The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00121

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
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wJewisli Floridiam
and SIIOFAIt OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Volume 5 Number 13
Hollywood, Florida Friday, June 20, 1975
25 cents
Campaign Leadership Retreat
Scheduled Aug. 1-3 Weekend
IN SUPPORT OF 'REFUSENIKS'
Soviet Jewry Committee To
Hold Rally At Space Center
The weekend dedicated to
the 1975 campaign leadership
at Palmaire Country Club in
Pompano is scheduled Aug. 1-3,
according to Lewis E. Cohn, co-
chairman of this year's fund-
raising drive.
Special guests will be Irving
Bernstein, executive vice chair-
man of the United Jewish Ap-
peal, and Prof. Allen Pollack,
member of the executive com-
mittee of the World Zionist Or-
ganization, the board of gov-
ernors of the Jewish Agency,
the board of directors of the
United Israel Appeal, and 1974
chairman of the Young Leader-
ship Cabinet.
Mr. Bernstein and Dr. Pol-
lack will be joined by other
notable guests to be announced
later.
Mr. Bernstein, known as an
international leader of the Jew-
ish community, presided over
the operations of the UJA dur-
ing its most demanding and im-
pressive era of growth, pio-
neering in new modes of edu-
cating and communicating with
the American Jewish commu-
nity.
An associate member of the
board of governors of the Jew-
ish Agency in Israel Mr. Bern-
stein serves on its Internation-
al Fund-Raising Committee and
is also a founder of the Jewish
Agency's Institute for Fund-
Raising in Jerusalem.
As a former teacher and so-
cial worker, Mr. Bernstein's
The American Apollo astro-
nauts will leave the Kennedy
Space Center to rendezvous
witli the Soviet Soyuz cosmo-
nauts Tuesday, July 15.
The Soviet Jewry Committee
of Jewish Federation is urging
that "cooperation in space tech-
nology should bring about a
Flight for Freedom' for Soviet
Jews the 'Refuseniks' who
have baen refused exit permis-
sion, the Prisoners of Consci-
ence suffering in Soviet labor
camps, and those Soviet Jews
who up to now have been too
frightened to apply for exit vi-
sas."
The Committee is planning a
rally at the Kennedy Space
Center and is asking the active
participation of South Broward
area residents. It is hoped that
the effort will be statewide and
include an amalgamation of all
Jewish organizations.
Anyone interested in going
to the Cape for the event is
urged to call the Federation
office. A Soviet Jewry Commit-
tee member will contact you as
soon as possible.
DR. ALLEN POLLACK
role in Jewish communal life
extends to the educational com-
munity. He is a member of
Brandeis University's board of
advisors for the Hornstein Pro-
gram, a joint project of the
Graduate School of Advanced
Studies in Social Welfare and
Contemporary Jewish Studies.
Prof. Pollack was educated at
Columbia Uni'-ersity, the Uni-
versity of Stockholm, and
Princeton He was a D>ike Foun-
dation Fellow, and under a Ford
Foundation grant was a visit-
ing fellow at the Marx-Engels-
Lenin Institute of the Univer-
sity of Leningrad.
A teacher of Russian history.
MICTS CfAUSfSCU
Allon Back
From Successful
Trip to Rumania
JERUSALEM(JTA) For-
eign Minister Yigal Allon, re-
turning from a four-day official
visit to Rumania, said the
friendship between Israel and
the only Communist bloc coun-
try to maintain diplomatic re-
lations with it persisted despite
sharp differences over issues
pertaining to the Middle East.
Allon said that the most seri-
ous divergence was over Bucha-
rest's recognition of the Pales-
tine Liberation Organization.
ISRAEL AND Rumania are
also at loggerheads over the in-
terpretation of Security Council
Resolution 242, but the differ-
ences there were less pro-
nounced than over the PLO, the
foreign minister said.
On the other hand, he report-
ed, his four hours of talks with
Rumanian President Nicolai
Ceausescu and his several work-
ing sessions with Foreign Min-
ister George Macovescu pro-
duced occasions in which both
sides publicly reiterated their
friendship, which was a valu-
able development in itself.
He said agreements were
reached on efforts to extend co-
operation in trade, tourism and
culture and that formal pacts
covering those areas would be
drafted soon.
A joint communique issued in
Bucharest at the end of Allon's
visit stated that both sides fa-
vored the elimination of out-
dated policies of pressure and
dictates in international rela-
tions.
THE COMMUNIQUE express-
ed agreement on the urgent
need to end the Middle East
conflict through diplomatic and
other peaceful means.
Allon said he invited Maco-
vescu to visit Israel again at a
time to be announced later. The
Rumanian foreign minister vis-
ited Israel last September, and
Allon's visit was in reciproca-
tion.
Allon said he had an especial-
ly moving experience when he
met leaders of the Rumanian
Jewish community and attended
Sabbath services in Bucharest's
main synagogue.
IRVING BERNSTEIN
Prof. Pollack's field of academ-
ic specialization is the history
of the Communist Party of the
Soviet Union, and the role of
the Jews in the revolutionary
movement of Tsarist Russia. He
has taught at Brooklyn College,
the University of Pittsburgh,
and Yeshiva University.
Serving with Mr. Cohn on
the committee arranging the re-
treat are Joyce Newman, Karen
Margulies Dr. Sam Meline
and Marslia Sherman.
Area residents interested in
making reservations for the
educational weekend are urged
to contact Sumner Kaye at the
Jewish Federation office.
Israel Testing Sadat
On Canal Passage
By GIL SEDAN
And YITZHAK SHARGIL
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Transport Minister Gad Yaa-
c&bi indicated June 5 that Is-
rael is testing the right of pas-
sage for its cargoes through the
Suez Canal.
The Minister confirmed on a
radio interview that a Liberian
vessel carrying 12,000 tons of
sugar for Israel will attempt to
pass through the waterway
which the Egyptians officially
reopened June 5.
YAACOBI AND other Israeli
leaders have repeatedly stress-
ed in recent days that passage
for Israeli cargoes through the
canal was an understanding of
the January, 1974, Israeli-
Egyptian disengagement accord.
Premier Yitzhak Rabin said on
a television interview that if
Cairo refuses to allow Israeli
cargoes through the canal, Is-
rael will bring the matter up
at the next stage of political
negotiations.
Israeli maritime circles said
that the Liberian-flag ship,
"Truxt Airens." was enroute to
Gaza with 12,000 tons of sugar
Continued on Pace 1*
NOT CONSIDERED EXPERT OF AREA
Toon Misquotes U.S. on Mideast;
Sure to Succeed Keating as Envoy
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Malcolm Toon, the ca-
reer Foreign Service diplo-
mat nominated by President
Ford to be the next U.S. Am-
bassador to Israel, has told
the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee that his position
on the "Palestine problem"
was contained in the lan-
guage of the Vladivostok
communique of President
Ford and Soviet Communist
Party Secretary Leonid
Brezhnev last November.
Toon then proceded to
misquote the language of
the communique. Asked by
acting committee Chairman
Sen. Richard Clark (D.,
Iowa) what he thought a
"fair and peaceful settle-
ment of the Palestine prob-
lem was." Toon replied that
the Vladivostok communi-
que had provided for "the
legitimate interests and as-
pirations of the Palestinian
people."
NONE OF the committee
members challenged that quo-
tation although the word "as-
pirations" was not included in
the Ford-Brezhnev language.
Asked by the Jewish Telegra-
phic Agency later whether the
word "aspirations" was includ-
ed in the communique, Toon
hesitated and replied that "in-
terests" was included.
Asked then if he intended to
withdraw the word "aspira-
tions" from his official testi-
mony, the Ambassadorial can-
didate said his statement
"should be changed," but he
did not say that he would
change it.
TOON TOLD the JTA that he
expected to be in Tel Aviv by
June 20. His confirmation by
the Senate seems to be a vir-
tual certainty. Toon, whose last
diplomatic assignment was U.S.
Ambassador to Yugoslavia and
whose diplomatic experience
has been chiefly in Eastern
European nations, told the Sen-
ate committee that Israel's de-
cision to thin out its forces in
Sinai was "not meaningful mili-
tarily" but was "helpful" in
Continued on Page 10
AZBEL COERCED TO QUIT
KGB Calls Science Meet
'Intelligence Operation9
NEW YORK (JTA) Prof. Mark Azbel charged in
a statement to the press that the KGB claimed that the sci-
entific seminary in his home in Moscow "is anti-Soviet
activity initiated by Israeli intelligence."
The National Conference on Soviet Jewiy, which re-
leased Azbel's statement here, also reported that Azbel was
Continued on Page 10-.
I


I


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, June 20, 1975
l
J
Histadrut' Solidarity Conclave
Nov. 1043 In Tel Aviv Mton
One-thousand women repre-
senting all walks of life attend-
ed the two "Women's Econom-
ics1975" seminars sponsored
recently by the Israel Hista-
drut Foundation ;n Miami Beach
and Hollywood, pledging close
to $500,000 for the 9.5 per cent
Histadrut Annuity Trust.
A substantial number signed
up as delegates to the Histadrut
iuliuarny conference to be held
at the Tel Aviv Hilton Nov.
10-13 under the high patronage
of Mrs. Golda Meir.
To qualify as a delegate, each
was required to subscribe to a
minimum of $2,500 for the His-
tadrut Annuity Trust, which
helps finance the 1L 100 mil-
lion Histadrut Mortgage Fund
for Israel's Army veterans and
their families
After presentations by Sam
Shulsky, nationally syndicated
financial columnist; Judge Her-
bert S. Shapiro, a Miami attor-
ney, who covered various as-
pects of Estate Planning for the
modern woman, and Dr. Sol
Stein, president of the Israel
Histadrut Foundation, the wom-
en heapd fm-lnsWb-vfttf-of Is-
rael's foreign policy today by
Ehud Lador. Consul General of
Israel in Texas.
Israel "will not be pressured
into doing things, or giving
away anything that will endan-
ger its security," Mr. Lador
stated. He stressed that grass
roots U.S. opinion favors Israel
as shown in national, polls.
"We are highly encouraged
by the knowledge that the
American people are firmly be-
hind us as shown by the state-
ment of 76 U.S. Senators, in
their letter to President Ford,
urging full support for Israel,
as America's most reliable ally
in the Middle East," he con-
tinued.
Mr. Lador described the Suez
Canal reopening as a public re-
lations ploy, and not as a sin-
cere move to peace on the part
of Egypt.
In his sober analysis of the
outlook for the 'stock market,'
Mr. Shulsky, whose column, "In-
vestors Guide," appears in 100
newspapers throughout the
country, cautioned the audience
Educational Committee Is Under
Dr. Robert PittelPs Chairmanship
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward has established
a Committee on Jewish Educa-
Attending the first session
were Dr. Samuel Meline, Mrs.
Meral Ehrenstein, Rabbi Sam-
uel Jalfe, Rabbi Morton Malav-
sky. Dr. Victor Glazer, Dr. Joel
Schneider, Herbert D. Katz,
Mrs. Joseph Kleiman, and Sum-
ner Kaye, staff member of Fed-
eration.
The purpose of structuring
an educational committee is to
explore the avenues open for
educational programs for the
Jewish community of South
Broward.
Dr. Pittell is currently in the
process of setting up sub-com-
mittees to study various pro-
grams.
DlC KOBEk 1' PIT 1ELL
tion under the chairmanship of
Dr. Robert Pittell.
V.D. Is Topic At
Public Seminar
"Venereal Disease: Spread-
ing Like Wildfire" is the sub-
ject of a free public seminar to
be sponsored by Community
Hospital of South Broward
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. in the
cafeteria.
Dr. Robert Rappel, urologist,
wiil act as moderator. The pan-
el will be composed of Dr. John
Fischer. OE/Gyn, who will
speak on "Venereal Disease and
the Pregnant Woman;" April
Martin, K.N., of the bigma Re-
prod jcti.e Center; and Gjrald
Dunlea1 y of the Broward Coun-
ty Health Department, V.D.
Control, who will show two
films.
Regisfation is not n;cessary;
refreshT.nts will be served.
.of 'its and dangers for
people of mature age.
Rabbi Leon Kronish, board
chairman of the Israel Hista-
drut Foundation, announced
that in addition to Mrs. Golda
Meir, the Histadrut Solidarity
Conference in Israel will be ad-
dressed by Israel's Prime Min-
ister, Itzhak Rabin; the Secre-
tary General of Histadrut, Yeru-
ham Meshel, and members of
the Israeli Cabinet and other
Israeli and American dignita-
ries.
"We shall bring along with
us to this historic conference
not only our prayers and warm
wishes for the security and prog-
ress of our beloved Israel, but
also a langule expression of
our solidarity with its people
in the form of a very substan-
tial contribution to the Hista-
drut Mortgage Fund that will
help provide homes for its re-
turning veterans," Rabbi Kro-
nish stated.
Rabbi Morton Malavsky,
spiritual leader of Temple Beth
Shalom in Hollywood, served as
chairman of the day for South
Broward County, while Mrs.
Lillian Kronish served in the
same capacity for the Miami
Beach conclave.
Other participants in the pro-
gram were Mrs. Anne Acker-
man of Point East, moderator at
the Women's Day Seminar; Mrs.
Lily Stone, a national leader;
Mrs. Phyllis Drickman, attorney
and counselor-at-law in Holly-
wood; Mrs. Harriet Green, pres-
ident of the Pioneer Wo-nen's
Organization, and Mrs. Mildred
Sahl, president of the Women's
Council of the Histadrut.
The proceedings were opened
by Ben Steinberg, Florida di-
rector of the Israel Histadnat
Foundation, who expressed his
deep gratification at the enthu-
siastic reception accorded
"Women's Day," which will
henceforth be an annual func-
tion in the program of the Israel
Histadrut Foundation.
arnett
anK
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
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Principals in the 1975 Women's Economics seminars in
Miami Beach and Hollywood included Hollywood attor-
ney Phyllis Drickman (left) Ehud Lador, Consul General
of Israel in Texas, and Mrs. Anne Ackerman of Point
East, who served as moderator.
'li < I::;.: ... !.l! I !!:!,." :.v .1 i ,..' :r:>>|i.....", i.'::)[ IV'! :i'i,M .'. Chaplain's Schedule
The Jewish Federation of of South Broward. Inc. an-
nounces that Rabbi Harold Richter. Chaplain for South Brow-
ard County, will be visiting the following
hospitals on a regular basis:
Mondays Doctors, Community nd
South Flo.ida State Hospitals.
Wednesdays Hollywood Memorial
Hospital
Fridays Golden Isles Hospital.
The Rabbi will also a isit nursing
homes and penal institutions in the South
Broward area. In addition, he will visit
institutions in Fort Lauderdale on Tues-
days and Thursdays.
For further information, please v. isit T^? Jewish Federa-
tion Office at 2338 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood or phone
921-S810 or 966-7751.
MMRHHMMMHMMMMK3II1'1''' 'iMHRItlVnpjBRVHVMUNi '. i'aa
Rabbi Richter
Riverside's
two new chapels in
Hollywood and Sunrise
serve the needs of
the entire
Jewish community in
Broward County.
In the Hollywood and Hallandale areas:
5801 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood.
920-1010
In the Fort Lauderdale area:
1171 Northwest 61st Ave.(Sunset Strip),Sunrise
584-6060
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel. Inc Funeral Directors
Other Riverside chapels in South Florida are located in
North Miami Beach. Miami Beach and Miami.
Riverside serves the New York Metropolitan area with chapels in Manhattan
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MunovN Rubin FD
H-C-20-75
H-6-20-75
H-4-20-75


iday, June 20, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 3
SOVIET JEWRY
Tax To Obstruct Financial Aid
Food Fair-Pantry Pride Chain
Announces 3 $1,000 Scholarships
By FRAN NEVINS
A new domestic tax that
would obstruct our financial
support of Soviet Jews has been
quietly introduced by the Sovi-
et government. The legislation
would impose an additional duty
on remittances of money from
abroad to Soviet citizens, be-
ginning Jan. 1.
"The provision appears to be
aimed at discouraging financial
aid sent from the West to help
people like Soviet Jews who
have lost their jobs after appli-
cation to emigrate, said a West-
ern diplomat.
SIGNED BY President Niko-
lai V. Podgorny May 23, the
new tax provision is likely to
be ratified by the Supreme So-
viet at its semi-annual session
in June. The duty would be
levied apart from the existing
"handling charge" of about 30
per cent that the Soviet State
Bank already deducts on re-
mittances.
This action comes at a time
when Jewish activists are open-
ly complaining about what thev
call "new pressures and cruel-
ties."
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Israel Still
A Wonderful
Vacation Spot
EDITOR. Floridian and Shofar:
Last month my husband and
I returned from a 22-day visit
to Israel, during which time we
walked the streets of many
cities, rode the city buses, hik-
ed the roads, attended many
public events, and enjoyed a
beautiful, wonderful experi-
ence.
However, wherever we went,
the Israelis asked us "Where
are the Americans this year?"
Therefore I am asking you'
to let people know that despite
the terrible fears they may have
from reading of border inci-
dents, etc. in the newspapers,
they should know that spending
the day at a beach in Tel Aviv,
or the evening walking on Di-
zengoff, or any street in Telj
Aviv, and enjoying a cup of;
coffee or a dish of ice cream
at a sidewalk cafe, or taking a
walk at night on any street in
Jerusalem, is safe and enjoy-
able.
Everyone is out walking day
and nightwe did it and en-
joyed every minute of it.
Please tell the people to in-
clude Israel on vacation itiner-
aries this summer and fall. The
Israelis need our moral support
as well as our financial sup-
port. We must not let them
down they are such a coura-
.. geous people.
Have no fears. Israel is still
a wonderful vaction spot and
a beautiful, spiritual experi-
ence.
ESTHER WINICK
Miami
A CRIMINAL investigation is
being carried out by the KGB
into an unofficial typewritten
journal, "Jews in the USSR,"
following searches of the homes
of contributors.
Nine issues of the journal
have appeared in the last two
years and a tenth has been
promised by Jewish activists in
the next month.
Ilya D. Rubin, a contributor
who ins been extensively
"questioned and warned," re-
ported that the KGB has con-
fiscated papers, notebooks, di-
aries, typewriters and ruble
certificates representing funds
f>-om abroad in Moscow and
Vladimir.
NEW HARASSMENT to Jew-
ish scientists involved in the
unauthorized weekly seminar
have occurred. These scientists
lost their government positions
after applying to emigrate.
"Theoretical physicist Mark
Azhel, 43. was summoned by the
KGB on May 24 and warned
that he could be prosecuted on
charges that included treason
if he did not drop his leader-
ship of the seminar.
Mathematician Aleksandr
Lerner, 63, another member of
the seminar, was informed that
he would be barred from ac-
cepting an invitation to join
American scientists at an inter-
national meeting to be held in
the Soviet Republic of Georgia
this fall. Mr. Lerner told re-
po/.ers that he has been "ad-
vised to withdraw his applica-
tion for Israel."
IN DERBENT, Emanail Eman-
hilov has been imprisoned
without a trial. In 1967, at age
17, he was attacked in the street
by assailants who baited him
Rent-A-Car
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with anti-Semitic taunts. A knife
fight ensued and one of his at-
tackers was injured and later
died. Emanhilov was sentenced
to 10 years but was released in
1969 as part 0f a general am-
nesty.
Recently he was suddenly re-
arrested and jailed. Appeals to
the Soviet Supreme Court by
his parents have been unsuc-
cessful.
NEWS OF THE PRISONERS
Hillel Butman has now com-
pleted two months at Vladimir
prison and has consequently
been transferred from a strict
regime to a general one within
the prison.
Israel Zalmanson was re-
cently placed in solitary con-
finement for se%'en days at
Potma.
Wolf Z.ilmanson, who was
self-learning Hebrew from a
book at Perm, had it confis-
cated.
Iosif Mendelevich, who is a
religious Jew, had his Bible
confiscated by the authorities
at Perm.
Arkady Veneman's situation
at Mikyn has worsened. He has
desperately tried to commit I
suicide twice because of intense
persecution. The administration
is trying to force him to re-
nounce his application for Is-
rael, implying he will "not leave
the camp alive" unless he does
so.
AMERICAN ACTION
If anything in this article has
disturbed you, there is some-
thing you can do to help.
Send telegrams or write let-
ters to:
U.S.S.R.
RSFSR, Moscow
The Kremlin
President Nikolai V. Podgorny
Anatoly F. Dobrynin
Embassy of the USSR
1125 16 Street N.W.
Washington, D.C.
If you would like to contrib-
ute funds to Soviet Jews who
need our help, please contact
the Soviet Jewry Committee at
the Federation office.
Food Fair/Pantry Pride su-
permarkets has announced the
granting of $1000 scholarships
to three southern Florida-area
residents who plan to attend
Florida State University in Tal-
lahassee. The three students
are Debra Benedetto of Miami,
Ronda L. Blum of Hollywood
and Susan Mermelstein of
North Miami Beach.
Ms. Benedetto is the daughter
of Vito Benedetto, manager of
Miami's Pantry Pride No. 299.
Ms. Blum is the daughter of
Michael I. Blum, assistant di-
rector of advertising and sales
for the supermarket's southern
region. Ms. Mermelstein is the
daughter of Irving Mermelstein.
manager of Pantry Pride No.
2H. in Hallandale.
The company annually grants
some 60 scholarships through
the Food Fair Stores Founda-
tion to children of its employes
and residents in communities
served by its supermarkets. The
company operates Pantry Pride
and Food Fair supermarkets in
this area.
The awards are given on the
basis of civic interest, leader-
ship and scholarship. Need for
financial aid may also be con-
sidered.
Established in 1952, the
Foundtion gives complete free-
dom to the institutions con-
cerned in making the awards.
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DR.CARLW.MEINHARDT
CHIROPRACTOR
ANNOUNCES THE RELOCATION OF HIS
PROFESSIONAL OFFICE FOR THE
PRACTICE OF CHIROPRACTIC
NEW OFFICE LOCATED AT
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday. June 20, 1975
A Real 'Reassessment'
We won't really know anything concrete for several
days, if then, about the discussions between Premier
Rabin and President Ford in Washington.
Both the President and Secretary of State Kissinger
have repeatedly assured the American people that the
administration has not yet come to any specific conclu-
sions vis-a-vis its 'Teassessment" of our nation's foreign
policy in the Middle East.
For all of their assurances, as we noted last week
in this column, Ford's meeting with Egypt's President
Sadat in Salzburg suggested otherwise that not only
had the administration already arrived at a full "reas-
sessment," but that it had done so in partnership with
Sadat himself.
In this sense, we would have to conclude what no
decent American would care to conclude: that President
Ford's meetings with Premier Rabin this week were
mere formalities designed to give Rabin the "word,"
which is to say the price in further concessions Israel
will have to make for some kind of interim peace agree-
ment, an arrangement all Israeli parties and personali-
ties have already ruled out.
He Needs an Education
Toon then volunteered to oppose earlier testimony
by Daniel P. Moynihan, the new U.S. Ambassador to
the United Nations, who has said the U.S. should take
a strong public stand against any Arab attempt to expel
Israel from the UN General Assembly. Toon, like his
boss, Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger, prefers
quiet diplomacy.
Finally, and most astonishingly, Toon refused to
answer a question in the presence of the "Israeli press,"
looking at the Washington Bureau chief of the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency.
It may be correct to send an ambassador to an area
that he knows nothing about. But Toon obviously needs
some quick education, something he will probably re-
ceive when he finally meets the real Israeli press in
Tel Aviv and Jerusalem not an American newsman,
whom he has cavalierly dismissed as "Israeli."
Toon's Sour Notes
Malcolm Toon, who has been nominated as Ambas-
sador to Israel to replace the late Kenneth Keating,
sounded some sour notes in his first public statements
on the Middle East. His remarks to the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee may be evidence that the Ford
Administration is still taking a harsh line with Israel.
Even before Toon's nomination was publicly an-
nounced, the State Department leaked that he was a
hard-line career diplomat who had no ties to either side
in the Israeli-Arab dispute. In fact, almost his entire
diplomatic career has been in the Soviet Union and
other East European countries.
Testifying before the Senate committee, Toon first
proceeded to misquote the Vladivostok communique be-
tween President Ford and Soviet Communist Party Sec-
retary Leonid Brezhnev last November. He said the
communique had provided for "the legitimate interest
and aspirations of the Palestinian people," even though
the word "aspirations" had not been used.
fJewisfr Floridian
ari Mlttt IH VI MUIMI HwlltKM*
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The Jewish Floridian. P.O. Box 012973. Miami. Fla. 3J101.
FRED K. 8HOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SEI.MA M. THOMPSON
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I The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Ksshruth
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The Jewish Floridian hat absorbed the Jewiah Unity and the Jewiah Weekly.
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Volume 5
Friday, June 20, 1975
Number 13
11 TAMUZ 5735
iEquus> a Sentimental Pleasure
T FRANKLY confess that ex-
cept for Elizabethan drama
and Restoration comedy, I hate
the theatre with a passion I
reserve for only one other art
formballet.
I cannot explain this defect
in me, but I must also confess
that over the years, there have
been moments of redemption
occasions when for one reason
or another I have been forced
to go to see a play and found
the experience entirely reward-
ing.
THERE WAS the opening per-
formance of "Sleuth" in Lon-
don I will never forget. And I
recall "Rosenkranz and Guil-
denstern are Dead" at the Coco-
nut Grove Playhouse with par-
ticular fondness.
Now there is "Equus," also at
the Grove, and despite my de-
termination to loathe it, I went
away thoroughly delighted.
"Equus" is by no means in
the same category as "Sleuth"
or "Rosenkranz and Guilden-
stern are Dead." But what it
misses in inventiveness and in
the brilliant use of the English
language, it makes up with en-
thusiasm and, in the Grove pro-
duction, with unexpectedly fine
acting.
IN THE sense that we are
going through a trying time, and
that we have seized upon senti-
mentalism as the dope for our
pain, "Equus" is a sentimental
escape to a simpler time when
men hoped that Freudian psy-
chotherapy might exorcise all
their devils their own and
those of their civilization.
That this is a long time ago
is manifest by what has come
after. Freudianism has not only
disappointed us to the extent
that it is daily being replaced
by variant forms of psycho-
therapy.
Mindlin
sitery by Richard Dunne has .1
mother .who smothers him T
Victorian mother love and
mother who smothers him with!
Victorian mother love and J
ligion and a father who turm
him off jinfV. !.._. _"UIBI
But even psychotherapy is
itself being replaced by old
witches' brews to strike the
devil: spiritualism, astrology,
transcendental meditation, even
exorcism itself.
PETER SHAFFER'S "Equus"
bring us back to the funda-
mental Freud, and in a way
Freud, himself, would best pre-
fer it.
The psychiatrist Martin Dy-
sart. played in the Grove pro-
duction by Brian Murray, is
confronted with an oedipal case,
pure and phrenetic, that ties
Freud to his classical origins,
the Greek tragedians, in this
case Sophocles.
Furthermore, Shaffer refuses
to present the patient, Alan
Strang, as a Freudian dilemma
in which the ugly supposition is
postulated that Freud wasn't en-
tirely correct about the id, ego
and super-egothat the Jungt-
an archetype, the Jungian ra-
cial unconscious must also be
taken into consideration if
there is to be hope for a cure.
NO. WE are never given
cause to waver. Instead, we are
assured that Jung's archetype
as id must be beaten back into
the mold of middle class re-
spectability if there is ever to
be any hope, not only for Alan
Strang, but for all mankind.
Young Strang, played exqui-
him off with latter-day Fahiss
Socialist philosophy that S
es as a foil for the unacceptable
mother love.
ALAN'S OEPIDAL attachment I
to Dora Strang emerges as a
kind of sex nausea that Shake
speare illustrated so biilliamW
in "Hamlet," and which Freud's i
student and biographer, Ernest]
Jones, psychoanalyzed in a clas-'l
sic volume on Hamlet's hatreyl
of his mother's "incestuous '
sheets."
Alan doesn't kill his father I
and marry his mother, as Soph-
ocles wrote it originally, adding
Oedipus' horrifying self-punish-
ment: his gouging out of his
own eyes when he learns what
he has done.
Instead, he turns from his
father's politics and his moth-
er's sexlessness to the poster of,
an exquisite horse his father
printed as a poster, which now
becomes Alan's object of onan-
istic love.
HERE, SHAFFER evokes
Robinson Jeffers' "Tamar," a
poem about the sexual passion
between a young girl and a
beautiful stallion.
Also, I suppose, there is D. H.
Lawrencethe Laurentian use
of the horse as a symbol of
nature in its most exquisite and
powerful form, still unfettered
by human mechanization (in-
cluding psychoanalysis) as a
corrupting force that ultimately
destroys it.
Fastening upon the image of
the horse, Alan sees it as a
god, which he subconsciously
deifies in lieu of his mother's
religious prattling.
WHEN ALAN is finally good
Continued on Page 9-A
Florida House Studies Family
By MAX LERNER
Los Angeles Times Syndicate
GAINESVILLE The Florida
House of Representatives is
launching a study commission
on the family, to discover (as
one report puts it) "what is
breaking up American homes
and leading young people
astray."
If they find out, we'd all like
to know. Nothing I have seen in
the vast sociological literature
on the family enables us to
answer this question with
enough assurance to base a leg-
islative program on it, as the
very intelligent Miami Demo-
crat, Rep. Elaine Bloom, wants
to do.
ITS QUITE an order. The
trouble is that when the com-
mission has discovered the
bearing of alcoholism and infi-
delity on divorce, there will
have to be another study com-
mission to discover why alco-
holism is spreading and how it
can be cured, and still another
to discover what causes infi-
delity and why it is spreading
and how it can be cured.
Ditto for the earthquake erup-
tion of sexuality and violence
in the movies; ditto for por-
nography; ditto for permissive-
ness in the home; ditto for
gender confusion and values
confusion.
ANOTHER Democratic mem-
ber, Rep. Earl Hutto, of Panama
City, Fla., seems already to be
pretty sure of what the com-
mission's answers will be like.
His amendment, also accept-
ed, told the committee what to
look for: "The incidence of al-
cohol, infidelity the impact
of sexual and violence-oriented
movies pornographic litera-
ture, and lack of discipline in
the home."
I don't mean to make light of
the idea of legislators learning
more about the basic trends
which bring about social chang-
es.
I DON'T go along with Rep.
Randy Avon, a Republican from
Ft. Lauderdale, who called the
whole enterprise "this non-
sense."
It isn't nonsense to find some
solid factual base on which to
reshape a state's legislative pro-
grams on marriage, divorce, ali-
mony, child custody, adoption,
juvenile crime.
But I have two doubts. One is
how much a state legislative
study commission can learn, in
any calculable period, about
what is happening to the family,
in better than superficial terms.
Having explored some of the
recent scholarship in this area,
I can report that we haven't
moved far toward clarity.
THE EXTENDED family of
the early republic has dimin-
ished in size, lost many of its
functions (educational, worship,
craft, value-shaping), and has
mislaid at least one generational
layerthat of the grandparents.
The nuclear family is too
small, too tense in its relation-
ships, too rootless, too stripped
of connections, too bare func-
tionallv.
After this the impact of the
erotic revolutions, the women's
revolutions, the media revolu-
tion, the suburban revolution,
the counterculture, and the
values revolutionand one gets
a glimpse of how massive a task
the Florida study commission
is being handed.
WHICH LEADS into my
second doubt. Why only the
problems of the family? There
isn't a single major aspect of
American life that isn't tangled
in its roots and dubious in its
flowering, as the family is.
There isn't a single one that
doesn't present its nettle to us
when we try to grasp it.
Lo, the poor legislator, whose
untutored mind doesn't exempt
him (her) from having to legis-
late on anything and every-
thing, and thus becomes a spe-
cialist in omniscience. It is an
intolerable burden to load on
anvone.
ONE ANSWER is to bring the
intellectual community more di-
rectly into the legislative pro-
cessand also the executive
process.
Awhile ago I made a proposal
for setting up, in Washington,
an OSIOffice of Social Intelli-
gence whose function would
be to sift not only facts and
figures but basic insights into
the root sources of social prob-
lems, in an attempt to get some
intellectual consensus on now
best to handle them.
The idea still strikes me as
having some validity. The study
of separate problems by sepa-
rate legislative or executive
commissions is at once wastenu
and fragmentized.
THERE MUST be some way
by which the legislatures in au
50 states can set up a continu-
ing liaison with the best schol-
arship, the best social and psy
chological thinking, the D*
scientific and technological
knowledge that the universities
in the state provide.
This can be a kind of third
force, to add to the legislative
and executive. And in this way
the scholars of a community
can achieve a new social func-
tion, and a warmer and closer
relationship can be set
tween the political and i
tual elites.
set up be- M
nd intellec- |jf,
J


Friday, June 20, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 5
? Ask Abe ?
by ABE HALPERN _
Mrs. Helen Cohan 4 Advisory Board Members
Appointed By First National

QUESTION: What is the
meaning and origin of Has-
sidism?
IDA SNYDERMAN
Hallandale
ANSWER: Hassidism is a He-
brew word from the word Has-
sid. meaning pious or kind man.
(Hassidim pl.> In usage, how-
ever, the word Hassid came to
mean the disciple, adherent or
follower of a Rabbi or Sage,
known as a Zaddik, a righteous
individual. (Zaddikim pi.)
Hassidism is a great religious
movement of joyous mysticism,
enthusiasm and ecstasy which
developed and flourished in the
18th and 19th centuries mainly
in Poland and the Ukraine. It
sustained the faith of the per-
secuted Jews who lived in ghet-
tos under conditions of inde-
scribable poverty.
During the early 18th cen-
tury, social and economic cir-
cumstances were deplorable.
The authorities imposed insur-
mountable taxes. Pogroms were
frequent. The ritual murder
charge was promoted to arouse
the peasantry against Jewish
communities. Opportunity for
general education was almost
nonexistent. The morale of the
Jews was at its lowest ebb.
It was therefore as if in
answer to a universal need for
nforter that the initiator of
.ism appeared. His name
was Israel the son of Eleazar.
Later he became known as Is-
rael Baal Shem Tov, Master of
the Good Name, Besht for short
(the acronym in Hebrew for
Baal Shem Tov). (1700-1760
c.e.)
Born to very poor and hum-
ble parents, in the village of
I'kop. situated in a remote and
obscure corner of Poland,
known as Podolia, he lost both
parents in early childhood. The
people of Ukop cared for the
young orphan and provided him
with a Jewish education.
He was a man of feeling and
emotion, an original thinker,
and an uprush of religious ec-
stasy dominated his life. A sun-
ny faith in God inspired all his
words and teachings. He endow-
ed Hassidism with the concept
of joy, of life full of religious
fervor and ecstasy. To laugh, to
sing, to dance, with the inten-
tion of praising the Almighty,
was the highest form of prayer,
in which all can find unity with
God.
He never held an official po-
sition, never wrote a book, but
many books have been written
about him and many legends
were woven around his person-
ality. His successors continued
to develop and expound his
teachings.
Following his death he was
succeeded by Dov Ber of Mezh-
rich, (1710-1772 c.e.), who sys-
tematized Hassidic teaching,
bringing it into line with the
doctrine of Isaac Luria, the
famed Kabbalist of Safed. (1534-
1572 c.e.)
Fierce opposition against the
Hassidic movement developed
in Lithuania, led by Rabbi Eli-
jah Ben Solomon, the Gaon of
Vilna. (1720-1797 c.e.) He re-
garded Hassidic teaching as
heretical. The Hebrew Gaon
(Geonim pi.) meaning genius,
was bestowed upon intellectual
leaders, scholars and sages dur-
ing the post-Talmudic period.
The opponents of Hassidism
were known at Mrrnaggedim
(Heb. opponents, adversaries.
Mitagged sing.).
Three branches of Hassidism
developed following the Baal
Shem Tov's death. The first was
the popular Ukrainian branch
which carried on the traditions
of the original Hassidic culture:
the elevation of the simple man.
devotion in prayer, song and
dance, and faith in the Zaddik.
Rabbi Levi Isaac of Berdichev
belonged to this group. (1740-
1809 c.e.)
The second branch was es-
tablished by Rabbi Shneour
Zalman of Lyady. (1747-1813
c.e.) He founded the Chabad
branch. Chabad is an acronym
of the three Hebrew Letters:
chet for choc lima (wisdom), bet
for bina (understanding), and
daled for daat (knowledge.)
The Chabad movement is also
known as the Lubavitch branch.
It i a Philosophical and ra-
tionalizing movement within
Hassidism and attracted the
scholars of White Russia and
Lithuania.
The third, a Polish Galician
branch, was founded bv Elime-
lech of Lizensk. (1717-1787
c.e.) He elevated the Zaddik to
the role of intermediary be-
tween man and God.
The Zaddik, or simply the
Rebbe. stood at the center of
the Hassidic movement. At
fi>-st Zddikim wre chosen for
their piety and leadership, but
later on dynasties were estab-
lished. The Hassidim would
travel to the Zaddik for the Sab-
bath, listening to his teaching
and seeking his advice.
Martin Buber (1878-1965
c.e.). one of the outstanding
philosophers of our era, wrote
a two-volume edition on the
Origin and Meaning of Hassi-
dism. According to Buber, for
modern man to be able to find
the true way of life with the
teachings of Hassidism as a
guide, he has to have the fol-
lowing four attributes. They
are:
1. HitlahuvutEcstasy
2. AvodahService to God
and man.
3. KavanahIntention, pur-
poseful devotion.
4. ShiflutHumility.
The centers of Hassidic in-
fluence in Eastern Europe were
wiped out by the Nazi Holo-
caust. Several dynasties have
been re-established in the State
of Israel and in the United
States.
b -h -k
This article is based on many
sources, including "The Ro-
mance of Hassidism," by Jacob
Minkin; "The Origin and Mean-
ing of Hassidism and Hassidism
for the Modern Man," by Martin
Buber: "Israel the Baal Shem
Tov (in Yiddish)," by Samuel
H. Setzer; the Encyclopaedia of
Jewish Religion and the latest
edition of the Encyclopaedia
Judaica ,
Editor's note:
Please send your questions to
??? ASK ABE ???
c/o Jewish Federation of
South Broward
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
ADVERTISING SALESMAN
DADE BROWARD
Telephone, Personal Contact,
and/or Both.
Send resume to S.T.,
Box 012973, Miami 33101
ALL REPLIES HELD IN
STRICT CONFIDENCE
Women's Division
Leadership Y-P
Mrs. Helen Cohan has been
selected as division leadership
vice president of the Women's
Leadership In-
stitute of Jew-
i s h Federa-
tion.
The Wom-
en's Leader-
ship Institute
consists o f
"women who
re involved
with the un-
derstanding of
Jewish life,
not just philo-
sophically, but
in an everyday setting," accord-
ing to Mrs. Cohan.
Last year the institute held
various programs, including a
discussion of the Holocaust, a
visit to Douglas Gardens, a ses-
sion with Jewish Family Serv-
ice, and a presentation of the
"Road Show," which explains
the goals and objectives of Fed-
eration.
In 1975-76 the institute will
be establishing new programs,
Mrs. Cohan said.
Helen Cohan
Louise Diamond
Educational V-P
Mrs. Louise Diamond of the
Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward
has been in-
stalled as that
group's educa-
tional vice
president.
Mrs. Dia-
mond's func-
tion will be to
establish edu-
cational pro-
grams for the
Women's Di-
vision board
of directors
and campaign
associates.
Last year the women's divi-
sion held three educational
seminars under the title of "Col-
lege of Federation Knowledge."
This year will be a continua-
tion of these ongoing education-
al symposia for women of the
South Broward area.
Maynyd Abrams. chairman
of the board and Gen. Joseph
Watson, chairman of the ad-
visory board of the First Na-
tional Bank'Of Hollywood, have
jointly announced the appoint-
ment of four new advisory
board members.
The new members are E. J.
Ansel, Fred J. Novak, D.D.S.,
William. W. Whitson and Bry-
ant A. Workman.
E. J. (Manny) Ansel is vice
president of Monarch Invest-
ments, the Bahamian subsidiary
of Food Fair Stores, Inc. A
specialist in administration, both
during his army career and in
his subsequent business activi-
ties, he joined Food Fair Stores
in Florida in 1948 and has
served in management, both in
Florida and Georgia. He was
responsible for opening the Ba-
hamian operation in 1967.
Ansel has been active in local
civic and trade associations, in-
cluding the Hollywood Cham-
ber of Commerce and Kiwanis
Club. He was also a member of
the first board of directors of
Temple Beth Shalom and is a
32nd Degree Mason and a mem-
ber of Shrine Clubs, both in
Hollywood and the Bahamas.
Dr. Novak, a native of Ne-
braska, has been engaged in the
private practice of oral surgery
in Hollywood for the past 16
years. He earned his B.S. and
D.D.S. at the University of Ne-
braska and is a graduate of oral
surgery training at the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania and Duke
University Medical Center.
Presently Chief of Oral Sur-
gery Services at Memorial Hos-
pital. Doctor's Hospital, Holly-
wood Medical Center and Bis-
cayne Medical Center, Novak's
professional affiliations include
membership in the American
Society of Oral Surgery, the
American Dental Association
and various regional, state and
local dental and oral surgery so-
cieties. He is also a member and
past president of the Hollywood
Rotary Club, a member of the
Committee of 100, Junta and
Revelers Clubs.
Whitson, a native of Holly-
wood, is a graduate of the Uni-
versity of Florida. After serv-
ice in the Coast Guard, he as-
sumed management of E. H.
Whitson Co., Inc., a company
founded by his father in 1936.
Presently serving as chair-
man of the board of the Holly-
wood Chamber of Commerce
and as a member of the Com-
mittee of 100, Whitson has also
served on the Hollywood and
Broward County Mechanical
Boards.
Regional president-elect of the
National Environmental Con-
tractors Association and Imme-
diate past president of the Air
Conditioning Contractors Asso-
ciation of South Florida, Whit-
son is a York Rite Mason.
Workman, president and gen-
eral manager of First National
Travel Service, Inc. of Holly-
wood, was born in Ohio and
served in the Air Force for 23
years. He retired with the rank
of Lt. Colonel. In 1964, Work-
man and his wife, Mary, moved
to Hollywood and assumed
ownership of First National
Travel.
A graduate of Ohio State
University, Workman is a mem-
ber of various travel-oriented
associations including SKAL,
ASTA. Bon Vivants of Greater
Miami, and is past president of
the Travel Association of Flor-
ida. He is also nast president of
both the Hollywood Kiwanis
Club and the Hollywood Ex-
change Club and a past di-
rector of the Hollywood Cham-
ber of Commerce.
L. Diamond
Sr. Friendship Club Meets
The Senior Friendship Club
will meet at the Jewish Com-
munity Center Tuesday noon,
it has been announced.
Need a Nurse who cares?
Our i-u-scs believe a genuine concern, an understanding
smile and a compassionate attitude are important to a
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When someone you care about needs special attention
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MEDICAL PERSONNEL POOL


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, June 20, 1975
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz of Hallandale Jewish Center
(left) who made the presentation, is pictured with Milton
Weinkle, Mayor of Hallandale; Paul Benjamin, who re-
ceived the citation, and Myer Pritsker, president of Hal-
landale Jewish Center.
Yeshiva9 s Heritage Dinner
Honors Paul Benjamin
At the annual Heritage Din-
ner of the Florida Friends of
Yeshiva University last month
in the Eden Roc Hotel. Paul
Benjamin, well-known philan-
thropist and communal leader,
received a Citation from Ye-
shiva University for establish-
ing the Henry Benjamin Fel-
lowship in Jewish Studies at
the Ferkauf Graduate School of
Yeshiva University for Huma-
nities and Social Sciences.
Mr. Benjamin, a Master
Builder of Yeshiva University,
is also very active on behalf of
the State of Israel and recent-
Temple In Pines
Elects Berger As
New President
The Temple in the Pines Con-
gregation elected officers and
directors for the coming year
at its annual meeting June 1.
After serving as vice presi-
dent for two years, Les Berger
has accepted the leadership of
the area's youngest Conserva-
tive congregation.
Serving with Mr. Berger will
be Justin Weininger, executive
vice president, Michael Glei-
cher and Isaac Wachsberger,
vice presidents; Mrs. Max Stein,
corresponding secretary; Ms.
Lydia Hamburger, recording
secretary, and Irving Uncyk,
treasurer.
Board members are Past
President Jack Reiter, Esther
Fried, Sam Pomeranz, Mrs. Ric
Garfinkle, Harry Katz, Mrs.
Owen Arnson, Steve Shutter,
Sam Marcus, Alan Krakower,
Joe Rosenthal and Nelson Klein.
Also holding board seats are
Mrs. Isaac Wachsberger, Sister-
hood president, and David Guss,
Men's Club president.
Addressing the congregation,
Mr. Berger pledged a year of
continued growth, and shared
with the members plans to en- i
gage a full-time rabbi in the I
very near future.
The first meeting of the!
newly elected board is sched-
uled next Wednesday at 8 p.m.
As in the past, all temple mem-
bers are encouraged to partici-1
pate at board meetings.
Sabbath worship will begin
Friday at 8 p.m. in the tern-1
pie's multi-purpose facility
(1900 N. University Dr.) with
Rabbi Aaron Shapiro officiat-1
ing. The Oneg Shabbat will be;
sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Max '
Stein.
ly established the Jane and
Haul Benjamin Youth Center,
named Bi-th Benjamin in Kfar
HaCarmel in Irrael. His com-
munal and philanthropic activi-
ties encompass many causes in
South FloiiJa, as well as in
New York.
In response to Rabbi Harry
E. Schwartz s presentation oi
the citation, Mr. Benjamin
stressed the strong ties between
the State of Israel and the Jew-
ish community here at home.
His remarks highlighted the
dinner where more than 250
persons celebrated the 90th
Anniversary of Yeshiva Univer-
sity which currently has an en-
rollment of more than 7,500
men and women from all parts
(I the country and abroad.
"Its five undergraduate and
nine graduate schools are a
source of great pride to the
Jewish community and to the
entire community at large,"
Mr. Benjamin said.
Sen ing as chairman of the
Yeshiva University campaign is
Peter Gcldring, real estate de-
veloper and communal leader.
The cjchairrren are Joseph M.
Drexler, Moses J. Grundwerg,
V'liiam l.anda, Steven D. Rob-
inson and Leonard Zilbert.
Miami Ueach Mayor Harold
Rosen and Murray Meyerson,
vice mayor, are serving as hon-
orary chairmen.
Hillel Holds
Commencement
Exercises
The Hillel Community Day
School held its Chaggigat Ha-
siyum (Commencement Exer-
cises) for the Kindergarten,
Junior Kindergarten, and Pre-
Kindergarten last week in Beth
Torah's Social Hall.
Through recitation, song and
dance, the children presented a
synopsis of their accomplish-
ments of the past year, per-
forming selections in both He-
brew and English. Cantor Ian
Alpern and Mrs. Esther Rich-
man accompanied the children
on the guitar and piano respec-
tively.
Mrs. Laura Solomon. Mrs.
Varda Golan and Miss Susan
Melnick are the Pre-Kindergar-
ten teachers. The Junior Kin-
dergartjn was taugiit by Mrs.
Rosalind Singer, Mrs. Linda
Krone, and Mrs. Nanette New-
man.
Mrs. Dorothy Gruen, Mrs.
Shula Leshetz. Mrs. Varda Go-
lan and Mrs. Lynda Magle are
the teachers for the Kinder-
garten.
Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz, spir-
itual leader of Beth Torah Con-
gregation, was host rabbi. Mi-
chael Scheck, president of Hil-
lel, extended the welcome.
A message to the students
and their parents was delivered
by Rabbi Albert Mayerfeld,
principal of the school. Dr. Lee
Duffner, educational '.ice pres-
ident, and Rabbi Mayerfeld
presented the diplomas to each
graduate.
Kindergarten graduates were
Adina Applebau.ii, iara Bos-
tom, Janine Braslawsce, Suzan-
ne Camel, Michael Cohen, Da-
niella Cohn, Randy Davis, Sher-
ri Feiner, Andrea Fingerer,
Ross Fischer, Eva Gelnowski,
Barry Ginsberg, Karen Gold-
be; g, Jessie lwanow. Alan Jo-
sowitz, Jonathan Katz, Damon
Keller. Lawrence Lambert, Jac-
queline Levy, Lisa Lcibowitz,
Oren Lipschitz, Lisa Ann Lust-
garten. Da\id Platt, Annette
Rosen. Dana Ross. Jordan Roth-
enberg, Elise Scheck, Laurie Sil-
verman, Javier Szwarcberg,
Dianne Weinberg and David
Wiener.
Marshall Baltuch, executive
director, announced that only
limited places are available in
the three-year old, four-year-
old and Kindergarten classes,,
and applications can be accept- i
ed only on a first-come first-;
serve basis due to the school's
policy of small classes.
Hillel is a beneficiary agency
of both the Greater Miami and
Hollywood Jewish Federations.'
Purchasers Urged To Check
Status Of Their Israel Bonds
^5
Millions of dollars which
could be actively helping Is-
rael have been reported to be
lying idle in safety deposit
boxes throughout the country,
according to Milton M. Parson,
Israel Bond Manager for South
Florida.
A recent survey revealed
that the majority of these dor-
mant bonds are being hell by
people who are either not aware
that the bonds have matured or
believe that the bond is still
helping Israel.
"A matured Israel Bond,"
Parson said, "does not help Is-
rael. If it is not cashed in, the
money remains idle in an es-
crow account."
The State of Israel Bonds of-
fice is urging all bond purchas-
ers to check t j ascertain if they
have in their possession any
redeemable Israel Bonds.
"If the bond holder would
cash in his or her matured
bond and purchase a new bond,
then brael could reap the ben-
efits of money which is active-
ly working towards the stabili-
sation of her economic develop-
ment," Parson said.
-Bond redemption and repur-
chasing are just two more vvayg
in which the South Florida Is-
rael Bond Organization is try-
ing to ease Israel's most des-
perate economic situation
Mm*..*), Cash Mobilization
Month.
For information on redeem-
ing and repurchasing bonds,
contact William Littman, chair-
man, South Broward Board of
Governors, at the Israel Bond
Hollywood office.
Urge Israel to Deal With Poor
NEW YORKThe American
Sephardi convention concluded
its second national convention
here by adopting a resolution
expressing concern that "con-
siderable sections of Israeli so-
ciety still suffer from an inade-
auate standard and mode oi
life."
'TientJ
'JIM
Senegal Gets Cold
Shoulder As
Peace Negotiator
JERUSALEM (JTA) Official sources here have
poured cold water on Senegal's President Leopold Senghor's
apparent interest in playing the role of mediator in the Mid-
cast conflict.
These sources said they questioned Senghor's objectivity
and neutrality in Mew of the fact that his country had
broken its diplomatic ties with Israel during the Yom Kippur
War and has done nothing to renew them. The sources said
there have been no direct contacts between Senghor and
Isia.l.
ACCORDING TO reports from the U.S., Senghor met Dr.
Nahum Goldmann, president of the World Jewish Congress, in
Paris recently, and Senghor also met with several leaders of
American Jewish organizations in New York.
There was no immediate comment from the Jewish lead-
ers as to the nature of the meeting.
The official sources here stressed that contacts with
diaspora Jewish leaders could not be a substitute for normal
diplomatic relations with Israel. To effectively mediate, the
sources added, a mediator needs good relations with both
parties to the conflict.
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I


Friday, June 20, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shojar of Hollywood
Page 7

US. Confirms Pledge on Suez Passage
1
WASHINGTON The State
Department has confirmed that
there were secret understand-
ings in the January, 1974, dis-
engagement agreement between
Israel and Egypt hut refused to
say whether these included an
understanding by Egypt to per-
mit Israeli cargoes transit
through the Suez Canal which
w.is officially reopened June 5.
The matter came up against
the background of reports that
a l.iberian ship carrying 12,000
tons of sug'ir from South Korea
to Israel would attempt to pass
through the canal.
Ptate Department spokesman
Robert Funseth said "there has
never been any question that
certain understandings exist."
Rut wh*n pressed bv reporters
to confirm reports that former
President Nixon had assured
^ former Israeli Premier Golda
} Mcir in a 1974 letter that he
had an assurance on Israel-
bound cargoes from Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat, Funseth
said he would not discuss "con-
fidential" diplomatic matters.
<* &
Immigration to Israel Drops
JERUSALEMJewish Agen-
cy Chairman Pinhas Sanir has
reported that immigration to
Israel this year is down 50 per
cet from last year.
He told the government-
Agency "joint coordinating
committee" that the figure for
Januarv through May is about
6.000. half of them from the
Soviet Union, as compared to
12.000 for the same period last
year, of whom 7.000 were Sovi-
et immigrants.
The committee is considering
a proposal to establish a faculty
of absorption studies in one of
the universities.
to to to
End to Political Parties
GENEVA Kalman Sultanik,
executive vice president of the
World Confederation of United
Zionists and a member of the
World Zionist Organization
Executive, has urged the WZO
to change its membership re-
quirements to ad'nit "all Jews
who wish to join the Zionist
ranks without party affiliation."
Thf> World Confederation is
the coordimting bodv for Zion-
ist organizations which do not
identify themselves with polit-
ical parties in Israel. Sultanik
declared that the outpouring of
massive support for Israel by
Jews everywhere, demonstrates
that there is no difference be-
tween Jews and Zionists.
He said a "meaningful revi-
sion" of the WZO constituti'iri
"would throw wide open th^
doors of our movement to vir-
tually hundreds of thousands of
voung Jews and contributors to
Israel funds who would thus be
able to wear proudlv the badge
of a full-fledeed Zionist with-
out any party label."
fr to to
Scandals Don't Hurt
NEW YORK The United
Jewish Appeal has not lost po-
tential contributions because of
the recent political and eco
nomic scandals, according to
Irving Bernstein, the UJA's
executive vice chairman. He
told a press conference for
Israeli newsmen here that UJA
"shrinkage" from pledges to
cash is only a marginal five
per cent. He said while pledges
arc down there will be an in-
crease in cash contributions.
ft
Rabin to Meet With
Jewish Leaders in U.S.
a
I
NEW YORK (JTA) Pre-
mier Yitzhak Rabin of Israel
will ny>ct privatelv with a dele-
gation of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations at Blair
House in Washington Friday, it|
was disclosed by Rabbi Israel
Miller conference chairman.
Rabbi Miller said one repre-
sentative of each of the 32 con-
stituent bodies in the Presi-'
dents Conference would be in-
vited to meet with Rabin who!
is expected to brief the group j
on his meetings with President!
Ford and Secretary of State!
Henry A. Kissinger just con-
cluded.
RABBI MILLER made the
announcement in releasing the
text of a cable to the Israeli
leader sent by the Presidents
Conference on the eve of Ra-
bin's arrival in the United
States. The message to Rabin
stated:
"As you prepare to under-
take your mission to our coun-
try, we send you our b^st wish-
es for a safe and successful
journey to our shores.
"Your visit comes at a mo-1
ment when th American peo-,
pie are especially sensitive to j
Israel's efforts to achieve peace.
The unilateral withdrawl of
troops, tanks and artillery from
Israel's forward positions near
the Suez Canal was welcomed
here as a significant gesture of
Israel's peaceful intentions.
"THE STATEMENT of 76
senators urging the President
to submit an economic and mili-
tary aid request responsible to
Israel's needs bespeaks the
American people's commitment
to Israel's security as it does
their understanding of Israel's
need for secure, recognized and
defensible borders.
"We look forward to your
presence in our midst as a
major event in the effort to
achieve a just and durable
peace in the Middle East."
Oppose PLO Attending Meeting
TORONTOThe province of
Ontario would consider it "an
affront and a provocation if
members of international ter-
rorist groups such as the Pal-
estine Liberation Organization
were allowed to attend a United
Nations conference here, On-
tario provincial Premier William
Davis has said.
A letter from the Premier to
Prime Minister Trudeau was
read to the legislature by At-
torney General John Clement.
Reports have said PLO mem-
bers may try to attend the fifth
UN Congress on Crime Preven-
tion and Treatment of the Of-
fender, scheduled in Toronto
for September.
* ft ft
Technion Cites Two
HAIFA An eminent
American nuclear physicist and
a distinguished Swedish im-
munologist have been chosen
the 1975 recipients of the
Harvey Prizes. This was an-
nounced by the chairman of the
Israel Committee for the Harvey
Prize Maj. Gen. (Res.) Amos
Horev, president of the Ttch-
nion Israel Institute of Tech
nology.
The winner of the Harvey
Prize in Science and Technolo-
gy is Edward Teller, of the
Lawrence Livermore Laboratory
of the University of California.
The recipient of the Harvey
Prize in Human Health is Dr.
George Klein, Professor of
Tumor Biology and Head of the
Institute for Tumor Biology at
the Karolinska Institute Medical
School in Stockholm.
Each prize bears a cash
award of S35.000.
ft ft ft
HUC Honorary Degrees
CINCINNATI. O. Israeli
Ambassador Simcha Dinitz and
the Most Rev. Joseph L. Ber-
nardin. Archbishop of Cincin-
nati, were bestowed honorary
Doctor of Humane Letters de-
grees from Hebrew Union Col-
lege Jewish Institute of Re-
ligion at graduation exercises
here at Rockdalc Temple.
Dr. Alfred Gottschalk, HUC-
JIR president, also presented
the same degrees to Max M.
Fisher, of Detroit, a leading
Jewish statesman and philan-
thropist; Dr. Franklin H. Lit-
tell, professor, Department of
Religion, Temple University,
and John W. Pehle, Washing-
ton, D.C. attorney and forme*
assistant Secretary of the
Treasury under President
Roosevc.lt, and the executive
director of the War Refuge*
Board in 1944-45.
ft ft ft
McGovern Proposes Settlement
WASHINGTON While
stressing that the United Slates
cannot impose a settlement on
the Middle East. Sen. George
McGovern (D., S.D.) has pre-
sented to the Senate "certain
basic elements" of an overall
settlement.
McGovern, who visited the
Mideast as chairman of the Sen-
ate Subcommittee on Near
Eastern and South Asian Af-
fairs, said the Arabs should be
prepared to "offer Israel full-
recognition and normalization
of relations" in return for an
agreement by Israel to return
to her 1967 borders "with prac-
tical modifications negotiated
bv the parties."
He said such a settlement
will need to be strengthened
with "international guarantees"
and additional assurances of
security" through "permanent
demilitarized zones, policed by
international forces whiot*
could not be removed except
with the consent of both par-
ties."
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar o/ Hollywooa
Friday, June 20, 1975
K.


tlTIp
^Rabbutttai flage
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. Uoschitz Rabbi Barry Altman
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
By
Executive Editor
Encyclopaedia Judaica
Why don't Jews kneel at
prayer?
Kneeling in prayer was prac-
tised during the biblical period,
and specific reference to it can
be found in the Bible, e.g. Dan-
iel 6:11, Ezra 9:5. During the
period of the Second Temple it
was also characteristic of the
Temple service, and the Mish-
nah prescribes the 13 acts of
prostration which had to be per-
formed by those visiting the
Temple. In addition, during the
Avodah on the Day of Atone-
ment, as soon as the high priest
mentioned the Ineffable Name
of God, all those present pros-
trated themselves, the authori-
tative Encyclopaedia Judaica
says.
The abolition of kneeling in
prayer by Jews is one of the
interesting examples of a cus-
tom's abolition simply because
it had become characteristic of
the forms of worship evolved by
other religions. The Muham-
medan custom of removing
one's shoes for prayer led to its
abolition as a Jewish form of
reverence, and kneeling as an
essential form of Jewish wor-
ship, the E'J explains, was
abolished when it became asso-
ciated with the Christian
Church.
The rationale was found by
interpreting the verse of Lev.
26:1 to mean that it was for-,
bidden to kneel or prostrate
oneself on any stone floor, with
the exception of the floor of the
Temple. As a result, although
the Aleinu prayer which con-
cludes every service has the
specific phrase, "and we bend
the knee and prostrate our-
selves," etc., the act of bowing
is not generally practised.
Nevertheless, the Encyclo-
paedia Judaica reports, there
are two exceptionsthe act of
prostration in the Synagogue
during the Aleinu prayer of the
Musaf service on Rosh Ha-
Shanah and Yom Kippur, and
during the recital of the Avodah
on Yom Kippur. The custom of
prostration during Aleinu, says
the Judaica, was introduced be-
cause of the solemnity of the oc-
casion, while with regard to the
Avodnh its purpose was to re-
capture as far as possible the
spirit of the solemn service on
that day when the Temple stood,
so as to keep alive the memory
of the Temple.
What is a "Kibbutz"?
The Kibbutz, or kevuzah
Issues And Answers..
: Our Rabbis' Views *
The Spirit of '76
By RABBI BARRY TABACHNIKOFF, Temple Israel
Our country is now gearing up to celebrate two hundred
1 years of independence.
The spirit of 1776 calls us to return to ideals and values,
many of which are essentially Jewish in origin. It is appro-
priate that we examine our Jewish values and strive to renew our
spiritual heritage at this time in history.
The Jewish equivalent of a "social contract'' took place at
Mount Sinai. The people as well as Moses accepted a code of
behavior and beliefs. The people as well as the leaders pledged
themselves to be "a kingdom of priests and a holy people." The
individuals, collectively, participated in the formation of a Jew-
ish people. It was not imposed upon them, neither was it viewed
as a way of life for the select leaders or professionals. No, it was
a participatory religion, an experiential religion, an activist re-
ligion.
HOW FAR we have come from that distant time and place!
Today, Judaism has become a religion of "professionals." We
have professional fund raisers who support Jewish charities. We
have professional liturgists who sing and read the prayers in
place of the congregants (the very term "Shaliach tzibur" re-
quired that the one who leads prayers be the representative of
his colleagues, taken from the congregation). The Mitzvoth, such
as visiting the sick, are left largely to rabbis.
Part of the blame lies with the community that looks for
the easy way out ("Let someone else say Kaddish for me, I'm
too busy"). Part of the blame lies with our society and its
priorities. But another part of the blame must lie at the feet of
the professionals who tolerate absentee-Judaism. They prefer
passive Judaism, because it gives them greater freedom to follow
their own interests without interference from others.
The consequences are debilitating. What good is a Rabbi who
' preaches to an empty sanctuary? Of what use is a religious
' school that has a fine staff of resources but is lacking in students?
' How can Jewish organizations function, without committed and
' involved members?
If Jews respond only to the threat of annihilation, then we
have lost much of our vitality as a viable group, a culture, a
' people, an active-believing-observant religious entity.
I am confident that there are individuals who are committed.
I am hopeful that they will gather around diem others who will
- revitalize and restore the vigor of our heritage.
(plural: kibbutzim, 'kevuzot)' is
a voluntary collective com-
munity, mainly agricultural, in
which there is no private wealth
and which is responsible for all
the needs of the members and
their families. According to the
authoritative Encyclopaedia Ju-
daica, the kibbutz movement in
Israel in 1969 numbered 93.000
people in 231 kibbutzim and
kevuzot organized in several
federations according to social,
political, and religious outlook.
The first kevuzah was found-
ed in 1909 at Deganyah by a
group of pioneers, who under-
took collective responsibility for
the working of the farm. An-
other group, which started work
at Kinneret in the same year,
became an independent kevuzah
in 1913. By 1914 there were 11
kevuzot established on Jewish
National Fund land under the
responsibility of the Zionist Or-
ganization, and the number
grew to 29 by the end of 1918.
The early kevuzot had small
memberships based upon the
idea that the community should
be small enough to constitute a
kind of enlarged family. During
the Third Aliyah, after World
War I, when larger numbers of
pioneering settlers (halutzim)
arrived, large, self sufficient
villages, combining agriculture
with industry, for which the
name "kibbutz" was used were
established. The first of this
type was En Harod, founded in
1921, and many others followed.
The Kibbutzim, says the En-
cyclodaedia Judaica. received
their manpower mainly from
the pioneering youth move-
ments abroad and, in their
turn, provided the movements
with a practical ideal of pio-
neering settlement on the land
in order to make a major con-
tribution to the building of the
Jewish National Home and
create a model and a basis for
the socialist society of the fu-
ture. They played an import-
ant part in expanding the map
of Jewish settlement and safe-
guarding the growing commu-
nity.
The kibbuitz is a unique pro-
duct of the Zionist labor move-
ment and the Jewish national
revival. It was developed by
Jewish workers inspired by
ideas of social justice as an
integral part of the Zionist ef-
fort to resettle the homeland.
Ever since its inception, the
kibbutz movement has played
a pioneering role in the econ-
omic, political, cultural and se-
curity activities required to
carry out that purpose.
The kizzutz movement has
been, and still is, a major factor
in the activities of the Zionist
movement and the State of Is-
rael. Its influence has been
both moral and practical, rang-
ing from settlement and se-
curity functions (including set-
tling new areas since the Six-
Day War), to the absorption of
immigrants and Youth Aliyah
children and the provision of
leading personnel for Zionist
and government service.
The number of kibbutz mem-
bers in the Knesset and among
army officers is far beyond
their proportion of the popula-
tion. This influence is indicated
by such diverse statistics as the
fact that its production ac-
counts for 12 percent of Israel's
gross national product, and that
more than 20 members of the
Knesset are kibbutz members.
In recent years, the move-
ment has been increasing in
size at the rate of about 2-3
percent a year. Although it has
become an established institu-
tion, it has demonstrated a
capacity of changing with the
times, the Judaica concludes.
Question Box
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
What is a "shtibul?"
A "shtibul" is the name usu-
ally given to a Hasidic syna-
gogue. The term means "a small
house."
Originally, when the Hasidic
movement developed, the estab-
lished congregations were, of
course, not Hasidic. The estab-
lishment often was antagonistic
to Hasidim. Also, the Hasidic
mode of prayer included a good
deal of singing by the congre-
gants as a whole along with
more bodily movement. This
was not welcomed in the estab-
lished congregations. Therefore,
the Hasidic groups were forced
to assembly in homes often
the home of the Hasidic leadei
or rabbi.
The establishment and its fol-
lowers looked down on the Hasi-
dim and referred to them as
the people who worshipped in
"little homes" (shtiblach) as
compared to themselves who
worshipped in comparatively
larger and well established
synagogues. Apparently the Ha-
sidim managed to convert this
title of shame into a name of
honor and so. to this day. many
refer to Hasidic places of pray-
er as "shtiDlach."
What is a "kabtzan?"
A "kabtzan" is another name
for a poor man. The term tech-
nically means "a collector."
This is applied to a poor man
because a poor man used to go
around and collect alms to sus-
tain himself.
In many communities in
Europe the poor man had to
have a letter from the head of
the community or the rabbi
testifying to the fact that he was
indeed poor and unable to sup-
port himself in any other way.
Why do many follow a
custom of eating "kugel"
on the Sabbath?
"Kugel" is a name given to a
delicacy which contains a stuf-
fing of meat or other foods con-
tained in a crust of dough
which covers it both from above
and beneath.
Some claim that the term
"kugel" indicates its circular
appearance and comes from the
Hebrew "k'igul" which means
"like a circle."
It is claimed that the idea of
eating a delicacy contained be-
tween an upper and lower crust
is a means of remembering the
manna which the Hebrews had
for food in the wilderness. That
manna was contained between
a layer of dew underneath it
and a layer of dew above it.
The Sabbath is an appropri-
ate time to remember this be-
cause of at least two reasons:
the Sabbath itself is a reminder
of the exodus from Egypt;
furthermore, on the eve of the
Sabbath two portions of manna
were found at the doorstep in-
stead of the usual daily one so
that the extra one would be
the double portion of the man-
na was a signal for the arrival
available for the Sabbath. Thus
of the Sabbath.
What is the "Nature! Kar-
ta?"
This is a term currently ap-
plied to the most extreme re-
ligious faction in the State of
Israel. Many of this sect re-
fuse to recognize Israel as a
State until the arrival of the
Messiah.
The name "Naturei Karta"*
has an interesting origin. It tech
nically means "keeper of the
gates."
Rabbi Judah once was said to
have sent his students to sur-
vey the condition of scholarship
throughout the land of Israel.
They arrived at a certain city
and found no scribe or scholar.
They asked the city fathers tip
bring to them the watchers at
the gates. When they brought
before the students the gate
keepers, who literally were the
watchmen of the physical gates,
the students replied: "These are
not watchmen of the gates. They
are the destroyers."
When the townspeople asked
them. "Who are the keepers of
the gates?" they replied, "These
are really the scholars, scribes
and teachers."
The indication was, of course,
that the solidification of a city
or a country rests with its re-
ligious leaders and religious
scholars. Thus, in defiance of
the literal government leaders,
this sect set themselves un as
an autonomous body claiming
authority over their own domain
because of their piety and
scholarship. (Talmu Yerusalmi,
Chagigah, Chapter 1)
Religious
Services
1UlONOaUl
HAlLANIUlE itA'ISM CENTIR
(Conserv.tive, "6 NE 8th Avk
Rbo: ".-. / G Suhwartz, Canto.
Jacol Danziaer.
nukiM MI/.MI BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADS
18801 NE ZZnii Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Klngaley. Cantor Irvino
Sholkea.
NORTH BROWARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. Liberal. 3501 Univer.
tity Dr. Rabbi Max Welts.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER, 875
N.W. 57th St., (Conservative) Rab-
bi Milton J. Gross.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 South Nob Hill Road,
Plantation.
K- .':;tv S p m
HuilYWOOD
VOUNO ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
(Orthodox). 3891 Sterling Rd.. cp.
ponte Hollywood Mills High School.
President Dr. Frank Stain.
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1M1 8,
14th Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffe. Aaslatant Rabbi Harvey M.
Rosenfeld.
BETH SHALOM (Tempt.) Conferva,
tlve. 4601 Arthur St. Rabbi Morton
Malav.ky, Cantor irvino Gold.
TEMPLE BETH *HM (Conservative).
JlO SW 62nd Ave.. Hollywood.
TEMPLE SINAI (Conservative). 1201
'ohnson St Rabbi David Shapiro,
Aaaociate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield.
Cantor Yer-.uda H.ilbraun
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal,. 5100 Sher.
idan 8t.. Hollywood. Rabbi Robert
Frazin. 41-C
MIRAMAR
TEilf,-E ISRAEL (Conservative)
6J20 SW 6th St. Raool AvroM
Drazlr,.
PEMBROKE PINES
T^iveP)L1Ei.NNTH.f .P,NfS 'Consarva.
tive) 1900 N. University Dr Pent.
broke Pin... R.bbi Aaron sh.oero.
9
CANDLEL.GHTIN6 TIME
11 TAMUZ 7:55


June 20, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 9
MINDLIN
\quus': The Pleasures of Sentimentality
ontinued from Page 4-
gick, the horse'becomes a"
1 godhead, and phallus all
into one.
Dot, his onanistic attach-
^to the horse, which super-
his attachment to his
|r, leaves him in an early
ent masturbatory stage
Impotent on the one occa-
offered him to lie in the
I of a woman.
Dysart knows none of
but must abreact it (a
\e\y Freudian term)
Alan to bring it all back
his repressed subcon-
B. act it out again and thus
j himself of his neurotic
lies.
OF which of course oc-
hnd in a quite miraculous
way on stage, including Alan's
blinding of, the horses (he has
multiplied their number in his
fantasy) because it is they, he
believes, who made him im-
potent as they stared at him in
the arms of Jill Mason, a girl
who seeks to elicit his man-
hood in the stable of Equus.
In the abreactive process,
Alan Strang thus "corrects"
Oedipus, who after all killed
his father and married his
mother unknowingly. Why
should he punish himself?
Wasn't it the horses (surro-
gates for his mother) that caus-
ed him to be defective (sexual-
ly) in the same way that
Oedipus was defective (lame)?
ALL OF which, I suppose,
sounds quite complicated. But
the Grove production, taken on
its own terms, is not really that.
In fact, Shaffer recognizes the
sentimentalism of his own pre-
posterous postulate Freud as
predictably successful therapy
when in a curtain speech Dr.
Dysart in essence declares:
Would that it always happened
that way.
Psychotherpy, he observes,
has the power to unfetter us
from our passions (the sick
ones), but not to inspire us
with new passions (healthy
ones) to take their place.
And, in the hopelessness of
our chaotic times, Dysart prays
for assistancepresumably for
a more "predictable" Freudlan-
ism, or whatever other form of
therapy in the future to deliver
men from their bederilments.
NOT EVEN the nude scene
between Alan and Jill, played
by Suzanne Lederer, is compli-
cated enough to be worthy of
mention in terms of its dra-
matic or pornographic purpose
other than for its simplicity and
good tasteand except for Ms.
Lederer's line delivery, which
might be a trifle less hectic
than it is as she assures an im-
mature young man that his
moment of impotency ought not
to be worth a life devoted to
self-torture and has been use-
lessly spent if it does not give
rise to a higher understanding.
All in all, "Equus" is a most
worthwhile experience. See it
here while you still can.
Minutes'
ill Frying
Griddle
WERYL ANNE GURA
IW YORK (JTA)
lAmerican Jewish Con-
announced that it reg-
a complaint with the
|nal News Council ac-
CBS News, and in
feular its "60 Minutes"
l, with "excessive,
ate and distorted rep-
^ations" of the condl-
Syrian Jewry and
obdurate refusal to
the picture.
AJCongress also at-
CBS News for pre-
lg an "inaccurate and
:umented assertion"
tthe devastation of Ku-
i, a city located in the
Heights, occurred
[by shell fire and war
^y bulldozer and dyna-
as the Israelis vacated
Rowing the 1974 disen-
[ent agreement.
AJCONGRESS request-
Council to investigate its
lint against CBS News
approve its suggestion
las a resolution to the "in-
jracies" in the "60 Minutes"
am, Mike Wallace, the
fam's host, interview a
er Syrian Jew now living
United States, one who,
at! recently existed under
antial terror in Syria could
openly and present an
fate account of the condi-
I in tb country and thus
wit an alternative insight"
[the problems of Syrian
Council agreed to in-
nate the complaint,
ares on the news media;
^re only interested in es-
ling that the actual and
fjudiced situation is pre-
to the public."
king at a press confer-
labbi Arthur Hertzberg,
ress president, empha-
lat "in absolutely no way
ask for any restrictive
FFER
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DIRECTORS:
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Services available in all
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throughout the Miami.
W. Palm Beach area*
Israel to Test Canal Passage
Continued from Page 1-
from South Korea consigned to
Israel and the administered
territories.
They said that the ship, which
apparently has been underway
for some time, was originally
scheduled to discharge its
cargo at Israel's Red Sea port
of Eilat but was subsequently
ordered to Gaza on the Mediter-
ranean.
IT WAS due to arrive there
June 16, but the date has since
been advanced to June 10, indi-
cating that the vessel was mak-
ing for the Suez Canal rather
than taking the long route
around Africa and through the
Straits of Gibraltar.
Yaacobi said, "I hope very
much the cargo (of sugar) will
go through. It will be a very
sweet cargo for our relations
with Egypt for the future."
He said that Egypt's commit-
ment to allow Israeli cargoes
through the Suez Canal was not
written into the disengagement
accords but was conveyed in
writing to the United States by
Egypt at the time.
ISRAELIS CHIEF of Staff.
Gen. Mordechai Gur, predicted
that the reopening of the Suez
Canal will usher in a period of
calm in the Middle East.
Addressing Hebrew Univer-
sity students. Gen. Gur said the
reopening of the canal strength-
ened the views of those who
- PALMER'S ~
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believe that a political settle-
ment is possible with Egypt
rather than a military one.
He observed that Egypt was
not likely to go to war while
the canal was open to naviga-
tion and that Syria and Jordan
would not go to war on their
own without the participation
of Egypt.
In his television interview.
Rabin said he didn't expect that
Israel's decision to thin out its
forces In Sinai would be suffi-
cient to make Egypt disengage
itself from its state of belliger-
ency.
"I WOULD like to believe so,
but I doubt it," the Premier
said. "I would like to integrate
into the bargaining, a commit-
ment toward Israel to undertake
a more moderate course toward
peace," he added.
Rabin said an interim agree-
ment with Egypt was possible
but cautioned that the period
between such an agreement and
an overall settlement might run
into years.
He was less optimistic over
the possibilities of an interim
agreement with Syria and said
there might be no way for Is-
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rael to reach such a stage with
that country.
HE SAID the possibilities for
territorial maneuver on the
Golan Heights were very limit-
ed and it was unrealistic to be-
lieve that Syria would be satis-
He said his meeting with
President Ford in Washington
this week would not deal with
an> one specific point but
would attempt to establish a
common policy that would deal
with more than one aspect of
the Middle East problem,
fied by an agreement that would
grant her only small conces-
sions.
Nevertheless, Rabin said, if
a second-stage agreement is
reached with Egypt, negotia-
tions might be resumed with
Syria at a later stage.
Solel Graduates
First Class Of
Pre-Schoolers .
The Anne ArrJftti Nursery
School of Temple Solel heH its
first graduation ceremony June
11.
The 60 pre-school children
and their families participated
in a program under the direc-
tion of Mrs. Shelly Herold and
received their diplomas from
Rabbi Robert Frazin.
The graduates included An-
drea Benjamin, Benjamin Blais-
dell, Lisa Blair, Carrie Blanke,
Jeffrey Blaze, Jennifer Bodner,
Jennifer Cohen, Lori Cooper,
Michael Cummings, Merry Ed-
wards, Kenneth Ehrlich, Linda
Feinberg, Dean Fishman, Bren-
da Fischer, Shannon Fishman,
Jean Franzblau. Susan Galfond,
Rebecca Glassman, Michael
Grulianti, Andrew Greene. Rosa
Haber, Susan Handler. Nicole
Harrison, Carvn Herold. Adam
Hurtig, Evan Kahn, Gary Kauf-
man, Laura Keller, Gary Kerz-
ner, Wendy Kobb and Jeffrey
Krouse.
Also Jason La Belle, Suzanne
Leeds, Michelle Levine, Steven
Liff, Kimberly Marcus, Joshua
Meyer, Leah Moore, Michael
Muskat, Laurel Packar, Tobi
Perl, Debbie Piha, Amy Rosen-
thai, Michael Ross, Robyn Ross,
Gayle Safier, Lauren Sandier,
Robert Sandier, Jonathan Sa-
tovsky, Mindy Schain, Alison
Schardl, Lori Seif, Stacey
Schafman, Stephanie Small,
Leslie Spievack, Andrew Tay-
lor, Jennifer Weiner, Jill Wei-
ner, Jonathan Wildstein and
Tara Wortman.
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I



Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywoocr
Friday. June 20, 1975
Temple Sinai Religious School
Holds June 8 Closing Exercises
Closing exercises for the
Temple Sinai Religious School
took place June 8 with a Siyum
Celebration in the main sanc-
tuary where students perform-
ed for their families and friends
in a "Pageant of Learning."
Each class gave one highlight
of the school year. Gifts and
awards were presented by Rab-
bi Shapiro, Joseph Kleiman,
temple president and Mrs. Mir-
iam P. Schmerler, education
director, and r.er staff.
The following students earn-
ed a gift for Special Attendance
at Religious Services, Extra
Participation, Accomplishment
of Work and Extra Service to
the Temple and the Commu-
nitv:
Class Aleph Stephan Co-
hen, William Epstein, Richard
Golden, Jonathan Josell, Judith
Katz, Jimmy Koenig, Glenn
Platt, Lisa Stein, Sarah Wach-
man, Scott Kupferman, Lisa
Harmelin and Louis Harmelin.
Class Beth Dale Appell,
Barbara Goldstein, Daniel Jo-
sell. Ilene Katz, Stephen Krinz-
man, Lloyd Maliner, Scott Mit-
chell, Robert Shenkel, Steven
Singer, Joseph Sutton, Daniel
Block, Wendy Kaswan, Marc
Mandelbaum, Michael Mihlstin,
and Brian Sugerman.
Class Gimel Jaime Cole,
Linda Haber, Carol Lehrer,
Mark Levin, Aimee Mandel-
baum, Myra Miller, Holly Saver,
Ronald Schoenbaum, Sara Sing-
er, Sheryl Sugerman, Jon Gold-
berg, Alan Ganzler, Richard Si-
monson, Claire Sultan, Jacque-
line Waldorf, Jill Berman, Josh
Kameron, Michael Wachman.
Kvutzat Geulah Maxine
Eichner, Kenneth Gottlieb, Ste-
ven Markowitz, Lynn Pittell,
Samuel Rose, Nancy Rosenthal,
Sarah Schmerler, Laura Schoen-
baum, Robert Siff, Sharon Sing-
er, Lisa Sutton.
Kvutzat Mitzvah Eric Ap-
pell, Cary Aron, Adina Conn,
Emily Goldstein, Irwin Heichen,
Larry Kaswan, Scott Levin,
Mona Lipof, Michael Lobel,
Steven Schwartz, Steven Tal-
bert, Lisa Veingrad and Na-
talie Farber.
These students, plus Steven
Caster and Marc Yeber, receiv-
ed special certificates of
achievement from Rabbi Sha-
piro for completing their Bar
and Bat Mitzvah year:
Pre Confirmation Faith
Eichner, Glenn Gordon, Miriam
Lusskin, Hope Mayer, Sharon
Bar Mitzvah
MARC YEBER
Marc, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Sergio Yeber, will be Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday, June 21, at Tem-
ple Sinai.
it LISA BECKERMAN
Lisa, daughter of Mr. Ross
Beckerman, will be Bat Mitz-
vah Saturday, June 21, at Tem-
ple Beth El.
it & ir
SHARON ALLALA
Sharon, daughter of Mrs.
Phyllis Allala, will be Bat Mitz-
vah Friday, June 20, at Temple
Israel of Miramar.
it it it
IVY LYNN
Ivy, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Alan Lynn, will be Bat
Mitzvah Friday, June 27, at
Temple Israel of Miramar.
fr ft fi
KEVIN VERMONT
Kevin, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Bart Vermont, will be Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday, June 28, at Tem-
ple Israel of Miramar.
it it it
LISA YANOFSKY
Lisa, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Yanofsky, will be
Bat Mitzvah Saturday, June 21,
at Temple Solel.
Miner, Andrea Newman, Debo-
rah Raticoff.
Confirmation Brian Ap-
pell, Deborah Brodie, Joel Brot-
man, June Eichner, Michael
Eisler, Jill Finder, Larry Green-
span, Sally Katz, Sam Kraemer,
Caren Miner, Amie Roberts,
Henry Rose, Alan Siff, Joel Ver-
gun, Edward Waldorf and Jef-
frey Zw'rn.
School of Judaica and Sen-
ior USY students Mark Brot-
man, Rena Fisher, Larry Gold-
man, Sharon Greenspan, Shari
Markowitz, Susan Miner, Linda
Myers, Nina Siff, Susan Tanur,
Rick Veingrad, Harold Waldorf,
Ellen Strachan, Bruce Terl,
Danny Rosenthal, Maria Ber-
man, David Apseloff, Lynn
Hoffman, Jeff Smith, Leigh Ro-
senthal, Johanna Drickman,
Shelley Foster.
In the Sunday School Depart-
ment the following students re-
ceived recognition.
Perfect Attendance Paula
Hoffman, Stuart Rosenthal,
Larry Siff.
Excellent Attendance Mir-
iam Drickman, Lenore Epstein,
Deborah Goldfine, Larry Lip-
sitz, Heidi Platt, Elliot Wach-
man, Melissa Block.
Excellence in all Studies
Stuart Rosenthal, Melinda Stein,
Debra Goldfine, Dale Miller.
Excellence in Laws and Cus-
toms Greg Signer, Larry Siff,
Lenore Epstein, Miriam Drick-
man.
Excellence in Bible Studies
Heidi Platt, Jennifer Levin,
Paula HoiT.nan.
Excellence in Hebrew Read-
ing Readiness Elizabeth Le-
vin, Gail Levin.
Most Improvement Marcie
Mandelbaum, Rachel Goldstein,
Da\id Berkowitz.
In the Hebrew Department
the following students received
recognition:
Class Aleph Outstanding
Achievement: Samuel Feibus;
Most Effort: Howard Friedman;
Excellence in Attendance: Lisa
Harmelin, Louis Harmelin, Judy
Katz, William Katz.
Class Beth Perfect At-
tendance: Lloyd Maliner; Ex-
cellent Attendance; Dale Ap-
pell, Steven Singer, Danny
Block, Michal Mihlstin.
Class Gimel Perfect At-
tendance: Myra Miller; Excel-
lent Attendance: Sara Singer.
Kvutzat Geulah Excellent
Attendance: Maxine Eichner,
Kenny Gottlieb, Samuel Rose,
Sarah Schmerler, Robert Siff.
Kvutzat Mitzvah: Emily Gold-
stein, Larry Kaswan, Steven
Schwartz, Lisa Veingrad. Out-
standing attendance at Junior
Congregation Services: Myra
Miller, Sarah Schmerler, Bar-
bara Goldstein.
USY Installation,
Awards Banquet
Held At Sinai
Temple Sinai USY's installa-
tion and awards banquet was
held June 1 in Haber Karp Hall
with Nina Siff was mistress of
ceremonies; the dinner was pre-
pared by members of Sister-
hood, under the direction of
Jeanne Waldorf, president.
Birkat Hamazon was recited
by Mark Brotman and Rena
Fisher; greetings were brought
by temple president Joseph
Kleiman and South East Re-
gional USY director Harry Sil-
verman.
Immediate USY past presi-
dents Jill Berman, Andrea
Newman, and Susi Tanur laud-
ed their fellow officers after
which the new officers were in-
stalled by Rabbi Chaim List-
field and Roslyn Z. Seidel,
youth advisor.
Rabbi David Shapiro deliver-
ed the charge to the new of-
ficers and Rabbi Listfield and
Roz Seidel presented the
"Thank You" Awards. Jeanne
Waldorf vinounced the LTI
Scholarship winners, while Dr.
Alfred R. Rosenthal named the
winners of the summer scholar-
ships.
The Rhoda Kaplan Memorial
Awards were presented by Jer-
ald Raticoff, Marlene Lusskin
and Abe Saperstein. The Mark
Norman Lippman LTI Award
was presented by Michael Ein-
horn and Phyllis Kraemer.
Rhoda Kaplan Memorial
Awards for Excellence and Out-
standing Leadership were won
by the three immediate past
USY presidents Jill Berman,
Kadimah; Andrea Newman,
Junior, and Susi Tanur, Senior
USY. The Mark Norman Lipp-
man Award for Outstanding De-
velopment and Achievement
was given to Linda Myers, im-
mediate past treasurer of the
Senior Group. Jeffrey Zwirn
received the Service Award for
being the USY "roving photog-
rapher" all year.
The following USY'ers were
awarded scholarships subsidiz-
ed by the Sisterhood to attend
LTI (Leadership Training In-
stitute) in Camp Blue Star, Hen-
dersonville, N.C.: Kenny Gott-
lieb, Aimee Mandelbaum, Rob-
ert Siff, Cary Aron, Maxine
Eichner, Lynn Pittell, Sharon
Singer, Lisa Veingrad, Adina
Conn, Nancy Rosenthal, Mark
Brotman, Rena Fisher, Larry
Goldman, Sam Kraemer, Shari
Markowitz, Linda Myers, Alan
Siff, Nina Siff, Susi Tanur, Har-
old Waldorf, June Eichner,
Faith Eichner, Debbie Brodie,
Jeffrey Zwirn, Maria Berman,
Glenn Gordon, Andrea New-
man, Miriam Lusskin and Deb-
bie Raticoff.
The banquet was the season-
closing affair for the USY'ers;
close to 200 students, parents,
and honored guests attended.
Toon Misquotes
U.S. Position
On Middle East
Continued from Page 1
moving the parties toward a
settlement.
He declined to discuss most
questions affecting the Middle
East on grounds that it would
be inappropriate to do so while
the Administration is still en-
gaged in its reassessment of
Middle East policy.
But Toon said, however, that
the U.S. stands for "a secure
Israel" and that it would do
anything it "thinks proper in
our own objective terms" to-
wards that end.
When Sen. Clark noted that
Toon had not included the is-
sue of Jerusalem in his remarks
on the Arab-Israeli conflict,
Toon replied, "I don't think it's
one of the problems we want to
face right now."
Toon will succeed the late
Kenneth Keating who was am-
bassador to Israel from 1973
until his death last month.
Young Professionals Calendar
FRIDAY, JUNE 20
Live Band Dance Mad Hatter Restaurant, 7565 W.
20th Ave., Hiafeah8 p.m.
SATURDAY, JUNE 21
House Party in Coconut Grove9 p.m.
SUNDAY, JUNE 22
Live Band DanceGreen Dolphin Restaurant, 301 NE
Miamarina Parkway8 p.m.
For information or reservations, call 538-2884 in Dade,
961-0717 in Broward.
i
KGB Calls Science Seminar
Big 'Intelligence Operation9
Continued from Page 1-
asked to sign a warning that he would cease the activities
of the scientific seminar. According to the NCSJ, he refused
to do so.
AZBEL'S STATEMENT said
that 100 scientists want the
seminar to continue, among
them Nobel Laureates and aca-
demic heads. He emphasized
that it is not anti-Soviet activity
and that their work should not
be stopped.
Azbel compared the KGB
harassment to the Middle Ages,
when scientists were "tried for
conducting research without the
permission of authorities."
The NCSJ also reported that
in regard to the searches con-
Federation
Forms Shut-in
Committee
Under the aegis of Rabbi
Harold Richter, Chaplain of the
Jewish Federations of both
North and South Broward coun-
ties, an ad hoc committee is be-.
ing formed for the purpose of
obtaining volunteers to visitj
patients at local hospitals and
nursing homes, as well as the '
sick who are house-bound.
Representatives of 17 area
temples and organizations,
heard the Rabbi explain that
volunteers are needed to serv-
ice 11 hospitals and 13 nursing
homes, in addition to the "shut-
ins" at a recent meeting. He
also established three sub-com-
mittees and named chairmen
for them. They include Volun-
teer Services to Hospitals, Mary
Wolfe, president of Hillcrest
B'nai B'rith Women; Volunteer
Services to Convalescent Homes
and Institutions, Dr. Lewis Ulan
of Jewish Family Service; Vol-
unteer Services to Shut-ins, Ja-
net Farcus of Aviva B'nai
B'rith.
An orientation meeting was
to be held Thursday at the Hol-
lywood Medical Building, with
Ms. Finnigan, Hollywood Medi-
cal Center director of educa-
tion and Rabbi Richter outlin-
ing the program's goals.
Area residents interested in
volunteering their services are
urged to telephone any of the
chairpersons.
ducted a few days ago during
vhich copies of the publication,
Jews in the USSR," were con-
fiscated from apartments in
Moscow, Vladimir and Dontsk,
was searched, said the aim of
the KGB was to try to eliminate
the only Jewish publication in
the Soviet Union and to im-
prison its editors.
RUBIN TIED the searches to
the attack on the scientific
seminar and labelled them "an
attempt to put an end to Jew-
ish cultural and intellectual
life in the Soviet Union."
I
GOING TO THE USSR?
Please contact the Jew-
ish Federation Soviet Jewry
Committee at 921-8810
about meeting with and
helping the Soviet Jews in
various cities.
OPENING JUNE 26 SPECIAL
4>_^ P( PERSON
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A


\uoitr

ynmit
EOPLE think and make value judge-
is in terms of blacks and whites. Our
Tjs characterized by polarization of
Ve Ignore the many options between
|mes. In judging a man, some people
It man is a complex creature and his
composed of diverse elements,
[journalists or historians destroy the
of great leaders, some people are
overlook the meritorious deeds of
Their disillusionment with the char-
tie personification of perfection causes
jo to the opposite extreme of rejec-
hopes that this will not apply to or
tor Herzl.
ELON has written close to a defini-
raphy in "Herzl" (New York, Holt,
[& Winston, $15, 495 pages). Eton's
despite some shortcomings, is ex-
pie depicts the father of political Zion-
ran intellectual snob, narcisstic, mono-
Ian inadequate husbandTind father, but,
d, a martyr to his own drive for a Jew-
jthor's research, while extensive, did
ie a study of the essay by Peter Low-
Theodor Herzl, a Psychoanalytic Study
Imatic Leadership."
MEN based their work on Herzl's
Herzl: The Man,
Myth and Messiah
ui .i........ "
diaries. Both men explode myths about their
suoject. Herzl did not come from an orthodox
home; he did not have a yeshiva training, he
came to an appreciation of anti-Semitism long
before the Dreyfus case; ho knew about Zion-
ism from his youth. He learned about it from
his grandfather who spoke of the Sephardi
Rabbi Alkali who preached about a return to
the Holy Land in 1840.
"HERZL HAD a personal need to be a
messiah-savior-political leader." according to
Lowenberg as revealed by Herzl himself. He
wrote plays because he required adulation.
"He was a lonermasterful, narcissistic,
independent." He found his greatest support
from the masses of poor Russian Jews whom
he had formerly ignored. His approaches to
the great European rulers failed to achieve
his goals but he lit a torch of hope and he
kindled the flame of devotion which brought
to fruition his dreams within the 50 years
that he predicted at the first Zionist Congress
in 1897.
HE WROTE, "I have not made Zionism
poorer but Jewry richer."
Eton reminds us of the words of Pope Pius
X words to Herzl in 1903, "We cannot approve
of the Zionist movement. ... The Hebrews have
not recognized our Lord, therefore we cannot
recognize the Jewish people."
Friday, June 20, 1975 mjmlsi)McrkMam Pa8e n
^JLj^vid
Sck
wartz
Just be Sure to Remember:
Don't Order an Omelette
| know anyone who is planning to visit
tell him not to order an omelette
maybe he could try a boiled egg.
fling to the New York Times, a guest
Jaurant in Uganda complained about
in serving the omelette he ordered.
ve have the omelette," he was told,
Idjn't have a plate to put it in until
else finishes earing."
THERE is a shortage of glasses for
be recalled that some time back the
pf Uganda ordered all Israelis who
giving technical help out of the
rThen Gen. Amin, who expressed him-
kof admiration for Hitler, ordered all
Is out of Uganda. Later it was re-
hat he had killed 50,000 of his own
khr New York Times reports that his
live: Minister has defected to London,
le economy of Uganda is in complete
ganda is not only now without Jews
t>peans. bat without its Finance Min-
without cups and saucers, and the
too good either, says the Times cor-
|nt.
UtES only one rotten egg at the top
country.
CM President to consider the naming
as Attorney General was Thomas Jef-
ferson and strangely enough, the man Jeffer-
son had in mind was named LevyMoses
Levy.
Moses Levy was an esteemed member of
the bench in Philadelphia. He was also one
of the Board of Trustees of the University of
Pennsylvania. Jefferson, it is said, had planned
to name him Attorney General but was dis-
suaded by Albert Gallatin, his Secretary of the
Treasury- Gallatin also came from Pennsyl-
vania. The reasons for GaUatin's opposition
are not known.
THERE WAS another Levy who is asso-
ciated with the Jefferson sagaCommodore
Uriah P Levy. He served in the War of 1812.
He was a fighting man and fought several
duels. Apparently he encountered some anti-
Semitism. He was a great admirer of Jeffer-
son.
He bought Jefferson s estate, Monticello,
after Jefferson's death, which probably saved
Monticello from being divided up and sold in
lots. He also presented to the government the
statue of Jefferson which now stands in the
Capitol in Washington.
WONDER WHAT President Jefferson would
think of the Mideast situation if he were here
today? It was in his administration. that the
United States went to war with Tripoli over
its sea-.>acking of American war vessels in the
Mediterranean. The war with Tripoli was the
first American war after the establishment ot
the Constitutional Union.
i' .; .. :
.
/Vo/'c
rt
t^ZjejMffi
Age Of
ii
\OW YOU don't need lo be an historian to rewrite momentous
events to square with your favored fancies. The voices of
the revisionists are heard in the land; and those voices assail
your ears over television. And there's gold in those interviews.
Best example to date, of course, is H. R. Haldeman. former
chief of staff for former President Richard Nixon, taping it off
for Mike Wallace and CBS at a price estimated at anywhere
from S25.000 to $50,000.
MR. HALDEMAN is not the first luminary to go through
this profitable exercise of "fee speech;" but his payment is
made to one under a minimum 30-month sentence for con-
spiracy, obstruction of justice and perjury in the Watergate
cover-up.
And with plenty of time allowed him for an appeal, what
better way to employ his leisure than by proclaiming his in-
nocence while playing airwave pitch-and-toss with Mike Wal-
lace?
No, H. R. Haldeman is not lead-off man in this new game
ot memoirs for hire. Sirhan B. Sirhan, believed by millions to
have been the assassin of Bobby Kennedy, has been paid for
his network attempt at revising history. G. Gordon Liday has
enjoyed similar privileges for a fee. And so have John W. Dean
III and William F. Calley Jr.
WHAT MR. HALDEMAN brought forth through his labors
with Mr. Wallace was really not all that astounding. He said
that he bore his captain, Mr. Nixon, respect, not love.
He revealed that Mr. Nixon had toyed with the idea of
pushing Spiro Agnew out of the vice presidency to make way
for John Connally. Apparently, both Mr. Nixon and Mr. Halde-
man regarded Mr. Connally as a fellow who would make a
superb vice president, or even president. Behold the numerous
blessings Mr. Connally showered upon Texas as governor.
DID MR. HALDEMAN make mistakes while in the White
House? Well, there was the one about the tapes: really, they
should have been destroyed. More's the shame they weren't.
(It would benefit CBS listeners to have Mike Wallace put that
question to Alexander Butterfield, who made tape history in
the Watergate affair and has since been bumped, truth-teller
tnat he turned out to be. Chances are Mr. Butterfield wouldn't
expect a tee for his interview. Just not his way of life.)
Having made notes on the Haldeman-Wallace $25,000 ov
up television interview, John Dean came up with two points
worth remembering: (1) Mr. Haldeman, despite all his efforts
to make the 26 million television viewers watching the show
hail him as an. innocent, remains clearly convicted by the
relentless process of law; (2) Mr. Haldeman, despite all his
protestations on the air, "confused motive with the legalities
of intent."
Mr. Haldeman insisted in his long hour on Mr. Wallace's
stage that he had no intent to commit the crime with which
he was charged. Let's grant that, says John Dean, and then let
us recall that "Robin Hood is no less a thief because he stole
to feed the poor; and Haldeman is no less a conspirator to
obstruct justice because he merely sought to protect a Presi-
dent. "
THESE REFLECTIONS on the Haldeman-Wallace show
bring us eventually to the thoughts going through the minds
of hjads of networks other than CBS, networks failing to pay
Mr. Haldeman handsome cash for his exclusive.
Over at ABC and NBC, the brass well knows that Presi-
dents Truman, Eisenhower and Johnson all received money for
interviews with no protests resulting. What's wrong with giv.
ing a convicted big name like Haldeman a slice of the bread
then?
For many Americans the answer is that the Truman. Eisen-
hower and Johnson interviews consisted of presentations of
fascinating insights into the careers of Presidents of the United
States in no trouble with the law and with no need to preva
innocence.
I m .11 :X
Decade Has Passed Since Elie Cohen Was Hanged in Damascus
Haifa
IS probably not a city or town in Israel
does not have at least one street, avenue,
other public place bearing the name of
en. It was on May 18, 1965, exactly ten
. that Elie Cohen was hanged in a public
the Syrian capital of Damascus.
\s and many newspaper and magazine ar
n b.-en written about Mm, but memories
|en years. Since Elie Cohen was a hero of
pnusual sort, it is fitting that history be
ag ;in.
|WAS an Israeli citizen who deliberately
enemy territpry to seek information which
valuable for the defence of his country.
Fspy. He rendered extremely valuable serv-
Car/
*4U
erl
1
ice. He was caught, and was executed.
Elie Cohen was a native of Egypt and there-
fore spoke Arabic fluently. After he emigrated to
Israel in 1965 he was enrolled in intelligence work
and it was decided to send him on the most danger-
ous mission. But first of. all. he had to acquire a
new identity.
He became a prosperous Arab businessman.
After steeping himself in every aspect of Arab cul-
ture ani Modem lore, he went to Argentina and
became a respectable member of the Arab com-
munity in that country. He was a liberal contributor
to Arab causes,
BECAUSE OF his personal charm, as well as
his financial means, he moved in the very top cir-
cles of Damascus society. Ha hobnobbed with gen-
erals and government officials. He became their con-
fidant. He knew everything that was going on. He
was taken on in-pection tours of the Syrian front
positions on the Golan Heights.
Elie Cohen was a spy, but he was entitled to a
fair trial with legal counsel. This he did not get.

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*
Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
F"day- June 20
1971







nearing completion*. ?
THE GARDEN MAUSOLEUM OF
MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY
5505 Northwest 3rd Street, Miami, Florida 33126
a perpetual memorial of everlasting beauty
SELECTING A FAMILY
RESTING PLACE is a sacred
family trust. Although you may
not like to think about it, the time
to arrange for it is long before
the need, when your mind is
unclouded, and you can consider
the altematives.The perfect
alternative is Mount Nebo's
Garden Mausoleum...a sanctuary
of love and peace; a comforting
place for prayer, remembrance
and meditation.
COSTS ARE COMPARABLE
TO ORDINARY GROUND
BURIAL. Entombment in this
magnificent mausoleum is com-
parable to ground burial, yet how
much more reverential. And there
is never a maintenance charge;
crypts will be maintained beauti-
fully forever, with sympathetic
concern and professional care as
part of the total purchase.
YOU MUST VISIT
MOUNT NEBO TO TRULY
APPRECIATE IT. FREE
TRANSPORTATION is offered
to this beautiful haven, from
wherever you live in Dade County.
And as a token of our apprecia-
tion for permitting our represen-
tative to show you our new
mausoleum, we have a FREE GIFT
for you YOUR CHOICE OF:
Beautiful, stainless water
pitcher... Stainless, 3-piece sugar,
creamer and tray.. .or Silver-plated
salt and pepper shakers.
We must tell you, how-
ever, that the supply of
gifts is limited.
SELECT NOW
FOR CHOICE
LOCATIONS
AND LOWER
PRICEour pre-comple-
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substantial savings, as wel
as small initial deposit and
3-year terms.
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY, CALL 261-7612
MAIL THIS COUPON TODAY-
MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY & GARDEN MAUSOLEUM
POST OFFICE BOX 440-367 / MIAMI. FLORIDA 33144
Sir:
? Without obligation, please mail me full information on the
Garden Mausoleum including types and availability of crypts,
and details of your payment plan.
D I prefer information about ground burial.
? Please have your sales representative call me to arrange an
appointment at Mount Nebo. I understand that I will receive a
FREE GIFT, without further obligation, after I have kept my
appointment at the mausoleum site with your representative.
NAME
STREET_
CITY
ZIP
TELEPHONE


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