The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00125

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJemsti Florid'f&n
V<
..r.ie 5 Number 17
and SIIOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood, Florioa Friday, Augusl 13, 1975
Price 25 cents
CAMPAIGN LEADERSHIP MEETING TERMED 'FANTASTIC
Palmaire C-C Weekend Retreat
Attended By 65 Local Leaders
According to Lewis E. Cohn,
]9"? Ca"""aign Chairman fo.-
the CJA'IEF. the recent week'
end held at Palmaire Country
Club fir campaign leadership
was "fir*irly fantastic."
It was," he said, "a marve-
lous opportunity for 65 of ou.-
own community leaders to g3?
top^ther with top leaders of
wo:!d Jewry. I feel that every-
one attenling was stimulated
beyond description, and tha:
each looks forward to the sec-
ond such get-tog3ther nex:
year."
D-. Allen Pollack, a member
of t1"* <>x',ctitive board of th-
World Zionist O ganization. the
hm-p" of governo-s of the Jew-
ish Ag;ncy an-1 t*e Soa-d of di-
rpcfvs of th United Israel Ap-
peal, told the euests that "Is-
rael's survival depends on
A^enc-m siiDno--t." He also de-
tailed his recent trip to Arab
countries und^r the auspices of
Prnf-sso'-s for Peace in the
Middle East.
UJA Executive Vice Chairman
Irving Bernstein remindd par-
ticinants that "what is at stake
is the quality of life in Israel,"
and reported on activities of the
Jewish Ass^blv abroad and on
international fund-raisine oro-
grams throughout the world.
Rabbi Dani-1 Syme, assistant
national "firecto1" of education
for the Union of American He-
brew Congregations, spoke on
trends of Jewish education in
Continued on Page 6-
Echeverria
Given Israeli
Welcome
DR. ALLEN POLLACK
JERUSALEM (JTA) "Bi-
envenido Senor Presidente"
say the red-green-and-white pla-
cards on the streets of Jerusa-
lem, "Bienvenido Senora de
Echeverria," in a greeting to
Mexico's President, Luis Eche-
verria, and his wife, Maria
Esther, due here Thursday for
a three-day visit.
Israel was to be the 14th port
of call on the Echeverria's cur-
rent world tour which will end
next week in Jordan.
Since It ;s not abundantly
blessed with visits by heads of
state, and since Echeverria is
considered here a warm friend
of Israel. Jerusalem is making
evpr-v effort to give the guests
a sincerely hearty welcome.
Officials here say they ex-
pected tough and frank talks
with the Mexican leaderwho
does not hide his deep dif-
ferences of outlook with Israel
on matters of fundamental im-
portance in the Mideast conflict.
Thus, Echeverria has already
indicated that he would argue
forthrightly with his Israeli
Continued on page 12-
HMgg UJA EXECUTIVE TO MEET GROUP IN ISRAEL
Rabbi Friedman To Join
Broward Leadership Mission
Rabbi Herbert A. Fri:dnian.
U r-ner executive chairman of
the national United Jewish Ap-
peal, will be joining the South
Broward Leadership Mission to
Israel when it arrives in that
country Oct. 26. Herbert Kau,
president of Jewish Federation,
has nnnouncsd.
"Kabbi Kmuman is an emi-
nent authority on virtually
every f3c;t of Jewish life," Mr.
K'i: said. "His activities with
UJA in the Diaspora, coupled
with his four-year residence in
Israel, have given him an
unique insight into the roots ot
Jewish existence.
"As executive chairman of
UJA." Mr. Katz added, "he
travelsd nearly 100,000 miles
annually raising funds to meet
Israel's requirements. As an Is-
raeli citizen, he provides a link
to the programs made possible
by those funds."
The first such mission to be
sponsored by the Jewish Fed-
eration, the Oct. 26-Nov. 4 ex-
cursion will be predicated on a
minimum contribution of $1,000
Continued on Page 5-
BACK FROM HELSINKI
Ford Says He's
'Encouraged;9
Arms Flow Slows
RABBI HERBERT FRIEDMAN
... Still, Chance of War
Greater Than Last Year
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) While Israeli political leaders
are preoccupied with intensive bargaining for an interim
Eccord with Egypt in Sinai, military circles here and other
observers have expressed increasingly pessimistic views
over the prospects of any
significant peace settlement
with Israel's-.ortghbow and,
in fact, have strong doubts
that the Arabs will settle for
anything less than the
shrinkage of Israel to its
1967 boundaries.
Should they ever succeed
in forcing Israel back to the
old lines which Israel insists
are insecure and indefensi-
ble, the Arabs would set the
stage for a further attrition
WASHINGTON "I am
really encouraged and opti-
mistic. I honestly believe
there were more pluses than
minuses," said President
Gerald Ford on his return
here Monday night from a
10-day, five-nation trip to
Europe.
The trip included his par-
ticipation in the European
security conference in Hel
sinki, where he signed on
the dotted line the Soviet-
sponsored security agree-
ment that the President said
he hoped would give the
Eastern European nations
now in the Soviet orbit an
incentive to move toward a
greater degree of personal
independence.
WITH PRESIDENT Ford and
Secretary of State Henry Kis-
singer was U.S. Ambassador to
Egypt Herman Eilts. who joined
the President and staff aboard
Air Force One in Belgrade,
Yugoslavia, the President's last
stop-over.
In Belgrade, there was some
tough talking between Ford and
Yugoslav President Josip Broz
Continued on Page 12
PRESIDENT FORD
Fight Against Ouster
From UN Being Won
JERUSALEM(JTA) Offi-
cials here say the fight against
the Arabs' plan to oust Israel
from the UN is by no means
over yetbut they cautiously
admit to a more hopeful and
relaxed feeling than was preva-
lent here only a week ago.
Developments in Helsinki, in
Kampala, and in Stockholm
have demonstrated that if Is-
rael must fight the ouster bid
she will not fight alone. They
have demonstrated, too. that
the Arabs will not have the go-
ing as easy as they had perhaps
thoughtif they do decide te
go ahead and press the ouster
effort.
AT THE same tims, though,
political observers here are
warning that western and non-
aligned support for Israel
against the Arab bid will very
probably have its price: those
states rendering this support
will make it contingent (at least
tacitly) upon greater Israeli
"flexibility" in the ongoing in-
terim settlement talks with
Continued on Page 12
Continued on Pe 1*
NEW YORK A Flushing,
N.Y., man returned to work this
week at the St. Albans Veterans
Administration Hospital after
federal officials ruled he had
been fired last November be-
cause of anti-Semitism and or-
dered his reinstatement.
Fred Emert. who was repre-
sented by the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith in his
complaint to the U.S. Civil Serv-
ice Commission, was rehired
retroactive to the day of his
termination, "with all pay and
benefits."
ACCORDING TO Robert C.
Kohler, director of ADL's New
York regional office, the VA
acted after a review of Mr.
Emert's case record.
In a letter to Emert. Kenneth
M. Meyer, acting assistant gen-
eral counsel for the VA, said
that "discrimination and repris-
al because of religion was sub-
stantiated by the evidence con-
cerning the issues raised in
your complaint."
Meyer said that "after a care-
ful review of the complete case
record." the VA concurred with
the findings of a U.S. Civil Serv-
ice Commission Equal Employ-
ment Opportunity complaints
examiner.
EMERT, a supervisor of hos-
pital police, told ADL last Oc-
tober that he was harassed by
his superior who made anti-
Semitic remarks about him, par-
ticularly when he switched
tours of duty in order to ob-
Continued on Page 9
A
Flushing Man Back on Job After Tiff J .
nviv vnRK A Flushinc. complaint to the U.S. Civil Serv- m Mwr artinn assistant een- ice Commission Equal Employ- I


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shoiar 0/ Hollywood
Friday, August 15, 1975
Hillel Community Day School Hadassah Conclave
Expands To Junior High Level
Rabbi Albeit Mayerfeld, prin-
cipal of the- HjJlsl Community
r*ny. *c~h>'nJ'_ ipruts Am thit
Education Department has de-
veloped a new curriculum bas-
. ed upon a totally new philo-
sophical approach for the jun-
ior high school level.
"Educators of the '70's must
recognize that students' needs,
personalities and sophistication
levels have changed radically
over the past two decades,"
the Kabbi stated.
"The age nf television, space
development and women's lib
have brought us students who
believe that they deserve self
determination rights at home
as well as in school. Requiring
every student to follow the
exact same course of study is
an abs ird and antiquated ap-
proach to education, which
makes as much sense as re-
quiting all students to wear the
sam shoe size."
The rabbi idmits that this
new approach his long been
tried and proven in the Amer-
ican public school system. In
the day schools, however, the
lack of computers and smaller
populations have been used as
the excuse for eliminating free-
dom of choice for over 25
years. This is even more ironic
since the Jewish people con-
tributed the concept of "Be-
chi a" freedom of choice to the
civilized world, he added.
The new philosophy in the
Junior High School at Hillel is
to offer a sufficient variety of
courses and electives to permit
each student to follow the
course of study b?st suited to
the individual student needs
and interests.
Each student chooses those
courses and electives from the
junior catalog for each quarter.
The choice must be approved
by the student's counselor to in-
Sure that all prerecruisifes have
been met.
The juniar high staff will in-
clude Dr. Alfred M. Dermer,
Mrs. Donald Lambert and Mrs.
Djnald '-essne.
Dr. Dernier, chairman of the
junior high Scisnce Depart-
ment, taught t.y. fie Dade Coun-
ty Board of Public Instruction
from 1953-1973, during which
time he also served.at Lindsey
Hop).ins as assistant director of
th. Headstait Program.
In addition, Dr. Dermer has
b?en_ a graduate instructor in
Child" Development. Adolescent
Psychology, inai idual Diagno-
sis. Theories of Personality,
Theories and Techniques of
Counseling, and Techniques of
Teaching Early Childhood Edu-
cation. Ha also instructed the
t .aching methods and materials
in mathematics, science and
language arts in the Elemen-
tary School.
Mrs. Lambert, who holds a
Master of Education from the
University of Buffalo, has
taught in Buffalo, New York;
Cape May, N.J., and at the
Lehman Day School. She is
the head teacher of the Lan-
guage Arts Department at the
Hillel Junior High School,
where she organized an active
Student Council, drama and
photography projects during
the la.-t year.
Mrs Lessee, head teacher of
t*i hin'or high Math Depart-
ment, l.as tak n Her graduate
anj undergraduate studies at
the Uni 'ersity of Miami. She
has ta ight math at North Mi- -
ami Senior High, Palmetto Sen-
io- High an>l Norland Junior
High prior to coming to Hillel.
The principal will serve as
the chairman cf the Social Stu-
dies Department in which the
courses offered for September
1975 are: The Federal Govern-
ment, The Electoral Process,
WesterHf^Euroiie.. 'i'hv Middle
,.iifl-t. ,*\iKi*m- b*vlizrh)na.iiPo-.
litical and Economic Studies,
World Stud! s. Introduction to
the Social Sciences of Psychol-
ogy, Anthxop i 1 .' and Sociol-
ogy; Map and Globe Skills,
General Social Studies and
Current Events. Modern Amer-
ica. The Civil War, The Amer-
ican Revolution; and the one
course required for all stu-
dents, The History. People, Gov-
ernment and Resources of the
State of Florida.
The Hebrew studies program
offers a selection from a num-
ber of Ulpan Course levels, a
variety of Hebrew literature
and composition courses,
choice frrmi the five Jiool^s of .
Se .jScahv t!wJ^uk-s afcoithe*"
Early and Latter Prophets. Ba-
sk- .1 wish So 1 ccs, a wide se-
lecti '"i of Mi' "in lie and Talmu-
ci'c L:t sratur? Jewish History
in Ancient. Medieval and Mod-
ern Times and Life and Wars of
Modern Israel.
Elective activities include
Student Council, Newspaper,
Speech and Drama. Choir, Bible
Club, Ecology, Stamp Club,
Chess Club, Athletics. Home
Economics and Jewish Cooking.
For further '"'" 'ition or a
copy of the CTt.-'es. rill the
school office f W 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday though Friday.
Beth El Religious School Program
In Final Stages Of Preparation
Programs for the coming re-
ligions school year are now in
th> fin*' st*g* of preparation
at T^wh B"th El, according
to Pabbi Hwev P,")nf"ld. with
t->ch<>r tr*tldag seminars set
for th end of A"'ist. and a
"Te^me F"n-Day" to be held
in *d-0~tob:\
All Judaica closes, ktoder-
g";*n th-ovqh 9th grade, will
be he'.d Sundays from 9 until
11:30 a.m. in an attempt to con-
solidate educational activities.
Hebrew classes, which have
b-en arranged to avoid duoli-
cl.ation in l*nsuage training, will
meet at follows:
Beginners' Hebrew (Level 1)
will meet during the Sunday
curriculum for 90 minut-s. with
the remaining time allotted for
religious school studies.
Levels 2 and 3Monday and
Wednesday 5:15 to 6:30 p.m.
Level'4 Saturday. 10 a.m.
till 11 a.m.
Private tutoring for Bar Mitz-
v.ah instruction may b* arrang-
ed with Rabbi Rosenfeld.
Confirmation classes will meet
Mondays from 7 to 9 p.m.; a
post-Confirmation seminar for
11th and 12th graders will be
held monthly at homes of par-
ticinants.
Under the guidance of Rabbi
Rosenfeld the grouo will estab-
lish its own curriculum and in-
vestigate modern Jewish con-
cerns.
Detente Test Fails;
Calls Hard to Make
NEW YORK dramatic t-st of the Soviet
Union's compliance with the
spirit of detente and interna-
tional telecommunications, a
group of well known New Yorlf-
ers tri*d to place calls to Jew-
ish actn ists in the USSR.
But only three of the 25 calls
went through. The event, which
was snonsored by the Greater
N?w York Conference on Soviet
Jewry, was also aimed at the
meeting between President Ford
and Soviet Communist Party
Secretary Leonid Brezhnev at
the European Security Confer-
ence in H -lsinki, Finland.
VARIOUS EXCUSES were
given bv Soviet operators whv
th calls did not get through.
On on-.-.t-,- t0H GNYCSJ
chairman Eugene Gold, in the
midBt of th^i- conversation,
that she could no longer speak
Eng'ish. All of the persons call-
ed were notified in advance, ac-
cording to the GNYCSJ.
One of the calls that did get
t'v-ough was to mathematician
D-. Ilva Piatetsky Shapiro,
whoc nnone hid been discon-
nect H for over a year. He urg-
ed pi-mist David Bar Ilan to
"continue yeuT efforts as much
as r.os'ih1'- M) heln us."
Ie*afe TsttberMtt toll a New
York television reporter thnt
"You don't know how difficult
it i= for "s to be alone hera
under such circumstances. It
onlv pos-ibl" to continue be-
c;"s of your concern and
heln."
ILYA UCHITEL told City
Councilman Howard Golden that
he lost his job after applying
for his visa and that he is now
forcd to do menial labor to
avoid arrest for parasitism.
The New York participants
also snoke on th" telephone to
relatives of Soviet J >ws now in
Israel who described their dif-
ficulty in co-nmunicating with
those they left behind.
Margv Kuth Davis, coordi-
nator of the event, said. "The
cut-off of phone communica-
tions, an increase in the num-
ber of trials of Jews, the ex-
cessive tax on charity funds and
a sharp decline in recent
months in Soviet Jews emigra-
tion combine to underscore the
growing magnitude of the plight
of vast numbers of Jews and the
relentless campaign of harass-
ment and oppression being wag-
ed ag3inst them by the Soviet
government."
Religious School Teachers
A7so Music and Dance.
TEMPLE BETH EL,
HOLLYWOOD.
Phone 944-7773 (Miami Line)
BETH SHALOM
DAY SCHOOL
A Unique Private School
1601 Arthur Street 966-2200
INFORMATION ON THE
FOILOVNG CLASSES:
KINDERGARTEN
(Waitina List Onlv)
FIRST GRADE
(Watina Lint Only)
SECOND GRADE
SPACE AVAILABLE
th;rd crade
SACE AVAILABLE
FOURTH GfADE
SPACE AVAILABLE
The program consists of very
high standard education, He-
braic, Judaic and Genera'.
Special enrichment programs
phys. ed. science music
- art.
To Begin
Th" 2^860 mepibers of the
Florida. Region of Hadassah will
he ivrneient'd when th? Na
t'onal Hadassah Convention
opens at the San Francisco
Hilton, Sunday.
"Florida will have over 100
delegates," said Bel*n (Mrs.
M ivwell L.j Weisberg, president
of the Florida Region, in dis-
cussing the arrangements for
the Pre-Convention National
Board Meetings with Gloria
(Mrs. H.arv~y) Friedman, pres-
ident of Miami Chapter; Jean
Feinberg, president of Miami
Beach Chapter; Cha>|ott (Mrs.
Leonard) Wolpe. elected mem-
ber of t*e National Roard; Gus
(Mrs. Fmantiel) Men'z. and
Ellen (Mrs. Bernard) Mandler,
National Service Committee
members.
These meetings prior to con-
vention will consist of discus-
sions with Other region presi-
dents and "Big Twelve" chan-
ter presidents concerning or-
ganization, structure, expan-
sion, conferences and chapter
servicing.
"in Hmb reonrts on Hadas-
sah projects and proposed plans
for the future will take too
1 rioritv." M s. W iaberg said,
"especially the rededicetion and
reopenim? of Ha3as*ah Mount
Scopus Hospital on October 21.
1975.
"The current situation in the
Middle East will be reflect;d
throughout the National Boar!
discussions which bgin at 9
a.m. daiiy evept Saturday and
continue until midnight or
later."
A Shabbat dinner for all the
National Board members will
be sponsored b" the San Fran-
cisco Chapter. Shabbat services
SuimU
av
and the Presidents' kiddush i.
open to all delegate.
Speakers at the c >,-,:._ I
will include Si-ncha Dini
rael Ambassador to 1 T-...7
States; Beal K' J
hunter of Nazi war c iminab-
Anush'a Preiman, a ',,f
concentration camps: s n D ,
McGee (D., v.'vo.j; Dr. -w1
Wildavsky. Dean, aduatt
School, Public Policy, Lniver-
sity of California at Berkeley
Dr. Kalman J. Mann. Director
General Hadassah Medical Or-
ganization: Rabbi Harold Schul-
weis, spiritual leader of Valley
Beth Sholom, Encino. Calif.;
Aaron Rosenbaum, research di-
rector, American Israel Public
Affairs Committee and Joseph
Klarman. World Head 0: Youth
Aliyah.
Tie Florida delegation will
consist of members of each 0!
ihe 20 Chapters in the P.
incliding Puerto Rico. Florida
R-gi->n will host a reception for
its delegates and the National
Board Tuesday night
banauet in the Region Suite.
Delegates, their guests and
friends are invited.
Founded in 1912. Hatosah
is the largest women's volum
organization in the country. It
is also the largest Zionist bloc
in the world toda>- .an I soendl
more than S?0 million annually
f"- ire iip.-ith. educational, vo-
entional. social welfare an hr.,
redemption nrogra-ns in Is-ael
and for its "duration and vi-ith
programs in the United States.
Jeanntte Alman. presid"nt of
Hallandale Chapter and Helen
(Mrs. Archie) Kamer, president
ot the Hollywood Chapter will
lead their chapters' delegation
t the convention.
Riverside's
two new chapels in
Hollywood and Sunrise
serve the needs of
the entire
Jewish community in
Broward County.
In the Hollywood and Hallandale areas:
5801 Hollywood Boulevard. Hollywood.
920-1010
In the Fort Lauderdale area:
1171 Northwest 61st Ave.(Sunset Strip),Sunrise
584-6060
V
RIVERSIDE
9\.
Nfcmon.il Chapel. Inc. Funeral Directors
Older Riverside chapel;, in South Florida are located in
North Miami Beach. Miami Beach and Miami.
1 u*hchapbin Manhattan,
B,<" kawayandWtchst
H-1-7B
H8-15-75



riday
r August IS, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shojar of Hollywood
Page 3
Rabbi ana wrs. morion Maiuvsky (itji) of lempie Beth
Shalom, Hollywood, and Mr. and Mrs. Harry Grossman
(right) were welcomed to Israel by Menachem Beig:n,
leader of Israel's Likud Party, during their recent tour
of the state. The local group, which was led by Dr. Ma-
tovsfcy, explored many areas in Israel seldom feen by
visitors, and also met with Menachem Porush, a member
rf the Knesset.

Israel Faces Week
Of Labor Strife
TEL AVIV (.ITA) Israel faces a week of labor
strife as strikes are threatened by salaried engineers,
El Al air crew members and the employes of Bank Leumi
le Israel, the nation's largest financial institution.
The government, the Histadrut and other bodies
are trying to avert the walkouts which could result in no
construction work being done, no permits issued, no in-
spection by engineers, no fiscal transactions in the coun-
try's largest bank, and the grounding of Israel's national
airline.
The labor disputes are a result partly of the new
lax reforms and partly of the efforts to close the salary
v.aps between various employe groups.
MGustav Badian, secretary of the Engineers Union,
said some 15,000 salaried engineers will start a partial
strike because their demands to maintain the ratio of
salary differences between them and other groups have
been turned down. He said the strike would hit all
spheres of work except essential security projects and
plants.
Israel Stages Raid
On Lebanese Town
TEL AVIV All raiders returned safely following an
attack Tuesday by Israeli forces on the southern Lebanese
town of Tyre.
According to Initial reports, five Palestinian guerrillas,
\[ four Lebanese army officers and a child were killed.
The raid occurred about 2 a.m., when some 300 Israeli
commando troops landed on the beach near the El-Bass
refugee camp.
AT THE SAME time, Israeli gunboats were reported
to have shelled the Rashidiyeh area, as well as the military
barracks at Tyre.
According to army headquarters in Tel Aviv, "A num-
ber of terrorists were injured or killed and army emplace-
ments were blown up."
Lebanese eyewitnesses said that the Israelis withdrew
under heavy fire.
Meanwhile, in retaliation for the raid, Palestinian com-
mando units fired rockets into Kiryat Shemoneh.
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Malavsky-Led
Meets
With Beigin
Dr. Morton Malavskv. sniritu-
M leader of Temple Beth Sha-
lom, returned recently from
leading a tour to the State of
Israel.
Rabbi Malavsky led a group
of people from the local area in
an in-depth visitation. Many
seldom seen areas in Israel were
explored by the Beth Shalom
eroun. und a "Uit was made to
a newly established settlement
of Russian Jws. A day was spent
i-< "vnlnr-inn, touring beyond
Sharm el-Sheikh, and a visit
was paid to Menachem Porush,
a member of the Knesset.
One of the highlights was a
sr sky and his grouo by M-michem
Beiein, fcadT of Israel's Likud
party, one of the strongest in
T-t-pH. Mr. Beigin has played a
leading roW in th develomipnt
of Israel since the days of the
underground.
MK i"ie'i snok*1 at length
regarding the present and the,
futurethe possibilities ind the
hopefulns,5 of nepce. He ac-
centuated the fict that to have
peace there nust b*> no more
attacks on either side, but in-
stead a complete period of gen-
uine peace.
Mr. Beigin indicated that th
Arab minority in Israel must al
so be given continu-H ci'l,'i- autonomy and equality, such as
proper housing, jobs, and all
rights and privileges.
Mr. Beigin spoke very opti-
mistically regarding Israel, its
neighbors, and all its problems,
but displayed some distress
over the fact that a man was
produced by the League of Arab
States as recently as March of
'75, showing their holdings from
the Atlantic Shores to the Per-
sian Gulf. Israel does not ap-
pear on that mapshe somehow
vanished, he reported.
In conclusion, Mr. Beigin de-
clared that it is his feeling that
ultimately justice must prevail
... the light must be seen.
* "In view of the fact that the
intentions of Israel are honor-
able, and it is desirous of j
peace," he said, "I believe that j
the time is not too far away
when understanding will replace I
hatred, and all of the Middle
East will again be a source of,
human culture, because people
will live in peace with security,;
and have freedom with human
dignity."
Shalom Group Of Hadassah
To Meet Tuesday, Sept. 2
The first metine of the Sha-
lom Groun of Hollywood Ha-
dassah will be held in th Town
Hall Room o# tSe Ho~i~ *Vdr"-a<
Building in Hollywood. Tuesday.
Sept. 2.
Rpfrsr,T>en at 12:30. and the meeting will
start promrtlv at 1 p.m. Th
program w*1l turbid- a rH*ww.
sinn on P-it-itinn by Mrs. Phyllis
Sis'in. A'-" riv-o-tor of th-;
"pi nd s'fts w'll be distribMted.
flORIDIAN PUBLISHER CREDITED WITH IDEA
Fascell Bill Would Enable
Small Businessmen To Hire
Congressman Dante Fascell
(D., FTa.) has introduced legis-
lation in the U.S. House of Rep-
resentatives to establish a pro-
gram whereby small business
concerns would receive federal
assistance to hire unemployed
workers.
The Fascell proposal would
enable small business concerns
located in areas of high unem-
ployment to apply for federal
funds to pay wages and employ-
ment benefits to individuals who
are unemployed. The funds
would NOT be available to firms
which have job openings as a
result of laying off or terminat-
ing employment of any regular
employee.
The four-year program, to be
administered by the Department
of Labor, would provide the
funds on a percentage basis of
the total wages paid to the new-
lv hired workers. For example,
the program would provide 80
per cent of the total wages and
employment benefits for the
first year of operation; 60 per
cent for the second year; 40 per
cent for the third year and 20
per cent for the fourth year.
Fascell credited Miami news-
paper publisher Fred Shochet
with the idea for the proposal.
"I believe this would be a
meaningful and effective way of
providing work for thousands
ol unemployed individuals who
have been laid off by large
corporations while at the same
time helping small business
firms increase their productivity
with skilled workers," Fascell
said.
"It is my hope that this bill
will receive prompt and favor-
able consideration by the Com-
mittee on Education and Labor
as one means of easing the cur-
rent unemployment situation,"
he concluded.
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
arnett
Sank.
HAtlANOAU,
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PHONE ItMW _


I
-- -*


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
V f
Friday, August 15, 1975
Idle Atomic Speculation
It seems to us that it is idle to speculate on whether
or not Israel has nuclear weapons, or precisely how
many she has, as the Boston Globe set the world to
doing just a week ago.
Suffice it to say that the State Department's- denial
on the basis of Premier Rabin's personal assurance dur-
ing a Danish television interview last December that
Israel has no such weapons is ludicrous to say the least.
If Israel indeed nas nuclear weapons, are we to ex-
pect that she should make a formal announcement about
them? Israel, after ail, is not India.
We can only add two thoughts to all of this. Our
editor's notebooks remind us that late in the 1950's,
when Abba Eban was Israel's Ambassador to the United
Nations and the United States, he replied this way to
similar speculation ubout whether or not his country
had atomic weapons:
"Who do you think made atomic weapons in the
first place?"
Eban meant, of course, the preeminent role of Jew-
ish scientists throughout the free world in the develop-
ment of the first atom bomb, and his clear implication
was that it would be absurd to think Israel did not have
them therefore.
Our second and final thought on the matter is the
recollection of a visit of ours to the nuclear reactor at
Dimona way back in 1963.
While we have never talked about it, and do not
intend to now, we are at least moved to declare that
the advanced state of Israeli technology' in nuclear fis-
sion at the time and the distinguished array of interna-
tional scientists on the staff there spoke for themselves.
And that was more than 12 years ago.
Leonid Brezhnev's Tears
Wasn't it sad that Leonid Brezhnev was driven
into a weeping fit following the signing of the European
security agreement in Helsinki?
The U.S. came to the conference in full panoply
President Ford and Secretary of State Kissinger,
along with their perfectly pious statements about the
auspicious occasion.
This meant that we were underwriting the Soviet
Union's enslavement of most of Eastern Europe.
On top of that, just a week before, the Soviets had
succeeded in shaking Earl Butz out of another 10 million
metric tons or so of U.S. wheat, and damn the impact
of the cost of living here at home.
Then, there is Portugalon the borderline of a Com-
munist takeover. Ditto for Italy.
As for NATO generally, the fiasco we are suffering
in Turkey seems to be our crowning glory. Not only do
the Soviets live to see the falling apart of NATO.
But Secretary General Brezhnev's phony substitute
for it the European security agreement now in-
cludes President Ford's signature to it.
We don't know just exactly what it was that made
Brezhnev cry. It seems to us that he should have been
roaring with laughter all the way back to the Kremlin.
The Public's Foreign Policy
The Ford Administration suffered a major setback
when it had to withdraw its letter to Congress outlining
a proposed sale of a S350 million air defense system to
Jordan. The Stete Department said that it may resub-
mit the same proposal in September, but unless the
package is reduced, especially the number of "Hawk"
ground-to-air missile batteries, it seems likely that the
arms sale will be rejected again and rightly in Congress.
The Administration's recall of the proposal %came
only hours before the Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee was expected to reject the sale as the House
International Relations Committee had done earlier.
State Department spokesman Robert Anderson said
the Department was "surprised" by the strength of the
opposition in Congress. But he shouldn't have been.
Members of the Senate and Congressmen correctly
expressed the fear 'he sale would upset the military
balance in the Middle East.
Witnesses before the Senate and House Committees
noted that Jordan had kept out of the Yom Kippur War
because of the lack of an air defense system. There was
the Israeli fear that Jordan, with heavy air protection,
coupled with a new friendship with Syria, could take the
offensive against Israel.
Congressional opposition was clinched when Sen.
George S. Brown, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, believed that six "Hawk" batteries were sufficient
for Jordan's defensive needs.
The defeat suffered by the Administration in the
Jordanian sale should be another lesson to Secretary
of State Henry A. Kissinger that he can not run foreign
policy with complete disregard of public opinion.
Lawman Moses Bites the Dust
i.pROTECT ME from my
friends. I know my enemies
and can take care of them my-
self." Thus goes the old saying,
or something very close to it.
Example: "I'm ready for the
Arabs, but what do I do about
the Fulbrights?"
NOW COMES Burt Lancas-
ter, whose "Moses the Law
Giver" bid adieu to the tube
the other night after six gruel-
ling weekly episodes on CBS te-
levision.
Mindlin
-4j3n!3nc"rt
MODERN ArtTlSEMmSM
<$$MlSto


Before this magnum opus of
his, I would never have thought
him either a friend or an ene-
my. Now, reluctantly. I must
put him in the category of
friend.
After all, as a consequen
of his TV production,
again untold millions of _
icans heard emphasized f
them what they have been- M
ing in church on Sunday ,
their lives long the Hebr.,
God Jehovah is wrathful an
obsessed with vengeance.
SOME WILL think me obi
sessed. too. It is not two yean
ago that I took out after Si
Laurence Olivier's productioi
of Shakespeare's "The Met
chant of Venice" on ABC-TV.
What I mean by obsessed ii
this case is the freely-floatin)
fear of what non-Jews will thinl
of us as if I don't for
most part know right now
B8 If I didn't come to u_
stand long ago that I '.,
not care.
But the truth is that Sh^li
speech, "I am a Jew. Hath
a Jew eyes? Hath not a Je?
hands, organs, dimensions
senses, affections, passions?
never did mitigate for me th,
danger of "The Merchant o
Venice" especially not a
Olivier delivered it, friend o
not.
IN THE end, all the hateful
anti-Semitic stereotypes in th
play win out over tllJg speech
The Jew-hater sees a 'play and]
is confirmed in his bigotif b
no less an immortal than
speare.
Continued on Page
Who Got Most Out of Helsinki?
By MAX LERNER
Los Angeles Times Syndicate
As the leaders of Europe.
America and the Soviet Union
gathered at Helsinki, in a se-
curity powwow, the gain-and-
loss question was being raised:
Who is getting what from the
European Security Conference,
at what cost, and with what
strategv?
This is not something to
harangue about, but to make a
cool stock-taking and assess-
ment. The immediate Soviet
aim is clear enoguh.
AFTER ALMOST 60 years,
the Soviet leaders want to
legitimize the Russian Revolu-
tion, and after 30 years they
want to legitimize the new
European boundaries carved
out in the wake of World War
II. They have worked hard to
get the stamp of Western ac-
ceptance for the East European
regime.
It makes it easier for the So-
viet Union to deal with potential
unrest and dissent in those re-
eimes and within Russia itself.
It may give Western Europe
the illusory feeling that it can
ease up on NATO military
readiness and even dispense
with the American military
presence.
ON ITS side, the United
States seems to come out with
the short end of the stick. Usu-
ally the Security Conference has
been considered one of a pair
of twins, along with mutual
balanced force reduction (MB-
FR) in Europe. That hasn't hap-
pened.
Whatever the West gets from
the Soviet Union at Helsinki
will have to come mainly from
some future results of current
contested issues, in the Middle
East and in the coming SALT
agreements.
This looks like pie in the sky,
in exchange for bread now. But
in foreign policy, the intangibles
are what count, and they oper-
ate on both sides.
LERNER
WHAT THE Russians are buy-
ing is Europe's goodwill. That
can be shattered overnight bv
future Russian actions like the
past ones in Hungarv and
Czechoslovakia; it can be badly
affected by Russian rigidity In
the SALT talks or by Russian
aggression or treachery in the
Middle East.
In some ways this puts the
pressure on the Soviet Union to
enter into some sort of world
moral community.
Actually, after the American
reverses in Southeast Asia, the
idea of force reduction in
Europe might have lost its ap-
peal.
THE AMERICAN policy-ma*!
ers may now prefer to stabiliz
Europe at its present fore
levels rather than risk force re
ductions whichon the Western
sidemight take on a momen|
turn of their own.
Thus the pro and con reason
ing on Helsinki. But neithe
argument is complete unle*
touches the question of la
strategy and the future.
In the draft of a striking "net
assessment" on the comparative
strength and capabilities of th
United States and Russia -1
"Giants in Darkness." drawn uj
for the General Electric-Temp
in Washington George G. Sfl
Murphy and Michael M. Stod
dard lay out three scenario
which might describe the large:
Soviet strategy on detente.
ONE IS that of "strategic" (o:
long-term) detente, which is t<
say that the Soviets mean t<
stick with it as a permanen
policy.
The second is that of "tac,
tical" (short-term) detente. Thi!
assumes that the Soviets an
playing the detente game only
for what it is worth to them
Continued on Page 12 **
^JewSslh ricridliiam
______ < ia ui mi m i ii ii,,i i I,.,,,,,,
iWWlCK and PLANT 120 N.B. 6th St.. Miami, Fla. 33132 mone 373-t0.
lOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 373-4603
P.O. Box 2973. Miami. Florida 33101
Th t.!' FS< 3?J? relurn9 "r to be forwarded to
Jtish Floridian, P.O. Box OUSTS. Miami. Fla. 33101.
Editor Ss/SSSm?* SUZANNE SHOCHET 8ELMA M. THOMFSO>
Editor nrtl'ul.i,h" Executive Editor Assistant to Publlsl
Jjwlth Floridian Doei Not Guarantee The Kaehruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Ite Columns
leoonrt n.. c!>ub"s^">.'l Bl-Weekly by the Jewish Floridian
En. I Postage Paid at Miami. Fla.
Al"*, PY''ro.lM\,',Tri''!.'h H"v "I"' ,n" SHOFAR EPlTOniAJ
M-lv,, ,..h ,, T N:uha" PrMcher, Chairman; Lewis E.
flar: Dr. Bamuel Mi line, D.JJ I1
E. O.lir
*l
rea) One Year 8.00. Out of Town Upon
Volume 5
Friday, August 15, 1975
Number,
8 ELUL
f


y v
* Friday, August 15, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 5
Temple Has Facilities For 2,000
Temple Beth Shalom has
worship facilities to accommo-
date approximately 2,000 wor-
shippers for the High Holy Days.
The services will begin with
midnight Selichot Saturdav, Aug.
30. and continue with Rosh Ha-
shanah, Kol Nidre, and Yom
Kipour.
The services will be conduct-
ed by Dr. Morton Malavskv,
spiritual leader who begins his
I !!' ..'. *.... >. [.

I NOTICE TO TEMPLES
AND ORGANIZATIONS
Deadline for Greetings to appear in the Rosh Hashona
Edition is August 29th. Please mail to
JEWISH FLORIDIAN AND SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
P.O.B. 012973, Miami 33101, or Call 1-373-4605.
"' ___:: '" J.I '""'I......I-'I'IEIbJ

Fearful Weapons Set
For Next War
JERUSALEM(JTA)A re-
search paper by a well-known
Israeli authority of Soviet af-
fairs predicts that a fifth Arab-
Israeli war will employ the most
sophisticated and destructive
weaponry from the arsenals of
the two super-powers short of
actual nuclear weapons.
Dr. Amnon Sela, in his paper
published by the Soviet and
East European Research Center
of the Hebrew University, also
suggested that the present pre-
carious military balance in the
Middle East "creates a fertile
ground for a variety of pre-
emptive strikes."
- HAI .Ml RS ~
MIAMI MONUMENT COMPANY/i
PIRSONAUZED MEMORIALS
USTOM CRAFTED
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HE SAID that Israel is in a
military position to seize such
an opportunity but does not dare
to for political reasons. Egypt
might be willing to launch
another surprise attack on Is-
rael but does not dare to be-
cause of its present inferior
military position. Dr. Sela said.
Consequently, he observed, it
is the super-powers which will
play a decisive role in the next
war. 'In a number of ways they
have already settled what the
next war will be like and
even how long it will last."
DR. SELA believes that the
line between tactics and strate-
gy wi] continue to be obscure
in any future war unless Israel
crumbles under the weight of
Arab pressure.
"If Israel could cross the di-
viding line between tactics and
strategy, that is. winning wars
instead of battles, it would be-
come the sole arbiter of Mid-
eastern affairs." Dr. Sela wrote.
"But," he added, "no Israeli
victory of this kind seems pos-
sible."
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
JemjtA
e 3etkl
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The only all-Jewish, cemetery In Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
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For information call:
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" TEMPLE BTHEL"" /^'V-V^-
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on tht above.
NAME:
ADDRESS:
PHONE:
13th year with Temple Beth
Shalom, and he will deliver all
sermons.
The liturgy will be rendered
by Cantor Irving Gold, who has
ministered at Temple Beth Sha-
lom for the past seven years.
Assisting the rabbi and cantor
will be a professional choir,
known as the Habima High Holy
Day Singers.
Tickets are given gratis to
members of the temple. They
are also available to non-mem-
bers at varied prices depend-
ing on seat location.
For further information call
Sylvia S. Gordon at the temple
office.
Does Israel Have j
Atomic Weapons? i
WASHINGTON (JTA) The State Department has
referred reporters to a statement by Israeli Premier Yitzhak
Rabin last year denying that Israel possessed nuclear
weapons.
The statement by Rabin in a Danish television interview
broadcast on Dec. 17 was cited by Department spokesman
Robert Funseth when reporters asked him to comment on
an article in the Boston Globe that said senior American
analysts believe Israel has assembled ten nuclear weapons,
each as powerful as the atom bomb that destroyed Hiro-
shima in 1945.
Beth Shalom
Sisterhood's
Fall Schedule
Mrs. Barry Portnoy, president
of the Sisterhood of Temple
Beth Shalom, has announced the
following autumn schedule of
social activities for the group:
Labor Day Picnic at T-Y
Park, cosponsored by Sister-
hood. Senior Friedship, and the
Men's Club. Monday, Sept. 1,
at 10 a.m.
Bowling League Hegins at
9 a.m. on Monday, Sept. 8, and
continues for 35 weeks, with
free babysitting. The cost is a
moderate sum, pavable weekly,
and a full donor credit is given
to each bowler.
Mah Jong day evening at the temple be-
ginning Oct. 15. A full donor
credit is given to each player,
ner or the temple office.
THE GLOBE article was
written by William Beecher, the
paper's Washington Corre-
spondent who was, until recent-
ly, a spokesman for the Defense
Department.
Rabbi Friedman To Join
Broward Leadership Mission
Continued from Page 1
to the 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal Israel Emergency Fund
campaign.
Highlighting this leadership
mission will be:
A tour of Jerusalem, in-
cluding the Old City, Mt. Sco-
pus, Mount of Olives, Ramat
Eshkol, and the Knesset
A visit to Beit Kay, con-
valescent center for heroes of
the Yom Kippur War
A visit to an absorption
center
Luncheon with front-line
troops
A special program at Yac*
Vashem, memorial to the mar
tyrs and heroes of the Holocaust
A visit to an armv base and
JDC facilities
Shabbat at the Western
Wall
Reservations are being taken
now at the Jewish Federation
offices; a S25 deposit is neces-
sary to hold such reservation.
Funseth said that "the United
States strongly believes that
every nation should strictly ad-
here to the nuclear non-prolifer-
ation treaty,"' a treaty Israel has
not signed.
Asked if that comment in-
cluded Israel, he said "that is
very clearly implied."
But Funseth also intimated
that the U.S. accepted Rabin's
statement that "Israel is not a
nuclear power which means
Israel has no nuclear weapons."
FUNSETH NOTED that Rabin
stressed in the interview the
Israeli government's policy that
it will not be the first to intro-
duce nuclear weapons in the
Middle East conflict.
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SONNY LEVITT, F.D. ALBERT LAYTON, F.D. PHILIP WEINSTE1N, F.D.
I


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
~* .
Friday, August 15, 197S
Local, National, International Leaders Exchange
i
Continued from Page 1
this countrj hi his capacity as
chairman of the Reform move-
ment's education program.
Distaff leadership was repre-
sented by Mrs. Eve Weiss, na-
tional director of the Women's
Division of UJA, who was join-
ed by Mrs. Reva Wexler, im-
mediate past president of the
Miami Federation's Women's Di-
vision and member of the Na-
tional Women's Division Board
of UJA.
A highlight of the event was
a presentation by Carole Bu-
shell, coordinator of media re-
lation of the UJA. on public re-
lations as a tool in the 1976
campaign.
And Dr. James Young, CJF
Director of Field Service, spoke
on trends in various Federa-
tions throughout the United
States.
Lewis Cohn, Ann Cohn, Dr. Jim Young, Lisa P*itcher, Nathan Pritcher
Ina Linda, Marion Levitats, Reva Wexler


Friday. August 15, iy75
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 7
+ 9
Ideas At Palmaire C-C Weekend Retreat
Karen Margulies, Rabbi Daniel Syme, Joyce Newman
Reva Wexler Conducts Women's Division Campaign Clini
Dr. Norman Atkin, Sydney Holtzman, Dr. Jim Young, Allen Gordon
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Nestel
Herbert Katz, Irving Bernstein, Lewis E. Cohn '
Herbert Katz Introduces Saturday's Dinner Speaker
Additional Photos Page 11



Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, August 15, 1975

? Ask Abe ?
by ABE BALPERN
QUESTION: Why is cir-
cumcision so important in
Jewish life?
SONIA MARTIN
Hallandale, Fla.
ANSWER: Circumcision, He-
brew milah or berit milah,
covenant of the circumcision
(Yiddish, bris).
It consists of the removal of
the foreskin which covers the
glans of the penis. It is an
operation performed on all male
Jewish children on the eighth
day after birth, and also upon
male converts to Judaism.
According to Biblical ac-
count, Abraham circumcised
himself at the age of ninety-
nine. Thi.s was at divine behest.
The Covenant was further ex-
pressed as follows: "Every male
among you shall be circumcised.
You shall circumcise the flesh
of your foreskin, and that shall
be the sign of the covenant be-
tween Me and you. At the age of
eight days, every male among
you throughout the generations
shall be circumcised ." (Gen-
esis 17:10, 11, 12)
Traditionally it is a Jewish
father's duty to have his son
circumcised. Had he neglected
to do so. it devolved on the
communal authorities. It is not
a sacrament, and any child born
of a Jewish mother is a Jew,
whether Circumcised or not.
The circumcision must take.
place on the eighth day, even if
it is a Sabbath or a Festival.
Should the child be premature
or in poor health, then the cir-
cumcision must be postponed.
According to the commen-
taries of the Talmud and the
Midrashim, the commandment
is considered so important that
the Rabbis declared that were
it not for the blood of the Cov-1
enant. heaven and earth would
not exist.
Abraham was said to have
circumcised himself on the tenth
day of Tishri, the day later cel-
ebrated as the Day of Atone-
ment, when the sins of the peo-
ple are forgiven.
Circumcision dates back to
prehistoric times. It is one of
the oldest operations perform-
ed by man and is also perform-
ed by many peoples all over the
world.
However, in Jewish life it be-
came not only a religious prac-
tice, but took on a national
character as well. Throughout
the generations, from Abraham
to this day, the rite of circum-
cision is a tradition practiced
almost one hundred per cent in
every Jewish home, even at the
risk of martyrdom.
Many Jewish mothers suffer-
ed martyrdom as the result of
circumcision of their sons when
the prohibition against it was
enacted under Antiouchus Epi-
phanes. (175-163 b.c.e.)
According to Spinoza, the
practice of circumcision was
alone sufficient to ensure the
survival of the Jewish people.
"It is not only a religious but
almost a national practice, and
is observed as enthusiastically
by the secularists of modern Is-
rael as by the traditional believ-
ers.
"Its influence on Jewish life
throughout the ages has been
so strong that its observance is
often the sole remaining token
of affinity with Judaism, even
after intermarriage, when the
Jewish parent insists on the cir-
cumcision of the sons.
"It has had a great effect on
the collective conscience of Is-
rael ... In Judaism it became
a sign of the awareness of God.
It sanctified the human body
and aided it in its tight against
erotic indulgence The pas-
sions were not to be ignored or
suppressed, but were to be sub-
limated to noble ends. The peo-
pel were to be holy, for their
God was holy." (Encyclopaedia
Judaica, Vol. 5, pp. 575, 576)
It is interesting to note that
there is some medical evidence
that since Jewish circumcision
is a complete and effective sur-
gical operation when performed
in infancy, it appears to be a
complete protection against sub-
sequent development of cancer
of the penis, and also seems to
be a protection against one
cause of cancer of the cervix in
women.
Editor's note:
Please send questions to
??? ASK ABE ???
c 'o Jewish Fedsration of
South Broward
2838 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood. Florida 33020
Committee
Extends
Credits
WASHINGTON (JTAl A
House-Senate Conference Com-
mittee has ensnded arms sales
and credits to Isra-1. due to
e-"ire Dec. 31, until June 30,
1977.
TV l-mont'i e contained in a $31.2 billion bill
authorizing ar-^s purchased by
the Department of Defense
which was made public by the
Conference Committee. Con-
gress may aoorove the bill and
s"nd it to President Ford for
his signature.
THE HOUSF.-Senate Confer-
ence Committee had been ap-
pointed to work out the differ-
ence between the two bodies in
the bill, including the arms sale
to Israel.
The Senate had aoproved an
extension of arms sales to Israel
while the House had not. The
Senate approval was over the
The Conference Committee re-
pom l'sted the House members
as registering "strious reserva-
tions' about the extension to
Israel because they believed the
proposal should not have been
in the weapons bill and should
be considered by the commit-
tees dealing with foreign affairs
AT CITY UNIVERSITY
Regents Urged to Probe
Bias in Medical Training
NEW YORK Charging
that admission to the City
University's medical train-
ing program last year was
"unfair, discriminatory and
based on racial categories
and quotas," the American
Jewish Congress has called
on the State Board of Re-
gents to launch "a thorough
and immediate review of the
1974 admissions process" to
prevent future abuses.
In testimony before the
Regents' higher education
comm:ttee in Albany last
week, Sylvia Deutsch, direc-
tor of the Congress' New
York Metropolitan Council,
also urged:
Censure of any officials in-
volved 'if discrimination and
racial preference are found to
have taken place;"
Admission into the medical
training program of "those stu-
dents deni 'd entry by reason of
discrimination;"
"A clear and unequivocal
statement opposing the use of
racial and ethnic criteria as an
integral part of the revised ad-
mission orocedure."
F It Pays You To
MAKE RESERVATIONS EARLY..
MRS. DEUTSCH warned that
the "unresolved controversy"
over charges of discrimination
could "blight an important and
innovative program." She add-
ed:
"We believe that the biomed-
ical program can play a vital
role in meeting the shortage of
physicians in our urban areas
and in serving as a model for
sitmilar programs throughout
the country. However safe-
guards must be established and
enforced to prevent discrimina-
tion, preference or quotas.
"The Board of Regents must
ensupe that higher education ad-
mission criteria, policies and
practices are totally non-dis-
criminatory."
THE PROGRAM of the City
College Center for Biomedical
Education offers a four-year
undergraduate program that in-
cludes the equivalent of the first
two years of medical school.
Students who complete the four-
year course and pass a special
examination will be admitted in-
to the third year of medical
0_.,,i ,>,s making it possible
to obtain an MD degree in six
years instead of eight.
The New
KOSHER HOTEL of the
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<


Friday, August 15, 1975
The Jewish Floridicn ar.d Shofar of Holly wood
Page 9
Lawman Moses Succumbs to Lancaster
On a lesser dramatic U.vel,
Burt Lancaster has done us a
similar disservice, friend or not.
Once again, the Jew-hater is
confirmed in his bigotry-. "So
that's how Moses was," he rea-
sons. "That's how they all are.
It wouldn't be shown on TV if
it weren't true."
And why should he not rea-
son that way? When the people
of Israel, fleeing from the Pha-
raoh, lose faith in Moses, they
succumb to the blandishments
of idolatry.
CECIL B. DeMILLE Jiad
Charlton Ileston hurl down the
tablets given to him by God on
Mt Sinai then despite hi-; an-
return to the mounteintop
for a second copy.
But Lancaster does move.
Lancaster whips and stones his
errant Israelites to death in the
name of Jehovah's' love. He
even melts down Aaron's i
to burning liquid gold and forc-
es them to drink of it as a sign
of their sinful ways, which of
course kills them, a process he
sees as punishment and expia-
tion.
How very Freudian, and
even Christian if you will, the
"taking" of the Host for purifi-
cation.
AS IF that weren t enough,
Lancaster's Moses hurls Israel-
ites over steep desert cliffs
wholesale. For a moment, he
has us confused, and we think
we are back with him in Tomb-
stone or Dodge City, fightin'
Injuns or the sheriff or sheep-
hearding poachers intruding on
good cattle-grazing land.
In God's name, he wreaks the
kind of carnage for which Je-
hovah is so well-known in a
Gentile world. Nothing of Mo-
ses' humanity, humility and
destiny, all of these qualities
emphasized by his fearful ft un-
mering, emerges in Lanca_--...'
characterization.
In the end. nothing can save
the production either from the
fate of its terrible mediae:uv
and unfidelity to history and
Jewish tradition.
IN FACT, Dodge City-style,
Lancaster's Moses pentilicates.
ml/ does he not stammer,
an Old restament flourish de-
.1 to undei sc n i his m >.-
tality but on can
"' is delta .,[
b -
j md the next pa -
And
da) ?'.
Jo it."
when a child aski -
"Where is v. ises to-
I
: le musi
To which, if asl ed, I can
observe, "You call thai s
the burnings, the
the hurlings of Israelites to
death from cliff-t
And. indeed, wiiat did the
Pharaoh do that Moses presum-
ably does not do better? That is
what the old saying means by
"protect me from my friends."
I AM at a loss to understand
why Lancaster put this pot-boil-
er together in the first place.
To state it bluntly. "The Bird-
man of Alcatraz" has flown the
coop.
If Lancaster's characteriza-
tion of Moses lacks, among
other things, destiny, it is that
Lancaster himself licks destiny
for such a role. The dramatic
weight is simply not there.
own impression was of
dialogue devoid of either poe-
try or con.iction. He seemed
to have all the clan of a mono-
syllabic football coach in heat.
PERHAPS LIKE old Father
Abraham, Lancaster "has come
to his days." tie can no longer.
with the ease c.i a decade or
tv i ag i. fly daringly on a Big
I 'ape e or outdraw the
sheriffs of half a dozen or so
counties in the nineteenth cen-
tury American southwest or
ff-lik walls in a dts-
pl >y oi b i acrob iti :s,
ust r lort t> h
-i 'om their tops in
In ."' perl
. and career as an
in which he purpi rtcdJy
towa d the excellence of
Canaan, but was not permitted
I i nter because of ...
lers he committed in an
endless array of shoot-'em-ups.
Whatever me reason, the guilt
he must now bear for "Moses
the Law Giver" is not entirely
his own. Chief script-writer was
Anthony Burgess, one of the
most talented novelists of the
past two decades ("Enderby."
"A Clockwork Orange." "The
E^e of Saint Venus," 'The
Wanting Seed.")
BUT THE Burgess script, an
effort gone awry, would betray
anyone u.nst cruelly, not only
the likes of Burt Lancaster. To
forestall that eventuality, the
Hand of Jehovah, believe it or
not, attempted a role in "Moses
the Law Giver."
le 1973 Yom Kippur War
interrupted Lancaster's produc-
ti hi scheduU in the Sinai. It
' as .i hi. i le ... .. .. to Lan-
c iste : ; .; e it all up as an
v icked as
efl :.. But Lancaster,
obviously, Ignored it.
And so now, the damage to
i a i it not to M ises is done.
One can only wonder what will
bi required of him to expiate
his own idolatry in the desert.
Perhaps a gentle shove off one
Of the steep cliffs surrounding
.'Sc erly mils.
School Opens Yom Kippur
ROSSMOOR EXECUTIVE SAYS
Thousands Of People Love
Living In Condominiums9
PARIS(JTA) The French
Chief Rabbi, Dr. Jacob Kaplan,
has called on all Jewish parents
not to send their children to
school on the opening of the
scholastic year, Sept. 15, which
falls on Yom Kippur.
In an official communique,
the chief rabbi also "deplored
the administration's refusal to
postpone the forthcoming school
year by one day to enable Jew-
ish children to attend."
THE COMMUNIQUE was re-
leased after Dr. Kaplan and the
president of the French Central
Consistory, Baron Alain de
Rothschild, appealed in vain to
the Minister of Education and
other top officials asking them
to change the school opening
day.
The Ministry of Education,
which fixes the start of the
school year for all establish-
ments in the country, refused
to change the date but officially
authorized Jewish students and
teachers to start school one day
late this year.
Flushing
Man Back
On Job
Continued JFrom Page 1
serve the Jewish High Holy
Days.
Four days after contacting
ADL. he spoke with an EEO
representative at the hospital.
On Oct. 24. he was notified that
he would be terminated on Nov.
8.
The Flushing resident filed
two formal complaints to the
U.S. Civil Service Commission
with ADL assistance. In one. he
charged discrimination, submit-
ting a statement by fellow em-
ployees that his supervisor had
made anti-Semitic remarks.
HE ALSO submitted state-
ments from two other super-
visors as to the high quality of
rk,
'.n the second complaint, he
ged he was fired in retalia-
tion for complaining to the EEO
representative the previous
month.
Emert was represented by at-
torney Michael Krakower. of the
Lawyer's Lodge of B'nai B'rith.
Krakower acted on behalf of
ADL.
IN THE past several months,
ADL also successfully repre-
sented five postal employees
and is currently representing
five others, all of them denied
promotions because of a misin-
terpretation of the federal gov-
ernment's affirmative action
program, Kohler said.
According to Kohler, all ten
were by-passed for promotions,
with the advancements going to
"disadvantaged persons," de-
spite the fact that all ten had
better examination scores and
good records.
Attorneys Howard Sherman
and Nathan Schwartz each rep-
resented one of the successful
complainants for ADL before a
U.S. Civil Service Commission
EEO complaints examiner.
Critics of the condominium
development industry may. in
their occasional eagerness to
find fault, tend to disregard one
of the really salient features of
that industry, according to a
veteran south Florida realty
executive long identified with
condominium development and
marketing.
"For many persons, particu-
larly gregarious, sociable adults
whose children have grown-and-
gone. condominium living is ex-
tremely attractive, economical
and viable. For them, it works,
and works beautifully," accord-
ing to. Larry Uchin. sales-mar-
keting vice president of Ross-
moor Coconut Creek, a total en-
vironment community being de-
veloped on a 600-acre site at
exit 24 of the Florida Turnpike,
near Pompano Beach.
"The most popular facility is
the recreation center, or social
complex. Based on our experi-
ence with over 50,000 residents
in Rossmoor communities in six
states, we feel that the club-
house is an imperative for adult
community residents. They in-
sist on itand they certainly
use it." Uchin said.
At Rossmoor Coconut Creek.
Clubhouse One, a $2 million
complex of seven buildings un-
der a mutual roof, is the rapid-
ly-growing community's "nerve-
center" and is in near-constant
use by residents. Other club-
houses are projected for Ross-
moor, which will be. when com-
pleted, a community of more
than 10.000 adults, living in 24
Caribbean-themed "villages."
One of the other high-priority
features at Rossmoor, and also
available in several other major
developments, is a health
ice. staffed with registered
nurses. Rossmoor's health serv-
ices center, open around the
clock, is under direction of
Peggy Sposato. a regisi
nurse, and there are six full-
time registered nurses on duty
Night-and-day security serv-
ice is another feature a] Ross-
moor. The community is sur-
rounded by a privacy-,md'
curity wall of masonry; admis-
sion is via an attended gate-
house only. Mobile security
units patrol the commumtv
around the clock. All Rossmoor
residential units are equipped
with emergency signals, linking
them to the gatehouse and the
communications central.
"There is no way that a value
can be set on this feature of a
condominium community."
Uchin said. "A sense of security
and well-being is priceless."
GREETING CARDS FOR
SOVIET JEWS ON SALE
Greeting cards with
names and addresses of
Soviet Jews are available
at the front desk of the
Jewish Federation offices at
283S Hollywood Blvd. On
package contains five cards
for SI; postage airmail is
26c each. Also availabh it
a 5-year Jewish calendar
and Hebrew alphabet.
Plense let Soviet Jews
know that we have not for-
gotten them!


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, August 15, 1975
community
.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 19
Senior Friendship Club of Temple Beth Shalom Regular
meetingAssembly Hallnoon
MONDAY, AUGUST 25
Temple Beth Shalom SisterhoodBoard Meeting8 p.m.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 26
Temple Beth Shalom Senior Friendship ClubRegular
MeetingAssembly Hallnoon
THURSDAY, AUGUST 28
ZOA, Broward County DistrictRegular meetingWash-
ington Federal Building, Park Road and Hollywood
Boulevard2 p.m.
FEDERATION SINGLES SCHEDULE
MONDAY, AUGUST 18
Al Golden, ADL member, will speak at Home Federal
Building, Young Circle, at 8 p.m.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 23
House Party in Lauderhill featuring all Israeli food. RSVP
in Broward 923-8573, in Dade 945-4066
MONDAY, AUGUST 25
Discussion group at Hollywood Federal Bank. 6100 Griffin
Rd.. 2nd floor8 p.m. (Dorothy Mitchell is vice
president and Harriet Burack treasurer.)
Young Professionals Professionals II
Call 538-2884 for information on all events.
FRIDAY, AUGUST IS
Office Party at John's Office, Suite 706, 12550 Biscayne
Blvd., at 8 p.m.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 16
House Party in southwest Miami at 9 p.m.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 17
Live Band Dance at the Green Dolphin Restaurant, Bis-
cayne Boulevard and 5th Street, at 8 p.m. Music by
Danielle and the Tropic Sun
Stone Will
| Open Office
1 In Miami
Sen. Richard (Dick) Stone
will open a Miami office to serve
constituents and provide liaison
with local and regional govern-
ments in South Florida next
month, it has been announced.
Staffing the office will be
Peter Weiner, who has been an
aide to Stone in Tallahassee and
Washington. Weiner's geograph-
ic area of responsibility will ex-
tend from Palm Beach on the
north to Key West on the south,
and west to Fort Myers.
"We have known of the need
for this office all along." Stone
said, "but we waited until we
could assign someone who
knows all phases of our constitu-
ent-service and legislative oper-
ations.
"Mr. Weiner has now achiev-
ed that background," Stone add-
ed. "He is equipped to help us
serve the citizens of South Flor-
ida as well as we possibly can."
The Stone office in Miami, to
open Tuesday, Sept. 2, will be
located in Room 731 of the Fed-
eral Office Building at 51 SW
First Ave.
Weiner will soon announce
regular hours for constituent
service in the office. When he
is traveling to other areas of
South Florida on business he
will keep in touch by means of
a bilingual telephone answering
service.
Weiner, 29, has maintained
permanent residence in Miami
since 1972. A former Peace
Corps volunteer in Brazil, he
nas specialized in condominium
and senior citizens legislation
and casework while working in
the Senator's Tallahassee and
Washington offices since Janu-
ary, 1975. .
Bar Mitzvah
LAWRENCE SHURACK
Lawrence, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Jack Shurack, will be Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday, Aug. 16, at Tem-
ple Israel of Miramar.
to ft ft
MARC EBER
Marc, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Alfred Eber, will be Bar Mitzvah
Saturday, Aug. 23, at Temple
Israel of Miramar.
Religious
Services
itrtllnfHrMf
NALLANDALI JEWISH CBNTB*
(Coneervativa). 1 NaT Str. Av
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz. Canto*
Jacob Dammar.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
INAI (Templa) of NORTH DAD*.
IS801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Raich P. Kingaley, Cantor Irving
Shulkea.
NORTH BROWARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. Liberal. S501 Unlver-
eity Dr. Rabbi Max Waltz.
------------------
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER, 878
N.W. 57th St., (Conaervatlve) Rab-
bi Milton J. Groaa.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 South Nob Hill Road,
Plantation. Rabbi Arthur Abram.
Friday 8 p.m.
HOLLYWOOD
VOUNO ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
(Orthodox). 3891 Sterling Rd.. op.
poaite Hollywood Hills High School
Preaident Dr. Frank Stain.
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1361 fc
14th Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffe. Aaaiatant Rabbi Harvey M.
Roaenfeld.
BETH SHALOM (1 ampie) Conaerva.
tlv*. 4601 Arthur St. Rabbi Mortoa
Maiavaxy, Cantor irvIng Gold.
TEMPLE BETH .HM (Conaervatlve).
jiO SW 62nd Ave., Hollywood.
TEMPLE SINAI (Conservative). 1201
ohnson St Rabbi David Shaoiro
Aaaociat* ilabbi Chaim S. Llatfield.
Cantor Yehuda Hallbraun
M
CANDIELIGHTING TIME
8 ELUL 7:38
iji
I
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal). 5100 Sher.
idan St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Robert
Frazin. 41-C
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE .'SRAEL (Conaervatlve)
W0 SW 86th SL RaPDl Avrom
aaaajaflfa,
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES (Conaerva-
trve) 1900 N. University Dr.. Pern-
broke Pinea. Rabbi Sidney Lubin.
Hfflel Plans
Half-Day
Pre-School
Hillel Community Day School
plans to open a half-day Pre-
School to provide an opportuni-
ty for those students on the
waiting list to take advantage of
the educational program offered
at Hillel.
"This program will enable
those students who are not yet
ready for a full day of school
to benefit from a school pro-
gram that will meet their pres-
ent needs," said Rabbi Albert
Mayerfeld, principal.
"The vulnerability of young
children necessitates quality ed-
ucational programs along with
meaningful Shabbat and holiday
experiences," Rabbi Mayerfeld
added.
"In keeping with this philoso-
phy, Hillel Community Day
School offers an exciting, chal-
lenging and supportive educa-
tional environment for little
people. It is an environment
geared to the child's individual
needs, encouraging learning in
a realistic way."
The rapiu growth of the stu-
dent population at Hillel, 21288
Biscayne Blvd., North Miami
Beach, has been analyzed and
evaluated by the staff and the
Educational Committee, Dr. Lee
Duffner, chairman of the educa-
tion committee announced.
"The purpose of the study
was to determine how the
school can best serve its grow-
ing young community effective-
ly with educational excellence,"
Dr. Duffner reportetd.
Hitlers Pre-School for three
and four year olds has tripled
its enrollment during the past
year. Despite the addition of
class units, the school has a
waiting list.
According to Marshall Bal-
tuch, executive director, bus
transportation will be provided
in the morning only; the child
will be picked up in front of his
home.
Hours for the half day session
will be from 8:30 a.m. until
noon, Monday through Friday.
In keeping with the school
policy of providing individual
attention to every student, en-
rollment is limited and, there-
fore, early registration is sug-
gested.
For further information, call
the school office from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Monday through Friday.
Stop Aid
ToILO
WASHINGTON (JTA)
George Meany, AFL-CIO presi-
dent, last week asked Congress
to stop financing international
programs and agencies that
have been transformed into "in-
struments of political warfare"
against the U.S. and Israel.
His targets, in testimony be-
fore the House International Re-
lations Committee, were the In-
ternational Labor Organization
and UNESCO.
MEANY NOTED that both
organizations were set up for
humanitarian reasons and have
done good work in the past,
particularly the ILO. But in re-
cent years, under the domina-
tion of the Communist-Arab
bloc, the ILO and UNESCO
"have been completely pervert-
ed," he charged.
Responding to a question,
Meany said the U.S. should give
the required two year notice of
intention to withdraw from both
organizations.
Sisterhood President Announces
Appointment Of Board Members
A number of women have
been annotated by Beth Shalom
Sisterhood president Mrs. Barry
Portnoy to assist the four vice
presidents for the coming year.
Working with Mm. Albert.
Robert, fund-raising vice pres-
ident, will be Mrs. Sidney Gold-
smith, Torah Fund cards; Mrs.
Jack Shapiro, Thrift Shop co-
ordinator; Mrs. Leon Brauser,
vice chairman of the Art Auc-
tion; Mrs. Samuel Davis, Donor
Committee;
Also Mrs. Fred Blumenthal,
chairman of the Art Auction;
Blind Benefit
From Luncheon
And Card Party
The "Service to the Blind"
program of Temple Beth El Sis-
terhood will benefit by the
group's annual luncheon and
card party to be held in the
Tobin Auditorium of the tem-
ple, 1351 S. 14th Ave., Holly-
wood, at noon Monday, Aug. 25.
The public is invited.
Sisterhood's Braille Services
provide study and test materials
for students at Nova Elementary
and Middle Schools, as well as
for students throughout the
State of Florida. Blind adults
benefit by the transcription of
career and technical manuals,
and the group also provides li-
brary hooks to the Jewish
Braille Institute of America.
The Braille Bindery group
wdrks under the chairmanship
of Mrs. Milton Forman, with
Mrs. Abraham Halpern in
charge of the tape recording of
books for the Nova Schools.
Mrs. Caryl Fetdman of Hollv-
wood. founder of Sisterhood's
"Service to the Blind," is now
coordinator of volunteers for the
proiect.
Planning for the luncheon is
being done by cochairladies
Mrs. Melvin Freedman and Mrs.
H--rld Rtner. assisted by Mrs.
Julius Halpern, Mrs. Alfred
Mazzarino, Mrs. Samuel Pollack,
Mrs. Mn'-tin Renno and Mrs.
Charles Wolfe.
For tickets and resrvations
call Sisterhood President Mrs.
Harry Finer, Mrs. Harold Part-
ner, or the temple office.
Mrs. Mix Cossin, donor sav-
ings and Tree of Life; Mrs.
Reuben Gillman, Torah Fund
chairman; Mrs. Sy Levin, vice
chairman of donor and treasurer
of the bowling league; Mrs. Jack
Levy, Wometco ticket sales;
Mrs. George Lustig, vice chair-
man of the Torah Fund;
Also Mrs. Frank Mirrer, fund-
raising events; Mrs. Wolf Reich-
kind, tribute cards; Mrs. Sey-
mour Samet. Early Bird; Mrs.
Joel Schneider, gift shop coor-
dinator; Mrs. Martin Klebanow,
Kiddushes and Oneg Shabbats;
Mrs. Joseph Rindner, donor
chairman; and Mrs. Jack Klein-
er, gift shop.
Assisting Mrs. Allan Freed-
man. Youth vice president, will
be Mrs. Rena Stern, Youth vice
chairman.
Mrs. Spencer Schoem. pro-
gram vice president, will have
the assistance of Mrs. Jacob
Rndermn. education and book
study chairman, and Mrs. Sol
Cohn, visual ails.
WorTing with Mrs. Michael
POtrwlrth-, rno'*ibership vice
president, will be Mrs. Morton
MalavsVv, Sunshine; Mrs. Law-
renc Anpel, '"ice chairman of
membership; Mrs. George Bar-
ren. Shalom baskets; Mrs. How-
ard Mindel. Secret Pal and
chairman of the nominating
committee; Mrs. Issie Messer,
guest book; Mrs. Martin Sklar,
retention; Mrs. Samuel Katz,
telephone squad; Mrs. William
Leiblein. Leagrams; Mrs. Irv-
ing Miller, hospitality; Mrs.
Morris Guss. hosnitality; and
Mrs. Harvey Sogoloff, mailing.
Serving on the Executive
Committee with Mrs. Portnoy
and the four vice presidents
-i'1 Mrs. Hv Rosen, corre-
sponding secretary; Mrs. Josef
l< ichKina, recording secretary;
Mrs. Jerome Friedman, treasur-
er: Mrs. Herman Toll, financial
secretary; and Mrs. Edward
Hoffman, parliamentarian.
GOING TO THE USSR?
Please contact the Jew-
ish Federation Soviet Jewry
Committee at 921 8810
about meeting and helping
Soviet Jews in various cities
while you visit Russia.
$899 EXCURSION TO RUSSIA AVAILABLE
A special excursion rate of $899 per person, double
occupancy, round-trip to the USSR from Washington, D.C.,
is available through Federation. The date of departure is
October 23; return is scheduled Nov. 7. Please contact the
Federation office for further information regarding the trip
and details on how one meets Soviet Jews.
Ezry To Head Temple Beth Shalom
Education Department As Director
Dr. Morton Malavsky. spirit-
ual leader of Temple Beth Shi-
lom, and Dr. Fred Blumenthal,
president and chairman of the
temple's school, have announc-
ed the appointment of Morris
Ezry as head of the educational
department.
Mr. Ezry is a graduate of
Marquette University, where he
majored in education and lan-
guage. His graduate work was
done at the Sperms College of
Judaica in Chicago.
Mr. Ezry has served religious
schools in Milwaukee, Wilmette
and Peoria. and has taught at
Bradley University College of
Liberal Arts.
The new director will be re-
sponsible for the total educa-
tional programming at Temple
Beth Shalom, and will be avail-
able for consultations with
parents and educators. His im-
meai ite goal is the formation of
a junior high school division.
MORRIS EZRY


L, August 15, 1975
The Jewish FlorWan and Shojar o1 Hrtlvwnod
Page 11
leas Exchanged At Palmaire C-C Weekend Retreat

Lewis E. Conn Addresses Meeting
haul Werner, Allen Gordon, Carole Bushnell, Herbert Katz
Irving Bernste'n Addresses aiuraa 's Dinner Guests
Chaplain's Schedule
The Jewish Federation of of South Broward, Inc. an-
nounces that Kabbi Harold Riohter, Chaplain for South Brow-
ard County, wiil be visiting the following
hospitals on a regular basis:
Mondays Doctors, Community and
South Florida State Hospitals.
Wednesdays Hollywood Memorial
Hospital
Fridays Golden Isles Hospital.
The Rabbi will also \isit nursing
homes and pena> institutions in the South
Broward area, in addition, be will visit
institutions in Fort Lauderdale on Tues-
day; and Thursdays,
!',! fvth'T irl>nnation. please visit Ths Jewish Federa-
tion Office at 2835 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood or phone
9^1-SS10 or 966-7751.
Rabbi Kichter
PAUL S. JELLINGER, M.D.
ANNOUNCES THE RELOCATION AND OPENING OF HIS OFFICE,
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
ENDOCRINOLOGY AND INTERNAL MEDICINE
Ai
HOLLYWOOD MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL PLAZA
3700 WASHINGTON STREET. HOLLYWOOD
BY APPOINTMENT
TELEPHONE 963 7100
t*aul Werner, Allen Gordon, Larote Bashell, Herbert Katz

Car/!A Joarron, MfJb.
tUKtM tirtal tttixitri in m:n: 'inrinq
i:.i tmocialim cj hm brotner
Jloicard(J. /' /. J).
for ill praclirt ,:
l aniuliijij tintl JitUrnul .illtutctiie
20t7 n,l/y,r '.lUli/u-vJ. fl.r..U 13030" 930-7277
lieva \vcxitr Ccndtict.n? W^rne t a Oiviswn Ccxi.ipagn Clinic

Session On "Role Of Federation In American Jewish Community"
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
HIGH HOLIDAY
SERVICES
THE OAKS CONDOMINIUM
Stirling Road and 56'h Avenue
Conducted by
RABBI MOSI1F BOMZEK
and
CANTOS I. WALLACE
SLICHFS AUGUST 30
ROSH HAS.HONA SEPTEMBER 6 AND 7
YOM KIPPUR SEPTEMBER 14 AND 15
FOR INFORMAT'ON CALL:
966-7877 962-1540 983-0713
---------


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar 0/ Hollywood
Friday, August 15, 197V

See War More Likely This Year Ford Encouraged;
Weapons Flow Sloic
Continued from Page 1
of Israel by demanding the
rights of the Palestinian
people and thereby hope for
the ultimate destruction of
the Jewish State. In fact,
military circles feel that
chances of war are much
greater now than a year ago.
THAT GLOOMY scenario,
though by no means shared by
all Israelis, is based on both
military and political develop-
ments of the past year. A year
ago, Israeli military circles
point out, Egypt and Syria were
in an adverse position owing to
the severe losses they suffered
in the Yom Kippur War.
But since July, 1974, the situ-
ation has changed. The Egyp-
tian and Syrian forces have
been reequipped to their pre-
Yom Kippur War strength, and
Syria, in fact, may be even
stronger militarily than in Oc-
tober, 1973, the military circles
say
Furthermore, they point out,
while the political situation was
obscure a year ago, the Arabs
today are increasingly blunt in
their statements and their talk
now is openly of a new war
rather than peace.
PRESIDENT ANWAR Sadat of .
Egypt has declared publicly that
peace with Israel is not attain-
able in this generation. He made
those remarks despite the on-
going negotiations for a Sinai
settlement, and they echoed the
Ara bsummit meeting at Rabat,
Morocco, last October when the
Arab summit meeting at Rabat,
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion the status of representative
and spokesman for the Palestin-
ian people.
What the Arabs want, these
Israeli circles say, is peace with-
out negotiations and without
concessions on their part.
They warn Israel back to its
June. 1967, lines and not an
inch less and would then start
dictating demands on behalf of
the Palestinians. In short, they
sav. the conditions, of the 1974
Rabat summit remain operative
no negotiations, no recogni-
tion and no peace with Israel.
THERE CAN be no progress
toward peace, the Israelis say,
while the Arabs constantly es-
calate their economic and po-
litical warfare against Israel in
the form of the boycott, the oil
weapon and attempts to oust Is-
rael from the United Nations.
Assessing the immediate mili-
tary situation, Israeli circles
concede that there have been no
overt violations by the Egyp-
tians of the January, 1974, dis-
engagement agreement. To the
best of Israel's knowledge, the
' Egyptians have not advanced
anti-aircraft missile batteries in-
to the limited forces zone west
of the Suez Canal or on the
eastern banks of the canal.
But they have prepared sites
for such batteries on both banks
of the waterway and Israel re-
gards this as a violation of the
disengagement terms.
SIMILARLY, Israel has no in-
formation that the Soviet MIG-
25 jets, flown by Russian pilots,
have been withdrawn from
Egypt. The MIG-25s were sta-
tioned in Egypt before the Yom
Kippur War and flew reconnais-
sance missions over Israel-held
territory.
According to direct Israeli ob-
servation, Egypt's army, navy
and air force were placed on a
state of alert two weeks ago
when Egyptian Foreign Minister
Ismail Fahmy announced that
his government would not agree
to extend the UNEF mandate
which expired July 24.
(This was confirmed by
President Sadat in Khartoum
when he said that Egypt's arm-
ed forces were in full mobiliza-
tion and under 24 hour alert. He
told a press conference in the
Sudan capital that "The time we
feel that diplomatic efforts are
of no use, we will have nothing
left before us but to prepare
for another battle." Sadat said
Israel had no option but to with-
draw totally from occupied Arab
territories and restore the legiti-
mate rights of the Palestinian
people.)
THE EGYPTIANS subsequent-
ly reversed themselves on UNEF
but Israeli security circles are
convinced that had UNEF been
forced to withdraw, clashes be-
tween Israeli and Egyptian forc-
es would have been inevitable.
Each side would have at-
tempted to seize as much as pos-
sible of the buffer zone evacu-
ated by the UN forces.
That immediate crisis has
been resolved, temporarily, but
it is the opinion not only of Is-
rael but of the Security Council
that the tension will be renewed
on an even more dangerous
scale as the new UNEF dead-
line of Oct. 24 approaches.
Should the UNEF mandate be
terminated then, Israeli circles
fear a replay of the 1969-70 war
of attrition between Israel and
Egypt on an even more inten-
sive scale as each side would
try to prevent the other from
gaining the initiative.
WITH REGARD to Israel's
other neighbors, observers not-
ed that there were no signs of
a military alert in Saudi Arabia,
Syria or Jordan during the re-
cent crisis over UNEF.
The Jordanians, nevertheless,
are continuing to build up their
fortifications on a line facing
Israel and would doubtlesslv
use them as the jumping off
point for an attack should they
join in a new war against Israel.
They are more likely to join,
Israeli circles say. if they re-
ceive the $350 million air de-
fense system they seek from the
United States which would pro-
vide an umbrella against Israeli
air attacks on Jordan.
ISRAELIS ARE also seriously
concerned that Jordan might
once again give the PLO terror-
ists a free hand to operate from
its territory.
On the other hand, security
circles here seem convinced
that Jordan is more concerned
over the effects on its own
sovereignty if the PLO was al-
lowed to operate from bases in
Jordan.
Israel Rolls Out Carpet
For Mexico's Echeverria
Continued irom Page 1-
hosts on behalf of self-determi-
nation for the Palestinian peo-
ple, a cause which he has con-
sistently supported.
(Self-determination as a po-
litical principle of universal ap-
plication is almost a part of
the Mexican ethos, say observ-
ers of Mexican politics.)
HE WILL argue, too, against
the acquisition of territory by
forcea cardinal and con-
sistent plank of Mexican po-
litical philosophy.
Mexico itself had vast areas
of fertile land taken by force
by the U.S. (California, Texas,
New Mexico), and partly as a
result of that it firmly opposes
such phenomena in other parts
of the world.
But beyond the differences of
view, which Israeli diplomats
and others who know him well
say are sincerely held on Eche-
verria's part, the Mexican lead-
er is considered here to be a
warm friend of Israel and the
Jewish people and a frank and
open admirer of the social, tech-
nological and agricultural de-
velopment of the Jewish State.
DURING HIS visit, he was to
be shown sites of scientific and
social interest around the coun-
tryas well as holding exten-
sive political talks with Premier
Rabin and other top ministers.
He will spend Saturday as Al-
ton's guest on Kibbutz Ginossar
(both he and Maria have often
expressed interest in the kibbutz
as a socio-agricultural frame-
work), and will hold a closing
press conference together with
Rabin here Sunday.
The Echeverrias were to
bring with them an entourage
of 180 persons, flying in two
special jets.
They include Foreign Min-
ister Emilios Rabasso and Mrs.
Rabasso, several deputy min-
isters and officials, adminis-
trative personnel nd newsmen.
Continued from Page 1-
Tito, who called on Israel to
withdraw from all the occupied
Arab territories.
In response. Ford declare!
that "moderation on the nart of
all parties" is essential if there
is f be an interim agreemnt
reached between Israel and
Egy in the Sinai.
The alternative, he declared,
would be world catastrophe.
IN A SEPARATE pr=s W-
f>rence in Belgrade. Dr. Kis-
singer noted that "I think there
is some slight movement on both
sides" in the negotiations.
Kissinger was to meet with
Israel Ambassador to the U.S.
Simcha Dinitz in Washington
Tuesday. He said he would know
"sometime next week" whether
he will be renewing his pe'-'sonal
shuttle diplomacy in the Middle
East.
As if to underscore President
Ford's remarks in Belgrade that
"a stalemate in the Middle East
is unacceptable," reports circu-
lated here this week that export
licenses for literallv dozens of
Israeli reouests for military
equipment have been held up.
THE REPORTS said that un-
der ordinary circumstances ap-
proval would have be-m routine.
Among the items Isra1 has
been seeking are the J79 pines used in the new "Kfir"
fighter plane, as well as in the
Phantom jet. Also included are
transmissions for the M48 and
M60 tanks.
The State Department denied
here that there is a deliberate
hold-up. Spokesmen s=iid th_
the requests are "being j-ro-1
cessed."
BUT IT IS understood that
the deliberate slowdown has
ben glared fo Secretary Kis-
singer's attemnt to arrange a
nw interim accord between Is-
rael and Egypt.
Observers in Washington
fvnt ont that the reassessment
of Am^-ir-n foreign policy in
the Middle East announced
Mar. 24 by President Ford fol-
lowing Dr. Kissinger's return
from his last round of unsuc-
r-ocf-'l t-iv which Israeli requests for new
arms were shelved.
But it was also nndersto
that the halt in the flow would
not include requests made prior
to Mar. ?4. Now. it seems clear,
even prior requests are being
set aside in an obviois move
to apply pressure on Israel for
greater concessions.
Meanwhile. th Stnt Depart-
mnt has acknowledged that the
sle of military equipment to
No-th Y->men has been ap-
proved, although spokesmen de-
clared that the sale would be
for arms worth ome $10 mil-
lion and not SSO milHoo as
previously revealed.
LERNER: Who Got
More Out of Helsinki?
*
Continued from Page 4
md only to catch up with the
West in te^hnolopv. f>c->-nmics,
ar^s and political position.
The third is a China strategv
and tacticthat thev are not
particularly focusing on the
West but on China: that they
want a stabilized Western front
in Europe and America, so that
they can turn their backs on
their long-term opponents in
order to face their immediate
brothers-in-enmitv. the Chinese
THE AUTHORS wisely add
that these three scenarios don't
necessarily exclude each other.
My own feeling is that the So-
viets are not closing any of
their options.
The bothersome enemy may
be China, but the immediate
stakes are Europe and tech-
Israel Winning Over Ouster Move
Continued from Page 1
Egypt.
Israel for its part has tried
to keep the two issues (the UN
and the talks) separated. Its of-
ficials have stated on numerous
occasions that the pace of the
talks with Egypt is set solely by
their content and intrinsic prog-
ress, not be extraneous consid-
erations such as the UN ouster
effort.
At the same time, they add,
the implementation of a new
agreement, if and when conclud-
ed, would inevitably hinge upon
the UN developmentssince the
UN emergency force is destined
to play a central role in the new
settlement.
THE IMPLICATION is that Is-
rael would not move towards
implementation if it had been
discriminated against at the UN.
(This policy is open to the
question which in Kampala
took on a practical aspectof
how Israel would act if it were
ousted by a UN majority which
did not include Egypt.)
The Israeli policy of sepa-
rating the two issues, however,
is not necessarily adhered to by
other states, including Israel's
chief friends. Their support
against the ouster bid is seen
by some here as based on the
assumption that a new Sinai ac-
cord will be achievedby fur-
ther Israeli concessions if neces-
sary.
MEANWHILE, however, Je-
rusalem has naturally been
heartened by the Arabs' failure
at Kampala, by the Soviets' in-
dications at Helsinki, and by
the firm stands taken by the
U.S., Canada, and latterly by
western European leaders.
The Arab bid, it seems, will
run up against the opposition of
the Western and Communist
blocs, as well as from a number
of the more sober non-aligned
states.
Premier Yitzhak Rabin, re-
turning from Stockholm Sunday,
spoke of a possible shift in Euro-
Arab relations as reflected in
the strong stand of the Euro-
pean Socialist leaders whom he
had met against th ouster bid.
OTHER HIGHLY placed
sources here are less sanguine.
Apart from the likely political
price to be demanded of Israel
later, these sources feel the
European stand is less impres-
sive than it perhaps looks at
first sight.
The Europeans, they say,
have conveniently found a
moralistic, universalistic posi-
tion from which they can sup-
port Israel and show a measure
of tentative defiance of the
Arabsin the knowledge that
the Arab ouster bid has not won
respectability in the Third
("Progressive") World.
Nor is it supported with total
enthusiasm even among the en-
tire Moslem bloc as evidenced
by Egypt's refusal to go along
with the rest of the Organization
of African Unity representatives
on Israel's ouster at their meet-
ing in Kampala.
nology. Thev have been rla-ing
catch-uo with the We?*, ever I
since the 1920s; they are closerI
now than ever, and they hops |
to get closer still.
If thev can woo Western I
Errope they stand to pain not
cnlv bv loosening Europe-
American ties buteven morel
by playing off the Western
European nations a^inst the
United States in b";*ne their.
technologies and off-ine IheM
trade. And, one must add. refl
h?ps also their good offices!
with the Arab oil cartel.
IN LONG-TERM strategy the 1
Russians have not given op
their grandiose dream of world
power, but they are waiting to
see what happens next. Tbey
wonH prefer to get command
of Eurone bv the "back door'
approach, through Europe* |
energy needs.
But could they conceivably
risk the big showdown over
Europe with the United StJttJ
some day? Communism !
started in Russia with World I
War I, and spread through
Eastern Europe after World War
n.
Will Marxist doctrine he
tempted by the thought J*J
Europe as a treasure-trove r
World War HI? __
Temple In Pines Welco**
Permanent Spiritual Leodef
Sabbath services were **
cated to newly arrived k*
Sidney Lubin, Temple injf
Pines' first spiritual lew*
July 25. Sisterhood menW
served as hostesses for ,h* ,
Shabbat sponsored by EBJ
Vice President Justin w
and Mrs. Weininger.
A reception in Rabbi ^
honor was held by the *-g
citizens ,in the ^m^SM
area Aug. 3. CcordmanjgJJ
event were Esther Fried. de
and Harry Katz, and G
Weinberg.
Onefl


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