale Condos
Plan 'Night in Israel9 Eve
M
Residents and guests of two
Hallandale conriominiums have
announced "Night in Israel"
campaign events on behalf of
the 1975-76 South Florida Is-
rael Bond Organization drive
for S20 million.
The first event. Sunday. Dec.
7, at 8 p.m., will be at Golden
Surf Towers. According to
chairman Irving Schwartz, Irv-
ing and Jeannette Krauss will
receive the Israel Solidarity
Award, and the entertainment
will be provided bv Mac Rob-
bins, stage, screen, TV and
nightclub entertainer.
Irving Krauss is mesid-nt of
the Golden Surf Condominium
Owners Association.
Committee cochairmen are
Murray Green Samuel Weiss-
berg and Max Yumas.
ntsl
On Wednesday, Dec in
and-Mrs. WilhV, F|Vjm'''
receive of the Stite of k.
Solidarity v* cial guest will b- W'
Jewish h-.-o-ist Mickevfo
man who will report on I
urgent economic dvelo
program needs.
According to chalrrnan
Somach and cochaiman k1
than Pasik. "it is indeed fitftj
that these two devoted meb
of our communitv reeefr m
special plaudit for their J
on behalf of their brethren I
IsraeL"
The Rrausses, who are ,,
hers of the Hallandah ,le3
Center have been honor.nl p
viously by State of Israel Bo_
and the Federation of Jen]
Philanthropies.
Gala Now Year's Eve Ball
At Temple Beth Shalom
A gala New Year's Eve Ball
will be held in the Grand Ball-
room at Temple Beth Shalom.
Dec. 31 at 9 a.m. The evening
is cosponsored by Temple Sis-
te hdd and Men's Club.
Rav Garcia's orchestra will
pro' ide musical entertaim,
a late aupper will b-- served]
party fa'o s provided.
l>n^rlTas for
should be made before Dxj
by contacting Mrs. Albeit
bert or Art Lew
Riversides
two new chapels in
Hollywood and Sunrise
serve the needs of
the entire
Jewish community in
Broward County.
IntheHol^woodandHollanda'.fC', .
5801 Hollywood Boulevard. Hollywood
920-1010
J/l [Ik- /or, Lmitferrra/e area:
1171 Northwest blst Ave.(Sunsef Str;pJ.Sunrise
584-6060
RIVERSIDE
NWinon.ilOmivI. Ini.. t-uiK'wU)::.-,-.
t)ther Hiverside chapels in South Florida an iocau
N,,r,h Miami Beach Miami Beach ai d Miami
*y "T****>* MawBBltoi iJaawiwh chdpri M
HKwUyn Hi..M.C,,,K..k.In.iv.ii.d,.\.- hfswi
Murr-yN Rubin I n
H12.5-76
H12-5-75
H12-5-75



day,
1975
The Jewish Floridian and .Shofta.of. Hoilywood
Page 3-A
Sculpture Depicting "The Shtetl"
To Be Displayed tat. Temple Emanu-El
Brandeis Women Present "Fusion"
i
B'nai B'rith
a of the
iLwULpre-
: & original
, ... rhe Shtetl,"
at Temple Etnanu-sJ.
On M. Kahn, ex-
>f B'nai
Ij, the announcement
ton, DC
.11 ling the
[ th Hondo sculpt .r
i life in
I le Yiddis* diminu-
town" or '"city," gen-
implying a relatively
rl community in Eastern
one.
| irt-Of Jacob Sheiniuk
[ irror of hi^ recollection
jfc in the shtetl' of his youth
J alter his immigration to the
|u*d States) and dramatizes
transition between life in
Jern Europe, and the accul-
ivsn through EHiS Island to
fcrican life." Ribbi Kahn
Over the last 20 years, he
recreated with painstaking
j and care the clraracters
i events so dear to his child-
Rabbi Kahn continued.
Ith vivid clarity he has re-
(ured the character of a so-
li is no longer with us."
According to Rabbi Kahn,
[entire collection of 42 wood,
d metal carv-
B Mad I" the Bnai
B'rith KhUeotok MWM in
\,'ashin;".pn.-"This b >dy of nrt
has -i made -available
to us for in appreciation, but,
more i-ipostantly, it serve* as
I rvarkj not
forg?t thocor, whoie live* and
way of life the Holcoa
This magnificent collection
is ol particular "alue during the
Bicentennial year since, for
most of its existence, B'nai
B'rith flourished ir. what was
for the most part an immigrant
society in the United States. Yet
these immigrants were quickly
integrated into.,, thaVa Auieacan..
scene and spirit,'" i. Kahn
said.
Born in V'ilna in Lithuania at
the turn of the century, at age
seven Jacob Sheiniuk moved to
Michalishuk, a small town near-
by with a population of about
200 families that became deeply
engraved in his memoiy.
At the end of World War I.
Sheiniuk's father brought the
family to Palestine, where he
had migrated earlier. In 1923,
after threu years in Palestine,
Sheiniuk came to the United
States and settled in Spring-
field, Mass.. became a metal-
worker and later moved to New
York Citv...
The Hollywood I Hallandale >
Women's Committee of Brandeis
University will sponsor a bene-
fit performance by the Mhfmi
dance grotto "Fusion" on
day at 2 p.m. at the? Barry Col-
lege Auditorium. Miami Sh"
This is the committee's only
fund-raising project.
'Fusion," UffAuH '\ill pres nt
a program of contemporary
dance has appeared on WPBT,
Educational TV Channel in
South Florida.
Pearl Laving is prcskier* of
the committee, and Sadylle Gor-
don is publicity chairladv.
BarnettBank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
arnett
anK:
i
JACOB SHEINIUK
A member of Artists Equity,
a national association of sculp-
tors, Sheiniuk and his wife of
46 years, Lily, moved to North
Miami Beach from New York in
1970.
"The Shtetl'' opens Monday
evening, Dec. 15, at Temple
Emanu-El. There will bft^twa
daily -showings, through P*c. 23;,
from- 1-4:^0 and 7-9 p.irr-.
For further- dtJs. cqitfact
Neil C. Rosen, Flonda lodge
service du;eflBfc: aU:th*> B'nai
B'rith regional office.
NU-LIFE
PAINT &
BODY SHOP
MAY. I HMi IHi NHf OfWTS
COLLISION SPECIALISTS
INSURANCE WORK
SPECIALIZING IN QMAL-ITV
WORK
30 YEARS EXPERie.-JCE I
2111 S.W.. 59 TEBR.
1 BL. S. OF TREASURY
', BL., E. OF 44V
S!
;, W-6040
Report Israel Fears About
U.S. Policy Shift on PLO
'mtinued from Page 1-A
ues to say it will not tol-
stalemate or stagna-
r in the M^ast peace
bcess, appears to tafce him
[his word, Israeli sources
here.
hlE CABINET angrily de-
linced what it described as
Jimony by D;p-itv Assistant
iretarj ol Ittte Harold Saun-
as before a Congressional
pimiuee in Washington last
bk in w hich Saxinders alleged
Intiimted that the U.S. would
[open to the idea of a Pales-
Ian state on CM -West Bank
1 Gaza Strip it rhe PLO recog-
d Israel and accepted UN
olutions 242^ and- 33* as prior
Editions.
Iccntary of State Hanry A.
raej with Israeli Am-
fcsadcr Simcha Dinitz after
pad re' appearartoe-before the
nmirtee try assure him that
\n has been no change in
0.8. position on the PLO.
l to the Israeli government
)t the U.S. still believes that
Palestine issue must be in-
Iporated in eventual negotia-
t between Israel and Jordan
that the U.S.'itaB- no desire
raise the issue at'this time.
pHAT IS more or less the
fey of Israel which holds
a Palestinian solution must
be found within the framework
of a future settlement with
Jordan.
But Premier Yitzhak Rabin
and his ministers apparently
were aot fully .convinced by
Kissinger's assurances, relayed
to them by Dinitz. A Cabinet
communique said it had the full
transcript of Saunders' testi-
mony before .it and.agreed un-
animously that it was replete
with "errors and misrepresenta-
tions."
The communique said that
Israel's "reservations and quali-
fications" waukt be brought "m
full" to the attention of th U.S.
government.
UNOFFICIALLY, it is under-
stood here that Kissinger told
Dinitz he had not seen Saun-
ders' testimony before it was
presented to the House com-
mittee.
Although Kissvnget, specifical
ly denied to Dinitz that the
testimony represented the be-
ginning of an Administration
effort to prepare public opinion
for a $hift in U.S. policy pn the-
Palestinian issue the feeling
here is that, such indeed is the
case.
By shifting to a possible Pales-
tinian solution involving the
PLO, Washington will seek to
persuade Syria that.jt step-by-
step Mideast policy would, in
due time,, incorporate .process
on the West Bank-Palestinian
issue,-sowoes* here- said.
Main Store and Plant
2000 NORTH DIXIE HIGHWAY
PHONE, 920-8021
Monday thru Friday 8 to 5:30
Saturday 9:00 to 1:00
BRANCH STORES
4551 Hollywood Blvd.
Phone:981-8555
610 Atlantic Shores Blvd.
IsoJTrTKirJoTsSy^rivr
Phone: 962-0999
i

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N$ed a Nurse who. cares?
1 'ute believe 4 ponuin* concern, an understanding.
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"" 'n a hoapial or nursing home,
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MEMCAIr PERSONNEL POOL
"A National Nursing Service"
Suiter 2M,
2500 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood-Ph. 920-4360
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& Loan Association of Florida
SHEFARBBKOAl)
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CHAIRMAN OV THE BOARD
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PRES1DEN1
CONVENIENT LOCATIONS IN MIAMI BKACH.3AY HAABOR ISLANDS. PLANTATION. LAUDERHILL.
HALLANDALE, DEERFIELD BEACH. POMPANO BEACH AND FORT LAUDERDALE.
Member. Federal Savings A Loan Insurance Corp. Your Savings Insured to $40,000.


1

Page 4-A
The Jewish Ftoridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, December 5, 1975;
First Chanukah Candle
Friday evening is the first Chanukah candle. His-
torians keep telling us that Chanukah is really a minor
Jewish festival, but in our own time it is rapidly emerg-
ing as one of the happiest and most soul-sustaining holi-
days in the entire Jewish calendar.
The warmth of the candles, the joyous centrality
of children to its spirit, the festive glow of the occasion
through eight days of blessings and song all this
brings to Chanukah a binding quality that reminds us
of our culture and tradition, and the price we have paid
for them in suffering and deliverance, throughout the
ages.
Few of our holidays do all these things better
than Chanukah.
Above all, there is the story of the miracle the
craze of oil meant to last for but a short time, and that
lasted long enough (the eight days of the festival) for
a new supply of sanctified oil to be made.
In this miracle, there is a statement applicable to
modern Judaism and the contemporary Jewish experi-
ence.
to Historic Promise Fulfilled
It surely is relevant to our times that nothing in
our history could have foreseen the fact of Jewish sur-
vival since the Maccabees. In fact, the reverse is true.
Even in the 20th century, from Hitler to the Arabs,
the course of Jewish experience would suggest demise
rather than survival.
And particularly so far as the Arabs, themselves,
are concerned: Not only is there the need for new
supplies of oil for all of us sanctified oil, non-Arab
oil but there is the promise of the holiday:
The oil is destined to come.
Jewish history promises this in the same way that
Jewish history has assured the Jewish continuum from
time immemorial.
Chanukah not only is increasingly enjoyable. Its
historic promise remains endlessly fascinating.
Academy Anniversary
Greater Miami Hebrew Academy celebrates its 28th
anniversary this month, with its more than 700 students
making it the largest Hebrew day school in the South.
Under the leadership of Rabbi Alexander S. Gross, its
principal for more than a quarter of a century, the He-
brew Academy is considered one of the fine Jewish
educational institutions in the counWy. -
(| The Academy will observe its official birthday with
a community-wide dinner at the Deauville Hotel Dec.
14 honoring one of its founders, former Bay Harbor Is-
lands Mayor Shepard Broad.
Now, the Hebrew Academy is a beneficiary agen-
cy for the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, receiving
yearly allocations for the community's CJA-IEF cam-
paigns.
Numerous Academy families "went it alone" for
many years, supporting Torah education at a time when
the community had not yet made day school education
a-priority.
The 28th anniversary celebration is a tribute to
them, as well as to the South Florida community that
now joins in supporting it.
Community Philanthropy
The danger that New York City's financial crisis
may spread to other cities is slowly being realized by
more and more Americans.. For American Jews the
problem is especially urgent since most of them live in
urban areas. -
This was eloquently pointed out by Sanford Solen-
der, executive vice president of the Federation of Jew-
ish Philanthropies of New York, in an address to the
General Assembly of the Council of Jewish Federations
and Welfare Funds in Miami Beach last week.
wJenisftflcridiari
m uwai as u*mi MUHHt
M* PLANT 1M N.m Ml at. Missal. M* Mitt A... m tees
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Tefepoooe 37V 4603
P.O. Bos 2973. Miami. Plow* 11101
" All P.O. 3fi7 returns are to be forwarded to
Hat Jwih Floridlan. P.O. Boa B129T8. Miami. Fta. SS101.
fRKD K. SHOCHKT 8UZANNE 8HOCHET SBLMA M. THOMPSOfr
Edltor and Publisher ExecuIlTS Editor Assistant te Publisher
The Jewish riorldlan Doe. Not Guarantee The Kashnrth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published Bl-Weeklr by the Jewish Floridlan
Poatajre Paid at Miami. PU.
eratlon of South Broward. toe SHOFAR EDITORIAL
COMMITTEE -^Nathaflditcher. Chairman; Lewis E. Cohn;
Baer: Dr. Samuel MeUne, D.M.D.
Second
Jewish P
ADVISO
Kelvin H
Class:
Ffter.-i
>1 C
H|fla.
The Jewish Flertdlan has absorbed the Jewish Unity And the Jswl.h Wsefcly.
Member ef the Jewish Teleorsphic Aosney, Seven Arts Feature yndi-
^- VVortdwide News 3rvi,;. National Editorial Association. American As
elation of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Aseeclstlen.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) Ons Ysar 5.00. Out of Town Upon
ft QUO St.
Question of Political Morality
By MAX LERNER
Los Angeles Times Syndicate
"God us keep," wrote poet
Robert Blake, "from single vi-
sion and Newton's sleep." There
is no single, simple way to see
the meaning of the Senate Intel-
ligence Committee's report on
the assassination policies of the
CIA. The only adequate way is
by a kind of triple vision.
There is, first and foremost,
the auestion of political moral-
ity. History will record that in
the 1950s and 1960s, in the wike
of the cold war with world
communism and under four
Presidents, America allowed it-
self to use the assassination of
foreign leaders as an element
in its policy.
t RNR
IN TERMS of morality, no-
thing can excuse or extenuate
this. The knowledge of it breaks
with special impact at a time
CHANUr^H I975
-OITT
vjn
Volume 5
Friday, December 5, 1975
Number 25
1 TEVETH
Waldheim Given
Cool Reception
By Israeli Chiefs
JERUSALEM (JTA) Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim flew into Israel from Syria early this week,
bearing with him what he called "concrete ideas" on the
UNDOF renewal issue.
All indications were that Waldheim had secured
Syria's assent to a mandate renewal conditional upon
the prospect of some further diplomatic progress in the
region.
BEFORE THE talks with the Secretary General be-
gan, government officials here expressed marked reser-
vations about his apparent desire.to broaden his mission
into a more general exploration of negotiating prospects.
As United Nations Secretary General, and as such
bound by General Assembly resolutions, Waldheim is not
considered by Israel a particularly useful go-between
at this time and was told so in no uncertain terms, in-
cluding reaction to a message from President Assad that
aa UNDOF renewal would have- to be predicated in Is-
raeli recognition of "Palestinian rights."
Officials said the Premier and other government
leaders intended to keep the talks with Waldheim closely
confined to the mandate question.
They would not favor extensive discussion of nego-
tiating prospects, whether what was envisaged was a
reconvening of Geneva or some less formal framework.
THE ISRAELI leaders, officials said, would reiter-
ate to Waldheim thtfr Israel would have, hotAing to do
with the UN committee set up by a recent General As-
sembly resolution to oversee the implementation of Pal-
estinian rights, nor would Israel heed the Assembly
resolution calling for the PLO to be invited to Geneva.
If the PLO were invited, Israel would not attend, Wald-
heim was told in the clearest terms.
Israel radio reported that Waldheim returned to
Syria later for another round of talks there.

of bicentennial celebration. One
ponders on how Jefferson or
Madison would have felt if they
could have foreseen thit the
moral republic they helped
found would someday have
truck with such confusion and
corruption of moral ends.
The second question is that
of motivation, on the part of the
officials who conceived the asr
MusilMtton schemes and what-
*-er P-"sidents may have
known of them. Motives are
inbred and often obscure. Some
of the people involved are dead,
others speak only warily, since
they fear not only loss of reou-
t'tion but possible criminal
indictment.
YET IT is clear enough that
the main motive was "reason
of state." It is the classic as-
sumption, since Machiavelli'i
ess-vv on "The Prince," that a
head of state grand or petty
can do no wrong, provided
he acts for reasons of state.
In the case of the plots
against Castro, Trujillo, DiemJ
and Lumumba (the kidnaninp"^
plan for the Chilean general
doesn't belong with these), the
CIA underlings probably were
content with orders or sugges-
tions from their superiors and
rtHn't <,sk ar>out presidential ap-
proval.
AS FOR the ton CIA men and
the Presidents themselves
Bts-nhnw***, Kennedy. Johnson
the high targets must have
seemed major obstructions in a
lethal cold war, and therefore
removable.
T>e historic irony of it is that,
aside from being morally wrong,
it didn't particularly work. Ei-
t'-"?r the plans didn't come,
through, as in Castro's case, or1
their impact now seems very
much disminished by time.
If the Presidents involved
knew what was happening
(which is not entirely clear)
and didn't merely want a base
for a "plausible denial," could
tbv have believed that the
plots wouldn't somehow be re-
vealed in time?
THEY MAY have thought that
the cover was multiple and
dense enough to keep from get-
ting unstuck. If they did en-
visage that someday the story
might break, they either be-
lieved that the social fabric
could stand it or else they wei
blind and self-destructive.
The last perspective has to do
with the unraveling of the story
and its publication. It is hard
to think of any other modern
state that has dared open its
secret intelligence closets to
reveal these skeletons.
NOTE THAT America has
done it as a matter of moral
ritihtness as wall as public
policy, without blinking at the
harsh fact that the publicity will
damage' its credibility around
the world.
The Rockefeller Commission
had combed through most of the
assassination material that the
Church Committee has publish-
ed. They passed up the chance
to- make it public since Presi-
dent Ford was worried about
the repercussions of havn
such lethal material in the
port of a presidential commis-
sion. They were wrong-
AND THE Church Committee
has been rieht in insisting on
going ahead with the publica-
tion* even .though, the avoidance
of a Senate, vote on the issue
was a tricky tactic
After the traumatic experrl
ences. of secrecy and coveruM
hawevesffrisky escept to I
reveal the total story. There are
often warts in any natioiui
portrait, as there were in Oliver |
Cromwell's.
But Cromwell's injunction to |
paint the whole picture, ""'an*
and all," is a wise injunction
for a modern democracy to fol-
low.
:\
esi-
eiit \


>
Friday, December 5, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 5-A
**i**r^r
^*^^*A^A
-*!
'WW\-^VUr'V
?MAbe?
by ABE HALPERN
^V^V^^^V^V^^^V^Vi^^^y
^f
-
ere
jes-
ar.J
IP"
ind
NO
n
D 3
'ore
hat,
ing,
Ei-
>me
i oi
try
I
r
ved
ling
;ar)
)ase
mid
the
re-
that
and
get-
en-
tory
be-
bric
re
$
>do
tory
lard
iern
its
to
has
oral
iblic
the
will
tund
sion
the
the
lish-
ince
resi-
jetit
rim
ssi-
'35
mis-
ittee
I on
licfr
met
ssue
pen-1
;rup.|
3 do
Jt l
; art I
iotul]
liver
m to I
varts
ction
,fol-
i Question: How did the custom
of visiting graves of parents and
relatives originate? What about
the placing.of stones or pebbles
on the tombstones? What is the
purpose or significance of these
customs?
David W. Levine
Lauderdale Lakes
Answer: The custom of visit-
ing graves of parents or close
relatives, and nraving there va-
ries from region to region and
co""*rv to eoontrv,
The origin of this custom is
not certain. Some authorities
beli"ve th*t it stated w'th the
visit to gravs of our Biblical
ancestors, rabbis and sages.
According to tn Talmud
(Tractate K""" SM th L"H of
Israel is considered to be holier
than any other land.
Within the Land of Israel
there are also many sites pop-
ularly considered to be Jewish
Holy Sites and as such as ven-
erated and visited.
According to the authontntive
Encyclopaedia Judaica, with the
exception of the Western Wall
the only remaining part of
the Wall which surrounded the
Temple Mount the other holy
sites are mostly eraves of bib-
lical figures or famous rabbis
and pious men of the Talmudic
period. These include the Cave
of Machnelah in Hebron, where
our patriarchs are mid to he
buried, the Tomb of Fnchl in
Bethlehem and the To-** of
King David-oh. Mount Zion in
Jerusalem.
In addition thre kt* bunal
sites mostly in the.Galilee, be-
cause most of th rbW m rhe
Talmud livd and ta"ht twr.
In Meron there are the -"-
of Rabbi Simeon Rw Yoohai.
Hillel and Shammai. Ther* e
many other eravesites in Tibe-
rias and Safed.
The notion of vMHnf t*>c
sites is almost nonviste" in
primary Jewish sourr. How-
ever, in the course of rime and
perhaps under non-Jewish in-
fluences. Jews car>p to r"-d
these places as holv a-H tie
prayers offered the"* .re
effective than at our phr.
"The theme of i**** > 'i
peaceful eternal r* f '- J >.
parted and invoc"*5' f~- ^vi'<>
id to the livinc o-> th Im*N of
pious deeds of *i oVid er-
formed in thei"* Wnl1"*. .'"da-
ism did not e^"'' '--ovine
to the dead' "-* ->m of
Kever Avot ('isit:nn ^o grave
of the fath"-* s ^"rvfore
limited to ".s-i-----lllooa"
(tncvclonjj, .indaica, Vol.
10, p. 934>.
The r-m ,.. i^j ^mm
rules about vWtfno graves. A
rfemete-----------. k- visits on
the SoVfv.fi. f".i.-,ia. holidavs
or d-H- v first thirtv davs
of fv., -,^^{q T>erkd. It is
pernMssibte cm .s. following oc-
casions: on Tisha B'av (the
ninth of *V rh. davof m "ie for destruction of the
Tp-r-nle. n-.-H, **, month of
Elul prior to the Hiuh Holidavs,
d"nng the oenitential davs be-
tween Rosh Hashana and Yom
Kipr-iu- and on tho Yohrzott. the
anniversary %of the denh of
dear on-. Fremvnt visits to
cemetery are
proper.
Th rabble !<, A*cr*A tkjt
lev'tv should not be nrcri~d
"n the *>m nonor due the dead. One should
"either eat nor drinV nor allow
We to graze on the cemeterv.
Visiting graves of the pious
in
Eretz Israel was considered
Israel Doesn't See Saunders
Paper as ILS. Policy Change
*1S1
regarded
as
a
a
im-
an act of piety. It became wide-
spread from the early middle
ages to the present. It was con-
by rhe Kabbalists (followers of
sidered particularly desireable
Jewish mysticism).
The purpose of such visits
seems to have been to commune
with the departed Tzadik (right-
eous and pious man). The grave,
therefore, served as a point of
focus. To pray, to recite psalms,
to meditate and study, would
enable the pilgrim to reach new
heights of spirituality.
"Nearly all the Jewish travel-
ers who visited Erez Israel mn-
tionen" eraves in their accounts
and, indeed, many travel books
outlining itineraries and listing
the graves enjoyed wide circu-
lation. A pilgrimage to a holy
grave was considered to have
therapeutic value and many
customs developed for such
visits. Candles were lit at the
grave; often the supplicants
made ceremonial processions
around it and prostrated them-
selves on it. There was and
still is a widespread custom
of placing a small stone or peb-
ble on the grave and some pil-
grims take a stone from it when
they leave. It is also common
practice to leave a written peti-
tion t the grave" (Ibid., Vol.
8, p. 922).
There is no accurate explana-
tion for the custom of placing
pebbles or small stones on the
tombstone or marker at the
grave. Some authorities state
that the placing of these is a
token of the viait. However this
custom is not universal.
A personal note: My younger
brother and I were born and
irrew un in the same small
shtetl in the Ukraine, under the
same customs and environment.
However, since coming to the
United States we live in differ-
ent areas and different sur-
roundings. Whenever we visit
our father's Rrave, I never put
a stone on the tombstxui". We
had never been exposed to this
custom in the old country. Yet
my brother goes out of his way
to find a stone or pebble to leave
on the tombstone. I do not have
a rational explanation.
It is interesting to note that
according to the American
Heritage Dictionary, the English
word cemetery is based on a
Greek term meaning "to put to
sleep." In Hebrew a cemetery
is called either "Beth Olam"
House Eternal. "Beth Chaim"
House of Life, or "Beth Ha-
Kvarot" House of Graves. In
Yiddish it is called Beis-oylem.
Other idiomatic names for a
cemetery in Yiddish are: "dos
gute ort" the good place, and
"dos reyne ort" the pure
place.
Editor's note:
Please send questions to
??? ASK ABE ???
c/o Jewish Federation
of South Broward
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood. Florida 33020. _
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) High
government sources conceded
here that Jhe so-called "Saun-
ders papers" did not represent
any real departure by the U.S.
from its established policy to-
ward the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
The sources were referring
to testimony last week by Sec-
ond Deputy Assistant Secretary
of Rate for Middle Eastern Af-
fairs Harold Saunders.
A TRANSCRIPT of Saun-
ters' testimony, discussed at
Sunday's Cabinet meeting,
brought an angry response from
the Cabinet which issued an
unusual communique charging
that it contained "errors and
mi srepresentations."
But the government sources
said that the U.S. has been sav-
ing for some time that it would
favor negotiations with tbe ?L0
if the latter met the stipulated
conditions, Israel, for its part,
has ruled out any contacts with
the PLO under any conditions.
The sources would not for-
mulate a position basd on the
"hypothetical auestion" of whe-
ther Israel would negotiit- with
the PLO if it accepted Israel's
sovereignty and the UN resolu-
tions.
They admitted, however, that
Israel was completely isolated
in its position but there wss no
need now for an "agonizing
reappraisal" by the government.
THE SOURCES described as
"hysterical" the reaction of th
Israel press and public to the
disclosure of Saunders' remarks.
They said the wisest course
would be to allow the furor to
subside.
They said the U.S. itself had
no desire to dwell on the Pales-
tinian issue at this time an-4
while the timing of Saunders'
testimony was unfortunate, it
was dictated by the House sub-
committee's timetable and not
by any intention of the Adminis-
tration to prepare American
opinion for a shift in the U.S.
position on the PLO, as charge^
by some circles in Israel.
The sources did not explain,
however, why the Cabinet is-
sued its sharp attack on the
Saunders testimony Sunday if
the government's desire was to
let the matter blow over. Some
officials believe the answer to
that question may be domestic
political pressures.
A Happy Chonufca To All
THE
HANGUP
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Pembroke Pines
WALLPAPER STUDIOS
Phone 9M-3661
lUiHappy Chanuka To All
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I
A


1
Page 6-A
The Jewish Flondian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday. December 5, i^
Galahad Complex Plans Three
"Night in Israel" Events
is of the Galahad com-
ply on Bdtftfc Ocean Dri'e
announced three "Night
MAURICE Id MB ALL
in Israel" campaign meetings
during the month of Decem-
ber. William Littman, chair-
man, board of governors, South
B reward County. State of Israel
Bonds in Hollywood, made the
announcement.
The Galahad Court evening
-Will be-in the:SociaI Hall--at-8
>pxa.. '"scaordipg to chairman
Xfrrsrfph "*Wrtstrtn -and -roVtrair-
*man Matilda Kimelblot.
The Stats of fcraelv.\Hll pre-
^ 1934
1949
1950
1957
1966
sent the lira el Solidarity Awacl
to Mmuice KilflBaH for his work
on behalf of his brethren in
Israel. His interest in Israel's
welfare is of 1 >ng standing, for
he made his first \ isit to Pales-
tine in 1926.
American Jewish folk humor-
ist Mickey Freeman will enter-
tain the meeting, which is
sponsored by the Galahad Court
Israel Bonds Committee, Moe
Levin, honorary chairman, and
Joseph Henry, Men's Club pres-
ident.
Rose and Da\id Kitter will
receive the Israel Solidarity
Award at the Galahad South
"Night in Israel' 'on Thursday,
Dec. 11 at 8 p.m. in the Galahad
South Scial Hall. David Kitter
was chairman of the Israel
Bond campaign when Mrs.
Eleanor Roosevelt was guest
speaker and cochairman when
Moshe Sharett was a principal
speaker. Rose Ritter has been
active in iJevish communal life
for more than 50 years, and in
Hadassah and Youth Aliyah.
Chairman Paul Sneider and
cochairmen Sidney Holtzman
and Emanuel Kirwin have an-
nounced that following the en-
tertainment by Mickey Free-
man, the men and women of
Galahad South will turn to the
serious business of raising Is-
*ael ^B^fids 8Hbscriprtons for
continuing the country's eco-
nomic development programs.
< Galahad III will pay tribute
to two of their most''devoted
residents. Lee and Harold
4cb*iie, at the "Night in Is-
UK'T'On -Mi*MtHv. Dec. IS at 8
-pwn. in rbe Social Hall. Special
gO*r\^rHe'Etnil Cohen, Amer-
ican Jewish folk humorist. Com-
TnitTce cochairmen '4Mr. and
Mrs. JukaXtOrdon and Mr. and
-Mrs. Jacob 1). Mmkes said a
host committee of Galahad III
TWIdPnts-'is""working diligent-
'.4y help even more in 1975 than
_ in the past. The Infamous'
"United '^Jaflons resolution de-
cierig Zionism as racism and
the recent attack on Zion
Sotmre 'in-Jerusalem are nly
two of the many reasons why
Israel mstc continue to be a
Vibratit end self supporting
country in her striving for
peace."
Lfts flcFHBrolcfSchakne, who;
will receive the Solidarity j
Award, were raised in the Jew- j
fstv tradition of Tzedakah. They'
hare 'received-plaques and hon-
ors from the Jewish Federa-
tion,' firnrideis University, Tech-
nion and B'aai B'rith. Mrs.
Selwkne is a i relative of the
late -Rabbi teaao Hatevi Herzog,
Chief Rabbi of Israel, who was
the father of Chaim Herzog. Is-
rael's Ambassador to the Unit-
ed Nations.
Milton M. Parsoa, executive
director. South Florida Israel
Bond Organization, stated that,
"The 'Night in Israel' programs
are extremely important to the.,
State of (trad because the j
pledges made are the only
source of funds that Israel re- j
ceiues for its entire reconstruc-
tion and development program.'
We are calling on every mem-
ber of the South Florida com-
munity to subscribe to Israel!
with a heartfelt purchase In
this dire time facing our breth-
ren in Israel. On Wednesday,
Doc. 17. a distinguished leader
of the Jewish people and free-
dom-loving people throughout |
the world. Golda Meir, will
come to our corniamty to tell
us of the critical need in that
' cDnnTry."
Saudi Job
Plan Under
Scrutiny
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Rep. John Heinz III (R., Pa.)
has called on Attorney General
Charles bevj for an opinion on
the constitutionality of a Cali-
fornia plan that would abet
Saudi Arabian discrimination
against Jews and others.
Heinz told Congress that Cali-
fornia "lias been put in the po-
sition of literally ignoring and
possibly violating our own civil
rights laws to accede to the di-
\ isionary whims of a country
that only recently has clothed |
itself in moralistic robes and
led the fight to declare Zionism
racist."
THE PENNSYLVANIA legis-
lator was referring to a project
announced by the California
State Department of Transpor-
tation to help unemployed mem-
bers of that department get jobs
building roads in Saudi Arabia.
The state officials reportedly
said that such jobs would not
be open to Jews. Blacks or i
women because they are unac-
ceptable to the Saudi govern-
ment.
Gov. Edmund Brown. Jr., of
California, who assailed the
plan, has meanwhile ordered a
halt to job negotiations with the
Saudians until they promise no :
discrimination against Jews,
Blacks or women.
A SPOKESMAN for the State
Transportation Department said
it was complying with the Gov-
ernor's orders. He said a cable
would be sent to Saudi Arabia
demanding "affirmative assur-
ance" that there will be no dis-
crimination in hiring highway
engineers and technicians.
The California state agency
is faced with the prosjgfcwof
laying off 2,800 employes by
next July because of a cutback
in highway construction.
Heinz said that if the Justice
Department does not see the
California plan as' violating any
Civil Rights Act provisions, he
would offer legislation that
would make such actions illegal
"We must not allow the hypoc- ,
risy of other nations to soil our
own hard-won civil rights |
eains." Heinz told Congress
Chanuka Greetings To Our
Customers and Friends
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SHEET METAL
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TELEPHONE 922-0239
QUALIFIED CANTOR
With beautiful lyric tenor voice
excellent traditional Cantoriji
Technique, now living in Hal.
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401 N.E.I 4tti Avenue
Hallomfole, F!a. 330C9
Telephone 1 -925-8272
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Blue trim 1395.00
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now *895
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s


''-Way, DccemtVer^ l?yfr~
n
Mr. and1 Mrs. Mogilowitz
To Receive Ben-Gnrion Award
At Temple Sinai Dinner
The Jewish Floridian and Shofdr a} Hollywood
Page 7-A'
1

T'i ssentKfon of the State
of Israel Da ij Ben-Ouiion
'I! b '-nt-d to
ft Mogilowitz
ael D;n-
: iv eveninc.
Dec. 2!. 3t"t!M tSpte Sinai
AlKliti i im.
The inn:" : ".tsmsde
todaw 'iibbl I Shpi.
who J '" the dinner-
m>tii HI -lenifioant
role a is ti***c in Israel's his-
rorj HI h flSfe ursrnt-
ly n led torael Bond subscrip-
tion- i -in":.. EiMel'a eco-
ii"- ic elopm programs.
Th.- sp< '! be Max
T. D'n : : lecturer
on .. h hi
i

A v ing to diaaer. chaii-
' 'I Antan.
rlrs A lea )c*in and
i tir Mann,
l>ed :iv-'p.4 that two
of o i! nost de' ofSd congre-
gant j.-cib and Seafiee Mo-
gilev should receive this
special trioute oecause they
have I i! : time and
mnn pro'id" strength and
Inspiration for I iek brethren
in I:;. "
Th ident I iemnlo Si-
nai Fi a'cob Moj?i-'
low:;- ; own MrtWMf of|
the board cf t n Feder-;
atici i 'o'-" -nvl- and|
MR. AND MRS. MOGILOWIT2
cha'ter president of Herzl B'nai
B'rith lodge. He serves on the
eoftmHrfM of the Hillcrest
Country Club United Jewish
Appe. I and was Chairman of
the Silent Appeal for the Tem-
ple duiiiiK the past eight years.
Beat, ice Magilowitz serves
on the Board of the Sisterhood
and the Women's Di> ision ofi
the Jewish Federation of South
Browaid.
Mr, and Mrs. Mogilowitz were
chairmen, under the direction
of Rabbi Shapiro, of the South
Broward Israel Bond Organiza-
tion campaign follow ine the
Six-Day War and the Yom Kip-
pur War.
Some of the South Broward delegates who
departed from Fort I.auderdale Airport
on Nov. 9 to attend the Histadrut Solidar-
ity Conference at the Tel Aviv Hilton, un-
der the patronage of Mrs. Golda Meir.
from left: Bess Pierson, Mr. and Mrs.
na.ry Wemstein, Yale Weinstein, Sadie
StBfcofcf, Reta Gershman. Irma Rochlin
and Mordcchai Puldiel (at rear). Dr. and
Mrs. Drickman, Rachel Shapiro, Mildred
Weinstein, Rabbi Malavsky and Jack Sha-
piro.
MEMBERS PRINCIPAL SECURITIES EXCHANGES
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Incorporated
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Atlanta/Boston/Buffalo/Great Neck/Greenville/Los Angeles/Miami Beach
Philadelphia/San Francisco/Washington, DC/White Plains
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CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS
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V...'
AUTO CENTER
540 S. Dixie Highway
Hollywood
922-3428
.**"
I

IsraePs Beloved Leader
at the
J OF THE CENTURY DINNER
COMMEMORATING 25 YEARS OF ISRAEL BONDS
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1975.
GRAND BALLROOM FONTAINEBLEAU HOTEL
MIAMI BEACH
Admission to the Dinner will be based on the paid minimum
purchase of a $1,000 Israel Bond since September 5, 1975
and $15.00 per person
For Prospectus:
STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS
1747 VAN BUREN STREET. SUITE 760.
HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA -: TEL. 920-9820


Page 8-A
*
The Jewish Floridian and Shefar of Hollywood
TridMj, Peewper S, 1973 '
60 South IJreward Federation Members

Attend CJF's 44th General Assembly
Opera Tells of Holocaust
Sixty members of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward
attended the 44th General As-
sembly of the Council of Jewish
Federations and Welfare Funds
in Miami, Nov. 19-23.
A streamlining of present
Jewish organizational structure,
without the creation of a mono-
lithic Jewish community, was
urged by Raymond Epstein of
Chicago, president of the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds, in his address
Florida State Association
Of B'nai B'rith Lodges
Plans St. Pete Meeting
Mike Teitclbaum, M.D., state
president, has announced that
the executive committee of th?
Florida State Association of
B'nai B'rith Lodges will meet in
all-day session Sunday, Dec. 7,
at Sun Coast Village in St.
Petersburg.
The semiannual meeting will
discuss the recent United Na-
tion* resolution condemning
Zionism as a for"i of racism,
projects for 1976-77, plans for
next year's state convention in
Miami Beach and the renova-
tion program for the B'nai
B'rith Hillel Foundation at the
University of Florida, Gaines-
ville.
State convention chairman
Jay Markowitz of Tamna, presi-
dent ofjhe B'nui B'rith Coun-
cil of West Coast Lodges host-
ing the executive committee
meeting, will unveil nln fn-
the conclave tc be held April
30-May 2.
The executive committee,
which conducts the business of
CHANUKA GREETINGS
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HOLLYWOOD
PHARMACY
2740 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
TELEPHONE 923-2458
CS5P
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For Information Call:
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TELE: 538 6539
B'nai B'rith in Florida, will hear
reports from ommittee chair-
men and B'nai b'rith profession-
al staff on their activities since
the group convened in Miami
Beach on Aug. 10.
Members of the state B'nai
B'rith executive committee in-
clude state line officers, lodge
presidents, state committee
chairmen, representatives from
the South Honda, Broward-
Palm Beach, North and West
Florida councils, national and
district officers residing in Flor-
ida and representatives of the
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization
(BBYO).
Wednesday evening at the
Deauville Hotel keynoting the
assembly. The organization is
composed of the leadership of
the more than 200 local Fed-
erations and Community Coun-
cils throughout North America.
Epstein underscored the tra-
ditional and continued need for
the CJF to serve the North
American Jewish community as
the "catalyst of change" and the
"recognition of the strength
that resides in the place upon
which everything depends
the local community."
The Council of Jewish Fed-
erations and Welfare Funds is
the association of central com-
munity organizations Federa-
tions. Welfare Funds. Commu-
nity Councils serving 800
Jewish communities fn the
United states and Canada. It
aids these communities in mo-
bilizing maximum support for
the U.TA and other overseas
agencies, as well as for major
national and local services in-
volving financing, planning and
operating health, welfare, cul-
tural, educational, community
relations and other programs
benefiting all residents.
There will be* premiere per-
formance of "Memoirs from the
Holocaust," sponsored by Tem-
ple Sinai, at Barry College on
Dec. 27.
"Memoirs" is an hour-long a
chamber opera written, com-
posed and directed by Michael
Biaz, music instructor at Barry
and assistant director of the
.uijiii oiivs ^h< i.\
The satting of "Memoirs" is
a small German town in the
bte 1^30's. The story explores
the dreams, anxieties and mo-
tives of its four characters.
Ticket reservations can be
maJe at the Temple office.
Menorah Lit at Beth El
The Festival of Lights was
commemorated with the kin-
dling of the Chanukah Commu-
nity Menorah on the front law:?
of Temple Beth El on Friday
Nov. 28, before the regular wor-
ship service.
H ISRAEL AIRUNES
ANNOUNCE YOU SAVE $81.00 ON 1975
11-DAY WINTER PACKAGE
Compare Prices
1974 1975
$719 $632*
Includes Round Trip Air Fare Florida to Israel, First Class Hotels,
with Private Bain, Airport Transfers, Porterage.
*To February 28 only
FOR INFORMATION CALL YOUR LOCAL TRAVEL AGENT OR
El AL A RUNES 532-5441 OR MAIL COUPON
"EL AL ISRAEIAIRUNES -"
1602 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
1


Friday, December 5, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 9-A
I
Dr. Beber Named to AJC
Florida State Advisory Council
Dr. Charles R. Beber has been
appointed chairman of the Flor-
ida State Advisory Council of
the American Jewish Commit-
tee, it was announced today by
Elmer Winder, president of the
Committee.
In accepting the appointment,
Dr. Hebur stated, "These are
turbulent times for America
and the world times in which
we face political and economic
challenges the American
Jewish Committee through its
nrograms to preserve liberty
has always fought for the rights
of every oppressed minority as
well as Jews."
Dr. Beber, who will be re-
sponsible for coordinating Flor-
ida chapter activities and for
implementing committee objec-
tives on a state level, is the
past president of the Greater
Miami Chapter, a member of
the National Board of Gover-
nors and National Executive
Council of the American Jew-
ish committee.
A graduate of Harvard Col-
lege and the University of
Nebraska College of Medicine,
Dr. Beber is assistant clinical
professor of medicine at the
University of Miami College of
Medicine, medical director of
Douglas Gardens-Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital, chief of the
Section on Geriatric Medicine
of Cedars of Lebanon Hospital,
physician in charge of the
Geriatric Clinic at Jackson
Memorial Hospital and presi-
dent-elect of the Cedars of Le-
banon medical staff.
Beber served on the Gover-
nor's Council on Aging and is
a delegate to the White House
Conference on Aging.
This signed and numbered lithograph by Theo Tcbiassc,
will be given away at Sisterhood of Temple Beth Shalom's
seventh annual Art Festival Exhibition and Auction on
Dec. 13.
Beth Shalom Sisterhood
Plans Art Auction
Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Shalom has planned its seventh
annual Arts Festival Exhibition
and Auction for Saturday, Dec.
13, at 9 n.m. in the Grand Ball
room. Admission is free.
The comprehensive exhibition
rf origin-'! signed and numbered
works of artsincluding graDh-
i a (lithos. etchings, engrav-
ings), oils, w itercolors, draw-
ings and sculoture by well-
Known artistswill be presented
by the Art Scene of Miami and
auctioned by Richard Reiser.
The art will be on display at
the temple on Friday Dec. 12,
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.. and on
Saturday, Dec. 13, from 7:30 to
9 p.m.
A Patrons' Buffet Dinner will
be served from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. '
on Dec. 13. Reservations for the
dinner can be made with Mrs.
F -d Hlumenthal or Mrs. Leon
Brauser, auction chairmen.
There will be a pri?e draw-
ing (not a raffle) of a signed
and numbered lithograph of;
Theo Tobiasse.
Auction committee members I
include Mrs. Samuel Bfeline and
Mrs. Irving Miller. Sisterhood
president is Mrs. Marie Port-
noy, and Mrs. Albert Robert is
f nd-'-aising vice president.
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
To All Our Customers and Friends
ANGiE'S GROVES
BONDED GIFT FRUIT SHIPPERS
1328 SOUTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY
PHONE: 927-5447_________
1 LB. COCONUT PATTIES $1.29
Order Now For Christmas
Shipping Pink and White Seedless
Grapefruit and Navel Oranges
Indian River Finest
<
I f
MR. MARSHALL BERWICK of
!
i1
Broward County's
Largest and Newest "Chevy" Dealer
Extend Chanukah Greetings to the Jewish Community
We don't meet competition .. .
We Make It!
Florida's Largest Indoor Showroom
HUNDREDS OF CARS
FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
760 South State Road 7 (441)
Across the street from Fashion Center
PHONE 962-5310
DADE 621-5656


) a*elO-A'
Tlte Jewish floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, Dtecember 5, 1975
Mrs- Meir To Be Honored
As "Woman of the Century
South Florida will play host
i ('. >I3a M.i.\ Israel's fourth
Mile Minist:!-, the first wom-
l ii to e\er hold t'le head of
i tatc position, when sht: recfix -
is a special p;\ sjntation coiB-
mpmoMttigg -' yeais of State
:f Israel Bonds at the Woman
f the Century Dinner on
Wdiwsda>'. i) c. 17, in the
''rand Ballroom of the Foo-
lainebleau Hotel.
The dinner is the climax ol
the National bead Bond Cash
Mobilization campaign and is
oserved to those persons who
'ia\e purchas d nd paid foV a
rrinimum of si,000 or more in
lstael B nds since Kept- 5.
According to dinner chair-
-ran an.l njn.-ral carepuif.u
chairman Robe t L. Sicul. M a
I i"'- i i.-i~ t > S "ith 1- ferii
' one of the most significant
;'Bd histOlic c ents in the life
f our community. Shfi come.*
s a trup spokesman of Israel's
)iaoplc at a ti~" wVn a-ri>r>
i ."ho strives for peace and a
neaceful coexfctJnCe is besie;;
id with anti-Zionism anil i:i-
''amous' resoliftions' by Third
'.Vbrld countries."
On the occasion of the offi-
c inl observance of Israel Bond's
siver Anniversary, people who
hjve 'pUMraiWl S253W0 worth'
will rec-i e
thfe Prime Minister's Chrb'
Awad and share the dais with
?'lrs. Meir. Those community
leaders include: Joseph Artpit-
f'aum, Moises Berezdirm. Sh'ep-
;sd Broad; Hvman Chaforfer.
WflHam B. Ch-'s'-y. Mrs. Rose
Colter lit : >.i 8 J. Mr. and
Mrs. JUBepri M. Dioxlor. Ben
I ixmar, BsMMel >.'. V iedland,
JeTMld F. ('Oad^an Nathan E
BVerg, Mr. and Mrs. Moses
HeVHSttfn, Leonard L. Luria,
Aiian Miiel. Herman OWntum,
D.\ is- in ii J RacMrB. Mr. and
Mrs. MkclWll Robin. Al -xander
S. J>ai'/. Kutii V. Sctiafrrfn, Sol
J. Pohrelber. Robeit L. Siegel,
Harold Slater, Nathan Slewett,
Doll SoBsr, MeJa-do Tuchman
and Nethan Wrnakirr:'
In- itatiocs to the dinner in-
clude moinhera representing
tlte Greater Miami Israel Bond
Oiganization, Robeit L. Siegel.
-,outh Broward Coun-
ty. William Littman, chairman.
L> iai d cf governors; North
Brfeft'MJ County, Robert M.
'Hermann, chairman, board of
!.">vei nor*. Milton M. Parson
is executive director of tht
South Honda .srael Bond Or*
ganizaSdB.
Temple Sinai Sisterhood'
I'hi ns Auction
Th Sisterhood of Temple Si-
nii or- North Dude will sponsor
its fin* ann'al auction on Sat-
urday I) v !.i. nt 7:30 tNSM Ad*
mission includes desserts, bev-
erage, door prizes, raffles and
the lisjrft to bid on thousands
of dorhrvs' worth of merchan-
dise.
For-further information and
ticket-;. CiH tl>> Tcrnite office
or ticket chairman Dixie Lam-
pert.
Sidney Hodes To Receive
Israel Solidarity Award
GOLDA MEIR
Chanukali
Sidney Hodes of Hollywood
will receive the State of ls\-aet
Solidarity Award at a "Night in
Israel" program sponsored by
the Galahad West Israel Bonds
Committee, Thursday, Dec. IN.
at 8 p.m. at the Galahad West
Social Hall. The announcement
was made by chairman Jwnme
J. Lowenthal and cochairmen Al
Lowy and George Schneider,
who stated that the resident*
of Galahad West will show their
solidarity for their brethren in
Isrel by aattending this pcogram
and pledging an overwhelming
amount of Israel Bond subscrip-
tions in 1975-76.
American Jewish folk humor-
ist Emil Cohen will provide en-
tertainment andAirgathe -mem-
bers and gwests to 'hetn Israel
at This serions time in"her|bis-
tory.
X
CHANUKA GMtTINGS
SEA AIR TOWERS
RESTAURANT
3725 South Ocean Drive
Telephone 920-9592
HOLLYWOOD
wfiday,
Qr-
A Shotting of 'Unique
Skirl and'Shirk
Ensembles
Pierre Car din
Chris Allan
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Lady Hemispheres
Lower Lobby -1950 S. Ocean Drive, Hallandale
Parking Validated 920-2077
DO YOU
KNOW?
Continued from Page 1-A
originally took place in the Ash-
kenaxi rite onlv. Seohardim also
recite the 30rh Psalm.
In the synagogue the dedica-
tion offering of the princes
(Numbers 7-l-t:-4> is read from
the Torah. and in the liturgy the '
full Ha'1-1 (Plains 113-118) la I
recked. Al-Nissim. the Chanukah
snecial nraver. is inserted in the
Amidah (as well as in grace
after meals) and recalls the
Temple miracle.
Candles are inserted on suc-
cessive nights, an additional one
added nightlv. from right to left.
while the lighting itself is from I
left to right. The menorah is
traditionally placed in a promi-
nent place to" symbolically "ad-1
vertise the miracle."
THE MENORAH of Chanukah, I
a non-Biblical holiday, original-
ly was an oil lamp. But over the ]
years it assumed the design of
the seven-branched candela
brum which was used in the'
Temple. In recent vears crafts-:
men and artists have created a
wide variety of menorah forms.
On the first Sabbath of Chami-:
kah the morrheticai portion1
read is Zechariab. 2:14-4:7 which
includes th^ verse: "Not bv
might nor by oower, but by My
spirit/saith the Lord of Hosts
Tlite emphasis is seen*: as- a f
rabbihid defcirs to nlv down the t
roilitrv facat of Chanukafli and |
to focus on the facet of the sur-
vroat- of reHgtatw Talues- threat--'
ened by Dagan and idolatrous
forces.
ONE OF the familv customs
of Chanukah is to nass eveninos
at home sninning the Chanukah
ton"dreidel" or "trendel" in
Yiddish. It bears the initials of
the Hebrew nhrase "A great
miracle hannened there;" in Is-
rael the word "here" is sub-
stituted "for "there." One of the
nrinoinal custa-ns is the. er-
changine of gifts including
monev (Chanukah "eelt").
IMC
^kurash;"1"
Phone 921-2902
Main Office 2429 Hollywood Blvd
Phone 947-5654 Toll Free
Stan lay S. Kurath
and Naomi R. Kurash
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* Extensive sightseeing visits to the newest discoveries
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Hollywood, Fla.
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944-4879
CHANUKA GREETINGS TO
ALL OF OUR JEWISH
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}
Friday, December 5, 1975
The Jevrish Floridian and Shofar o/ Hollywood
Page 11-A
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
to iniSMton of A nWtca
ward Zionist lJi;t.iut
Editor, Jewish Flo:idian-Shofa-:
The Zionist Organization of
America through its Public At-
nspa'.iirreiK'f eii'fxi' nnne-
I > the attack against
i. in the u.\. it is called
I pS NATION t&ACN-OUT.
i'he i tllowing actions ware
tak.
:. On Saturday, Get. 18, a--.
i] jilts were made 1>r Dr.
isteiu, president of the
ZOA, tj broadcast a li e
stai-.i'.jnt on behalf of the ZOA
over f'BC national radio.
2. On Sunday, Oct. 19, a state-
by I);-, hternstein was gr -
en to the -New- York Tinus and
meo.porp.ted as- a IP3d story
thai Jay.
3. n Monday, Oct. 20, the
Jewish Telegraphic Ag?ncy re-
ported a statement by the ZOA.
4. Cn Tuesday, Oct. 21, ur-
gent messages w.re sent to 14
n;iti mar fraternal, labor and re-
ligious organizations di.-ecting
rheir attention to the UN reso-
l-.if.on as an attempt to legit-
imize hdtwC.
On Wednesday, Oct. 22. per-
sonal tetters were sent to an
additional 200 national organi-
zations (describing) our view
of this despicable action.
6. Ad\ertisements have been
planned in major media, and
thousands of buttons proclaim-
ing that Zi'inism is a badge of
honor will be 'distributed.
We hope the physical and fi-
nancial help- will be forthcom-
ing. Please bear in mind that
"0 nations ha< e voted for the
resolution charging Zionism
with being a racist program and
therefore questioning the very
legitimacy of Israel and the
Jewish people.
We urge your readers to
write to your senators and con-
gressmen, demanding a change
in this resolution. Also to oSf*
UN Ambassador Moynihan,
thanking him for his attack on
this despicable action.
AU this won't help the UN.
We hope the resolution will be
canceled by the time this let-
ter appears. In any event, this
is the type of propaganda we
must expose.
Broward Zionist District
SAM J. PERRY
President Emeritus
P.S. Since the above was writ-
I UN G n 1 l! \-s nKy
i the reaoluti n, but
iv vid w n t accept. H ..
i; shows what the ZOA
had d ne.
Jor; Jewish FtoHdtah^SlMrfn-:
Your issue of Nov. 7, 1975,
carries on the inside pages this
aVtitls which Ctrtfght my atten-
ti Heard."
I read it through very care-
fully and then discussed it with
gome" friends. You see, I am a
newcomer to these partshave
*i-:n ih Floridn for slightly more
thin a vear. They agreed with .
my thinkin;;to wit:
1. The Anti Defamation
-League has l^ad this matter
rfWrddgnry straightened otti
v.'th all concerned.
2. Senator Stone has been
sntisfied.
3. I intend to write the: 5
Jewish Senators, one of whom
I know quite well from Conn,
(Abraham Ribicoff).
Now for the crux of the matter
as far as I am concerned and-as
far as my mature judgment en-
ables me to see things clearly.
How can you permit an article
of this sort to appear'in your
wVU-read highly esteemed pa-;
per? Do you agree that Nice
hatred shall be perpetuated and
that Jack Eckerd, whom I do
not know, should become a per-
manent anti-Semite? Articles j
such as I refer to surely would
arouse considerable unpleasant
feelings in my mindso why
not in Jack Eckerd's?
The' Miami Herald is an ex*
c;llcnt paper. President Ford-is'
not a biased Hian, whatever else
' anyone wishes tothhik of him
as our President. In other,,
words. I am bemused, annoyed
and quite angry with the article
in questionthough 1 am certain,
that the writer thereof, thought
he was' doing the proper thing
by expressing himself as he did.
I believe you get my message:
"Don't Perpetuate Hatred otf
Bias."
Sincerely,
Irving Eisenstein
GoMnealih
&r thimriuess
BAGEL
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THE WHITE HOUSE
Washington
November 10. 1975
Dear Fr-i/nds:
Thank you for your letter to
Presid :nt lord expressing your
\-:,w an ihe recent vote in the
il Committee of the United
NeXtuus.
As you may low. on Octo-
ber '-li' President Ford issued a
MMVHMlH in which he deplored
the vote to which you refer.
The President expressed his be-
lief tb-it actions such as this
serve only to weaken the United
Rations.' The-President express-
ed his firm support of Ambe '-
sador Moynihan and his asso-
ciates who he indicated had
stated well the views of I I
Administration and the Am
iean people on this issue.
Th^nk you for taking the ti
to write.
Roland L. Ellin-
Director of
Correspondence
The Members of the
Jewish Federation of
South Broward, Inc.
283B Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood. Florida 33020
I
ISRAEL HISTADRUT FOUNDATION
Invites von to attend its
Annual
Founders'' Day Luncheon
Celebrating its
Forty Million Dollar Milestone
- Featuring-
HONORABLE" EM %N13EL SHIMON I
Dynamic Consul General of
Israel in Philadelphia
i
DR. SOL STEIN
Motional President
Israel Histadrut Foundation
JSoted Eranomist 'PersonidFinaiwud& KsUtte Planning
DR. MORTON MALAVSKY
Spiritual Leader. Temple Beth Shalom
Chairman. South Broward Council
Israel Histadrut Foundation

BINA LANDAU
Soprano singing star
specudizing in
Jewish and Israeli folk music
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9th, AT 12 NOON
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM-GRAND BALLROOM
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$4 per person
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 927-1656
ISRAEL HISTADRUT FOUNDATION
HOLLYWOOD BREAD BLDC, SUITE 840, 1747 VAN BUREN ST., HOLLYWOOD, FLA.
i
i

i
I


Page 12-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shqfar of Hollywood
Friday, December S, 1975
^r
>
h>
pabfrtwcai ipage
...
*
coordinated by the
CfMtar Miami Rabbinical Association
ce-ediKr
Dr. Max A. Lipathte *<>*>' Robert J. Of k.and
devoted to discussion of themes and Issues relevant to Jewish life pest end present
V
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
IsraelThe Chosen
Chanukah: Its Ceremonies
By RABBI CHARLES RUBEL
. No concept in Judaism has
been more maligned or mis-
understood than the concept of
the Chosen people. Many non-
Jews feel that the claim of the
Jew or Israel as the Chosen
people of God is sheer arro-
gance on the part of the Jew,
the claim that he alone has been
chosen by God as His favorite
people. This concept is even
more misunderstood than is the
concept of Zionism, which is
now before the eyes of mankind,
when the anti-Semitic world of
Arabs and communists has
branded Zionism as a racist
philosophy. I am leaving the
defense of Zionism in more
competend hands than mine.
I would like to discuss the
philosophy of the Chosen peo-
ple as it has always been under-
stood in Judaism, not as an ar-
rogant claim, but as the true
philosophy of the Torah and its
ideals. Does it mean that the
Jew is racially superior, as Hit-
ler Yimach Shemo claim-
ed for his "Obermenschen," the
blond Nazi beasts? Does it mean
that the Jew must enjoy special
privileges? Do we mean to im-
ply that we are mentally super
ior to other nations of the
world? Not at all.
Our rabbis and prophets have
defined that concept aa being
one of responsibility. When a
Jew recites the blessing Asher
Bochar Bonu, before the Torah
reading, he does not mean that
he is better than the Italian or
the Frenchman, but it means
that he accepts the responsibi-
lity which the Torah thrusts
upon him to live the decent ex-
emplary life, prescribed by
God's Law in the Torah and in
Rabbinics.
We Jews are to be an ex-
ample of better behavior in our
lives as human beings, we are
to strive to reach the high goals
Bet in our Torah to live and act
justly, to be kind to others, to
really show that the Jew strives
i for a better world of peace, jus-
i tice and righteousness between
man and his neighbor, and na-
tion and nation, that we strive
to bring the world to a real day
when men will learn war no
more, and when the lion will
lie down with the lamb. The
fulfillment of such a task re-
quires discipline and self-con-
trol. Judaism has, for exam-
i pie, ordained for us the observ-
ance of the dietary laws, to
teach as the concept that life is
sacred, even if it is only that
of an animal. When we take
that innocent life for our eating
pleasure, we must at the same
time follow certain ways and
laws which are to demonstrate
our concept of mercy and pity.
We cover the blood of the
bird we prepare for food, as a
sort of atonement for taking its
life, a sort of burial, so to speak.
The Jewish method of slaughter
has scientifically been proven
to be the least painful for the
animal, and only anti-Semites
have branded Shechita as cruel.
A Jew mut not eat Mood in
any shjepe, form or manner, and
so we_soak and salt the meat to
remove the blood. An egg with
CANDUUGHTING TIME
m
1 TEVETH 5:10
w
a drop of blood is Treif. Every
observant Jews knows that. And
the lesson of the Jewish dietary
laws is mercy and the sacred-
ness of all life, whether of an
animal or a human being.
As Jews, then, we must dedi-
cate our lives to social justice,
to bring about a day of justice
and brotherhood between man
and man, and nation and nation.
We conclude all our prayers
with Adon Olom, Lord of the
Universe, not Adon Yisroel,
Lord of Israel.
We recite the Olenu prayer
three times a day to emphasize
that we look forward to the day
when all mankind will be united
under the banner of One God
Who created us all, when broth
erhood will really be the uni-
versal law of all men. These are
the principles to which our Jew-
ish chosen-ness dedicates us as
Jews.
And our task is undone as
long as there is somewhere in
the world where men suffer be-
cause of the cruelty of man to
his fellow man.
The Jew points his finger at
the wicked nations of the world
and warns them that all wicked
and evil rulers will finally de-
stroy themselves, as the Psalm-
ist clearly states, Temoses Rc-
sho Ro that the evil itself
kills the wicked, one in the end.
This is being proven now,
when wicked nations, cruel dic-
tatorships, had the arrogance
and chuptzah to brand Zionism
as racist.
We are here to teach the
world that the God of history is
always fighting on the side of
justice, and that justice and
truth will prevail in the end.
RABBI NORMAN N. SHAPIRO
Temple Zion, Miami, Florida
Chanukah is a minor holiday
in our calendar, but one which
is widely observed. The beauty
of the Festival of Lights evi-
dences itself in its meaningful
customs and ceremonies. The
special prayers and songs, the
lighting of the Chanukah can-
dles, the menorah, the spinning
of the dreidle, the gifts and
Chanukah geldt, all are an inte-
gral part of these eight happy
days.
Yet, the so-called modern
trend has been away from cere-
monials. In far too many of our
Jewish homes the abandonment
of our religious rituals and cere-
monies is shocking, to say the
least, and this neglect does not
augur well for our future con-
tinuity unless religious leaders
and teachers and members of
synagogues can make a con-
certed effort to achieve a new
awareness of ceremonials and
their significance all year round
and not only on a specific or
isolated occasion like Chanukah.
I WONDER how many of us
realize the role ceremonials do
play in our daily lives. We stand
at attention when we hear the
national anthem. We salute the
flcg of our country to show de-
ference to the principles it re-
flects. We observe Independence
Day and thus pay our respect to
the Founding Fathers of oHr na-
tion.
All these are ceremonials.
Women wear wedding bands as
a symbol of their love and devo-
tion. These are obvious and
time-honored ceremonials. It is
not a sign of intellectual super-
iority for an American to for-
sake or ignore the customs and
ceremonies of the American
people.
SO ALSO in Judaism cere-
monies have become fixed
means of conveying- certain
ideals and commemorating his-
toric events. The customs and
rituals enhance the imagination
by giving content and cencrete-
ness to otherwise abstract ideas
and emotions. Religious doctrine
needs to be supplemented by
observances and picturesque
methods to teach us lessons and
give us ethical and moral ex-
amples. To practice these cere-
monials we are bound to
strengthen our religious moor-
ings and broaden our base of
observance.
The Sabbath makes us cogniz-
ant that we are the handiwork
of God. The Day of Atonement
(Yom Kippur) impresses us
with the importance of self-
improvement. Judaism calls
upon us to show our apprecia-
tion for what is otherwise taken
for granted and regarded as
commonplace. We therefore
recite special prayers on awak-
ening from sleep, on partaking
of a meal, sharing in some en-
joyment, and the like. The pious
Jew attaches the Divine name
and command (the mezuzah) to
the doorpost, so that in his home
God and duty are entwined and
hallowed.
THE TZTTZIT remind him
that his life must be one of
purity. The Teffilin phylac-
teries) signify that his heart,
mind and hand are one with
God. On retiring to bed at night,
the Jew prayerfully commits his
soul to the Almighty's, care h?
reciting the "Kriat Sh'ma." Up-
on arising in the morning he
thanks his Creator for restoring
his soul. The Jewish parent
pledges the male child to Torah,
the marriage canopy (chupah)
and good deeds (maasim tovim)
at the Brith Milah ritual and
the parent names his new-born
daughter in the synagogue aa
an act of consecration to God.
Judaism does not say "Do
these acts, they are holy." It
says make every act holy. Every
object in nature, every human
experience tells of God's power,
goodness and glefy.
TO THOSE who would deny
the meaningfulness of our Jew-
ish religious customs and cere-
monies, to those who will not
wear Tallit or prayer shawl, or
who feel that our age-old rit-
uals and practices are obsolete
or are of no consequence, 1
snould like to point out that
these same iconoclasts, strange-
ly enough with remarkable in-
consistency, will rush to lodge
meetings to bedeck themselves
in all sorts of regalia and uni-
forms.
They will, without complaint,
undergo varied rituals and ritea
in initiation ceremonies. They
will parade in costumes and
robs of office to show their
rank or status.
A soldier can just as easily
fire a gun in civilian clothes.
However, he wears a uniform
to remind him at all times that
he is serving in the armed
forces of his country.
The Jew adheres to his cus-
toms and ceremonies to make
him a part of his past, to give
him a reason for living and to
inspire him to future identifica-
tion with his people. As a result,
Judaism has survived for cen-
turies under the most adverse
conditions.
Through clinging to and un-
derstanding the role of tradi-
tions, we shall with God's help
continue to sing and pray "Am
Yisrael Chai," The people ot
Israel Mves.
-^hutui,' mtWMMWHI* l^iWfcircjttMl1MimHttMB4M;BmM|IW
tAihwrawnjiiitM':
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Chanukah Has Clear
Historical Meaning
Miketz
By
DR. SAMUEL Z. JAFFE, Rabbi
HARVEY M. ROSENFELD
Assistant Rabbi
South Broward temples start-
ed celebrating Chanuka begin-
ning at Sundown Friday, Nov.
28.
Chanukah has a well-defined
historical and political mean-
ing. The event it commemorates
occurred in 165 B.C.E. One of
the Hebrew struggles for reli-
gious liberty occurred in the
regime of the Greco-Syrian
emperor Antiochus Epiphanes.
This background inspired the
tradition of the lights.
For the Jewish people Cha-
nukah symbolizes the victory of
a spiritual ideal over military
and political despotism. A hand-
ful of Jews, determined to pre-
serve their faith and culture,
openly defied the overwhelm-
ing Syrian power that oppMps-f
ed Jewish*monotheism andita
observance.
ANTIOCHUS ordered that
the temple in Jerusalem be
used for pagan practices and
that sacrifices be offered there
to Greek gods. The Jews, un-
der the leadership of Judas
Maccabeus, rebelled and finally
reconquered Jerusalem, expel-
ling the Syrians and purifying
the temple.
According to legend, all the
oil for the holy lamps of the
temple had been defiled by
pagan worshipers. Only one un-
touched flagon of oil was found,
sealed and hidden away. The
oil, enough to last for only one
day, miraculously lasted eight
days.
Chanukah is celebrated by
Jews everywhere by the light-
ing of candles on every night
of the holiday, beginning with
one the first night, two on the
second night, until finally on
the eighth night eight candles
blaze in the Chanukah me-
norah, or candelabrum.
THIS PROGRESSION is also
a symbol of Judaism's belief
in the gradual increase of- in-
tellectual light, and the slow,
steady victory of spiritual en-
lightenment., over darkness.
?jmaJMjoOaaV ^observed wii
/Special services, prayers saL
hymns in houses of worship,
schools and homes. Chanukah
is especially for children; games
are played, a Chanukah top
called "dreidel" is spun and
children receive presents of
"gelt" (money) on the fourth
day day of the holiday. Pan-
cakes called "latkes" are tra-
ditional food for Chanukah.
His brothers bow before Joseph who is now the rul-
er of Egypt.
"And Joseph was the governor over the land .
And Joseph's brethren came, and bowed down to him"
(Gen. 42.6).
MIKETZ Two years later, Pharaoh dreamt a
dream in two slightly different versions. The dream
terrified the king of Egypt; but none of his sages could
explain it satisfactorily. Pharaoh's butler remembered
Joseph's masterly interpretations of dreams, and inform-
ed Pharaoh. Joseph was brought before Pharaoh and ex-
plained the dream as forecasting seven years of plenty
that were to come to the land of Egypt, only to be suc-
ceded by seven years of famine. He advised Pharaoh to
appoint a wise overseer to collect wheat daring the
years of plenty and distribute it during the years of
famine. Pharaoh appointed Joseph himself to this post
as his viceroy.
As Joseph had forecast, the Egyptian stores of
wheat were in great demand during the seven years of
famine. Among those who came to buy. wheat in Egypt
were Joseph's oldest brothers. Joseph recognized them,
but they did not know him. Joseph so- contrived that
the brothers came to Egypt a second time, bringing
Benjamin, Joseph's full brother with them. Joseph re-
ceived them cordially; but then he made it seem as
thotfgh Benjamin had stolen a goblet, and insisted that
he stay behind as a servant. The brothers refused to
abandon Benjamin, and all decided to return to Jo-
seph's home.
This raceuitta of the Weakly Portion of the Law Is extractac
3ES F^y* GrBphic """V Jwih Heritage/
dried by P. Wollm.n-T.amlr, $15. Publisher ie ShengoM. anc
Jevolume ,, mMto at V William St., New York, NY
10005. President of the society distributing the volume k
Joseph Schlang.


iday, December 5, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood

Page 13-A
Anti-Semitism at Andrews AF Base Studied
Continued
from Page 1-A
of anti-Semitism
of the nature
I in America."
The first four sections of
Anti-Semitism" are excerpts
Ifrom "Christian Beliefs and
[Anti-Semitism," a sociological
indy conducted by the Univer-
of California Survey Re-
learch Center under an ADL
ant and published by Harper
land Row. They deal with the
jc noept of anti-Semitism, and
anti-Semitic beliefs, feelings and
actions.
THESE ARE followed by two
sections from a book published
by The Seabury Press and dis-
tributed by ADL, "Faith and
Fratricide: The Theological
Roots of Anti-Semitism," by
Rosemary Ruether, associate
professor of historical theology
at Howard University School of
Religion.
One is the Introduction, an
analysis of anti-Semitism over
the centuries, by Prof. Gregory
Baum. of St. Michael's College
of the University of Toronto;
the other a chapter from the
book itself.
Next is "The Treatment of the
Holocaust in History Textbooks,"
reprinted from an ADL pamph-
let by Henry Friedlander, as-
sistant professor of Jewish Stud-
ies at the City College of the
City University of New York.
THE NEXT SECTION, "The
Jewish Stereotype in English
Literature: Shylock and Fagin,"
by Ilja Wachs, professor of liter-
ature at Sarah Lawrence Col-
lege, is from "Teachers' Study
Guide: Stereotypes in English
Literature," produced jointly by
the Catholic Archdiocese of New
York and ADL.
This is followed by a chapter
from "The New Anti-Semitism"
(McGraw-Hill) by Arnold For-
ster, ADL's associate director
and general counsel, and Ben-
jamin R. Epstein, national di-
rector. Another section, "Pref-
erential Treatment and Quotas,"
from an ADL pamphlet, is also
by Forster and Epstein.
New Dimensions in Jewish Education Eyed
"A whole new entity with an
I institutional framework for the
b oadest spectrum" in the field
cf Jewish education and culture
is needed "to provide a new
[quality of integration and serv-
fi;?s," according to a report
nade to the 44th General As-
embly of the Council of Jewish
Herations and Welfare Funds
EcJF) by its Committee for Na-
tional Planning for Jewish Edu-
cation and Culture under the
chairmanship of George M. Zelt-
zer of Detroit.
Observing that nearly $250,-
000,000 is spent annually by the
American Jewish community
"in the field of Jewish educa-
tion and culture, including
schools, camps and Jewish com-
munity centers, and that over
$">0.000,000 is spent annually by
Ppt Ha jpt^fp
mm
7* Ifl JH
Israel's Ambassador to the United States, Simcha Dinitz,
[with Mr. and Mrs. Moses Hornstein at the Nov. 13 Pace-
setters' Dinner at the Konover Hotel, Miami Beach. The
dinner, sponsored by the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, is for those who have contributed over $10,000.
m | ..
1-. ff *'^^ ffl If
* ;^l \*H ^L^aV L
l^jrf V mtm mm -IP ^B m
At a combined meeting of the United Jewish Appeal and
the Jewish Federation of South Broward were (from left)
Paul Nestle, chairman; Betty Neft, cochairman; Morris
i Markman, honorary chairman; and Leo Schuster, co-
fchairman of the Parker Plaza Building.
State Dep't. Okays
\Saunders Statement
Continued from Page 1-A
script of Saunders' remarks was
replete with "errors and mis-
representations" and that Is-
rael's "reservations and qualifi-
cations" would be brought "in
full" to the attention of the
U.S. government.
According to the transcript
nade available here, Saunders,
So is Second Deputy Assistant
eretary for Middle Eastern
fairs, told the International
[Relations Committee's subcom-
mittee on investigations that
"there are some indications that
1 co-existence between separate
Palestinian and Israel states
might be considered" by th
PLO.
Saunders also said that "a
| particularly difficult aspect of
the problem is the question of
who negotiates for the Palestin-
ians. It has been our belief that
Jordan would be a logical nego-
tiator for the Palestinian-related
issue" but "the Rabat (Arab)
Summit, however, recognized
the Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization as the 'sole legitimate
i representative of the Palestin-
an people.'"
ISRAEL'S view is understood
to be that despite the Rabat
decision, the U.S. position has
not veered from having Jordan
negotiate for the Palestinians.
But Saunders' use of the past
tense when he said "it has
been our belief that Jordan
would be the logical negotiator"
and his reminder to the Con-
gressmen of the Rabat decision
apparently indicated to the
Israelis that the U.S. no longer
considers Jordan in that role.
Saunders concluded his pre
pared statement by saying that
"We are prepared to consider
any reasonable proposal from
any quarter and we will expect
other parties to the negotia-
tions to be equally open-mind-
ed."
THAT WAS viewed in some
quarters here and in Israel as
a public call on Jerusalem to
back off from its opposition to
the PLO. ...', .-,
Saunders' remark that "co-
existence" might be considered
by the PLO was also regarded
as contrary to the facts. The
PLO has never spoken of co-
existence but has insisted on
the establishment of a "secular
democratic state" embracing all
of Palestine, including that part
which is now the State of Israel.
Federations in support of local
formal Jewish education, Zeltzer
said, "the issue before us is, are
we going to utilize these dol-
lars most productively?"
ADMITTING that he had no
formula "no blueprint, no
architecture" to present to
the 3,000 Jewish leaders present
at the General Assembly, Zelt-
zer, a vice president of Detroit's
Jewish Welfare Federation, said
that there must be more coor-
dination and cooperation be-
tween the American Association
for Jewish Education, the Na-
tional Foundation for Jewish
Culture, and the CJF's three-
year-old division, the Institute
for Jewish Life, which is due
to be phased out by 1976, and
other national bodies concerned
with the development of Jew-
ish content.
A streamlining of the present
Jewish organization structure,
without the creation of a mono-
lithic Jewish community, was
earlier urged by Raymond Ep-
stein of Chicago, president of
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions and Welfare Funds in his
keynote address Wednesday
evening at the Deauville Hotel.
In an overview of his three
years of CJF leadership, Ep-
stein said:
"I am calling for a stream-
lining of our present structure.
But I am not suggesting a cen-
tral voice for American Jewry.
I am proposing a responsible in-
volvement and accountability
so that the right voice is heard
at the right time on the right
subjects.
"A NEW and unprecedented
effort of redirection and reor-
ganization is required," he
stated, also advising "that this
must be done planfully, that
established structure and pro-
grams must bend to the ex-
pressed sentiments of the com-
munity and that we must
emerge with instruments more
suited to the times and more
capable of resolving the issues
that confront us. And this can
be brought about only by strong
individual and institutional lead-
ership."
Stating that he is not calling
for merger and greater cen-
tralization, "although some of
that is clearly desired," he
urged American Jewish leader-
ship to harness all its forces
in a recognition and acceptance
of responsibility to the com-
munity and authority to speak
and act within whatever limits
the community sets.
"It it be said that frequently
there is merit in more than
one voice being heard on an
important subject, I agree. But
the need exists for leadership
to issue the call for a mere ra-
tional structure and program
than we now have and to get
in motion action toward that
end."
The financial crisis in New
York City, with its possible cut
in funding for welfare services
and institutions, threaten the
very existence of the voluntary
philanthropic structure in Amer-
ica and "may dismember our
existing health, welfare and
educational setup, leaving us
only with the remnant of a sys-
tem that is unable to function."
This was the warning given
to the almost 3,000 Jewish lead-
ers by Sanford Solender, execu-
tive vice president of the Fed-
eration of Jewish Philanthro-
pies of New York, largest Jew-
ish philanthropy in North Amer-
ica.
In his presentation "Meeting
Jewish Needs in a Period of
The remainder of the re-
source text consists of airarticle
published by the American Jew-
ish Archives, "Black Anti-
Semitism in Twentieth Century
America: Historical Myth or
Reality?" by Nicholas C. Polos,
associate professor of history,
graduate division. La Verne Col-
lege, Calif.; an editorial, "Our
Time to Choose," from the New
York Amsterdam News, remind-
ing Blacks that Jews "struggled
and died with Blacks" in the
battles to achieve civil rights
and suggesting that Blacks
ought to stand up with Jews in
combatting anti-Semitism, and
two reprints from the League's
national publication.
Inflation and unemployment,"
along with Ms. Elizabeth
Wickenden, of New York,
the consultant of the non-
sectarian National Assembly of
National Voluntary, Health and
Social Welfare Organizations,
the Federation executive paint-
ed a dire picture as he explored
the human costs of the current
economic situation, particularly
its impact on family, the elderly
and youth.
"THE PROFOUND tragedy of
what is now happening in New
York," Mr. Solender pointed
out, "is that the heaviest burden
of the drastic cutbacks in city
expenditures is at the expense
of the poorest, most deprived
and defenseless people. They
are the victims of unemploy-
ment and the inflationary
squeeze, the poor and the peo-
ple on marginal incomes, the
aged, the troubled families and
the children in difficulty."
CHANUKA GREETINGS
KRAYIT JEWELERS
Art Libman
Walter Kravif
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gardens
The only all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings,beautifully land*
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call:
9J20-8225 or write:
"^TEMr^EBCTWcI" ""' Er$%SM
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Please send me literature on the above.
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ADDRESS:
PHONE:
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ELKIN
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CUSTOM CRAFTED
IN OUR WORKSHOP
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i
------


1
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:

December 5
Shhmoni yarned Keynoter ffar Milzrah
Of IHF Founders' Dav Lunch
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JW
Kosinski's Latest Book
Leaves Us Breathless
JERZY Mm Cockpit.: Boston: Honghton
Mlfflin.'.19.7SeSS$5.
'Crxhpit'^briDgs usrlcrthe otit-r reaches of
In- u,an, experience.. Kosioski. author of "The
Painted Bird"' and 'Steps'* Bggg National,Book
Award \vinner.)^preseni3:Ms whh Iv inrimate. vjew of a depersonalized individual.
Tnrjien. Who fe**ls. no r remorse at imposing
brutal' life situations- npon.unwary prey.
hi an imaginative and ; daring scheme,^be
eacaMM from,his^ birthplace;-, a totatitnrian East-
ei a mropearr nation. HC flees to the West, and
becows an .intelligene-eent.
CftRDEN SOON tires Of. this vocation. Hi-
remedy is shrewdly to erase his.presence from
!>n>c'-niientiiik.s..ThiouRhoit it he rest pf ihe
novel- he. moves-: about sans; his- roil: identity.
Tarden cannot survive with; one identity as
d<> the rest of us.iThe control over others that
he thrives on necessitates changing .his modus
oi>et-am!i according-10 th<-type of person'-.he
v, islies.vtn.-cpnrvol.
HFL.OORS su vrit'i eas'.:.I',mhin jspredict-
.!'). He perpetrates-collapse under his unex-
pectedddemands of perverse and indiilg.mt
i.jydfv.
Taxdea's. obsession with control locks him
into a. world of bis own-making. He constantly
fine tunes his faculties.-.from:.flawless photo-
graphic memory t. nnbebevaMe: physical con-
tortions.
I He niaintniD.s several apartm-nts, each fhfetd
with numcrous^ocks and ep'wjawaauryetUanee
equipment..He becomes.-ae victim of his own
barbarity. A human being.-so compteteJy out
of touch with normal human, emotion that I-k-
survives>onlyr from- one* atrocity to the newt.
-THE MOST,shocking aspect)of;.-the book
*s. .that we.ate one-whhTTnfdenhe-arratpr.
: Kosinski. gluesi u.s o:his side/.brings -inside
' his. mind.and.aajss us to -react as:.he.!daes.
Lackinc Tarden's detachment, we emote at-what
he cannot.
'Cockpit may he Kosinski's ovcrreaction to
those controls exerted upon him throughout
his own. life vjith its anguished Jewish be-
ginnings. Like the child in "The Paired Bird"
and. the.youagr man in "Steps,",.be. suffered
enough, physical tortures, political pressures
and.niibrary.atrictures to destroy most men.
Brutality, sex and violence have become
'Kosinski's- trademarks.*Ha leaves us breathless
and speechless as he races [ from climax to
climax assaulting, raping, and killing.
'
linbtlimMe Stalkslh Detail
White Collar (rime Increase
| \ THE. past few months. President Ford has
lakan two hard swings, at America's, hot--
iido-is, cri.ne probj-m.. In April, speaking at
Vile, hecam a down heavy for mandatory p>is-
o-t sentences-for.those guilty of vnriava violent
crimes and. took a strong stand against, pi-a
barairilritg In.Jmie. he urged Congress to act
affirmatively on: hi* docket of,.proposed court
relomjs-.wltb special stress onithe need ta com-
ih Mat n lictiras.
Occupying that powerful pulpit in ihe White
Hous-_.\Mr." Fnvd is quite right .to pound it as
an expression.of his own and-Ins-countrymen's
BQguAsh -over-ftbe. perennial ..crime .wave: that
wont ,Ro-way.He is not -the fij-M- mdern
I IrMhNta to rake aim at this monster and likely
not the last.
II4CTC IN 1QA7. President Johnson warned
that crime had grown into a public malady
when he called on-Congress to pass his "Safe
Ft'eets" bil. The nation at that time was hav-
ing a sad harvest, reaping the growth sown by
justified demands for human equality and by
the civil ferment proliferating from despair
over Vietnam.
When President Nixon movecbaacad-tewaea.s
the Presidency, he boosted to top prioritv his
pledge to wipe out crime in the streets. Attor-
ney General John Mitchell teamed iup with
hi-i. vowing to carry out that promise.'bet us
draw the curtain of charity over that now.

NOW PRESIDENT Ford, free of domestic
disaffection over Vietnam, and not held respon-
sible for crimes committed in the name ot
Watcrgitc. is trying vigorously to advance his
ihoowvIs foH-vUra muasinxs. But his projected
remedies are not well received by many who
have wrestled for years with the 1 gislative
judicial, and social aspects of-the disease.
Mr..'Ford'a;critics.maintain that mandatory
sentences block- correction- programming with
out accompanying gains for a society in ned
. of-protection. .Moreover; tba President was tak-
ing aim at federal crimes whereas intrastate
criminality appears ..to: be (the heart.) of tithe
problem.
One wonders. *lvo./-wbot*T-i-c-nt Presi-
dents grasp the magnitude, and seriousness of
outrages branded as "white-collar crime" by
kalph Nader.
IN A STUDY of cases involving some 150
corporations, 160 corporate executives, 40
stockbrokers. 16K "overnment employes, and
a host -ot political figures and lawyers. Nader
has teld.lthe Senate Subcommittee!.on Criminal
knars and Pi-ocedfcre.s that .the media thigh-
light bank robberies as tiiajo- events, yet the
white-collar criminal intddtv-Jthe baak. through
fraud and embe*rlcmcnt.oek six times more
money in fiscal 1973 than did" the holdup men."
fits run over SSO billion a vear,

&*
K-j
Orthodox Eve
Television
(overage
ffWONEW YORK Orthodox Jews, agreeing that Orthodox Je :ey^,as a community, is generally ignored by radio and te .-
vision, have expressed totally opposing views about the propor-
tion taut steps should be- taken to correct the situation.
iTbe debaters.v,ve Dr. Bernard Fryshman. ebair'vtnn of r'-.?
co^-t^asion an krSWaJMM and civic action oi Atwlath I*rae!
,-.pn ? Mwttin'Wexmnn. a gradum-; of Mesifta Torah Vodaith. ide
:tifi*das >? freelance iourwslWt and advertisina corvwnter. They
,-,nreaBnttdt.-thei'- views, in "The Jewish Observer." tlie public -
':rionrir>f'Agudath: Lsrael.
: OB. FRYSHMAN cited the. results of ;i sn'-v of Jewish
..intfirest-rwogratmning on radio anctTV stations in the New York
\Metronolttan.-.area-made by the commission. He-rer^.tedlthat
irta-welckof more;-than 12S hatwa of bi-oadcasts^ and telegas--
f programs Of interest to the'Jewish commumtv tymcnlly aver-
age no more-trmn'35 winutes a week per station .(with a ft'.v
significant exceptions)."
Ha..aaoclnded thit "to manv- radio and tsk*Miaion stMions
in the; area,: the Orthodox Jewish,, community js jrirtua'.ly v <
haown."
Wfr>RESULT, he asse-ted.hhaff-been (MM "self-appoint. J
spokesmen, without any constituency;pr following,1, have oftet
bn able t,totally nviarepresentthe attitudes.of'thc Onhnd'-s
Jewi la an apparent reference to Orthodox Jew s accused of abu-.*
o^feM^ntaiond- tb>ft-of,.nmlic funds in nursing' ho"?t operations,
Dr. Fryshman declared that "stories.regarding MMfcfactora who
^hgnngaJQ be. Orthodox have given the eommunitv, an pvt'-e,iK-'.y
I bad miag" ar.a result of-the absence of any positive exposure"
. tif ihe Oft^odox connmmity.
fflPALt^cnMendfd fiat styles?.and modes.ofcbeha'ipr f
young people, as portraved on- television, "never- mirror ti-;
sedate behavior of Orthodox Jewish young" and t'wt therq mi
"ample evidence that this has a negit:ve impact on some I
our young people."
Ka said that radio and I'V officnls, in re^OMIM t'1 oueatio -
on tne probjem, hae said Mam was no sine' iwanesentntil'e '
ti- tllliiiMn I Jevisli community and that "splimm- groups' (A
Orthodox dawa MlW deman'* "equal time" N t'--eii: \ iewpgints;
an i that, to the degree that the Orthodox Jewish -approach- W -
rcltgiius. as well us cultural, other religious RMMJI also WOU'.d
demfinl eonpl: tin a
,IR. FRYSaiVlAN contended th:it groivs aMhans Auudai:
Israi 1 could .nse their "good offices to establish an umbrella
.gvonp that, would ensure that the picture of th-* t>rthodox Jew-
ish iTmmmry": tor media projection "is both realistic andfuni
versMly acceptable."
t ommenting. that "xbe: bomosexunl has b=eoiie acceplabl
;i- a -tib.iect ol tele\lsiou propiams." be asked','isi it not time
that tlv- religious also1-becomes acceptable?" He said one*Step
th; i could he taken would be under:the Federal HMrmunictfhma
Cemmiaginn,public servke rule lor ren.wal of Kcsases of radio
and TV stations, adding that virtually the onlv public qroup
which has not asserted its rights under that rule has beea i'i
Orthodox Jewish community.
Dr. Fryshman Stressed that he did not mean to encndjraffl
the viewing of TV among Orthodox Jews, declaring he. was
"well aware" of the dangers.
HE SAID the, purpose of his statement was "to stinailate
discussion andtaction" to induce the media to take "cognisance
.nfeithejstrnngtN. gn^bem ^nl HtaMtv of the Tn'-ah world"! and
ar Ma'^eMeathat 4,.tbc wild, animal-like behavior" projected by
.Vj" rCmo and T\' ""Mia should be "moderated by civilteinp in-
IMIIBJi ii in gancrai"
'>id.*".-. Dpci mbt'i- H. 1 "75 ttm4*JbFtnrlrtlntf Pace L5-A
Walter Matthau: Humble l{ej*iniiin}>s. to Heart Attack, to Stardom
Hollywood
Y^'ALTER MATTHAU portrays the tragicomic role
of Morris Buttermaker, former league-pitcher
Whom booze has pushed down to such menial chores
M 'i-)l maintenance, in the motion picture "The Had
News Bears," now completed at Paramount Studios.
' i't.n by 26-year-old Bill Lancaster, son of the
star, the yarn concerns a group of bumbling misfit
1 i 's who are molded by their drunken "coach" Mor-
ris into a winning baseball team, a team headed by
such unlikely hotshot players as pint-sized Tatum
ON1.
PRODUCER WUBtUKt K. Jaffe. who in W9S
' a "ed with harry Pee ace to make the controversial
pictart, "Goodbye. Coainibiis." at tba age.of 30. for
a snort while was president of Paramount, now again
6 iig independent, selected the sc ipt by Lancaster,
oecauas the theme about winning or losing intrigued
hi n in one way or another.
Director Michael Ritchie comments, "You don't have
lo be a baseball fan to respond to 'The Bad News
JZnft
Bears.' In fact, you don't have to know anything
about the e.anie. It is t-ie story about losers over-
coming their handicap*."
-MATTHAU, in spite of his athletic- bearing swf-
ferjng a snwrc apronary a few yeans ago. all hi- lila
haii to overcome being a loser. Born in New York
some 52 yeats-.ago. the son of |x>er Jewish immi-
grants he grew up under dire circumstances, with
his mother the sol wnportgr of tnu family after die
father had deserted them.
Unable to pav the rent, mother Rose moved with
her cbn from tenement to tenement to keep alive
: .r another day.
Walter started to earn a living when he wgf
pin", selling soft drinks during intermission at m
Bast Side Yiddish theater at the age of 11. Dream*
ing of becoming a writer or even actor, he was Rivet
a snail part in a farce entitled. "The Dish*
washer." n tting him 50 cents a performance.
AT SEWARD Park High School, he performed is
plays and simultaneously scored in basketball, b< e-
c-r. trgfck and swimming. After graduating, he Btrugj
glad to make a meager living.until Uncle Sam hired
lun a*- au army, an Ioj-c*' man in World War II
Serving as radioriaiiiuer in bombers over Europg
netted him six battle stars and the rank of staff
I -g-ant. Discha > d from the service late in \913,
Matthau enrolled at Erwin Piscator New School in
New York, with Hod Steiger, Tony Curtis, Harry
GuardJno and Gene S^cks among his fellow studentt
in the dramatic work mop.


Page 16-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
1
Friday, December 5, 197s M
!
:
!'

Plw &Y*ur P%>
We Are One
5t*t.
JEWISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD INC.
COMBINED JEWISH APPEAL ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
2838 Hollywood Blv Telephone 921-8810
_J


Friday, December 5, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 17-A
CJF Elects New Prexy, Passes Major Resolutions
Wide-ranging solidarity and
support for the maligned and
the besieged and the need for
new, streamlined structures for
Jewish organizational life on the
eve of America's third century,
featured major issues, resolu-
tions, and actions taken at the
44th General Assembly which,
meeting in Miami, has elected
Jerold C. Hoffberger of Balti-
more as its new president.
Capping the five-day agenda
and over 100 plenary sessions,
forums and workshops of the
General Assembly devoted to
meeting the full range of hu-
man needs facing the North
American Jewish community at
home, overseas and in Israel,
the delegates adopted IS resolu-
tions addressed to:
U.S. aid to Israel;
The need for stepped up
campaigning;
The UN resolution on Zion-
ism, on Arab terrorism and the
Arab boycott;
Aid to Soviet and Syrian
Jewry;
On the human aspects of
the economic crisis in this coun-
try and New York's particular
plight;
The need for more inten-
sive Jewish education;
Additional services for the
ag id;
Tax legislation on philan-
thropy;
The growing role of wom-
en in leadership;
Support of the U.S. Bicen-
tennial.
THE THREE principal speak-
ers at the General Assembly
Jerold C. Hoffberger, new presi-
dent, Raymond Epstein, the out-
going president, and Dr. Abram
I. Sachar, main speaker at the
banquetall agreed that as the
I'nited States moves into and
beyond its Bicentennial, the
Jewish community has achieved
a maturity and a broadened
responsibility which' makes re-
\uu. redirection, and owidtnn-
tion imperative for the advance-
ment of its social welfare and
educational commitment.
Epstein called for a "stream-
lining" of present organization-
al structure "with a new and
oved level of responsible
involvement and accountab-
ty," and Hoffberger pledged
If to a presidency of
"resiliency, vitality, and "greater
participation. Dr. Sachar, speak-
from the point of view of
an historian, said that American
lewry has come of age and the
American melting pot dream of
the past century has been re-
placed by a symphonic concept
in which Jews as a group proud
of their tradition as both Amer-
icans and as Jews feel free "to
develop our uniqueness and the
singularity of our special con-
ti ibution."
MEETING LESS than two
weeks after UN passage of the
resolution that seeks to equate
Zionism with racism, during
which period a Syrian raid on
the Golan Heights killed three
innocent Jewish victims, the
Jewish Federations and Welfare
funds meeting here adopted a
resolution urging the U.S. Gov-
ernment to "fulfill the commit-
ments undertaken in the course
of negotiating an agreement
with Egypt to provide Israel
with $2.3 billion for economic
and military aid."
Speaker after speaker addres-
sing the largest General As-
sembly in CJF history3,000
delegates from over 200 North
American Jewish communities
made the point that Amer-
ican aid to Israel is necessary
to the American defense posture
in the Middle East.
While examining the needs
facing American Jewish com-
munities and philanthropic
structures both in the U.S. and
abroad, the delegates heard
Frank R. Lautenberg, general
chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal, urge that $600 million
be raised in 1976 by community
Federations and Welfare Funds
for aid to Israel.
MAKING an unscheduled ad-
dress to the delegates on Fri-
day (Nov. 21), Israel Ambassa-
dor Simcha Dinitz said that the
most important problem facing
world Jewry, in view of the
recent developments at the UN,
is to demonstrate "solidarity"
between the Jews of America
and the Jews of Israel. He ex-
pressed the hope that during
the coming year at least one
million American Jews from
every part of the United States
will visit Israel.
"This positive action," he
said, "will carry a message of
hope and strength to Israel, as
well as bejng of great signifi-
cance to the American visitors.
Just as we will be fortified by
you, you will be fortified by us.
We will be a stronger Israel and
you will be better Jews."
RECOGNIZING "the grievous
problems facing the people of
New York City" and the "severe
cutbacks the Jewish agencies
face in their extensive services
to the city's Jewish and general
population," the delegates
passed a resolution declaring
that it is "essential that respon-
sible federal legislation be
passed immediately to prevent
the financial default of New
York City."
Delegates and their constit-
uents were urged to contact
their Senators and Representa-
tives in Congress "to support
federal assistance such as is
embodied in resolutions cur-
rently before the House of Rep-
resentatives and the Senate
(HR 10481 and S 2615).
A related resolution by the
delegates called upon Presi-
dent Ford and Congress not to
place the burden for combating
inflation and recession on the
poorest and most victimized
members of the population,
pointing out both a 10 percent
reduction in the purchasing
power of the dollar and that the
Federal budget for the U.S. calls
for 45 percent reduction in pub-
lic assistance, Medicaid and
service in fiscal 1976.
It recommended that the gov-
ernment sponsor a five-point
program:
"To carry out the intent of
the full Employment Act, en-
acted in 1946;
"To extend Federal Unem-
ployment Insurance beyond the
present limitation;
"To develop legislation for
the Federal government to as-
sume total responsibility for in-
come maintenance programs
which will make possible decent
living standards;
"To expand the current
Food Stamp program not only
to those on cash assistance but
to the working poor as well.
"To enact a national health
insurance program."
REPORTING that Jewish Fed-
eration allocations to Jewish
education have increased by
"175 percent since 1976," the
delegates adopted a resolution
stating that the "quality and
effectiveness of Jewish educa-
tion is of the highest urgency
for Jewish communal life."
The resolution stated that
"Jewish schools are central to
the development of an informed
and committed Jewish commu-
nity" and that "there is grow-
ing reason that effective Jew-
ish education take place in
many settings."
Three noted scholars ot the
five-day Assembly discussed
"Zionism: The Attack in the
United Nations and the Future
of the Jewish People."
The participants were D^".
Emil Fackenheim, professor of
Philosophy at the University of
Toronto; Dr. Yehuda Bauer,
professor of the Hebrew Uni-
versity of Jerusalem; and Rabbi
Irving Greenberg, director of
the National Jewish Conference
Center, who served as G.A.
scholar-in-residence and headed
the convention's Shabbatom
program for delegates.
They discussed varying as-
pects and results in the short
period since passage of the
United Nations resolution.
THREE RELATED resolutions
on Zionism, terrorism and the
Arab boycott were also adopted.
The UN resolution equating
Zionism with racism was called
"a resurgence of virulent anti-
Semitism." Zionism was called
"the National Liberation Move-
ment of the Jewish people," and
the delegates decaring them-
selves as "prfoud to identify
ourselves with the people of Is-
rael and to reaffirm our sup-
port for the Jewish religious
and cultural heritage that they
enshrine in nationhood."
Stating that the Jewish com-
munities of North America "do
not oppose Arab investments in
our countries," the resolution
on the Arab boycott declared
that "we will expose and combat
any use of such investments
that violate, that threaten basic
American democratic princi-
ples."
TERRORISM was bitterly
condemned and a resolution
called for "an international
compact of government to out-
law kidnapping, highjacking,
bombing, seizing hostages, as-
sassination, massacre, and other
barbaric practices which have
become frequent devices for
seeking political ends."
Red Penal Standards Shockingly Low
LONDON (JTA) Con-
ditions in Soviet penal insti-
tutions "not only violate in-
ternational standards for the
treatment of prisoners, but
fail to achieve the standards
established in parts of do-
mestic corrective labor leg-
islation ana tneory, attmu-
ing to a 154-page Amnesty
International report publish-
ed here.
The illustrated report,
"Prisoners of Conscience in
the USSR: Their Treatment
and Conditions," shows how
many of the legal and penal
abuses are directed particu-
larly against political and
religious dissenters in the
Soviet Union.
THE REPORT charges that
"Jewish prisoners are frequent-
ly singled out for special abuse"
in Soviet prison and labor
camps, and quotes a statement
by a Jewish group of prisoners
in the Perm penal colony as
representative of many Jewish
prisoners' criticism on this sub-
ject.
Throughout, the report names
several well-known Jewish pris-
oners of conscience and dissen-
ICI3, ou^-ii ft* im iU----- -
Alexander Feldman, Alexander
Fainberg, Semyon Gluzman, Yo-
na Kolchinsky, Vladimir Bukov-
sky and Vladimir Gershuni, but
it does not deal with the plight
of Jewish prisoners or any
other minority as such.
INSTEAD, it arranges its evi-
dence and conclusions under
such headings as "articles of
Soviet criminal law which
restrict the exercise of funda-
mental human rights," "main-
tainance of prisoners" (giving
details of rations, "hunger re-
gimes" and medical care),, "re-
lationship between prisoners
and administration," "compul-
11 Mel House GainesvMe
Committee Is Formed
Committee for Hillel House
Gainesville has been formed to
provide funds for renovation
and expansion of the B'nai
B'rith Hillel Foundation facility
at the University of Florida,
Gainesville campus. Civil lead-
ers and concerned individuals
from throughout the state are
serving on the Committee for
Hillel House Gainesville.
The announcement was made
by Mike Teitelbaum, M.D.,
president of the Florida State
Association of B'nai B'rith
Lodges, which endorsed the
project at its state convention
last May.
"This is a statewide commu-
nity effort to raise $250,000 to
refurbish and remodel the Hil-
lel House at Gainesville which
was constructed in 1953," Dr.
Teitelbaum said.
Expansion of kitchen and din-
ing facilities, administrative
offices, classrooms and the li-
brary is planned.
"Today there are more than
3,000 Jewish students on the
Gainesville campus, and the 22-
year-old structure can no long-
er effectively serve as the guid-
ance, educational, religious and
social center it was designed
as," according to Rabbi Stanley
Ringler, Florida regional direc-
tor of the B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundations.
Beginnings of the Hillel
House at Gainesville were
sparked during the early 1940's
by Daytona Beach attorney
Louis Ossinsky, Sr., Jacksonville
attorney Morris Whitten and
Dr. Mathew Drosdoff, a profes-
sor in the university's College
of Agriculture.
With the enrollment boom at
the University of Florida fol-
lowing World War n, the Flor-
ida State Association acquired
land for a Hillel facility to pro-
vide for the growing number of
Jewish students. When military
buildings at nearby Camp
Blanding were declared surplus.
B'nai B'rith purchased one of
them and had it moved to the
Hillel site.
The continued growth of the
Jewish student population pre-
cipitated the need for a larger
and more permanent structure,
and a statewide Hillel House
building fund was established,
under the leadership of Ossin-
sky and Whitten, to raise funds
for the present facility.
sory detention in psychiatric
hospitals," and others.
"There has never been in
Amnesty International's experi-
ence an acquittal of a political
defendant in the USSR," the re-
port says.
Noting the absence of official
Soviet statistics on the subject,
are now at least lO.OOU pbnhcai
and religious prisoners in the
Soviet Union.
THE REPORT, one of the
most detailed Amnesty has ever
produced on violations of hu-
man rights in a single country,
was published simultaneously
in English, Dutch, German.
French and Swedish.
Starting with profiles of five
typical Soviet prisoners of con-
science among them Jewish
Aliyah applicant Alexander
Feldman from the Ukraine sen-
tenced to three and a half years
imprisonment in an intensified
regime corrective labor colony
after his Aliyah application.
The report analyzes the con-
ditions under which prisoners
are held in corrective labor in-
stitutions and psychiatric hos-
pitals.
In a series of recommenda-
tions at the end of the report,
Amnesty urges Soviet author-
ities to undertake a program of
penal reform, starting with a
public discussion of the present
system.
AS LONG as the day-to-day
working of the Soviet penal sys-
tem is treated as a state secret,
the report says, it will continue
to "generate suspicion and mis-
trust, certainly abroad and to
some extent within the Soviet
Union itself."
Amnesty indicates that recent
reports emanating from the
abuses of psychiatry is srm ue
ing applied by the Soviets."
The report quotes at length a
statement by a Jewish group of
prisoners in Perm to the effect
that "the camp authorities in-
culcate nationalistic conflicts
and agitate other inmates
against Jews. KGB officers
stress in their conversations
with non-Jewish inmates that
all nationalities of the USSR
must take a stand against Jews,
particularly in labor camps.
AMNESTY stresses that "the
open contempt with which the
convictions of prisoners of con-
science are treated is not con-
ducive to their reeducation in
the spirit desired by the law.
"On the contrary, political
prisoners' experiences in cor-
rective labor institutions usual-
ly strengthen their dissident
convictions by providing what
they regard as corroboration of
their criticisms of institutional-
ized illegality and arbitrariness
in their country."
JCC Plans Winter Camps
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Florida, Holly-
wood Extension, are offering a
"fantastic five-day winter camp"
program. The program will be
available to sixth-, seventh- and
eighth-graders. Numerous ex-
cursions, from Key Biscayne to
Ft. Lauderdale, are planned for
Dec. 22, 23, 24, 29 and 30.
Go-carting, skating and bowl-
ing, as well as visits to the Zoo,
Planetarium, Ocean World, and
the new Planet Ocean Museum
are scheduled. Middle-schoolers
can attend any number of the
days in the winter camp.
An exciting special "Derech
Eretz Weekend at Camp Grey-
nolds" will be open to sixth-,
seventh- and eighth-graders.
Boys will be sleeping overnight
and girls will be invited for the
day programs. The weekend
runs from Friday afternoon.
Dec. 26 through Sunday after-
noon-Dec. 2.
For further details and in-
formation concerning costs,
times and specific schedules,
call Ellen Reiff at the Jewish
Community Center, 2838 Holly-
wood Blvd.
& ft &
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of Hollywood will once
again offer a Winter Holiday
Camp for youngsters in kinder-
garten through fifth grades.
There will be seven days of
trips beginning on Monday, Dec.
22, and continuing through Dec.
31. The fees will vary according
to the day's activities.
Camp headquarters are at the
activity building, 2838 Holly-
wood Boulevard.
Details are available from
Mrs. Fried at the Center.


IW
iST-'-ii.;
bhh| m _-,..


The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 18-A 1 Jcwvsn rwruiuui wux ^wgw ") ^...y.~~ ^
Ford Opposes Punitive Aid Cuts to Araks
Friday, December 5, 197S
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Ford Administration
has reaffirmed to Congress that it opposes any Deduction in
its planned assistance this fiscal year of $1.3 billion to
Egypt, Syria .and Jordan, despite the -United Nations anti-
Zionist resolution.
It also wants approval Of $2.3 billion earmarked foi
Israel. The figures include military and economic support
and agricultural commodities under the Food for Peace
program. The same amounts ace nuisioned for .the next
fiscal year.
Kissinger responded that if
aid is not continued to Israel,
"the Arabs might be tempted
to start a war."
He added that Israel must
take "its place in line" for
weapons being produced and
those ordered this year -may
not be delivered until 1980.
Kissinger also said Israel is
"probably slightly stronger"
now than in 1973, "but remem-
ber, we bad to have a massive
airlift" to help Israel in the war
that year.
"A country of three million
surrounded by ISO million that
havent even recognized its ex-
istence can .never feel secure."
HE NOTED that "all the in
;
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Conservative Rabbis
LAKE, N.Y.
(JTaVj The
* ntmkahtm atthe Nresotu-
tion equating Zionism with
racism." it was dtodngrrt hem
at the biennial convention of
the-TJniled Synagogue of Amer-
ica, the congregational arm -of
Conservative Judaism represent-
ing more than 1.5 million Jaws
in 830 affiliated synagogues in
the United States and Canada.
Declaring that "Zionism is
Judaism and Judaism is Zion-
ism," Arthur J. Levine, presi-
dent of the United Synagogue of
America, said that affiliation
would be effected through the
World Council of Synagogues,
the international organization
of Conservative congregations
which has its headquarters in
Jerusalem.
THE COUNCIL'S president,
Samuel Rothstein. disclosed that
its board of directors has held
a policy meeting here on affilia-
tion with the WZO and will take
final action ip December
Rabbi Bernard Segal, execu-
tive vice president f the United
Synagogue df America, who dis-
closed the plans, explained why
the Conservative movement had
refrained from formal affiliation
tth the WZO since It was
founded M years ago and why
it mn -taking the step at this
tune.
Rabbi Segal said that since its
inception in 1913. Conservative
Judaism has been "unequivocal
ty committed to Zionism and
lhate has never been any roenr
-in its ranks for anti-Zionism. As
a result." he said, "we have
over the .years, repeatedly de-
clined to eek formal affiliation
ED as a way of dom-
iialiaiiiig that Zionism is. an
integral part of. Judaism and
^tfcusjiffUittian.was not neces-
telligence people" ;-had envis
aged in October, 1973, that "Is-
rael was overwhelmingly supe-
rior and would win in 48 hours.
But at the end of the week, for
all practical purposes, Israel
was running out of munitions."
When Rep- William Chaope]
(D., Fla.) questioned the posi
tion of Egyptian President An-
war Sadat, in supporting the
anti-Zionist resolution, Kissin-
ger said that "all the countries
of the Arab world are under
domestic and inter-Arab pres-
sure."
-
On Third World countries
that attacked Zionism, Kissin-
ger .said the votes af at least
some Third .World countries
were "fairly accidental," and in
a few cases, their-ambassadors
ware "uninstructed."
He added, that "tf countries
continually thwart our national
interests-. We wfll take this into
account but jiot in -the legisla-
tive process.**
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prid &mM-Ftmmmm*sKm**Boti9W6**
Pa*e 19-A
Worthwhile Book Gifts for Chanuka Holiday
By SUSAN PANOFF
IT IS time to think of books for Chanukah gift
Giving:, this year. Of two books especially
- suited for the holiday the copiously illustrated
"The Maccabees,'' by Moshe Pearlman (Mac-
millan. $12.50), is an exciting way to introduce
the :histqry "of the holiday. The second, Mae
Shatter Rjockland's "The Chanukah Book"
(SchbckehV $10), has just come out.
Mrs. Rockiand, who is concerned with e-
taHishinga Jewish folk art in America, presents
a multitude of craft projects to celebrate Cha-
nukah.ifrom ceramics to needlework.
REMAINING in the art world we find a :
number of very attractive books. The two-
volume'""Jewish Art and Civilization" edited
by Geoffrey-Wfgodfer (Walker & Co., $75) is o
fabulous addition to any home library. Beauti-
-MrMl.color tipped-in plates accompany the' \A
-.history of Jewish art in European and Asian
countries;
Three recent issues by Abrams publishing
house one of the best art publishers in the
world spotlight Jewish artists "Mordechai
Ardon," "Chaim Gross" and "Reuven Rubin"
(S35 eacB>-rT3iese books span the life and work
of each artist with the text accented by lovely
tipped-in plates.

SEVERAL fascinating volumes which deal
with the social life and customs of the Jewish
people have come out this year. Franz Hub-
rriann's "Jewish Family Album" (Little, Brown,
$24.95) depicts the life of the European Jew
before the Holocaust in photographs.
This is a thoughtful gift for all ages those
who wish to remember, and those who never
knew. "The Walled Garden," by Chaim Ber-
. mant (Macmillan, $12.95), chronicles the saga
:- ^ of Jewish family life and tradition with memor-
- able: photography.
A comparatively small work by Diane and
David Roskies is "The Shtetl Book*' Ktav,
.-' ".96). It is rich in the history customs and
ceremonies of pre-Holocaust Eastern Buropean
Jewry.
^KETXJBA.JtfwiahMfcriage Contract*
r through the Ages" (Tel Aviv: Dewm-Epstein,
$22.50), by David Davidovitch, is a beautiful
account' of ketubahs in European and Asian
countries with botft English and Hebrew text.
It comes in an attractive slipcase.
The full color tipped-in plates of ketubahs
are cut out to accentuate the design of each
marriage contract. One juvenile work worth
owning is the recently published "My Shalom,
My Peace," edited by Jacob Zim (McGraw-Hill,
$9.95). Israeli and Arab children have written
Interfaith Body Raps Resolve
poems and drawn pictures about peace.
Many non-fiction works about Israel have
appeared this year. Two which come to mind
as immensely popular are General Chaim Her-
zog's "The War of AtonementOctober, 1973"
(Little, Brown. $10.) and Amos Eton's "Herri"
(Holt, $15). The first is a new and provocative
look at the 1973 War; the second is an exciting
biography of Theodor Herzl.
FICTION, as always, has been a prolific field
this year. The most talked about book at the
moment is Chaim Potok's "In the Beginning"
(Knopf, $8.95), another of the author's well-
written stories about the conflict between tradi-
tion and contemporary society in the life of
a religious Jewish boy.
Saul Bellow, who narrowly missed receiv-
ing the Nobel Prtee for Literature this year,
wrotfr "Humbdldfs Gift" (Viking, $10), which
is presently at the top of the best seller list.
A RISING star in Israeli literature is Amos
Oz, His newest book "Unto Death" (Harcourt,
$6,95) includes two novellas which eloquently
deal with the burning issues of anti-Semitism
and Russian Jewry.
Let us not forget the author of the "Garden
of the Finzi-Conrinis," Georgio Bassani. The
latest translated collection of his works is "The
Smell of Hay" (Harcourt, $7.95) which contains
beautifully, written" stbries of Italian Jewry.
MINNEAPOLIS (JTA)
An enthusiastic overflow crowd
of 7,000 attended a Twin City
rally held at St. Thomas Col-
lege, a Catholic school in St.
Paul, to* protest against the
United Nations General Assem-
bly resolution equating Zionism
with racism. .
Bayard Rustin, chairman of
Black Americans to Support Is-
rael, and Senators Hubert H.
Humphrey and. Walter Mondale,
both Minnesota democrats,
were featured speakers at the
interfaith event.
OTHER speakers included
Gov. Wendell Anderson; Rep.
Donal Fraser (D., Minn.), who
is the Congressional representa-
tive to the-UN; The Rev. Canon
George Lemoine, of the Minne-
sota Council of Churches; and
Rabbis Arnold. Goodman, of
Minneapolis, and Bernard Ras-
kas, of St. Paul, who were also
cochairmen of the rally.
The program also included a
message of support from Presi-
dent Ford.
Speakers stressed the need
for Americans of all faiths to
ban together against the bigotry
and anti-Semitism implied in the
OW icauIUTiuii aaiu m*.**.**^ *
port the State of Israel. Hum-
phrey saw the resolution as
"open violation of the United
Nations charter" and said 'It
sows the seeds of religious
bigotry, and will inevitably take
its toll on America's willingness
to walk the extfca mile for the
UN." --,
THE RALLY wa sponsored
jointly by the Jewish Commu-
nity Relations Council. Anti-
Defamation league of Minnesota
ZOA Corrects
Klutznick Remarks
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Zionist Organization of America
clarified a previous report in
which the ZOA created trie er-
roneous impression that Philip
M. Klutznick, chairman of the
Governing Board of the World
Jewish Congress, addressed the
concluding session of the re-
cent 18th ZOA national conven-
tion in Chicago. The convention
took place Oct. 2 to 5.
The ZOA clarification was in
connection with remarks attrib-
uted to Klutznick concerning
the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organi-
zations.
ACTUALLY, the ZOA state-
ment of clarification said Klutz-
nick was not eye* oresent at
the concluding session- Opt. %
at which tune he was already
in Israel. He addressed the' con-
vention on Oct. 3, when he and
Jacques Torczyner, a pasr pres-
ident of the ZOA, participated
in a symposium off the subject:
"Should American Jews Inter-
vene in Israeli Affairs?"
Furthermore, the statement of
clarification continued, Klutznick
was misquoted iff remarks he
made in the course of the sym-
posium regarding the Confer-
ence of Presidents.
Kahane Says He Doesn't
Get Hispanics Riled Up
CHANUKA GREETINGS
W1V AI
MARKET
ar-i 1946 Harrison Street
Phone 92*4581
A Happy. Chanuka To All
TRAYft, 1MVB, ITO.
2500 R Beach Blvd.
HalUnd.l. 921-1200
I ii i I
Htippy Chanukah to Our
Friends and Customers'
and to
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Hallandale> Florida 3-3009
Phor* 927-0566
HOUYWOW, HK. fcEfttKMIS
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We Are Thankful!
Each year at Bacfc to School time we reflect
on those many years we spent learning the art
of Pharmacy ... It wasn't easy and we some-
times questioned the Importance of all the
knowledge.
BUT now we are operating our own Phar-
macies ana real tie how vltaj this knowledge was
to serving the health need* of the great many
families that entrust us with their prescription
and health needs.
Every day we are doing things that remind us of
this necessity for a comprehensive education.
We are thankful, and urge every student not to
give up- when the school going gets roujrh. In
later years. In whatever career you choose, you
too will understand and he thankful for what
you have learned. Incidentally. Pharmacy can
be a good career for you too.
FREDERICK LIPPMAN & ROBERT HSHMAN, Reg. Pharm.
NEW YORK (JTA) Fed-
eral Judge Jack B. Weinstein
has ordered that a deputy
United States Marshall accom-
pany Rabbi Meir Kahane, the
founder of the Jewish Defense
League, whenever he leaves his
confinement in a Manhattan
half-way house.
U.S. attorney David Trager
said that the order is an out-
j growth of Kahane's appearance
in the Borough Park- section' or
Brooklyn, where he was accused
of increasing tensions between
the Jewish and Hispanic com-
munftMfc. w
Eleanor Holmes Norton,
chairman of the New York City
Commission on Human Rights,
wrote a letter to Weinstein ask-
ing the court to look into "se-
rious abuses" by Kahane of his
special privileges.
Kahane is allowed out three
thnes-a-dey for piayers and to
get Kosher meals.

I *
HI1XWOOD CHEMISTS
100 N. 46th AVf. AT HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
PHONE: 907-8000
POST HASTE PHARMACY
4401 SHERIDAN STREET
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
PHONE: 989-OSBr- FREE DH.1VEUY
TOWN DRUG STORE
2730 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD
HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
PHONE: 923-7242


*"
Page 20-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Holtywood
Friday, December 5/7S
Tough Time With Syria-UNDOF or No
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Top level government sourc-
es predict a prolonged im-
passe in negotiations with
Syriawhatever the Syrians
do about the Nov. 30 UNDOF
expiration.
The sources saw little
hope for the negotiation of a
second interim accord with
Syria since Israel could "of-
fer only cosmetic" border
changes within the context
of an interim agreement and,
even in the context of a final
peace settlement, would nev-
er agree to a total withdrawal
from the Golan Heights.
SINCE SYRIA rejects both
positions there appears to be no
practical value at this time for
either interim negotiations or
negotiations for an overall
peace package, the sources said.
They acknowledged that the
United States does not accept
Israel's reading of the situation
aid is vigorously pressing foi
interim negotiations on the Go-
lan once the UNDOF mandate
is renewed.
Secretary of State Henry A.
Kissinger has made the Amer-
ican position clear on more than
one occasion and Washington
has been pressing Premier Yitz-
hak Rabin to make an early
visit to the U.S. to explore pos-
sibilities for Golan talks. Rabin
has eschewed the invitation and
is not expected to go to Wash-
ington before the latter half of
January at the earliest.
The government sources
stressed, however, that the U.S.
was committed in writing to
continue its support of Israel
even if no agreement can be
reached on the Golan Heights.
THE SOURCES said the com-
mitment was part of the Amer-
ican package offered Israel in
return for last September's Si
nai accord with Egypt even
though it does not appear among
the documents "leaked" and
later officially confirmed in
Washington during recent Con-
gressional hearings on the Sinai
pact.
Thus. Israeli sources believe
the U.S. will not undertake an-
other "reassessment" of its Mid-
dle East policy even if it is dis-
appointed by a Golan failure.
American commitments to Is-
rael will remain firm at least
until after the 1976 Presidential
Silnitsky Given 3 Years
On 'Draft Evasion' Charges
NEW YORK (JTA) Aleksandr Silnitsky, of
Krasnodar, has been sentenced to three years on "draft
evasion" charges after months of harassment by Soviet
authorities, it was reported by the Greater New York
Conference on Soviet Jewry.
The GNYCSJ said it received a telegram from Alek-
sandr's father, Teivel, calling for his immediate release.
Aleksandr Silnitsky, 23, is the latest victim of Soviet
repression which is part of a pattern to intimidate those
seeking to emigrate to Israel, the GNYCSJ said.
The Silnitskys first applied for exit visas in Sep-
ltig*WasmsSmfflfe, 1Sfoa tinStKer "y^S^m&SS
from his position as a lecturer at the Polytechnical In-
stitute.
Last July 24, Aleksandr was told that neither he
nor his family would ever receive exit permits. He was
twice summoned to register at military headquarters
but refused to comply with the orders, claiming that he
was an Israeli citizen. He was arrested on Sept. 10 for
draft evasion and tried six weeks later.
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elections, which means that Is-
rael is in effect assured of U.S.
support for its present political
positions for another 15 months,
the sources said.
The sources did not discount
the outbreak of another Mideast
war in that period, a risk that
obviously falls on Israel. But
from the political-strategic view-
point, Israel would find itself in
a comfortable situation if war
were to break out, the sources
said.
THEY maintained that this
was one of the benefits ofthe
Sinai accord with Egypt out of
which Israel expects to receive
substantial military and eco-
nomic aid from the U.S.
Israeli optimism that Syria
will agree to renew the UNDOP
mandate was bolstered by re-
ports that UN Secretary General
Kurt Waldheim is' "hopeful"
that his present mission for that
purpose will succeed. Wald-
heim' was in Damascus this
other Mideast states and is ex-
were also reports that the So-
viet Union is trying to persuade
Syria to renew the UNDOF
mandate.
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Friday, December 5, 1975
The Jewish Flcridian and Shofar of HoUywooa
Page 21 A
Suit Against Morton Filed Even Though
He'll Likely Fly the Coop
1
WASHINGTON (JTA) Twenty-five members of
:he House of Representatives have filed suit in Federal Dis-
trict Court here charging Secretary of Commerce Rogers
Morton and Secretary of the Interior Thomas S. Kleppe
with having acted to "hinder, impair or frustrate" the anti-
r/ovcott policy of the United States.
At a news conference in the Rayburn Building follow-
ng the filing of the suit, Rep. Robert F. Drinan (D., Mass.)
one of the 25 complainantssaid the two Cabinet officers
had "failed, neglected and refused" to implement the 1965
Export Administration Act, which states in part:
"IT IS THE POLICY of the
United States to oppose re-
Mdctive trade practices foster-
ed or imposed by foreign coun-
tries against other countries
friendly to the United States."
Drinan charged that Morton
srid Kleppe had disregarded
the law by "failing actively to
oppose the restrictive trade
practices and boycotts carried
out by 14 countries in the Near
East and North Africa against
Israel and against American
companies that trade with Is-
rael."
Leo Pfeffer, of New York, a
constitutional lawyer who is al
fo special counsel of the Amer-
ican Jewish Congress, is serv-
ing as attorney for the 25 House
members.
HE EXPLAINED that the
complaint charges Moiton and
Kleppe with violating the Con-
stitution by neglecting to meet
their responsibility under Ar-
ticle 11 "that the laws be faith-
fully executed."
Pfeffer told reporters the suit
seeks an injunction against the
two government officials bar-
ring them, "from promoting or
encouraging trade" between the
U.S. and the 14 Near Eastern
and North African states so
long as those countries con-
tinue to boycott Israel and U.S.
companies continue to trade
with'Israel. **'
The complaint also asks for a
writ of mandamus directing
Morton and Kleppe "to imple-
ment and effectuate the na-
tional policy of the United
States_ as set forth in Section 3
of tbJe "Export Administration
Act."'
IN CHARGING Morton with
"actions tending to hinder, im-
pair and frustrate the anti-
boycott policy of the United
States," the suit cites Commerce
Department export regulations
. (Sec. 369.1) stating that export-
ers "are not legally prohibited
from taking any action that
has the effect of ^furthering or
supporting such restrictive
trade pratices or boycotts."
A booklet published by the
department, "The Near East and
North Africa: A Report to U.S.
Business," repeats the same
statement.
The assertion that direct vio-
lation of national policy is not
legally prohibited, the com-
plaint charges, "is an er-
roneous statement of law.
Whether erroneous or not, the
statement has and can only have
one purpose and effect name-
ly to invite and encourage con-
cerns to violate the anti-boycott
policy of the United States."
THE COMPLAINT also al-
leges that the Commerce De-
partment circulated among
American concerns notices of
trade opportunities or tenders
from Near East and North
African countries that boycott
Israel "Without informing these
concerns that the notices or
tenders are from countries par-
ticipating in the boycott policies
and practices against which
Section 3 of the Export Admin-
istration Act is specifically
aimed" and "without stating
that compliance with the ex-
pressed trade practices or boy-
cotts violates American nation-
al policy."
Kleppe was charged with
"tending to hinder, impair or
frustrate the anti-boycott policy
of the United States" by requir-
ing American vendors of mate-
rials for use by its Geological
Surv-y Bureau in Near East and
North African countries "to
submit certifications that
neither the steamship on which
the materials are to be sent nor
the company insuring the mate-
rials is on the boycott list of
the particular Near East or
North African country involv-
ed."
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African countries referred to in
the complaint as participating
in restrictive trade practices or
boycotts against Israel or com-
panies that trade with Israel
are: Algeria, Bahrain, Iraq, Ku-
wait, Lebanon. Libya, Morocco.
Qatar. Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tu-
nisia and United Arab Emirate.
All 25 of the House members
listed as complainants in the
suit are Democrats.
The original sponsors of the
lawsuit are Drinan, Edward I.
Koch (N.Y.), Benjamin S. Rosen-
thai (N.Y.), James H. Scheuer
(N.Y.) and Henry A. Waxman
(Calif.)
THEY WERE joined by Bella
S. Abzug (N.Y.), James J. Blan-
chard (Mich.), William S. Brod-
head (Mich.), Joshua Eilbert
(Pa.), Elizabeth Holtzman
(N.Y.), William Lehman (Fla.),
Clarancc D. Long (Md.), Nat-
thew F. McHugh (N.Y.), Robert
N. C. Nix (Pa.), James L. Ober-
star (Minn.), Richard L. Ot-
tinger (N.Y.), Frederick W.
Richmond (N.Y.), Paul M. Si-
mon (111.), Stephen J. Solarz
(N.Y.), Morris K. Udall (Ariz.),
Charles Wilson (Tex.), Lester
L. Wolff (N.Y.), and Sidney R.
Yates (111.).
Asked why no Republican
members are among the "Wash-
ington 25" Drinan theorized
that participation would be em-
barrassing since their own party
members are being sued. Dri-
nan said that Republicans were
asked to join, but they declined.
He did not name them.
Drinan also said the factor
of the Arab boycott would be
a point in the confirmation pro-
ceedings of Elliot Richardson
as Morton's successor as Com-
merce Secretary.
RICHARDSON would ee the
light very quickly," he said,
"but I can't predict what he
will do. We went forward with
the lawsuit even though we
knew he was coming in" as
Morton's successor.
AT THE news conference,.
Rep. Matthew McHugh (D.,
N.Y.) charged that the basis for
the Ford administration's policy
is "rooted in the dollar sign."
Rep. Clarance Long (D., Md.),
citing the slogan inscribed on
the U.S. Supreme Court build-
ing, said that "equal justice
under law is simply what we are
trying to achieve."
Rep. James L. Obserstar (D.,
Minn.) said that unless the Con-
gressmen proceed with the law-
suit they are going to allow the
administration to support the
Arab boycott.
Rep. Edward Koch (D.. NY.)
said he glad Morton was leav-
ing at the end of December be-
cause "he has not done a good
job."
REP. JAMES Scheuer said
that there are three categories
of companies doing business in
the Middle East: those that deal
with Israel but cannot trade
with the Arab countries, those
that knuckle under to the Arab
countries and cannot deal with
Israel, and some that do bust
ness both with Israel and i!h
Arabs.
Charging that high U.S. o'ft-
cials must be prevented fi^nt
violating American policy, P>i-
nan declared, "We cannot t
for new legislation when C i-
net members are violating 'he
laws each day."
Rep. Bella Abzug (D, N.Y.)
said that it was "shocking 1I" it
foreign powers are forcing is
to violate our own laws" md
that "the President is silem rn
the action or inaction by is
own cabinet officer."
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PWgt 72-K
The Jewish Floridlan and Shojar of Hollywood
.p
Problem: How to Deal With Violence
Erupting on Golan Heights
By YUTZHAK SHARG1I.
TEL AVIV (JTA) Is-
rael faces a serious dilemma
over how to respond to the
murder of three 19-year-old
yeshiva students all of them
soldiers and the wounding
of two others by Arab terrorists
who infiltrated the religious
movement settlement of Ramat
Magshimim on the Golan
Heights.
The terrorists entered Israel-
held territory and escaped
through the heavily-manned
Syrian lints on the Golan with,
the obvious complicity of the
Syrian army and probably the
knowledge and endorsement by
DaTpasfcua of what an Israeli
spokesman described as a "kill-
and-run" mission.
ALTHOUGH tension is run-
ning high on the Golan, and
Israelis are infuriated over the
latest outrage, military retalia-
tion by Israeli forces is not feas-
ible at this time, circles here
acknowledged.
The government has a speci-
fic request from the United
States to exercise maximum
cestr.aijit in face of Syrian pro-
vocation.
(State Department spokesman-
Robert Funseth said in Well-
ington that the U.S. is taking
"opposition to terrorist acts"
which "work against the calm
necessary for progress in search
of a settlement." However. Fun-
seth would not say at the time
whether the State Department
believed Syria was involved and
would not comment on the pos-
sible motivation of the mur-
ders.)
Brig. Gen. Dov Sion, an army
spokesman, said that Israel
holds Syria fully responsible for
the murders which he termed
a- violation of the letter and
spirit of the separation of forces
agreement and the specific
undertaking by President Hafez
Assad of Syria to U.S. Secretary
of State Henry A. Kissinger that
he would not permit terrorist
activity through Syrian lines.
Insights on questions
of Jewish Interest
by DR. FREDERICK LACH2V1AN
Executive Editor
Encyclopaedia Judaica
What is the biblical atti-
tude toward miracles?
Biblical Hebrew has no word
corresponding to the English
"miracle" (Ex. 3:20; Josh. 3:5;
Ps. 78:11;; etc.), but. says the
authoritative Encyclopaedia Ju-
daica. the meaning of "wonder"
is much broader than "miracle."
A particular class of miracles,
however, can be considered as
a definite biblical concept, since
it is designated by terms of its
own. These are the "signs,"; 1^
extraordinary and surprising
events which God brought about
in order to demonstrate His
power and will in particular
situations, when men had- to be
convinced- A sign can be given
as prtof of proahecy. Thus the
altar of Beth-El collapsed as a
sign that the prophecy of its:
future destruction was true (I
Kings 13:1-6). The mere- im-
portant signs occurred in Egypt:
the sjaff turned into a serpent
to show that Moses was indeed
sent by God (Ex. 4:1-7); the ten
plagues coerced' Pharoah to ac-
cept the divine command and
let the people go.
Some biblical miracles are
more than signs, in that their
purpose- goes beyond the mere
proof, of divine power. Israel
was saved and Egypt's army
destroyed by the parting of the
Red Sea, the people were given
water- and food in the desert by
means of miraculous acts, and
so on. Both Samaria (II Kings
6:8-7:20) and Jerusalem (II
Kings 19135) miraculously es-
caped conquest by besieging'
armies.
Such miracles can be viewed'
as direct divine intervention, at
critical moments of human Ips-
toryi Even in these incidents the
element of a "sign" is never
wholly absent- Dathen and Abi-
ram and their followers ware*
swallowed by the earth; it was-
a just punishment, whose sud-
denness was demanded by the
situation. Moses' words (Num.
16:28-38), however, designate
the event clearly as a sign.
It is also stated that when
Israel saw the mighty deed of'
Egypt's destruction in the sea:
they believed" in God and in*
Moses (Ex. 14:31). Evidently,
says the Enbyclopaadia Judaica,
the Bible make* no distinction
between signs proper and mi-
raculous divine intervention in
human history.
There is third* type of mir-
acle in the Bible in which the
sheer admiration of the wonder-
worker seems more important
than both elements discussed'
abovei One cannot escape this
impression when reading the
stories about Elijah and. to an
even greater degree, about
cHisha. Stjcn stories are a regu-
lar feature of popular religion
of all times and in all places
Question Box
. By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Why is suicide forbidden
in Jewish law?
Generally speaking, one who
commits suicide denies the au-
thority of the Almighty, who is
the ultimate owner of both
man's body and his soul. The
Talmud (Baba Kama 91:B) in-
terprets the verse in Genesis
(9:5) which states "I will seek
a reckoning for your blood" to
mean that the Almighty will
seek a reckoning from any man
who spills his own blood. If the
general rule of Judaism is to
value life, this requirement in-
cludes valuing one's own life.
A person who does not value
his own life would have little
regard for anyone else's life or
life in general. A question is
raised by some as to why
martyrdom would be allowed
whereas suicide would be pro-
hibited. They answer this by ex-
plaining that martyrdom is
something which is in conform-
ity with God's- will because it
spares the desecration of His
major commandments. Suicide,
on the other hand. s not an act
in conformity with God's will.
Martyrdom is an act of gen-
erosity where one offers his life
under certain circumstances for
the Divine purpose. Suicide, in
contrast, is a selfish act violat-
ing man's commitment to life
which was prescribed by the
Almighty. A genuine suicide, if
it can be proven to be genuine,
would strip the deceased from
his rights of eulogv. mourning,
etc. However, consideration is
usually given by the rabbis to
the understanding that whoever
commits suicide is mentally
disabled. Thus, he might be con-
sidered as acting under the com-
pulsion of forces which over-
come him and make him ir-
responsible for his actions. It
is. for that reason, therefore,
that suicide victims are given
proper burial and are mourned
according to Jewish law.
in the Biblethey are almost
entirely confined to the figures
of these two "nonliterary"
prophets.
The problem of whether
miracles are "natural" or "su-
pernatural," which was of con-
cern to scholars of later ages,
dots not bother Bible writers.
In one case (Num. 16:30) a
miracle is described as a "cre-
ation," which indicates an
awareness of what moderns
might call the "suspension of
natural laws" (see also Ex. 34:
10). On the other hand, the
miracle of the descent of the*
quail (Num. 9:18-23) is quite
plainly and clearly described as
a "natural"though unexpected-
occurence and yet is treated
as a fall-scale miracle. Bible
writers simply- do not question
God's ability to do anything, by
any means.
The intellectual's dislike of
miracles has furnished the main-
stream of Bible criticism with a.
yardstick: some sources contain
more account* of miracles than
others, and ace therefore deem-
ed' less "valuable." Scholars
with apologetic tendencies tend
to minimize the importance of
Bible miracles, in their endeav-
or to make biblical religion less'
"crude" and more "pure." This,
case can be based on the pre-
ponderance of the "sign" con-
cept in. the Bible, but is never-
theless wrong, says the Judaica.
The Bible does not, a* a rule,
tell miracle stories for their
own sake, but it dees regard the
"signs and. wonders1' of God as
extremely important. Man has
to know that God' can do any-
thing, whenever and wherever
He chooses; that this has been
demonstrated in history many
times and. the sacred history of
Israel has been shaped often
enough by direct and quite evi-
dent divine intervention. Faith
that can do without this notion
of miracles is possible, but un-
thinkable in biblical terms.
THE VICTIMS were identified
as Nahum Fenigstein, Michael
Nadler and Benzion Leibowitz.
All were members of the Hes-
der Yeshiva program which
permits religious youth to serve
half of their required three
years oi military service on ac-
tive duty and complete the bal-
ance while continuing their
refigious studies. All held the
rank of sergeant.
Fenigstein, the son of a Miz-
rachi Bank branch manager in
Jerusalem, and Nadler, who
came to Israel from the United
States five years ago and was
the son of-a lecturer on social
work at. Bar Ilan University,
were buried in Jerusalem. Lei-
bowitz^ was bXirled In the Pone-
wezh cemetery in the religious-
settlement of B'nai Braq
t *
The two wotinded students
were rJtnjkjfej fan satisfactory
condition in hospitals. One of
them, Yehuda Cohen, was left
for dead by the terrorists. The
other, Shalom Mocha, of Jeru-
salem, was abducted by the
killers but managed to break
aWay and sustained slight
wounds from shots fired at him.
ACCORDING to security,
sources, the five youths were
spending the night at Ramat
Magshimim, a Golan settlement
sponsored by the Orthodox
Friday, DocweMff- j z979
Bnei Akiva youth
They were carrying bed-
-clothes in one of the settlement
buildings when, the terrorists
broke in and opened fire with
small arms and grenadesv
A subsequent search by Is-
raeli military patrols ajded by
helicopters failed to fj/fa *'
killers, but fobfprlfiC; <"*---- .
found leading to'and-m *"| iQat
Syrian lines. rj, :?*.| ->,
Chief of Staff Gen! Mordwtial
Gur told newsmen Here that the
infiltration and murders"wotild
not have been possible "wfthonT
full knowledge and'^eoordlna-i
tion between the" "Soften army
and the ten-drifts/13"rns" '-"
ISRAELIS, meanwhile, pojfc
dered whether it was in Israel's
interest to continue the. UN
presence on.the Golan Heijrits.
Sources noted* Mi^^be fUN
troops were no hindrance to ter-
rorist infiltrators but effective-
ly prevented Israeli retaliatory
action. *|||i}i
Israelis were also questioning
whether the tragedy was the
beginning of a new- caftnjsrtgn
of terror on the Golan Heights;
aided and abetted, by the Syria*
army. sii.".rtfcio>i f
the- killers were.^ngjhaiiy
identified as El Fatah numbers.
The Popular Democratic ^ronjfc
for the Liberation of Palestine
subsequently claimed credit-for
the murders in a statement is-
sued at its Beirut headquarters.
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(toy, pecember 5, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 23-A

abin Considering Big Cabinet Reshuffle
ab
JERUSALEM (JTA) Premier Yitzhak Rabin is be abolished, and many of its Agriculture Aharon Uzan.
,ut to undertake a major reshuffling of his government functions, including national in- Zevulun Hammer of the Na
cabinet ministers likely to be affected are raising ob- durance, would be absorbed by tional Reh ious Part who u
htiins expanaeu ministry or Social
' Although rumors have been flying for weeks, the public JES2 "^SfmSS! *"
It its first official indication that changes were on the way
9m a cabinet communique that said the ministers did not
time at this week's session to discuss the "reorganiza-
in of government
REORGANIZATION is
ected to include changes
commended by the special
nisterial committee on the
vernment's proposals for
earn lining, the government in
aftermath of the Yom Kip-
War that were shelved for
nost a year.
It has been revived of late,
mainly because Premier Rabin
believes the time has come to
set up a new team of his own
men and partly for internal co-
alition reasons.
According to unconfirmed re-
ports, the Labor Ministry will
Other Labor ^Ministry 'func-
tions would be assigned to the
Housing and Education Minis-
tries.
LABOR MINISTER Moshe
Baram, of the Labor Align-
ment, has objected vigorously,
especially as he would be
shunted to the less prestigious
Communications Ministry, re-
garded as a junior portfolio,
which is presently held on a
temporary basis by Minister of
ative
.
IaUaE, .. .
Id For tha first time any
a national' nrsjoniiatiiin
undertaken to cijmlm.1 the
fairs of lyuagagur no longer
lie to maintain itself because
-the changing ethnic charac-
of a big city neighborhood
| Arthur i. Levine, president
the United Synagogue ot
lerica, the national organiza-
bn of Conservative congrega-
hns. revealed" here at the or
Jnization's Biennial conven
_' thai ^tbje Raited Synagogue
-assumed responsibility for
iple Ansche Chesed, 100th
and West End Ave., one ot
L oldest congregations in the
of New York and second
lest among the 30 affiliates
|the United Synagogue.
4E .SAID, "It will be our ex-
ri cental station for programs
aling with all age levels with
concentration both on youth
on the older generation. It
|ll hecosne tfenManttag ground'
our ideas and. we believe,
historic attempt to restore
[major Jewish neighborhood
stabuiae an important com-
iinity which has been on the
cline and now shows signs ot
lurgnce.
Ansche Chesed represents an
oric first in our effort*, and
hope that it will provide
lelines to save other con-
ations facing similar prob-
evine .attested that Arwch*
Chesed. "which dates its origin
almost to the beginning of oar
republic, will remain a house
of prayer in the total sense of
those words under the direction
of the present board and rabbi.
"It is an act of faith in the
future of New York's West Side."
be said, "and we will act this
out in the most tangible ways."
incorporated in 1895, was found-
ple will become the center ot
the United Synagogue's youth
activities, both for precollege
youngsters in the United Syna-
gogue Youth (USY) and for col-
legians through the ATTD (fu-
ture) organization.
There will also be facilities
for adults, including recreation-
al, educational and suDoortive
programs for senior citizens
Once the home of one of the
city's finest religious schools,
Ansche Chesed again will have
a school which eventuallv i
expected to become a day school
from kindergarten through high
school.
ANSCHE Chesed, which was
incorporated in 195, was found-
ed in the early decades of the
19th century.
Its present building con-
structed in 1933, is considered
on- of the finest examples of
svnagogue architecture of the
tune.
The Cntted Synagogue of
America'8 five-day biennial con-
vention began with some 2,000
delegates in attendance.
S9-5fd4
Wheel. Alignment
Balancing
gj
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SEASON'S GREETINGS
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currently Minister of Welfare,
said he had no objections to
the expansion of his ministry
provided that it remains an
NRP fiefdom.
But Rabin reportedly plans
to assign the new Ministry of
Social Benefit to Mapam's Vic-
tor Shemtov, the current Min-
ister of Health. Hammer would
get the Health portfolio in ex-
change.
POLITICAL PUNDITS believe
Rabin wants to mollify Mapam
with the new Welfare post be-
cause be intends to abolish the
Ministry of Absorption, cur-
rently held by Mapam.
That ministry was establish-
ed after the Six-Day War whom
immigration increased dra-
matically.
. But Yosef Almogi, the Labor
Party's candidate for chair-
manship of the Jewish Agency
and World Zionist Organization
Executives, has demanded abo-
lition -of the Absorprion Minis-
4ry and restoration of its func-
tions to the. Jewish Agency's
Immigration Absorption De-
partment.
MEANWHILE, according to
persistent rumors, Rabin wants
to remove Yehoshua Rabino-
witz as Finance Minister and
replace him with Yaacov Lev-
inson, head of the Bank Ha-
poalim.
Rabinowitz has come under
mounting criticism for not tak-
ing sufficiently decisive meas-
ures to alleviate Israel's efco-
nornic crisis, especially the
country's declining foreign cur-
rency reserves and lag in ex-
ports.
Rabinowitz has argued that
more severe measures would
lead to widespread unemploy-
ment.
In an unrelated development,
Menachem Porusn, a veteran
MK of the ukra-$rthodox
d* Israel faction.
that be would relina
Knesset seat in favor of
er Aguda politician. Rabbi
Shlomo Gross.
Porush was eating in obedi-
ence to the Aguda's "Council of
Sages," which oadered him to
step flown in favor of Gross.
Happy Chanuka To All .
LITTLE FLOWER SHOT
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CHANJKAH GREETINGS
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7744 TAFT ST., PEMBROKE PENES
K


Page 24-A
The Jewish Floridkm and Shofar of TJoJlvwood
Friday, December 5, 1975
EUEWIESEL
SIMCHA DINITZ
JOIN
SHIMON PERES
CHAIM HERZOG
FRANK R. LAUTENBERG
and the
LEON DULZIN

American Jewish Community
in Strength and Unity
at the
United Jewish Appeal's National Conference
1
1
December 10-13,1975
New York Hilton
JEWISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD, INC
2838 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD, HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33020
Telephone 921-8810
\
1


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