The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00131

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text

wJewislh FleridHaiin
and MIOFAll OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Volume 5 Number 23
Hollywood, Florida Friday, November 7, 1975
Price 25 cenu
2,500 REPRESENTATIVES TO MEET IN MIAMI BEACH
44th General Assembly Of CJF Set Nov. 19-23
More than 2,500 representa-
tives from the organized Jew-
communities of the United
Si tes and Canada will attend
the -14th General Assembly of
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions and Welfare Funds (CJF)
to be held in Miami Beach
.Nov. 19-23, the largest Assem-
bly in CJF history.
Meeting at both the Carillon
and Deauville Hotels, the lead-
ers of the Jewish Federations
and Welfare Funds serving 800
Jewish communities will con-
sider the wide range of hu-
man needs at home, in Israel,
and other countries overseas.
The community leaders will
plan hew best to carry out Fed-
eration s crucial role and re-
sponsibilities in maximizing aid
and services.
The Assembly will include
seven plenary sessions, four
major forums, and nearly a
hundred workshops.
Some 100 sessions will fo-
cus on critical community is-
sues, priorities and planning to
maximize aid and services for
local, national, overseas and Is-
raeli programs.
Herbert Katz, president of
Jewish Federation of South
Broward, Inc., said, "This is a
once in a lifetime opportunity,
held in our own backyard,
where almost 3,000 people
the largest congregation of
Jews at one time ever will
assemble."
The CJF is the association
of central community organiza-
tions Federations, Welfare
Funds, Community Councils
serving 800 Jewish communi-
ties in the United States and
Canada.
The CJF aids these commu-
nities to mobilize maximum
support for the UJA and other
overseas agencies, as well as
for major national and local
services involving financing,
planning and operating health,
welfare, cultural, educational,
community relations, and other
programs benefitting all resi-
dents.
Ford, Sadat Hail Ties
Of 'New Friendship'
WASHINGTON President Ford met Egypt's Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat in a 68-minute meeting, the first in a
series that launched Sadat's historic 10-day visit to the
United States beginning Monday.
Preceding the two chief of was not specific about
states' review of an Honor
Guard, Sadat acknowledged
that "I shall be asking the
U.S. to sell me arms." He
"shopping fist" he was re-
ported to have brought with
him.
SADAT DID say, however,
that if the United States com-
plied with Egypt's request, the
arms "will be used only in ac-
cordance with the United Na-
tions charter, which permits
self-defense."
The President refused to af-
firm that they would not be
used against Israel.
He declared that Egypt had
not been able to replace the
arms it lost in the October, 1973
war. The Soviet Union, he said,
refused to sell Egypt arms.
The- implication was that, be-
cause of his disaffiliation from
Moscow in .recent years, Sadat
expected the U.S. to fill in the
gap.
SADAT ALSO declared that
he would be seeking economic
assistance for his "red-tape"-
ridden enonomy suffering under
a staggering load, including the
promise of education and work
to all Egyptians.
Later, at the National Press
Continued on Page 2
Herbert Katz, (left) president of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward, Inc., is shown with Prof. Allen Pollack
and Helen Cohan, Women's Leadership vice president.
Pollack Addresses
Young Leaders
Prof. Allen Pollack gave an
informative analysis of Russia
and its relationship to the Mid-
East when he addressed a group
of 200 people at Temple Solel
on Oct. 22.
The evening was sponsored
by the Young Leader's Coun-
cil and Women's Leadership
Institute of the Jewish Fede-
ration of South Broward.
Prof. Pollack was instrumen-
tal in establishing the American
Professors for Peace in the
Middle East, an organization of
15,000 academicians on some
500 campuses. He currently
serves as vice chairman of its
National Executive Committee,
and has participated in several
study missions of the Amer-
ican Professors which were in-
vited to visit Israel, Jordan and
the United Arab Republic as
guests of the respective gov-
ernments.
A member of the Executive
of the World Zionist Organiza-
tion, the board of governors of
the Jewish Agency and the
board of directors of the United
Israel Appeal, Prof. Pollack's
publications include "The Arabs
Need and Want Peace, But...",
"Prospects for Peace in the
Middle East," and "American
Jewry and Israel: Partners in
the Struggle for the Jewish
Future."
Predict
Hate Drive
Will End
UNITED NATIONS
(jTA) Amadou Mahtar
M'Bow, director general of
the United Nations Educa-
tional, Scientific and Cultur-
al Organization (UNESCO),
said here that he believes
that UNESCO in its next
general conference, sched-
uled to meet late next year,
will heed the recommenda-
tion of UNESCO's executive
board earlier this month to
end the anti-Israel measures
adopted by the organization
last year.
Last November, after UN-
ESCO adopted two Arab-in-
spired resolutions cutting
Israel off from the agency's
international cultural aid
program and barring her
Continued on Page 9
Sadat Getting
What He Wants
WASHINGTON Whatever Egypt's president An-
war Sadat, may or may not be getting during his historic
10-day visit in the United States, one thing is sure.
He is successfully dealing with the anger that con-
servative and even radical Arab leaders have been feel-
ing about him for concluding his interim Sinai accord
with Israel.
" Mainly he keeps insisting that the accord is only
Phase One in a general withdrawal he is expecting
Israel to make in addition to other concessions, particu-
larly on the Golan Heights.
In press interviews here "Tuesday and Wednesday
President Sadat said he has been "urging" President
Gerald Ford to apply pressure on Israel to withdraw
from the Golan Heights.
"If there is a reasonable proposal I think he will
agree," Sadat said of Syria's president Hafez Assad, who
has been Sadat's strongest and most belligerent critic.
Also, Sadat has let it be known that the U.S. ought
to press for a resumption of the Geneva talks with "full
participation" of Yasir Arafat's Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization as an equal partner.
In terms of his own needs by mid-week President
Sadat also:
Signed agreements with the U.S. providing for a
$98 million sale of American wheat, flour and tobacco;
Learned that the administration will ask Con-
gress for $750 million in economic aid for his country;
Press for military commitments amounting to $5
billion over the next 10 years.
On Sunday Sadat will be meeting President Ford in
Jacksonville, Fla., where Sadat is scheduled to stay as
a guest at the home of Raymond Mason, president of
Charter Co., which controls vast oil interests in the Mid-
dle East.
Senate, House Rap UN
Anti-Zionist Resolution ^
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Senate and House
have prepared a joint resolution informing the 142 member
states of the United Nations of their condemnation of the
anti-Zionist resolution adopted by the General Assembly's
Third Committee (Social, Cultural and Humanitarian Com-
mittee) and urging the General Assembly "to disapprove the
said resolution if and when it is presented for a vote before
that body."
The joint resolution de-
clares that the UN draft
"wrongfully associates and
equates Zionism with racism
and racial discrimination"
and that the purposes and
principles of the United Na-
tions thereby "are threaten-
ed with being nullified and
subverted."
THE JOINT resolution, back-
ed by the leadership of both
major parties in both chambers
of Congress, is to be presented
to the U.S. Ambassador to the
UN, Daniel Moynihan, with the
request that he distribute co-
pies to all UN delegates prior
to the General Assembly's plen-
ary session which is expected
to act on the Third Committee's
draft.
The five co-sponsors in the
House are Reps. Thomas O'-
Neill (D., Mass.) and John Mc-
Fall (D., Calif.), Majority Lead-
er and Deputy Majority Leader,
respectively; Reps. John Rhodes
(R., Ariz.) and Robert H. Michel
(R., 111.), the Minority and Den*
uty Minority Leaders; and Rep.
John Anderson (R., Ill), chair-
man of the Republican House
Conference.
Other prime movers behind
the resolution in the House in-
cluded Reps. Sidney Yates (D.,
Continued on Page 9


1

Page 2-
The Jewish Rorkflpn and Siofar. of Haflxwood~
. i "" 1 '. -rr~
Friday, November 7, 1975
Almogi Stomps (or Agency Post
LONDON (JTA) Haifa
Mayor Yosef Almogi, who was
officially nominated last week
by the Labor Partv leadershio
for the post of chairman of the
Jewish Agency and World Zion-
ist Executives, told Anglo-Jew-
ish leaders what he believed are
th* qualities demanded by the
office he seeks.
Almogi, who later delivered
the keynote SDeech at the 7-tt'i
annual conference of the Zion-
ist federation of Britain and
Iraeland, declared, "You need
a man who is both practical,
namely, he stands firmly with
both feet on the ground, and
who, at the same time, has vi-
sion."
ALMOGI SAID he was grat-
ified by his nomination, con-
firmed that, if elected he would
relinquish his Krujsset seat, and
expressad hone that the citizens
of Haifa who elected him their
mayor would understand his
reasons for not completing his
full four-vear term.
Ha said he had been asked to
run for a position that present
ed one of the greatest challeng-
es. He said he believed aliya,
was the main task ahead and
From left to right are. Robert Piztell, Mission chairman;
Gen. Dov Sion; Herbert Katz, president of Federation,
and Lewis Cohn, general campaign chairman.
Gen. Dov Sion Speaks To
Local Mission Participants
Israeli Army General Dov
Sion addressed participants of
South Broward's 1st Community
Mission to Israal at the Jew-
ish Federation offices on Oqt.
15. The group departed Sun-
day, Oct. 26, for a M-day in-
tensive study mission in Israel.
Gen. Stan spoke, to the group
about, this critical tun a in Is-
rael's, hiptpry. Discussing the
Interim Agreement, he'sajJ "It
is a designed framework for
possible future development
we expect peaceful developr
meat to be the course it will
lead to."
The group visited:
Jerusalem, including the
Old City, Mt. Scopus. Mount of
Olives, Rarnat Eshkol, and the,
% Bful Ki>, Convalescent
Canur for heroes, of the Yoni
KiptW ^ar,-.
JAn aoflorpfjflo, ceater;
An army base and JDC fa-,
cilities;
Explored wall-established,
and struggling communities on
the. Lebanese, bprdsr;
O Lunched; with front-line
troops.
% Attended- a special pro-
gram at, Yal Vasjisai, Memorial
to the martyrs and heroes of!
the Holocaust;
Participated ia Shabbat at
the. Weetatn Wall
El Al Cuts Back in Face
Of Ongoing Wildcat Strikes
TEL AVIV CJTA) -81 Al
has taken drastic measures to
reduce its expenditures in the
face of a wildcat strike, by
woijkshpo employes, that, ground-
ed the airline.
The coraoany s-ud, the T*^as.-
ures would remain, in effect as
long as conditions prevent the
uninterrupted, smooth opera-
tion of El Al's services.
TORY INCLUDED 1-tters of
dismissal sent to 100 temporary
emnloyes. the furloughing of
1,000 other employe*, the" re-
call of *H air crews oow abroad
and suaoemion of the compa-
ny's subsidy to its local canteen.
Continued on Page 12
Jewish
Civilization
it's al! there in the
Encyclopaedia
Jiulnira.
For free color
' b.ro^hurc.
nil (3Q5) 534-8251
o* wHte: E. I.. Suite *05.
420 1 Inmln Rd.. M.B. Ht39
PAYMENT ACCEPTED
IN ISRAEL BONDS
observed th/ Israelis should, *k
ways keeo in mind the demo-
graphic issue without arguing
over geography.
In an impassioned speech, Is-
rael's Ambassador to Britain.
Gideon Rafeal. rtecladed that It
is not the fulfillment of the
Palestinian aspirations" that
moves the enemies of Israel
"but the extinction of Israel's
right to national existence
which motivates their struggle."
HE ASSERTED that Zionism
and Judaism were today svnony-
mous and the attack on Zionism
was, meant to strike at the very
existence of Jews. He protested
the distortion of the Jewish na-
tional independence movement
which reached "its height of ob-
scenity" in Uganda President
Idi Amin's recent attack at the
UN General Assembly.
A political session of the Zion-
ist conference was suspended
for a time after a fight broke
out between Herut and left-wing
delegates over a, Maoaij resolu-
tion urniim "an overall peace
plan based upon territorial ad-
justments'* and readiness by Is-
rael to negotiate with "repre-
sentative. Palestinian Arabs."
The resolution also called on
the Israeli government to give
full recognition to "the Pales-
tinians' right to self-determina-
tion. Stewards were farced to
eject two Herut youths, in the
melee.
Later, Herut leader Malyyn
Benjamin, defeated ia his can-
didacy for the chairmanship of
the, Bjritish Zionist Faderajtion.
axiressed deep rag'ret over the
incident.
Continued from Page I-..
Club, Sadat declared that the
interim Sinai accord would not I
bind Egypt to inaction if Israel
refused to come to terms with
Syria over the Golan Heights.
"The, United States," he de-
clared, "holds in us hands more
than 99 per cant of the cards
in this game."
FT WAS clear Sadat expected
the administration to begin ap-
plying pressure on Jerusalem
to reach an accord with Syria.
In greeting President Sadat,
President Ford noted that the
Egyptian leader's vis\t "is a
symbol of the new dimensions
of our friendship," and prom
ised that the U.S. would not ba|
satisfied with a stalemate in the
advance toward a lasting peace
in the Middle East.
ADL Fund-Raising Breakfast
Will Honor Myer Pritsker
The Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith will hold its an-
nal fund raising breakfast of
the South Broward Region of
B'nai B'rith under the aaqpioes
of the Broward-Palra BMch,
Council of B'nai B'rith Lodges.
Sunday. No". 9. at 9:30 a.m. in
the Hallandale Jewish Center,
416 NE 8th Ave.. Hallandale.
Myer. Pritsker, president of
Hallandale Jewish Center will
be honored on that occasion in
recognition of his loyalty and
support of the ADL, and in
particular for his keen under-
standing of the part played by
the Anti-Defamation League in
keeping the American-Jewish
community strong, united, well
defended, respected and re-
Beth El Sisterhood To
Sponsor Comic Opera
"The Old Maid and the
Thief," a one-act comic opera,
will be presented by the Flor-
ida Family Opera Singers of the
Opera Guild of Greater Miami
at Temple Beth El Sunday,
Nov. 23.
The evening is sponsored by
the Beth El Sisterhood. Ticket
information may b* obtained
by contacting Mrs. Harold Rat-
ner, Mrs. Melvin Freedman,
Mrs. Julius Halpern. or calling
the temple office.
spuoaive to the needs of the
country and the State of i3.
rael, it was reported.
The principal speaker will be
Ben Essen, recipient of the
1974, Human Relations Award
of the Anti-Defamation L.-ague
and a member of the ADL Ex-
ecutive Committee.
Tom Cohen, a member of the
Florida Regional Board of
ADL, past president of HUicrast
Lodg, B'nai B'rith, and a
member of the Board of Gov
ernoxs of District 5 wi'.l ssrve
as master of ceremonies.
The lodges participatin in
the event include Hallandale,
Herzl, Chai, Jerusalem, Holly-
brook, Harry S. Truman and
Ben Jehudah of Galahad Dade.
"Especially in view of the
enormous amount of petrodol
lars poured into this country
by the Arab League it is im-
perative that the members of
the, Jewish community support
the Anti-Defamation League
and, its. programs," declared
Joseph Perbtein and Sam Al-
bert, cochairmen of this fund
raising event, the second of its
kind in this area.
The cost of the breakfast is
moderate: ladies are invited.
Reservations may be made by
calling Mr. Perlstein or Mr. Al-
bert.
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Our Ursa Staff of
Qv.bftw *m*m
dy To So. You.
Riversides
two new chapels in
Hollywood and Sunrise
serve the needs of
the entire
Jewish, community in
Broward County.
In the Hollywood and Hallandale areas:
580% Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood.
920-1010
In the Fort Lauderdale onto;
1171 Northwest 61st Ave.(Sw\set Strtpy.Sunrise
584-6060
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel. Inc./Funeral Directors
Other Riverside chapels ir South Florida are located in
North Miami Beach. Miami Beach and Miami.
Rkwrsde ierwrs th New York Metropolitan ar*. with chapafc in Manhattan,
Brooke Bron*. Far Rockaway and Wwtchtslar.
Murray N Rubin. FD
H11-7-75
H11-7-75
H11-7-76


Friday, November 7, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 3
Barriey Eeviiie Named Ch'man Temple Beth EVs
Of "Salute To Israel" b^L nSS*
irrity anJ chic leader
Levinfe <;f Hallandale
. n named die Chairman
. ilate to Israel" break-
ored by the Hallan-
lewish Center Congrega-
lieih Tefila, on behalf of
;')75-76 South Florida Israel
Organization campaign, to
j held Sunday morning, Nov-
, vr 23 at 10 a.m. in the So-
cial Mail. 416 Northeast 8th
A enue, Hallandale. The an-
nouncement was made by Rab-
bi Harry E. Schwartz, spiritual
leader who was the recipient of
the State of Israel Masada
award at last year's event.
Working with Levine on the
meeting will be George Paley
coordinator and cochairmen
Art Canon and Irving Hoffman.
Levine, who has been active
in countless philanthropic en-
deavors, has devoted his time
and effort into making this
. nt one of t!n> biggest in Hal-
landale Jewish Center history.
rding to William Liftman,
chairman, Board of Governors,
Sojth liroward County. "This
meeting is of extreme impor-
tance to the success of this
year's drive to raise a record-
breaking $20-million in Israel
Bond purchases in South Flor-
ida, and the Hallandale Jewish
Center has always played a key
role in helping us achieve
these life-building, life-saving
pledges for their brethren in
Israel. We know that with the
work of Barney Levine and his
Israel Bond committee, we will
have a "Salute to Israel" which
will reflect the dedicated devo-
tion these men and women
have always provided through-
out their lives.
Hallandale's Parker Dorado To
Hold "A Night In Israel"
Residents and friends of
Parker Dorado in Hallandale
are being invited to a special
"Night in Israel" program, Wed-
nesday, Nov. 19 at 8 p.m. in the
Blue Room, at Parker Dorado,
South Ocean Drive, it was an-
nounced by Norman Gordon,
chairman.
The meeting sponsored by the
Parker Dorado Israel Bond
Committee, will feature the
presentation of the State of Is-
rael Solidarity Award to resi-
dent Samuel Greenblatt for his
exceptional leadership and ded-
ication in behalf of the develop-
ment and strengthening of the
economy of Israel through the
State of Israel Bond campaign.
The evening's events will
feature Emil Cohen, American
Jewish folk humorist, who will
present comedic satire. The hu-
morist, raconteur and vocalist
at Grossinger's Hotel and Coun-
try Club in New York, has ap-
peared in major night clubs and
theatres throughout the country.
According to William Lift-
man, chairman. Board of Gov-
ernors, South Broward County,
"This event is very important to
the residents of Parker Dorado
because it gives them all the op-
portunity to help our brethren
in Israel in their dire time of
need. And no one person is
more deserving of this sn-^iil
honor than Sam Greenblatt "-ho
is truly representative of f>"
Jewish tradition of helping his
fellow man."
An active member of Temple
Beth El in Cederhurst. Long Is-
land, Sam Greenblatt has nlay-
ed a major role in the United
Jewish appeal ca^nnaign in the
carment district in New York.
While a resident of Lawrence,
Long Island, he served as a
trustee of the village, and con-
tributed to the minv civic en-
deavors in that o-rnunity. Mr.
and Mrs. Greenblatt are mem-
bers of Temple Sinai in Holly-
wood.
Milton M. Parson, executive
director. South Florida Israel
Bond Organization, said that
this year, the campaign to raise
$20 million for Israel Bonds
will be highlighted by Congre-
gation Dinners and Hi-Rise
meetings in response to Israel's
urgent need for economic aid to
continue her progress and wel-
fare programs during this cru-
cial time in history.
Working on the Parker Dora-
do Israel Bonds Committee are
Past honorees Nat Malamuth,
Isaac Nassau. Lou Manes and
Isidore Rafkin.
Members of the Parker Dorado
Israel Bonds Committee Include: Dr.
and Mrs. Edward Ansel, Mr. and
Mrs. Oscar Appelbaum, Mr. and Mrs.
Nat Appenxeiler, Mr. and Mrs. Ben
Berger, Mr. and Mrs. Irwln Berger.
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Billet, Mr. and
Mrs. Harrison Blanksteln, Mr. and
Mrs. Barney Bogart, Mr. and Mrs.
Zarhary Boosln, Mr. and Mrs. Hen-
ry Brautman, Dr. and Mrs. Sidney
Cohen, Dr. and Mrs. Sam Dubln,
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Duchin, Mrs. Bet-
ty Enftel. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Ep-
steln, Mrs. Rosalind Friend, Mr, and
Mrs. Abe Puss, Mr. and Mrs. Sam
Relies, Mr. and Mrs. Murray Gold-
berg, Mr. and Mrs. I>arry Goldstein,
Mrs. 8am Greenblatt, Mrs. Frances
Haaxma, Mr. and Mrs, Isidore Her-
man. Mr. and Mrs. Carl Jannel, Mr.
and Mrs. Herman Kaho, Mr. and
Mrs. Jacob Kallman, Mr. and Mrs.
Cecil Keasler, Mr. and Mrs. Ray
Kramer, Mrs. Birdie Kreshover, Mr.
and Mrs. Emanuel Lauterbach, Mr.
and, Mrs. Paul I Mrs. Joe Levin. Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. Irving Lewlsh,
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Uebman, Mr.
and Mrs. Curtis Lion, Mrs. Louis
Manes, Ms. Jenny Melnlk, Mr. and
Mrs. Al Uabel, Mrs. Isaac Nassau,
Mrs. Fannie Nlma, Mrs. Isidore Raf-
kin. Mr. and Mrs. William Ragala.
Mrs. Lillian Reltman, Dr. Robert
Rosenberg, Dr. and Mrs. Louis Ro-
senthal, Mr. and Mrs. William
Sachs. Mr. and Mrs. Max Scheer,
Mrs. Florence Schlssler, Mr. and
Mrs. Benjamin Schreck. Mr. and
Mrs. Abe Shrage, Mr. and Mrs. Jo-
seph Steii.berg. Mr. and Mrs. Mau-
rice Stoller, Dr. and Mrs. William
Stromlnger, Mrs. Etta Tunlk. Mr.
and Mrs. Philip Welnberg, Mr. and
Mrs. David Wetsberg, Mr. and Mrs.
Samuel White, Mr. and Mrs. Percy
Wien, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Wiener.
Mrs. Charles Zwelman, and Mr. and
Mrs. David Zwick.
Temple Beth El has initiated
a Havurah program offering
personalized adult education.
I he rabbis and Adult Education
Committee are formulating
plans for special small seminars
to meet in congregants' homes.
Eacli group, or Havurah, will
select a Jewish theme of com-
mon interest and there will be
open discussions to enhance
mutual fellowship and knowl-
edge.
By turning the livingroom
into a mini-synagogue, it is
hoped that the depth of per-
sonal Jewish commitment to
the survival of our people's
heritage will be enhanced and
passive involvement in Jewish
life will be transferred into
dynamic participation.
Theme of Havurah No. 1,
which is nearly filled, will be
"Modern Jewish Thought." The
Havurah will meet at the home
of Rabbi and Mrs. Harvey M.
Rosenfeld Wednesday, Nov. 12,
at 8 p.m.
Those interested in partici-
pating in this involvement
program, please call Rabbi Ro-
senfeld.
JCC Announces Opening Of A
Special Teen Program
'ine Jewish Community Centers of South Florida, Hollywood
Extension. 2ttt8 Hollywood Boulevard, are still accepting reg-
istration for its Teen Program. The special interest groups
that are available are as follows:
SENIOR HIGH
SCHOOL
TUESDAY
Backgammon Night
7:30-9:30
Creative Movement
7:00-8:00
WEDNESDAY
Creative Ceramics
7:00-9:00
SUNDAY
Earth Group
4:00-5:00
Every other Sunday
beginning November 9
The Teen Lounge will be open on Sundays from 1 to 5 p.m.
>s follows:
MIDDLE SCHOOL
MONDAY
Creative Ceramics
7:00-9:00
TUESDAY
Adventures in Macrame ....
7:00-8:30
WEDNESDAY
Community Service Club
7:30-9:00
Every other Wednesday
Babysitting Course
7:00-8:30
MIDDLE SCHOOL
November 16
November 30
December 14
SENIOR HIGH
November 9
November 23
December 7
Please call Ellen Reiff at the JCC in Hollywood for details
and questions.
SCHLESINGER; VIEWED WITH 'SOME SYMPATHY'
Door to Pershings Still Open
arnett
lank
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Defense Secretary James
R. Schlesinger said here that
the U.S. government would
look "with some sympathy"
on Israel's request for long-
range Pershine missiles.
He said that was Secre-
tary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer's meaning when he
included in the 16 point
U.S. Israeli memorandum
that became part of the re-
cent Israeli-Egyptian accord,
the pledge of a "positive re-
sponse" to Israel's request
for Pershinss.,
Schlesinger stated that a
joint U.S.-Israel study would
be made regarding the
Pershings "but it is unlikely,
given all of the factors in-
volved, a near term decision
to provide Pershings to Is-
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
rael is likely to be forthcom
ing."
HE SAID "I have noticed
that Prime Minister (Yitzhak)
Rabin has indicated the Persh-
ing ground-to-ground missile
was not an indispensable ele-
ment of Israel's defense pos-
ture," adding that "I think that
will of course be included by
both sides in any study."
The Defense Secretary made
his remarks at a press confer-
ence when he was asked wheth-
er the supply to Israel of the
Pershings which have a 400-
mile range and are capable of
delivering nuclear warheads
was "now a dead issue."
He said the U.S. examination
of the matter would include
"other elements of the prob-
lem" such as "the inventory
situation and the like consist-
ent with the supply of Persh-
ings to Israel."
SCHLESINGER REITERATED
that the U.S. would not send
Pershings to Israel from its
stocks.
Asked about a report that the
Condoned on Page 12
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, November
1
Clarif ying the Issue
The Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith has
performed an important puMic service in reminding ns
that Jack Eckerd, President Ford's nominee for adminis-
trator of the federal government's General Services Ad-
ministration, continues to deny that his 1974 campaign
ad against Sen. Richard Stone was an appeal to religions
prejudice.
We have no desire to continue fencing with Eckerd
over this issue. Mad the President not tapped him for
the GSA post, we would not have opened it again. We
think the debate is detrimental to the welfare of the total
community. Wo are sure the ADL would agree-.
Unfortunately, the issue was reopened by the Pres-
ident's nomination.
And so now, all Eckerd has to do is to say that he
repudiates the purpose of the ad. Up until this time, he
has flatly refused to do so. This means that all the talk,
printed and otherwise, about Eckerd's alleged apologies
to Stone is beside the point.
Eckerd can do all of us a favor and bury this di-
visive issue once and for all. He can say, publicly, that
calling attention to Stone's being Jewish and his being
Protestant was an appeal to religious prejudice, which
has no place on the American political scene.
The Ties Among Enemies
It's hard to determine the truth of the story that
Capitol Hill has warned Israel against "invading" Leba-
non if the legally-constituted government there falls
and the Syrians move to take the Lebanese over.
But what must be understood is why Israel would
feel bound to do so not raally to "invade," but mili-
tarily to assist the presiding forces in power.
The present struggle in Lebanon is not simply be-
tween Christians and Moslems. It is not a religious war.
The present struggle is over whether Lebanon will
survive as a modern nation turned toward the west or
whether it win be taken over by Palestinian radicals
with an eye toward the east.
There is more similarity between Israel and- the
presently-constituted Lebanese government than any
Arab would care publicly to admit. But those- Lebanese,
Christian and Moslem, who are fighting against the cur-
rent insurgency inspired by the Palestinians fed that
similarity nonetheless.
It Was Doubly Refreshing
Ambassador Moynthan's repudiation of the United
Nations resolution on Zionism, and President Ford's
urging of some of ear Latin American neighbors that
rhey ehange their minds and vote against the resolution,
were-eourageous stands in themselves.
Coming as they did on the eve of President Sadat's
visit to the United States this week showed a double
dose of courage.
For one thing, here is the Egyptian chief with a
shopping list for a monumental amount of military hard-
ware he says Secretary of State Kissinger promised him,
and which the administration says Sadat had better not
expect to have filled.
Far another, here is the Egyptian chief already
threatening that he'll sic the Syrians on Israel if we
don't fill his shopping list and that if we don't, Rus-
sia wilL
Ifs refreshing these days to see any kind of cour-
age expressed in our national convictions. To see it
coming, from the administration is doubly refreshing.
Protest Not Censorehip
A sponsor of a cinema festival in Atlanta, Ga., at
which two Nazi propaganda films will be shown, has
charged the southern office of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith with exerting undue pressure to
baa tiem. "We wffl net be subjected to any form of
censorship," declared Gudmond Vigtel, director of the
High Museum of Art,
The films in question were-made by Leni Ibefcn-
stabl, a close friend of Hitler. Oae is 'Triumph Of the
Will," about a Naai mass rally in Nuremberg in 1984.
The other is "Olympiad," about the 1936 Olympics in
Berlin. There are those who claim that both films broke
new grounds in cinematic technique, and for that reason
alone deserve to be presented at a film festival.
At issue is whether the ADL's protest against these
films, shown at a festival meant to honor "humanistic"
achievement, constitute censorship. The argument that
these two films broke new grounds are specious. If Na-
zism, was fought as a modern form of barbarism, why
should its "art" ha considered a contribution to the
advancement of humanity?
Let the Apology Be Heard
HTHERE IS a certaia Saturnal-
iaa splendor in the Miami
Herald's editorial support Oct.
23 for the nomination of Jack
Eckerd as head of the General
Services Administration.
The editorial wallows in the
sanctimonious aroma of deca-
dent Rome when the then-rul-
ers ef the world said one thing
in aa outpouring of philosoph-
ical philandering while doing
another in the trifling flirta-
tions that cost them their des-
tiny.
ONE SHOULD expect noth-
ing more from a newspaper
that condemned Richard Nixon
for his criminality while urging
his reelection to the presidency
and chewing up and consigning
to hell anyone who even in the
meekest manner suggested that
there was insanity in such edi-
torial judgments.
I mention this because the
Eckerd flap is typical of the
spirit of the Nixon years which,
far from being behind us, still
lie ahead of us on the horizon
just over the hill, with the pres-
ent political moment but a hia-
tus intended to lull us into a
false sense of security that we
have successfully come through
a national crisis.
Leo
Mindiin
THAT IS a lie, and the big-
gest He of them all is that we
are cleansed of the Nixon co-
terie of crooks who attempted
to seize our lives, our fortunes,
our sacred honor.
Confirmation of President
Ford's nomination of Eckerd
would also confirm our slavish
dedication to our personal de-
struction. It would underwrite
another triumph of the Presi-
deatial contempt for the people.
It would serve as further
proof, if further proof be need-
ed, that what lies ahead of us
on the horizon just over the hill
is evea closer than we think.
"ECKERD IS the right man
for the job," opines the Her-
ald's Oct. 23 editorial at the
By MAX LERNER
If ever there was a classic
case of the politicizing of eco-
nomics for the wrong reasons,
New York City is that case.
The sins that New York lead-
ers committed in their financing
shenanigans are now history.
Let the past buv its dead.
THE SPECTACLE of Presi-
dent Ford and Treasury Secre-
tary William Simon running
around the country, breathing
vengeance and reprisals, con-
signing. New York to its hell-
fire doom, as if they were the
lord and the prophets, and New
York were Sodom and Gomor-
rah combinedsuch a spectacle
is not only cruel and absurd:
It is in national terms self-
destructive.
New York has learned its bit-
ter lesson. So have the other
cities, watching it. The task now
is to keep the New York de-
bacle from shaking the economy
and the society, and ts get New
York back on the path to fiscal
sanity.
WE ALL know what New York
stands for in the nation's demon-
OMfly. It is the Rome of the late
empire, with a dash of Nineveh
and Tyre thrown in. Its mayors
are the Roman emperors
straight out of Sallust and Gib-
son, and its political economy is
that of bread and circuses for
the multitude.
It is the medern spawning
ground for pornography, drugs,
crims. Maoist plots, black pow-
er, UN intrigue, global bankers'
conspiracies, the protocols of
the elders of Zton and the media
elite which holds America in
thrall.
Having spewed ut this fan-
tasy nonsense, we should all
feel better and get down to the
hard political dynamics of the
controversy swirling arouad
New York.
IT TAKES no giant brain to
figure out why Gerald Ford ha?
been taking the hard line, in
denying aav federal help to
New York Chy.
He is the target of mounting
attacks by the Reagan guerril-
las, whose current line is that
Ford has deserted the. r'-'Ti
and mountain passes of Heart-
land America and succumbed
to the fleshy temptations of the
Eastern Establishmentinclud-
ing Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger, detente. Soviet grain
deals, American technicians in
the Sinai, Vice President Rocke-
feller, deficit financing and all
the rest.
With the New Hampshire
primary looming in February,
Mr. Ford must not be in favor
of abetting the nefarious doings
in New York.
TBS IS traditional politics
hard-knuckle, unsubtle, short-
rangewhich doesn't make it
any easier to swallow. It is
clearly bad economics, aad even
bad political economy.
All but a few forecasters I
omit Treasury Secretary Wil-
liam Simon and the crew around
him are agreed that a New
York declaration of bankruptcy,
with a repudiation of its obliga-
tions, will mean a severe set-
back to the national economic
recovery which is slowly get-
ting started.
Arthur Burns, from his Fed-
eral Reserve aerie, sees what
Simon should be seeing if he
were sot so bunkered -* the
global psycological Impact that
a New York City repudiation
would have on the world's
money markets and on
America's symbolic standing as
an economic and political pow-
er system.
f THE end, the basts blind-
Continued on Page *
same time that it recalls Ed.
Richard Stone for the SfS
U.S. Senator from Florida.
In that campaign, on the ew
of Election Day. Eckerd 2
forth his qualifications in can
parison with Stone's in news-
paper advertising calling to
voter attention that Eckerd u-
Protestant, and Stone is Jewis*
The Heralds Oct. 23 tt
dorsesnent of Eckerd as head of
the General Services Admiris-
tration concedes that this was
"a scurrilous advertisement" a
fact, incidentally, that did'not
prevent the Herald from ac-
cepting and running the ad-
vertisement in its own pages.
NEVERTHELESS, it urges in
its typical editorial schizophre-
nia that Eckerd should be coo-
firmed because he "is a forth-
right, public-spirited man who
will serve his country well. It
needs his like."
Like a hole in the head. M
The Eckerd advertisement***"
was blatant anti-Semitism. A
candidate's religious conviction
can in no way be construed as
a political qualification un-
less a contender for office
means to suggest that his Jew-
ish opponent is sui generis un-
qualified.
NO AMOUNT of ex-post facto
moving around on trie chess-
board of political expediency
will ever be able to change
that. Whatever he may say now
to the contrary, Eckerd's cam-
paign tactic was a base appeal
to religious prejudice.
"Scurrilous," the Herald's
"talmuday chachomim" them-.,
selves agree. Still, in their
view, he is a forthright, public
spirited man who will serve his
country well."
Well, that's what the Water-
gaters were doing. They were
serving their country well
as they saw it,
AND SO aow we must see it
as the Herald sees it because,
after all, Eckerd has "apologiz-
ed." And because the Herald is
"apologiiing" in its Oct. 23 edi-
torial, too:
"It (the Eckerd ad) prompted
this newspaper in part to en-
dorse his successful opponent,
Sen. Dick Stone," meaning that
the main reason we (the rkr%^^
aid) supported Stone was Eck-
erd's dirty pool, and so now
you (the Jewish community)
must reward us for the greater
glory of our flaming social con-
sciousness by knocking off
rocking the boat and support-
ing our confirmation plea.
Furthermore, "the apology
was accepted in good faith and,
significantly, Sen. Stone says he
will accompany him (Eckerd)
to the confirmation hearings
and support his nomination
Deus dixit. Deus miseratur.
MY OWN sources inform me
that this is a gilding of the
lily that Stone and Eckerd
met quite by accident on a
flight back from Washington
sometime after the campaign.
Allegedly. Eckerd offend
>_
Continued on Page 9
'ffiJewistiFlcridiari
mm* WMMM M UU.III !
umA nuurr us n.b. sth at, mimbi. n*. sum a HB-sp
HOLLYWOOD OPFICE Telephone J7>'*oM
P.O. Box 2973. Miami. Flouda 33101
AH P.O. 3579 returns are to be forwarded to
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Ur ad Publisher Execute *&* AaSsSint to Publish*
The Jewish Fieridlan Does Not Suiwitw The Kashrot"
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
,____ PbtfsfceI B-WeeMy _!r Jewlaa Ftortdian
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ACVjaORY COMMITTEE Ntaan Pritcher. Chairman; Lewis E CoM.
""*"' ": Pr Samuel MeHne. DtM.D. _________
L.tH^H FJ?r,di" Sesrbsd the Jswlsh Unity and the J"i,|V wJjffi
IiJ^2 ^ ?! "'** Tstejaraphic Agency. Sevea AHs *Mr*, *.
oats. Worldwide Newe Service. Notices! Editorial Association. AmeHei"
WCUtr Cnalisa.Jsw.isJt Mewspspsrs. sa U Flartda Press_A*j^
-*uMCWIPTION ATS*f7uical Aiia) On* V* SOS. Cert of Town Uc*
" Number^ I
3 KISLEV 5736-
Volume 5
Friday, November 7, 1975
5Lcv j"- aj


r
Friday, November 7, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywooa
Page 5
For their work on behalf of the people of Israel, members
of the Allington Towers Men's Club in Hollywood, were
presented with the State of Israel Bonds Honor Award by
William Littman, (second from left), chairman. Board of
Governors, South Broward County. Accepting the award
were (from left): Jack Rosenblatt, cochairman; Harold
Abramson, vicepresident and Murray Goldstein. The
plaque presentation made September 21 at a special
breakfast, Was Israel Bonds' 'thank you' to Allington
Towers for their Salute to Israel in December, and to
chairman Leon Shuster for his support and cooperation.
plans are underway for the 2nd Annual Breakfast to be
held in December.
Bikur Cholitn... With Humor
Added By Visiting GtbUp
Bikur Cholim (Hebrew mean-
ing visiting the sick) is the
welcome addition to the Visi-
tation Committee of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward,
Inc.
The Committee is eosponsor-
ed by the Jewish Federations
of South afed North Broward
under the auspices of the Chap-
laincy program headed by Rab-
bi Havold Richter.
Las: May Saul Levine sug-
gesltd to Rabbi Richter that en-
tertainment be used when the
committee vTsfted patients in
nursing homes and hospitals.
With this idea as its base,
Bikur Cholim was formed and
since July has brought joy to
countless patients at Broward
Convalescent Home. Hollywood
Hills Nursing Home. Golf crest
Nursing Borne, Washington
Street Manor. Alden Hou^e.
Manor Pines and Golden Isles
Convalescent Center.
Members of the group are:
Jim Milner oi Hillcrest, piano;
Herman Sholl of Emerald Hills.
r; MiTfm and Rose Sarner
cf Hillcrest, and Jenny Grad
Of InVerrrry, pianist.
Saul Levine, who performs
humorous monologues, is a re-
tired executive of a wholesale
tobacco firm, now living in
Emerald Hills.
Levine. who has spoken to
many service and civic clnbs
and currently teaches a "Fun
With Yiddish Class-- at the Jew-
ish Ctmrrunity Center-Holly-
wood Extension, feels humor
is the greatest cure for these
patients.
"The group has made a valu-
able contribution to the many
people they visit, and we are
always looking for new mem-
bers," Levine said.
Persons interested in ;oining
the group may ceil Saul Levine.
Court In Session
At Gahthml South
The Beach Group Hadassah
of Hollywood will present
"Chanukah on Trial." a court-
room scene adapted by Ethel
K. Schwartz, vice president and
program chairman, at the reg-
ular meeting Wednesday, Nov.
19. in the Galahad South Social
Hall.
The presiding judge of the
"court" is Lillian Schulman;
Patricia Perlstein is the prose-
cuting attorney; Evelyn Davis,
defense attorney: Sid Dulberg.
the witness; Phyllis Schoen,
the court clerk; and the audi-
ence is the jury.
Preceding the skit. Sadye
Bagdan. president, will conduct
a Chanukah Memorial candle-
lighting ceremony. All mem-
bers are urged to attend and to
invite a prospective member as
a guest.
Refreshments will be served
from 12:30 p.m. to 1 p.m.
Temple Selel Men's Club
Derby Dance 75 Nov. 8
Dr. Michael Rush, president
of the Men's Gub of Temple
Solel, has announced plans for
a Derby Dance '75, at the tem-
ple Saturday, Nov. 8, at 8:30
p.m.
The night will have a Gay
90's flair. Plans include horse
race films, prizes, gift certifi-
cates, dance contests, free
gifts and give-aways. For more
information, call Joel Mish.
Rent-A-Car
LOW AS
$7 A DAY
7c Per Mile
(100 Mi. Ridlut)
We Honor BankAmtricard, Matter
Charge. Carte Blanche and
' Diners Club
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
S20 S. Dixie Hwy., Hollywood
926-4 Ml
-'

COOK UP A
FREE TRIP TO
PUERTO RICO
send us your favorite recipe
using Sweet Unsalted
Ma/.ola
Margarine
Contestants must be 18 years
or older.
Send recipe and proof of pur-
chase (green flag with words
contains liquid corn oil' from
front panel) with your name,
address and phone number to:
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Box 011973, Miami 33101
MAZCM.A COrfltST
SPECIAL CONTEST
FOR OUR READERS
The winner of our special
contest will win $100.00
and all entries will be elig-
ible for the grand prize
a trip to Puerto Rico.
ENTER NOW!
TAMARA R. COHEN, Ph.D.
ANNOUNCES THE RELOCATION OF HER OFFICE
TO
Emerald Hills Medical Square
4440 SHERIDAN STREET
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Air Conditioning Service
Hemisphere resident and community leader William Litt-
man, (left), chairman, Board of Governors, South Brow-
ard, South Florida Israel Bond Organization meets with
Israel's former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Abba Eban
at an Israel Bond Dinner of State last week on Miami
Beach. Eban told a group of more than 300 community
leaders that Israel needs the aid of Israel Bonds even
more in 1975 because of the urgently needed economic
development programs, and at a time when the Israeli
people are the heaviest taxed in the free world. Littman
announced that a number of hi-rise "Night in Israel" and
Israel Dinner of State events have already been planned
in the Hollywood-Hallandale area to help meet this year's
campaign goal in South Florida of $20-million.
IMU-LIFE BODY SHOP
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BEN EERMAN, Proprietor
4
Marsh offers
the ideal gift
for Chanukah.
From the ruins of King Achem's ancient temple
came the beautiful carving reproduced in this
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felt message: "WITH ALL THE LOVE IN THE
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MAIL ORDERS INVITED
Fine Jewelers & Silversmiths since 1908
265 Miltbu'rn Ave., Millburn, N. J.
American Express BankAmencard Master Charge
i


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hoaywood
Friday, November 7, 1975
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Message Of Importance Is
Offered By TV Stations
EDITOR, Jewish Floridian-
Shofar:
I think you will agree that in
of the editorial contents
of the Shofar and the work of
Federation** committees, the
temples and Jewish organiza-
tions, there are thousands of
in South Broward who are
not reached with a message of
importance to Jewry.
Perhaps they steer clear of
it, but I am thinking of those
who can't go to meetings. It is
possible that they can be pre-
vailed upon to revive their in-
terest and even commitments
if they will but tune in on the
Jewish Worship Hour on Chan-
nel 10 and The Still Small Voice
on Channel 7, which can be
seen and heard every Sunday
morning.
These two television stations
deserve a great deal of thanks
for their cooperation and you
should help promote the idea
through your columns. Many
well known rabbis and leaders
can be seen and heard and
their information, advice and
spiritual help are truly worth-
while.
Allow me to mention that
through the efforts of The Still
Small Voice on Channel 7, the
Jewish community will play a
big part in this area for our
Bicentennial Year. This was
led off on Oct. 19 by Rabbi
Irving Lehrman. spiritual lead-
er of Temple Emanu-El, Miami
Beach.
SAM J. PERRY
Hollywood
ir it
EDITOR, Jewish Floridian-
Shofar:
If fools like Hitler, Musso-
lini, Stalin, Arafat, and Amin
can rule millions of peoples,
the end of civilization in our
time may come as a rude shock,
but to me it will no longer
come as a complete surprise,
unless we all be silent.
I was the happiest man in
this world, when the United
Nations formed and proclaimed
to work toward international
peace and democracy. Instead
the UN permitted Arafat to
come to the General Assembly
and gave him a standing ova-
tion.
Again, a few months later,
the UN allowed anotherprovo-
cateur, racist, dictator Idi
Amin of Uganda who demands
of the General Assembly to de-
stroy the democratic State of
Israel.
As they say, there is "noth-
ing new under the sun" be-
cause in 1935 to 1945 a simi-
lar fanatic Hitler managed to
burn and kill six million Jews
and forty-five million of differ-
ent nationalities.
Then Mussolini helped Hit-
ler to instigate the African war.
and the famous butcher Joseph
Stalin also killed, murdered
and destroyed millions of Jews
and non-Jews.
Lately, Arafat and Amin wish
to persecute the Israelis and
the Jews and to exterminate all
who do not believe in the
Muslim religion.
I traveled the world over and
millions of orphans were starv-
ing for food and water, also
for education, since their par-
ents were slaughtered by Mus-
solini, Hitler and Stalin and no
one then protested, the atroci-
ties they all committed to man-
kind.
Stalin organized pogroms in
Russia and in every country he
had a chance. Hitler and Mus-
solini did the same. Stalin used
the Jewish doctors as an ex-
cuse and destroyed thousands
of Jewish lives. Poland did the
same too.
And now the world has new
instigators, namely Arafat and
Amin who wish to start a new
fresh holocaust. Unless the
free democratic forces stop
them soon, it will be too late
and unless the civilized people
of the world interfere soon, we
will all be in trouble.
Nations should pool their
strength and use their influ-
ence to save the world from
destruction by the atomic pow-
er.
EDWARD A. DINCIN
Hallandale
'Diabetes' Topic
Of Health Forum
"Learn to Live," a commu-
nity health forum about dia-
betes, will be held at the Hol-
lywood Medical Center Nov. 18
at 7:30 p.m.
The panel will include: Dr.
Paul Jellinger, endocrinologist;
Dr. Robert Schultz, pediatric
endocrinologist; Dr. Samuel
Winn, ophthalmologist; Robert
Kronowitz, executive director,
Juvenile Diabetic Research
Foundation, and Mrs. Judy
Cheatam, Hollywood Medical
Center Staff, ADA dietician.
There is no admission charge
and the public is invited to at-
tend. Refreshments will be
served.
rjkfony
OCEANFRONT 32nd to 34th St. MIAMI BEACH
THANKSGIVING WEEK END SPECIAL
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For Reservations Phono
1-538-6811
Histadrut Conference In Israel
Some ISO leaders of the
South Florida Jewish commu-
nity will join with more than
750 American men and women
in the Histadrut Solidarity Con-
ference in Israel next week,
Dr. Sol Stein, national president
of the Israel Histadrut Foun-
dation, has announced.
I he four-day conclave, un-
der the patronage of form
Prime Minister Golda Meir,
will be the largest contingent
of American friends of Hista-
drut ever to assemble in Israel
at one time.
Leading the local delegation
will be Dr. Morton Malavsky,
rabbi of Temple Beth Shalom,
Hollywood, a national board
member and chairman of the
South Broward Council of the
Histadrut Foundation; and Mrs.
Charlotte Teller, IHF coordi- j
nator in South Broward.
Also, Rabbi Leon Kronish. I
national chairman of the board
of IHF; Moe Levin, a national j
vice president and chairman of |
the outh Florida Advisory Com- <
mittee of IHF; Morris New-
mark, president cf the Israel
Histadrut Council of South
Florida; and Judge Herbert S.
Shapiro, national board mem-
ber and legal counsel for the
local advisory group.
And. Ben Zion Steinberg, BX-
e director of the Israel
idrut Foun lation of South
Florida: and Mrs. Philip (Mil-
dred) Sahl, president of the
. Histadrut Women's Coun-
cil.
A special feature for the
South Florida delegates will be
visits to many Histadrut proj-
ects in Israel which have been
sponsored by residents of the
Greater Miami Jewish commu-
nity.
Rabbi Malavsky will offer
the invocation at the opening
dinner of the Histadrut Solidar-
ity Conference Monday. Mrs
Meir will address the delegates
at this opening session.
He also will serve as chair-
man of the breakfast session
-.2sday on Israel's social
ru'eds.
ier sessions will feature
addresses by Israel's Del
Minister Shimon Peres, .
ham Offer. Minister of 11
ing, and Prime Minister
hak Rabin, who will be gui
honor a; the dosing dii
Wednc sday evening.
The Israel Histadrut Fou
tion provides financial sir
for the vast network of educa-
tion,:!, health and welfare insti-
tutions of Histadrut, which
serves the social needs of more
than 70 percent of Israel's pop-
ulation.
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by weighing, directly in calories, every type of food you eat.
From the Korex Industries, it includes a calorie book
with information on how to start, stay on and successfully
complete your weight loss program.
A special calorie index guide teHs you how many calories
you should eat dairy to reach your ideal weight.
And a convenient digital counter keeps track of the calories
you take in each day. The Cateuweigntor is compact,
lightweight and easy to carry around.
Housewares. at all jm stores
except lauderhill and pompano
FLORIDA
\.


Friday, November 7, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shojar ef Hollywood
Page 7
1
Founder's Day Luncheon December 7th
Israel Histadrut Foundation
(IHF1 of South Florida will
"old its annual community-wide
Founder's Day Luncheon Sun-
day, December 7. at the Fon-
tain-hleau Hotel in Miami
Beach.
Announcement was made by
Leon Kronish, rabbi of
Temple Beth Sholom who is
rial chai "man of the b- ^f th.- H'-'M '* F-^'ti-Hfi-in.
and Moe Levin, chairman of
the South Florida IHF Advis-
ory Committee.
The Founder's Day event
will pay homage to all indi\id-
uals in South Florida who have
become founders difing 1975
through testamentary bequests
to the Hi*tadrul Foundation,
Rabbi Kronisfa said.
A major lsra?ii diplomat \\:'.l
> sf >>!> c<- )-.. [unch-
? Ask Abe ?
eon, according to Levin. In ad-
dition, a musical program fea-
turing Israeli and Yiddish folk-
lore will be presented.
Ben Zion Steinberg, execu-
tive director of the Israel His-
tadrut Foundation of South
Florida, explained that the be-
quests help provide financial
support for the educational,
health and welfare institutions
of the Histadrut, which serve
the needs of the majority of
Israel's populal
I or luncheon tickets, contact
the Histadrut office.
by ABE HALPLKN
-,
QUESTION: What does the
expression "I see the hand-
writing on the wall" mean,
and where does it come from?
Z. T.
Highland Park, N. J.4
I
ANSWER: This expression
usually meaning a warning
foreboding misfortune or sad
Tidngs is based on a passage in
the Book of Daniel. This book
is in the third division of the
Hebrew bible known as Hagio-
grapha or the Writings. The
Book of Daniel is partly in He-
brew and partly in Aramaic.
The narrative tells about a
banquet arranged by King Bel-
shazzar of Babylon, successor
to Nebuchadnezzar, for a thou-
sand of his lords, wives and
concubines. During the festivi-
ties wine was served in vessels
take nfrom the Temple in Je-
rusalem which was destroyed
by Nebuchadnezzar in 536 b.c.e.
Suddenly a hand appeared and
began writing a message on the
wall of the king's palace.
According to an interpreta-
tion of this event in our Scrip-
tures, God sent an angel to
warn Belshazzar. The angel
wrote the message in Aramaic
with Hebrew characters in red
ink. Only the king saw the
part of the hand that wrote.
The narrative continues: Bel-
shazzar became troubled. Since
he did not understand the writ-
ing on the wall, he called upon
Viis astrologers, soothsayers and
wise men to read and interpret
the writinp. He said that who-
ever can read and interpret
this writing shall be honored
and made the third ruler of the
kingdom. But not one of these
wise men could read the writ-
ing on the wall.
Then Belshazzar was told
about Darnel who was brought
to Babylon from Judah by Ne-
buchadnezzar. He was one of
several boys of good family,
handsome looks and promising
intellect. Daniel was able to in-
terpret Nebuchadnezzar's dream
and he appointed Daniel the
administrator of the Province
of Babylon.
Daniel was summoned before
Belshazzar. After rebuking the
king for drinking wine from the
vessels of the Holy Temple and
for worshipping man made
gods, and not glorifying the
only true God, Daniel read and
interpreted the writing.
"And this is the writing that
was written MENE, MENE, TE-
KE, UPHARSIN. This is the in-
terpretation of the things:
MENE; God had numbered thy
kingdom and finished it. TE-
KEL; thou art weighed in the
balances and art found want-
ing. PERES; thy kingdom is di-
vided and given to the Medes
and Persians. Then command-
ed Benshazzar, and they clothed
Daniel with scarlet and put a
chain of gold upon his neck
and made a proclamation con-
cerning him that he should be
the third ruler of the kingdom.
In that night was Belshazzar
the king of the Chaldeans
slain." (Daniel, 5:25-30)
i
4
i
<
*-----.1
All authorities agree that the
exact meaning of this passage
which is in Aramaic is not
cleat-.
According to the authorita-
tive Encyclopaedia Judaica,
some scholars interpret the
words MENE, TEKEL, and
PKARSIN to refer to weights
of monetary units of different
value in descending order. The
U in UPHARSIN is a prefix
meaning and. Thus MENE is
interpreted to refer to the mo-
netary unit known as mina.
TEKEL is a monetary unit
equivalent to the Hebrew she-1
kel and PHARS1N is two half-
minas. The first MENE accord-
ing to this interpretation is the
Aramaic equivalent of the He-
brew manui, meaning counted,
and the handwriting on the
wall is to be read as "it was
counted MENE, TEKEL and
PARSIN.
Some sources transliterate
the last word from the original
text as and PARSIN. Others
transliterate it either as UP-
HARSIN or U-FARSIN or and
FARSIN.
"These words were probably
used not only to indicate mone-
tary values but also to express
estimates of character. Thus,
these words presumably refer-
red to a situation of degenera-
tion. God has weighed the kings
of Babylon and has found them
to be steadily decreasing in
weight. P. Haumpt and J. D.
Prince hold that the phrase re-
fers to Nebuchadnezzar (mene).
Belshazzar (tekel). The Medes
(peres, a half mene, i.e., half
the greatness of Nebuchadnez-
zar) and the Persians (peres, a
half-mene, i.e., half the great-
ness of Nebuchadnezzar." (En-
cyclopaedia Judaica Vol. 11,
page 1351)
It is interesting to note that
in the origin text Daniel reads
the inscription with the word
MENE appearing twice. But
when he gives his interpreta-
tion he interprets the word
MENE only once. No explana-
tion is given in the text for the
repetition of the word MENE.
Also when he reads the mes-
sage, he reads the last word
as UPHARSIN, whereas in his
interpretation he used the
word PERES. This has bother-
ed and puzzled many scholars.
Some Talmudic sages suggest
that the reason the astrologers
and soothsayers could not read
the handwriting on the wall is
cither because it was written
in reverse order or in initials
only. Some archaeological evi-
dence corroborates the fact
that in Aramaic contracts of
the period the names of
weights were designated by ini-
tials only.
The word PERES has been
found in Aramaic inscriptions
and in the Talmud in the sense
of a half-mina.
Editor's note:
Please send questions to
??ASK ABE??
c/o Jewish Federation of
Sooth Broward
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
* A Beth Tefilah Set
Congregation Beth Tefilah,
(Hallandale Jewish Center) will
begin its adult study classes
Wednesday, Nov. 12 at 10 a.m.
offering a Prayerbook Study
Course, instructed by Mrs. Sid-
ney Esterson, and Advanced
Conversational Hebrew, with
Mrs. Harry E. Schwartz as in-
structor.
Bible Appreciation will be
held at 8:30 p.m. Wednesdays
with emphasis on the Book of
Exodus. Instructor is Rabbi
Harry E. Schwartz. Registra-
tion for the 12 weekly sessions
will be held at the beginning
of the sessions.
Mrs. Rhona Miller, Hallandale civic leader, renews old
acquaintances with Professor Yigal Yadin o] the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem, during the world-renowned ar-
chaeologist's visit to South Florida. Pro). Yadin, former
chief of staff of the Israel Defense Forces, appeared here
in behalf of the American Friends of the Hebrew Uni-
versity, which supports Israel's oldest and largest uni-
versity. Mrs. Miller, who moved to Hallandale from Je-
rusalem, is a Founder of the Hebrew University of Je-
rusalem and a member of the board of the American
Friends.
Main Store and Plant
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PHONE. 920-8021
Monday thru Friday 8 to 5:30
Saturday 9:00 to 1.-00
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4551 Hollywood Blvd.
Phone. 981-8555
610 Atlantic Shores Blvd.
Phone: 920-3789
irwersiryDTive
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where you can learn all about mine from the experts, and wine-tasting contests
Where you can win great prizes. And best of all. it's all Italian; the crew, service,
registry, gourmet food, and the wine everything! All Italian means a cruise to
the Caribbean and South America that's continental, eliciting and fun. Your
unforgettable holiday begins onboard and takes you to seven enchanting ports:
San Juan, St. Thomas, Martinique. Caracas. Aruba. Cartagena and Montego Bay.
This is one cruise you won't want to miss, so call your travel agent today to
reserve your space. Salutel Air/See packages available from most maior cities.
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^^psf^M (Rates based on per person, double occupancy and availability, plus tax )
-J


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Sholar of Hollywood
Friday, November 7, 1975 -;
*2RaMrittHl fag*
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. L'oschitz i^oooi Robert j. Orkand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
In The Beginning*'
By RABBI ROBERT ORKAND
Temple Israel ot Greater Miami
All beginnings are hard .
especially a beginning that you
make by yourself. That's the
hardest beginning of all." Thus
begins Chaim Potok's latest
novel, "In The Beginning." a
novel that tells us a great deal
about the author himself and,
in turn, about ourselves.
The central figure in Potok's
work is David Lurie. a young
boy growing up in the difficult
years of the !920's and '30s.
His father and uncle are former
members of the Polish under-
ground who have come to the
United States, to the "golden
land." to escape the oppression
of Eastern Europe. The two
men, upon their arrival in the
United States, founded the Am
Kedoshim Society that would at-
tempt to raise the funds neces-
sary to bring other members of
the underground to this country.
The young David learns of the
death of his father's brother,
after whom the boy is named,
at ihe hands of the Cossacks.
He is told time after time that
the Jew is always to be on his
guard. He -is always to know
that he is hated by the "goyim"
and it is only by fighting back
that the Jew can survive in a
most difficult world.
Thus David grows up believ-
ing that the Jew must always be
ready to fight those who hate
him. But how are we to fight
back? David's father says that
force must be met by force. At
the same time. David is raised
in an Orthodox environment,
one in which Torah is sacred,
-Icontaining the peaceful solu-
tions to all the problems of the
Jew. David is taught that it is
the duty of the Jew to know
Torah, for only then will our
enemies be defeated.
Needless to say. David is con-
fused. As an Orthodox Jew, be-
lie vin* in the divinitv of Torah.
David is taught to believe that
knowledge is the Jew's most ef-
fective tool. But. asks David,
should we simply accept the
knowledge of Torah without
question? For David, a brilliant,
questioning young man. the
answer is far fro-n clear. David's
study of Torah begins with Mr.
Bader. a friend of David's
father. One Shabbat. after the
reading of the Torah. the young
boy asks Mr. Bader a question
about the "sidrah" (the portion
of the week):
"First God iells Noah to
take two animals of every
kind into the ark; then God
tells Noah to take seven of
the clean and two of the un-
clean animals into the ark.
Which did God tell Noah
to do"?
(Mr. Bader) gazed at me
and was silent for a long
moment. "Are you able to
read Rnshi"? I nodded. "I
understand the Rashi ."
"You asked a good ques-
tion. You aren't satisfied
with the answer given by
Rashi"?
No. David was not satisfied.
Why, he asks, does Rashi need
to tell us how to read the Torah?
Why. he asks, did not God give
us a Torah free of difficulties?
Then there would have been no
need of the commentaries of
Rashi and others. Thus begins
the questioning, the searching,
of a young man who is to lead
him to a decision that would
change the course of Mb life and
cause him to be an outcast from
his family and his Orthodox
community.
David's questioning causes
him to want to know about what
non-Jews have written abom
the Bible, so as to understand
the hatred of the "goyim." He
discovers textual criticism
which asserts that the Bible was
written by inspired men who
lived during different times and
who had particular points of
view that caused them to write
the Bible as they did. Ultimate-
ly, David, after graduation from
the Yeshiva, goes to the Uni-
versity of Chicago to receive a
degree in Oriental Studies, the
study of textual criticism.
David's search for the truth
was, perhaps, Chaim Potok's
search for the truth. He. like
David, received a classical Jew-
ish education, having graduated
from Yeshiva University. He,
like David, seems to have ques-
tioned and ultimately was or-
dained at the Jewish Theolog-
ical Seminary, the Conservative
rabbinical seminary, where he
received an education that was
a departure from the strict
Orthodoxy of the Yeshiva.
David's search and Chaim Po-
tok'sis an important one. for
it represents the attempt at self-
discovery undertaken by count-
less numbers of Jews.
What David discovers in "In
The Beginning" is that to be a
Jew does not necessarily de-
mand allegiance to any one way
of looking at life. Who is to say,
for example, that the use of the
sword or the gun is the only
way to fight our enemies? Is
it not possible to fight them with
well-chosen words as well? Does
looking at the Bible from a crit-
ical, literary point of view make
it any less meaningful or im-
portant for the Jew?
Cannot the .lew find guidance,
strength and comfort from a
Bible written by men who
searched and struggled as have
Jews for generations? David's
attempt to answer these ques-
tions, his search for a truth that
will be right for him. has been
our search as well. Should the
Jew who questions as David
questionsbe seen as an out-
cast, a heretic?
The point is that David's
need to search, and the dis-
coveries he makes about him-
self and his religion, does not
make him any less a Jew but,
perhaps, more. David's refusal
to merely accept that which had
been passed down from father
to son creates within him the
need to search, to learn, to
know. That need represents the
kind of intellectual and emo-
tional searching that -has been
so much a part of Reform Juda-
ism since the first decade of
the 18th century. While that
searching may. on occasion, lead
us down the wrong oaths, the
process ultimately leads to a
strengthening, rather than a
weakening, of Judaism. We. like
David, cannot be merelv content
with what was. We, like David,
must continue to find new ways
of answering the questions that
constantly confront us, ques-
tions that cannot always be
answered by tradition alone.
Near the end of "In The Be-
ginning" David, now a graduate
student, goes to Germany to do
Biblical research. Standing at a
memorial erected in one of the
concentration camps David his
n imaginary conversation with
his dead Uncle David and his
living father who has rejected
David, the Biblical scholar:
I tried, said my father. It
was my job to try. We could
have done more together ar
father and son. But the
world kept coming between
us, stealing my time and
strength. And he (David the
scholar) went out to their
evil culture.
To another culture, said
my uncle gently. To bring
new life to our roots.
To an evil culture (said
David's father). Look hew
it slaughters us.
David (Uncle David said),
look at me. Here is the past.
Never forget the past as
you nourish the present.
Like David, we too must
never forget the past. But. like
David, we must bring new life
to the present by means of both
creed and deed.
By Rabbi DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
(c) 1975. Jewish Telegraphic Agency
QUESTION: "Why is the
day after a festival still re-
garded as a festive day?
ANSWER: The day after a
festival is usually called "Isru
Chag," which is taken from the
Psalms (118:27) where we are
told to "bind the festive sacri-
fice wit* cords." The term "Is-
ru Chag" wouM mean to bind
the day of the festival to the
day after so that it would not
be quickly forgotten. In the Je-
rusalem Talmud this day is also
called "Breh D'moeda," which
means "The son of the festi-
val." This means that the day
after the festival still bears -
fruit of the ioy of the festival. ;
It is claimed by some that the
reason for this extra day of re-
joicing stems from the fact
that in Israel the festival oi -
Shavuoth lasts only one day. In '*
the days of the Temple, when 1
sacrifices were offered, some I
of the sacrifices were evidently |
offered also on the day after I
Shavuoth. Consequently, this I
day was also regarded as a fes- |
rive one and this practice was \
also extended to other holi- j
days. Furthermore, on other f
holidays the meat of certain |
sacrifices could be eaten for i
two days. This meant that the j
meat of a sacrifice that was of- i
fered on the last day of a fes- I
tival could still be eaten on the 5
day after the festival. Thus, the I
day after the festival still has I
some festive condtation. Gen- I
erally speaking, in Hebrew tra- I
dition, festivals are not sup- I
posed to be merely isolated ex- |
periences. The spirit of the fes- j
tival should have some influ- \
ence on the other days of the
year. Observing an additional
day m a festive mrJod would in-
dicate the carry-ever from the
holy days to the secular davs of \
the year.
CANDLEUGHTING TIME
3 KKLEV "5:16
ill
mwtsifci
*t,r
A BICENTENNIAL COMMEMORATION
Haym Solomon
By RABBI
MICHAEL B. EISENSTAT
During the period of the
American Revolution, one of
the most fascinating personali-
ties to emerge was Haym Salo-
mon. Though not American
born, surely he was one of
America's most ardent sons.
Haym Salomon was born in
Poland in 1740 but died in his
adopted homeland in 1785. As a
European, Salomon had ample
opportunity to learn other
languages. He took full advan-
tage of this opportunity. Before
coming to the New World, he
had at least a working knowl-
edge of German, French, Italian,
Russian, Polish and English.
These skills he used well n
making valuable Contacts with
the merchants of Europe.
It did not take the British
long to learn how ardent a
sympathizer Salomon was of the
American cause. By September
of 1776, he was in a British
prison in New York, suspected
of spying. It was here that his
skill with languages saved him
for the Hessian guards needed
a translator. Not only did Salo-
mon translate, he also propa-
gandized, inducing some num-
ber of Hessians to leave British
military service.
Salomon's greatest skills lay
in the world of finance. He be-
came a very wealthy man. His
love of America was as great
as his financial skills and it was
not long before Salomon found
himself called upon to help fi-
nance the Revolution. Robert
Morris. Supervisor of Finance.
called upon Salomon to begin
selling the new country's bills
which were outstanding with
many of the countries of Europe.
So staggering were the debts
that our new nation was amass-
ing in this brief time that Salo-
mon often had to accept the li-
ability for them on his own
when the country could not
meet its obligations. Thus, when
he died, his estate was com-
pletely eaten up by the debts ol
the new country. Only 44 years
old when he died, it is a mea-
sure of both his fiscal acumen
and his sincere patriotism that
he had in that short time been
able to amass a great fortune
and to spend it on the cause of
a free America.
Haym Salomon was not only
lover of country, but was a lov-
er of his own Jewish people
and his faith. He was one Of the
founding members" of Congrega-
tion Miekve Israel and was also
the largest single contributor
to the first genuine synagogue
building in Pennsylvania.
His death at such a young
age. though common to many at
that time in history, is none-
theless tragic, for having '.-com-
plished so much in such a short
time, one can on!v speculate
how much more He might1 have
done had he I'ved long?r. Here
was a m-m ah-} a J w who help-
ed buUl this country.

5>
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Toledot
Isaac blesses Jacob, whose arms are wrapped in the
skins of young goats.
"And his father 1-aac said unto him: 'Come near
now, and kiss me, my son' ...And he smelled the smell
0J his rainment, and blessed him" (Gen. 27.26-27).
TOLEDOT Like Sarah, Rebekah at first was bar-
ren. After Isaac prayed to God on her behalf, she bore
twin boys Esau and Jacob. Esau grew up a hunter,
Jacob an upright dweller in tents. One day, Esau re-
turned from the field very hungry, and disdainfully solo! i
his "elder son" birthright to Jacob for a pot of lentil
soup. Isaac was old and blind and likely to die soon. He !
called Esau and instructed him to prepare Isaac's favor- !
ite dishes, that he might bless him before his death.
However, Rebekah, who favored Jacob for his superior I
merits, arranged for Jacob to secure his father's coveted |
blessing instead of his elder brother. Fearing Esau's >
revenge, and anxious lest Jacob marry a Canaanite ?
woman, his mother sent him to her brother Labffn, who 1
lived in Paddan-Aram. Before leaving, Jacob received
Isaac's blessing, the continuation of God's original bless-
:no to Abraham; that he and his seed would inherit the
land of Canaan. Isaac bade Jacob marry one of his un-
cle Laban's daughters.
This recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted
ew* based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage,'
edited by P. Wollman-Ts.mir, $1$. PuWish.r ft Shengold, and
thevolume is available at 27 William ., New York, H.Y.
TOW5. President of the society distributing The volume Is
Joseph Schlang.
iliminimililiHI*
aariiuM mil ill M I


November 7, 197S
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollvwoott
I ill n miiii run ii, ',
Page 9
MlNDUN
,et Voice of Apology be Heard in Land
Coatimmtd from Page 4
a handshake and "apol-
" for the "incident,"
Stone, flustered, accept -
ause he did not know
else to do under such
vard social circumstances.
ut Stone, unfortunately, did
| ask what Eckerd was apol-
for. His acceptance of a
eralized statement of air-
camaraderie was an inex-
sneed, politically unwise
to do, for which Stone
what appears to be a
Lie knack even now after
["many months on Capitol
FACTS, as they are now
|rging, and as the Herald
Drial in question would not
its readers understand,
rly indicate that Eckerd to
very moment refuses to
gize for the content of his
Irtisement.
People, Eckerd declares
"you people" is the popular
phrase, meaning "you Jews"
are just too damned sensitive.
And so, if he has hurt anyone's
feelings, he apologizes for
THAT.
But Eckerd does not apolo-
gize for anything else because,
after all, he is Protestant, and
Stone is Jewish, and anyone
with any sense at all can take
it from there.
SWEET TALK in private over
the roar of jet engines is not
the same thing as a public con-
fession of error and apology.
Meanwhile, it will be inter-
esting to see if Stone does in
fact support the Eckerd nomi-
nation, as the Herald antici-
pates.
How he will be able to do
that in the face of the grilling
Jacob K. Javits (R., N.Y.) and
Abraham Ribicoff (D., Conn.)
are likely to give it shapes up
as a fascinating Senate fantasy
in my mind with three Jewish
senators in a dogfight as a rank
panderer to religious bigotry
sits by buffing his executive's
polished fingernails.
I FIND ;t Inconceivable. But
stranger things have happened.
Take the Herald editorial itself,
which in urging Eckerd's ap-
pointment, quotes from Otto
von Bismarck's "fine phrase"
about "the right people in the
right jobs."
Opines the Herald: It was
just 100 years ago that Bis-
marck came up with that one,
and wouldn't it be a nice anni-
versary present (for whom
Bismarck or Eckerd?) if the
Senate voted to confirm?
That's all very interesting
and the most outrageous mis-
application of an historical me-
taphor I can conceive of, unless
I were called upon to write a
script for Abbott and Costello.
NESCO Chief SeesEndtoHate
Continued from Page 1
its Buropean regional
aping, Congress decided
lalt all funds for UNES-
until the agency takes
icrete steps to correct
it decision of a polit-
character.'*
lASfflNGTON withheld this
$19.8 million from UNES-
its share of the agency's
Bt
a press luncheon
M'Bow said that the
States must pay its 25
share of UNESCO's
budget, indicating that non-pay-
ment of American dues is ille-
gal.
"We are in a world where
problems cannot be solved by a
show of feroe," he said, "nei-
ther by force of weapons nor
by force of money."
Late last week M'Bow met
with officials in Washington,
where he discussed UNESCO's
attempt to correct its position
regarding Israel. According to
M'Bow, Ins agency is in contact
with Israel, though not in for-
mal negotiations. He added
that he is trying hfs best to nor-
mate, House Rap UN
nti Zionist Resolution
Continued from Page 1
Jonathan Bingham (D..
[) and Don Fraser (D.,
a.).
THE Senate, the immedi-
co-sponsors were Repubfic-
iinority Leader Hugh Scott
Pennsylvania, Jacob K. Ja-
(R., N.Y.), WUttam Brock
I Tea*.), and Richard Stone
Fla).
he prime movers of the
|te resolution, which is
htical to that of the House,
iided Lloyd Bentsem (D.,
L), Harrison Williams, (D
[), Richard Schweiker (R..
). and Abraham Ribicoff (D.,
a.).
joint resolution points
that the "United States, as
Dunder of the United Na-
s, has a fundamental inter-
in peoieatiig tho purposes
principles for which that
nization was created."
state* that the UN Charter
cities that the purposes of
world organization are "to
elop friendly relations
_ nations based on respect
[the principle of equal rights
elf determination of peo-
and to "achieve interna-
ral uuantHftn in solving
frnational problems of an
Domic, social, cultural, or
nanitarian character and in
noting and encouraging, re-
ct for human rights, and
damental freedom for all
hout dMwrunnation a* to
e, sea. language or religea."
JOINT resolution charg-
that "such purpose* are
eatened with being nullified
subverted/' by the draft
pted in the Third Committee
ch "wrongfully associates
equates Zionism with rac-
ism and racial discrtmnation."
In that connection, the reso-
lution noted that the U.S. rep-
resentative to the Third Com-
mittee declared that is action,
"under the guise of a program
to eliminate racism," was ac-
tually "officially endorsing anti-
Semitism one of the oldest
and most virulent forme of rac-
ism known to human history."
Hemispheres
Hadassah
Luncheon
A paid-up membership lunch-
eon for the Hemispheres group
of Hadassah was held October
21 as tho group's first event of
the season-
Helen Rubin, membership
vice president, and Frances
Liftman, program viee presi-
dent, were in charge of- the
meeting and were assisted by
Helen Johnson, Janet Stone
and Rao Shaw.
President Gertrude Dank
presented a history of Hadas-
sah with special emphasis on
the reopening and dedication
ceremonies of the Hadassah
Hospital on Mt. Scopus in Is-
rael
Education viee president
Haasie Lichtenstein presented
a report on the Sinai interim
agreement.
The next meeting of the He-
mispheres Hadassah group wiB
be held November 18 in tho
Ocean Terrace Room. A firm,
entitled "If I Forget Thee," will
be shown.
malize Israel's position within
UNESCO.
MEANWHILE, the Commit-
tee Far An Effective UNESCO
has urged M'Bow to take ac-
tion to ameliorate the harm
done by the agency last Novem-
ber. The committee made the
appeal in a letter to the direct-
or general.
The letter was signed by
Joshua Lederberg, Nobel Lau-
reate and professor of biologi-
cal sciences and genetics, and
by Carl Djerassi, a noted chem-
ist and colleague at Stanford
University.
The letter, which was endors-
ed by- many leading American
scholars and academicians, urg-
ed action to restore UNESCO
to its primary role as the chief
organization for international
scientific and cultural ex-
change.
"We do not believe that the
politicization of UNESCO vill,
play a signifcant part in the
outcome of the national con-
flict in the Mideast," the schol-
ars said in the letter.
"Our concern, rather, is the
impending destruction of UN-
ESCO as a voice for trans-na-
tional intellectual life of man-
kind"
THE COMMITTEE said 40
distinguished scholars, who re-
flect a substantial cross-section
of the American Scientific and
academic community, had back-
ed tho letter.
- rALMElfS -
BAMI MONUMENT COMM
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Bismarck, known throughout
his life for his diplomacy based
on blood, oil and iron, was a
frank reactionary who openly
voiced his contempt for parlia-
mentary rule.
BISMARCK'S CONSTANT fo-
menting of war in Europe with
an eye toward centralizing the
power of Prussia became so in-
tolerable even to a belligerent
William I, who stood to gain
from these totalitarian policies,
that William nevertheless "put
him on ice," as he called it in
a momentary burst of honest
self-satire, by sending Bis-
marck off to St. Petersburg as
ambassador to Russia.
Not even Europe's greatest
thief could tolerate his own
arch-henchman.
Furthermore, hardly three-
quarters of a century later, the
Bismarckian "right people in
the right jobs" graced as a mot-
to of their murderous intent the
entranceway to many a Nazi
concentration camp.
THE BITTER irony here is
that the history of the motto
fits the nominee to a "t" if one
is to judge by the campaign
tactics he embraced against
Stone.
Clearly, however, that's not
how the Herald editorialists,
seated behind the veneer of
their "scholarship," intended it.
But that's the danger of schol-
arly veneer. It is almost always
ignorant.
If we are asked to support
the Eckerd nomination, let us
at least be spared reference to
the brutal spirit of Bismarck
and what that spirit did to de-
mocracy in Europe in our own
time.
The Ford nominee's own ac-
tions need no metaphoric assist
from the father of modern fas-
cism.
If this is too stern a state-
ment and a misrepresentation of
the man, then let Eckerd say
so. Let him REALLY apologize
so all of us can hear.
Lerner
Continued from Page 4
ness that Ford and Simon and
their advisers are showing goes
beyond economics to whatever
it is political, psychological,
cultural that makes up the
health and wealth of nations.
Above all. New York City,
with all its clutter and its dirt
on the streets, all its intrigue,
all the blunders and sins on its
head, is a great national re-
source.
If a people and its leaders
have any wisdom, they don't
let so important a resource go
down the drain. De Gaulle knew
this about Paris, as did his
cultural adviser, Andre Malraux
that Paris as a cultural world
center was more important for
France, even in oower terms,
than any material power source.
John Kennedy knew it also,
about American scientists and
artists and writers.
IS THERE no one around
Gerry Ford to tell him that
while Grand Rapids is an im-
portant symbol of American
strength. New York is an even
more resounding one around
the nation and the world?
Will no one tell him that to
be blind to this fact isn't even
good politics, because at a time
when the roof-beams of the
world are shaking, Americans
won't in the end opt for leaders
with the vision of provincials
and gygmies?
No one is asking the federal
government to give New York
any massive handouts. What is
asked for is a psychological
commitment that the nation
will put its credit behind this
national resource.
IF THE nation thus prophe-
sies that New York will m time
make good on its obligations it
will be a serf-futfillmg oroohecy.
So will it be if the federal gov-
ernment says, in effect, that
New York will fail.
Crusty old Cato, In the Roman
New York is not a Carthage to
his repeated insistence that
"Carthage must be destroyed."
be burned to the ground and
plowed over for its sins.
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I

(,
L-J!


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, November 7, 1975
United to helping raise life-saving pledges for the 1975-
76 South Florida Israel Bond Organization were these
community leaders and congregation members of Tem-
ple Beth Shalom of Hollywood, who attended the Temple
Beth Shalom Israel Dinner of State, October 19 at the
Temple. From left, Rabbi Morton Malavsky, spiritual
leader; Jaime Shapiro and his brother Noel Shapiro, who
received the State of Israel David Ben-Gurion award on
behalf of the people of Israel; and guest speaker, author-
journalist Robert St. John.
Delta Players To
Present Yiddish
'II.M.S. Pinafore'
The Delta Players, a non-
profit group of retirees in
Greater Miami, will again pre-
sent Gilbert and Sullivan's
tuneful operetta, "H.M.S. Pina-
fore" in Yiddish, known as
"Der Shirtz."
The presentations benefit the
State of Israel and so great is
the interest that their sched-
ule goes through March, 1976.
Last season's outstanding suc-
cess will be enhanced by a
larger cast, additional lyrics,
musicians and dances. The
opening performance will be
Sunday, Nov. 23, at 8:30 p.m.
in the South Broward High
School, 1901 N. Federal Hwy.,
Hollywood.
Performances will also be
given in Daae and Broward
counties on Dec. 7, 9, 13, 14, 20
and 27. Tickets may be ob-
tained by calling the Surfside
Community Center.
38 New Members Inducted
At Hillcrest B'nai B'rith
Thirty-eight new members
were inducted into the B'nai
B'rith Women of Hillcrest on
Oct. 20, Mary Wolfe, president,
announced.
Chairman of the Hillcrest
B'nai B'rith membership drive
is Hermina Russell. Tom Co-
hen, past president of Hillcrest
Lodge, B'nai B'rith, was the
principal speaker.
Bar Milzvah
ABBY DRESCHER
Abby, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Ira Drescher will be Bas
Mitzvah Saturday, Nov. 15, at
Temple Beth El.
HUGH KOERNER
Hugh, son of Mrs. Frances
Koerner, will be Bar Mitzvah
on Saturday. Nov. 15, 1975 at
Temple Solel.
Religious
Services
NALUNDAU
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTBA
BJmervstlvs). 411 NE th Avk
bbi Harry E. Schwartz. Canto*
Jacob Danxlaar.
NORTH MIAMI IEACH
NAI (Tsmpla) of NORTH OADI
18801 NE 22n* Ava. Reform. Pt.bbl
Ralph r>. Klngalay, Canter Irvine
ojnvlKoo.
NORTH HOWARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
QREGATION. Reform. 721 N.W.
100th Ave. Rabbi Max Weltz. 44
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER, I7U
N.W. 57th St., (Conservative) Ret>-
bl Milton J. Oreae.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE
GATION. 400 South Nob Hill Ho><
Plantation. Rabbi Arthur Abram.
Friday 8 p.m.
HOILYWOOD
VOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
(Orthodox). 3891 Sterling Re", op j
posite Hollywood Hill* High School ;
Preiident Dr. Frank Stein.
fEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 19S1 &
14th Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi Samua.
Jaffe. Assistant Rabbi Harvey M
Roeenfeld.
Friday, 7:45 p.m.. Consecration and
Simcha.i Torah services, with mem-
bers of the Youth Oroup and Chll- j
dren'a Choir participating; special I
blessing for the first- grade and new
students Saturday, 10:30 a.m., Tlskor
Memorial prayers.
------------
BETH SHALOM (Temple) Conserve
tiv*. 4801 Arthur St. Rabbi Msrtar
Malavaky, Canter irvlnoj Gold.
------------a-------------
TixMPLE BETH AHM (Conservative)
S10 SW *2nd Ava.. Hollywood.
a---------
TEMPLE SINAI (Conservative). 120.
-eehneon St Rabbi David Shaoiro
Aaaoojate Rabbi Chalm S. LlatflaM
Cantor v.^d. rUUfcraa*
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberan. 5100 Sher-
idan St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Robert
Frazin. <\-t
MIRAMAI
TEMPLE .'HjRABL (Conservatlvei
820 SW IStJl St. Raoel Avror.
Mem
PEMM0M PINES
TEMPLE IN THE RINKS (Conserve-
tlve) ItOO N. University Dr.. Peas,
broke Pine*. Rabbi Sidney Llrbin.
TEENS WANTED! 1
The Jewish Community Centers cordially invites
all interested teens to join the J. C. C. Players in
the performance of an original musical produc-
tion.
Call Ellen Reiff at the JCC, Hollywood, TODAY
for further details and information.
Encyclopaedia Judaica Offers
'My Jewish World' For Youngsters 10-16
A new, six-volume encyclo-
paedia designed to appeal to
readers between the ages of 10
and 16. known as "My Jewish
World," has been published and
printed in Israel by the pub-
lishers of the renowned En-
cyclopaedia Judaica.
Announcement of the new
set for young readers, printed
in the summer of 197S and in-
troduced to coincide with Jew-
ish New Year, was made here
by Michael E. S. Becher, execu-
tive vice chairman of the Flor-
ida Committee for the Encyclo-
paedia Judaica. Offices of the
committee have been moved to
larger quarters in Suite 230 of
the Barnett Bank Office Build-
ing, 420 Lincoln Road Mall, Mi-
ami Beach.
It is, according to the Depart-
ment of Education and Culture
of the World Zionist Organiza-
tion, "the most comprehensive
work on Judaism yet available
for youth in English."
Abraham P. Gannes, director
of the Department of Education
and Culture's American Section,
headquartered in New York,
said "I have examined My Jew-
ish World and find it an ex-
cellent medium for strengthen-
ing and expanding the knowl-
edge of our youth in all areas
of Judaica, Hebraica, Israel, our
history and tradition. My Jew-
ish World is well written, am-
ply illustrated and attractive in
format. I highly recommend My
Jewish World for individual
uses, for the Jewish home and
the Jewish school."
Dr. Raphael Posner is editor-
in-chief of the new encyclopae-
dia, to which more than 2,500
leading scholars contributed
entries on all the important
concepts and ideas of Judaism,
on all the Jewish festivals, on
hundreds of great Jews of to-
day and of the past.
Attention:
Committee
Chairmen
ODYSSEY TOURS INC:
Attention:
Social
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WHOLESALE, so that your organization or charity can benefit
financially and still save your members money.
Let ODYSSEY show you how!
CALL SANDY LOWENBERG at 683-4700
INTERNATIONALLY KNOWN ARTIST
Willing to sacrifice PAINTINGS AND GRAPHICS at
Aections, Benefits, Private Sales, etc. with objective to
raise hinds to finance research in Vad Vashen for
Present Paintings on the Holocaust.
TONY KECK
C/0 the Hideaway, 4111 S. Ocean Drive, Hollywood
All Inquiries and Hole Greatly Appreciate
community
calendar
NOVEMBER 8
Temple Solel .Men's d;bCarnival Derby Night. Temple
Solel, 8:30 p.m.
Jewish Federation Singles. Bowling, Cloverleaf Lanes.
8 p.m.
NOVEMBER 9
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, Fund Raising
Breakfast, Hallandale Jewish Center, 9:30 a.m.
NOVEMBER 10
National Council of Jewish Women, Membership Lunch-
eon, Temple Sinai, 10:30 a.m. 3 p.m.
NOVEMBER 11
Sisterhood of Temple Beth El, Luncheon and Book Re-
view by Shirley Cole, Temple Beth El, 12 noon.
NOVEMBER 12
Miramar Chapter Pioneer Women, Tenth Anniversary
Meeting, First Federal Savings and Loan Building,
18495 Biscayne Blvd., 12 noon.
Broward County Women's American ORT, Luncheon,
Bahia Mar Hotel, 12 noon.
NOVEMBER 13
Brandeis University, Board Meeting, Atlantic Bank Build-
ing, Hollywood, 10 a.m.
Miramar Chapter Pioneer Women, Regular meeting,
Miramar Recreation Center, 12:30 p.m.
Brandeis University National Women's Committee, Mem-
bership Luncheon and Movie, Hollywood Federal
Building, Hallandale, 12:30 p.m.
Jewish Federation Singles, Discussion Group, Jewish
Federation Office, 8 p.m.
Sabra Group of Hollywood Chapter of Hadassah, General
Meeting, Program "The Evening Show," Temple
Solel, 8 p.m.
NOVEMBER 14
Women's American ORT-HoUywood Hills Chapter, Rum-
mage Sale, Publix at Taft Street, 9:30 a.m.
NOVEMBER 17
National Council of Jewish Women, Discussion Group,
Home Federal Building, Hallandale, 1 p.m.
David Ben Gurion Cub, Meeting, 2100 Hollywood Blvd.,
7:30 p.m.
Jewish Federation Singles, Rap Session moderated by
Rabbis Labovitz and Richter, Home Federal Building,
HoUywod, t pjn.
NOVEMBER 18
National Council of Jewish Women, Luncheon honoring
new national president, Mrs. Esther Landa, Holiday
Inn. 4000 S. Ocean Drive, 11:30 *un.
NOVEMBER 19
Women's American ORT Hallmark Chapter, Luncheon and
Card Party, Hallmark Building, 3800 S. Ocean Drive,
12 noon.
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HMMaMiM&n-rtami6g|iiii.....i*^nwiii(#femii^miS!3i,
dish Language Being Accepted Widely Even in Academic World
YIDDISH languagethe origin of which goes
to the earliest Ashkenazic communities of
pish people on the Rhine some 1,000 years
now becoming more and more a prestige
e in the United States. Its acceptance in the
Ic world is becoming wider with every year,
finds now an increasing number of scholars
Yiddish not only as a language but also as
of Jewish cultural, economic and social life
30 generations of Jews in the various coun-
their dispersion.
NUMBER of Yiddish literary works being
ed into English, and published by modern
en publishing houses, is growing and attract-
le and more interest on the part of American-
hvs who never learned to read Yiddish. Among
slated works is the "Tzeenah U-Reenah"
|ical book in Yiddish which was written in the
ntury primarily for women who did not un-
Hebrew.
MHHmWpB -.-..*..:* 1.1.1. ,.. :-.... in....... :i.u...
<^moiai
This 400-year-old Yiddish book popular among
women, was translated by Norman Gore, a scholar-
priest of the Episcopal Church in Atlanta. Georgia.
THE U.S. Government is aiding in the preserva-
tion of Yiddish as a language and a source of Jew-
ish history and culture. Through its National En-
dowment for the Humanities it has been financing
during the last years some projects of the Y1VO In-
stitute for Jewish Research.
Now it has awarded $75,000 for the "Great
Dictionary of the Yiddish Language" as an outright
gift. At the same sime, it offered to increase this
award by $149,200 on condition that a half of this
sum be matched by private and institutional dona-
tions by Feb. 29, 1976.
The interest that the U.S. government has in
helping the publication of the "Great Dictionary of
the Yiddish Language"which is to appear in 13
volumes, the fourth of which i now in printtesti-
fies best to the quality of this monumental project.
THE DICTIONARY has been acclaimed by na-
tional Jewish personalities and experts in lexicology.
The National Endowment offer to increase its
award by $149,200 on a "matching funds" basis conies
at a time when the group engaged in carrying out
the dictionary project faces an acute financial crisis.
Its financial situation will become even more des-
perate should the group not succeed in securing from
private and institutional sources the donations need-
ed to match the National Endowment's generous
offer.
illiniumimiiwmiiM imm n mi mm mi i
wirm iimnriHiiiiwiwi huimwww MMiywinpiii inttBumncitiw]: millnwwsiiumw
Telephone Aid for Old
And Himebound Jews
}RAM to provide .subsidies for instal-
?n of telephones and payment of
telephone charges for poor and eld-
rish residents of the West Bronx no
^ble to pay the charges believed
first project of its kind in the United
has been started by the West Bronx
Service Center.
ir Moskowitz, center director, said 60
had been installed, with payments
lor a year of the monthly charges,
20 other Jews had been assured of
t0, P^ their monthly telephone bills
[period.
ptOWITZ SAID a related program has
four volunteers who make telephone
al times a week to Jewish residents
alone and are ill or disabled. One
inctions of the volunteers is to notify
(ice center of problems of the horne-
t's so that help can be provided them
aid that, through this regular contact
lers in the community, elderly West
pews have the opportunity to develop
r sense of security through awareness
that others are concerned about their well-
being. The telephone reassurance project be-
gan on Sept. 1 and will continue through n>uct-
Aug. 30.
THE TELEPHONE installation charges
and monthly subsidies are being funded by
the subcommittee on Jews in the inner city, of
the distribution commiftee of the Federation
of Jewish Philanthropies. The telephone re-
assurance program is being funded through a
grant from the special allocations committee of
the Greats/ New York fnnd.
The maximum monthly subsidy fox pay-,
ment of telephone fees is $6, Moskowitz said,
which pays for a category known as budget
service. Persons choosing the regular service,
for. which the monthly, charge is $8, are re-,
paired to pay the $2 difference.
THOSE JEWS.who do not qualify for a
waiver of the service, deposit have their tele-
phones listed with the service center which
receives and pays the monthly balls. Those
who are qualified get the bills and make the
payments themselves with the aid of the sub-
sidies, Moskowitz said.
Is Our Memory of Past
east History All That Short?
CZarl
^4t*
'pert
Haifa
HISTORY never repeats itself pre-
gt but those who nay no heed to the
history may well be called upon to
I again the price which their predeces-
|so dearly.
itter dilemma with, which Israel is
ated is not unique in the brief; annals
|mg state. Have we pondered, wsjl the
i be learned from two orevious occa-
ph are amazingly parallel to.today's
8, Israel's defense forces, after hold-
pie first Egyptian assaults which for
t erven Tel Aviv, broke through
Arn* on die Sinai coast. Britain
were signatories to a military de
and the. British high command sent
I Air Force an a mission to. scout out
Bers."
tS with mined feelings that Israelis
lie news that no less than, five British
}ad been shot down over Sinai. British
at was certainly, nofc desired bet Israel
"Hy not welcome from, the Btatlsh
pn reouested Washington's good, of-
eking immediate Israel withdrawal to
irther confrontation. In retrospect U"
&id that this w one of the few occa-
rhich Ben Gurion's political intuition
Under the circumstances he could
have entered into negotiations, seeking to ex-
tract ooUtical concessions..
HE MIGHT nave requested demilitarization
of the area. He could have set the price as
agreement to a peace pact. He did none, of th^se
things. Little Israel was still n%ive in the, ways
of international diplomacy, and having won a
smashing and. m the. eyes of the world, unex-
pected victory over the combined armies of,
the Arab world, did the gentlemanly thing. Is-
rael quickly withdrew, in the expectation that
when the post war talks got under way, this
would be a point in our favor.
The withdrawal was all the way back to
Beersheba. and the Egvptians lost no time in
moving their forces right back to the Israel
lines. Through the first half of the 1950's this
was the jumping off place far, the nfchtly. raids,
of the Fedayen which took such a, high "toU of
Israel civilian life in the south, and served as
the background for the Suez campaign, of 1956.
THE SAME operation was repeated in 1957
This. time. we. were, at the Canal. John Foster
Dulles, a Kissinger predecessor, served Ben
Guriop an ultimatum: loss of all American sup?
port and even an embargo on private fund-
raising for Israel m the U.S.
And. in,.this.yea> "75 H^jnry Ki&siofer, un-
able, to convince, bra*.. leadership, turns, di-
rectly to the peop'* of Israel and asks then to
"take a chance" and accept his proposals for
withdrawal, retreat and surrender on the
grounds that in that direction lies peace.

wartz
Irish, Jews:
An Affinity
COME OF the Arab delegates walked out when Chaim Herzog,
the new Israeli envoy to the United Nations, arose to make
his first speech, h was a very peace-attuned speech. Herzog
said Israel stood ready to. give to Jordan and other Arab coun-
tries, use of the. port- facilities of Haifa and also to make avail-
able to them all the Israel developed agricultural technology
which should prove very useful to the developing countries.
As the ton of a rabba, Herzog has a background of peace
and he also has a good, military background, having served
with the Allied forces in World War II and also more recently,
in the. Israeli military.
HERZOG IS the son of the former Chiaf Rabbi of Ireland
and was hitnself born in Belfast and speaks with a slight Irish
accent.
The Irish have a legend of the prophet Jeremiah visiting,
their cmintry, which probably accounts for the great number
of Jerries among the Irish.
On the surface, the two peoples. Iris aand Jews, seem
very unlike, but if you look deeper, a surprising number of
similarities reveal themselves.
The Irish are presumed to be more bellicose. You get
"your Irish up," but you never get your "Jewish up," but Jewa
have countervailing advantages.
THE JEWISH religion enables you to enjoy so many good
things. Jews, for instance, can rest not only on their Sabbath
but on Sunday. Also, if you are a Jew, there are so many good
things to eat. On Purim, Hamentashen; on Chanikah. latkes;
and on the Sabbath, kugel, gefilte fish and cholent. What have
the Irish? Just corned beef and cabbage.
It is true the Irish drink a little more schnapps than the
Jews, but when a Jew takes a drink, he has double the satis-
faction of the Irish. He has to make a bracha or blessing
before drinking, so he gets, in addition to the pleasure of the
drink, the pleasure of the mitzvah.
ALSO, A Jew doesn't have to confess to his rabbi like the
Irish to the priests; and he doesn't have to take the Fifth
Amendment to avoid confessing to his rabbi. He just tells the
rabbi what he, wants .
Agayv take the matter of fasts. When an Irishman abstains
from meat during. Lent, he calls that a fast. According to the
Jew, that's no fast at alL The Jew just calls that eating "milr
chiges." Tiie Irishman doesn't get the real joy of fasting at all
In one thing, the Jews can envy the Irish. The latter are
mueh better at,marching. Comes St. Patrick's day, the Irish
are in their glory. Jews are no good at all at marching. They
are too tired from, fasting and the, qther Jewish pleasures to
march. Also, the Jew feels, by, marching you lose all th*
pleasure.
BY STANDING, he can look on and enjoy the whole parade,
which he feels the Irishman misses, by marching. The fellow
who is marching only sees plain people standing. What pleas-
ure is there in that?
There is a joke about the Irishman exho asked that when
he dii ha. be bund w a Jewish cmatery because, that would be
the last piece where, the devil would look for an Irishman.
THE IRISH, like the Jews, are fond of their jokes, but as.
to the de\ il, they have different points, of view. As far as Jews
are concerned, the devil can go ta the devil. The only devil
Jews recognize is anti-Semitism and the Irish suffer also from j
anft-S^miftBsn.
In the cast of the Irish, it is not called anti-Semitism, but
prejudice, is prejudice. No matter what you call chicken soup,
it is still chicken soup.
It was te^s prejudice which defeated Al Smith years before
Kennedy in his race for the Presidency. The Jews took a
leading part in the campaign for Al.
Fnuay, November 7, 1975 *Je**isi fktrkiiajn .Jage 11
i


Page 12
The Jewish Floridtim and Shofar of Hollywood
1
Friday, November 7, 197$"
t El Al Cuts Back in Face
Of Ongoing Wildcat Strikes
Beth Shalom Presents Concerts This Season
0I tnm Page 2
The measures were announc-
ed following a midnight meeting
between transport Minister Gad
Yaacob: and El Al Managing
Director Mordechai Ben An at
which the possibility was raised
of clos-ng down the airline al-
together.
The company is reportedly
considering chartering its
grounded fleet of 13 jets to
other carriers.
THE STRIKE, which began
last week with advance warn-
ing, has been denounced by the
government. Histadrut issued a
strongly-worded call to the
strikers to return to their jobs.
Maintenance workers who
joined the workshop employes
in their strike decided to re-
turn to work, but as long as the
workshops are closed, the air
line remains grounded.
Several back-to-work orders
were issued in the hope that
limited service could be re-
stored. The emotoyes who re-
sponded showed up at Ben
Gurion Airport wearing signs
that said "I am a forced labor-
er." Other strikers lay down on
the tarmac to block planes from
taking off.
Rabbi Listfield Speaker
At Torah Fund Kkkoff
Rabbi Stephen C Listfield.
associate rabbi of Temple Si-
nai, Hollywood, was to be the
guest speaker at the annual
Torah Fund tickoff of the
Florida Branch of the Women's
League for Conservative Juda-
ism to be held at Temple Sinai
Thursday. Nov. 6. at 10 a.m.
Rabbi Listfield was ordained
in 1974 at the Jewish Theologi-
cal Seminary in New York
City. He delivered the valedic-
tory address at the graduation
exercises and was awarded the
Women's League Prize for the
outstanding student in the
graduate Rabbinical School
Temple Beth Shalom. Holly-
wood, will pnamt two con-
certs this season in the tem-
ple's ballroom.
The first concert will fea-
ture the Brothers Zim. singing
Israeli favorites, pop and Kas-
sidic melodies. These two sing-
ers have appeared before cap-
acity audiences in major cities
throughout the United States.
Europe. South America and Is-
rael, and promise a program of
rtainment for both young
and old. They will appear at
Beth Shalom on December 21.
The second concert. Decem-
ber 28, will feature pianist and
teaching musician Edith Corn-
field. Mrs. Cornfield holds a
Bachelor of Science degree
from Juilliard and a Master of
Arts from Columbia Teachers
College. She is well known as
an accomplished artist in the
metropolitan area of New York,
where she has presented many
concerts.
Tickets will be sold for the
series and are available at the
temple office. Patrons will be
seated in a reserved section
and will meet the artists fol-
lowing each performance at a
cocktail party. Chairnun of m-
concert series is Jack RleC
For additional hrfoniiS
call the Beth Shalom i5
Sylvia S. Gordon. eTeCug
secretary, is handing .j^l
sales.
ElMi'H CORNFIELD
BROTHERS ZIM
! -_
Door to Pershings Still Open
CantiMMd from Page 3
VS. was withdrawing 36 Persh-
ings from its inventory in the
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza-
tion, which would suggest their '
availability for Israel, Schlesin-
ger said he regarded the Persh-
ings as "an important part of
the alliance defense posture in
Europe.''
I
He declined to discuss a re-
ported request by Egypt for
American weapons, saying he
would have nothing to say
"partly out of delicacy and
partly out of dearth of infor-
mation" on the subject. He re-
ferred reporters to the State
Department on that matter.
Egyptian President Anwar Sa-
dat has publicly opposed the
supply of Pershings to Israel.
saying that if Israel received
large stocks of American weap-
ons, Egypt would increase its
own arsenal.
CARDIOLOGY ASSOCIATES, P.A.
MORTON A. DIAMOND, M.D., F.A.
F.A.C.C.
JAY S. KERZNER, M.D., F.A.C.C.
IA PIEASUM M ANNOUNCJNG THE ASSOCIATION Of
BENET S. KOLMAN, M.D.
H THI PRACTICE Of-
CARDIOLOGY
2740 HOUYWOOO SOUtEVARO
MOUVWOOD. FIOMOA 33020
_________________ TELEPHONE 920-274C
n
C.P., I
ROBERT K. FABRIC. M.D., PA
Announces The Opening
of His Office for me
Proctice of
PLASTIC AND COSMETIC SURGERY
at
EMERALD HILLS MEDICAL SQUARE
4430 Sheridan Street
Hollywood, Florida
MOWARO
981-4417
DAOE
620-4417
ANGIE'S GROVES
BONDED GIFT FRUIT SHIPPERS
1328 SOUTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY
PHONE: 927-5447
CPE/VS
FOR THE NEW
nr*:
Citrus Season
a
Order Now For Thanksgiving and Chanukah
SHIPPING PINK & WHITE SEEDLESS
GRAPEFRUIT & NAVEL ORANGES
INDIAN RIVER FINEST


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