The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00130

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewisti Floridi&n
and SIIOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Volume 5 Number 22
Hollywood, Florida Friday, October 24, 1975
Price 25 cents
Hornstein Chairs Skomrai Dinner Dec. 6
The Shomrai Dinner, sched-
uled to take place on December
6 at the Diplomat Hotel will be
chaired by Moses Hornstein,
announced Lewis E. Cohn,
1975 76 General Campaign
chairman for the Jewish Fed-
eration of South Broward. The
posh affair is a first in that it
is dedicated to the $5,000 don-
ors in recognition of their val-
ued support.
Senator Thomas Eagleton
(D-. Mo.), will be guest speaker
a\ the affair.
Eagleton was born in St.
Louis, Missouri in 1929, the
son of a politically active local
attorney, Mark D. Eagleton,
who fostered his interest in
politics and public service. Aft-
er graduating cum laude from
Amherst College and Harvard
Law School, Eagleton returned
to St. Louis and practiced law
before running for Circuit At-
torney.
The Democrat from Missouri
became the State's youngest At-
torney General in 1960 and its
youngest Lt. Governor in 1964.
Eagleton was elected to the
Continued on Page 2
Ford Okayed Moynihan
Blast at Amin 'Racism'
MOSES HORNSTEIN
SEN. THOMAS F. EAGLETON
FOR JEWS
Catholic
Needs
At Issue
MILWAUKEE (JTA)
If American Jews, under-
standably, desire Catholic
"sensitivity" for Jewish sup-
port of Israel, Catholics, in
turn, should ask their Jew-
ish fellow citizens to display
similar concern for their po-
sition on public aid to pri-
vate schools.
This is the vUw of the
Continued on Page 12
WASHINGTON (JTA)
President Ford was reported to
be supporting Ambassador
Daniel Moynihan's denuncia-
tion of Nganda President Idi
Amin as a "racist murderer"
and the statement by Clarence
Mitchell, Jr., a member of the
U.S. delegation to the United
Nations, in which he said that
Amin's speech to the General
Assembly was "an affront to
millions of citizens of the United
States."
Presidential press secretary
Ron Nessen said Ford believed
both statements "needed to be
said." Amin delivered a tirade
calling for the expulsion of Is-
rael from the UN, the extinc-
tion of Israel as a state and
charged that the U.S. is con-
trolled bv Zionists.
MC-YNIHAN, THE U.S. envoy
to the UN, in a speech before
the AFL-CIO convention in San
Francisco, picked up the phrase
"racist murderer" from an edi-
Continued on Page 9
Community Day Features Buchwald
Pershings, Scuds
Should Be
Scrapped-Peres
JERUSALEM (JTA) Defense Minister Shimon
Peres set here that Israel would withdraw its request
for long-range Pershing missiles from the United States
if Egypt reciprocated by giving up its Soviet-made Scud
ground-to-ground missiles.
"Instead of escalation, let us try the road to de-es-
calation," the Defense Minister declared in an address
Continued on Page 12
Called by Time Magazine
"the most successful humorous
columnist in the United States,"
Art Buchwald comes to Holly-
wood on Thursday, Dec. 4, to
speak at "Community Day" un-
der the sponsorship of the
Women's Division, Jewish Fed-
eration of South Broward. "Com-
munity Day" will be held at
the Holiday Inn, 4000 South
Ocean Creek Drive, Hollywood,
from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Also featured will be Audrey
Finklestein. recipient of the
"Woman of the Year" award
for Dade County.
The "Day" will afford an op-
portunity for women in the
ART BUCHWALD
community to join in an in-
teresting forum.
Cochairmen of the "Day" are
Mrs. Sherman Katz and Mrs.
Calvin Linda. Committee chair-
men working on the details are:
Mrs. Paul Koenig, hostess chair-
man; Mrs. Steven Weisberg, in-
vitation chairman; Mrs. Paul
Weiner, luncheon chairman;
Mrs. James Jacobson, decora-
tions chairman.
Luncheon covert is $7.5.
Your check is your reservation;
seating is limited to the first
500 reservations. There will be
no solicitation. Interested per-
sons may obtain further infor-
mation by calling the Federa-
tion Office in Hollywood.
DAILY NEWS CONDUCTS POLL
N.Y.'ers Oppose Sinai Setup
Alaska Senator Repudiates
'Islamic Notes' Applause
WASHINGTON Alerted by
the American Jewish Congress
that his name was being used
to promote a Washington, D.C.
newsletter that engaged in anti-
Israel propaganda and "crude
and blatant anti-Semitism," Sen.
Mike Gravel of Alaska has dis-
associated himself from its views
and told its editor to stop us-
ing his name.
In a letter to Muhammad Ta-
hir, editor of "Islamic Items,"
Senator Gravel declared:
"WHILE I certainly support
your right and that of any group
to disseminate information on
any issue, I in no way wish to
associate myself with your views
on 'the need for the Arabs to
fight Israel to the death,' your
general ideas on the 'obiectives
of Zionism' and die alleged sub-
ordination of American interests
to Jewish interests.
"I find that the distribution
of my July 9, 1973 Senate re-
marks has been interpreted by
some as a blanxet endorsement
of such views.
"I am sure this is as em-
barrassing to vou as it is to me,
Continued on Page 9-
NEW YORK(JTA)A ma-
jority of New York area resi-
dents are opposed to the sta-
tioning of American technicians
in Sinai and the U.S. arms sales
to Arab nations but favor con-
tinued arms sales to Israel, ac-
cording to the results of a poll
conducted by the New York
Daily News.
The majority against the
American presence in Sinai was
40-36 per cent. Arms sales to
Israel were supported by a 42-
30 per cent majority, and simi-
lar sales to Arab couhtries op-
posed by a margin of 56-25 per
cent-
THE NEWS, which published
the roll results here, said it was
conducted by newspaper em-
ployes in a telephone survey of
532 persons, 18 or older, resid-
ing in the city and adjacent
northern New Jersey, West-
chester, Rockland, Nassau and
Suffolk counties.
The News reported sharp dif-
ferences among religious groups
on the issues. Jews favored
sending technicians to Sinai by
67-17 per cent. Protestants were
about equally divided, 38-36 per
cent in favor, while Catholics
were opposed by a 51-26 per
cent margin.
THE STRONGEST opposi-
tion came from respondents un-
der 35 (46 per cent), from those
with less than a college educa-
tion 44 per cent), low income
groups (44 per cent), union
members (47 per cent), and
women (44 per cent).
The News reported that the
strongest support for arms sales
to Israel came from college
graduates (53 per cent), Jews
(85 per cent), and persons with
incomes of over $20,000 (52 per
cent).
MEN BACKED the arms sales
53-33 per cent, but women were
opposed by a 46-31 per cent
margin.
The biggest opposition to
arms sales to Arab countries
came from persons under 35,
Jews and union members, all
of whom registered 64 per cent
against such arms deals, the
News reported.
President's Conference Flayed
CHICAGO (JTA) The Conference of Presidents
of Major American Jewish Organizations was sharply crit-
icized by Dr. Joseph P. Sternstein and Philip M. Klutznick
during the final business session of the Zionist Organization
of America's 78th annual national convention here.
Rabbi Sternstein, the ZOA president reelected to a sec-
ond term, concurred with Klutznick's charge that the Presi-
dents Conference, which Klutznick helped found, was no
longer effective.
."S2S 1?T n **- *.
World Jewish Congress, a for- United Nations and one of the
first chairmen of the Presi-
dents Conference.
He said it should be replaced
by a new group that was "more
reflective of the mood and sense
of American Jews."
He told the 1,500 convention
delegates that what was needed
was an independent American
Jewish voice not constrained by
the Israel government, "as is
Continued on Page 12
I
PHILIP KLUTZNICK
new group needed


Page 2
The Jewish Floriman and thofar of JMfywoed
Friday. October 24, 1975
^ ^E_ _fl E*i9
La m\ B _..
^ ^j 1
L ,/ ,^ PlEi^fli -*Jft-
T 1
H 1 1v I 1
1'iLlurea left to right arc Mrs. Marcy Lev,n, president of
the Florida Branch Women's League for Conservative
Judaism, Mrs. Edyihe Schoem, Sisterhood program vice-
president, Mrs. Jeanne Wolf, guest speaker, and Mrs.
Marie Portnoy. Sisterhood president.
Jeanne Wolf Facet! Live Audience
"Behind the Scenes .
With Jeanne Wolf of Channel 2
TV." was an exciting feature of
Temple Beth Shalom's Safer-
hood general meeting. Jeanne
wMf g-ire the Sisterhood mem-
bers and guests an in-depth
l*>k et the wort in?? of a tele-
vision production and answer-
ed questions from the audience.
Mrs. Spencer Schoem. pro-
gram vice president, and Mrs.
Barry Portnoy, president of
Sisterhood. coordinated the
evening.
Richard Essen Appoints
Society Of Fellows Chairmen
Leonard L .Abons. William
M. Alner, Ben Emm, and
appointed honorary chairmen
of the Florida Chapter of the
Suciety of Fellows of th= Anti-
Dufa-matim League of B'nai
B'rfth. The appointments were
announced by Kichard Esssn.
srire chairn7an of the Society
of Fellows.
A former chr.irmpn of ADf.'s
Florida Regional Board. Leon-
ard 1.. Ab^ss nas been asso-
ciated with the League in a
vai-tv of leadership positions.
He is the donor oi ADL's covet-
ed annual Human Relations
A^rarH which !>"* hta its* a.
Mr. Abess is chairman of the
Board of the City National Bank
I'ttrp. and has N* n recumi/ed
frequently f'ir aehi.-vemeiMs as
a iMskHH leader and rdiilnn
thropist.
William M. Alner has b^cn
acii e in the L-adership of the
Soci.-ty and of ADL fsr rn-.ny
yuis. Current I- serving f>n t*le
E- ociitr-e Cbmmrrf e of the
ADL Regional Board, he is a
oat chairman of that Board.
H-- sarved as the 1972 chair-
man of the Society of Fellows,
is a national commissioner of
the Laague and a immhT of
its Latin Americin Affairs
Committee. Mr. Alner is a
prominent Bade County attor-
ney.
Run Essen, an attorn-y, has
b* n an active worker in the
Miami community for the past
tliirty years and has been iden-
tified with many of the major
Jewish organisations in the
axca. la 1973 he served as co-
chairman of the Society of Fel-
1 v. s of the Ami Defamation
J.F.
Jewish
Civilization
It"- al! there in the
Encyclopaedia
'twlaica.
r r free color
lr',M-lmre.
.11 (iW&) 534.8851
o- wft: E. J., Su'te SOS,
470 t ln|n Rf|.. *t '11.10
PAYMENT ACCEPTED
IN ISRAEL BONDS
I-eague and is currently a mem-
ber of ADL's Executive Com-
mittee and its National Legal
Committee.
George J Talianoff. promi-
nent Miami Beach attorney and
ci.ic leader, served as chair-
man of the Florida Chapter of
The Soci-ty of Fellows in 1969,
1970 and 1971 He has been
closely- identified with the Anti-
Defamation League and its par-
ent organization, B'nai B'rith,
and is natiunal chairman of the
League's Community Service
Committee. He served for many
years as chairman of the Flor-
ida Rejuarad Board of the
L*aue and was a mtaubci f
ADL's National Ad* Mary Coun-
-**. **- *sn mmm oM. f
the Florida State Association
of B'nai B'rith lodges.
Operating with the authori-
zation of the Greater Miami
Jesttat Federation, the Society
of Fi'llov < is endeavoring to
enroll Hew members whose sup-
port will help immeasurably the
continuity of the multi-faceted
programs of the League.
The Society of F M-uvs i a
leadership g-o-ip whose mem-
bers work to promote ADL's lo-
cal and national programs.
Members of the Soci.-ty spon-
sor special ADL activities and
accord fitting recognition and
public honor to mdhiduabs for
gnrosity and inei iroi ious
service.
Vanik Aide
To Direct
UF Office
NEW YORK Mark E Tal-
isman, prominent Congressional
aide and Administrative Assist-
ant to Representative Charles
A. Vanfk of Ohio, has been
named to head the new Wash-
ington office of the Council of
Jewish Federations and Wel-
fare Funds, ft was announced
by Raymond Epstein. CJF Pres
idem. He will assume his new
responsibility in mid Novem-
ber. The initial work of the of-
fice is already under way.
As director of the recently
authorized service. Talisman
will be responsible for pnmrj
ing Federations and their ajjen
cies with information and guid-
ance on government fund po-
tentials to voluntary organize -
lions and in matters of related
national legislation of pnorit
health, welfare and education
concern to conmnmilns*.
Taking (ttf
Ben Gurion Club
Last May. a handful of men
and women assembled in North
Miami Beach to organize a club
where members could meet for
discussions, exchanging views
concerning Jewish life and oth-
er topics of interest.
Todav. the clib is officially
called Da\id Ben Gurion Cul-
ture Club, Inc. and has over
150 members.
Regular membership meet-
ings a.c held on the third Mon-
day of each month at 7:30 p.m.
at the Home Federal Bank
Building. 2100 HaDandale Beach
Bbo.. Hallandale.
Upcoming events are sched-
ule 10.: i/ctober 26 meet-
ing will feature a concert at
2:30 p.m.. Washington Federal
Comnn.nny nan, 00J NE 167th
St. .\01tn Miami Beach. No-
vember 30 Chanukah festi-
val. Washington Federal, North
Miami Beach.
Mel Ztifllar Annaintad1 Tn
nnsjanninji nvwytfltUU IV
The Nat'l Boxinq Committee
M.-l Zeigler, rice chairman
of the Miami Beach Boxing
Commission, las been appoint
ed to tb nati irjal hi itij; etn).
mittee for the United States
Committee Spo>t for 's-tI
7>igler, executive vice pres-
ident of Fib reform an*, nw
cornpl tAy Casual Coaiinny, is
a member of B'nai B'rith Soarts
I^odee, Miani Beach Elks. Mahi
Shiine and arts been a resident
f Miami Beach lor almost 30
years.
The Florida State Committee
Sports for Israel, of which E.'
Albert I'allot is chairman, spon-
sors Jewish sthlefs for the Is-
raeli worldwide Olympics, the
Maccabiah Games, to be held
in Israel in 197/.
I lorii.slcin Chairs Shomrai Dinner
C'intfiiii.-d f.-om Pag* I-
L'nitL-d States Senate in 19 >8,
wmmng th*. st-aa by a 300U0
1 use n'atin whint the national
D -moe-aric sfektt was fasing
br 30.000 vosrs Burins Ws
term in the Senate he has es-
tahhslK-d a soM reputation as
an expert on the problems con-
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGtrTS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS-LABELS
BAGS BOXES
WIPES Ak
M10-24-75
i.untint^ labor and on the en-
virorrmmt, urban affairs.
h -irtth ewe, drug abuse, for-
eign pnncT, and the aged.
I" the Satiate. F.il-cm has,
sorvod as chairman of the Sen-
ate's Committee on the District
of Columbia, and has been an
advocate of home rule for the
District's almost 800.000 Inhab-
itants.
I
776-6272
ROWARO
Iaper a
ACl.AGlNC
1201 N E 45 STREEV
FORT LAUDERPALE
M10-24-75
Senior Adult Program
Begins At JCC, Hollywood
The Jewish Community Centers of South Florida,
wood Extension, has begun its Senior Adult program
The eight-week classes will meet once a week-
Jewish Community Center Activities Building. 2838 H 1]
Blvd., and are scheduled as follows:
the
MONDAYS Bridge Classes (beginning and intc edt
ate) from 10:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAYS Slim and Trim Class from in
11:30 a.m. and also on WEDNESDAY a Cardio-I'ulnio:
suscitation Class from 10:30 a.m. 11:30 a,m.
FRIDAYS will be a Fun with Yiddish class iiKctip. um
10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
The Senior Adult daily trip program includes the J w-
ing projections:
WEDNESDAY. OCT. 29. a tour of the Lowe Art M mi
to see the exhibit "Passing of the Great West."
SUNDAY. NOV. 2. an evening performance of "Mhuue's
Boys" will be held at Temple Beth Israel in Fort Landerdala.
SUNDAY, NOV. 16, an evening performance of "The Co-
lumbus Boys' Choir" at the University of Miami's Gasman
Hall.
WEDNESDAY. DEC. 3, a city tour of Fort Laud cdale
aboard the Voyager Train.
WEDNESDAY. DEC. 17, a gnded tour from the Zo<-
Society of Florida of Crandon Park Zoo.
All bus pickups are at Jewish Community Center' iud-
irtg. Prices of the trips are determined by cost of ad: -ion
and transportation.
An overnight trip to Disncyworld will be offered N sm-
bei 11 and \1. Hit cost of Ihe trip includes bus transpo -,,i-n.
motel room (TBBUk' Inn), admission to park and ur. vd
attraction tickets, but does not include food.
Registration will be accepted for all classes thro.-.- the
lirst MsB of November. Registration is limited for tii- iro-
grama, All checks must be in at least five days before pia.i 1 d
t.if) end made payable 10 the Jewish Community Cent-.- j of
South Floi ida.
Further infonnaiii.il may be ootaincd by calling Su- mie
Engtlberg. Senior Adult Coordinator, at the Center's oi; -
Riverside's
two new chapels in
Hollywood and Sunrise
serve the needs of
^ the entire
Jewish community in
Broward County.
In the Hulkw**! and Hallandale are*s-
5801 Hollywood Boulevard. Hoflvwood
920-1010
l" the Fort Lautttrdaie area
1171 Northwest 61st Ave.( Sunset Strip), Sun rise
5846060
RIVERSIDE
M*iT>or!7iK.hjipel. Inc l-'nidJ ftnrlnn
Olher Kaviside chapels in South Florida atv loc.ifed m
North Miami Beach. Miami Beach and Mian*
H:.^M^*Iv^^.>(,vV*Mv*.,rx>*n.w::-,,lwfk.lt.M.,:V rft..
ItfOO'KJvn BiHnxCaK.k,j,
Munv-N K*m- t-U
H10-24-75
d


Lday, October 24, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 3
Hotline Services
* *
Those In Need
Temple Sinai Begins Adult Education Series
'..
A new HOTLINE is now
I available for young adults, mid-
dle-a'jrs and senior citizens. A
division of Teenage Hotline,
the new service has been added
accommodate those other
rftan teens who have problems
[they wish to discuss.
HOTLINE is a creative lis-
tening facility an outlet
which encourages the caller to
verbalize his problems and seek
realistic solutions, either
through his own capabilities or
by referral to an appropriate
agency. Operators are thorough-
ly t:;.infcd by a professional
staff, including lawyers, doc-
tors, social workers, psycholo-
gists and clergy before man-
Inins the phones. Both operator
land caller remain anonymous,
with no face-to-face confronta-
tion.
Operators are trained to help
callers with problems ranging
from:
"My wife di?d liter 34 years
of marriage and I'm lonely."
"I'm new in town, 30 years
old where can I go to meet
people?"
"What can I do if mv chil-
dren don't write to me?"
HOTLINE has a backup re-
source file of referral agencies
to help with problems of lack
of money, late social security
and retirement checks and
counselling on a personal level.
The new number for HOT-
LINE is 966-1061. The phones
are open Sunday through Fri-
day from 8:00 p.m. through
11:00 p.m. and Saturday from
8:00 p.m. to midnight.
Millsaps, Jordan Named Vice
Chairmen 1975 United Way
Two Broward business lead-
ers Fred R. Millsaps and S.
Kelly Jordan have been ap-
pointee! vice chairmen of the
1975 United Way Fund-Raising
Campaign, by campaign chair-
man Larry Adams.
Millsaps, chairman and presi-
dent of the Landmark Banking
Corp. of Florida, vice chairman
for loaned executives .is work-
ing with businesses in obtain-
ing executives for lending to
United Way during the cam-
paign.
Jordan, manager of Sears, Ft.
Lauderdale, is vice chairman
of major groups for profit and
will be working with the fol-
lowing sections of the cam-
paign: auto dealers, banks,
commercial, department stores,
development and construction,
hospitality, industrial, mass
merchandising, media, savings
and loan, utilities and other
major groups.
F. R. Millsaps S. KeUy Jordan
A member of the United Way
executive commitee or board
of directors from 1971 through
1973, Millsaps was chairman of
the business and industry
group in 1971 and of the finance
group in 1973.
Jordan was a campaign lead-
er last year and was in charge
of the loaned executive pro-
gi-am in Mobile, Ala.
Conservative Women's League Of
Fla. To Hold Annual Torah Fund
The annual Torah Fund Kick-
off day of Florida Branch of
Women's League for Conserva-
tive Judaism will be hld on
Nov. 6th at Temple Sin-si. Hol-
lywood, at 10 a.m.
Highlight of the dny ';.ll tn
a talk on the Jewish Th^l*f'**1
Seminary of Americi bv Ribbi
Chaim Listfield. Ass^ciat" R^b-
bi of Temple Sinai. R-bbi List-
field is a 1974 g-aduif of the
Seminary and recently returned
from the Soviet Union.
In absent:* of tV nresident,
Mrs. Morton Lv in. M~s. Albert
Solo, Florida b- dent will pr^sMa at th- business
portion of the meeting. Mrs. I
Ewald Ziff -. To & Fund chair-
man an.! b->n-,i vies president,
toill rnn '-ft to Torah Fund ]
portion of *h^ dav.
Working with Mrs. Ziffer in
planning the day are: Mrs.
Mary Feldman, Mrs. Albert
F>-eemnn. Mrs. Joseph Goldman,
Mrs. Morton Levin, Mrs. Ted
Martin, Mrs. Abe Meyer, Mrs.
Norman Sholk. Mrs. Sam Si-
sholce, Mrs. Melvin Waldorf,
and Mrs. Jack Wolfstein.
Torah Fund Residence Cam-
paign has as its theme Shehe-
heyanu in gratitude for the
realization of the Mathilde
Schechter Residence Hall. The
public is welcome.____________
Adult Education classes at
Temple Sinai, offering a series
of studies to cover twenty
weeks, has begun, it was an-
nounced by Rabbi David Sha-
piro. Rabbi Chaim Listfield, Roz
Seidel and Mr. Joseph Kleiman,
temple president. The follow-
ing courses are being offered:
Monday night there will be
a Parents Education Program,
led by Mrs. Arlene Liebowitz.
Wednesday, 9-10 a.m.Jew-
ish History, Tourist Hebrew.
10-11 a.m.The Values of Ju-
daism Instructor, Rabbi Da-
vid Shapiro. The Jewish Fam-
ily Instructor, Mrs. Arlene
Li"bowitz. Gourmet Kosher
Cooking Instructor. Rabbi
Jean Claude Klein. 11 a.m. -
noonMaking Prayer Meaning-
ful Instructor, Cantor Yehu-
dah L. Heilbraun. Intermediate
Hebrew Instructor, Mrs. Ar-
lene Liebowitz. Beginning Yid-
dish Instructor, Rabbi Klein.
Noon 1 p.m.Lunch and
Learn faculty and guest
speakers invite students and
parents of children in religious
school to join them for lunch
each Wednesday after class
when a topic of Jewish interest
will be discussed. Students are
asked to bring their own dairy
lunch. A beverage will be pro-
vided.
8 10 p.m.The following
courses will meet on alternate
evenings in the homes of par-
ticipating students: Current
Jewish Events Leader. Mr.
David Liebowitz. "Doing Ju-
daism" the course will be-
gin November 5 in the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Elliott Sein.
Parents of students in reli-
gious school are in- ited to par-
ticipate in monthly Sunday
October Art Fest
The second show in a series
of Art and Plant Festivals spon-
sored by Hallandale Civic Cen-
ter will be held at the Diplomat
Mall today. Saturday and Sun-
day.
Displays of original work in
oils, acrylics. watercolors.
drawings, photography, wood-
carvings, sculpture, graphics,
unusual pottery will be featur-
ed.
Sinai Hosts Dinner-Dance
Temple Sinai will host its
first annual Cadillac Dinner
Dance in the Regency Room at
the Diplomat Hotel, Saturday.
February 14.
Anyone interested in pur-
chasing tickets or obtaining
tickets to sell may contact Mr.
and Mrs. Max Chira or Mr. and
Mrs. Nathan Widlitz. Tickets
will be limited to 300 couples.
morning Chevrusb, (fellowship)
programs beginning ?Jovember
2. The group will meet 10:45
a.m. noon.
A monthly book review se-
ries is planned beginning
Thursday evening, Dec. 11. All
courses are open to Temple
members free of charge except
for books.
Jewish Community Centers
Elementary Program Still Open
The Jewish Community Centers of South Florida, Holly-
wood Extension, 2838 Hollywood Blvd., are still accepting
registration for its Elementary School Program. The classes
that are available are as follows:
TUESDAYS
Grades k 2 TUMBLING 3:30 4:30
Grades k 2 SPORTS 3:30 5:00 (Hwd. Hills Elementary)
Grades 3 5 FISHING 4:00 5:00 (T. Y. Park)
Grades 3 5 MAGIC 4:30 5:30
Grades k 2 PUPPETEERS 4:30 5:30
WEDNESDAYS
Grades 3 5 COOKING 3:30 5.00
Grades 2 5 CERAMICS 4:30 5:30
Grades k 2 Grades k 1 3 5 HANDICRAFTS 4:30 5:30
BOWLING 3:30 5:00
(West Hollywood Lanes)
BACK TO NATURE Learn to camp (Family Fun)
6:30 7:30 Every other Wednesday Evening
A weekend camping experience in Everglades National
Park January 10 and 11
FRIDAYS
Grades 2 3 SPACE CADETS 4:30 5:30
4 5
Grades 3 5 MACRAME 4:30 5:30
Interested persons should contact "Mike" Fried, Elemen-
tary School Program coordinator.
arnett
lanK
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
',
1975
SOUTH DADE HEBRfW ACADEMY
PRESENTS
DIRECT FROM TEl AVIV & CARNEGIE MALI
M0 MMttttSni T0U Of *X CITIK______
Need a Nurse who cares?
Our r-u'SM believe t penuine conce'n, n understanding
smile and a comparonate attitude are important to a
parent. Almost it important as her professional skill.
All M*dtcal Pooi RNs. LPNs. Aides. Companion Sitters
and Male Attendants have registered nurse supervision.
When someone you care about needs special attention
at home in a hospital or nursing home,,
call us, day or night.
r#."
Rent-A-Cor
LOW AS
$7 A DAY
7c Per Mile
(100 Ml. Radio.)
Wt Honor BankAmericard. Maattr
Charge. Carta Blanch* anu
Diner* Club
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
520 S. Dixie Hwy.. Hollywood
920-4141
Isfddi Chassidic festival
Israel's most popular
stage production
is. corning to
SOUTH CONVENTION HAH
ONE NIGHT ONLY
SAT. EVE. WN. 1st 1975 8.30 Ml.
Dotation $4.50- S5.50 $6.50- $7.50
Tickets Available at the Bex
Office. Far Fartber rataratetian
or Group Discount Call
532-1851 or B6> 3M1
Tickets also available
at Jordan Marsh
Downtown Miami
4 163rd St., NMB
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"A National Nursing Service"
Suite 206,
2500 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood-Ph. 920-4360
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HOUSEWARES ft GIFTS
HOME DECOR
PATIO DINETTE FURNITURE
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.Store Hours7:30 A.M. 6 P.M. Closed Son.
IN EAST IEACH BOULEVARD
WALLAKDALE, FLORIDA UNA
PHONE S2T 05C&
i


^
Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
I
Friday, October 24, 1973 f r
Pioneer Women's Conference
Pioneer Women's 50th anniversary convention on
Miami Beach opening this week is expected to attiact
some 1,000 women representing 500 clubs and 50,000
members across the United States.
The high calibre of the convention program and the
speakers who will appear at the various sessions all
attest to the importance of the occasion.
Convention delegates will be concerned with an
examination of Pioneer Women's activities in Israel.
These include:
Helping new settlers;
Providing, in cooperation with its sister organi-
zation in Israel, Moetzet Hapoalot (the Working Wom-
en's Council), social and educational services for wom-
en, youth and children;
Encouraging active participation on the part of
American women in the civic and Jewish community
life of America so that a vigorous and well-informed
Jewish women's organization such as Pioneer Women
can continue to perform its centrally important func-
tions for the welfare of Israel.
The prominent speakers scheduled to address the
convention, drawn from the political and intellectual
circles of both America and Israel, will make this 50th
anniversary occasion especially memorable.
South Florida is honored to be the site of this dis-
tinguished gathering and wishes Pioneer Women a suc-
cessful and fruitful event.
Mo\ iiihaii's Reply
U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Daniel P.
Moynihan deserves our congratulations and applause
for a prickly but pertinent response to the impertinence
of Uganda's President Idi Amin in Amin's presentation
before the United Nations.
There is no point any longer in reminding Amin
that what he knows militarily and whatever sophistica-
tion he may have achieved politically and socially, how-
ever low these levels, are the result in large measure
of his training in Israel.
There is no point in this because President Amin is
beyond reminding that he is guilty of biting the hand
that fed him.
What is more important is that the United Nations
can no longer seem to begin its official year of delibera-
tions without an unconscionable attack on Jews, Israel
or both.
Last year, it was the odious performance of Yasir
Arafat. This year, it is Amin's anti-Semitic speech be-
fore the General Assembly calling for the extinction of
Israel as a nation.
ft ft ft
Tlie Facts of Life
To this singular habit, for the first time the United
States has chosen to reply. Quite simply, Ambassador
Moynihan called Amin a "racist murderer."
Furthermore, and it is about time someone said it,
Moynihan told the African fascist dictators, including
Amin, to knock off telling the West, and America par-
ticularly, about just how wanting we are in our demo-
cratic ways
We take special joy in Africa's shocked response
to the sharpness of Moynihan's reply.
It's about time that we get Africa to understand
the fuels of hie.
The underp-ivileged need not necessarily be paid
for their historic suffering with a strange kind of West-
ern tolerance toward African permissiveness that is not
only impolite but also intolerably crude.
wjemsinnoricfjair?
> ****** *M l i-ftl miii IIOI I VWiMli
DVriCU and PLANT M0 N. Kit Bt, Waal, Fla. 33181 phone 173-4OI
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 373-4605
P.O. Box 2973. Miami. Plmw* 33101
All P O. 3J79 return* ara to be forwarded to
The Jewish Floridian. P.O. Bo* OtSHSS. Miami. Fla. 33101.
I fKBD K. SHOCHET bUSAXNE SHOCHET SttJAlA M. THOMPSON
Mltor and Publisher Kxwrntlv* Editor Assistant to Publisher
The Jewish r-sridlsn Base Not GujrwU, The "
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Column*
.... Publish, d Bl-We*kly by the Jewish Plortdhui
econd-CaVS Pontage Paid at Miami. Pas-
Jewish raderallon >( S ADVISORY COM.MITTFH Nathan Pritchar. Chairman: Isris B. Colin-
Helvin H. flaer; Dr. Samuel Mutiiie. i> I 1>.
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Uaity and the Jewish Weekly.
Memosr of the Jewish Telegraphic Aaeney, Sevan Arts Feature Syndi-
cate. Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Associatior, Amerloan As-
sociation of English-Jew.eh Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Ares) On* V**r 5.00. Out of Tows Upon
ProUMt
Volume S
Friday, October 24, 1975
Number 22
19 HESHVAN 5736
Real.Conspiracy is Unnoticed
PERIODICALLY, I think of the
Steinberg cartoons you see
on cocktail glasses and napkins.
They show a hermit-like man
in a deep depression dug into
himself and refusing to respond
to the world outside. The cap-
tion says something to the ef-
fect that people are just no
damn good.
THE STEINBERG cartoon
hits me with increasing fre-
quency these days for obvious
political reasons ranging from
the post-Watergate blues to the
galloping inflation that has me
working harder than I've ever
worked to pay my bills.
I don't think I'm alone in
this. Most of us, in one way or
another, have joined die nat-
tering nabobs of negativism
the nay-sayers who would like
to chuck it all or who, in lieu
of that, set up a fretful buzzing
about how awful people and
things are.
That's what's behind all our
obsessive searches for conspir-
acy not genuine conspiracy,
only the kind you can't prove.
WE AREN'T nearly as excit-
ed by the revelations these days
about the insidious workings of
the CIA and FBI as we are by
a gnawing proposition that John
Fitzgerald Kennedy wasn't real-
ly killed by the one man, Lee
Harvey Oswald.
Or that, absolutely, there
must have been a gaggle of
gremlins who pulled the many
triggers that slew Robert Ken-
nedy. It could not have been
Sirhan Sirhan alone.
And just when the evidence
again seems overwhelming that,
after all, there was no real
conspiracy, and these men died
pretty much the way the courts
say they did, why there always
is a UFO or two on the horizon
Mindlin
ner, so:.-, where near
Centauri. ;.< it were.
to fly us away from our other-
wise dreary existence on this
dim vast vale of tears to a more
incandescent, celestial universe.
IF THERE are no conspira-
cies around to prove the prin-
ciple that people and things are
just no damn good, why we can
go into transcendental medita-
tion 20th century style on
a spaceship at the speed of
light.
Just to sit there glumly a la
Steinberg seems too existential
for most Americans, who are
after all more in tune with Wil-
liam James than Albert Camus,
even if they don't know it.
Americans are too pragmatic
to be in awe of philosophies of
seemingly inutile being. If you
can't move at the speed of hght
(at least), if you're just going to
sit there pondering the pur-
poselessness of it all, why you
may very likely wind up a con-
spiratorial suspect yourself.
It's downright imAmerican
not to toe suspicious of inertia;
it is even more unAmertcan
than to be inert.
BART OF all this malaise. I
suspect, may have to do with
the 2,000-year cycle, which
many Theosophists and Chris-
tians anticipate will bring the
second coming of the Messiah.
Since the first coming 2.00J
years age Jailed in its grand'dj.
sign bee*.m. we poor Jews Jus,
wouldnt get the message, now!
there is a new opportunity for!
all of u.' just around the' cor- *
Alph-
In Jutt 25 years from now
we have a second chance
That's what the furiously re-
newed missionary activity di.
rected ai us is .til about, in case
it hasn't i-truck you.
THE CHRISTIAN world
doesn't want the Messiah muf-
fed again, and it has been pre.
paring f<>: u< to understand this
a long time now.
But at .eact part of the 2,000-
ycar-cyck contingency are al-
ready depressed that they're
going to ft: the same treatment
from us again that they got the
first tirr.t ; round.
And already, they see a cgn-
spiracy in that.
Thost 20 UFO trainees lost
somewht.-t en the West Coast
are doubtlessly part of the most
advanceo phalanx of this outfit.
They've just chucked it all, ar-
guing tuft Shakespeare, "A
plague 00 both your houses."
WHAT GETS me about all
this is thr-i there is so much
passion attending the cock-a-
mamey conspiracy and so much
boredom by contrast surround-
ing the real thing.
Did you ever see so much
measured reserve and even
good-natured patience on the
part of our congressmen V
they uncover the statements
and actions of the CIA-FBI
Continued on Page 9
Assassins Raise Major Questions
By MAX LERNER
Los Angeles Times Syndicate
LONDONIf President Ford's
two would-be assassins had
carried out their mission how
much difference aside from
the human element would it
have made politically?
In New York or Washington
the big question is whether
Presidents should campaign and
shake every extended hand or
stay in the safety of TV. View-
ing the United States from the
perspective of Europe the strik-
ing fact is not only that Presi-
dents get shot at, but that it
makes a global difference.
IN EUROPE it is only a few
towering figures who make a
difference, and then only if
their country is between the
claws of the crab.
Thus it would make Hole
difference for Italy if the target
were Prime Minister Aldo
More: The Italian game of mu-
sical chairs would go on, and
the political problem of govern-
ment with heavy. Communist
membership would remain.
If the target were Harold
Wilson (vote that in Britain the
prime ministers- don't get shot)
either Denis Healy or James
Caliaghan would step into his
place until the next general
election, and the Tories would
have a more redoubtable fig-
ure to beat.
THE TWO old met) of Eurqpe
are Franco and Tito. Both have
overstayed their time and oau't
be cured of their age. But each
has been a great symbolic fig-
ure in his nation's history.
Franco will have to go soon,
but if he were the target now
the succession would be blood-
ier than otherwise.
Tito has more time, but if he
were a present target the eth-
nic and nationalist divisions of
Yugoslavia would be more dan-
LERNER
gerous than if he goes by choice
or dies in bed.
Of the other East European
governments, only President
Nicolae Ceausescu of Rumania
would make a great difference,
since it is his nationalist vision
and his skill of maneuver that
keeps his people from being
eaten wholly by the Soviet wolf.
AS FOR Brezhnev, Be will
fiave to go sooner rather than
later, and another gray bureau-
craft wiH replace him.
Soviet dictators don't often
get shot at, although Lenin did,
but the violence they succumb
to is the lethal internal struggle
for power. Brezhnev is adopt at
it, but he is also all but worn
out by it.
Germany is the strongest na-
tion in Western Europe, a/id
Helmut Schmidt has been a good
chancellor. But if he were a
target, Willy Brandt who
stepped aside for him could
step back.
THE STAJOK for stability
are higher in France. With all
his economic troubles, France's
President Giscard d'Esteing has
proved a supple leader. If he
were a target it would be herd
to deny the long-sought prize
of the presidency to Francois
Mitterand and his Socialist-
Communist alliance.
No or* ci.a say now whether
such a regime would open new
roads for Europe especially
Italy stj^ Spain or prove a
pilgrimage to nowhere.
The American case differs
from all fhefe, because the im-
portance of an assassination at-
tempt on a President turns less
on the stature of the targe
than on the fact of the violence.
I PASS over the complex in-
ternal political impact of the
atempts against Ford ii they
had succeeded. It is an unsav-
ory subject and happily not rel-
evant. But the impact on the
world wouid be great because
everything violent that happens
in America has world repercus-
sions.
Until trese episodes one of
the traits of the Ford regime
seemed to be that it had refus-
ed some of the social tensions
and the Violence that went with
them. The death attempts show
how limited such calculations
are, even with a President like
Ford who is the least polariz-
ing one since Eisenhower.
The world is concerned abo^t
violence in America. This is
true ever, in countries whose
violence levels are higher than
the American. This way of look-
ing at America, however, un-
just, makes some sense.
THE BC0NOMIC and politic-
al roof tree* of the world are not
strong. America is not then'
carpenter but willy-nilly Amer-
ica has had to carry a good part
of their weight.
When violence in America
reaches some of its major fig-
ures, as it did with the Ken-
nedys, Dr. King, George Wal-
lace, and as it almost did twice
with Gerald Ford, the world
wonders whether the shoulder*
are strong and stable enough J^
to sustain the burden.
en. -J


The Jewish Vlondiar. and Shofar of Hollywood
Pae 5
? Ask Abe ?
by ABE HALPERN
>
QLESTKIN: When and un-
der what circumstances did the
Synagogue originate? Why?
GEORGE PALEY
Hailandale. I la.
ANSWER: Synagogue is a
word derived from the Greek,
meaning assembly. It is the
word used in the English lan-
guage to designate a building
used for Jewish public prayer.
In the United States some of
these buildings are designated
by the word Temple, usually
followed by a Hebrew name,
such as Temple-- Beth Shajom
(House of Peaces or Temple
Beth El (House of God) etc
The Yiddish name for such a
building is Shu I. sometimes
pronounced Shiel.
The Hebrew designation for
such a building is threefold:
Beth Ha'Kneset (House of As-
sembly), Beth Ha'Tfilah (House
of Prayer) and Beth Ha'Mid-
rash (House of Study). In the
small "shetlach" (villages) of
Eastern Europe there was usu-
ally only one Synagogue and it
served all three purposes.
According to the authorita-
tive Encyclopaedia Ji'daica, the
Synagogue, as an institution in
Judaism, is considered.-equal in
importance with the empte in
Jerusalem.
The exact tixne and piace of
the origin of the Synagogue is
not known. Although prayer
was an integral part of the- sac-
rificial service, in the Temple,
there is no record of the exist-
ence of special Prayer Houses
during tb time of the First
Temple.
Many scholars believe the
Synagogue developed during
the Babylonian captivity. Fol-
lowing the destruction of the
First Temple by NobuchadneE-
zar in 586 b.c.e., the exiles
found an institution for prayer
and instruction alrady in ex-
istence in Babylonia. The firat
Babylonian exile* (897 b.c.e.)
seemed to have, set up places
for public worship and exposi-
tion of the Scriptures- on Sab-
baths and Festivals
In the Prophetic Book of
Kzekiel, the. third: of the ma-
jor prophets said tu have been
deported to Babylonia in 597
b.c.e.. then is the following
passage: "Thus saith the Lord
God: Although I have removed
them far off among the nations,
and although I have- scattered
them among the countries, yet
have I been to them as a little
sanctuary in the countries
where they are came" (Ezekial
11:16) The key Hebrew words
in the text are "L'tmfcdash M*-
at."
In the Soncioo publication of
the Book of Ezekiel (Page 60),
there is the following commen-
tary to the reference "as the
little sanctuary":
"To the humiliating allega-
tion of the inhabitants of Jeru-
salem that the exiles, being far
removed from the Temple, for-
feited the Fatherhood and pro-
tection of God, comes the Di-
vine retort that they still pre-
serve their relationship to Him
by means of their Houses of
Worship and Houses of Learn-
ing, each of them serving the
purpose of a miniature Temple
in which the spirit of God was
present. (Meg. 29 a) The Syn-
agogue is even now called a
little sfinctuary in allusion to
this verse."
Following the Babylonian
Exile, the Synagogue expand-
ed both in Eretz Yisroel and
the Diaspora. After the destruc-
tion of the Second Temple by
the Romans in the year 70 ce.,
the Synagogue continued to
flourish and became the spirit-
ual fortress of the Jewish peo-
ple.
"Many of the customs and ri-
tuals of the Temple were de-
liberately and consciously tran-
sferred to the Synagogue, and
on the other hand, some of
these rituals were forbidden
just for the reason that they
belonged to the Temple and the
Temple only. Prayer was-- re-
garded as the substitute for
sacrifice, and it was no accident
that the word- 'avodah' refer-
ring to. the sacrificial system
was now applied to prayer
which was: the, Avodah of the
heart.' The service function^
and lunctiomu'ies of the Syne
gogui; have remained remark-
ably consistent throughout the
2.500 years of its history." (En-
cyclopaedia. Judaica Vol. 15,
P. 585) (Emphasismine AJJ.H.)
The central feature of the
Synagogue is the Ark, usually
on the Bast Wall (oriented to-
ward Jerusalem and the Tem-
ple Mount). The Ark contains
the. ScroMs of the Tomb. One
Scroll is taken out on Sabbaths
and Festivals for the purpose
of reading a portion aloud. The
Torah is also read during the
Saturday afternoon prayers and
on Monday and Thursday dur-
ing the morning prayers. In
front of? the Ark there is a "Net
Tamid;" the perpetual light,
reminiscent as the lights kin-
dled by thu priests in the se-
ven-brancheu candelabrum in
thu Temple.
It is interesting to note that
Tulmudic sagos stated that one
of tbe reasons for the esteem
in which tbe Rabbis held the
Synagogue was its central rate
in holding the community to-
gether, and in perpetuating the
Jewish People. Talmudic homi-
lies by tbe score are aimed at
encouraging attendance at the
Synagogue.
Editor's note:
Pleas* send all questions to
??ASK ABE??
c/'o Jewish Federation of
South Broward
2838 Hollywod Boulevard
Hollywood, Florida 33020
U.S. Ships
Will Test
Suez Deal
TEL AVIV (JTA) Th
American President Lines of
San Francisco a major
American shiooin company, is
about to inaugurate container
service from the U.S. to the
Far East via ths Suez Canal
which will include calls at the
Israeli port* of Haifa and Ash-
dod in both dii-ectinns. shipping
circles report in Haifa.
According to the circles, the
company is waiting for the first
Israeln careoe* to -viss through
the Sue Canal before nutting
its schedule into effect. Repre-
sentatives of the line visited Is-
rael recently to appoint local
agents.
THEY ALSO met with nort
authorities and with officials of
the Zim Lines: Israel's national
shipping company.
The rreu service would- ad*
another major line to.the roster
of> shipping companies serving
Israeli port* and- would' consti-
tute a political benefit arising
from the recently signed'Sinai
accord with ligypt.
But- Zim. Lines* circle* have-
expressed: fear that the APU
would become a serious- com-
petitor, inasmuch as- it- would
be carrying Israeli cargoes-
through the Suez- Canal while
Zim shi'Wj firing the Israeli
flag, would have, to liave their
canvas trausshionud overland
between the Mediterranean and
Kilat.
THE NEW American service
mnv also contribute to the de-
cline of the nort of Eilat which
has suffered a drop in business
since the Suez Canal was re-
opened last June.
The American President
Lines, founded io the 1920s as
the Dollar Steamship Lines, has
been serving Egyptian ports for
more than 50 years on a west-
about round-the-world service
but naver called at Israeli ports.
Rummage
Sale
The woman's B'nai B'rith of
Ililie-rest will hold a rummage
sale on Sunday, Nov. 2 at the
American Legion Post 92, 211
N. 21 Ave. Saleable ladies' and
man's clothing, household
items, bria-brac, old jewelry,
and volunteers for pick-ups of
merchandise are needed for
this one-day-only sale.
Proceeds go to B'nai B'rith
agencies. Interested persons
may call Bea Candell or Edna
Goldstein.
Keep your Loved Ones
at home during illness
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INC
Peed, McConnell To Chair
1975 United Way Program
Billy M. Peed of Eaton, Peed,
Kmidsen & Hughes. Certified
Public Accountants, and A. Y.
McConn;ll, district manager c.
Southern Bell, have been ap-
pointed vice chairmen of the
1976 United Way Campaign.
Announcements of their ap-
pointments were made by Lar-
ry Adams, campaign chairman
Peed is vice chairman for
the professional division of the
campaign, and McConnell, vice
chairman for small businesses.
Both will be working with the
mayors of Broward's- 29 muni-
cipalities and County Commis-
sion Chairman J. W. Stevens.
McConnel. a Plantation resi-
Biily M. Peed A. Y. McConnell
dent, is a member of the execu-
tive board of the National Safe-
ty Council and the board of di-
rectors of the Fort Lauderdale
Downtown Business- Council.
Musical *Eve"-ning At Betfe Shalom
Mrs. Barry- Portnoy, presi-
dent, has- announced that the
Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Shalom will hold its next gen-
eral! meeting an Monday, Nov.
3, in the grand ballroom of the
temple at' 8:00 p.m. Members
and guests are invited1 to at-
tend.
TMo meeting will be followed
by a musical presentation en-
titled "It Started With Bve," *
light, carefree production star*
ring- a cast and chorus of Sis-
terhood members, said Mrs.
Spencer Schoem, program vice
prosidenr. "It Started With
Eva" will- be produced and" di-
rected: by Mrs. Lewis Roloff.
co-produced by- Mrs. Alvin
Stein, with musical accompani-
ment- by Mrs. William Kowitt.
and scenic designs by Mrs.
Bradley Buschel.
Refreshments will be served
by the Hospitality committee
following the night's program.
The 1975 Israeli Chaseidic Festival, a musical review
featuring Israel's leading popular Biblical songs, is com-
ing to Miami Beach November I for one show at South
Convention Mall. The festival, returning to the U.S. for
the fourth year, is a musical export based on Israel's an-
nual Chassidic Song Festival The latter is a nationwide
competition held under the auspices of the president of
the State of Israel. Israel's top performers present their
songs, modern compositions set to Biblical verse. The
winning songs, judged by the audiences, are then pre-
pared and staged for the export theatre production. This
year's Israeli competition, in which, hundreds of songs
were entered, was performed in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and
Haifa. The two-hour extravaganza will feature solos and
choruses of ballads and rhythmic medleys on Biblical
themes, costumed and, for the first time, choreographed
to chassidic folklore. There will also be chassidic story-
telling. Tickets are available at the South Convention
Hall Box Office.
',


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, October 24, 1973
Federation Tells Story To Interested Residents
The Jewish Federation of Jewish residents. The purpose trating community programs
South Broward has conducted of these forums is to explain benefited by its efforts, to in-'
a series of educational forums
in the homes of many of its
the role of Federation, illus- terested area residents.
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Pictured in the home of Dr. and Mrs. Alex Fred Friedman, Dr. and Mrs. Steve
Buchwald are (left to right) Sam Meline, Schwartz.
Vice-President Federation, Mr. and Mrs.
Pictured in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Shel-
don Miller are the Millers, Mr. Henry
Weiss, cochairman. Metropolitan Division
for Federation; Sam
dent Federation.
Meline, vice presi-
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Friday, October 24, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 7
Prominent Pittsburgh Jewish Communal Leader Named
Chairman Of CJFs Task Force On Multiple Appeals
"Der Shirtz" In Production
Leonard H. Rudolph, prom-
inent Pittsburgh business and
Jewish communal leader, has
been appointed chairman of
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions and Welfare Funds' Task
Force on Multiple Appeals, it
was announced by Raymond
Epstein, president of the CJF.
The Task Force, cheated in
1973, is concerned with the
problems of multiple appeals
in behalf of Israel agencies and
institutions.
Under Mr. Rudolph, the Task
Force will carry forward its
responsibility in four key areas:
to serve as CJF liaison with
the U.S. Committee on Control
an 1 Authorization of Cam-
paigns, and through it with the
committee of the Jewish Agen-
cy and Government in Israel;
to help in assessing the extent
of multiple appeal problems
and in dealing most effectively
with them locally, nationally,
and internationally; to assist in
formulating an approved basis
for support of the capital needs
of Israeli universities; and to
recommend such policies and
guidelines for communities in
dealing with such fund raising
and financing efforts.
Mr. Rudolph, a former vice
president of the United Jewish
Federation of Greater Pitts-
burgh, is currently chairman of
its Social Planning and Budget-
ing Committee. In more than
a decade and-a-half of commu-
nity activities, he' has served
as well as the Federation's
campaign chairman, as treasur-
er of the Jewish Chronicle, and
on the boards of Montefiore
Ms. Trager To Chair Technion
National Women's Convention
i -
Hospital and the Squirrel Hill
Y.
President of McKnight De-
velopment Corp., Mr. Rudolph
is a member of the board of
Israel Bonds, the Joint Distri-
bution Committee, and Tech-
nion.
The CJF is the association of
central community organiza-
tions Federations, Welfare
Funds, Community Councils
serving 800 Jewish communi-
ties in the United States and
Canada. It aids these communi-
ties to mobilize maximum sup-
port for the UJA and othei
overseas agencies, as well as
for major national and local
services involving financing,
planning and operating health,
welfare, cultural, educational,
community relations, and other
programs benefitting all resi-
dents.
Mrs. Gerry Trager of Bridge-
port has been named national
convention chairman of the 1975
National Biennial Convention of
the Women's Division of the
American Technion Societv
which will be held in the Ameri-
cna Hotel, Bal Harbour. Oct.
26-29.
Announcement of Mrs. Trag-
e,-,i annoint"ient as convention
chairman was made by Mrs
Rose K. Herrmann, national
president of the Women's Di-
vision.
"The Women's Division of the
American Technion Society is
proud to share in the significant
work of the Technion. and con-
centrates its supportive efforts
on the dual responsibilities of
Student Scholarship and Med-
ical Engineering research,",
Mrs. Trager commented.
"Hundreds of Women's Divi-!
sion leaders and members from
across th* United States will be
joined by leaders of the
American Technion Society and
the Technion-Isracl Institute of
Technology, in Haifa during the
four-day convention." Mrs.
Trager said.
Each of the four days of
meetings and deliberations will,
have unique sienificanc*. be-
ginning Sunday, Oct. 26 with the,
Onening Plenary and concluding
Wednesday, Oct. 29 with a na-
tional board meeting and
brunch. I
Amos Horev, president of
Technion. will be guest of honor
at the opening banquet Sunday (
night.
The following day at a 20th
Anniversary Luncheon, Worn-,
en's Division delegates will be
joined by presidents of the
American Technion Society
past and present, as tribute is
paid to National Women's Divi-
sion Founder, Sarah Leffert and
all those women who have built
pfllt two decades,
the Women's Division during the
Tuesday will be highlighted
bv an installation luncheon at
which time Pearl Milch, chair-!
man of the Medical Engineering
Project will be honored. Carl Al- j
pert, executive vice chairman of
the board of governors of Tech-!
nion will be guest speaker.
The luncheon will be followed
by a Seminar on Youth and Edu-
cation in Israel, where delegates
will have the opportunity to hear
Shoshana Horev, First Lady ol
Technion and Technion Profes-
sor Brian Silver.
These festive events will be
in addition to the business at
hand: workshops on education,
program and public relations,
fundraising, medical engineer-
ing and membership and
growth.
Women's Division American
Technion Society Florida Re-
gional President Miriam Sirkin
is regional chairman. For fur-
ther information, please contact
the American Technion Society
Regional Office. 167 Lincoln Rd.,
Miami Beach.
COOK UP A
FREE TRIP TO
PUERTO RICO
send us your favorite recipe
using Sweet Unsalted
Mazola
Margarine
Contestants must b 18 years
or older.
Send recipe and proof of pur-
chase (green flag with words
'contains liquid corn oil' from
front panel) with your name,
address and phone number to:
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Box 012973, Miami 33101
MAZOLA CONTEST
SPECIAL CONTEST
FOR OUR READERS
The winner of our special
contest will win $100.00
and all entries will be elig-
ibly for the grand prize
a trio to Puerto Rico.
ENTER NOW!
NU-LIFE BODY SHOP
MAY I HAVC THE NEXT CUNTS'
COLLISION SPECIALISTS
INSURANCE WORK
SPECIALIZING IN QUALITY
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30 VEARS EXPERIENCE
2111 S.W. 59 TERR.
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I 989-6040
BEN BERMAN, Proprietor
The Delta Players are in full
production in preparation for
the gala 1975-76 premiere of
"Der Shirtz," Gilbert and Sul-
livan's "Pinafore" in Yiddish
by Mims Walowit. The cast will
feature 50 talented singers,
dancers and musicians.
The premiere, sponsored by
three Chapters of ORT, under
the leadership of Berry Sch-
wartz, Helen Mitnick, and Dor-
othy Fried, is scheduled for
November 23 at South Broward
High School. All proceeds are
being donated to Israel chari-
table projects.
Cast president George B.
Ticktin, reports that the calen-
dar for performances in De-
cember is almost filled due to
the many requests from Chap-
ters of ORT, Hadassah, Miz-
rachi, and B'nai B'rith. Dates
for performances in 1976 are
now being accepted.
Tickets may be obtained from
the Chapters and from the
Surfside Community Center.
.
Soviet Jewry Needs You
Persons wishing to volunteer to work on the various So-
viet Jewry committees such as Adopt-A-Family Program,
Prisoner of Conscience Campaign, Community Meetings, Let-
ter-Writing committees, legislative action, may call the Jew-
ish Federation of South Broward office.
From Holland America,with luxury.
the
Best Indies
One great ship, two great itineraries. s.s.Statendam,
10 and 11 days. From Miami Dec. through March
Our 10-day cruise offers an exotic
new sampling of Jamaica, Haiti, and
St. Thomas. Plus Mexico-balmy
Cozumel or...a trip to the storied
^Mayan ruins of Chichen Itza.
Or choose 11 days worth of tradi-
tional island delights: Curacao, La
Guaira, Grenada, Barbados, Marti-
nique, St. Thomas.
And there are no gratuities re-
quired. See your travel agent or mail
the coupon.
Cruise Rates tor 1975-76.
10 days, 4 ports, Friday departures. Dec.
12. Jan. 16, Feb. 6, Feb. 27, Mar. 19 $610 to
$1275.
11 days, 6 ports, Monday departures. Dec.
1, Jan. 5, 26, Feb. 16, Mar. 8 $665 to $1385.
You may never want to get off.
Holland
America
Cruises
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ir.-*"1

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[Holland America Cruises
Two Pennsylvania Plaza. New York. N Y. 10001
Tel. (212) 760-3880 or Toll-Free (800) 221-6657
Please send me information on Slatendam W.I. Cruises.
Name___
Address.
City-------
.Stale.
.Z,p.
My travel agent is.
Rates per person, double occupancy, subject to availability.
Minimum rates may not be available on all of the above listed sailings.
All ships registered in the Netherlands Antilles.
Film Festival at Sea.
Dec. 12th, s.s. State Adam
Your fellow passengers: Rock Hudson, Debbie Reynolds, June Allyson,
Donald O'Connor, Cornel Wilde, Ann Miller. Meet them all right on board,
see their movies in the Statendams comtortable theatre. Panel discussions
with the stars and a critic. A delightfully different cruise at no extra cost.
I -,*.-ivr- -jjj | ii, -,-, 11r. m>edl n -^v i ***m&N.
\


Fage 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, October 24, 1975
h>
^abfrtworl flags
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. Lioschitz ivauOi Robert J. Ori-,and
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
SYNOPoIS Or THE WEtKLY TOUAH PORTION
Vayera
Abraham welcomes the three angels into his tent.
"As he sat in the tent door in the heat of the day;
and he lifted up his eyes and looked, and, lo, three men
stoodu>ver against him" (Gen. 1&.1-2).
Vayera God appeared to Abraham as he sat at
the door of his tent in the heat of the day. Lifting up
his eye6. Abraham beheld three men (actually, angels
in? the- form of men). Abraham ran toward them, took
them into his tent, and treated them hospitably. One of
, the angels foretold that in a year Sarah would bear a
, son. The other angels went on to Sodom to destroy the
chy because of its wickedness; only Lot," Abraham's
righteous nephew, was to be saved. God revealed this
plan to Abraham, who pleaded that Sodom be saved, for
the sake of the righteous. perBsna.-living; in it. But it
turned out that Sodom could not be saved there were
not 10 righteous persons in the whole city. Lot was
saved, and lived in a cave. There his two daughters
bore him two sons: Benammi, or Ammon, and Moat* In
fulfillment of the angel's prophecy, Sarah bore a son,
who was named Isaac. When the lad grewup, God tested
Abraham's devotion by bidding him offer Isaac as a
sacrifice. Abraham prepared to carry out God's bidding}
at the.last moment, an angel intervened, and:Isaac was
saved. Abraham had passed the. hardest trial of all.
This recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted
and based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage.'
edited by P. Wollman-Tsamir, Si5. Publisher is Shengold, and
the volume is available at 27 William St., New York, N.Y.
10005. President of the society distributing the volume is
Joseph Schlang.
..
Question Box
By RABBI DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
Whr does Judaism forbid
a.Jew from marrying a per-
son who is not of the Jew-
ish faith?
Maimonrdes (Issue Biah, 12)
Jet ires this f-wn a statement
in the Bible (Deut. ~:3) where
the Israelites were forbidden
to consummate marriages with
other nations.
Various reasons are offered
for this, prohibition. The Sefer
Ha-Chiniioh (427) claims that
the children of such a marriage
would probably be brought up
without full conviction and
commitment to- Judaism because
one of the parents is not Jew-
ish.
Even for the Jewish mate
such a union could be confus-
ing because oni would be caught
in a dilemma of having to de-
cide between pleasing one's
partner or fntfUHng one's faith.
Generally speaking, such
commentaries indicate that
si'ch a union could. never be
completely fulfilled in a full
Bgnje of.the word. This is be-
cause marriage constitutes the
microcosm of' the, Jewish faith
community which ha* to be, vis-
a-vis itself and the Almighty, an
uncompromising and full devo-
tion.
The mixed union as such not
only robs the Jewish mate of his
fulfillment, but also short-
changes a non-Jewish mate.
A NEW POINT IN HiSTORY
The Arrival Of The 23
By RABBI ROBERT ORKAND
Temple Israel of Greater Miami
Charles sailed into the Hudson
R'rver around early September.
1654. a new point in history was
reached.- That vessel brought to
the shores of Dutch New Am-
sterdam the founders of the first
Jewish community in what is
now the United States. Twenty-
three Jews came ashore, refu-
gees from Recife. Brazil, follow-
ing that city's capture from the
Dutch by the Portuguese. Al
thoi^m individual Jewish set-
tlers had reached the "new
land"nearlier. the arrival of "the
23" marked the beginning of
organized'Jewish life in America.
It was to be misfortune and
hardship that met the 23 as they
set foot on North American
soil. Their resources depleted,
they were 1,600 guilders short
on the 2,500 guilders to which
thev had been forced to agree
to nay the capain and the crew.
Suit was immediately brought
agdinst them, the first actual
record of their presence in ttv?
Dutch colony. When the sale
of their belongings failed to
bring enough to satisfy the
judgment, two of their people
were held in civil arrest.
Two Jews who had arrived
earlier from Amsterdam, Solo-
mon Pietersen and Jacob Bar-
sinion, were unabie to help the
23 directly, but they managed
to get help from Amsterdam.
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
Synagogue Membership Enlarge* Our Lives
By RABBI SOLOMON WALDENBERO
Israelite Center Temple
We all know that we are constantly faced with issues, some
answerable and some insoluble.
The issue of the synagogue and the community is one of
the most troublesome. Synagogue leaders plead for membership
but we do not make a realistic effort to bring that about.
IN RECENT MONTHS I have been reading that one concern
of the synagogue is its inability to attract young families despite
expensive "gimmicks," such as the engagement of. prominent
newspapermen, politicians and consuls, or even ambassadors,
which are publicized with so much enthusiasm among the com-
munities. Prom a social point of view this method is workable,
but what about the religious approach and the educational bene-
fits of our traditional and liberal synagogues?
To rekindle the sparks of Judaism in die hearts of our people
it is, I believe, necessary to inform the public what the synagogue
is really for and what it has to offer its members socially, re-
ligiously and educationally. Let parent and child kno wthe facts-
Most of us do not stop to consider what our community-
would be like without a synagogue in our midst. There would be
no rabbi to instruct adults and children in the tradition of their
ancestors. There would be no spiritual leader to speak for them
in their relations with their neighbors in the community. There
would be no one to whom they could come for advice and help
in dealing with pressing problems. There would be no one to
whom they could come for information concerning their faith.
There would be no central Jewish gathering place to perpetuate
the Jewish heritage.
THIS IS THE historical background of the synagogue. Its
presence in a community is a perpetual reminder of the age-old
affirmation by the Jewish people of the ideals of their fathers,
contained in the Bible, the Talmud and literature of the centuries.
Therefore, the joining of a synagogue is unlike the joining of
any other institution in contemporary Jewish life. There are dis-
tinct and unique advantages to be gained in an act of affiliation
one shares in the common deathly of the Jewish people
One should not underestimate the importance of sharing matters
of Jewish importance.
The synagogue represents the Jews of our community.
The soafel message of the medem synagogue is the reiteration
of the ancient prophetic call for a better mode of human conduct
on earth.
^through a synagogue, one enjoys the growth and develop-
ment of one's family life. That development begins in the nursery
school where chikliwj of three and four years of age meet. At the
age of five, the child is introduced into the regular religious
srhool curriculum and he, or she, continues his courses through
Confirmation. By this process the young person is mstructed
in Hebrew. Israeli folk dances, arts and crafts, Jewish music, pray-
ers, history, literature, ceremonies and customs. At the age of
thirteen there is a Bar and Bat Mitzvah ceremony for boys and
girls.
One can improve his or her knowledge of Judaism and
Jewish Hfe when affiliated with a synagogue. Here the message
of the rabbi is invariably concerned with the broadening of Jew-
ish knowledge. This does not exclude consideration of the con-
temporai-y. world scene and its manifold problems. But we must
be aware that it does include to the greatest possible extent
the Jewish meaning and interpretation of the elements that make
up our existence. In addition to the pulpit discourses by the
rabbi, there are other avenues of adult Jewish education made
availabl to the synagogue members at frequent periods through-
out the year. There are the regular weekly adult evening courss
offered by outstanding scholars in the field of Hebrew, Bible and
general Judaica.
One makes new friends by becoming a member of a syn-
agogue. There, congregants meet neighbors whi have similar
needs and problems The rabbi serves as a ready rtference in time
of need, and answers questions about Jewish jfe and custom and
tradition.
A Jew worships in the tradition of his fathers when he
becomes a member of a synagogue. Here, the Sabbath festivals
and High Holydays become part of a living faith. As we sometimes
take our own homes for granted, so we take our synagogue for
granted. It is only wr.en we reflect on its ancient history, on its
capacity to serve ^ur spiritual needs, when we feel its presence in
joy and sorrow, when we understand its deep impact on out
personal life, when we s.-e how it gives us a sense of dignity and
stature ampng our neighbors, thai we begin to realize now poor
we would be without it.
THE ADVANTAGES of belonging to a synagogue can be see*
in the way it enlarges our individual lives, given us a center for
sharing with our neighbors the cultural, religious and social ele-
ments of our great heritage and serves as a home for our ideals
and imp in at
It is an investment in human relations and in the Jowish
faith which returns to us infinitely more than we put into it
Debt and the matter of survival
through the approaching winter
then faced the refugees. They
were made to feel unwelcome
by the Dutch Reformed Church,
but at least its leader authorized
the use of welfare funds to keep
the Jews from starving.
Lack of funds, however, was
only one of the problems of the
23 Jews in the new land. The
governor. Peter Stuvvesant. and
his council, didn't want them in
the colony at all and asked them
to leave. After all. Suiyvesant
said, they bad no passports and
hence no 'right" to stay. On
September 22. Stuyvesant wrote
the Amsterdam directors of the
Dutch West India comnany a sk-
in* for authority to deport the
Jews.
When Stuwesant's letter
reached the Netherlands, the
Jews of Amsterdam approaches
the Dutch West India Company
on behalf of the 23. Some ot the
Amsterdam Jews were share
were able to convince the other
were abue to convince the oth"r
directors, and on Feb. IS. 1655
the comnany directors '.'ranted
the Jews the right to settle and
trade in New Netherland. The
condition was made, and ac
copied, that the Jews had fn
take care of their own poor, a
condition that led to the es-
tablishment of one of the moat
successful philanthropic sys-
tems in the world
The arrival of mo'v T frn-n
Amsterdam in 165=; 'p < |
the resentment of tH >tinv
against the Jews. Many ol the
existing colonists l/v-.> t anon
the Jews as coTwitT-s for
whatever ODPO'tuniiHs isted
in the corn",'n-v. T*t > -'-ninent
Jewish-A*"*'" Jacob R. xnrnis. n-lS written:
"For ahovt twi Vjejtm Sttiy-
BaanM ?nrt hi garding the charter of February
1655, made every effort to sab-
otage its injunctions. Jews were
forbidden to trade with the In-
dians; they could buy no real
estate, hold no oubHc religiouv
services, engage in no retail
trade, nor march with the mili-
tia, but they were subject never-
theless to discriminatory taxa-
tion."
Despite all attempts to force
the earlv Jewish settlers from
the new land, the Jews persist-
ed. Finally, at the urging of
their fellow Jews in the colony,
the Jews of Amsterdam per-
suaded the Dutch West Indies
Company directors to send a
reprimand to Stuyvesant and an
order to allow the Jews to trade
at the conoly's outposts, to buy
real estate, to "quietly and
peacefully carry on their busi-
ness as heretofore," and, even,
to exercise their religion in the
privacy of their own homes.
From such humble beginnings
was to grow one of the largest
and most creative Jewish com-
munities in the world.
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
19 HESHVAN 6:25
m
j


riday, October 24, 1975
The Jewish Floridian oik1 thofar of Hollywood
Page ?
1st Dialogue For Inter-Faith Council- .
Hollywood Mayor Dvid R.
[Keating, honorary chairman of
[the [ntei -Faith Council of South
Isroward. announces the first
gn Town Hall Forum of the
eas-on presented by this group.
Th Forum will commemorate
Nations Bicentennial year
and strengthen the ideals of
brotherhood and religious free-
dom that have made this coun-
try so great,'" Mayor Keating
said.
The Forum will be held at
Temple Solel of Hollywood. 5100
Sheridan St.. at 7:30 p.m., Mon-
day, Nov. 3.
Speakers for the evening will
be: Reverend Bill Vassey, First
Presbyterian Church of Holly-
wood; Rabbi Robert Frazin,
"Temple Solel of Hollywood; and
Father Edward Moan, St. Ste-
phen's Catholic Church.
The topic of the Forum is:
"Understanuiiig Your Neigh-
bor" What is a Catholic?
What is a Protestant? What is
a Jew? Following the program,
the floor will be opon for ques-
tions and discussion.
The Inter-Faith Council is
comprised of representatives
from the Broward Ministerial
Association, the South Broward
Hoard of Rabbis, the Commu-
nity Relations Comiuitee of
Jewish Federation of South
Broward, the Archdiocese of
Browar-d. the Orthodox Church
of Broward.
Refreshments will be serv-
ed, an! the public is invited to
attend this first in a series of
cooperative Inter-Faith pro-
grams in South Broward.
EO MINDLIN
The Real Conspiracy Goes Unnoticed
Continued from Page 4-.
elitists determined to have us
five up our freedoms in or-
jer to preserve our freedom?
O how about the overwhelm-
lim congressional approval giv-
en to the 200 Sinai technicians
arrangement which disguises a
veritable Arab bazaar of secret
Kissinger intrigues and outright
lies about the role the U.S. will
be playing (or not playing, de-
pending upon your point of
view) in the Middle East dur-
ing the years ahead?
TALK ABOUT Kissinger con-
spiracies. This one boats his l.e
Due Tho performance hands
down and who cares?
Well, the 2.000-year cycle.
neither philosophically nor the-
ologically, moans a thing to me.
And there hasn't been a single
UFO on my own personal hori-
zon yet to whisk nic away into
transcendental star drive.
So Steinberg, move over.
FordOkarb
Harsh Reply
Continued from Page 1
Mvtol in thi New York Times 11
d scribe Amin.
Mitchell, who is also the rector of the Washington
bureau of the NAACP, remark-
ed three days later that a Iod.
war had been fought "again.-"
one kind of racism, inflicte I
upon the world by a dictate
who' exterminated millions cf
humans because they were not
members of what he called th
master race."
HE ADDED, ir we had been
less courteous with that dictate''
in the beginning, immense hu-
man suffering and loss woul
have been a%'oided."
Reporting Ford's belief
both statements "needed to be
s lid," Nessen added: "The Pre:-
ident feels that is about al: he
can contribute."
Alaskan Repudiates Islam Aid
Continued from Page 1
\\m : I have consistently sup-
rted the right of Israel to
bds and have cosponsored and
|up, id -tatements of policy toward
pis nd.
"FOR THESE reasons may I
ispactfully reuuest that you re-
am from distributing this
ni*ressional Record reprint in
meet ion with your activities."
On July 9, 1973, Sen. Gravel's
imarks supporting construction
the trans-Alaska pipeline K>
ase the nation's energy prob-
fem included reference to the
(unc 1 and June 8, 1973 issues
"Islamic Items," which tlic
Alaska Senator-described as cov-
ering "a variety of subjects re-
sting to business, finance. Mid-
lie Eastern oil and the Palestine
luestion, all of which should be
concent and interest to us."
Sen. Gravel Inserted articles
3m these issues into the Con-
fessional Record.
On July 26 and 27 of this
ear, however, a reprint of the
relevant page of the Congres-
sional Record of July 9, 1973.
with a large-type quotation of
Sen. Gravel's reference to the
newsletter superimposed as -an
endorsement, was distributed at
the Muslim International Bazaar
on the grounds of the Washing-
ton Monument together with
material from current issues of
"Islamic Items" that referred to
"The Jewish grip on the U.S.
government." among other ac-
cusations.
PHIL BAUM, associate execu-
tive director of the American
Jewish Congress, wrote to Sen.
Gravey on Aug. 19, calling to
his attention the use of his "name
as an alleged endorsement tof
"Islamic Items." Baum wrote:
"We know that you do not
subscribe to the crude anti-
Semitic tngotry that pervades
the 'Islamic Items.' We respect-
fully suggest that it would be
helpful if you would publicly
clarify your position in this re-
spect and repudiate this attempt
on the part of 'Islamic Items' to
exploit your name for purposes
Congressman Burke Supports
House Resolution 682
J Congressman J. Herbert
lurks (R-12th, Florida) in re-
tail s delivered on the House
foor Sept. 18, called on fellow
Bembers to support House Res-
lution 682, which he introduc-
d.
The resolution strongly dis-
approve* of threatening efforts
by some countries in the Unit-
fed Nations to supend or expel
(srae; front that body.
Congressman Burke told his
polleagues that the resolution
ilso calls for the upholding of
the underlying principles of the
U.N. charter which was to es-
tablish conditions under which
justice and respect for the obli-
gations arising from treaties
and other sources of interna-
tional law can be maintained,
and to practice tolerance to
live together in peace iwitf one
another as good neighbor*.
Congressman Burke was re-
cently appointed to serve as a
member of- the U.S. delegation
to the 30th General Assembly
which convened September 15.
that we believe you. like our-
selves, find totallv repugnant."
In a response to AJCongrcss
on Sept. 9. Sen. Gravel wrote:
"AS ONE who has consistent-
lv, through both word and ac-
tion, supported the cause of Is-
rael during my entire Senate
service. I regret *o find there
are those apparently attempting
to "give an erroneous impression
concerning my views on the po-
litical situation in the Middle
East.
"In order to correct the situ-
ation. I have sent the attached
"letter to Mr. Muhammad Tahir
requesting that he refrain from
using my name in this context
In the future.
"I appreciate your bringing
this matter to my attention."
NCJW Meets On Nov. 18
A special brunch to honor
NCJW's new national president.
Esther Landa will be hosted by
the Hollywood Section of Na-
tional Council of Jewish Wom-
en or. November 18.
This is the first time a na-
tional president has visited the
Hollywood area. The brunch
will be held at the Holiday Inn,
4050 S. Ocean Drive at 11:30
a.m.
Council members are urged
to indicate support for Council
by attending. Information and
reservations ma ybe obtained
by contacting Sylvia Giles and
Ethel Sklar.
Danger Jews
Of Poland May
Be Disappearing
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Jewish community
in Poland, once one of the most vital in the world, is on
the brink of disappearance.
"It is like a graveyard of Jewish life," said Arthur
Brodie, of New Jersey, leader of a United Jewish Ap-
peal Study Mission that arrived here after visitme
Poland.
They are joining a larger group that came to Israel
directly from the U.S. for this year's annual UJA study
mission.
THE MISSION members said they found the 3,500-
odd Jews still living in Poland to be in a permanent
state of depression and hopelessness.
They saw only elderly Jews and very few cf
themin synagogues in Warsaw, Byalistok and Cracow.
The Polish Jews themselves believe that within a
comparatively short time, Polish Jewry will no longer
exist, the visitors said.
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4


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, October 24, 197^
Youth Aliyah 41 Years Old
The Hollywood Chapter of
Hadassah will celebrate the
41st anniversary of YOUTH
ALIYAH on Nov. 24, at the
Marco Polo Hotel in Miami
Beach. Since its inception in
1934 under the directorship of
Henrietta Szold, over 150,000
children have been rescued and
rehabilitated in Israel. Hadas-
sah has contributed over 72
million dollars to help maintain
the 270 childrens' villages and
all day centers.
Seated on the dais will be
Youth Aliyah chairman, Miss
Ruth Grayber; Hollywood Chap-
ter president, Mrs. Archie
Kamer; Program chairman,
Mrs. Ethel Schwartz; Chapter
Fund Raising vice president,
Mrs. William Schulman; and
guest speaker, Mrs. William K.
Dorfman, National Fund Rais-
ing coordinator from New York.
The Hollywood Chapter,
which began with a single
grou of 25 members, now has
ten Groups, comprising over
2,000 members. The Groups
are: Beach Group, Mrs. Harry
Simons, Youth Aliyah chair-
man; Golda Meir Group, Mrs.
David Kern, chairman; Hall-
mark, Mrs. Morris Prusansky;
H'Atid, Mrs. Sol Pelish; Hen-
rietta Szold, Mrs. Joseph Gold-
Religious
Services
HALUNDAIE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
(Conservative). 416 NE 8th An
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz, Canto*
Jacob Danztoer.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
INAI (Temple) of NORTH DADI
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Klngaley, Cantor Irvine
Shulke*.
NORTH BROWARO
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. Reform. 4721 N.W.
100th Ave. Itabbi Max WelU. 44
TAMARAC JEWI8H CENTER, 87M
N.W. 57th St., (Conaervative) Rab-
bi Milton J. Groae.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE
GATION. 400 South Nob Hill Road,
Plantation. Rabbi Arthur Abnam.
Friday 8 n.m.
HOLLYWOOD
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
(Orthodox). S891 Sterling Rd. op.
Soaite Hollywood Hills High School
resident Or. Pranx Stein.
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1*81 8
14th Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffe. Aaaistant Rabbi Harvey M.
Roaanfeld.
Friday, 7:45 p.m.. Consecration and
Simchas Torah services, with nn-m-
bera of the Youth Group and Chil-
dren's Choir participating; special
blessing for the first grade and new
students. Saturday, 10:30 a.m., Yiikor
Mem..rial prayers.
ETH SHALOM (Tempt*) Conaerva.
tlva. 4601 Arthur at. Rabbi Mortor
Malavaky, Cantor trying Gold.
------------a
TEMPLE BETH AHM (Conservative)
810 SW 82nd Ave- Hollywood.
TEMPLE SINAI (Conservative). 120\
Johnson St Rabbi David Shaolro,
Associate Rabbi Chsim S. Listfield.
Cantor vatMioa Hallbraur.
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal). 6100 Sher-
idan St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Robert
Frazin. 41-C
MIRAMAI
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Conservative)
8*20 SW 3Mh St. Rsd.I Avrom
Drazln.
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES (Conaerva.
tlve) 1900 N. University Dr., Pern-
broke Pine*. Rabbi Sidney Lubin.
BETH SHALOM
DAY SCHOOL
A Unique Private School
601 Arthur Street-966-2200
INfORMATION ON THE
FOLLOWING CLASSES:
KINDERGARTEN
(Waiting List Only)
FIRST GRADE
(Waiting Llat Only)
SECOND GRADE
SPACE AVAILABLE
THIRD GRADE
SPACE AVAILABLE
FOURTH GRADE
SPACE AVAILABLE
The program consists of very
high standard education, He-
braic, Judaic and General.
Special enrichment programs
phys. ed. science music
- art.
stein; Hillcrest, Mrs. Louis Ja-
cobs; Mt. Scopus, Mrs. Lillian
Harris; Sabra, Mrs. Thea Mil-
lerman; Shalom, Mrs. Irving
Davidoff; Tel Chai, Mrs. Gilbert
Aren. The Publicity chairman
is Mrs. Louis Jacobs.
A pledge of "CHAI" will en-
title a member to receive a
Hollywood Chapter Youth
Aliyah Pin.
The entertainment will be
furnished by Lydia King, lyric
soprano, star of Broadway, op-
era, concerts, television and
recordings.
Letter To The Editor
EDITOR, Floridian-Shofar
I am in receipt of a copy of
your "highlights of recent
news" dated September 30 and
the first item covers United
States aid to Israel by Frank R.
Lautenberg, general chairman.
It seems to me that this is
probably the most important
item as it definitely answers
the confusion caused by the
talk and publicity of a $2.3 bil-
lion in United States foreign
aid to Israel, with Jewish giv-
ing.
As you pointed out, this
United States aid is for military
arms for protection in the case
of war and as a deterrent. It
will be spent in the United
States. It does not pay for im-
migration, housing, schools, etc.
as they are our own responsi-
bilities.
There is no doubt in my
mind that these items will be
constantly featured at the many
meetings to be held in connec-
tion with the U.J.A. campaigns
but there are too many people
who won't be reached and they
should be informed by other
methods.
SAM J. PERRY
Yours truly,
President Emeritus
Zionist Organization
of America
"Poor Cousins" Tells Story
Of European Jews
Shirley Cole will review the
book "Poor Cousins" by Ande
Manners in celebration of Jew-
ish Book Month at the Nov. 11
buffet luncheon meeting of the
Temple Beth El Sisterhood, at
noon in the Tobin Auditorium
of the temple, 1351 S. 14th Ave.,
Hollywood.
The answer to "Our Crowd,"
"Poor Cousins" is the remark-
able story, rich in insight and
humor, of the history of the
Eastern European Jews who
migrated to America.
Mrs. Cole, who has resided
in the South Broward area for
the past few years, is a mem-
ber of Sisterhood and is well-
known in the area for her pro-
fessional one-woman shows. A
native of Wilkes Barre, Pa., she
is a graduate of Temple Uni-
versity, Philadelphia, and has
had extensive drama and the-
ater experience.
Reservations for the lunch-
eon may be made with Anna
Wolfe or Belle Green .
Aquarius Cancer Unit To Meet
A meeting of the newly-or-
ganized Aquarius Cancer Unjt
of Hollywood will take place
on Monday, Oct. 27 in the Cas-
cade Room at 1:00 p.m.
After a brief business meet-
ing, there will be an enlighten-
ing program featuring Natalie
Greenfield founder of "Weight
Watchers of Greater Miami,"
and presently codirector. Ms.
Greenfield has appeared on TV
and has lectured on radio as
well as in classes in the area.
An invitation to attend the
meeting is extended to all wom-
en residing in the Aquarius
buildings and to those women
residing in the immediate area
adjacent to the Aquarius.
Further details may be ob-
tained from program vice pres-
ident Mrs. Lewis (Ann) Cohn.
Bar Mitzvah
SHARON SINGER
Sharon, daughter of Dr. and
Mrs. Saul Singer will be Bat
Mitzvah Friday, Nov. 7, at Tem-
ple Sinai.
-fr -fr it
RICK BERNSTEIN
Rick, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Harvey Bernstein, will be Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, Oct. 25, at
Temple Solel.
a- & &
DAVID BODISHER
David, son of Mrs. Sandra
Bodisher will be Bar Mitzvah
Saturday, Nov. 1, at Temple
Solel.
& "fr -fr
RICKY WEINSTEIN
Ricky, son of Sally Bailey
will be Bar Mitzvah Saturday,
Oct. 25, at Temple Beth El.
fr H &
KEITH NEWMAN
Keith, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Ronald Newman will be Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, Nov. 1, at
Temple Beth El.
THANKSGIVING WEEKEND IN NEW YORK!
Wednesday, Nov. 26 thru Sunday, Nov. 30
5 DAYS 4 NIGHTS De Luxe Accommodations at the
HOTEL WARWICK 54th Street at 6th Avenue
AVENTURA TRAVEL
Only $184.73 per person, double occupancy
Includes round trip via EASTERN AIRLINES .. Transfer to
Hotel and back to Airport
(Price does not include Meals, Tax, Gratuities)
Based on Group of 40 People
CALL 932-2908
for Information Regarding Thanksgiving Dinner!
i- u
community
coienoor
*
OCTOBER 27
National Council of Jewish Women Board Meeting
Home Federal Building, Hallandale 10 a.m.
OCTOBER 28
Hollywood Chapter of Hadassah Home Federal Buil
ing, Hollywood Board Meeting 10 a.m.
Shalom Group of Hollywood Hadassah Reef Restaurant,
2700 S. Andrews Ave., Ft. Lauderdale Fourth An-
nual Hadassah Medical Organization Luncheon 12
noon
Hollywood Chapter of Hadassah Home Federal Build-
ing, Hollywood Book Review "Scrolls of the Dead
Sea" by M. Paldiel, 1 p.m.
NOVEMBER 1
Hillel Community Day School Diplomat Hotel 6th
Annual Scholarship Dinner Dance 8 p.m.
Aviva Chapter B'nai B'rith Howard Johnson, Holly-
wood Spook Ball Dinner Dance 8:30 p.m.
NOVEMBER 3
National Council of Jewish Women Temple Sinai
Meeting 12 noon
Temple Beth Shalom Sisterhood Temple Ballroom
General Meeting 8 p.m.
NOVEMBER S
Temple Beth El Brotherhood Special Golfers Day
Hollywood Lakes Country Club, 14800 Hollywood
Blvd. 9:00 a.m.
Temple Beth Shalom Sisterhood Temple Ballroom
Library Fund Luncheon 11:30 a.m.
or-
phi
New Aquarius Lodge Is Official
The David Ben Gurion Lodge,
a new lodge at the Aquarius
building, was presented with a
provisional charter by the Di-
rector of New Lodges of B'nai
B'rith, Jack Glick.
Accepting the charter before
a crowd of over 150 people was
president Abe Cohen. A presen-
tation was also made to the
Golda Meir Group of Hadassah.
The first Installation Dinner-
Dance will be held at the Diplo-
mat Hotel on November 23, ac-
cording to David M. Blumberg,
International president of B'nai
B'rith.
BAR MITZVAHS WEDDINGS
STUDIO OF HOLLYWOOD HILLS
PHOTOGRAPHY
624-2052-983-1200 4512 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
INTERNATIONALLY KNOWN ARTIST
Willing to sacrifice PAINTINGS AND GRAPHICS at
Auctions, Benefits, Private Sales, etc. with objective to
raise funds to finance research in Vad Vashem for
Present Paintings on the Holocaust.
TONY KECK
C/0 the Hideaway, 411 S. Ocean Drive, Hollywood
All Inquiries and Help Greatly Appreciated
DO YOU
KNOW?
IS AVAILABLE FOR
BANQUETS & WEDDII
* BAR MITZVAHS CARD PARTIES
RELIGIOUS RETREATS BUSINESS SEMINARS
* TOURNAMENTS OUTINGS
tj*t superb FOOD in
Private Country Club Atmosphen
FROM $195
14800 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Fl. 33126.
PHONE
981-8800
*\


[Cor/ I
K
f
rf
& Naval Vessel In
Aition Against Arabs
Haifa
I.ARMED BY reports of Arab terrorist ac-
tivity, :Iic U.S. State Department ordered
U.S. Navy to take appropriate action, and
,1 result a unit of the Mediterranean fleet
into port hare. An armed force came
ire. saw to it that the terrorists were ap-
eii'led and imprisoned, and provided anns
;i nmunition to tire peaceful citizenry,
rhu above is no fanciful prediction of
|nt might happen, but a factual account of
at diJ happen here in the year 1854. 1 have
jn> possession copies of the U.S. Noval docn-
hts, extracts from the ship's log of the task
^. vessel and other authenticating material.
NEWS THAT Bedouin marauders were
iriri-ing American citizens who were perma-
rle resident in Palestine led to this historic
i>f "armed intervention."
On June 3. 1854, the U.S. war vesse!.
It.e';:nt, dropped anchor in Jaffa harbor.
|a task force came ashore. The offending
were located, hailed before a Turkish
and imprisoned.
Ihe American commander told the au-
lii.-s lus would bold them responsible if
were any further repetition of the ter-
m, and he premised to pay return visits
Iv of Felix Frankfurter:
risl, Jew and Zionist
U THE Diaries of Felix Frankfurter,"
^ith i, biographical essay and notes by
l_8. Lash (New York, W. W. Norton and
-..SO. 366 pages) is a most important
"anMurter's reputation as a legal giant,
xl law professor and iust< of rV P
I Court overshadows his role over many
(is a Zionist and as a Jew concerned with
e of his co-religionists.
Viennese prodigy was born 1882 and
It to America by his parents in 1894.
leaded in the lower East 5ide ot i*wW
WAS educated in the public .schools
\y College. He attended Harvard, and
his classmates was Morris Raphael
the noted philosopher, rrnnkia.i.. a
^s a student of the law was recognized
graduation.
BUS HE was known as a Jew, and he
ended that he was a Jew. he left the
Me when he was 15 and was complele-
tbservant.
pevcr, when he personally made the
taunts for his funeral, he stated to Gar-
pin that he wanted Prof. Louis Henkin,
ns secretaries when he served on the
fo be the last of those who were to
fceause. "he is my only close personal
who is also a practicing Orthodox Jew.
three or four times a year to make sure the
peace was kept.
IN HIS ship's log, Capt. Turner recorded
further details: "The vicinities of both Jaffa
and Jerusaiem are visited now and then by
small bands of Bedouins from the desert, who
make inroads sometimes to the walls of the
cities, stealing and plundering whatever comes
in their way.
"One o.' the Ameriean families living about
four miles from Jaffa expressed apprehension
of an attack from them, and begged that I
would eupply them with some means of de-
fense. I without hesitation sent them a few
Halls' Carbines with the necessary ammuni-
ti'.n which, with what they have, will be enough
to keep off the Bedouins w'io come in very'
small numbers and are very great cowards ."
FURTHER CONFIRMATION of the inci
dent was reported by Warder Cresson. nn
American convert to Judaism, who wrote of
the visit in 'The Occident." an American Jew-
ish peribthxal published in Philadelphia.
Crr-sson was pleased with the help which,
he said, "rendered a most signal service and
'benyflt "to 'Hie American party located near
Jaffa, who hail been disturbed and driven off
their settlement two or three times."
*Z)cymofr ^/).
xu
man
He knows Hebrew perfectly and will know
exactly what to say ... I think that it is fitting
that I .should kave as a .lew."
HENKIN RECITED the Kaddish at the fu-
neral.
Frankfurter's character was complex. He
wanted to be accepted:by the WASPs and asse-
ciate witli them bat on his terms as a Jew.
He served as assistant to Secretary of -\Vai
Baker during World War 1. One of the-Impor-
tant assignments was to accompany the formei
Ambassador to Turkey Henry Morgenthau, Sr..
to Egypt and Palestine.
Morgenthau was an anti-Zionist, and
frankfurter was chosen deliberately because
of bis known Zionist activities.
FRANKFURTER ADMITTED to being an
intellectual snob. He knew that, as a Jew, ik
had to perform better than others. He attended
the 191 > Pa.is Peace Conference at the request
of Judges Brandefe ami Mack. Prince Faisal
wrote l:k> r"a*i(us letter ot .March 31, 1919. to
FranlTu. ter
Then in, Faisal endorsed the Balfour Dec-
laration and the proposals submitted by the
/'nist Organization ... as moderate and
proper:"
Frankfurter left organized Zionism in
1921 when the Zionist convention selected
Ij.. Weinman's leaUo*sllip rather tiian that of
Brsnd-is and Mack.
filics'-Tiie
(iloom Rises
HO YOU know what a nuclear-powered cruiser is? Could >
say whether such a b.ittle wagon has arry relationship to
"counter-cyclical assistance" for America's cities?
Dont let these mind-blowing terms frighten you. Thong it
of calmly and digested slowly, they might heln you understar. i
something about the mseds of national security as played of'
against the Heeds of ewr mar-bankrupt cities where so mar*
people reading these lines live.
FOR WHILE the mayors of s-veral of our Urge cities easts
begging the federal government for monev a lew weeks ago
President Ford was trying to get an appropriation for that b*.
nuclear-powered ship.
The mayors wanted S2 billion in countercyclical assistance
that Is. money to battle the effect of cycles in the economy o -
people trying to survive in New York. Detioit. Newark, en;
many other cilies where unemployment runs at 7 or 8 percent'..
or perhaps higher.
In the same season, the President was attempting to e-
pand a S25 billion militarv procurement bill to accommoda*:
SL2 billion for that nuclear-powered cruiser.
GUNS AND BUTTER .--gain. Lyndon Johnson had the prer
lem when he tried to get the costly war in Vietnam finance:
while hesitating to put a bigger, unpopular tax bite on Ml
people.
Mayor Henry W. Shier, of Milwaukee, in urging his fello
mayors at the 43rd annual convention of the U.S. Conference
of Mayors in July to go along on a resolution calling for a CU2
in military expenditures, reminded the heads of cities that "yu
can't eat a gun: you can't live in a helicopter."
All this was taking place while New York was being bcandeo
"Fear City" and "Stink City" with 28,00(1 tons of garbage piliiu-
up each day and a sore need indicated for permission to flo"
a huge bond issue so that thousands of municipal employe:
could be paid and city services resumed.
OH YES, the power of unions representing suiit uion work
ers and police, firemen, and other government functionaries i-
awesome: pensions ai shooting as high as skvscrapers: th-.
temptation to strike and tie the cities into near-panic is alarming
And the cities have other friahtening factors to conten-
with: tax bases are shrinking as key business houses move out
property is deteriorating, people remaining in the cities hava
small incomes.
IN AMERICA'S, lasgc cities, the consumers and mass trans',
riders are banged again-t the high prices Inherent in an ir-
flationary swing, yet stranded on the shoals of nnomploymetv
identified with recession
And the people in this bind are no longer only the million-
labeled "low-income" ht also those other millions the statisti-
cians and sociologists have long spoken of as "middle-income.*
It may even be concluded that middle income people have
been rnbeed out completely, leaving only two classes, oasir-
'recognized.
HOW THEN, are the mayors of our big citi -s. together vit
the elected councilmen. going to keep the municipalities solvent1
At the Conference of Mayors. Houston's Fred Hofhcinz pro-
vided one solution: annexation. Just take over the suburbs, he
suggested, and in them you'll find that the people who mow
to the perimeter of the city continue to pay taxes that suppor;
the inner city. So Houston has a S14 million surplus and onl;
4.2 percent unemployment. But where else does that forirml
work?
Our cities are in such deep trouble that they may, in tit:
end. not be saved.
Friday, October 24, 1V75 f.hMislfkridkann Pag* u


Irilliant Work of Fifty Years Ago is Still Brilliant in Our Time
HLE DELINQUENCY is today one of the ma-
Hems in Amn-iean* lffc. It exists even
lie v.- ell-to-do classes of Ae pepci teuton. B
rtrpoitlwi also among Jews.
He 50 years ago, Dr. John Skws*n. n'w
xice president emeritus of the Am'rfcan
[Committee and one of the outstanding ner-
in the 'Lid of Jewish social work, und^r-
uiufy of t5!? delinquency probf*m among Iw's
fe a Ths nwrpos was to loak intu the cmtses
luoncy and h.lp prevent it.
OUTCOME of this study was a very im-
45i;-page l>ook by Dr. blaws.m w'ri :h ap-
liti 1026 under the title, "Tie Delinqu.nt
[weighty was the contents el the hook t^at
artt Ruefcefl, lie highly st*cw\e pbhRsMng
'iich is a di ision of Atheneum Publishers,
\&
on*
Lj)iiK'/iir
has dee-iied u i-.ipoitaut to have i republished to-
day Sb yeais i. ter without any changes in test.
This i* a g:\at tribute to the work ol Dr. Slaw-
son. Il testili 'S t" the lasting quali'v of his b.ok :;ii.i
t.. the famrisTnri it made in the fi.ld of coping
with rj.emle deiinqu^ncj duiing the 50 years since
its publication.
THE SCHOLARLY volume was written by Dr.
SMwsoi* net for the ordinary readers.
As a socj-pj-yciioioKiCid study, it. was intemied
prima Hy for social workers, for physicians spccrnl-
i in^ in the psython.irrottc field, -far teachers, hn-
iu eniie com* judg sand'far administrators of insii-
tuti ns dealing with juvenile delinriucncy. The vul-
n, is like a doctor^ book for doctors.
DR. SLAWSON deals in Ids "The Delinquent
ri>>" with all asp els of -Ittvenile d. KnajMency. Among
.iih'r ficts, ':e b.ine> irteivsting data showing that
in ml delinq-j.' \w* less 50 years ago among
Jewish boys ;har among those who came from Ital-
i m, Polish ana other immigrant families.
in intellig n^.-e. jtr\ in .New Y irK tai. -- w**3re -most Jewish rnmigants
j i were L.e.ierier to riiose ot Anwiican parent-
age.
THERE MAY be n ifrreTeltce in the causes for
' 'wish (' l*noucncv b-r-*en 50 years ago anil to-
.^ay but ihe-proahnu rs such remains.


*,



Page 12
'9 The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of HoUywooa
Friday, October 24,
Jews Should be Sensitive to Catholie Needs
use
Contooaed fraw Page 1
Catholic League for Relig-
ious and Civil Rights, which
adds that "it is only on this
oasis that increased coop-
eration and understanding
between Catholics and Jews
can become a reality."
THE LEAGUE, which defends
the rights of Catholics and oth-
er minorities, emphasizes this
position in an article entitled
President's Conference Flayed
Continued from Page 1-A
the case now with the Presi-
dents Conference."
The Conference had failed
recently to rally American Jews
against U.S. moves that forced
Israel to accept what he term-
ed "the one-sided and discrimi-
natory" interim agreement with
Egypt in Sinai.
HE PLEDGED that the ZOA
would not be "guided by coun-
sels of timidity or the silence of
other organizations in coping
with the emergencies or crises
affecting the economic viability
or political and military secur-
ity of the State of Israel."
The ZOA convention adopted
a series of strong resolutions,
some of them aimed at the U.S.
Government. Claiming that the
Sinai accord was "imposed" on
Israel by the U.S. to Israel's
detriment, the convention de-
manded assurances that Amer-
ican military assistance would
"be forthcoming without delay"
if Egypt violated the accord,
that there are "no private or
secret arrangements" in the ac-
cord that would "in any way
be harmful to Israel's future"
and that Israel's requirements
for immediate economic and
military assistance "no longer
be delayed."
THE DELEGATES denounced
the idea of a Palestinian state
on the West Bank and Gaza
Strip, claiming that such a state
has "no valid claim in fact or
history" and that those terri-
tories "are integral parts of the
land and State of Israel."
The delegates called for a
Zionist voice alongside the Is-
rael government's "in interna-
tional conclaves where the ques-
tion of the future of the land of
Israel will be debated, nego-
tiated and decided."
The resolution noted in that
connection that "the Arab
states have made the question
of Israel a matter for all the
Arab nations and are seeking
the representation of non-gov-
ernmental Arab bodies in con-
ferences focusing on the Arab-
Israeli conflict."
OTHER resolutions adopted
urged Congress to strengthen
measures to counter the Arab
boycott of American firms do-
ing business with Israel, called
on the Administration and Con-
gress to initiate programs to
make the U.S. self-sufficient in
energy sources, warned that the
Soviet Union was violating the
spirit of detente "by supporting
Arab terrorist groups and to-
talitarian regimes in Arab coun-
tries" while continuing "to vio-
late the humanitarian principles
of freedom of expression and
unhindered emigration in the
USSR," and charged the UN
with "legitimizing Arab terror
against Israel" and the U.S. with
"failure to proceed with deter-
mination against countries
which support and give shelter
to terrorists."
IN A final resolution, the
ZOA delegates stated their sup-
port of Leon Dulzin for the
chairmanship of the World
Zionist Organization and Jew-
ish Agency Executives.
Let 'em Scuttle Scuds
Continued from Page 1-A
at a dinner of the United Jewish Appeal annual Study
Mission. The meeting was closed to the press but Peres'
call for a mutual reduction of missile strength was pub-
lished and released by the Government Printing Office.
THE DEFENSE Minister said Israel sought weapons
such as the Pershing not to make war but to deter it.
He said Israel was not interested in the Pershing for
its nuclear delivery capability. He noted that the Phan-
tom and Ekyhawk jets already in Israel's Air Force
could theoretically deliver nuclear devices.
Peres said that when Israel bought those planes
from the U.S. it was the clear understanding that they
would never carry nuclear devices and this understand-
ing has been honored.
"Catholic-Jewish Dialogue" in
the current (September, 1975)
just published issue of its
Newsletter.
In this connection, the
League refers to a recent state
ment by the Most Rev. Joseph
L. Bernandin, Archbishop oi
Cincinnati, O., and president of
the National Conference of
Catholic Bishops, who told
American Jewish Committee
officials that "insensitivity on
our part to your convictions
(about Israel) would be inex-
cusable."
Commenting on this state-
ment, the League states that
"Frank questions must be ask-
ed and advanced in any dia-
logue," and "as Archbishop
Bernandin rightly states. Cath-
olic insensitivity to convictions
about Israel is inexcusable."
THE LEAGUE then cites two
recent instances where leading
U.S. Jewish groups "committed
their resources and statewide
organizations" to help opposi-
tion that successfully overturn-
ed state laws to grant auxiliary
aids to students in Catholic and
other private schools.
One instance was in Mary-
land, where a law passed
wide margin by the State
uuature to provide free
transportation and the
secular textbooks by
school students was defe
a referendum, even tho
such aid is constitutional.
The other was a PennsJ
ma law granting such i
secular textbooks and
charts, slides and tapes 1
vate schools, as well as st
and hearing therapy, dentaT
eye care, remedial readine i
psychological counseling .
poor, disadvantaged childrenl
those schools.
PASSED overwhelmingly
the State Legislature, the
was upheld on appeal by a
District Court, only to
most of its provisions tl.,
out by the U.S. Supreme Co
in the Meek vs. Pottenger
The Catholic League Ne^
letter points out that "by m
ing it extremely difficult if ,
impossible for Catholic pare]
to exercise their right of
gious freedom in the educ
of their children, Jewish
terest groups have not sb
the necessary sensitivity to i
Catholic agenda that insn
fruitful dialogue."
The Catholic League
formed at Washington, D.C,]
a group of representative
olic leaders in 1973. It has
official connection with
Catholic Church. League _
Quarters are in Milwaukee.
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y. Naval Vessel In
Attion Against Arabs
Haifa
LARMED BY reports of Arab terrorist ac-
ti ity, ;hc U.S. State Department ordered
U.S. Na\y to take appropriate action, and
I a result a unit of the Mediterranean llset
into port here. An armed force came
iv. saw to it that the terrorists were ap-
pended and i'Wprisoned, and provided arms
ammunition to the peaceful citizenry,
rhu above is no fanciful prediction of
lit might happen, but a factual account of
It tiiJ happen here in the year 1854. I have
|i> possession copies of the U.S. Noval docu-
pts. extracts from the ship's log of the task
vessel and other authenticating material.
1 NEWS THAT Bedouin marauders were
sri' |l> resident in Palestine led to this historic
' armed intervention."
[)n June 3. 1854, the U.S. war vessel.
-';;nt. dropped anchor in Jaffa harbor.
tusk force came ashore. The offending
ivere located, hailed before a Turkish
and imprisoned.
fhj American commander told the au-
luj would imlil them responsible if
H tdB any further repetition of the ler-
m. and he promised to pay return visits
|v of Felix Frankfurter:
i
fist, Jew and Zionist
III THE Diaries of Felix Frankfurter."
th -, biographical essay and notes by
?. i.ash (New York, W. W. Norton and
C50. 366 .pages) is a most important
an';furter's reputation as a legal giant,
law professor and iust' of th" P"
.ourt overshadows his role over many
i a Zionist and as a Jew concerned with
of his co-religionists.
Viennese prodigy was born 1882 and
to America by his parents in 1894.
tsided in the lower East 6ide ol rtwW
WAS educated in the public schools
College. He attended Harvard, and
i bis classmates was Morris Raphael
|pH noted philosopher, riankui.i.. s
a student of the law was recognized
'graduation.
ILE HE was known as a Jew. and lie
tnied that he was a Jew. lie left the
Be when he was 15 and was compl.-le-
Ibservant.
pever, when he personally made the
runts for his funeral. He stated to Cisr-
In that he wanted Prof. Louis Henkin,
ps secretaries when he served on the
be the last of those who were to
Icause. "he is my only close personal
lio is also a practicing Orthodox Jew.
three or four times a year to make sore the
peace vas kept.
IN HIS ship's log, Capt. Turner recorded
further details: "The vicinities of both Jaffa
and Jerusaiem are visited now and then by-
small hands of Bedouins from the desert, who
make inroads sometimes to the walls of the
cities, stealing ;ind plundering whatever comes
in lheir way.
"One o! the American families living about
(our miles from Jaffa expressed apprehension
of an attack from them, and bagged that I
would eupply them with some means of de-
fense. I without hesitation sent them a few
Halls' Carbines with the necessary ammuni-
tion which, with what they have, will be enough
to keep off the Bedouins who come in very
small numbers and are very great cowards ."
FURTHER CONFIRMATION of the inci-
dent was reported by Warder Cresson. an
American convert to Judaism, who wrote of
the visit in "The Occident." an American Jew-
ish periodical published in Philadelphia.
Ctpssop was pleased with the help which,
he said, "rendered a most signal sen-ice and
QMMAt *to 'h>e American party located n.-ar
Jaffa, who had been disturbed and driven off
their settlement two or three times."
*-3ci|i
uniour /)
R.
Xict
man
He knows Hebrew perfectly and will know
exactly what to say ... 1 think that il is fitting
that I should k*ve as a Jew."
HENKIN RECITED the Kaddish at the fu-
neral.
Frankfurter's character was complex. He
wanted to be accepted'.by the WASPs and asso-
ciate with them but on his terms as a Jew.
He served as assistant to Secretary' f "War
Baker (taring World War I. One of the impor-
tant assignments was to accompany the formei
Ambassador to Turkey Henry Morgenthau, Si-
lo Egypt and Palestine.
Morgenthau was an anti-Zionist, and
Fraidtfurter was chosen deliberately because
of his known Zionist activities.
FRANKFURTER ADMITTED to being an
intellectual snob. He knew that, as a Jew, Ik.
had to perform better than others. He attended
the 1V1. Pa. is IVa-CL Conference-at the request
of Judges Brandufes ami Maok. Prince Faisal
wrote Ht> '"aaicus letter ot .March 31, 1919. to
FranlTu.ter
Therein. Faisal endorsed the Balfour Dec-
laration and "the proposals submitted by the
/mist Organization ... as moderate and
proper;"
Frankfurter left organized Zionism in
1921 when the Zionist convention selected
L.. Wcizman's leadeasnip rather than tliat of
Brind-is and Mack.
Cities'-The
(loom Rises
l"|0 YOU know what a nuclear-powered cruiser is? Could
say wherher sach a battle wagon has mv relationship to
"counter-cyclical assistance" for America's cities?
Don t let these mind-blowing terms frighten you. Thorns'".
of calmly and digested slowlv. they might help you understan
something about the needs of national security as played of'
agamst the Beeds of or near-bankrupt cities where so mm*
people reading these lines live.
FOR WHILE the mayors of several of our Urge cities weii
-beggm? the federal government for monev a few weeks ago
President Ford was trying to get an appropriation for that bfc
nuclear-powered ship.
The mayors wanted S2 billion in cnunter-cvclical assistance
that Is. money to battle the effect of cycles in the economy o -
people trying to survive in New York. Detroit. Newark, -an:
many other cilies where unemployment runs at 7 or 8 percerw:
or perhaps higher.
In the same season, the President was attempting to ex-
pand a S25 billion military- procurement bill to accommoda*
SL2 billion for that nuclear-powered cruiser.
GUNS AND BUTTER .again. Lyndon Johnson had the prer-
lem when he tried to get the costly war in Vietnam finance:
while hesitating to put a bigger, unpopular tax bite on Ml
people.
Mayor Henry W. Staler, of Milwaukee, in urging his fcllo
mayors at the 43rd annual convention of the U.S. Conference
of Mayors in July to go alone on a resolution calling for a tilt
in military expenditures, reminded the heads of cities that "yu
can't eat a gun; you can't live in a helicopter."
All this was taking place while New York was Mm btandt.u
"Fear City" and 'Stink City" with 28.000 tons of garbage piling
up each day and a sore need indicated for permission to floe*
a huge bond issue so that thousands of municipal employe
could be paid and city services resumed.
OH YES, the power of unions representing Basil ition work.
ers and police, firemen, and other government functionaries i-
awesome; pensions at- shooting as high as skyscrapers: th:
temptation to strike and tie the cities into near-panic is alarming
And the cities have other frightening factors to conten.
with: tax bases are shrinking as key business bouses Dttftve ou:
property is deteriorating, people remaining in the cities have
small incomes.
IN AMERICA'S laige cities, the consumers and mass trans.
riders are banged against the high prices in'v flationary swing, yet stranded on the shoals of unemploynvr"
identified with recession
And the people in this bind are no longsr only the million'
labeled "low income" bet also those other millions the st*tlsti;
cians and sociologists have long spoken of as "middle-mcome.";
It may even be concluded that middle income people have
been rubbed out completely, leaving only two classes, easih
" recognized.
HOW THEN, are the mayors of our hie citi -S, tOgSther vit
the elected councilmen. going to keep the municipalities solvent1
At the Conference of Mayors, Houston's Fred Hofhcinz pro-
vided one solution: annexation. Just take over the suburbs, be
suggested, and in them you'll find that the people who nave
to the perimeter of the city continue to pay taxes that sttppor;
the inn?r city. So Houston has a S14 million surplus and onl;
4.2 percent unemployment. But where else docs that fornml'
work?
Our cities are in such deep trouble that they may. in t!1 :
end. not be saved.
Fndav, October 24,
i*75 KkwisfrHorkBam i'ane*ii

* mr* I
, i

frllliant Work of Fifty Years Ago is Still Brilliant in Onr Time
ILE DELINQUENCY is today one of the ma-
roMc-ms in AmeYienn Iffc. It exists even
He w -ll-to-do classes of Ae population. It
Proportion also among Jews.
50 years ago, Dr. Job* Sknvson. n'w
> ice presid- nt emeritus of the Am -rrcsn
ommittec and one of the outstanding per-
il] *he M.ld of Jewish social work, und-i-
|udy of tV? dennquency probf*m amohg boys
s. Th rmrt*> was to l*k into the causes
|ueney and h.-lp prevent it.
OUTCOME of this study was a very im-
[45U-pag.: I>ook by Dr. Slawson w*n*ch ap-
i :2o under the title, "Ine Djliiui'.i.n:
|reigh:y was the contents of the book t^at
tu*e*. ie hlglily sefccUve- pnhfisMtig
[jich is j di ision of Ath.u.'uni Poblisheis.
ori~
has dee ned it important to have i republished to-
AhV ^' yea.s U t^r without any changes in UM.
[his i a gaeat tribute t.^ the work ol Dr. Slaw-
son. It testili k) the lasting ouali'v of his b.iok Bad
t.; the eeOUMuotin it made in the li.ld of copi g
with juvenild dennquvney duiing the 50 years since
its publication.
THE SCHOLARLY volume was written by Dr.
Sfcwao* nat lor the ordinary readers.
As i. >oc'J-p.>^iuiyKickl etudy, it ws mtiiMSte
prima Uy for social workers, for physicmns spceml-
i inj in the psythonarrotfc field, for teach.-rs, for
iu anile cour' iudg s and for administiators of insti-
tutJ ns dealing with jtJili delinnuency. The
n, is like 0 do -tor's book for doctors.
DK. SLAWSON d :aIs in Ins "The Delinquent
Bojr" with all asp cts of tuvemle MfM|MsW< Among
uthar f '.cts, he b.ings rcteivsting data showing that
in n'te dclinqu. tw less 50 years ago amoivg
Jewish boys ;har among those who came from Ital-
i n. Polish u:'U other immigrant families.
in inuliift nee. f^Mfctle boys of Jewish paKsM
in New i' i k tal where ,:iost Jewish rnmig-ants
ir ed were MMe.ier to riiose oi American parent-
18 -.
THERE MAY be n drT-rence in the causes for
f -'.ish d linot'i ncv b r'.*en 50 yonrs ago ami to-
iiW but Ibe proo*em ns such remains.
*,




Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywooct
Friday, October 24, 197$
Youth Aliyah 41 Years Old
The Hollywood Chapter of
Hadassah will celebrate the
41st anniversary of YOUTH
ALIYAH on Nov. 24, at the
Marco Polo Hotel in Miami
Beach. Since its inception in
1934 under the directorship of
Henrietta Szold, over 150,000
children have been rescued and
rehabilitated in Israel. Hadas-
sah has contributed over 72
million dollars to help maintain
the 270 childrens' villages and
all day centers.
Seated on the dais will be
Youth Aliyah chairman, Miss
Ruth Grayber; Hollywood Chap-
ter president, Mrs. Archie
Kamer; Program chairman,
Mrs. Ethel Schwartz; Chapter
Fund Raising vice president,
Mrs. William Schulman; and
guest speaker, Mrs. William K.
Dorfman, National Fund Rais-
ing coordinator from New York.
The Hollywood Chapter,
which began with a single
grou of 25 members, now has
ten Groups, comprising over
2,000 members. The Groups
are: Beach Group, Mrs. Harry
Simons, Youth Aliyah chair-
man; Golda Meir Group, Mrs.
David Kern, chairman; Hall-
mark, Mrs. Morris Prusansky;
H'Atid, Mrs. Sol Pelish; Hen-
rietta Szold, Mrs. Joseph Gold-
Religious
Services
HALIANDAU
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
(Corxcrvativa). 416 NE tth Avi
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz, Canto*
Jacob Danziaer.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
ilNAI (Temple) of NORTH DAOI
18801 NE 22nd Av*. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kinaalay, Cantor Irving
hulkaa.
NORTH BR0WARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON.
GREGATION. Reform. 3721 N.W.
100th Av*. Ilabbl Max Waltz. 44
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER, 875
N.W. 57th St., (Coneervative) Rab-
bi Milton J. Groaa.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE
GATION, 400 South Nob Hill Road.
Plantation. Rabbi Arthur Abram.
Friday 8 p.m.
HOUYWOOD
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
(Orthodox). 3891 Sterling Rd.. op.
poalte Hollywood Milia High School
Prealdent Or. Frame Stein.
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1M1 &
14th Av-.. Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffe. Aaalatant Rabbi Harvey M.
Roaanfeld.
Friday, 7:45 p.m., Consecration and
Slmchas Torah Bervlcea, with mem-
ber* of the Youth Group and Chil-
dren's Choir participating: special
blessing for the first grade and new
atudents. Saturday, 10:30 a.m., Yizkor
Memorial prayers.
IETH SHALOM (Tempi*) Conserve.
live. 4401 Arthur Rabbi Morton
Malavsky, Cantor trying Gold.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (Coneervative)
310 SW 42nd Ave., Hollywood.
TEMPLE SINAI (Conservative). 120v
Johmon St Rabbi David Shaolro,
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Llstflald.
Cantor vhuda H.llbr.ur.
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal). 5100 Sher-
idan St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Robert
Frazin. 41-0
MIIAMAI
TEMPLE IWAEL (Coneervative)
M20 SW SMh St. R.d.I Avrom
Drazin.
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINE8 (Coneerva-
tive) 1900 N. University Dr.. Pern-
broke Pines. Rabbi Sidney Lubln.
BETH SHALOM
DAY SCHOOL
A Unique Private School
601 Arthur Street-966-2200
INFORMATION ON THE
FOLLOWING CLASSES:
KINDERGARTEN
(Waiting List Only)
FIRST GRADE
(Waiting List Only)
SECOND GRADE
SPACE AVAILABLE
THIRD GRADE
SPACE AVAILABLE
FOURTH GRADE
SPACE AVAILABLE
The program consists of very
high standard education, He-
braic, Judaic and General.
Special enrichment programs
phys. ed. science music
- art.
stein; Hillcrest, Mrs. Louis Ja-
cobs; Mt. Scopus, Mrs. Lillian
Harris; Sabra, Mrs. Thea Mil-
lerman; Shalom, Mrs. Irving
Davidoff; Tel Chai, Mrs. Gilbert
Aren. The Publicity chairman
is Mrs. Louis Jacobs.
A pledge of "CHAI" will en-
title a member to receive a
Hollywood Chapter Youth
Aliyah Pin.
The entertainment will be
furnished by Lydia King, lyric
soprano, star of Broadway, op-
era, concerts, television and
recordings.
Letter To The Editor
EDITOR, Floridian-Shofar
I am in receipt of a copy of
your "highlights of recent
news" dated September 30 and
the first item covers United
States aid to Israel by Frank R.
Lautenberg, general chairman.
It seems to me that this is
probably the most important
item as it definitely answers
the confusion caused by the
talk and publicity of a $2.3 bil-
lion in United States foreign
aid to Israel, with Jewish giv-
ing.
As you pointed out, this
United States aid is for military
arms for protection in the case
of war and as a deterrent. It
will be spent in the United
States. It does not pay for im-
migration, housing, schools, etc.
as they are our own responsi-
bilities.
There is no doubt in my
mind that these items will be
constantly featured at the many
meetings to be held in connec-
tion with the U.J.A. campaigns
but there are too many people
who won't be reached and they
should be informed by other
methods.
SAM J. PERRY
Yours truly,
President Emeritus
Zionist Organization
of America
"Poor Cousins" TeUs Story
Of European Jews
Shirley Cole will review the
book "Poor Cousins" by Ande
Manners in celebration of Jew-
ish Book Month at the Nov. 11
buffet luncheon meeting of the
Temple Beth El Sisterhood, at
noon in the Tobin Auditorium
of the temple, 1351 S. 14th Ave.,
Hollywood.
The answer to "Our Crowd,"
"Poor Cousins" is the remark-
able story, rich in insight and
humor, of the history of the
Eastern European Jews who
migrated to America.
Mrs. Cole, who has resided
in the South Broward area for
the past few years, is a mem-
ber of Sisterhood and is well-
known in the area for her pro-
fessional one-woman shows. A
native of Wilkes Barre, Pa., she
is a graduate of Temple Uni-
versity, Philadelphia, and has
had extensive drama and the-
ater experience.
Reservations for the lunch-
eon may be made with Anna
Wolfe or Belle Green .
Aquarius Cancer Unit To Meet
A meeting of the newly-or-
ganized Aquarius Cancer Unjt
of Hollywood will take place
on Monday, Oct. 27 in the Cas-
cade Room at 1:00 p.m.
After a brief business meet-
ing, there will be an enlighten-
ing program featuring Natalie
Greenfield founder of "Weight
Watchers of Greater Miami,"
and presently codirector. Ms.
Greenfield has appeared on TV
and has lectured on radio as
well as in classes in the area.
An invitation to attend the
meeting is extended to all wom-
en residing in the Aquarius
buildings and to those women
residing in the immediate area
adjacent to the Aquarius.
Further details may be ob-
tained from program vice pres-
ident Mrs. Lewis (Ann) Cohn.
Bar Mitzvah
SHARON SINGER
Sharon, daughter of Dr. and
Mrs. Saul Singer will be Bat
Mitzvah Friday, Nov. 7, at Tem-
ple Sinai.
it ir ir
RICK BERNSTEIN
Rick, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Harvey Bernstein, will be Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, Oct. 25, at
Temple Solel.
ir ir ir
DAVID BODISHER
David, son of Mrs. Sandra
Bodisher will be Bar Mitzvah
Saturday, Nov. 1, at Temple
Solel.
k ir ir
RICKY WEINSTEIN
Ricky, son of Sally Bailey
will be Bar Mitzvah Saturday,
Oct. 25, at Temple Beth El.
ft ft ft
KEITH NEWMAN
Keith, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Ronald Newman will be Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, Nov. 1, at
Temple Beth El.
THANKSGIVING WEEKEND IN NEW YORK!
Wednesday, Nov. 26 thru Sunday, Nov. 30
5 DAYS 4 NIGHTS De Luxe Accommodations at the
HOTEL WARWICK 54th Street at 6th Avenue
AVENTURA TRAVEL
Only $184.73 per person, double occupancy
Includes round trip via EASTERN AIRLINES Transfer to
Hotel and back to Airport
(Price doaa not include Maala, Tax, Qratuitiaa)
Based on Group of 40 People
CALL 932-2908
for Information Regarding Thanksgiving Dinner)
community
coier*
.
OCTOBER 27
National Council of Jewish Women Board Meeting
Home Federal Building, Hallandale 10 a.m. .
OCTOBER 28 J
Hollywood Chapter of Hadassah Home Federal Build*
ing, Hollywood Board Meeting 10 a.m.
Shalom Group of Hollywood Hadassah Reef Restaurant,
2700 S. Andrews Ave., Ft. Lauderdale Fourth An-
nual Hadassah Medical Organization Luncheon 12
noon
Hollywood Chapter of Hadassah Home Federal Build-
ing, Hollywood Book Review "Scrolls of the Dead
Sea" by M. Paldiel, 1 p.m.
NOVEMBER 1
Hillel Community Day School Diplomat Hotel 6th
Annual Scholarship Dinner Dance 8 p.m.
Aviva Chapter B'nai B'rith Howard Johnson, Holly-
wood Spook Ball Dinner Dance 8:30 p.m.
NOVEMBER 3
National Council of Jewish Women Temple Sinai
Meeting 12 noon
Temple Beth Shalom Sisterhood Temple Ballroom
General Meeting 8 p.m.
NOVEMBER S
Temple Beth El Brotherhood Special Golfers Day
Hollywood Lakes Country Club, 14800 Hollywood
Blvd. 9:00 a.m.
Temple Beth Shalom Sisterhood Temple Ballroom
Library Fund Luncheon 11:30 a.m.
or-,
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New Aquarius Lodge Is Official
The David Ben Gurion Lodge,
a new lodge at the Aquarius
building, was presented with a
provisional charter by the Di-
rector of New Lodges of B'nai
B'rith, Jack Glick.
Accepting the charter before
a crowd of over 150 people was
president Abe Cohen. A presen-
tation was also made to the
Golda Meir Group of Hadassah.
The first Installation Dinner-
Dance will be held at the Diplo-
mat Hotel on November 23, ac-
cording to David M. Blumberg,
International president of B'nai
B'rith.
BAR MITZVAHS WEDDINGS
STUDIO OF HOLLYWOOD HILLS
PHOTOGRAPHY
624-2052 983-1200 4512 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
INTERNATIONALLY KNOWN ARTIST
Willing to sacrifice PAINTINGS AND GRAPHICS at
Auctions, Benefits, Private Sales, etc. with objective to
raise funds to finance research in Vad Vashem for
Present Paintings on the Holocaust.
TONY KECK
C/0 the Hideaway, 411 S. Ocean Drive, Hollywood
All Inquiries and Help Greatly Appreciated
IS AVAILABLE FOR
iNQUETS & WEDDINGS!
* BAR MITZVAHS CARD PARTIES
* RELIGIOUS RETREATS BUSINESS SEMINARS
* TOURNAMENTS OUTINGS
Z*7"t SUPERB FOOD in
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FROM $3.95
14800 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Fi. 33128.
PHONE
981-8801
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