The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00116

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
0eJewi5ti Florid tin
and SIIOI All OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Volume 5 Number 8
Hollywood, Florida Friday, April 11, 1975
25 cents
Gen. Herzog On Final Tour
Before Taking Up UN Duties
. ^dwalMMn


Maj. Gen. Chaim Herzog, Is-
rael's next Ambassador to the
United Nations, will soon be mak-
ing his last speaking tour in this
country before taking up his new
diplomatic duties.
First stop on his Itinerary Is
his speaking engagement at Hol-
lywood's Temple Sinai, set for
Sunday, April 20, at 7:30 p.m.
Gen. Herzog's topic on that oc-
casion will be "The Middle East
and Today's World."
The general will be in the
United States from that date
through May 4 on a special mis-
GEN. CHAIM HERZOG
sion at the request of Prime Min-
ister Rabin.
Top political analyst of the
Middle East. General Herzog has
been hailed as the Eric Sevareid
of European television for his
distinguished radio and TV com-
mentaries in Great Britain, Ger-
many. Sweden, and France. He
has also broadcast in the United
States.
In January of 1970 Queen
Elizabeth of England named Gen.
Herzog a Knight Commander of
the Most Excellent Order of the
British Empire.
Rabbi Miller Praises Israel Stand;
Cites Vietnam as Major Precedent
NEW YORK (JTA)Charg-
ing that the Arab world's refusal
to accept Israel's right to exist
was responsible for the failure of
Secretary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer's latest peace efforts in
the Middle East, Rabbi Israel
Miller declared here that the wis-
dom of Israel's insistence on tan-
gible peace moves by Egypt be-
fore relinquishing further terri-
tory in Sinai "Is confirmed by
what is happening today in Viet-
nam."
Rabbi Miller, chairman of the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organi-
zations, drew the Middle East-
Vietnam parallel in a statement
issued here.
"THERE TOO, Secretary Kis-
singer served as mediator among
the local parties to the conflict"
and "there too, pledges of peace-
ful intentions were offered but
without the necessary safeguards
to make sure the promises would
not be broken," Rabbi Miller said
referring to the 1973 Paris peace-
accords.
"The aginy of Vietnam today
is a price that is being paid for
the failure to insist on such vital
safeguard?. Israel has learned the
lesson of Vietnam, and both the
American peoole and the cause
of peace are the gainers," Rabbi
Miller observed.
He said "It is clear now that
by its refusal to renounce bellig-
erency against Israel, Egypt and
the Arab world are not yet ready
to accept Israel's right to exist
as a legitimate and nermanent
political entity in the Middle
East." ^
RABBI MH*;BR readied: "uni-
ty and'-solidanUy.wttlv leteel **
her struggle for peace and se-
curity." He said that "the col-
lapse of secretary Kissinger's
peace mission is regrettable but
not fatal. Far worse for Israel's
securitv, for America's strategic
interests and for the cause of
world peace would have been Is-
rael's submission to Egyptian in-
transigence.
"For that would only have
whetted the Arabs' appetite for
the goal that they have not yet
abandoned the destruction of
Israel."
Rabbi Miller advised that "Now
RABBI MILLER
responsibility elsewhere
is the time for Israel to stand
fast and stay cool. For Israel's
friends in this country it is a
moment to speak out in solidarity
with thp Jewish State, recogniz-
ing that peace cannot be achieved
by surrender nor security bought
with promises."
IN RELATED actions, two Jew-
ish organizations called upon
Ford to reaffirm the Administra-
tion's commitment to Israel's se-
curity.
Dr. Joseph P. Sternstein. pres-
ident of the Zionist Organization
of America, in urging Ford to
"make known your Administra-
tion's support for Israel's rightful
position and that the United
States will not abandon her loyal
ally," blamed the prevailing
Arab intransigence aided by the
Kremlin for Egypt's rejection of
moderation.
Howard Adelson, president of
the United Zionists-Revisionists
of America, noted "with dismay
reports that you (Ford) place re
sponsibility on Israel for the fail-
ure of Secretary of State Kissln
ger. Egyptian refusal to take
steps toward a political solution
made failure inevitable." Both
leaders made their statements in
telegrams to Ford.
MM.....WHM I
m HMMHI
......!M;iwi.t"in in i" nr.i
INS Vows Action Against
Ex-Nazis Living in U.S.
WASHINGTON(JTA)The head of the U.S Immigra-
tion and Naturalization Service pledged here that he would
increase the number of Department of Justice investigators
seeking the 33 Nazis still living in America.
Retired Gen. Leonard Chapman had testified about the
four to 12 million illegal aliens in the United States when
he was asked by Rep. Joshua Eilberg (D., Pa.) about the
Nazi leaders who fled from Germany as World War II was
ending.
EILBERG, Rep. Elizabeth Holtzman (D., N.Y.) and
others in Congress have been urging a thorough investiga-
tion of the Nazis believed to be in the United States.
Eilberg is chairman of the subcommittee on immigra-
tion of the House Judiciary Committee. Chapman replied
that of 89 cases that the INS had begun, 33 remain on the
active list and "we have it at the highest priority."
When Eilberg noted that more than a year has passed
since more active investigation had been urged in Con-
gress, Chapman promised he would put more investigators
to work on the cases.
CBS Apology Asked
For Program on Syria
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Committee for the Rescue of
Syrian Jewry has demanded that
CBS News make a "public cor-
rection of all the misrepresenta-
tions and distortions" on the con-
ditions of Syrian Jews which the
group said was made during the
"60 Minutes" program on Feb.
16.
In a letter to CBS News Presi-
dent Richard Salant, Rabbi Jo-
seph Harari, the committee's ex-
ecutive director, said the "erron
eous report" by Mike Wallace,
"has justified Syrian brutality,
intensified the agony of the Jews
in Syria and jeopardized the lives
of these helpless people."
ROBERT CHANDLER. CRS
vice president for public affairs
broadcasts, told the Jewish Tele
graphic Agency that the "60
Minutes" report was based on
first-hand reporting in Syria dur-
ing January-February.
He said CBS had a researcher
in Damascus for four weeks, and
the producer of the program was
there for two weeks. He said the
show pointed out that Wallace
was accompanied by Syrian
agents during an interview with
a Jewish family.
"Obviousiy. we can't be sure"
that all of the things CBS was
told is true," Chandler admitted.
Rabbi Harari has demanded
that CBS name the four Syrian
Jews who were allegedly exe-
cuted for espionage in 1969, ac-
cording to the CBS report.
Chandler said the information
came from the Syrian Jewish
community, and CBS could not
corroborate it by any newspaper
reports.
RABBI HARARI said that Wal-
lace reported that Syrian Jew*
are kept under close surveillance
because they are "suspect in
Continued on Pag? 5
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l_


I
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, April n, 197s
OPEC Paying Magazine For
Favorable Articles?
ft
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON(JTA)The Organization of Petrole-
um Exporting Countries (OPEC) is considering paying
Readers Digest to publish sympathetic articles and accept-
ing a "cold turkey" offer from a New York advertising
agency to bring OP EC's "message" to "the American peo-
ple" according to Business Week.
In an editorial entitled
"Blacklist Backlash in Con-
gress," Business Week said that
"Administration officials fear
that escalating anti-Arab senti-
ment in Congress will make new-
trouble for legislation dealing
with trade or foreign investment
in the United States."
THE MAOA4lNb pointed out
that amendments are sprouting
to block commercial deals with
co-mtiies that participate against
L'.S. companies with Jewish in-
terests."
One top Senate aide is quoted
in the Business Week editorial
as sa ing that "people are really
upset" over the blacklist.
"Unless *:ie Aral>s renounce
tl.e blacklist, pressure for Con-
gressional reprisal may grow ir-
resistible" although "State and
Treasury Department officials
argue the lest way to handle
NCJW Reaffirms
Support of Amnesty
At its National Convention
March 9-13 at the Fairmont Hotel
in San Francisco, Calif., the Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women
reaffirmed its support of uncon-
ditional amnesty lor all who re-
sisted fighting the war in Indo-
china.
The nearly 700 Convention del-
egates, from Sections across the
country, called in a separate ac-
tion for a halt to United States
military intervention and involve-
ment in Cambodia.
"It is shocking and unaccept-
able to us,' said outgoing Na-
tional President Eleanor Marvin,
"that at a time of saeb economic
hardship throughout the world,
the precious resources of the
United States should be spent on
military iaterveatiea in Southeast
Asia, a policy which has already
proved a failure. We feel that
government should reassess its
priorities so that funds are allo-
cated for human services in this
country and abroad."
Convention delegates attended
program sessions devoted to the
major priorities of NCJW con-
cern, including a presentation on
the subject of Protection of Con-
stitutional Rights by Frank Wil-
kinson, Executive Director of the
National Committee Against Re-
pressive Legislation, who said
that citizens must be alert to the
hidden significance of legislation
and hp wary of ostensibly harm-
less bills.
"The criminal code revisions
now pending in Congress," he
said,, "will reenact dangerous
threats to our liberties, such as
v-'r*3poing. and it i= our respon-
sibility to call for Senate hear-
ings ta stop this regressive
trend."
Another major priority session,
devoted to Justice for Children,
was the occasion for announcing
th publication of "Children With-
out Ju-tice," a 150-paee renort
on NCJW's two-year study and ac-
tion Droject on the inadequacies
of and reform needed in the
juvenile justice system.
Aryeh Neier, Executive Direc-
tor of the American Civil Liber-
ties Union, and Robert E. Trim-
bl*". Western Regional Director of
the National Council on Crime
and Delinquency, were the fea-
tured speakers at the sesssion.
"The enlightened dream of the
1820 s that government could re-
form a troubled youngster by re-
moving him from the bad in-
fluences of society has become
a 'nightmare. At its best," Mr.
Neier said, "our system has no ef
feet, and at its worst, it actually
creates a criminal by incarcerat-
ing the status offender."
Mr. Neier praised the NCJW
report and encouraged delegates
to continue their efforts at re-
forming the juvenile justice sys-
tem through improved legisla-
tion and the establishment locally
of alternative living arrange-
ments such as Group Homes.
Dr. James Celeman of the Uni-
versity of Chicago, author of the
Caleman report on school inte-
gration, was the highlight speak-
er at the program sessions on the
NCJW Research Institute for In-
novation in Education in Israel,
which creates new methods of
materials for teaching the disad-
vantaged population.
Dr. Coleman toid the delegates
that the school integration proj-
ects designed by the Research In-
stitute are among the most suc-
cessful in the world, and the edu-
cational system in Israel has be-
come a living laboratory from
which other countries might bor-
row workable techniques.
In a separate convention ses-
sion, the NCJW reaffirmed its
support of affirmative action pro-
grams to ensure the principles of
equal opportunity for all; rein-
forced its strong support for
equal opportunity and legal rights
for women; and renewed its com-
mitment to promoting Dublic un
derstanding that abortion is an
individual right and to working
to eliminate any obstacles that
limit this right.
Support of education, together
with programs for social action
and community service both at
home and abroad, have been a
tradition of NCJW since its
founding in 1893. The 100.000
member women's organization
operates in more than 200 com-
munities.
the problem is through quiet
diplomacy."
IN ITS news article on OPEC
Seeking to iinpiove its image in
Ameiica, Business Week report-
ed in its Mar. 24 issue that an
OPEC report it obtained showed
that three editorial and adver-
tising representatives from
Readers Digest met OPEC of-
ficials in Vienna Jan. 17 to dis-
cuss the campaign.
"They to!d chief M. O. Feyide,
the oil group's secretary general,
who is from Nigeria," the maga-
zine said, that "a suitable pro-
gram would cost anywhere from
$1>7 million to $4.58 million,
de; ending on the length of thp
at tides and the number of in-
sertions."
In Nev York, according to
Business Week, the managing
editor of Readers Digest. Ed-
waid T. Thompson, said that the
"articles" mentioned in the
OPEC document were strictly
paid advertising, not editorial
material.
ONE OF the Digest repres-J
entatives at the Vienna session, |
European director John D. Pa- j
nitza, is quoted by Business
Week as saying the Digest team
went to great lengths to explain
the difference between adver-
tising and editorial content to!
the OPEC group.
"If the oil group is confused
about what is or is not paid ad-
vertising, it is not apparent from
the rest of the report," Business
Week emphasized. Part of the
report discusses a letter re-
ceived by OPEC from PKL Ad-
vertising Inc.. New York, which
proposed an advertising cam-
paign in television, news week-
lies, newspapers and radio, that,
the agent was quoted by Busi
ness Week as saying, "guaran
tees that the campaign will
reach 95 per cent of adult Amer-
icans over and over again
throughout 1975."
THE LETTER suggested.
Business Week reported, that
mounting the campaign would
cost "less than $10 million."
John Shims. PKL's president,
the magazine said, had confirm-
ed he wrote to OPEC "cold
turkey" to offer his services.
OPEC will consider the offers
at its June meeting in Gabon.
!
Miramar Chapter
Holds Luncheon
The Miramar Chapter of Pio-
neer Women's annual fund-rais-
ing luncheon honoring its "big
sister" organization, Moetzet
Hapoalot, in Israel, was held
March 9 at the Diplomat Coun-
try Club.
Mrs. Sue Cooper, donor chair-
man, welcomed those participat-
ing and introduced the guest
speaker, Mrs. Milton Green, pres-
ident of the Greater Miami
Council of Pioneer Women and
Regional Director of the south-
eastern district.
Hostesses were Mrs. Samuel
Friedland and Mrs. Abe Wilken-
feld.
Ansel Insurance Agency
Ansel Wittenstein fl
All Forms of Insurance
Including
Homeowners Automobile Jewelry
2430 Hollywood Boulevard Hollywood
9239518 945 3527
FIREMAN'S
FUND
AMERICAN
Eleanor Niederman (seated) hosted a recent coffee at
her home in behalf of this year's United Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund campaign. Some $1,500 was
raised at the coffee towards the $300,000 goal. Among
the Emerald Hills Townhouse residents attending were
Anita Rose, (Le]t) Dorothy Shainberg and Anne Rosen-
stock.
A UNIQUE EXPERIENCE IN
PRIVATE EDUCATION AT
BETH SHALOM DAY SCHOOL
4601 ARTHUR STREET HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
The only private Jewish school in Broward County
KINDERGARTEN THROUGH FOURTH GRADE
REGISTRATION NOW OPEN FOR 1975-76
ir Small Classes
ir Certified Teachers
ir Daily Lunches
if Transportation Available
ir Spacious Facilities
ir Individualized Instruction
ir Open Classroom
ir Structured Program
ir Latest Methods
ir Judaica and Hebraica
FOR INFORMATION AND LITERATURE, CALL
966-2200
DR. MORTON MALAVSKY, RABBI
DR. FRED BLUMENTHAl, PRESIDENT
MOROECAI OPHE*, DIRECTOR OP EDUCATION
Riverside's
two new chapels in
Hollywood and Sunrise
serve the needs of
the entire
Jewish community in
Broward County.
In the Hollywood and Hallandale areas:
5801 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood.
920-1010
In the Fort Lauderdale area:
1171 Northwest 61st Ave.( Sunset Strip).Sunrise
584-6060
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel. Inc Funeral Directors
Other Riverside chapels in South Florida are located in
North Miami Beach. Miami Beach and Miami.
Riverside serves the New York Metropolitan area with chapels in Manhattan,
Brooklyn. Bronx. Far Rockaway and Weslchesler
Murray N Rubin. ID
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C/*l I -K_l_|


kridav, April 11, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 3
Among the ladies who sponsored a lunch-
eon at the Aquarius recently to raise
funds for the Jewish Federation of South
Broward were, from left to right (front
row) hairiet Wiletsky, Rose Schwartz,
Ronnie Fields, Betty Solondz, Ann Cohn,
Olga Goldberger, and Sylvia Arons; (back
row) Eleanor Weiner, Rose Kern and Ce-
cile L. Cohen. More than $26,000 was
raised at the function, according to Ann
Cohn, chairman of the building.
Passover Seders Held In
Hospitals, Nursing Homes
Rabbi Harold Richter, chaplain
of the Jewish Federations of
South Broward and Greater Fort
Lauderdale, reports that Passover
Haggadahs, Passover food, and
model seders as well as tradition-
al seders were provided at Brow-
ard hospitals and nursing homes
through arangements made by
the office of the chaplaincy.
The model seder held before
Passover included American
Health and Rehabilitation Cen-
ter, Plantation, conducted by the
BBG's of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale under the direction of Jack-
ie Citron; Broward Convalescent
Home. Fort Lauderdale, conduct-
ed by the senior youth group of
ij| Temple Beth El under the lead-
ership of Rabbi Harvey Rosen-
feld. Essex Tower Nursina Cen-
ter, Fort Lauderdale, led by Paul
Kerbel:
Also Sheffield Convalescent
Home. Fort Lauderdale. under
the direction of Saul Levine;
Manor Pines Convalescent Cen-
ter, conducted by Chris Scott and
Howard Rogers; Heritage of Fort
Lauderdale by the senior vouth
group of Temple Emanu-El un
der th advisorship of Mrs. Hil-
lary Chazin; Washington Manor, |
Hollywood, by the religious j
school of Temple Beth Shalom i
under the leadership of Dave Sie- *
gel; Golden Isles Convalescent.
h ''<-(' hv Rabbi Richter: Holly-
wood Hills by the vouth group
of Temple Sold under the ad-
visorship of Mrs. Ellen Fleet:
Al-o South Florida State Hos-
pital by Rabbi David Shapiro, the
Pro-Confirmation Class, and the
\Mux Lieberman To
Head$lflOOClub
Max Lieberman has accepted
chairmanship of the newly form-
ed $1,000 Club of Parker Plaza.
This program Is geared to
reaching every possible donor
who can give $1,000 or more
among the many residents of
the building.
At present there are 13 mem-
ber of the club, Mr. Lieberman
expects to enlarge this number.
The committee presently in-
cites Melvin H. Baer, Eli
Baum, Harry L. Cohen, Morris
Markman and L. Paul Nestle.
Others were to be added at the
first meeting Thursday.
Rent-A-Car
* m LOW AS
'5 A DAY
5c Per Mile
MMM.
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
5MS.MOIHWY.HIW0.
WO-4141
Junior USY group of Temple Si-
nai under the leadership of Mrs.
Rosalind Seidel; the children's
ward of South Florida State Hos-
pital by Rabbi Richter and Mrs.
Cheri Rothschild, the new re-
ligious school teacher there.
The students of the religious
school of Temple Solel prepared
to present a model seder at a
nursing home in the area, but
were prevented by circumstances
beyond their control. They were
prepared by Carol McKenzie.
Biscayne Medical Center held
a traditional seder for ambula-
tory patients which was arrang-
ed by the director of volunteer
services. Mrs. Phyllis Kolbe.
Passover Haggadahs were dis-
tributed to Community Hospital
of South Broward, Hollywood;
Lauderdale Lakes General Hos-
pital, Fort Lauderdale; Planta-
tion General Hospital. Plantation:
University Community Hospital,
Tamarac; Bennett Community
Hospital, Plantation: Memorial
Hospital, Hollywood; Broward
Medical Center, Fort Lauderdale;
Holy Cross Hospital, Fort Lauder-
dale; and Hollywood Medical
Center, Hollywood.
J[SF To Aid
In Building
Israeli Park
Dr. Morton Malavsky, chair-
man of the Jewish National
Fund's Broward Council, an-
nounces that plans have been
completed for Sunday's dinner
in the Grand Ballroom of Tem-
ple Beth Shalom. 1400 N. 46th
Ave., Hollywood. There will be
a national speaker, in addition
to music and entertainment.
The dinner will serve as the
kick-off for a special Broward
undertaking to raise $500,000 for
a park to be established in Jeru-
salem. Planned to coincide with
the Bi-Centennial of the United
States, the park will be dedi-
cated July 4, 1976, by a special
delegation which will go to Jeru-
salem.
Dr. Malavsky has named a
special committee of co-hosts
for the dinner, including Dr. Al-
vin Colin, Jack Leopold, Bernard
Oshinsky, George Paley, Mrs.
Elaine Plttell, Mrs. Charlotte
Robinson and Yale Weinstein.
For additional information re-
garding the dinner, call the Tem-
ple Beth Shalom office.
isracle
16 GLORIOUS DAYS
SPONSORED BY RABBI MORTON MALAVSKY
FORT LAUDERDALE TO FORT LAUDERDALE
JUNE 9-JUNE 24
Arrangements by
SHALOM / PETERS TOURS INC.
Please Call for Interview 920-9202
Armed Forces on Alert
TEL AVIV(JTA)Israeli forces have been placed
on a high alert on both the Egyptian and Syrian fronts fol-
lowing the collapse of second-stage talks with Egypt.
According to reliable sources, Israeli forces are keep-
ing a close watch on troop movements behind the Syrian
and Egyptian lines.
EVEN BEFORE the negotiations broke down, Israeli
military sources had expressed serious concern over the
massive military build-ups by Egypt and Syria and the
large-scale war exercises conducted by both countries just
behind the ceasefire lines.
The war atmosphere was increased by a statement by
the Egyptian Chief of Staff that Egyptian forces must be
prepared to complete the mission started on October 6,
1973the day Egypt and Syria attacked Israel launching
Barnett Bank
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Tel. 927-5447






Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, April 11, i97s
ReassessmentFor Whom?
In the light of the failure of Dr. Kissinger's Middle
Eastern mission, the statement he has made at a press
.conference and references to the so-called light at the
end of the tunnel, the time has come for a reassessment
on the part of the Jewish community in tune with de-
veloping ewant,,.-^ -*-*_ -
It is shortsighted and of no value to detach Israel
from the rest of the world. The situation in the Middle
East is part of global developments in Vietnam,
Cambodia, Portugal, Greece, Turkey, Cyprus, Ethiopia
and the oil cartel.
Kissinger's statement that South Vietnam requires
a program of three-year support is vapid in the face of
a similar reassessment going on vis-a-vis Israel and the
Middle East.
It ignores domestic considerations and a distaste
for an unpopular war. However, Kissinger does not of-
fer an even-handed three-year program of support for
Israel. He confesses: "We are committed to Israel's sur-
vival."
But survival needs definition, and the nature of
that definition can best come from Israel.
We Have to Look Forward
Kissinger also referred to the dangers of "radicali-
zation" in the Middle East without specifying their na-
ture. Did he have in mind the assassination of King
Faisal, or did he have in mind what Edmund Stillman,
director of the Hudson Institute, said in his Op-Ed
article of the New York Times on Mar. 26: "Trouble is
bound to come in the region within the next ten years.
Political take-overs ana palace revolutions by imported
mercenaries and 'craftsmen-slaves' is one of the oldest
themes of Middle Eastern history."
Obviously, far-sighted statesmen have to look for-
ward. But not with blindness. The view has to be total.
Even Kissinger had to admit events elsewhere in
the world had their effect on the failed attempt at un-
tying the Middle East tangle. Perhaps then, it would be
best, as so many more Israelis are now saying, for the
peace negotiations to take place in Geneva.
There, under global spotlight, the world will be
ble to see what is going on. No executive sessions as
nere, or if there is a behind-the-scenes dealing, it will
have to come to light in the public debate.
The Soviet Union, not immune to world pressure,
and just as aware of developments in the Middle East
potentially inimical to its interests, will have half the
responsibility. It will not be able to take pot shots, as it
has been doing, when it haj no responsibility.
A Mutuality of Respect
The return of the Orthodox branch of Judaism to
the Synagogue Council of America is welcome after
so long a disaffection.
But the return carries with it the Orthodox
branch's stipulation that it still does not recognize the
legitimacy of either the Conservative or Reform
branches.
Under these circumstances, it may be hard to see
what the Orthodox move means in terms of healing the
breach among the various religious affiliations of Amer-
ican Jewry.
For one thing, the return itself at least heals the
schism on the surface, and that is a good thing.
For another, it affords an opportunity for those In
the Orthodox branch who may be more moderate on
this question to engage in active dialogue with members
of the Conservative and Reform movements.
The issue here is not to challenge Orthodoxy to
argue that the return is meaningless if it is not accom-
panied by statements of accreditation to the others.
Rather, the issue is that perhaps a beginning has
been made toward a mutuality of respect in the name
of total Judaism.
Israel Should Shun Geneva
fcJemsti F/oridfiain
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Volume 5
Friday, April 11, 1975
Number 8
30 MISAN 5755
"SUPPOSE they gave a war.
and nobody attended?" is a bit-
ter sentimentalism from the dark-
est days of our Vietnam agony.
Everywhere, it evoked philo-
sophical .smiles. ..
It epitomized the secret dreams
of men who dared to believe that
they can control their own des-
tiny without leaving it to the
selfish hearts and minds of the
political hacks and shysters they
periodically elect to office.
I CAN think of no more apt
time to resurrect this dream than
now.
Suppose they set the stage for
another Geneva conference, as
surely is occurring behind the
drawn curtain of international
duplicity at this very moment,
and Israel didn't attend?
On its face, it seems absurd.
But what is the compulsion to go
to Geneva?
WHO BESIDES the fat cats, by
whose rules the game will be
played at Geneva and who are
the predestined winners at Gene-
va, conceive of Geneva as the
onlv alternative to the current
Mideast condition?
No one, except the United
States. And Israel, of course, but
Israel is by no one's definition
a fat cat. Still, consider the excep-
tions.
The United States would have
preferred to avoid Geneva be-
cause the resumption of the
Geneva talks will give the Soviet
Union a co-chairman's role, and
Soviet prestige in the Middle
East is already at the danger
point.
AS FOR Israel, well at Geneva
she will have to reckon with the
full panoply of world poison di-
rected against her. Had Henry
Kissinger's diplomacy succeeded,
she would have had to swallow it
only a drop at a time.
The point is that the two ex-
ceptions are exceptions all right,
but for entirely different rea-
sons.
For Israel, Geneva means in-
stant execution at the hands of
the Russians and the Arabs if.
minimally, she cannot resuscitate
the Kissinger formula there. And
that seems doubtful, indeed.
For the United States. Geneva
no longer means pursuit of the
Ki--sineer formula, which is to
say poisoning of Israel drop by
droo. to avoid the participation
of the meddlesome Russians.
FOR THE United States. Gene-
va now means the reality of the
meddlesome Russians riding at
fu'l tilt toward greater influence
in the Middle East.
As we pursue our own interests
at Geneva, the Israelis will have
to keeD asking thems^ves how
they can avoid execution there
of whatever branoor whether
the Americans, finallv u-earv of
the whole campaign. wi'I eive in
to the executioners al'ogether as
they are doing in Southeast Asia.
The only vay for Israel to out-
wit her obviuus fate at Geneva
is bv simply refusing to attend
in the same wav that she ivoided
the lethal Dossib-lities of the Kis-
singer formula by simply saying
"no" to it.
WHAT IT comes down to is
the reaction of the United States.
Take Gerald Ford, that incalcul-
ably valuable UJA and Israel
Bond perfsrmer of two years ago.
He has already let us know in
no uncertain terms that his Da-
tience is running short with the
'intransigent'' Israelis.
And where did he get his im-
patience from? Well. NBC-TV
newsman Richard Valeriani un-
wittingly let the cat out of the
bag following Dr. Kissinger's
press conference at the State De-
partment, last week.
Opined Valeriani: One would
think that the problems still out-
standing between Israel arid the
Arabs the Arab refugees, the
role of the Palestine Liberation
Organisation in the drive toward
establishing still another A-rab
Mindlin
state, the status nf Jerusalem
all these are "easily" capable of
reconciliation given the will to
reconcile them.
BUT, CONCLUDED Valeriani,
the Israelis were "stubborn."
Over a few kilometers of Sinai
sand, meaning whether they with-
drew from Gidi and Mitla accord-
ing to Plan A rather than Plan
B. the Israelis sank Dr. Kissin-
ger's effort, and hence all hopes
for peace in the Middle East
based on moderation.
In Valeriani's view, then, the
Kissinger mission failed because
of Israel's undiminished need n
dictate her boundary- line5
because of Egypt s refusal todi
avow belligerency.
But Valeriani was on the gv
singer plane returning from
Middle East, and on that Whi
py flight Kissinger raved and
ranted, according to private but
well-founded reports, about h.
raeli "intransigence" and true ,
lence." (The "few lousv kiloa
eters" theme, which except f
the "lousy," Valeriani harped
upon in his post-news conference
analysis, bears the Kissinger
thumprint from the davs imra..
diately following the Yon, Kip.
pur War, when Egyptian and Is-
raeli officers were locked in ne-
gotiations in a tent at Km. 101
and Kissinger was critical of Is-
rael's slow pace.)
SO THAT it wasn't Valeriani
saying what he said after the Kis-
singer press conference. It via
Valeriani saying what Kissinger
said on the plane back from Jeru-
salem.
Continued on Page 13
-------_------r
; Ast. t
Max Lerner
Sees It
-xsWsiM.A.
By MAX LERNER
Los Angeles Times Syndicate
Scarcely a single secretary of
state since Charles Evans Hughes
perhaps since John Hay or
even Thomas Jefferson would
talk of a foreign policy event as
a "Greek tragedy" and then go
on to define the concept.
That is what Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger did in talk-
ing with correspondents on his
plane after his failed Middle East
mission, md again in briefing
congressional leaders.
HE DEFINED the nature of a
Greek tragedy: "when both sides,
each following the laws of its own
nature, produce consequences
destructive of both.'' It may go
back to his massive senior honors
the-is at Harvard on the meaning
of historpto Speng'.er and Kant
rather than to the Mctternich who
was the hero of his first book.
But it can be of small solace
to either the Israelis or the Egvo-
tians to be told by the man ei"h
had pinned its hopes on that in
fo'lowing th laws of their nature
thev would both be destroyed.
THERE IS an element which
makes the trady seem even
more fateft'l. Kissingr refuse;
publicly to assess the blame for
his failure of dinlomacv. but he
has said in closed session that
the Israelis should have been
more flexibK
Yet ht* adds that Prime Min-
ister Yitzhak Rabin couldn't have
conceded more without suffering
th d",vnfr-"l of his government.
Th l=raeli roon'e vr* ^d"v.
and 'he onnns'tion partis were
waiting for a "\in of weakness.
Yet Pres'dnt Anw?r Sadat
also showd himself inrl>xible,
perhnos for simi'ar reasons.
THE ISRAELIS refused to
withdraw t^e 11 four or I've,
miles from th" Mitla Pass in the
Sinai Dese-t without a clear ctat-
ment of Egypt's "nonbel iger-
ency."
But it was Sadat who stonoed
short of making the statement.
The heat was on him from the
PLO and the more militant Arab
states. He may well have feared
an assassination fat" su^h as
. caight up later with King Faisal
of .-audi Arabia, or else a life-,
revolutionary military coup.
WMJa Kisajpger has no real.
tffa tahtlve reason, he may have
a tactical reason for seeming to
till the blame toward lsra-1to
ga credit with Sadat and the
Arabs, which he will sorely need
at Geneva.
HE HAD another tactical ob-
jectiveto point to the lack of
congressional support as a factor
in the larger collapse of
American policy. This was a bit-
ter hour for him. He used it for
a call to a more unified American
"national purpose," with a clear-
ly implied rebuke to the liberal
isolationist trend of the current
Congress.
. We need to go beyond the
ironic gaietv of the funeral re-
markks which Kissinger's op-
ponents are reading o-.r him.
There are some real challenges
to be made on his Vietnam poli-
cy.
WHY WORRY me Dress
qquestioner asked) abDu' a Com-
munist takeover in Sai-ton if we
have resolved diferences with
mist rther Communi;t r^imes
through detente?
Kissinger fumbl d n his
answr. But of cour-o lues
tion is not about Communist ex-
pan ion. which has been consul-
fr->b"e, but about the authority
and crdibi'ity of American com-
m!t"ints. wherever.
It is on this score that Kissin-
prr uses his best phrase that
"-- rin be m "seWtive cred-
ibility" for the United States.
A RUNAWAY Congress, now
tiWng over American policy on
Vietnam aid. might take it over
again on Kissinger's emtinuing
pledge for Israel's survival.
We must mov" aw^ from our
preoccupation with Vietnam to
th* roai struegbs ahead at the
difficult Geneva conference anl
the ouestion of renewed aid to
Israel to he'o its economy
\\r'. -J'its rr;-'rtarv oo-itir-n
Ki-s;nser says that hi- declara-
tion about a "reassessment" of
the Amer^an nosition in the Mid-
dl Fast is not directed at Israel.
PERHAPS NOT but, coming
sharDlv after his return and his
discontent with Israel's barWj*
foi beh->"ior, what other "ree"
tion could he have meant? It re-
calls John Foster Dulles' historic
threat to the French, that tne
United State's would have w
make an "agonizing reappraisal-
If it happens, and if a 5,ron"
rp"-> puroose doesn't emerg j
then the Middl- East tra""!'' >j
take on a third actor. It will *
not only the Arab* and I?
who will be "following the la>
of their nature" toward t war 0l
destruction, but Abk
i


Friday, April 11, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 5
CBS News Apology Demanded
Continued-from Page 1
a9 a ; ossible fifth col-
The rabbi said, '"The Syrian
authorities are obviously aware
that their Jewish citizens are in-
nocent scapegoats and that, their
only crime is being Jewish."
Chandler in a letter to the com-
mittee noted that Wallace "re-
ported in some detail on the dis-
criminatory restrictions against
Syrian Jews on '60 Minutes." He
was not trying to justify Syrian
brutality by creating a false im-
pression that Syrian Jews are sus-
pect as a possible fifth column
in Syria. He was reporting that
this is the belief ofcttrny* Syria*
officials." 1 |
| I
Chandlers letter sent Mar. IT
was an answer to a complaint
from the committee. But the
committee did not accept his ex-
planation, and on Mar. 19 Rabbi
Harari sent Salant a letter de-
claring that "We hold CBS News
responsible to retract the espio-
nage statement and to disasso
ciate itself from the other di
tortions on the above program
which were based on misinforms
tion by advising the public that
this does not represent the views
Of CBS News."
Philip Wernick Elected To
Brandeis Board of Fellows
Thilip Wernick of Chestnut
Hill. Mass., and Miami Beach,
executive vice president of the
Home Owners Federal Savings
and Loan Association of Boston,
has been elected to the Board
of Fellows of Brandeis Univer-
sity.
Brandeis Fellows are leading
men and women throughout the
country whose skills and ex-
perience are placed at the uni-
versity's disposal in areas of
their special competence.
A supporter of the university
for many years, Mr. Wernick
was formerly a member of the
Brandeis President's Council. He
has aided the university's schol-
arship programs and has helped
underwrite both academic pro-
grams and physical facilities.
Mr. Wernick h-is also been ac-
tive in a large number of reli-
gious, philanthropic, business and
trade groups, serving in leader-
ship roles for the Jewish Me-
morial Hospital of Roxbury, Mass,
the Combined Jewish Philan-
thropies of Greater Boston, and
Temple Israel of Boston.
The current New England Re-
gion president of the Zionist Or-
ganization of America, Mr. Wer-
nick is also associated with the
Beth Israel Hospital in Boston,
the Graduate School of Savings
and Loan at Indiana University
and the National Savings and
Loan League in the District of
Columbia.
Rabbi Harari joncluded that
"This erroneous report has al
last week and ransacked Jwlsh
ready intensified the agony of
tne jc.s in Syria and jeopar-
dized the lives of those helpless
people."
MEANWHILE THE London
Daiiy Te.cgraph reported that
gangs of young Syrians invaded
the Jewish quarter of Damascus
homes. The Telegraph said that
cxcwitnessci who returned to
Europe said they saw several
people injured and the contents
of Jewish homes thrown into the
street. Syrian police were pres
ont but did not intervene to pro
tect the victims of what was
called a "mini-pogrom."
Raliamim Sultan, a spokesman
for the Committee for Rescue o,'
Syrian Jewry, told the JTA that
this incident proves the harmful
effects of the distortion of the
"60 Minutes" show and demon-
strates once again that Jews are
not free and continue to be per
secuted.
In another development, the
New York City Council has unan-
imously adopted a resolution urg-
ing Mayor Abraham Beame to
proclaim the week of Apr. 13 as
"Rescue Syrian Jewry Week."
Meanwhile, the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations is continu-
ing its drive to gain one million
signatures on a petition urging
President Ford to intervene oa
behalf of Syria's 4,500 Jews to
convince Syria to cease ths
persecution of Jews and to al-
low them to emigrate.
I
The Women's Division of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward raised more than $7,000 during this year's four-
day-Phon-a-Thon, March 17-21. Manning the phones in
three daily shifts were representatives of ORT; National
Council of Jewish Women, Hallandale and Hollywood;
Hallandale Chapter of Hadassah; Women's Division of
the Jewish Federation and local teen groups under the
auspices of the Jewish Community Centers of South Flor-
ida. Pictured here with Joann Katz, chairman, (left,' is
Ruth Feuerstein.
How Dr. K. Waited for Israel's Decision
JERUSALEMNow it can
be told. The final fateful
hours before Dr. Henry Kis-
singer's step-by-step diplo-
macy for a Middle East peace
broke down were spent by
him in his sixth floor suite
at the King David Hotel
awaiting the outcome of an
Israel Cabinet meeting.
No substantive informa-
p tion was available to news-
men beyond the clear indica-
tion from top Israeli sources
that the last ideas and
proposals that Kissinger
brought back from President
Sadat could "not serve as
the basis of a settlement."
M'KCILATION was rife
among observers and newsmen
here that Kissinger had pro-
: .some kind pf compromise'
formula of his own and was
seeking Israel's consent before
bioaching it to Sadat.
But if that was the case, there
was no inkling when Kissinger
left of the contents cf the pro-
posals he was taking to Egypt.
Some sources believed the
Cabinet abandoned, hope of a
"broad" settlement involving an
Egyptian renunciation of bel-
ligerency and was casting around
for some alternative scenario
either its original "modest" pro-
posal for a 30-50 kilometer pull-
FILLING IN
BACKGROUND
f\ :!' ,.'!.!!
ii i;" -. 11 r>.
back in Sinai without relinquish-
ing the strategic passes or the
oilfields, or some intermediate
configuration that would rescue
the current talks.
THERE WAS speculation, too,
that differences of opinion be-
tween the Ministers or between
the Israeli and American nego-
tiators accounted for the in-
ordinately long deliberations.
A brief statement issued did
little to dispel the clouds of un-
certainty. The statement said
the Cabinet has "decided to au-
thorize the negotiating team to
continue the talks with the Sec-
retary of State in accordance
with the decisions of the Cabi-
net, striving for a positive con-
clusion to the negotiations on
the attainment of an interim
settlement between Israel and
Egypt."
It was learnew that apart
from the non-belligerency issue,
the two sides were deeply divided
over the time factor of a second-
stage accord, as well as over the
central "components" of non-
belligerency.
STOOLS-BARS
& Things
M105 S. MSCAYNf BIVD., NO. MIAMI, IEACH
Phone 932-4282
| "World's Largest Display"
I l* for yur b-r' ** PHmi from 15" high to 34" high
ISR.VCL's fundamental con-
cern, basic to all of its demands,
was to establish whether there
was any chance to effect a basic
change in Egypt's attitude to-
ward its conflict with Israel
meaning its willingness to ac-
cept the existence of a Jewish
State as a permament feature
in the Middle East.
Evidence of such a change
was finally not visible.
Israel, Uuiefore, did not per-,
mit itself to be seen as the cause
for the failure of Kissinger's
mission. On the other hand, all I
of the government's leaders j
agreed that Israel could not
retreat from their basic demand
that any far-reaching accord
with Egyptone involving sub-
stantial territorial withdrawals ;
including the Mitle and Gidi
passes and the Abu Rodeis oil
fieldsmust include a funda-
mental turning point in rela-
tions between Israel and Egypt.
ISRAELI proposals that Kis-
singer took to Egypt before
.lie end embodied a certain soft-
ening of Israeli demands on the
non-belligerency issue.
A well-placed source said af-
ter Kissinger's departure that
Israel had given Egypt a num-
ber of options which linked
greater or lesser concessions on
its part to greater or lesser ful-
fillment of Israel's demand for
the practical components of non-
belligerency.
Mapam ministers and some
others favored greater conces-
sions than the majority would
accept.
Premier Rabin and Defense
Minister Peres stood with the
majority. They said theie was.
little prospect that the narrow
scenario of a very limited Is-'
raeli withdrawal in Sinai would
be revised inasmuch as Egypt,
had totally rejected it.
But as far as Israel was con-
cerned, there were still options
midway betveen the limited'
scenario and a broader one, un-
til the very end.


'5
Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, April n, 1975
? M Abe ?
fcy ABE BALPERN
QUESTION: What do the
sounds of the Shofar mean?
ROBERT M. FELLER
Highland Park, NJ.
ANSWER: Shofar, sometimes
spelled Shophar, is a Hebrew
word designating an animal's
horn prepared for use as a mu-
sical instrument. It is one of the
earliest musical instruments
known to man which is still in
use. It is known primarily as the
ram's horn blown on Rosh Ha-
Shanah (the New Year) and
other occasions.
The Shofar is mentioned in the
Bible in connection with the Giv-
ing of the Law at Mount Sinai.
"On the third day, as morning
dawned, there was thunder, and
lightening, and a dense cloud
upon the mountain, and a very
loud blast of the Shofar and all
the people who were in the camp
trembled." (Exodus 19:16)
Rosh Ha-Shanah is designated
as Yom Teruah, a day when the
horn is sounded. (Numbers 29:1)
There are many other refer-
ences in the Bible indicating its
uses; on Yom Kippur (Day of
Atonement), the Jubilee Year, as
an accompaniment to other
musical instruments (Book of
Psalms 98:6). in processionals as
a signal, and in order to induce
fear.
"Whereas the Bible gives
neither the order of the blasts
nor their meaning, the Rabbis
evolved an elaborate order of
sounding, the essence of which
is that the Shofar should sound
broken notes resembling sobbing
(the shevarim sound) and wail-
ing (the teruah sound), which
are both preceded and followed
by a long unbroken sound
(tekiah V (The Encyclopedia of
the Jewish Religion, page 358)
Saadyah Gaon, (882 942 c.e.),
a sage and scholar offered ten
reasons for sounding the Shofar.
1To proclaim the sovereignty
of God. since it was the cus-
tom to sound the Shofar at a
coronation.
2To herald the beginning of
the 10 days of Repentance.
3As a reminder to be faithful
to the teachings of the
Torah. since the Shofar was
heard at the giving of the
Torah.
4As a reminder of the
prophets, the teachers of
righteousness, who raised
their voices like the Shofar,
to touch our consciences.
5As a reminder that to the
sound of trumpets the Tem-
ple feli, and to the sound of
trumpets it will be restored.
6As a reminder of the Ake-
dah, the binding of Isaac,
since the ram which was sub-
stituted for Isaac was caught
in the ticket by its horns.
7To inspire awe.
8As a summons to the Heav-
enly Court on the Day of
Judgment.
9As a reminder that the Sho-
far will call together Israel's
scattered remnants'to return
to the Holy Land.
10As a reminder of the Day of
Resurrection, the Return to
Life.
According to a legend, the
WANTED
General custodian for 6,000
square feet building to do
cleaning, maintenance and
general handy man. Salary-
open for discussion.
Call Jewish Federation of
South Broward 921-8810.
Shofar is sounded in order to con-
fuse Satan. Satan it seems, hates
the sound of the Shofar because
of all it represents. Satan, who
on Rosh Ha-Shanah, is the chief
prosecutor against Israel, is com-
pletely disoriented when he hears
the Shofar blown. Hopefully that
will assure a positive judgment.
Maimonides (1135-1204 c.e.)
gives a moving interpretation of
the sounding of the Shofar.
"Sleepers, awake from your
sleep! Slumberers, rouse your-
selves from your slumber! Search
your deeds and return to teshu-
vah (repentance, literally, re-
turning) and remember your Cre-
ator." (Hilkhot Teshuvah, chap-
ter 3)
In "Gateway to Judaism," by
Albert L. Shulman (pp 358-359)
there is the following interpreta-
tion:
1 Tekiah, a pure unbroken
sound that calls man to search
his heart, forsake his wrong
ways, and seek forgiveness
through repentance.
2Shevarim, a broken staccato
trembling sound. It typifies
the sorrow that comes to a
man when he realizes his mis-
conduct, and desires to change
his ways.
3Teruah, a wave like sound of
alarm, calling upon man to
stand by the banner of God.
4Tekiah Gedolah (Great Teki-
ah). a prolonged unbroken
sound typifying a final appeal
to sincere repentance and
atonement. .
It is interesting to note that
in Modern Israel the Shofar is
used for the swearing in of a
new president of the State. Dur-
ing the Six-Day War on June 7,
1967. the Chief Rabbi of the Is-
raeli Army, blew the Shofar at
the Western Wall after its libera-
tion by the Israel Defense Fore-
is
It is noteworthy that the Shul-
chan Aruch (Code of Jewish
Law). Orach Chayim (589:6)
specifically allows women to
sound the Shofar.
A 6 -it
EDITOR'S NOTE:
Please send questions to
??? ASK ABE ???
c/o Jewish Federation of
South Broward
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
McGovern
Supports
* PLO
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Sen. George McGovern
said after a meeting with
Yasir Arafat that "American
policy should take into se-
r i o u s consideration the
question of recognizing the
Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization," according to a re-
port by the Palestinian news
agency WAFA.
The Beirut newspaper An Na-
har reported that the South Da-
kota Democrat who heads the
Senate Foreign Affairs Commit-
tee's subcommittee on Near
Eastern Affairs, and is currently
on a fact-finding tour in Middle
East countries, met with Arafat
for 90 minutes last Friday at
the Senator's request.
THIS MARKED the first meet-
ing between a high-ranking
American politician and the head
of the PLO, An Nahar noted.
McGovern, who was the Dem-
ocratic Party's Presidential can-
didate in 1972, was quoted as
saying that it was "imperative
for some kind of Palestinian na-
tional entity to emerge because
it is difficult to achieve stability
in the area unless the Palestin-
ians exercise an efficient poli-
tical existence."
At the meeting at PLO head-
quarters, Arafat briefed Mc-
Govern en PLO policy and
stressed the 1974 decision by the
Arab summit meeting in Rabat
recognizing the PLO as the sole
representative of the Palestinian
people, the press reports said.
OTHER sources said McGov-
ern indicated after the meeting
that he plans to draft a Middle
East peace plan which, accord-
ing to officials accompanying '
him, would be based on the es-
tablishment of relations between
Israel and the Arab countries,
the guarantee of a fair and last-
ing peace by recognizing the
rights that must be accorded to
the Palestinians, the pre-1967
borders and a solution of the
problem of Jerusalem.
McGovern arrived in Beirut
last Wednesday and has visited
Egypt and Saudi Arabia. He
has also scheduled to visit Jor-
dan. Syria. Israel and Iran.
mmum m-

By BOB KtRBH, fx.ctiv. Dirtctvr,
Jewish federation of South Broward, foe
I......MMMtMNHH ''::' I
h:":.....
One of the beautiful things about Judaism is that a Jew is to""'
perform his mitzvoth during his lifetime so he will be remembered*1'
after his death.
One of my closest friends recently passed away. It was a death
that was expected but can never be accepted. His wife has sent
me a letter and I should like to quote just a short part of it:
"He was not just my husband of 21 years, my lover
my companion: he was my very best friend who loved me
more than I deserved, who thought I was always looking
younger and not older, who never tired of my company or
of doing things with me and for me. His sweetness, his gentle-
ness, his love of people and of life, and his unbelievable
courage at all times, makes his loss all the greater for me."
Wouldn't everyone like to leave that kind of memory? It ig
a natural pattern that we gather around people who are in pain and
who are suffering, and express guilt that we didn't spend more time
with them when we could have enjoyed life together.
We take life for granted and so often forget the little niceties
that can make life so much more pleasant for others. We get so
involved with our own intimate problems and concerns that we fail
to see the things around us that we can make more whole, more
meaningful, more beautiful.
I believe that we don't recognize the secret of the art of living,
the art of choosing life in spite of its uncertainties, its paradoxes,
and its enigmas. The secret is the ability, the desire, and the ful-
fillment of giving to others to make their lives better. This can be
done in many undramatic ways: a telephone call, an evening to-
gether, a smile or a compliment.
We have just finished the celebration of the freedom of Pass-
over. We have just commemorated the 30th anniversary of the death
of Anne Frank. We have just remembered the uprising and destruc-.
tion of the Warsaw Ghetto. We will be celebrating the 27th annUr
versary of the founding of the State of Israel and the 30th anni"f
versary of the end of World War II.
During this period between Passover and Shavouth. a ti^e of
counting days, why not spend each day in a meaningful activity for
.omeone else? There are friends who need your comfort and your
laughter. There are members of your family who are looking for a
kind word and there are Jews throughout the world who are looking
for your help.
As I see it. ther? is no better time than now.
MEYER
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Ford Sent Sharp
Letter to Rabin
JERUSALEM(JTA)Israeli
newspapers reported here that
President Ford sent a sharp let-
ter to Premier Yitzhak Rabin in
which he rebuked Israel for tak-
ing too hard a line in the nego-
tiations with Egypt being con-
ducted by Secretary of State
Henry' A. Kissinger and warned
that the U.S. would hold Israel
responsible for failure of the
talks and would have to recon-
sider it* relations with Israel.
Rabin acknowledged that he
had received a letter from Ford
but refused to divulge its con-
tents on the basis of the "special
relationship" between the U.S.
and Israel.
HOWEVER, Rabin insisted at
a press conference here that
descriptions of the letter by the
news media wers exaggerated
and distorted.
According to Israeli news-
papers, Ford's note, received dur-
ing 15 hours of marathon delib-
erations by the Cabinet, shocked
and angered the ministers.
The newspapers alleged that
the Presidential note was dis-
patched to Jerusalem at the spe-
cific request of Kissinger after
the latter reported to Ford on
the hard line taken by President
Anwar Sadat at Aswan.
Kissinger admitted that he had
initiated the President's note,
but the text of it apparently was
stronger than he had anticipated,
the Israeli newspapers claimed.
THE WHITE House has refus-
ed to confirm or deny the report
that Rabin was strongly urged
by the White House to show more
flexibility in dealing with the ap-
proach to the second-stage ne-
gotiating effort.
A White House spokesman
said that "we don't normally dis-
cuss diplomatic exchanges."
^KURASH.T
Phone 921-2902
Main Office 2429 Hollywood Blvd.
Phone 947-5654 Toll Free
Stanley S. Kurash
and Naomi R. Kurash
Our Urge Staff at
Qualified Associates
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''lea


'S
r, April 11, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 7
Peace Impossible At Geneva Dinitz
WASHINGTON (JTA) Israeli Ambassador Simcha
Dinitz said here that the Geneva conference was "not a
place for making peace" and expressed hope that the Amer-
ican initiative for a Middle East settlement will be renewed
tiations for a second-stage Israeli-Egyptian agreement in
Sinai.
Dinitz, who was interviewed by Bruce Morton and
.iughes Rudd on the CBS-TVs "Morning News," said, "We
iave never said that we are afraid to go to Geneva, al-
!hough we were always mindful that out of Geneva nothing
substantial can come. Geneva is nothing but a mini-UN. It's
a place for declarations, not a place for making peace."
UIMTZ MADE those remarks
only hours after Israeli Premier
Yitzhak Rabin had told the
Knesset in Jerusalem that Is-
rael was prepared to seek peace
through any possible means "in-
cluding through the Geneva con-
ference."
Dinitz said on the CBS inter-
view. "We still believe that the
best prospect for peaee is to ra-
the American initiative in
way or another. We believe
that the Americans are the only
ones who can push the cause of
peace because they are the only
ones who really have" the nec-
essary influence "on Israel and
Egypt in order to advance to-
waid peace."
He said that while Israel owes
much to the United States "and
we value and appreciate very
much the efforts of the Secre-
tary of State and the American
government." Egypt also "re-
AMKASSADOIt DINITZ
In TV interview
reived tremendously from tho
United States ... in the last sev-
en months, more than tney re-
ceived from the Russians in the
seven years that preceded the
war. So there is no reason why
Egypt ton should not help us to-
gether to divide the initiatives
and we are standing ready at
any point to continue our march
to peace."
- I ft
The /.mbassaaor said he did
not know yet "how to interpret"
President Ford's order for a ma-
jor formal reassessment of U.S.
foreign policy in the Middle
East.
He said that if the President
means a gerciui reassessment,
"that is not only legitimate, but
is absolutely expected after a
setback that was caused by
Egypt's refusal for the negotia-
tions."
HE ADDED, nowever, "If the
meaning of it is that this re-
new the Ai
^^pr way or
'Trafalgar Towers I and 11
Honoring Glantz and Jaccobs
The Committee for the Sur-
vival of Israel and World Jewry
will demonstrate its solidarity be-
hind the Combined Jewish Ap-
peal Israel Emergency Fund by
hosting a breakfast at the Hab-r-
Karp Social Hall of Temole Sl-
1201 John=on St.. Hollywood.
unday at 10:00 a.m.
The residents of Trafalgar I
Lwill be honoring their president,
ernard Glantz, and Trafalgar II
will simultaneously honor Sam-
uel E. Jacobs, a past president of
the huildins-
An educator, Mr. Glantz has
been concerned with all aspects
of communal and charitable ac-
tivities. He organized the Edu-
cators' Lodge of the B'nai B'rith,
and served on Jewish Community
Relations Council Committee,
and the United Jewish Appeal
School Division in Philadelphia.
President of the Philadelphia
PrinciDals Association. Mr.
lantz was also a professor at St.
oseph's College and lecturer at
emple University, University of
ennsylvania, LaSalle College,
and Rosemont College.
The author of two text books
that are now being used in ele-
mentary schools in Philadelphia,
Mr. Giantz has been honored by
many professional organizations
and was elected to the member-
shin of Legion of Honor Chapel
of Four Chaplains.
Mr. Glantz is the current presi-
dent of the South Beach Civic
Association, and serves on the
Citizens Advisory Committee of
the Broward County Area Plan-
ning Board, the Centennial Com-
mittee aid 50th Anniversary
Celebration of Hollywood and the
Revision Committee of Civil
Service Board of Hollywood.
Mr. Jacobs came to Hollywood
from Chicago where he served as
chairman of the Meat Packers
Division of the United Jewish Ap-
peal for over 20 years.
While living in Chicago. Mr.
Jacob* was very active in Jewish
communal affairs and in The
Shaare Tikveh Congregation.
Since coming to Hollywood, he
has been involved with the Jew-
ish activities in this community.
David Sella. a young Israel
veteran, will address the break-
fast, discussing the serious con-
ditions that now face the Israeli
people.
Mr. Sella is an Israeli cellist
who is studying at Juilliard. His
career was interrupted when he
was recalled to serve in the Go-
lan Heights. As a paratrooper in
the 1967 War, his hands were se-
verely burned.
Heading the committee of resi-
dents for Trafalgar I ere Abra-
ham Goldberg and Adolpb Cohen,
cochairmen, and Mrs. Beae Co-
hen, Allen Dinaburg, Bernard
Glantz, Jonas Kevelson, Stephen
Marlow, Max Merbaum. Mrs. Ros-
alie Oremland, Mrs. Sarah Schec-
ter, Louis Sher, and Abraham
Winikoff, committee members.
Mrs. Adeline Davis is heading
the Trafalgar II committee with
Louis Ballin, Joseph Davis, Sam-
uel E. Jacobs, Matthew Levy,
Charles Mayer, Martin Narrod,
Charles Wolfe and Samuel Zeal
as committee members.
U.S. Commemorative Stamp
Named After Haym Salomon
CINCINNATI A United
States commemorative stamp
has been named after Haym
Salomon, Jewish merchant,
banker and Revolutionary War
financier. The ten-cent stamp,
issued by the United States Post-
al Service Mar. 25, is part of a
series entitled, "Contributors to
the Cause."
te
According to Dr. Jacob R.
arcus, director of the Amer-
an Jewish ATchfcros of the He-
brew Union College Jewish In-
stitute of Religion, this is one of
the few times a Jew has been
so honored.
HAYM SALOMON was a Po-
lish immigrant, who arrived in
America about 1775. He was in
New York only few months
before he became an impassion-
ed patriot, and was twice arrest-
ed and imprisoned by the Brit-
ish.
He was released by the Ger-
man mercenaries who served
the British. "It is very probable
that one of the German-Jewish
quartermasters who had accom-
panied the 'Hessians' induced
their general to free and em-
ploy him," stated Dr. Marcus.
Salomon operated underground
as an American agent encourag-
ing Hessian officers to resign
and helping French and Amer-
ican prisoners to escape. When
the British caught up with him,
he escaped to Philadelphia where
he became the financial agent
in America for the French gov-
ernment and was one of the
leading dealers in bills of ex-
change and other securities.
THE AMERICANS needed
large sums of money to equip
their troops. Salomon's job was
to serve Robert Morris, the su-
perintendent of Finance, "as an
alchemist; he was to transmute
paper into gold, and this he
did," Dr. Marcus continued.
He advanced direct loans to
the government and gave of his
own resources to pay the sala-
ries of government officials and
army officers. Robert Morris"
diary for th* years 3781-84 re-
cords some 75 transactions be-
tween Salomon and himself,
with frequent entries, "I sent
for Haym Salomon."
After the war, Salomon was
almost penniless and died in
1785 before he could rebuild his
business. A monument stands on
Wacker Drive in Chicago, com-
memorating the services of Sal-
omon to the "beloved land of
his adoption." Gen. Washington
stands, flanked on his right by
Robert Morris, on his left by
Haym Salomon.
ON THE reverse of the Pos-
tal Service stamp bearing Salo-
mon's name is printed, "Finan-
cial Hero: Businessman and
broker Haym Salomon was re-
sponsible for raising most of the
money needed to finance the
American Revolution and later
to save the new nation from col-
lapse."
The American Jewish Ar-
chives was established in 1947 at
the Cincinnati campus of the
HUC-JIR to gather, preserve,
and make available for study
documentary material to illumi-
nate the history of American
Jews.
\
assessment is vis-a-vis Israel
which I don't believe that
this is the meaning of it then,
of course, we don't feel that we
should be the_one to be singled
out for the failure of the nego-
tiations after we have made
generous proposals absolutely
rejected by Egypt."
Dinitz said he was "very en-
couraged by the words of the
President that America will
continue to search for ways and
means to advance the cause of
peace." He a'so said he did not
believe the role ot Kissinger has
ended, although "maybe the
shuttle diplomacy is ended for a
while, maybe new ways should
be found."
New Booklet Honors Jewish
Patriots In American History
Who was the first Jewish patriot to be killed in the War
of Independence?
"Without his aid they could not have carried on the (Rev-
olutionary) cause." What U.S. president said this about what
great Jewish American?
What Jewish commander led the legendary "Jewish Le-
gion"?
Whom did the British call a "very great rebel"?
These and many other accounts are recorded in the new-
booklet entitled: "Honoring 1776 And Famous Jews In Amer-
ican History," published in commemoration of the Bicentennial
Year.
Who was the first known Jewish settler in the New World
and when did he arrive? In 1750, 1701, 1677, 1654?
Who was America's original "women's libber"?
Which Jewish officer reached the Navy'; highest rank and
for what law does his name rest in U.S. history?
Whose fleet of ships were critical in the colonies' ability to
wage the War of Independence?
Every Jewish child and parent will feel pride in reading
about the heroic Jewish Americans who helped to create the
nation and shape its growth from the earliest years. Page after
page will be exciting, especially for those who are used to
thinking of most Jewish contributions to America as beginning
with the great migrations at the turn of the 20th Century.
Copies of "Honoring 1776 And Famous Jews In American
History" may be obtained by mail. Send 50c for each copy
desired to: "Jewish Patriots,' Box 4488 Grand Central Station,
New York, N.Y. 10017.
POOL
and Supplies
Professional Water Analysis
FREE
1 month service
with 1 year contract
2119 N.
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Hollywood
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*
OF SOUTH FLORIDA INC j*jjg Wwtw* >r "*
I

!


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April U, 1975 /s
Charleston Jews Seek to Bar Kuwaiti Project Pi
CHARLESTON, S.C. community here has asked the Charleston
County Council tc< deny a Kuwaiti company
and its American subsidiaries permission to
develop Kiawah Island off the South Carolina
coast as long as Kuwait continues its blacklist
and boycott of American firms.
The Council was scheduled to hold a public
hearing on rezoning the island. The Commu-
nity Relations Committee, an arm of the Jew-
ish Welfare Fund, announced that it would hold
a protest rally in advance of the hearings at
Marion Square in the center of downtown
Charleston.
KIAWAH IS one of a chain of undeveloped,
sparsely inhabited "sea islands'' in the Atlantic
J
The -women of La Mer met recently to
evaluate their March 6 fund-raising func-
tion. In the top picture are (from left)
Estelle Glattman, Mary Golden, cochair-
man; Delia Rosenberg, a member of the
food committee; Evelyn Stieber, chair-
man; and Corinne Kolodin, cochairman.
Bottom photo shows (seated) Miriam El-
lis, Martha Levitz, Sherry Edelman, Es-
ther Slutkin; (standing) Corinne Kolodin,
Evelyn Stieber and Delia Rosenberg.
fr 5
'SCCO
IctJL^ahe^jt
nn
IN THE COOL AND SCENIC BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS
Altitude 2500 IHI
Finest Jewish American Cuisine
From S
W D"'y
Per person dble occ
Including Breakfast.
Lunch and Dinner.
SWIMMING POOL 'GOLF -TENNIS
HORSEBACK RIDING BOATING 'FISHING
SUPERVISED CHILDREN'S PROGRAM
ENTERTAINMENT -INFORMAL
Write for Brochure or Phone MIAMI OFFICE (305) 534-8356
250 PALM AVE.. PALM ISLAND. MIAMI BEACH. FLA. 33139
Resort Hotel on Beautiful Lake Osceola
HENDERSONVILLE. North Carolina 28739
The Hollander Baker
MOVED FROM 911 N. FEDERAL HIGHWAY
to
3005 JOHNSON STREET
(Johnson Sq. Plaza Next to Winn-Dixie)
Phone 989-3396
y
Israeli Professional & Wife
looking for positions Husband M.S.
engineering, M.B.A. from M.IT
Wile B.A. Vosar, M.S. social work
Both experienced. Write KOH0RN,
41 Wallis Rd., Chestnut Hill,
Mass. 02167
south of Carolina. Last year i* was purchased
from its owner, a South Carolina businessman,
by the Kuwait Investment Co.
The hitter established American subsid-
iaries, the Kiawah Beach Co. and Coastal
Shores Inc., to develop and promote the island
as an exclusive resort and residential commu-
nity for wealthy Americans.
The Community Relations Committee said
it will demand, as a condition of further de-
velopment "that the Arab boycott and black-
list shall not be implemented or enforced in
Charleston County and the United States of
America."
Bii:rjLB!i*fT-
NEW YORK (JTA) David
Rockefeller, board chairman and
chief executive officer of the
Chase Manhattan Bank, said here
that "in support of current ef-
forts to establish a lasting peace
in the Middle East, we intend to
continue our normal banking op-
erations under standard banking
practices with all concerned" be-
cause "we do not think that any
good purpose would be served,
public or private, by modifying
this traditional pelicy."
Rockefeller issued the state-
ment in response to what he
termed "the painful irony of the
bank's situation" with regard to
its role in the Middle East.
To "illustrate" he mentioned
a CBS broadcast editorial alleging
that Chase Manhattan "has bowed
to an Arab boycott by refusing
to open an office in Israel."
AT THE same time, the news-
paper Newsday reported today
that Chase Manhattan faces boy-
cott proceedings by the Arab
League.
Stating that his bank serves
countries in all parts of the world
in "the cause of international
commerce," Rockefeller noted
that "We have for a good many
years, served the banking require-
ments of the State of Israel, al-
ways basing our decisions on
sound economic grounds. Like-
wise, we continue to serve the
requirements of virtually every
other country in the Middle East,
based on these same economic
principles."
The B'nai B'rith Anti Defama-
tion League recently accused
Chase Manhattan of being one of
a number of American firms par-
ticipating in the Arab boycott of
Israel, citing the fact that the
bank has not opened a branch in
Israel although it has branches
in Lebanon and Bahrein and will
open one in Egypt
A SPOKESMAN of the bank
said Friday that it bad given con-
sideration at one time to opening
a branch in Israel but decided
that a branch there would not be
profitable.
Rockefeller said in his state-
ment that 'The heart of the mat-
ter is that we are carrying on
normal business operations in the
Middle East at a time when
fundamental and far-reaching po-
litical issues are at stake. Con-
sequently, it is quite understand-
able that all concerned should be
seeking to achieve maximum ad-
vantage for their side."
Envoy Denies His
Meddling Words
JERUSALEM (JTA) Daniel Nestor, the economic
and commercial attache at the United States Consulate m
East Jerusalem, denied to the Jewish Telegraphic Agencv
that he had made remarks disparaging to Israel at a recent
meeting with West Bank Arab businessmen in Ramallah.
According to press reports here, Neston said at a Ra-
mallah Chamber of Commerce meeting that the West Bank-
ers soon will not need Israeli permits to conduct business
"because Israel will have nothing to say in these matters."
NESTOR ALSO allegedly advised the Arab merchants
to do business directly with American firms rather than
through Israeli or Jordanian firms and suggested that they
open their own office in the U.S. to encourage American
investments on the West Bank.
Nestor told the JTA that he had said nothing of a
political nature to the Ramallah Chamber of Commerce.
Chase Bank Vows To
Continue Present Policy J
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Hollywood, Florida 33020
Phone: 923-2471___________
Automobile Insurance For Senior Drivers '
Tenants Form Homeowners Policy for
irtmont or Condominium Owners
\


Friday, April 11, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 9

Bank Leumi Assets Trebled In 3 Years
MM!.....i.rii it;......
.ii lbu: mmimm.im..... 11 I
Bank Leumi opened a representative office in Mi-
ami Beach in 1974; the representative is Judah H.
Kurtzbard. Mr. Kurtzbard was born in 1940 in Poland;
he and his parents later* escaped from a concentration
camp and have been living in Israel since 1950. He
completed his studies in Economics, Sociology, and Po-
litical Science at the Hebrew University and has been
working for Bank Leumi Le-lsrael B.M. since 19r,1 in
a variety of capacities, including Business Development
and Provident Funds.
<;:.i i ,n.' ..'. i i i ,i
Percentage 1973 41.6 1972 38.2
35.8 46.4 37.2 46.2
34.8 40.4 36.9 36.7
I
Bank Leumi Le-lsrael B.M., Israel's leading commercial bank,
was incorporated in 1951 to take over and continue the business ot
the Anglo-Palestine Bank Ltd., which was established by the Zionist
Movement in London in 1902 under the name of the Anglo-Palestine
Company as a subsidiary of the Jewish Colonial Trust Ltd., and
opened its first office in Jaffa in 1903.
The Anglo-Palestine Bank soon became the principal financial in-
stitution of the young "yisbuv." In 1908 it was active in the financial
arrangements for building Tel-Aviv. In 1910 its original caDital of
40.000 had increased to 100,000 and by 1914 deposits and
reached 400,000.
SOON AFTER the outbreak of the war, the Turkish authorities
ordered the bank to be liquidated, but it managed to survive clan-
destinely and by the end of the war its deposits stood at 700.00",
The Anglo-Palestine Bank was able to maintain its leading posi-
tion under the British Mandate. Its board was transferred from Lon-
don to Tel-Aviv in 1931. Deposits rose from 1,550,000 in 1932 to
6.150,000 in 1939.
In anticipation of independence in 1948, the bank prepared its
own currency notes. With the declaration of the State of Israel, the
Analo-Palestine Bank became government banker and bank of issue,
until the establishment of the bank of Israel in December 1954.
AMONG THE specialized institutions established by the bank,
in cooperation with the Jewish Agency, were: th? General Mortgage
Bank (1924); the Ozar le-Ta'asiyyah (Industry Fund, 1944) and the
Ozar le-Hak-la'ut (Agricultural Fund, 1944; merged in 1960 into
Va'ad Agricultural Development Bank).
In 1934 a securities clearing house was set up, the forerunner
of the Tel-Aviv Stock Exchange. The Bank Leumi Le-lsrael Invest-
ment Corporation, the first in the country was formed in 1945.
Bank Leumi acquired the majority of the shares of the Union
Bank of Israel, the country's fourth largest commercial bank, a
specialist in diamond-industry financing, in 1961, and in 1966 it
bought the large cooperative bank Kupat Milveh la-Oleh "Immigrant
Loan Bank").
In 1974 the bank had 315 branches and offices in Israel and
abroad. Its subsidiary in New York is Bank Leumi Trust Company
of New York, which has six branches (Member F.D.I.C); and Leumi
Securities Corporation.
Other subsidiaries abroad are the Bank Leumi (U.K.) in Lon-
don, Bank Leumi Switzerland in Zurich and Geneva, Bank Leumi Le-
lsrael (France) S.A. and Luxinvest S.A., opening soon in Chicago.
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
The following are a few financial highlights from the March S
press release of the Bank Leumi Group:
The total consolidated, assets of the Bank Leumi Group at the
end of 1974 reached 41.1 billion (nearly 7 billion)an increase
this year of 15.4 billion or 60 per cent as against 7.9 billion
or 45 per cent in 1973.
The total consolidated assets, as also the balances of the various
Balance Sheet items, have more than trebled in the last three years
(end-1971/end-1974; see table below). The total assets of eight of
the Bank's subsidiaries pass the 1 billion mark
6.0
The Group 20.6
Total Consolidated Assets ..... 1.1
Total Deposits ......................... M
Debentures Issued .................... 41.1
Total Loans* .............................. Bal
Capital Funds .......................... 30.0
* including Loans to Government/Deposits with Treasury
1 CAPITAL FUNDS
The Capital Funds of the Group have passed the 1 billion mark,
earching 1,115 million, a growth over the year of 354 million
or 47 per cent. This figure includes a Capital Note Issue in Israel by
Bank Leumi to a total of 120 million, the raising of capital by the
London and New York subsidiaries to a total of some 40 million,
and the accumulation of undistributed profits.
the Bank Leumi Group (commercial banks in Israel) in the bank
ing system to have been, at the respective ends of the last three
years, as follows:
1974*
Total Assets............................... 42.9
Deposits of the Public,
Israeli Currency ................ 36.7
Total Deposits of the Public ... 49.3
Credits to the Public,
Israeli Currency ............... 34.5
Total Credits to the Public ... 37.9
in the absence of year-end figures, end-November figures have
been taken.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
The international business of the Group, as carried out by its
Banks in Israel and affiliates abroad, continued to expand and de-
velop, despite the difficulties encountered on world marketsthe
economic recessions, the inflationary pressures, the oil crisis and
the upheavals in world finance and banking.
Four new extensions nave been added to the Group's interna-
tional networktwo of them in New York, one in London and one
in Torontobringing the overall number up to 25: 4 banking sub-
sidiaries operating through 12 branches, plus 13 other extensions
Represent**!' Office*. Finance Companies and the like Four more
extensions are shortly to be opened, two of them in Europe and two
Ji the United States.
The activities of the Bank extend over five continents and a
staff of some 700 (including about 30 Israelies) operates the ex-
tensions overseas.
The number of Customer Accounts of all kinds operated by the
Group (commercial banks) in Israel totals some 2.6 million, the
overwhelming majority of which are credit accounts.
Industrial ,
Output
On Rise
*
Quadomain Breakfast Sunday
To Honor Mr. and Mrs. Hof f
3.4 2.0 1.2
11.5 7.7 6.0
0.8 0.5 0.4
1973 1972 1971
25.7 17.8 13.2
ees in billions
19.1 13.8 10.3
Sydney Holt .man, associate
hi-rise chairman for the 1975
United Jewish Appeal Campaign,
has announced that the Qua-
domain will honor Mr. and Mrs.
Sidney Huff at a breakfast Sun-
day in the Social Hall.
Robert N. Kerbel, executive
director of the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward who will,
address the breakfast guests will
report on the serious conditions
that face Israel today, not only
for the survival of the nation,
but their day-to-day existence
as well.
Heading the committee are
Dr. Harry Breslaw, chairman,
and Joseph L. Ehrlich, William
Masur and Louis Schlesinger,
cochairmen.
Quadomain Committee mem-
bers include Gerald Aronson,
14 Hollywood USY'ers To
Attend Regional Convention
Rabbi Chaim Listfield of Tem-
ple Sinai will be leading a dele-
gation of 14 USY'ers to Camp
Ocala for the major USY pro-
gram of the year, the S.E. Re-
gional Convention, April 17
through 20. The convention will
unite 350 committed teenagers
from five Southeastern States.
Its theme will be "You shall be
Holy, for I the Lord am Holy."
The teenagers will participate
in many study sessions and
workshops throughout the four
days.
USY'ers attending will include
Mark Brotman. Faith Eichner,
Rena Fisher, Larry Goldman,
Sam Kraemer, Miriam Lusskin,
Shari Markowitz, Linda Myers,
Andrea Newman, Debbie Rati-
coff, Nina and Alan Siff, Susan
Tanur and Jeff Zwirn.
Mrs. Rhea Baritz, Philip Barton,
Arthur Basch, Dr. David Capson,
Mrs. Morton Cole, Samuel E.
Edelman, Morris Epstein, Saul
Fine, Samuel Koffler, Sol Lang-
el. Bernard Markowitz, Charles
Mund, Kyman Orenstein, Sol
Orenstein, Nat Ross, Mrs. Rhea
Roth, Murray Silverstein, David
Sklar, Louis Tillim, Dr. Harry
Urstein, Sam Weinberger, Ben
Wiesman, Mrs. Belle Wolfe and
Max Wollman.
Preliminary plans were develop-
ed and the program announced
at a special committee meeting
Thursday, April 3, addressed by
Lewis E. Conn, 1975 United Jew-
ish Appeal cochairman. Mr.
Cohn reported on his recent
visit to Israel and the serious
conditions under which all the
Israeli people ere now living.
Mr. Cohn's appeal for in-
creased support resulted in a
commitment by the committee
to obtain maximum funds from
the residents of the two Qua-
domain buildings.
NEW YORK (JTA) Avra-
ham Shavit, president-elect of
the Israel Manufacturers Asso-
ciation, said here that Israel's
industrial output in 1974 was
15 percent more than In 1973
and reached a tctal value of
$1,250 billion.
He spoke at a press confer-
ence sponsored by the American
Jewish Committee. Shavit said
it was a distortion of the condi-
tion of Israel's economy to de-
scribe it as facing an "economic
collapse." This evaluation "is
not true," ht added, but admit-
ted that Israel was facing eco-
nomic problems.
HOWEVER, he said, these dif-
ficulties arc shared by all the
industrialized countries, citing
the impact of inflation and
snortages of raw materials as
the major problems of Israel and
other industrialized nations.
Shavit, who arrived here for a
three-week speaking tour for the
Israel Bond Organization, said
Israel's economy was further
burdened by a costly defense
budget, which consumes 40 per-
cent of Israel's GNP, and by the
need to absorb immigrants.
He said outlays tor defense
and immigration were inflation-
ary, adding that "these expendi-
tures are like pouring fuel" on
Israel's inflation.
SHAVIT, who is managing di-
rector of Shavit Oven, the larg-
est plant of its kind in Israel,
warned that the recently inten-
sified economic warfare by the
Arabs was "a threat to the
whole industrial world" and not
only to Israel.
He said petro-dollars and oil
were "sophisticated weapons in
the hands of not very sophisti-
cated people," the Arabs. He
warned there was a danger that
the economies of all industrial-
affected.
Paul Diamond Magic Show
At Temple Sinai April 27
A magic show will be pre-
sented by Paul Diamond on Sun-
day, April 27 from 1 to 3 p.m. at
Temple Sinai.
Bag lunches and cold drinks
will be available for the Sunday
School crew from 12 to 1 p.m.
For information call Charlotta
Brodie or Flo Rosenthal.
^
CREDITS
Total Credits (including Deposits with the Treasury) of the
Group increased to 20.6 billion, a growth of 9.0 billion or 79
per cent.
The increase in credits can be attributed mainly to an increase--------------------------
in loans in foreign currency as well as in loans from earmarked Group Seeks Singles
deposits.
The Bank Leumi Group in Israel accounts for some 38 per cent
of total bank loans to the public and its share in the Directed Credit
Funds reaches 40 per cent. Particiularly outstanding is its share in
the financing of export industries, chief among them citrus fruits,
cotton and diamonds. Diamond, financing in the Group is managed
as a consortium by Union Bank.
The number of Borrowers' Accounts held by the Group is in the
region of 280,000 and more than 90 per cent of them are loans for
lesstthan 10,000, a fact which shows the weight of the small bor-
rower in the Bank. '
SHARE IN THE BANKING SYSTEM
"The Jewish Federation Sin-
gles of Broward invite Jewish
singles ages 25-50 for women
and 25-55 for men to participate
in its activities. The schedule
this month includes a "Singles
Jamboree" Sunday; a "Sing-A-
Long" Saturday, April 19; a dis-
cussion group Monday, April 21;
a cruise on a chartered boat Sat-
urday, April 26, and brunch Sun-
day, April 27. For further infor-
Need a nurse who cares?,
Our nurses believe a genuine concern, an
understanding smile and a compassionate
attitude are important to a patient. Almost
as important as her professional skill.
All Medical Pool RNs, LPNs, Aides,
Companion Sitters and Male Attendants
have registered nurse supervision.
When someone you care about needs
special attention at home, in a hospital
or nursing home, call us, day or night.
MEDICAL PERSONNEL POOL*
V
mation call the Federation pf-
XbfrjaonUdy statistics of the Bank af-Israel show the-akare of fices. .__ -
I
t



Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, April 11, 1975
Activists Charge Reds With Trying for 'Final Solution'
/s
NEW YORK (JTA)
Jewish activists in Moscow
have accused the Soviet au-
thorities of trying to achieve
a "final solution" of the Jew-
ish emigration problem by
issuing visas To'selected" ac-
tivists but denying them to
others who are regularly
harassed, threatened with
prosecution or actually ar-
rested and held for trial
on unspecified or dubious
charges.
The accusation was made
by a group of 15 Jewish ac-
tivists who met with West-
ern journalists in Moscow,
according to the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry, kovetsky, of Leningrad; Valery
THEY INDICATED that the Buiko. of Riga; and Yuli Brind,
David Blumberg Speaker At
B'nai B'rith Installation
strategy apparently is aimed at
splitting the hard-core activists
anil intimidating other Jews
from seeking exit visas. A state-
ment distributed to foreign
newsmen cited the cases of two
activists, Mark Nashpitz and
Boris TBitlionok who were
among seven demonstators ar-
rested outside the Lenin Library
in Moscow Feb. 24 for protest-
ing the denial of visas.
While the others were either
released or given brief jail terms
for "hooliganism," Nashpitz and
Tsitlionok were held for trial.
The charges against them were
unspecified until last week when
they were formally charged un-
der Art. 190-3 of the Soviet
Leonid Lotvin and Yacov Vin-
One of them, Prof. Alexander
Penal Code for "the organiza-
tion or active participation in
group actions disturbing public
order."
They face prison terms of up
to three years.
AT THE same time, however,
exit visas were granted to 10
"hard core" activists. They were
identified as Mikhail Polotsk,
Vladimir Davidov, Yaacov
Schwartzman and Mikhail Agur-
sky, all of Moscow; Anatoly
Schwartzman and other activ-
ist, surnamed Valin of Kishinev;
of Kharkov, who was just re-
leased from a labor camp.
The Macow* acOlvisfe said in
their statement that the selec-
tion of these men for visas -was
a "smoke screen" thrown up by
the Soviet authorities to conceal
their repression of other Jews.
THE STATEMENT disclosed
that three other activists were
summoned to KGB (secret po-
lice) headquarters in Moscow
this week and warned that they
faced arrest and trial.
Luntz, a scientist, were threat-
ened with prosecution under Art.
64 of the Penal Code which re-
lates to .treason and carries the
maximum penalty of death. The
other two, Anatoly Sharansky
and Leonid Tsipin, were advised
that they might be charged un-
der Arts. 190 and 70 respective-
ly.
The latter covers anti-Soviet
agitation. A KGB official al-
legedly told them: "We can do
what we like; the West no long-
er supports you," the NCSJ re-
ported.
Israelis Behind GovHSs Decision
David M. Blumberg, president
of B'nai B'rith International, will
be. the guest speaker at the an
B'rith for research in and treat-
ment of arthritic and kindred dis-
eases.
Blumberg is a long-time resi-
dent of Knoxville, Tenn., and is
a former member of its City
Council. An insurance executive
affiliated with the Massachusetts
Mutual Life Insurance Co., he is
former president of the 80,000-
member National Association of
Life Underwriters.
Active in Knoxville's civic .";'-
fairs for many years, Blumberg
was cited in 1961 by the Chamber
of Commerce as that city's "Man
of the Year."
Tickets for the April 13 instal-
lation brunch are available from
any B'nai B'rith lodge president
in Dade County, or by calling the
B'nai B'rith office.
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Is-
raelis of all political persua-
sions appeared here to stand
fully behind Premier Yitz-
hak Rabin's government's
refusal to agree to major
territorial withdrawals in
Sinai without a formal dec-
laration of non-belligerency
by Egypt.
Histadrut, Israel's power-
ful labor federation, issued
a statement pledging its full-
est support of the govern-
ment's policy.
SECRETARY General Yehu-
ram Meshel said Israeli work-
ers back the government's de-
cision, and although they ardent-
ly desire peace, they understand
that the Egyptian attitude made
it impossible for Premier Rabin
to accept Cairo's territorial de-
mands.
Naftali Feder, political sec-
retary of Mapam, said that
party, a member of Rabin's La-
bor Alignment, supports the gov-
ernment's decision although it
DAVID BLUMBERG
nual installation of officers of th"
South Florida Council of B'nai
B'rith Lodges, according to in-
stallation chairman Mel Feigeles.
The brunch will be held Sunday
morning, April W, at the Ameri-
cana Hotel.
"Eighteen officers will be in-
stalled for one-year terms on the
South Florida Council, the gov-
erning body of Dade County's 38
B'iiai B'rith lodges.
To be installed are Barry T.
Gttrland. president; Louis Hym-
son, president-elect", Harry Mar-
con, Joseph Sussman. Mel Feige-
les, Col. Nathaniel Kutcher, vice
presidents; Kenneth Hoffman,
treasurer; Sid Schwarzbach. sec-
retary, and George Kotia, Mau-
rice MehLman, Jack Sloan. Jack
Chaiken. Sid Ritter. Sol Klein.
So| Kaye, Herman Nudelman,
Rdbert Feingold. and Dr. M.
Teltelbaum, trustees. Fred Sny-
der is immediate past president.
Blumberg is the 19th president
of B'nai B'rith. He was elected
by acclamation in October. 1971
at a B'nai B'rith triennial con-
vention in Philadelphia, and was
reflected to a three-year term in
November. 1974 at a convention
in Israel. He has been a member
of B'nai B'rith for over 40 years
and has served in many major
leadership posts.
Former national commission
chairman of the B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization. Blumbera
served two three-year terms as an
international vice president of
B'nai B'rith. representing District
7. a seven-state Southern region
which he previously served as
president.
Blumberg also was chairman of
the board of the Leo N. Levi Hos-
pital in Hot Springs. Ark., a med-
ical center founded by B'nai
Osceola Lake Inn Reopening
For Its 35th Season June 5
Rubin's Osceola Lake Inn, lo-
cated in the cool and scenic Blue
Ridge Mountains on Lake Osceo-
la in Hendersonville, N.C., is re-
opening June 5 for its 35th sea-
son.
There are some new additions
this year, including new guest
rooms, dining room and recrea-
tional area.
Popular with lovers of the great
outdoors as well as with those
who simply want to relax, the
Inn features a host of activities.
Horseback riding, pool, boating,
fishing, tennis courts, putting
green, shuffleboard. horseshoes,
ping pong, volleyball, badminton
are all being offered.
Specially supervised programs
are available for children. In ad-
dition, two magnificent 18-hole
Championship Golf Courses are
nearly.
The Osceola Lake Inn locat?on
boasts some of Ihe most scenic
mountain areas in the Eastern
United States. Situated at a height
of 2500 feet, the resort has ac
eommodations for up to 125
guests. Attire is informal at all
cuisine is Jewish-American Style.
Featuring American Plan, tne
cuisine is Jewish-American Style
Fresh baked breads and pastries
have become synonymous with
Osceola Lake Inn, and are pre-
pared by Arthur Rubin, a gradu-
ate of the Culinary Institute of
America.
Owner manager host Stuart
Rubin, now entering his 16th
year of operation, took over its
management from the late Joe
Rubin, who founded the Inn in
1941.
A color brochure and rates are
available by writing to Rubin's
Osceola Lake Inn, Henderson-
ville, N.C., or by phoning Stuart
Rubin in Miami.
Twlight Supper At Sinai
The Sisterhood of Temple
Sinai will host a "Twilight Sup-
per" and entertainment to bene-
fit summer Judaica scholarships,
Wednesday at 6 p.m. in the Ha-
ber Karp Hall, 1201 Johnson St.,
Hollywood. Mrs. Elliot Stein and
Mrs. Hy Kameron are cochair-
people of the program. Contact
the temple office for reserva-
tions.
EDUARDO F. SALABERT, M.D.
Announces
The Opening of his Office for
GENERAL PRACTICE
6099 Hollywood Boulevard
Hours: By App't.
9-5 Daily
(Including Wednesday)
Telephone
983-6865
deeply regrets the failure to
reach a second-stage accord with
Egypt. Mapam urged continued
efforts to seek a peace settle-
ment.
The Civil Rights Movement,
headed by Shulamit Aloni, also
declared its support for the deci-
sion but at the same time ac-
cused the Rabin government of
misrepresenting Israel's case,
both internally and abroad.
TZVI BERNSTEIN, secretary
general of the National Religi-
ous Party, a member of Rabin's
coalition, said the latest de-
velopments made it all the more
urgent to establish a govern-
ment of national unity.
He said this was now possible
as a result of the "rapproche-
ment" between Rabin and Likud
leader Menachem Beigin. He
was referring to the fact that
Rabin telephoned Beigin to re-
port the situation to him and
personally briefed Beigin and
other Likud leaders on Satur-
day.
If Israelis generally did not
hold their own government to
blame for the collapse of the
second-stage peace talks, and
put the onus squarely on the
Egyptians, there was also bit-
terness against the two super-
powers expressed in editorials
in the country's two mass cir-
culation evening newspapers.
M \ Ahiv acknowledged the dan-
ger of a serious erosion of Amer-
ican-Israeli relations and said
the delay in inviting Israeli
pilots to train on the new F-15
jets was symptomatic of the
American attitude even before
the failure of Kissinger's talks.
The paper added that whi'e
Israel has no desire to split with
the U.S., it must be prepared
for such an eventuality and must
mobilize for a vast political and
propaganda campaign in the
international arena and espe-
cially in the U.S.
Yediot Achronot suggested
that Egypt's tough stand may
well have resulted from behind
the scenes maneuvers by the
Soviet Union and also by the
collapse of the American strate-
gic position in the Far East.
WHATEVER, the case. Kis-
singer should have realized
where his "Chamberiainian" line
(apiieasementl would lead his
own country and the entire free
world, the newspaper said, ad-
ding that Kissinger's failure in
the Middle East should sound
the alarm for a change of Amer-
ican policy in general.
Random samplings of public
opinion included the view that
the United States was blaming
Israel for denying it a much
needed diplomatic tri m.li ;n
the Middle East at a time when
its policies in Indo-China ure in
shambles and its Western alli-
ance is endangei ed by L e sharp
leftist swing in Poitjga:, a
NATO memfce..
Some Israelis expressed the
view t; at the U.S. had pressed
Israel ha,d for concessions and
was now attempting to hold the
weaker party responsible for its
diplomatic failure. Others dis-
agreed and claimed that was not
the genuine American attitude.
VOTE APRIL 19, 1975
KEEP
1fou*S*fx>utxccci(?o(4Mei(m JARED AYERS
FOUR YEARS AS YOUR COUNCILMAN
Active sine* 1966 in various areas
of responsibility for our City.
Pd. Pol. Ad by Jit.d Ayfti Cimpiijn Fund
?*'......................



[iday, April 11, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 11
AT CJF QUARTERLY MUTING IN ATLANTA
loridian Columnist Receives Nat'l. Award
ATLANTAJewish Floridian columnist Leo Mindlin
eceived the Boris Smolar Award for excellence in North
fmerican Jewish Journalism in 1974 at special ceremonies
re.
Presentation was made at a banquet session of the
jring quarterly board of the Council of Jewish Federations
Knd Welfare Funds.
The award to Mindlin was in the category for editorials
id personal columns.
Receiving awards in two
I her categories were Robert A.
lohen. editor-in-chief of the St.
Duis Jewish Light; Gary Rosen-
att. assistant editor of the
laltimore Jewish Times; and
fax W. Jacobs, international
prrespondent for the Buffalo
ewish Review.
! ADDRESSING THE banquet
tssion here at the Fairmont Ho-
was Dr. Robert Pipes, of
trvard University.
^The CJF is the association of
ntral community organizations
Federations, Welfare Funds,
imunity Councils serving
Jewish communities in the
jiited States and Canada.
lit aids these communities to
|obilize maximum support for
UJA and other overseas agen-
es. as well as for major na-
lal and local services involv-
financing. planning and
prating health, welfare, cul-
.educational, community re-
ral. educational, community re-
all residents.
scheduling its quarterly
etings in Atlanta, the CJF's
than 40 planning sessions
geared to provide particu-
} for increased involvement
le part of a wider number of
imunities in CJF's actions and
liberations.
? ARTICIPATING WERE more
200 representatives from
ne 65 Jewish communities
i.ghout the United States and
nada. with a large contingent
|ni the Southern region, includ-
Hollywood residents Dr. Nor-
|n Atkin, a member of the
krd of CJFWF, and D id
rra. who serves on its Inter-
Idiate Cities Services Commit-
highlight of the meet-
was a report on the present
of community federated
paigns which, as of the end of
binary, raised almost S230 mil-
i for local, national and world-
Jiwish needs. A special
feting of the Campaign Serv-
ices Committee focused on ex-
tending maximum momentum and
progress during the mid-season
phase of the 1975 campaigns.
On two major issues of deep
Federation concern considered by
the Community Planning Com-
mittee, the following actions
were taken: in the matter of
"Local 'Resettlement of Soviet
Jews," the creation of a broad-
based national committee to in-
volve local Federation leadership
with key agencies (such as United
Hias Service, Jewish Welfare
Board, United Jewish Appeal,
Jewish Occupational Council, Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women)
was approved to coordinate serv-
ices, costs and staff, mobilize
volunteers, help in shaping com-
munity understanding; as well as
to refine the process of matching
job skills with local placements
for the newcomers, and to start
a process of "interpreting the
American and general Jewish
community" to them before they
leave Europe.
IN ITS review of the "Impact
of the Recession on Jewish Com-
LEO MINDLIN
munal Services," Federations
were urged to seek out fresh
funding sources, in particular
governmental, and to be open to
more intensified service needs,
new clients and to maintain an
ongoing review of their agency's
programs.
Under the auspices of the Na-
tional Endowment Fund Com-
mittee, progress in finalizing the
Jewish Federation Pooled Income
Fund for long range financing
was reported to community
leaders.
At the meeting of the Overseas
Services Committee, Max M.
Fisher, chairman of the Jewish
Agency, Inc., and I. L. Kenen,
chairman of the American Jew-
ish Public Affairs Committee, re-
viewed recent developments in
Chess Body Eyes
Israel's Expulsion
TEL AVIV(JTA)A decision by the World Chess
Federation that would exclude Israel from considera-
tion as a possible site for the 1976 International Chess
Olympiad, has been protested by the Israel Chess Fed-
eration.
The Israeli group said it wrote to the Federation.,
meeting in Holland this week, pointing out that Israel
is the only country so far to submit an offer for next
year's contest but was ruled out on the basis of the po-
litical situation in the Middle East.
"On the basis of purely chess interests we have
both the right and the resources to host the 1976 Olym-
piad. The situation in Israel is far from being a war
zone," the letter said.
|AZF, CAJE, Aliyah Center
Sponsoring Ulpan Classes
Community Ulpan Hebrew
sses for beginning, interme-
and advanced level stu-
nts, under the joint sponsor-
i of the American Zionist Fed-
Hiort, the Israel Aliyah Center,
the Central Agency for Jew-
Education, will begin during
week of April 14, in locations
[North Dade; South Dade and
|ami Beach, Herbert Zvi Berg-
executive director of the Cen-
\\ Agency for Jewish Educa-
announced.
The Ulpan Hebrew Centers are
rt of a national program or-
lized by the Department of
(ucation and Culture of the
Zionist Organization,
Piich is under the direction of
Abraham Gannes.
In the North Dade area, class-
will be held at Temple Sinai
North Dade, 18801 NE 22nd
pe., Mondays and Wednesdays
Dm 9:45-11:45 a.m. and at Beth
krah Congregation Tuesdays and
^ursdays from 7:30-9:30 p.m.,
all levels.
The location of the Miami
ach classes will be at Temple
Sholom, 4144 Chase Ave.,
lays and Wednesdays from
a.m. to noon, and 7:30-9:30
p.m.
In the South Dade area, classes
will be held at Temple Zion. 8000
Miller Rd.. Tuesdays and Thurs-
days, from 7:30-9:30 p.m. and at
Temple Beth Am, 5950 N. Ken-
dall Dr., Mondays and Wednes-
days from 9:30-11:30 a.m.
The Ulpan Hebrew classes will
be conducted in cooperation with
Miami Dade Community College.
Classes will meet for two hours
each session, twice a week, for
nine weeks.
In addition to the Hebrew
language learning in the Ulpan
classes, Israeli culture is also in-
troduced. Classes discuss recent
happenings in Israel, and learn
Hebrew songs and dances. In ad-
dition, there are parties and
meals together, with the entire
menus and ordering in Hebrew.
Instructors for the classes are
especially trained teacherr who
have been involved in in-service
study in the methodology of
teaching Ulpan Hebrew. They
concentrate on spoken Hebrew
with the Israeli accent so as to
provide a good speech model for
the students.
Serving on the Hebrew Ulpan
Committee are Harriet Greene,
director of the American Zionist
Federation; Eliezcr Kroll, di-
rector of the Israel Aliyah Cen-
ter; Herbert Zvi Berger and
Abraham J. Gittelson, executive
and associate directors of the
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation; Levi Soshuk, prominent
Hebrew educator, and Rita Gold,
coordinator of the Ulpan pro-
gram.
Additional information about
the classes may be secured from
the office of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education.
Hollywood Section NCJW,
Plans April 28 Installation
Hollywood Section, National
Council of Jewish Women, will
hold its annual installation
luncheon at the Holiday Inn,
South Ocean Drive and Hallan-
dale Beach Boulevard, Monday,
April 28, at 11:30 a.m. Husbands
and friends are invited to see
the 1975 officers take the oath
of office.
Tickets are still available and
may be obtained through Janet
Leib, chairman, Charlotte Grand
or Estelle Lang, cochairmen.
Jerusalem and Washington, with
Fisher reporting that the Agen-
cy's budget has had to be cut
from $750 million to $500 mil-
lion; also, the establishment of
a long-range planning committee
to evaluate its operations.
CONGRESSIONAL SUPPORT
for Israel remained "high," ac-
cording to Kenen. as well among
the general population; although
the attraction of business leader
to petrodollars and the power of
oil would continue to make it-
self felt.
The work of the Israel Task
Force of the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council in making available posi-
tion papers, polls, media features,
radio and film materials, was
recognized as highlighting the
need for the continuation of such
an emergency program to serve
communities.
Other areas covered during the
four days, inclusive of meetings
to deal with the special needs of
large, intermediate and small
cities, public relations, and Worn-
er's Communal Service, were:
A review of community ex-
periences and their response to
the draft guidelines by the CJF
Task Force on Federation-Syna-
gogue Relations was made; with
pilot liaison programs in the
area of youth services and family-
counseling and the setting up of
local task forces being recom-
mended.
The Committee on Federa-
tion Planning for Jewish Educa-
tion, in its analysis of recently-
issued figures of Federation allo-
cations in the fieid in 1973, noted
that 93 communities reported a
high of $16 mil.ion in allocations
- a 127 per cent increase etace
1967. and a 12'a per cenfc in-
crease'over the prior year;-the
rate of increased allocations for
Jewish education running much
higher than for all local purpos-
es; and that a majority of its
subsidy funds are allocated to
day schools. Further progress in
shaping draft guidelines for Fed-
eration support of congregational
schools, was also made.
The role of fund-raising in
developing communal leaders,
plans for an international youth
leadership seminar in Israel this
summer and community experi-
ence in the use of a recent com-
mittee manual on Jewish identity
were aniona the agenda items at
the Committee on Leadership
Development session; capped
that evening with its traditional
dinner and services. "Shabbaton,"
hosted by the Atlanta Federation
for nearly 100 delegates.
The rising number of ap-
plicants -some 600 in 1974 as
against 200 at the outset in 1971
the currsnt status of recruit-
ment, student field Dlacements,
standards and rising tuition
costs, in the CJF's widely ac-
claimed Federation Executive
Recruitment and Education Pro-
gram (FEREP) were the focus
of the Committee on Personnel
Services: also the development
of pension plan standards for
Federations.
HIGHLIGHTING THE Satur-
day evening board meeting pre-
ceding the award banquet were
projections from Dr. David Si-
dorskv, professor of Philosophy,
Columbia, on "The American
Jewish CommunityIssues and
Opportunities."
MELV1N J.\< OB*
Bll M.VKi) McEWKN
Jacobs, McEwen
Named By Bur dines
Melvin Jacobs, president of
Burdines, has been named chair-
man and chief executive officer
and Richard W. McEwen, Bur-
dines executive vice president,
has been named president, Fed-
erated Department Stores, Inc.
has announced.
Mr. Jacobs succeeds Thomas
C. Wasmuth, who died March
11. Mr. Wasmuth had been with
Burdines for 10 years, and had
served as chairman for the last
seven years.
Mr. Jacobs, 48, has been with
Federated for 28 years, starting
as an executive trainee at
Bloomingdales in 1947. In three
years he was made buyer, and
in 1955 became general manager
of the basement stores.
In 1960, at the age of 34, Mr.
Jacobs was named merchandis-
ing vice president and in 1969,
became senior vice president
and general merchandise man-
ager. Two years later he was
promoted to executive vice presi-
dent and general merchandise
manager.
In 1972. Mr. Jacobs was trans-
ferred from Bloomingdales to
become president of Burdines.
Mr. McEwen, 54, has been
with Burdines for nine years. A
graduate of the University of
Toledo, he received his early de-
partment store training at R. H.
Macy in that city.
Prior to joining Burdines as
vice president-finance in 1966,
Mr. McEwen was treasurer of
Sibley, Lindsay, Curr & Co. de-
partment stores in Rochester,
N.Y., where he spent much of
his professional life.
At Burdines, he was promoted
to executive vice president of
finance and service in 1969. In
addition to being chief financial
officer. Mr. McEwen was also
responsible for operation, store
planning, construction and EDP.
Burdines has 11 stores in
Florida. It recently added a sec-
ond store in Orlando and will
soon open another store in Clear-
water.
4

I


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, April 11, 1973

Ip
wf> g *
IRabbtwcai flag

co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
devoted to discussion of themes and
co-editors
Dr..AAax A. lipschit? Rabbi Barr/Altman
issuesrelevant to Jewish life past and present
K^fnsidc juclai


By Dr. Frederick T.achman
Executive Editor
Encyclopaedia Judaica
What is the status of Jews
in Turkey?
In 1969. says the authoritative
Encyclops.-dia Judaica, there
were 35-40,000 Jews in Turkey,
nearly all Sephardim, of whom
30,000 lived in Istanbul. Ashken-
azim, called "Poles" by the Turks
because of the 17th and 18th
century immigration from Po-
land, accounted for 3-5 per cent
of the Jews. German-speaking
Ashkenazim who arrived later
from Austria formed the elite of
the community, and the Great
Synagogue built by them became
known as the "Austrian Temple."
After the death of the last of-
ficiating Rabbi (1944), the con-
gregation went into a decline and
was in danger of complete dis-
integration.
The older generation of Seph-
ardic Jews continued to speak
' Ladino. In The 1955 census, 64
per cent among the Jews declar-
ed that their mother tongue was
Yahudice (Ladino) compared
with 84 per cent in 1927, but
knowledge of Ladino is decreas-
ing. There are about 200 Karaite
families (1,000 people) living in
a suburb of Istanbul whose fore-
fathers settled in the city in
Byzantine times, ot recognizing
the Talmudic-Rabbinnical tradi-
tion, they established their own
aica
synagogue and cemetery and are
completely separated from the
rest of the community.
The peace treaty of Lausanne
(July 24, 1923) followed by the
abolition of the caliphate, assur-
ed the minorities living in Tur-
key their personal status as pro-
vided by their religious canons.
The Turkish republic was declar-
ed a secular state, and Kemal
Ataturk, its founder, attempted
to erase all signs of the religious-
institutional influence of Islam
and also to maintain equality of
Christianity and Judaism in pub-
lic life. The wearing of a "cler-
ical garb," for example, was pro-
hibited. For Jews the prohibition
on teaching Hebrew in schools
was a hard blow. After Ataturk*
death in 1938, many of the pro-
hibited. For Jews, the prohibition
eased, but the general attitude
toward the religious minorities
remained unchanged.
Nevertheless, says the E/J,
Jews remained second-class citi-
zens in Turkey, like Greeks and
the Armenians. This was demon-
strated during World War II, as
Hitler's propaganda gained
ground and it seemed that the
Axis Power* were moving toward
victory. To meet wartime needs
in neutral Turkey, a capital tax
was approved (1942), and it soon
became apparent that the tax-
payer's assessment was based on
his religion and nationality. In
fact, the poorest among the non-
Muslims, especially Jewish arti-
Issues And Answers...
Our Rabbis' Views
Your Yiddishkeit Shows
By RABBI HAROLD RICHTER, Jewish Chaplain of Broward
to. A ffW T1!" ag0' Dr" Euene Borowitz, noted Jewish educa-
S;n enruan,c ctu:er wrote a book entitied' ^ Sslew"
Wear In it, the author states his belief that most of us are really
more Jewish than we would be willing to admit. It is a 'new twist-
to the American Jew's dilemma and a theme that came to mind
when I thought of a strange visit to a Jewish patient in a Broward
County hospital.
In the incident which I am about to relate, the patient after
RahhTfi tmdUC,iKn'graei0Usly extended his hand and ^claimed,
Rabbi, I will say hollo, and that's it." I am not here to intrude
upon an individual's privacy, and would have graciously taken leave
as there are numerous Jewish patients where I can expect a heartier
welcome. However, a Talmudic injunction came to mind at this
point: "Follow every request your host makes except the one in
which he says "go." Intuitively, I sensed there was more to come
and so I graciously sat down, and strangely, he did too.
The man then spewed forth: "I am angry with God!" (he spoke
onutbturstYiddiSh)' PCrhaPS hC MW WM DOt takeD aback ** his
The shtetl Jew says: "If God would have lived in the shtetl, they
would have broken his windows!" In these days it is good to see
a Jew who is not indifferent to God, but has some feelings for him
pro or con.
f He then changed his theme and tone and spoke of how Jewish
his son was and how in his work he often has occasion to act as
a lay rabbi. He went on to say how he looked forward to Passover,
for then his "Jewish" son would come to visit and lead a real tradi-
tional seder.
The conversation continued and he told me that at the delicate
age of 11, God has taken his father from him and that he was
till very angry. Since then he has very rarely entered any syna-
gogue. I explained to him that he may have missed a great many
spiritual joys and warm opportunities for friendship because he
had estranged himself.
I wonder how many of us are like my slightly-confused patient
not only denying our closeness with Judaism, but actually missing
out on its many goodies because of some frozen anger or other
excuse.
f To put it in terms of the book, I mentioned, "The Masks Jews
Wear," it's time to doff our masks as Jews.
sans and wage earners, were tax-
ed at rates wildly beyond their
ability to pay. Through the
spring and summer of 1943 the
continuing arrests, seizures, and
deportations were almost all of
non-Muslims, the majority of
whom were Jews. With the de-
cline of German power, a law
was passed (1944) releasing all
defaulters still detained and can-
celling all amounts still unpaid.
After the end of the war, the
Judaica relates, the general situ-
ation improved. In 1968 the eco-
nomic situation of Turkish Jewry
was good. There were few under-
privileged since most of the
needy had settled in Israel soon
after its establishment. Minor
persecutions of Jews in Istanbul
occurred, however, through ten-
sion between Turkey and Cyprus,
during the anti-Greek riots in
1955 and 1964, and during the
Six-Day War. The Turkish gov-
ernment, having established dip-
lomatic relations with Israel, tried
to quell mob violence. Anti-Sem-
itism though prohibited by law,
has not been erased and is dis-
guised as anti-communism.
How were the Danish Jews
rescued during the Holo-
caust?
For almost three and a half
years, from the day of Denmark's
occupation by Nazi Germany on
April 9, 1940, the nearly 10,000
Danish Jews and Jewish refugees
were not molested. The Danes,
while collaborating with the Ger-
mans in the so-called policy of
negotiation, simultaneously ex-
tended full political, social, juri-
dical, and personal protection to
the Jews and their property. The
behaviour of the Danish authori-
ties and the population was so
steadfast that the Germans did
not think it profitable to injure
the Danish Jewish population, the
Encyclopaedia Judaica states.
Things changed when Ger-
many, on Aubust 28,1943, abolish-
ed the Danish-German agree-
ment. In September 1943 martial
law was declared. The represen-
tative of the German Reich, the
Nazi. Werner Best, advocated
using this opportunity to deport
the Jews. The attache for ship-
ping affairs, F. G. Dukwitz, who
maintained good relations with
leading Danish Social Democrats,
informed them of the impending
danger for the Jews. His warning
was quickly spread by Danish
citizens, organizations and by the
Jews themselves, and overnight
a rescue organization sprung up
that helped 7,200 Jews and about
700 non-Jewish relatives escape
to Sweden in less than three
weeks. Danish captains and fish-
ermen carried out this operation.
What began as a spontaneous
popular movement was developed
into an organized action by the
Danish resistance movement. The
cost of the transfer amounted to
about 12 million Danish crowns,
of which tae Jews themselves
paid approximately 8^4 to 7 mil-
lion. The rest was provided out
of private and public Danish con-
tributions.
During the night of the per-
secution (October 1-2, 1943) and
following it, less than 500 Jews
were seized by the Germans.
They were sent to Theresienstadt
and remained there until the
spring of 1945. when they too
CANDIELIGHT1NG TIM!
30 NISAN 7:22
5
were brought to Sweden by the
action of the Swedish Red Cross
headed by Count Bernadotte.
Upon their return from Sweden
to Denmark at the end of the
war, most of the Jews found their
property intact, the Encyclopae-
dia Judaica says.
It may be estimated that ap-
proximately 120 people perished
because of the persecution: about
50 in Therc;ienstadt and a few
more in other camps. Close to the
same number committed suicide
or were drowned on their way to
Sweden. Less than 2 per cent of
the Jewish population of Den-
mark perished.
Denmark, during the Holocaust,
was a beacon that the rest of
Europe should have followed .
but did not so that the Holocaust
came to represent the European
attitude toward Jews and the
humane love of the Dane for
their fellowmen was simply a
benevolent postscript in a brutal
and inhuman time.
Great Jewish Personalities
The Lion Of Safed, Isaac Luria
By DR. MAXWELL BERGER
Temple Samu-EI
Safed is the northern most
city in Israel and the highest.
It sits atop the mountain range
of upper Galilee, 2,700 feet above
sea level.
In the century following the
Jewish Expulsion from Spain
this little town became the seat,
and fountain-head of the Kab-
balists, a small but potent group
of pious scholars who devoted
themselves to the regeneration
of the Jewish Oral Tradition,
and delved into esoteric doc-
trines and sought to fathom oc-
cult lore and interpret Jewish
mysticism.
One of the key figures who
personified these tendencies was
Rabbi Isaac Luria, who was re-
garded as the founder of the
school of pratical Kabbala.
His brief life of only 38 years
(1534-15721 is encrusted with
layers of legend. He was dedi-
cated to the pursuit of the spirit-
ual and his students and dis-
ciples revered him as the ideal
of spirituality. They called him
Adonenu, Our Master.
The letter 'A," ana the initials
of Rabbi Isaac form the word
ARI. which is the Hebrew for
"Lion." He was thus known as
"The Lion" and his students
were known as the "Gurei H'ari
The Young Lions." The letter
"H" was added to his name to
stand for "Ha-ElobJ the di-
vine," and he has since been
known as Ha-Ari.
In the heart of Safed stands
the Ha-Ari Synagogue as a liv-
ing shrine wnere one can visual-
ize this saintly scholar surround-
ed by his disciples gathering for
prayer and engaging in mystical
discourses on the secrets of God
and His hidden meanings.
Isaac Luria was born in Jeru-
salem in 1534. His father. Solo-
mon Ashkenazi, who had emi-
grated from Germany, died at
a very early age and Isaac was
sent to Cairo to be brought up
by an uncle. He was a brilliant
student and became a Talmudic
authority in his teens. Although
he was groomed to engage in
his uncle's pepper and grain
business, the rising trend of
mystic studies intrigued him.
When he was about 22, he
withdrew to a small island in
the Nile near Cairo. There he
lived alone for the next 13 years
visiting his family only on Sab-
baths and holidays. He was en-
grossed in the study of all con-
temporary Kabbalists, with par-
ticular emphasis on the Zohar
which had then just recently
been published.
The Zohar, as a commentary
on the inner and hidden mean-
ings of the Bible, has been de-
scribed as a mixture of theo-
sophic theology, mystical psy-
chology, myth and poetry. Old
gnostic doctrines, mystical tradi-
tions, theurgic speculations, pop-
ular superstitions and mytho-
logical motifs dwell side by side
with echoes of Neo-Platonic and
Aristotelian philosophic theories
about the nature of the Cosmos
and about the relationship be-
tween a transcendant God and
a finite world. ^ ..
Long periods of seclusion "and
contemplation nurtured his flex-
ible imagination and he began
to believe that he had commu-
nication with Elijah, who on
numerous occasions explained to
him the difficult passages in the
Zohar.
He believed that in his sleep
his soul engaged in discourses
with the ancient Talmudic Sages
in Heaven. His disciples attrib-
uted to him supernatural knowl-
edge, the power of performing
miracles, the ability to exorcise
demons, and a knowledge of the
languages of the trees, the birds
and the angels.
In 1569, Luria responding to a
"divine call" settled in Safed
which had become a center of
Kabbalistic mysticism. Instantly '
he was surrounded by a coterie
of disciples and colleagues who
eagerly awaited his lectures and
interpretations. Among them
were Solomon Alkabetz, Joseph
Caro, Moses Cordevero, Hayim
Vital, Moses Zacuto and Moses
Hayim Luzatto.
Although Luria himself wrote
virtually notning save for a few
poems and Sabhath hymns in
Aramaic, most of his theoretical
Kabbala was published by his
students as notes taken from his
lectures and discourses.
These ideas spread throughout
every country of the Diaspora,
their cosmic drama of Exile and
Redemption caught the imagina-
tion of the masses as well as the
scholars. Elements of the Lu-
rianic Kabbala lay behind the
messianic claims of Shabbetai
Zevi in the 17th century, and
behind Chassidism, the revival-
ist movement stemming from
Israel Ben Eliezer, Baal Shem
Tov, in the 18th century.
Rabbi Isaac Luria, Ha-Ari
The Lionthe legendary giant
in Jewish tradition and Jewish
literature, died in Safed in 1574.
He was buriedalong with Rab-
bi Joseph Caro, and the other
Talmudic luminaries of the 16tb
century, in the cemetery on the
slope below the Art Synagogue,
facing Meron, the shrine of Rab-
bi Shimon Bar Yochai, the au-
thor of the Zohar.
I
XI
4
:


April 11, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 13
IINDLIN
hat If Israel Shunned Talks at Geneva?
Continued on Page 13
o for Gerald Ford, that wit,
1 savant, whose impatience
|s Kissinger's.
to this Nelson Rockefel-
nterviewed on Air Force
i his return flight from the
funeral and the Vice
lent's talks with Anwar
Arabs, he was surprised to
\er, were not as pessimistic
expected despite those
fold Israelis. They were still
lul. the petrobillionaire
have us know in a message
his fellow-petrobillionaires.
EN TO return to the origi-
esis: Suppose they gave
a. and Israel didn't attend?
er all, the Ford-Kissinger
impatience with an "intransi-
gent" and "stubborn" Israel is all
the scenario the Russians and
Arabs need to be stubborn and
intransigent in equal and oppo-
site directions. Why should Is-
rael attend?
Would the United States join
the Soviets, the only bargainer
that really counts, in punishing
Israel? That depends upon what
one means by punishment.
Even given the growing sense
of isolationism seizir. the
American Congress, and particu-
larly with respect to Israel the
palpable development of anti-Is-
rael feeling based on the real-
politik of oil and exoressed in
classical anti-Semitic terms, I can
not conceive of a cut-off imposed
on Israel in the same way that
the Congress is imposing a cut-
off on Southeast Asia.
MOST PEOPLE may not under-
stand the subtle distinction be-
tween Maoism and Muscovite
Communism, but they know as a
practical matter that what is at
stake in the Middle East is the
ascendancy of the latter, not the
former.
(That is why we are abandon-
ing Southeast Asia, which is fall-
ing victim to the formerthe Ma-
oists. Not only do we not popu-
larly understand that each is
equally dangerous, but in fact the
legacy of the Nixon years is that
we have com.e to regard the Ma-
oists as the latter-day Noble Sav
trusalem Mum on Ford Anger
age undeserving of the reserve
between ourselves and the Mus-
covites. In fact, detente with the
Maoists is part of what the Ford
administration sees as unfinished
business to which he must get
down quickly If only those
damned Israelis would do just
exactly what Kissinger tells them
to.)
Furthermore, a diminished and
mortally-threatened Israel would
be a greater danger to Europe
than any single selfish inwardly-
turned European nation, includ-
ing the elegant French, can pos-
sibly imagine at this time.
AND ALTHOUGH some Euro-
peans may prefer to see the U.S.
out of Europe, it is a matter of
American security that at least
some U.S. presence in Europe
DAVID LANDAU
IUSALEM (JTA)
ll sources here were
il not to react to news
resident Ford's inter-
in Hearst newspapers
uch he blamed Israeli
isigence for the failure
:retary of State Henry
ssinger's latest Mideast
/ately, officials tended
[>e that Kissinger's news
rence last Wednesday
in Washington in which he
carefully avoided apportion-
ing blame represented a
more up-to-date and more
balanced U.S. official posi-
tion.
THEY NOTED that Ford
had given his interview Mar.
24, before Kissinger's press
conference and when the
President was reportedly
highly angered and upset by
the failure of the shuttle ef-
fort. They ventured to hope
privately that Washing-
ton might since then have
cooled its wrath.
Some well placed sources
here saidagain in private
briefings that Geneva is
not necessarily the sole av-
ailable option at this stage.
They mentioned "proximity
talks" as a possible alter-
native, noting that when
during the Kissinger shuttle
the prospect of failure was
aired, the possibility of
"proximity talks" was rais-
ed.
>ars Marked Final Farewell
kEL AVIV(JTA)Secretary of State Henry A Kis-
could scarcely hold back his tears as he bid Premier
Rabin a somber farewell at Ben Gurion Airport.
\he Secretary was returning to Washington after his
lys of tireless "shuttle" diplomacy failed to achieve
}nd-stage agreement between Israel and Egypt in Sinai.
Kissinger's first acknowledged diplomatic failure in
liddle East.
[is voice choked, as he told the Premier, before re-
|s and television cameras, that today was a sad day
le United States which has invested so much effort
Jope in moving the Middle East closer to peace; and
day for Israel which needs and wants peace so very
llN SHOOK Kiisingers
nd told the Secretary that
convinced that he had
lore than any human being
io toward "o. inging peace
| region.
aid he was sorry the ef-
IJ not yield the wished for
[and that the talks between
Jnd Egypt have been sus-
^dd?d that he honed and
that despite this set-
|rdations between Israel
United States, based on
ly elements of friendship
|mmon interests, will re-
iharmed.
INGER, in return, thank-
kin for the hospitality ex-
po him. He noted that the
{an and Israeli negotiators!
together for the past two |
|in their traditional spirit'
adship.
aid the goal of bringing
fill not oo given up. and
will continue to con-
to a just and lasting
8n the area, to give the
(people here the right to
knout war.
iger praised Rabin's, wis-
conducting the talks and
lication toward the goal of
going to the airport for
| leave-taking, Kissinger
paid a courtesy visit on former
Premier Golda Meir at her Tel
Aviv home. After 65 minutes of
private talks with Israel's elder
stateswoman, Kissinger emerged
from her flat smiling.
MRS. MEIR told reporters
later that she and Kissinger
talked as friends, as they always
have. She said that after listen-
ing to his report of the past two
weeks of negotiations she fully
backed the Rabin government's
decision not to yield to Egyptian
demands.
Most Israelis seemed to share
Mrs. Meir's view, at least for the
time being. They learned of the
collapse of the talks in the wee
hours of thp morning.
The weather was hot and stifl-
ing, one of the warmest pre-
Passover nights on record. Doors
and windows were open all over
Tel Aviv and radio and television
sets were on, mostly broadcasting
pop music from Europe.
It was well past midnight when
a news flash interrupted the reg-
ular proarams to announce the
failure of the negotiations.
ISRAELIS WERE told that
their government had been pre-
pared to give up important po-
sitions to the Egyptians if only
the latter would formally re-
nounce belligerency. They were
told that as an alternative. Israel
had offered a smaller withdrawal
in Sinai for a less far-reaching
political undertaking.
But Cairo rejected all. If Is-
mayed by the ominous turn of
raelis were saddened and dis-
events, they were, "doves" and
"hawks" alike, solidly behind
their government's decision.__
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NOT be killed. Israel is a major
factor in this regard.
There is, of course, always the
tax-exempt status of UJA against
which the Congress can turn, but
that kind of blackmail would
work in too many non-Jewish di-
rections as well, and could hard-
ly get oft the ground short of the
emergence of a frank, selective
political American anti-Semitism.
In sum, for America to join
Ruiua in punishing Israel under
any circumstances would be for
America to punish America, as
well, although that viewpoint may
not be eminently clear in the be-
fogged American congressional
consciousness yet.
Hence. Israel might well con-
ceive of ignoring Geneva. The
Romans mav have already staked
out the arena, and may indeed
have their well-oiled lions at the
ready, but at least for the mo-
ment the necessity for Israel to
submit to being eaten is less ur-
gent than we may think.
Israel Recruiting Additional
U.S. Educated Social Workers
1
After the recent successful
completion of a one year orienta-
tion program for qualified Amer-
Israel, recruitment for a second
course is under way.
The program is intended for
candidates who hold a Master's
degree in social work and are
planning to settle in Israel. It
will begin in Netanya, located on
the Israeli coastline next Septem-
ber, and participants will enjoy
special benefits and partial pay
during the ten month course.
Israel has hundreds of job
openings for social workers at
present The supply of graduates
from Israeli universities does not
meet the need. This special
orientation program is aimed at
filling the pressing shortage.
The first four months of the
study program will be devoted to
intensive study of the Hebrew
language. Concurrent with the
Hebrew studies, lectures will be
offered on Israel's society, po-
litical make up. cu'.tural set up.
economy, demography and social
ican educated social workers in
services.
Participants will go on field
trips in order to get acquainted
with social services facilities.
Meetings will also be arranged
with potential employers and par-
ticipants will be offered a choice
of field placements. In the fifth
month, participants will be eased
into the social services in the
areas.
All participants will enjoy the
benefits offered to new immi-
grants including the right to re-
quest a long-term, interest-free
loan for travel to Israel. Success-
ful completion of the course will
guarantee a position.
Registration and further infor-
mation may be obtained at the
regional Israel Alivah Centers.
In Miami contact Eliezer Kroll
at the Israel Aliyah Center, 4700
Bisr-svn" B'vd.
lempte 3etitt
WemoticU
CjazcUnt
The only all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call: cSv*-.' r\
9?0-8225 or writ*: ^iv'J.l
TEMPLE BTH EL /?.*,:*.3
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above.
NAME: ,----------------------------------------------------------------
ADDRESS:
PHONE:


Page 14
The Jewish Flondian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, April 11, 1975
c
\tu \^*alcndar
omnium
FRIDAY, APRIL 11
Carnival, Temple Beth Shalom, sponsored by the Men's Club.
SATURDAY, APRIL 12
Carnival, Temple Beth Shalom, sponsored by the Men's Club.
SUNDAY, APRIL 13 -
Carnival. Temple Beth Shalom, sponsored by the Men's Club.
Breakfast Program: "What Chance Does a Jew Have in the
Christian World." sponsored by the Brotherhood
Temple Beth El9 a.m.
Dinner Jewish National Fund- Temple Beth Shalom 6
p.m.
Israeli Film FestivalJCC8 p.m.
MONDAY, APRIL 14
Gold Patroness LuncheonHallandale Chapter of Hadassah
the Eden Roc Hotelnoon
TUESDAY, APRIL 15
Senior Friendship ClubTemple Beth ShalomAssembly
Hallnoon
THURSDAY, APRIL 17
Temple Israel of Miramar Sisterhood "Light Up Miramar"
annual show8 p.m.
SATURDAY, APRIL 19
Fun Feast DinnerTemple Sold, sponsored by Sisterhood
6 p.m.
SUNDAY, APRIL 20
Miramar Chapter of Pioneer WomenFlea MarketMira-
mar Recreation Center10 a.m. till 4 p.m.
MAJOR GENERAL CHAIM HERZOGTEMPLE SINAI
7:30 p.m.
MONDAY, APRIL 21
National Council of Jewish WomenDiscussion meeting-
Home Federal Building, Hallandalenoon
TUESDAY, APRIL 22
Senior Friendship Club of Temple Beth Shalom Assembly
Hallnoon
Hollywood Chapter of HadassahMeeting of Great Jewish
Books and IssuesHome Federal Building, Hollywood
1 p.m.
Israeli Statement
On Breakdown
JERUSALEM(JTA)"The talks that were intended
to initiate a movement toward a peaceful settlement be-
tween Israel and Egypt have been suspended. From the
early stages of the negotiations, Israel stated its readiness
to evacuate the Gidi and Mitla Passes and the Abu Rodeis
oil fields in return for a renunciation of the state of war
by Egypt. Egypt refused to renounce the state of war and
insisted that it continue.
"Nevertheless, Israel offered, in return for a less bind-
ing political undertaking, to withdraw its forces from the
present disengagement lines, including thp western part
of the strategic passes, the Mitla and the Gidi, and to trans-
fer them to United Nations control. Israel also offered to
transfer the oil fields to Egyptian administration. This of-
fer was rejected as well by Egypt. This rejection by Egypt
led to the suspension of the talks.
"Israel remains ready as always to persevere in its efforts to-
ward a settlement with Egypt and will continue to maintain the
closest contacts with the U.S. government toward this end. Israel
extends its dee;> gratitude to the U.S. government and particularly
to Secretary of State iCissinger for his untiring efforts in the cause
of peace."

State Department Statement
JERUSALEM (JTA)State Department spokesman Robert
Anderson issued the following statement on behalf of Secretary of
State Henry A. Kissinger:
"We have been seeking in response to the desires of the parties
to help them achieve a further step towards a peace settlement.
We believe both sides have made serious efforts to reach a success-
ful outcome. Unfortunately, the differences on a number of key
issues have proven irreconcilable. We tnerefore believs a period of
reassessment is needed so that all concerned can consider how best
to proceed towards a lasting peace.
"Secretary Kissinger has accordingly informed the parties that
he is suspending his present efforts and returning to Washington
to report to the President and the Congress on the negotiations.
He will remain in close touch with the parties and the cochairman
Religious
Services
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
(Coneervative). 418 NE 8th Avs
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz. Canto*
Jacob Danzlaer.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
6INAI iTempIo) of NORTH DAD
18801 NE 22nd AVe. nWWrfn. HrtW
Ralph P. Kinaaley. Cantor Irving
Shulkea.
NORTH BROWARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON
GREGATION. Liberal. S801 Unlvar.
aity Or. Rabbi Max Waits.
------------
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER, 8751
N.W. 57th St., (Conservative) Rab-
bi Milton J. Gron.
HOLLYWOOD
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
(Orthodox). 3891 Sterling Rd.. op.
poaite Hollywood Mills High School
President Or. Frank Stain.
m
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1381 t>
14th Avs.. Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffa. Assistant Rabbi Harvey M.
Roaenfeld.
BETH SHALOM (Tempts) Conasrva-
Mve. 4801 Arthur St- Rabbi Morton
Malaveky, Cantor irving Gold.
TEMPLE BETH S.HM (Conaervatlvs)
810 SW 82nd Avs.. Hollywood.
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal). BOm
Thomas St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Rob-
art Frazln.
TEMPLE Str'AI (Conservative). 120x
'shnaon St Rabbi David Shapiro
Asaociate llabbl Chain) 8. Listfleld
Cantor YtNiat Hellbraur-
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal! 5100 Sher-
idan St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Robert
Frazin. 41-C
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Conservative)
8920 SW 86th St. Raool Avrom
Orazin.
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES (Conserve
tlve) 1900 N. Univeraity Dr.. Pem.
broke Pinea. Rabbi Aaron Shaoero.
Bar Mitzvah
RICKY WEINSTEIN
Ricky Weinstein, son of Mrs.
Sally Bailey, will be Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday, April 12, at Tem-
ple Beth El.
ft ft ft
HVMAN HALPERT
Hyman, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Saul Halpert, will be Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday. April 12, at Tem-
ple Sinai.
^
-:

rV
LISA VEINGRAD
Lisa, daughter Of Mr. and Mrs.
Moiton Veingrad, will be Bat
Mit/.vah Friday. April 18. at
Temple Sinai.
ft a ft
STEVEN S< hwartz
Steven, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Kenneth Schwartz, will be Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, April 19, at
Temple Sinai.
ft ft ft
ADRIAN NE ROSS
Adrianne Ross, daughter of
Mrs, Pat Portlier, will be Bat
Mitzvah Friday, April 11, at
Temple Israel of Miramar.
Golden Horn
Residents
Raise $7,000
The residents of Golden Horn
North and South responded to the
needs of Israel by raising over
S7.000 at an affair to benefit
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward, Inc.
Mm ray Lefson, Bob Bank and
Shirley Kahn were largely re-
sponsible for the organization of
this major function, which took
place in the Golden Horn North
building.
The guest speaker was Dr.
Arieh Plotkin, Haganah veteran,
who spoke on the needs of the
state of Israel.
"The people of the "Golden
Horn buildings joined hands
with their brothers and sisters
in Israel by responding in such
an excellent manner," said Mr.
Lefson.
meichels
by .NORM A BAH AM

y^^^^^^^^^r',v^^^v^^ Attention noodle kugel lovers! Here's' a chance to trim the
calories a little. Serve it hot.
CHEESE KUGEL
1 pound medium noodles cup sugar
6 extra large eggs
1 pound carton low-fat
cottage cheese
1 stick margarine (melted)
4 cup sugar substitute
(powder)
1 tsp. salt
Cook noodles according to package directions: add margarine,
eggs, cheese, sugar, sugar substitute, salt and raisins. Mix well.
Pour into well-greased 9x 13-inch pan. Bake at 350 degrees about
50 minutes or until top is browned.
Potatoes are a good value now, as we constantly hear in
radio commercials and can see for ourselves on our supermarket
shelves. So the time seems appropriate to give you a recipe for
a good potato sidedish. Eat 'em while they're cheap. This recipe
comes our way courtesy of the Idaho Potato Commission, which
has a great interest in our consumption of this vegetable.
CARROT-STUFFED BAKED POTATOES
4 Idaho potatoes H tsp. pepper
1 cup mashed cooked carrots 3 tbsps. milk
2 tbsps. grated onion 2 tbsps. butter
Hi tsps salt 1 egg
V* tsp. dried dill weed
(optional)
Scrub potatoes well, dry them and prick with fork. Bake in
425 degree oven 55 to 60 minutes, until soft. Immediately cut
slice from top of each. Carefully scoop out potato without break-
ing skin. Place potato in a large bowl. Add remaining ingredients
and beat until smooth. Pile potato mixture into shells. Bake in
350 degree oven 25 to 30 minutes. Yield: 4 servings.
Continuing with my series of recipes for Passover, I'd like
to bring you another one from the cookbook of the B'nai Amoona
Congregation Sisterhood in St. Louis, Mo., entitled "From Gen-
eration to Generation." Inquiries about the cookbook ought to
be addressed to the Sisterhood at 524 Trinity Ave., St. Louis,
Mo. 63130. ,
MATZO KUGEL
3 matzos 1 tsp. cinnamon
4 eggs 1 tsn. salt
2 cups milk '? cup seedless raisins
h* cup sugar 1 cup sliced apples
Break matzos into small pieces; soak in cold water for 5
minutes and drain. Beat eggs and add milk, sugar, cinnamon,
salt, raisins, apple slices and drained matzos. Mix weft. Pour
into lightly buttered IH quart casserole. Set casserole in a
shallow pan of water and bake at 350 degrees for one to 1"4
hours or until a knife inserted comes out clean.
Here is a truly economical and different main dish for the
kosher cook. It feeds five people for about $1. It does need time
to prepare, though it is easy.
"HAM" BURGERS
1 cup milk
2 tbsos. chopped onion flakes
1 beaten egg
1 tso. water
'; cud matzo meal
oil
1 3-oz. package of textured
vegetable protein (ham
flavoredthough there is
no ham in the product)
3 tblsps. margarine
4 cud flour
'_ tsp. salt
Cook vegetable protein according to package directions. Cool
and set aside. Melt margarine and mix it in the flour. Then add
salt and milk to flour and cook over medium fire .stirring until
thick. Let mixture cool. Add vegetable protein and onion flakes
to the flour mixture. Chill about l' hours.
Mix egg and water. Shape chilled mixture into patties. Dip
the patties first into egg mixture and then into matzo meal. Fry
in hot oil until brown on both sides. Makes 10 patties. Can be
served on bun.
Chicken, chicken. Everybody is always looking for something
different to do with chicken. So what've you got to lose? Try
this chicken recipe on for size.
CHICKEN A LA KIEV IN CORN FLAKES CRUMBS
4 whole chicken breasts '2 tsp. thyme
(about 14 ozs. each) 3 tb*r>s. margarine
1 stick parve margarine 2 medium eggs
1 tsp. freeze-dried chives 1 tbsp. water
1 tsp. salt 2:i cud corn flake crumbs
Cut breast in half. Carefully remove skin and bones. Place
each half of breast between waxed paper and pound gently until
flattened very thin. Cut margarine in half and then cut each half
into four parts lengthwise, getting 8 small sticks. Chill.
Combine chives, salt, thyme. Sprinkle an equal amount of
the seasoning over each piece of flattened chicken breast. Place
a margarine stick on edge and roll tightly, folding in sides to
enclose margarine and make a firm tight roll. .Fasten with
skewers and chill.
Beat eggs and water slightly. Dip chicken rolls in egg mix-
ture, drain and roll in corn flake crumbs. Arrange in shallow,
well-greased baking pan. Bake in oven for 30 minutes at 450
degrees or until chicken is tender and lightly browned. Makes 4
to 8 servings.
'*'"


* : h nmmmwmmmnam mm\
MMmMAMMHMriu:r mmimmm>mmmmmmmmmmimmKmmmmitmmmimmrm
itler's Plot to Kidnap Pope is Traced to Source in Kurzman Book
Jerusalem
)PE PIUS XII's failure to protest against the Nazi
deportation of Jews from tl\e holy city of Rome
i\( is accountable to his fear of being kidnapped by
SS and c^ the Vatican being occupied by the Ger-
Ins and its treasures and holy relics carried off.
This thesis is developed with strong documentary
Id other corroboration-- in a new book by ace re-
irtT-turned historical-novelist. Dan Kurzman, "The
re for Rome," published by Doubleday and Co.
KURZMAN, author of the popular "Genesis 1948"
(the foundation of the State of Israel, was formerly
|op ranking roving correspondent for "The Washing-
Post." He is currently in Israel researching for his
Let book, a detailed account of the Warsaw ghetto
pising.
"The Race for Rome" took Kurzman three years
|rc;earch and write. While dialogue and description
vividly written, they are carefully credited in foot-
les and addenda.
Kurzman explained that he was anxious to avoid
criticism or allegations that he had "created" dia-
ueas were levelled against him by some review-
of "Genesis 1948," quite wrongly, he says.
JDavict
^L^anJaii
THE HITLER plot to kidnap the Pope is authenti-
cated by interviews Kurzman conducted with SS Gen-
eral Karl Wolff, now living quietly in Germany after
serving a 20-year prison term.
Wolff recalled from his own contemporary notes
the day Hitler called him from Rome to the Nazi HQ
in September, 1943, and ordered him to prepare a plan
to occupy the Vatican and kidnap the Pope.
Wolff says today that though he obeyed the order
to plan the assault, he would never have actually car-
ried it out. Kurzman writes, too, that other top Ger-
man generals and officials serving in Italy had their
grave doubts about the wisdom of Hitler's planamong
them Ambassador Ernst von Wiezsaecker.
This, however, did not prevent the Ambassador
from pointedly hinting at the "violent reaction" that
could be expected from Hitler, both against the Jews
and against the Church, if he (the Ambassador) were
to relay to Berlin the protest which thc.Vstican sought
to make in October, when the SS began rounding up
the Jews of the Roman ghetto.
KURZMAN dramatically describes how a sympa-
thetic Italian Princess. Enza Pignatclli, told the Pope
at his dawn mass of the deportation of the Jews of
Rome, how the Pope expressed his shocked incredulity,
how he ordered his Secretary of State. Cardinal Mag
tione. to protest lo Germany, how the Cardinal met
with Ambassador Von Wiezsaecker with the thought
uppermost in both their minds being Hitler's known
desire to kidnap the Pope and occupy the Vatican
when, and if, the opportunity presented itself.
The Secretary of State expressed the Pope's protest
at the deportation, and then agreed to the envoy's
unprecedented diplomatic suggestion: that he not con-
vey the Papal protest to Berlin.
Pius' relations with the occupying Germans im-
proved thereafter, with the Pope asking for, and re-
ceiving, additional units of German police to guard the
Vatican.
l'i!m>lll"!!ft

I '."I
IMMMMHInivi ,!
MHM Ml mMMMM
Ml
\Uoff
Rabbi and Priest
Conduct Seminar
m I
TE THE Vatican's persistent refusal to recognize the State
srael, at least among American Catholics and Jews the liai-
pens and widens. In New York, in a broadly publicized
ie rector of St. Patrick's Cathedral, Msgr. James F. Rigney,
spiritual leader of Temple Emanu-El, Rabbi Ronald B.
exchanged pulpits to mark the beginning of a year of
between members of their faiths.
hardly-noticed event conceived in Washington, two Cath-
Jewish clergymen have gone farther and perhaps even
ectively.
ABBI and a Jesuit priest led a three-week seminar in Is-
the years-end for 16 Georgetown University students
nts. Jews, Catholics or of no faith at all.
seminar, sponsored by Georgetown, a Jesuit institution,
ration with the Jewish Agency's Department of Education
ure. was conducted by Rabbi A. Nathan Abrahamowitx,
ington's Tiferetfa Israel Congregation, and .the Rev. Wil-
McFadden, SJ.
teach theology at Georgetown. Ft hwhideslvisits to Jeru-
ericho, Bethlehem and the Dead Sea.
discussion at the university, six of then* spoke of their
ces that articulated in direct, honest- terms what many
itors may recognize as their own unexpressed feelings.
Bob Quinn, of Manhasset, N.Y., a senior in business
Iration, after referring to the visit as "rne of the best
(ve ever done educationally," observed: "It (Israel) is just
of a contrast with what we're used to. A real awakening.
mmitment to somethingto live even, almost. We're just
hines. We den't think of things too much and they're
think of things every' day."
ORDING to Mike Meotti, of Glastonbury, Conn., a senior
breign Service School where he is majoring in interna-
lizes, the people of Israel have "a very determined feel-
are things they have to do and they're going to do them.
By are facing a lot of worlds opposition and violent opposi-
leir closest neighbors. It's a tough task but I found among
pie there they seem ready to do it, and want to do it
tferent, unlike the who-gives-a-damn attitude in this coun-
I refreshing and dynamic feeling."
>(v CHARLES, of Baldwin. N.Y., a sophomore in business
7~~--- ation, put it th,u way: "The main reason I wanted to go
a coticerned member of the American Jewish community
to try to guage the attitude of the people there especially
If the events of the Yom Kippur War and since then and
y changed from the post-1967 euphoria that definitely was
roughout the country to the kind of somber impression I
the American press exists in Israel right now.
nd the Israeli people seem to be totally and unquestion-
ated to preserving the State of Israel," Charles added.
socalled Masada complex which exists is definitely prev-
ughoat the country.
LT they're justified in feeling that way because every
f the country seems willing to sacrifice the greatest gift
ich is life in the hope that the country will be pre-
think also that the Israeli people are just remarkable
the fact that they live under this constant pressure and
4' don't show it on the outside."
en Grieb, of Alexandria, Va a junior majoring in gov-
emarked she was "not interested in the shrines" but in
and's archaeology and history and to see modern Israel,
ery definitely unique in the world," she said. "The whole
me a very good feeling... the spirit that Israel and
to me, Jerusalem, have, a city that the inhabitants really
eryone in the group really learned to love it, no mat-
rd the stones were to walk on."
vJewisHUridHar} Friday, April 11, 1975
w
tiwVV
$m
*^eumc>ur 5*
X-iCO
man
Christianity, Synagogs
And the Jews Today
^ ROY ECKHARDT is a Methodist clergyman
who is a friend of Jews and Israel. His book
"Your People, My People" (New York, Quad ran
gle Books, $8.98, 275 pp.) is his recent attempt
to advance Jewish-Christian understanding. The
Pope and the Vatican secretariat would be well
advised to read it.
The author traces the history of Church anti
Semitism inspired by New Testament sources and
times to the post -Holocaust era.
BE STRESSES that the integrity of Chris-
tianity is involved unless there is a sharp de-
lation in Christian theology and attitudes. He
appeals for Christian penitence. His chapters
"Toward Authenticity" and "Deeds," are excel
toot springboards for true Jewish-Christian dia
Re affirms that Christian anti-Zionism and
even handed ne*s represent anti-Semitism in a new
form. He states that, "The serious daagcr in
-preachments stressing Arab rights is a strengthen-
ing of those forces and interests that are beat
upon the destruction of the Jews of Israel" .
ORBIS BOOKS, of Man-knoll. New York,
have published several books that present in
teresting views.
Among these are "The Jewish Jesus," by
Robert Aron. $4.95, 183 pp.); "Rich Church-Poor
Church," by Enzo Gatti ($4.95, 127 pp.); "African
Bedfellows Make Strange
Politics in Modern World
1 OOKING NOW in sorrow upon the fall-out
from recent explosions in the United Nathim
General Assembly and UNESCO, one is hurt most
of all to note Americans of stature upholding
those Third World politicians who defile and
putrefy the agencies of international cooperation
Dr. Benjamin Spock, who has counseled so
often against violence, now scolds our UN Am
bassador John A. Scali for speaking out against
the tyranny of the new majority in the UN, a
majority extending an unprecedented welcome to
the Palestine Liberation Organization's leader
through-murder, Yasir Arafat.
ROGER N. BALDWIN, who at 91 is honored
for his unending battles against totalitarian fore
es, astounds his friends by declaring that the
General Assembly, having recognized the PLO,
is now closer than ever to functioning "as a uni-
versal agency for mankind."
Homer A. Jack, secretary general of the
World Conference on Religion and Peace, de-
clares he is ashamed of Ambassador Scali and
mutters that the United States "hardly has clean
hands in this controversy."
By their rationalizations and sophisms, this
trio now offer proof of an old judgment: "The
default of the best is the worst of defaults."
Traditional Religion." by E. Bolaji Idowu ($5.95,
228 pp.); "Biblical Revelation and African Be
liefs." ed. by K. Dickson and Panl Ellingworth
($5.K>, 191 pp.): and "African Culture," by Ayl-
ward Shorter ($6.50, 225 pp.) ...
"The Jewish Jesus" is a biography of Jesus
gleaned not so much from Christian sourcas as
from Jewish sources and prayers which the au-
thor asserts shaped the life of the man.
WHILE ONE can differ from much of the
Christian Interpretation in the book, the render
ing of the Jewish liturgy and Aron's appeal for
the use and understanding of prayer is one that
shonld be heeded.
Irtowu's book has many scholarly pages de-
fining religion and its study as well as a surfeit
of other definitions of religious terms. "African
Traditional cV-ligion" doos not discuss the many
different religions sects er faiths in the Dark
Continent but primarily the basics of religion and
tome of the commonalities among the different
beliefs. .
TBB ITALIAN theologian. Eneo Gatti. takes
the Catholic Church to task for not embracing the
poor to a much greater extent. He appeals for
Christianity to elevate deeds above liturgy.
His theology is Christ-oriented, and conse
quently his interpretations of the Bible and the
post-Jesus era are clouded by this factor.
ert
Ocaa/
0*
ONE OF the stated purposes of the UN,
clearly spelled out in its charter, is "to be a
center for harmonizing the actions of nations in
the attainment of (certain) common ends"
those objectives including the achievement of
international cooperation in solving problems of
an economic, social, cultural, or humanitarian
character.
When a president of the General Assembly
for the first time in the body's history uses that
high post for political advantage, when represen-
tatives of the Arab-Asian-African bloc arbitrarily
try to legislate the State of Israel out of exis-
tence, how can Americans like Spock, Baldwin,
and Jack justify their contribution to the schem-
ing, offensive activities of the new majority?
LET DR. SPOCK and Messrs. Baldwin and
Jack eoj-ider for a moment one of the Third
World bloc's excuses for banning Israel from
UNESCO European regional membership. What
was Israel's transgression?
Well, her renowned archeologists and engi-
neers had been altering the historic features of
Jerusalem. Israel's search for artifacts annoyed
Arab*. In that instance. Israel halted the digging
in deference to the Moslems.

<'


Page 16
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, April n, 19?J
If
the next
ffSSP=5
You are about to find out
why a tire you never heard of
is the best tire for these times
)
Radically new. Radically different.
The only radial with steel sidewalls.
The MM. All-Steel Radial is the world's first
all-steel radial tire for automobiles. It's the
most economical tire you can own. Because of
the radial design, you get more miles per gallon
of gas than from either bias or belted bias
tires. Because of the exclusive I.R.I. All-Steel
construction, you get thousands of extra miles
out of the tire itself. We believe the result
is the lowest cost per mile of driving from any
kind or any brand of tire on the market today.
Our engineers believe the I.R.I. All-Steel
Radial drives safer, rides more comfortably,
steers more precisely and responds surer
than any other tire you can buy at any price.
We guarantee them for 50.000 miles. What's
more, Norton is so sure you'll find these
the finest tires you've ever. had that if you
are not satisfied at any time within 90 days,
we will refund your purchase price in full.
No tricks. No hidden charges.
But, boil it all down and
you've got three basic
tire types to consider.
I. BIAS
2. BELTED 3. RADIAL
1. BIAS TIRES
Two. (our or sometimes even more plies (or
layers) of material cross under the tread at an
angle or bias to the center line ol the lire. Generally
the cheapest tire to buy.
2. BELTED TIRES
Similar to the bias tire with the addition of two
or more belts of material that run around the tire
under the tread This combines a bias sidewall
with increased tread stability and improved
tread lite.
3. RADIAL TIRES
Offer the most desirable features Cords of
material run from sidewall to sidewall crossing the
tread at 90 degrees Two or more belts of material
also run around the tire Price per tire is higher,
but cost per mile is lower.
Buying tires is tough enough.
You almost need an engineer's education to
understand tire advertising these days. There
are bias and belted and radial types. F-78's
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AVAILABLE ONLY AT
NORTON
SINCE 1924
TIRE CO
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2. Two belts of special filament
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3. Double steel protection here.
The only passenger tire with steel
on both sides of the bead
for sure-fire responsiveness.
4. All-weather computer-designed
tread.
The strongest radial is an all-steel radial.
The I.R.I, is the only all-steel radial
automobile tire.
Conventional, so-called steel radials. put steel
to work beneath the tread only. One or two
belts of steel run the circumference of the tire
and fabric or fiber cords are used radially
sidewall to sidewall. The conventional steel
radial tire is only a steel-belted radial. This is
important in understanding the superiority of
an I.R.I. Ail-Steel Radial.
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Full Text
I April 11, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 13
IINDLIN
hat If Israel Shunned Talks at Geneva?
J Continued on Page 13
to for Gerald Ford, that wit,
1 savant, whose impatience
|s Kissinger's.
to this Nelson Rockefel-
Interviewed on Air Force
pn his return flight from the
funeral and the Vice
ent's talks with Anwar
i Arabs, he was surprised to
|er, were not as pessimistic
expected despite those
I old Israelis. They were still
ful. the petrobillionaire
have us know in a message
his fellow-petrobillionaires.
SN TO return to the origi-
Jhesis: Suppose they gave
ML and Israel didn't attend?
ler all, the Ford-Kissinger
impatience with an "intransi-
gent" and "stubborn" Israel is all
the scenario the Russians and
Arabs need to be stubborn and
intransigent in equal and oppo-
site directions. Why should Is-
rael attend?
Would the United States join
the Soviets, the only bargainer
that really counts, in punishing
Israel? That depends upon what
one means by punishment.
Even given the growing sense
of isolationism seizir the
American Congress, and particu-
larly with respect to Israel the
palpable development of anti-Is-
rael feeling based on the real-
politik of oil and exoressed in
classical anti-Semitic terms, I can
not conceive of a cut-off imposed
on Israel in the same way that
the Congress is imposing a cut-
off on Southeast Asia.
MOST PEOPLE may not under-
stand the subtle distinction be-
tween Maoism and Muscovite
Communism, but they know as a
practical matter that what is at
stake in the Middle East is the
ascendancy of the latter, not the
former.
(That is why we are abandon-
ing Southeast Asia, which is fall-
ing victim to the formerthe Ma-
oist*. Not only do we not popu-
larly understand that each is
equally dangerous, but in fact the
legacy of the Nixon years is that
we have come to regard the Ma-
oists as the latter-day Noble Sav
rusalem Mum on Ford Anger
age undeserving of the reserve
between ourselves and the Mus-
covites. In fact, detente with the
Maoists is part of what the Ford
administration sees as unfinished
business to which he must get
down quickly if only those
damned Israelis would do just
exactly what Kissinger tells them
to.)
Furthermore, a diminished and
mortally-threatened Israel would
be a greater danger to Europe
than any single selfish inwardly-
turned European nation, includ-
ing the elegant French, can pos-
sibly imagine at this time.
AND ALTHOUGH some Euro-
peans may prefer to see the U.S.
out of Europe, it is a matter of
American security that at least
some U.S. presence in Europe
|y DAVID LANDAU
IUSALEM (JTA)
Hal sources here were
x\ not to react to news
resident Ford's inter-
in Hearst newspapers
lich he blamed Israeli
isigence for the failure
:retary of State Henry
Issinger's latest Mideast
|vately, officials tended
pe that Kissinger's news
rence last Wednesday
in Washington in which he
carefully avoided apportion-
ing blame represented a
more up-to-date and more
balanced U.S. official posi-
tion.
THEY NOTED that Ford
had given his interview Mar.
24, before Kissinger's press
conference and when the
President was reportedly
highly angered and upset by
the failure of the shuttle ef-
fort. They ventured to hope
privately that Washing-
ton might since then have
cooled its wrath.
Some well placed sources
here saidagain in private
briefings that Geneva is
not necessarily the sole av-
ailable option at this stage.
They mentioned "proximity
talks" as a possible alter-
native, noting that when
during the Kissinger shuttle
the prospect of failure was
aired, the possibility of
"proximity talks" was rais-
ed.
>ars Marked Final Farewell
fEL AVIV(JTA)Secretary of State Henry A Kis-
could scarcely hold back his tears as he bid Premier
Rabin a somber farewell at Ben Gurion Airport,
["he Secretary was returning to Washington after his
^ys of tireless "shuttle" diplomacy failed to achieve
jnd-stage agreement between Israel and Egypt in Sinai.
Kissinger's first acknowledged diplomatic failure in
liddle East.
lis voice choked, as he told the Premier, before re-
rs and television cameras, that today was a sad day
ke United States which has invested so much effort
|ope in moving the Middle East closer to peace; and
day for Israel which needs and wants peace so very
HN SHOOK Kissinger's
Mid told the Secretary that
convin;ed that he had
lore than any human being
[dj toward 'o.inging peace
region.
feaid he was sorry the ef-
d not yiivd the wished for
and that the talks between
land Egypt have been sus-
(addd that he honed and
pd that despite this set-
relations between Israel
United States, based on
my elements of friendship
Dmmon interests, will re-
(nharmed.
INGER, in return. thank-
Jin for the hospitality ex-
to him. He noted that the
tan and Israeli negotiators |
together for the past two
in their traditional spirit |
kndship.
Isaid the goal of bringing j
jwill not oe given up, and j
i-S. will continue to con-1
to a just and lasting
i" the area, to give the
people here the right to I
|ithout war.
linger praised Rabin's. wU- \
conducting the talks and '
iication toward the goal of
going to the airoort for
|1 leave-taking, Kissinger
paid a courtesy visit on former
Premier Golda Meir at her Tel
Aviv home. After 65 minutes of
private talks with Israel's elder
stateswoman. Kissinger emerged
from her flat smiling.
MRS. MEIR told reporters
later that she and Kissinger
talked as friends, as they always
have. She said that after listen-
ing to his report of the past two
weeks of negotiations she fully
backed the Rabin government's
decision not to yield to Egyptian
demands.
Most Israelis seemed to share
Mrs. Meir's view, at least for the
time being. They learned of the
collapse of the talks in the wee ,
hours of thp morning.
The weather was hot and stifl-
ing, one of the warmest pre-
Passover nights on record. Doors
and windows were open all over
Tel Aviv and radio and television
sets were on, mostly broadcasting
pop music from Europe.
It was well past midnight when
a news flash interrupted the reg-
ular programs to announce the
failure of the negotiations.
ISRAELIS WERE told that
their government had been pre-
pared to give up important po-
sitions to the Egyptians if only
the latter would formally re-
nounce belligerency. They were
told that as an alternative. Israel
had offered a smaller withdrawal
in Sinai for a less far-reaching
political undertaking.
But Cairo rejected all. If Is-
mayed by the ominous turn of
raelis were saddened and dis-
events, they were, "doves" and
"hawks" alike, solidly behind
their government's decision.
rAI.MER'S
MIAMI MONUMENT COMPANY/1 .
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NOT be killed. Israel is a major
factor in this regard.
There is, of course, always the
tax-exempt status of UJA against
which the Congress can turn, but
that kind of blackmail would
work in too many non-Jewish di-
rections as well, and could hard-
ly get oft the ground short of the
emergence of a frank, selective
political American anti-Semitism.
In sum, for America to join
Ki' i;i in punishing Israel under
any circumstances would be for
America to punish America, as
well, although that viewpoint may
not be eminently clear in the be-
fogged American congressional
consciousness yet.
Hence, Israel might well con-
ceive of ignoring Geneva. The
Romans mav have already staked
out the arena, and may indeed
have their well-oiled lions at the
ready, but at least for the mo-
ment the necessity for Israel to
submit to being eaten is less ur-
gent than we may think.
Israel Recruiting Additional
U.S. Educated Social Workers
After the recent successful
completion of a one year orienta-
tion program for qualified Amer-
Israel, recruitment for a second
course is under way.
The program is intended for
candidates who hold a Master's
degree in social work and are
planning to settle in Israel. It
will begin in Netanya. located on
the Israeli coastline next Septem-
ber, and participants will enjoy
special benefits and partial pay
during the ten month course.
Israel has hundreds of job
openings for social workers at
present The supply of graduates
from Israeli universities does not
meet the need. This special
orientation program is aimed at
filling the pressing shortage.
The first four months of the
study program will be devoted to
intensive study of the Hebrew
language. Concurrent with the
Hebrew studies, lecture1! will be
offered on Israel's society, po-
litical make up. cu'.tural set up,
economy, demography and social
ican educated social workers in
services.
Participants will go on field
trips in order to get acquainted
with social services facilities.
Meetings will also be arranged
with potential employers and par-
ticipants will be offered a choice
of field placements. In the fifth
month, particioants will be eased
into the social services in the
areas.
All particioants will enjoy the
benefits offered to new immi-
grants including the right to re-
quest a long-term, interest-free
loan for travel to Israel. Success-
ful completion of the course will
guarantee a position.
Registration and further infor-
mation may be obtained at the
regional Israel Mirah Centers.
In Miami contact Eliezer Kroll
at the Israel Aliyah Center, 4700
Bi 4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
Umptt 3etk(
OftemotioC
Cjazdens
The only all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call: '.y^'-Y'l
920-8225 or write: i;-Y.Tv,l
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Please send me literature on the above.
NAME: ___
ADDRESS:

PHONE:


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Page 12
The Jewish Flondian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, April 11, 197$
Us
xxxxtul flag*
.. tun -. ..-.-... ,~i. lu>-jujiii)e no Do
co-ordinated'by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
< V: cp^difors
Dr..AAax A. Lipschit*

Rabbi Barry Altman
ll-'*i
1lf"> ,11 1 -" *'' JUKI --'- ia IU.JH1UI16 iiu ns u"i*
devoted to discussion of themes and issuesrelevant to Jewish life past and present
.tjhMmia 'i tibia
K^fnsldc judal
By Dr. Frederick t.arhman
Executive Editor
Encyclopaedia Judaica
What is the status of Jews
in Turkey?
In 1969, says the authoritative
Encyclopi.-dia Judaica, there
were 35-40,000 Jews in Turkey,
nearly all Sephardim. of whom
30,000 lived in Istanbul. Ashken-
azim, called "Poles" by the Turks
because of the 17th and 18th
century immigration from Po-
land, accounted for 3-5 per cent
of the Jews. German-speaking
Ashkenazim who arrived later
from Austria formed the elite of
the community, and the Great
Synagogue built by them became
known as the "Austrian Temple."
After the death of the last of-
ficiating Rabbi (1944). the con-
gregation went into a decline and
was in danger of complete dis-
integration.
The older generation of Seph-
ardic Jews continued to speak
Ladino. In The 1955 census, 64
per cent among the Jews declar-
ed that their mother tongue was
Yahudice (Ladino) compared
with 84 per cent in 1927, but
knowledge of Ladino is decreas-
ing. There are about 200 Karaite
families (1.000 people) living in
a suburb of Istanbul whose fore-
fathers settled in the city in
Byzantine times, ot recognizing
the Talmudic-Rabbinnical tradi-
tion, they established their own
aica
synagogue and cemetery and are
completely separated from the
rest of the community.
The peace treaty of Lausanne
(July 24, 1923) followed by the
abolition of the caliphate, assur-
ed the minorities living in Tur-
key their personal status as pro-
vided by their religious canons.
The Turkish republic was declar-
ed a secular state, and Kemal
Ataturk, its founder, attempted
to erase all signs of the religious-
institutional influence of Islam
and also to maintain equality of
Christianity and Judaism in pub-
lic life. The wearing of a "cler-
ical garb," for example, was pro-
hibited. For Jews the prohibition
on teaching Hebrew in schools
was a hard blow. After Ataturk's
death in 1938, many of the pro-
hibited. For Jews, the prohibition
eased, but the general attitude
toward the religious minorities
remained unchanged.
Nevertheless, says the E/J,
Jews remained second-class citi-
zens in Turkey, like Greeks and
the Armenians. This was demon-
strated during World War II, as
Hitler's propaganda gained
ground and it seemed that the
Axis Powe" were moving toward
victory. To meet wartime needs
in neutral Turkey, a capital tax
was approved (1942), and it soon
became apparent that the tax-
payer's assessment was based on
his religion and nationality. In
fact, the poorest among the non-
Muslims, especially Jewish arti-
Issues And Answers...
Our Rabbis' Views
Your Yiddishkeit Shows
By RABBI HAROLD RICHTER, Jewish Chaplain of Broward
to. A ?" m0!ltI,S ag0' Dr" Eugene Browitz, noted Jewish educa-
tor, wner and lecturer wrote a book entitled, "The Mafks S
Wear In It, the author states his belief that most of us are really
more Jewish than we would be willing to admit. It is a "new twist-
to the American Jew's dilemma and a theme that came to mind
when I thought of a strange visit to a Jewish patient in a Broward
County hospital.
In the incident which I am about to relate, the patient after
mRyabbh.efli,mdUaC,i0Kn'ngraCi0USly eXtended his hand and exclaimed,
Rabbi, I will say hello, and that's it." I am not here to intrude
upon an Individual', privacy, and would have graciously taken leave
as there are numerous Jewish patients where I can expect a heartier
welcome. However, a Talmudic injunction came to mind at this
point: "Follow every request your host makes except the one in
which he says "go." Intuitively, I sensed there was more to come
and so I graciously sat down, and strangely, he did too
The man then spewed forth: "I am angry with God!" (he spoke
onutburstYiddiSh)' PCrhaP8 hC "* W8S DOt takeB aDack with his
The shtetl Jew says: "If God would have lived in the shtetl, they
would have broken his windows!" In these days it is good to see
a Jew who is not indifferent to God, but has some feelings for him
pro or con.
He then changed his theme and tone and spoke of how Jewish
his son was and how in his work he often has occasion to act as
a lay rabbi. He went on to say how he looked forward to Passover,
for then his "Jewish" son would come to visit and lead a real tradi-
tional seder.
The conversation continued and he told me that at the delicate ,
age of 11, God has taken his father from him and that he was
still very angry. Since then he has very rarely entered any syna-
gogue. I explained to him that he may have missed a great many
spiritual joys and warm opportunities for friendship because he
had estranged himself.
I wonder how many of us are like my slightly-confused patient
not only denying our closeness with Judaism, but actually missing
out on its many goodies because of some frozen anger or other
excuse.
To put it in terms of the book. I mentioned, "The Masks JewB
Wear," it's time to doff our masks as Jews.
sans and wage earners, were tax-
ed at rates wildly beyond their
ability to pay. Through the
spring and summer of 1943 the
continuing arrests, seizures, and
deportations were almost all of
non-Muslims, the majority of
whom were Jews. With the de-
cline of German power, a law
was passed (1944) releasing all
defaulters still detained and can-
celling all amounts still unpaid.
After the end of the war, the
Judaica relates, the general situ-
ation improved. In 1968 the eco-
nomic situation of Turkish Jewry
was good. There were few under-
privileged since most of the
needy had settled in Israel soon
after its establishment. Minor
persecutions of Jews in Istanbul
occurred, however, through ten-
sion between Turkey and Cyprus,
during the anti-Greek riots in
1955 and 1964, and during the
Six-Day War. The Turkish gov-
ernment, having established dip-
lomatic relations with Israel, tried
to quell mob violence. Anti-Sem-
itism though prohibited by law,
has not been erased and is dis-
guised as anti-communism.
How were the Danish Jews
rescued during the Holo-
caust?
For almost three and a half
years, from the day of Denmark's
occupation by Nazi Germany on
April 9, 1940, the nearly 10,000
Danish Jews and Jewish refugees
were not molested. The Danes,
while collaborating with the Ger-
mans in the so-called policy of
negotiation, simultaneously ex-
tended full political, social, juri-
dical, and personal protection to
the Jews and their property. The
behaviour of the Danish authori-
ties and the population was so
steadfast that the Germans did
not think it profitable to injure
the Danish Jewish population, the
Encyclopaedia Judaica states.
Things changed when Ger-
many, on Aubusl 28,1943, abolish-
ed the Danish-German agree-
ment. In September 1943 martial
law was declared. The represen-
tative of the German Reich, the
Nazi, Werner Best, advocated
using this opportunity to deport
the Jews. The attache for ship-
ping affairs, F. G. Dukwitz, who
maintained good relations with
leading Danish Social Democrats,
informed them of the impending
danger for the Jews. His warning
was quickly spread by Danish
citizens, organizations and by the
Jews themselves, and overnight
a rescue organization sprung up
that helped 7,200 Jews and about
700 non-Jewish relatives escape
to Sweden in less than three
weeks. Danish captains and fish-
ermen carried out this operation.
What began as a spontaneous
popular movement was developed
into an organized action by the
Danish resistance movement. The
cost of the transfer amounted to
about 12 million Danish crowns,
of which tfle Jews themselves
paid approximately 6'4 to 7 mil-
lion. The rest was provided out
of private and public Danish con-
tributions.
During the night of the per-
secution (October 1-2, 1943) and
following it, less than 500 Jews
were seized by the Germans.
They were sent to Theresienstadt
and remained there until the
spring of 1945. when they too
were broucht to Sweden by the
action of the Swedish Red Cross
headed by Count Bernadotte.
Upon their return from Sweden
to Denmark at the end of the
war, most of the Jews found their
property intact, the Encyclopae-
dia Judaica says.
It may be estimated that ap-
proximately 120 people perished
because of the persecution: about
50 in There-ienstadt and a few
more in other camDs. Close to the
same number committed suicide
or were drowned on their way to
Sweden. Less than 2 per cent of
the Jewish population of Den-
mark perished.
Denmark, during the Holocaust,
was a beacon that the rest of
Europe should have followed .
but did not so that the Holocaust
came to represent the European
attitude toward Jews and the
humane love of the Dane for
their fellowmen was simply a
benevolent postscript in a brutal
and inhuman time.
Great Jewish Personalities
The Lion Of Safed, Isaac Liiria
CANDlELrGHTMG TIME
30 NISAN 7:22
f
By DR. MAXWELL BERGER
Temple Saimi-El
Safed is the northern most
city in Israel and the highest.
It sits atop the mountain range
of upper Galilee, 2,700 feet above
sea level.
In the century following the
Jewish Expulsion from Spain
this little town became the seat,
and fountain-head of the Kab-
balists, a small but potent group
of pious scholars who devoted
themselves to the regeneration
of the Jewish Oral Tradition,
and delved into esoteric doc-
trines and sought to fathom oc-
cult lore and interpret Jewish
mysticism.
One of the key figures who
personified these tendencies was
Rabbi Isaac Luria, who was re-
garded as the founder of the
school of pratical Kabbala.
His brief life of only 38 years
(1534-1572) is encrusted with
layers of legend. He was dedi-
cated to the pursuit of the spirit-
ual and his students and dis-
ciples revered him as the ideal
of spirituality. They called him
Adonenu, Our Master.
The letter 'A," ano the initials
of Rabbi Isaac form the word
ARI, which is the Hebrew for
"Lion." He was thus known as
"The Lion" and his students
were known as the "Gurei H'ari
The Young Lions." The letter
"H" was added to his name to
stand for "Ha-Ebhi the di-
vine," and he has since been
known as Ha-Ari.
In the heart of Safed stands
the Ha-Ari Synagogue as a liv-
ing shrine wnere one can visual-
ize this saintly scholar surround-
ed by his disciples gathering for
prayer and engaging in mystical
discourses on the secrets of God
and His hidden meanings.
Isaac Luria was born in Jeru-
salem in 1534. His father. Solo-
mon Ashkenazi, who had emi-
grated from Germany, died at
a very early age and Isaac was
sent to Cairo to be brought up
by an uncle. He was a brilliant
student and became a Talmudic
authority in his teens. Although
he was groomed to engage in
his uncle's pepper and grain
business, the rising trend of
mystic studies intrigued him.
When he was about 22, he
withdrew to a small island in
the Nile near Cairo. There he
lived alone for the next 13 years
visiting his family only on Sab-
baths and holidays. He was en-
grossed in the study of all con-
temporary Kabbalists, with par-
ticular emphasis on the Zohar
which had then just recently
been published.
The Zohar, as a commentary
on the inner and hidden mean-
ings of the Bible, has been de-
scribed as a mixture of theo-
sophic theology, mystical psy-
chology, myth and poetry. Old
gnostic doctrines, mystical tradi-
tions, theurgic speculations, pop-
ular superstitions and mytho-
logical motifs dwell side by side
with echoes of Neo-Platonic and
Aristotelian philosophic theories
about the nature of the Cosmos
and about the relationship be-
tween a transcendant God and
a finite world.
Long periods of seclusion ind
contemplation nurtured his flex-
ible imagination and he began
to believe that he had commu-
nication with Elijah, who on
numerous occasions explained to
him the difficult passages in the
Zohar.
He believed that in his sleep
his soul engaged in discourses
with the ancient Talmudic Sages
in Heaven. His disciples attrib-
uted to him supernatural knowl-
edge, the power of performing
miracles, the ability to exorcise
demons, and a knowledge of the
languages of the trees, the birds
and the angels.
In 1569, Luria responding to a
"divine call" settled in Safed
which had become a center of
Kabbalistic mysticism. Instantly
he was surrounded by a coterie
of disciples and colleagues who
eagerly awaited his lectures and
interpretations. Among them
were Solomon Alkabotz, Joseph
Caro, Moses Cordevero, Hayitn
Vital, Moses Zacuto and Moses
Hayim Luzatto.
Although Luria himself wrote
virtually notning save for a few
poems and Sabbath hymns in
Aramaic, most of his theoretical
Kabbala was published by his
students as notes taken from his
lectures and discourses.
These ideas spread throughout
every country of the Diaspora,
their cosmic drama of Exile and
Redemption caught the imagina-
tion of the masses as well as the
scholars. Elements of the Lu-
rianic Kabbala lay behind the
messianic claims of Shabbetal
Zevi in the 17th century, and
behind Chassidism, the revival-
ist movement stemming from
Israel Ben Ellezer, Baal Sheiu
Tov, in the 18th century.
Rabbi Isaac Luria, Ha-Ari
The Lion the legendary giant
in Jewish tradition and Jewish
literature, died in Safed in 1574.
He was burledalong with Rab-
bi Joseph Caro, and the other
Talmudic luminaries of the 16th
century, in the cemetery on the
slope below the Ari Synagogue,
facing Meron, the shrine of Rab-
bi Shimon Bar Yochai, the au-
thor of the Zohar.