The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00115

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJewisti Flondliai m
and MIOI Alt OF GREATER HOIJLYWOOII
Volume 5 Number 7
Hollywood, Florida Friday, March 28, 1975
Two Sections
Price $1.00
K. Still on Diplomatic Shuttle;
'Difficult Period' Lying Ahead
JERUSALEM (JTA) Secretary of
State Henry A. Kissinger left for Egypt earli-
er in the week after delaying his departure
for two hours for additional talks with Israeli
leaders including Premier Yitzhak Rabin
with whom he had breakfasted privately.
He was back again in Jerusalem
Wednesday afternoon.
Kissinger commented to reporters that
the talks were "very good and constructive."
But it was apparent that a serious stalemate
has developed in negotiations for a second-
stage Israeli-Egyptian agreement in Sinai,
mainly over the political aspets of such an
accord.
ISRAELI SOURCES said bluntly that
they regarded the "substantial ideas" Kissin-
Continued on Page 11-A
Kissinger Rule Seen at End;
Richardson His Successor?
fa.
WASHINGTON The conviction is growing in lo-
cal political circles that Dr. Kissinger's term as Secre-
tary of State is rapidly drawing to a close. According
to these observers, Kissinger will resign even if he
achieves a success on his present Middle East mission.
Three possible successors are prominently men-
tioned: former Defense Secretary Melvin Laird, former
Governor of Pennsylvania William Scranton, and former
Attorney General Elliot Richardson.
ACCORDING TO the experts, Richardson is the
front running candidate. His views on the Middle East
are not too well known. In his former official capacities,
he failed to express any strong opinion on the subject.
As Attorney General, he closely followed the Ad-
ministration's line. Some political observers, however,
recall that when Richardson was still Undersecretary of
State, he played a role in the formulation of the "Rogers
Plan."
Washington's party-goers say that in private con-
versations Richardson was heard to remark that, in his
view, the creation of the State of Israel produced too
many problems. _____
ELLIOT RICHARDSON
odds on him
Gen. Herzog Guest at Sinai
Sunday, April 20. is the date set for the appearance of
Maj. Gen. Chaim Herzog, top political analyst who is reported
to be slated for the Israeli Ambassadorship to the United Nations,
at Hollywood's Temple Sinai.
Commencing at 7:30 p.m.. the talk by the famed TV military
commentator will be entitled "The Middle East and Today's
World."
A champagne reception-for patrons at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. Jerald Raticoff will follow the program.
....*!,!
^mm*mmmmmmmmmmmmHmmmmmmmMmmimm&
Passover Greetings
As we are aH aware, Passover is not just one of the
majoV events in Jewish Me it is symbolic of the very
I* begWrdng OfiJttWice nlf*eedom throughout the CWtfr
K ized VtoriA*Ai*'1?iifflP4>eomes imperative that each
generation of Jews regard itself as having been singu-
larly freed from bondage.
The Jews have fought for equity and freedom
throughout history. Today both justice and freedom are
endangered as perhaps never before and we the Jew-
ish community must muster every resource at our
command to withstand the forces that would destroy us.
This Passover, as we set aside the Cup of Elijah, let
us combine our motivations, our energies, our resources
to the future of not onlv the Jews, but of mankind.
HERBERT KATZ, President
Jewish Federation of South Broward
PASSOVER IS A
TIME OF GIVING
Lewis E. Conn, cochairman
of the 1975 Combined Jewish
Appeal Israel Emergency
Fund Campaign, has an-
nounced that every family in
the South Broward area wili
Be contacted for their 1975
contribution to the Combin-
ed Campaign during the
Passover season.
"Passover is a time of re-
membering our past and re-
living what happened to us,"
he said. "It is also a time to
help insure the future for
the Jewish people by con-
tributing the greatest amount
possible."
"Over 5,000 families have
already made their commit-
ments, but that is only 25
per cent of all the Jewish
families in South Broward,"
Melvin Baer, cochairman,
added. "Every Jew must be
counted, as WE ARE ONE."
Threats By PLO A Problem
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)- The
State Department has affirmed
that it took "very seriously" its
responsibility to protect individu-
als and foreign installations here
"including those of the govern-
ment of Israel" and also took
"very seriously" terrorist threats
against those targets.
State Department spokesman
Robert Funseth gave that assur-
ance in response to reports from
Damascus that the Palestine
Liberation Organization will
mount more raids on Israel along
the lines of the Savoy Hotel at-
tack a week ago and would
"strike at any Israeli target wher-
ever we can reach it, in Israel,
or in Japan or in the United
Slates."
THE THREAT was issued by
Zouheir Mohscn, head of the
PLO's military section and of the
Syrian-sponsored Al-Saiqa terror-
ist group. Mohsen was quoted as
saying that the raid on Tel Aviv
last week was intended to under-
mine Secretary of State Henry A.
Kissinger's current peace effort
which he claimed was aimed at
coaxing Egypt into a separate
agreement with Israel and split
ting it away from Syria and the
PLO.
Mohsen referred to Kissinger
as a "joker and charlatan."
Replying to a question by the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency,
Funseth said that "The U.S. gov-
ernment takes all such threats
very seriously."
ASKED WHAT precautions
were being taken, he declined to
go into specific measures but ob-
served that "Under international
law, it is the responsibility of the
U.S. government to protect our
foreign guests and official for-
eign installations, including those
of the government of Israel.
, '.,.,. '. U.i !-! ilji
NMMMMMM* "!i


Page 2-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, March 28, 1975
Arab Boycott Is
Condemned By ADL
The Florida Regional Office of
the Anti-Defam3tion League of
B'nai B'rith has pointed out that
any business enterprise or per-
son in Florida engaging in, aid-
ing or cooperating with the Arab
boycott will be violating the crim-
inal laws of the State.
In averting that such conduct
is "ur.An'erican and contrary to
our national interests." the
League declared th?t nrtici">a-
Hon in the Arab boycott would
be an un'a.wful restraint if trade
or commerce, constituting a
felony and caled unnn the States
Attorneys of Florida to Institute
ciminal proceedings u*>on evi-
dnce of m<4 ll'**el activities
coming to their attention.
THU LEAGUE also called MDon
the Attorney Genera' to institute
civil nrocoedings against comora
t'ins encasing in any asoect of
the Arab boycott. It was not"d
f'at the ?->na'ties rro>'id"d bv
Florida law include the forfeiture
of corporate charters.
George Bernstein, chairman of
ADI.'s r*giona> board, also called
V*nq Go' Rubin Askew and
slate reeulatory agencies to tske
affirmative steps to injure that
Fl rida banks and businesses do
not coooerite with- or become
victimized bythe Arab boycott.
ADL sent a telegram to Gov.
A'ke-v a=kins Him to "exert you-
moral leadership in the face of
/rib inspired bovcot's and h'ack-
miil. hv d"e'aring at this critical
moment what we know to be
your personal commitment to the
_ib"c poliev of the State of
F T'da. vhlak opposes such dis-
crimination.".
IN OTHER actions d-signed to j
inform and sensitive kv state
o'ficials to the Potential viola-
t:ons of Flor'da 'aw. the '.ag'i
h^s contacted the Secretary of
State's office. tS Department of
Pisinss Regulation and the
State Comotrolbr'= office, urgins
e-^v, ^i^-v to state in the clear-
est ncsible trms to the b-isi-
im and banks which th^v
re'ii'at" that cooperation with
Ar^b boTCOtt demands mav in-
vn've restraint of trade in viola-
tion of Florida 'aw.
Arthur Teitelbaum. ADL's F'or-
idi Rginnal director, said the
Lea'ue's action in Florida i in
r?cr-once to a continuma. nation-
,,;.!-. invnstjcation bv ADL which
is uncovering an increasing flow
of viden"e of widenread ivili-
!"""- = :n American ndmtrv
arrd banking circle* to be "secret
lrtors" in "an Arab riot to cut
I r:">' off fr m its oriiei->al all",
f-p r'-iit^d Stitjs an-1 to !-<>
Jews from fnnnaris doing busi-
I with the Arabs."
T ir the sake of illustration
T ite'baum cited several types of
"d:s-r'minatory business con-
spiracies." fostered bji the Asab
boycott which would be unlaw-
ful:
'n order to sel! services or
fo-di to Arab countries, the
r fu-al by cn U.S. company to
do business with a second U.S.
company, because the second
comnany is on the Arab blacklist
The discharge, demotion or
refusal to hire persons of the
Jewi-h faith in order to curry the
favor of potential Arab clients,
or as a condition of doing busi-
ness in Arab countries.
When an American bank, at
the request of a foreign buyer,
requires a steamship line to sub
mit Arab boycott compliance
forms before honoring letters of
credit (the forms certify that the
ships are not carrying goods in-
cluded on the Arab blacklist, do
not belong to an Israel or "an
Israeli subject," and will not slop
at an Israeli port).
TeiteJbaum noted that the Arab I
boycott is as much an issue for
Fl>ridians as it is for other
Americans throughout the coun-
try. He referred to the 1970 Saudi
Arabian blacklist released by
Sen. Frank Church, of Idaho,
which contained the names of
several Florida corporations.
HE ALSO cited the bivcott re-
lated danger from Arab imest-
mnts in the U.S. ind soecu'ation
that Arab Investor* are eyeing
opportunities in Florida.
"'We fear those investments
may be u-ed for political pur-
poses and might include condi
fons that are discriminatory to
.' w; ?nd non-Jew; who refuse to
h-> intimidated T^te^um S3id
"We be'ieve that the maiority of
.Americans wi 1 not submit to
that kind of blackmail."
Bernstein said th ADL had
also contacted the Florida State
Chamber of Commerce and. .he
Greater Miami Chamber of Com
merce, urging them to inform
th-ir members of the unlawful
aspects of the Arab boycott and
requesting Chsmber members to
forthrightlv reiect any Arab pres-
sures to submit to boycott de-
r--_-ds.
Two Programs For
Senior Adults
Planned By JCC
The Jew'sh Community Cen-
ters of South Florida has planned
two programs for Senior Adults.
Wednesday evening. Airi! 23.
Senior Adults wi'l see a produc-
tion of the clav "Company" at
the Univer itv of Miami's Ring
Theatre. They will leave Holly-
wood at fi-20 p.m. from the Cen-
ter's buildina. 2333 Hollywood
Blvd. Approximate time for ,-e-
turn to Hollywood will be 11 p.m.
C >st is S5.50 ner person.
A four dav pbne trin to Wash-
ington D C. is being planned for
May 1923
Th trip. iT-'uding hotel room
for three ntehte transfers to and
from airport baseaee hand'ing.
complete sightseeing of world
famous Washington buildings.
will eo-t $185 nor person (two
in a room); add $20 for a single
room. An immediate dPo=it of
$25 will assure a reservation foi
this program.
For more details call the Jew-
ish Community Center office at
320-2089.
Reduced Summer Camp Fees
Available Only Until April 1
An exciting program of mass
activities wiir highlight the sum-
mer camping program of the
Jewish Community Centers, serv-
ing youngsters in both South
Broward and North Dade.
All young people attending
camo this summer will parti-
cipate with hundreds of children
in the entire Dade and Browaxd
communities in a maccibiad fea-
turing track and field events,
swimming events, and many mon
fun activities.
In celebration of T'sha B'av,
the holiday commemorating the
destruction of the Tcm-ile. Haul-
over Beach will be turned over
to the Center Day Camp for a
masMve archaeological dte, cul-
minatfn" with te bui'ding of
the "Western Wall" and an ap-
propriate nngram memoria'i/ing
the destruction jf the Temple.
A third high.ight of the sum-
mer wi.l be tne second annual
Jewi h World's Fair, a massivj
carnival for all Fewish Commu-
nity Centers' campers and par-
ents. Each group will have a
booth. Special musical review;
will be presented bv fine arts
re ntcr campers and food will bi
availab'e.
A bible stories' parade through
the streets of North Dade and
South Broward will toe another
highlight of the summer in which
groups will prepare costumes and
floats dealing with bible charac-
ters and stories.
A birthday party celebrating
each child's natal day according
to the Jewish calendar will be
held during the summer, and
each camp session will end with
a show out on by the fine arts
center camoers and some of the
groups in the other camping pro.
grams.
An early registration incentive
prosram of reduced camp fees is
available only until April 1. For
information call the camp office
at 923-2089.
Koloctt'jst Program April 8
At its general meeting Tues-
day. April 8, at 8 p.m., the Sis-
terhood of Temple Sinai will
present Rabbi Chaim Listfield in
a special program on the Holo-
caust with USY'ers participating.
Mrs. Elliot Stein is in charge of
the event: the public is invited.
Refre hments will be served.

To Continue Increasing Our Service
To YOU and the Jewish Community
Of Greater Hollywood
tUemsti Floridian
a.i.l SIMM AM Asks That
"Every Reader Become A Subscriber
We Need YOU!...
If your subscription is now under the Federation
program ... We urge you to help defray costs and
purchase your own Please mail this coupon
today along with your check for $3.00 for one year.
2 year subscription $9.00
THE JEWISH FlORIDIAN i. SHOFAR
Of GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Circulation D# P.O. Box 012973
Miami, Florid* 33T01
YESI I want to p*v for mv own Subscription
Enclosed D $5.00 for 1 yo.r rj $o qo for i y..
.
u.
htmm
_ AdorMs ....... -* Kir.
City (Broward Area Only)

M-j/at/n H 3/38/T


i Friday, March 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 3-A
TRUST DEVELOPMtNT OFFICER
Ben Salter Appointed By
First National of Hallandale
Ben Salter, prominent attorney
and. outstanding leader in B-row-
ard County Jewish philanthropies
and civic activities, has been ap-
pointed Trust Development Of-
ficer of the First National Bank
of Hallandale, according to a
statement issued this week by the
banks board of directors.
Mr. Salter has practiced law in
Hollywood for more than 20
years specializing in estate and
trust planning. In his new posi-
tion, he will use his expertise in
these fields to aid bank patrons
in need of such services.
In the field of Jewish philan-
thropies. Mr. Salter is a past
president and canroaign chairman
of the Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion of South Broward and is cur-
rently a member of its board of
directors and its executive com-
mittee. He has also served as
president of Temple Beth Shalom
in Hollywood where.. he is cur-
rently* merobet.of,tfae board,.of
directors.
Mr. Salter was instrumental in
the creation of the Community
Relations Commission of Brow-
ard County and served on its
board and its executive commit-
tee for several years. He has
served as chairman of the Com-
munity Service Council of Brow-
ard County and as chairman of
the South Broward .'vision of
United Fund, and recently ac
cepted a position as a member
of the board of governors of the
areawide Council on Aging.
Born in New York City. Mr
Salter was educated at St. John
University Law School and is a
member of the American and
Florida Bar Associations and is a
past president of the South Brow-
ard Bar Association.
Women's Leadership Institute
Members Visit Douglas Gardens

Susan Singer (left) hosted a Feb. 7 coffee at her home
for this year's United Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency
Fund. Some IS women attended the function which ben-
efitted this year's Jewish Federation campaign. The
guests included Susan Chira and Carole Wyman (right)
Ben Salter, newly ap-
pointed Trust Development
Officer of First National
Bank of Hallandale.
Passover Youth Shabbat
Rabbi Chaim Listfield will con-
duct a special creative Passover,
USY Sabbath in his home Friday
beginning at 7:30 p.m. The young
people will lead songs and intro-
duce their own innovations in
prayer. There will be Israeli
dances and a special Passover
Oneg Shabbat.
Ina Linda. Joyce Newman,
Merle Schneider, Janet Bertman.
and Uene Weisberg, all members
of the Women's Leadership Insti-.
Hute 'spent- a day recently at
Douglas Gardens, the Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged
.ii Miami.
"In today's society wherein
longevity has become a way of
life, the Jewish aged must have
a place to live in a healthy and
happy environment. Douglas Gar-
dens is that environment" ob-
Beth El's Annual Meeting
Scheduled Sunday, April 20
The annual congregational
meeting of Temple Beth El mem-
bers has been scheduled for Sun-
day, April 20, at 7:30 p.m. Brief
reports will be presented, follow-
ed by election of officers and
board members for the coming
year.
Following the business meet-
ing, a new revue will be present-
ed by Cheryl Taylor and Com-
pany, famous song and dance
team, plus a piano recital. Re-
servations must be received no
later than Wednesday, April 16.
served Ilene Weisberg after the
trip.
I
"Women's leadership will bo
arranging othef tours, to Douglas
Gardens. Please contact the Jov-
ish Federation office if you are
interested. We will be limited to
eight women per tour" she said.
f
ILENE WEISBERG
Attention
Subscribers!
To all our subscribers who responded to our special
offer last month, mailing of gifts has been completed.
If you were qualified and did not receive your gift,
please notify our Office by phoning 373-4605. A tracer
will be instituted.
THE PUBLISHER
I
*
JM'S PASSOVER CANDY
BY BARTON .
FOR A SWEET ACCENT TO YOUR HOLIDAY
Delicious. JM offers a tempting array of Barton's
chocolates and baked specialties to enhance the
festive mood of your holiday entertaining. A sweet
idea for gift-giving. The enticing selection includes:
Chocolate Seder Mints, 9 ounce box, 2.45
Bartonettes Parve, 1 pound box, 4.25
Barton's Passover Assortment, 12 ounce box, 3.45
Barton's Parve Nuts and Fruits, 12 ounce box, 3.45
Macaroons, 12 ounce box, 2.50
Petit Fours, 8 ounce box, 2.45
Passover Surprise Bag, 6 ounce bag, 1.75
Fine Foods, at all stores
except lauderhill and pompano
It's a pleasure to shop with a jm credit card

!vl *v 1,1 ime ron o* rcAi*


i


Page 4-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, March 28, 1975
Vigilance NeededNot Fear
Word seems to be spreading in this area that Arab
petrodollar interests are about to do some buying into
Florida corporations.
This is of course significantly different from the
impact upon us of Arab petrodollars used to purchase
potential vacation sites for the super-privileged along
our southeastern seaboard.
In terms of existing corporations, the fear is that
the new Arab chiefs would bring with them new Arab
policies namely discriminatory practices against
Jewish personnel.
One word of optimism here is that our fears in this
matter are self-perpetuating and contribute in no small
measure to the rumors.
But even if the rumors turn out to be true, we wel-
come the Anti-Defamation League statement last week
that reminded Florida corporate structures that it is
against the law to enter into discriminatory hiring prac-
tices.
Welcome Black Statement
One of the unhappy side-effects of the growing
Israel-Arab crunch has been the disaffection between
American Jews and Blacks because American Blacks
have tended to identify with the politically utilitarian
policies adopted by the African nations toward Israel.
And so it is good to see from time to time respon-
sible Black opinion here calling the shots on an individ-
ual basis.
This has nothing to do with the traditional ties
that Jews had hoped to maintain with Blacks on the
basis of the long-standing Jewish role in the civil rights
struggle. On the contrary, it has to do with Blacks,
themselves, who see through the sham of identification
with the Arab cause on the basis of African pragma-
tism.
The Conference of Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations this week, in- its Middle East
Memo, points to an editorial in the Philadelphia Tribune
of Mar. 8.
The Tribune is a distinguished weekly serving one
of the largest Black communities in the nation.
Opines the Tribune: "The recent disclosure that
pressure from Arab countries, particularly Saudi Ara-
bia, has caused our federal government and several
large corporations to impose a pattern of anti-Semitism
on their policies is a disgusting development that is
diametrically opposed to everything this country is sup-
posed to stand for."
We could not have put it nearly so well ourselves.
That it comes from enlightened Black American opinion,
makes it all the- more heart-wanning.
An Oppressive Society
Representatives of the New York Medical Commit-
tee on Soviet Jewry and the Greater New York Confer-
ence on Soviet Jewry met Mar. 11 with World Health
Organization officials, including Dr. Stavios Malafoto-
poulos, director of WHO liaison at the UN, to discuss
the case of Soviet Jewish endocrinologist Dr. Mikhail
Stern.
The possibilities are slender here for obvious rea-
sons the UN is a captive and a puppet of Soviet
political ambition and is not likely to cross the Kremlin.
If nothing else, the meeting continues to emphasize
on the international stage of public opinion that *he
Soviets are as oppressive a society as one is likely to
find anywhere on earth.
Needed: A Dose of Pragmatism
^Jewish Floridiam
OTFICB and PLANT 110 N.E. th St, Miami. BTa. MM rhone 17J <*
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P.O. Box 297J. Miami. Plorum 33101
__ All PO. U7I returns are to be forwarded to
The Jewish Floridian. P.O. Box 012973. Miami. Ha. 3.1101.
WWD n mmxaurt jjl'za.nne shochvk jjelma m i-hompson
sxUior and Publisher Executive Editor Assistant to Publisher
The. Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kaahrvth
Of Tha Merchandise Advertised In Ita Colum.ia
Published Bi-Weekly by the Jewish Floridian
aerond-Claes Postaae Paid at Miami. Fla.
Jewlsh Federallon of South Broward, Inr. SHOFAR EDITORIAL
AL.VISOKV COMMITTEE Dr Sheldon Willena. Chairman; Roe, Be^.er-
man. Ben Salter. Marlon Nevlns. Dr. Norman Atkln. Robert N" Kerbel
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed tha Jewish I'nlty and tha Jewish Weekly.
M-mbrr o tne Jewsb Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndl.
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ociation of ftnfllian.jewish Newsoapers. ana the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year 5.00, Out of Town Upon
Request.
Volume 5
Friday, March 28, 1975
Number 7
16 NISAN 5735
ATLANTA Harvard Prof.
Dr. Richard Pipes and I
shared a ride here, and so I was
not at a'l surprised by t,he posi-
tion he took in an address be-
fore the Council of Jewish Fed-
eiations and Welfare Funds on
American Jews and the Middle
East.
Nor was I surprised at the
kind of response members of the
CJF Board gave him, having had
the same response from similar
positions I myself offered in this
column on frequent occasions in
the past in fact, as recently
as last week.
WHAT DID surprise me was
the frankness of his words. Off
camprs, and without benefit of
protective devices in the form of
professorial ambiguities other
academicians often adopt when
they stray from their home anil
last. Dr. Pipes on the contrary
made no effort to be popular.
He said what he had to say
straight out, and the result was
predictable. I could feel the hos-
tility in the banquet hall rising
against him.
Briefly, Dr. Pipes argued,
American Jews still suffer the
pangs of embracing a militarist
policy with respect to Israel at
the same time that they remain
unalterably opposed to U.S. in-
volvement in Southeast Asia
whether in Vietnam or even
now, as it appears likely, in
Cambodia.
/If STAKE in Vietnam, he
said, was the U.S. ability to deal
with guerrilla warfare waged by
villages (oppressed agrarian so-
cieties) against the cities (cen-
ters of the privileged politicos,
militarists and industrialists).
At stake in Israel, he said, is
not so much Israel herself, but
the geopolitical considerations
behind American supremacy in
the Middle East.
In Vietnam, the village-city
struggle was the guerrilla tac-
tic inspired by Mao Tse-tung in
the ultimate Red Chinese tri-
umph over Chiang Kai-shek's
Kuomintang.
THE AMERICAN involvement
there, in Dr. Pipes' view, was not
so much the shoring up of
Hanoi's corruption, as the lib-
erals who have organized them-
selves into a claque on this issue
wr>'iirl have it.
Rather, the American involve-
ment there was a stand taken on
a distant short to discourage sim-
ilar village-city struggles at
closer and tactically more dan-
gerous quarters.
"Like in Argentina, or perhaos
Mexico," Dr. Pipes declared,
leaving the door open for such
struggles to occur anyway in
some ominous future encounter
or series of encounter* because
by our s^nrldv effort in Vietnam.
we have discouraged nobody and
nothing. Quite the contrary.
IN ISRAEL, the ltTU**> is "t
so much for "that ovave ba*tiT
of democracv" as it is for our
claim to a vital role in the real-
politik of the irea.
Should I-rael go, so would we
go in an implosion setting the
Soviets upon the throne of Mid-
dle East ascendancy.
Now. there was noth-n? w*t*
ticularly brave or inslvhttu]
hout the second part of Dr.
Pipes' presentation.
But there was much thit is
very brave and very insightful
about the first Dart.
FOR THE truth tHl verv m"-\
and very painfully is thit
American Jews refuse to see the
para'll.
And while six months, a month,
even a week a?o American .Tws
se?n as Janus-like in their dove-
hawkWhness on this rsue was
lare-W academic, it no longer is
academic today.
Cambodia snails the diffrp"r><\
and the liberals arraved in their
I p'*"'!". who nrP--UTT>' to s-nolr f-^r
all Jews, are already vociferous
in their anti-involvement cam-
paign at t>e same time that
i'Ti aid to Israel, militarv
anj otherwise, la tci.u di
bWA
r;
Mindlin
on Capitol Hili.
DR. PIPES, who has connec-
tions in the military and govern-
ing circles of the Soviet Union,
as well as in the Pentagon and
Congress, assured the CJF Board
that both our defense people and
many key legislators are well
aware of the split in American
Jewish sentiment on this issue
and do not take kindly to it.
Chief of the Joint Chiefs Gen.
George Brown may or may not
be an anti-Semite. Dr. Pipes de-
clared, but his by-now famous
statement about American Jews
and their political power was
tempered in the acid of his angor
on this very questionthat Jew-
ish "liberalism'' is so selective.
In this sense, the statement it-
self had political and mi'itarv im-
plications far beyond its surface
anti-Semitism.
WARNED DR. Pipes: Gen.
Brown, and others like him, put
together the U.S. airlift to Is-
rael during the Yom Kinpur War
in record time and with an ef-
fectiveness that belied every im-
pediment put in the way of it by
our "allies" Britain, France,
West Germany, not to mention
the Russians and the Arabs,
themselves.
It was not Israel they were
supplying, but a tactical force in
an operation against the achieve-
ment of Soviet aims in the Med-
iterranean area.
But Gen. Brown, and the
others, see Southeast Asia iu-t as
fixedly. They make no distinc-
tions.
THEY THEREFORE do not
understand, for example, how
Sen Jacob Javits cently voted "the most intelli
gent man in the Senate," and of
course a Jew, could have under-
taken a trip to Havana to test
the waters for renewed U.S.-
Cuban relations, whose primary
beneficiary of such a dinlomatic
effort would be the Soviets.
Nor does Dr. Piper, who point-
ed to Cuba as one of the most
vicious enemies of Israel, with
which Sen. Javits would s :rely
agree in principle.
It is thi schizophrenia in th?
SEEN IN these terms, it we
can at the moment do little or
nothing to rectify the Kissinger
American Jewish elan that nvjt
be healed, as Dr. Pipes =ces it
AT STAKE in the Harvard
professor's view is the simple as-
sertion that if the C.6. cou'.d not
He trusted to keep its commit-
ments in Southeast Asia, how can
Jews hope to trust whatever com-
mitment America has in the Mid-
dle East toward Israel?
Apparently, the question of
our very survival as the ascen-
dant power in the Middle East
would then be insufficient to mo-
tivate Us to assure its continua-
tion in the face of the need of a
second resupplying of Israel
should another Yom Klppur-
tjfpa war break out.
His parting shot: "Though Mr.
Kissinger and I were colhaguei
at Harvard for many year-, and
though I have the utmost respect
for him, he made a tragic mis-
take in preventing Israel from
achieving a smashii.g victory in
the Yom Kippur War."
SPURRED BY the Kissinger
diplomacy, which exacis more
and more concessions trom l-rael
with liltlc or no real resolution of
the problems between Israel and
the Arabs, and which in fact is
contributing to the certaintv of
future Israel-Arab wars, the ul-
timate American position toward
Israel, the position beyond th
Kissinger years, is already in
formation now.
The Kissinger disaster has ac-
complished two things: (1) It ha3
taken out of Israel's hands Is-
rael's power to achieve a rap-
prochment between herself and
the Arabs without ultimate Sovi-
et involvement; (2) it has
ineluctably tied the prestige of
the U.S. presence in the Middle
East to a strong Israel, rather
than leaving each as a separate
and independent entity.
errors beginning with Oct. 22,
1973, other than to refuse to be
stampeded by the Soviet-Arab
propaganda that the Arabs are
unwilling to wait for a settle-
ment with Israel (that is to say,
that it must occur now or not at
all) we can at least do somethit*
to shape the design of future
dinlomatic or even military pos-
sibilities.
We can lay th- dove-hawk
masque of our reason to rest
once and for al'.
Needed. Dr. Pines urged, is a
marriage of convenience between
American Jews and the mi'itar-
ists who equate Israel and Cam-
bodia as necessary comoonents of
Ar"erinan foreign Dolicv abroad.
SINCE THAT is what I have
been ursing for years, the lib-
erals in their claque of no s not
withstanding, I could only ap-
r'-* him heartily.
Unhapoily at the CJF meting
here, the applause for Dr. Pipes
besides my own was sparse in-
deed.


Friday, March 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 5-A
Teen Scene
0
By PAIL liERBEL
- The surirme'r is )t'6t too far off
and many of us are planning our
summer vacations. Summer camps
galore, family trips cross country,
visits to your grandparents up
north, and skiing in the Swiss
Alps.
But for teenagers who are
searching for one of the most
exciting and fascinating experi-
i i, (- of their lives, "The Greater
.Miami High School in Israel" is
premier. The High School in Is-
rael takes five groups of about
40 high school students (mainly
11th and 12th graders) to Israel
each year for an intensive learn-
ing and growth experience for
an eight-week period.
The goal of the eight weeks'
experience in Israel is to ac-
quaint the average American
teenager (Jewish and Gentile)
th one of the most captivating
birthplaces of Western culture
zr.d civilization.
Ar~roximdi$iy 20 of the 48
Class days (six days per week)
include visits to sites of historical
or cultural significance. Fourteen
of the twenty days are half-day
ps, and six are overnight visits.
The program calls for 225 hours
of interdisciplinary study with
the history of Israel as the core.
\- the curriculum develops,
the elements of literature, arehae
o'.Ogy, cartography, geography,
irative religion, philosophy,
and political science are added
in a volatile mixture.
Prior to each site visit, its his-
tory, archaeology and literary
background are studied by stu-
dents and investigated in depth.
When I toured Israel in 1972,
' that was exactly it: a tour. Al-
though I visited many places, ex-
cept for very basic information
on that p^slicular site and cer-
tain places such as the Western
Wail and Yad Veshem for which
I had a "built in" feeling, I had
only a very shallow understand-
ing of the importance, meaning
and beauty of the ground under
my feet and the stones before my
eyes.
This unique program enables
us truly to find the gist of what
being a Jew is all about. We will
not only sec what la in front of
us. but we will be able to feel
it as well.
So far, the Greater Miami High
.School in Israel program loo''?
like all work and no "play." Al-
though classes take up many
mornings, on days when no trav-
eling is planned the afternoons
are free to study or to enjoy the
facilities of Beit Berl (the home
of the High School which is set
in a de.ightful rural campus
setting and which houses several
other high school programs both
for Israelis and foreign students
thus offering opportunities for
exposure to a variety of teenage
groups).
The facility is well developed
with academic buildings, dormi-
tories, libraries, recreational fa-
eilites. a large swimming pool,
canteen,, and leather dining hall.
The location and -^uoervision of
SthgpT-Arfsuch thatUie
f tfo group >gyer,
the
seAirj
cnftaflSWPt
Even during the Yom Kippur
War, the students were never in
any peril, and though they could
have returned to the United
States at anv time, they were able
to remain in Israel and complete
their program.
A summer in Israel provides a
greater education, understanding
and commitment to our people
as well as an awareness of who
we are and what it means to be a
Jew. than all of our years in He-
brew and Sunday school put to-
gether.
Besides the assets of the High
School program which I have al-
ready mentioned above, the
greatest secular asset is that
upon successfully completing the
High School program, one quali-
fies for 6 quin (or quarter)
credits.
Another word about each of*
the six subjects covered a .id com-
pleted: you will receive the same
amount of credit as if you were
in school for that same eiaht or
nine week period in time, which
means possible eany g.adualion
from high school. It might also
assist the college-bound student
in that a foreign study program
on your high school transcript is
very impressive and highly re-
garded by College Admissions
Boards of many coller.es.
The cost Of thi, eight-week
program is now approximately
$1,500. Scholarships are available
from the Jewish Federation, for
families in financial need.
"The Greater Miami High
School in Israel/' says Richard
Goldstein of the Miami Federa-
tion," shows promise of opening
a new pathway toward the goal
of Jewish survival based upon
intellectual as well as emotional
commitment.
"The Jewish community be-
lieves that it offers a viable ad-
dition to the avenues of Jewish
Education commonly available to
high school students. The pro-
gram tends to attract an elite
potential leadership group and
develops them within an emotion-
al and intel.ectual commitment
which will help to assure the fu-
ture of Judaism in the commu-
nity."
A student can appty for this
program through his'her high
school counselors or by calling
Robert Kerbel, executive director
of the Jewish Federation, 921-
8810, or Stephen Weinberg, ad-
ministrator of the High School
program at the Miami Federation,
576-4000.
This fascinating program is ac-
cepted by the School Board of
Broward County and if any prob-
lems should arise, please call the
Federation offices.
The Miami High School in Is-
rael is an "-experience you will
never forget, for it will be a part
of you for the rest of your life.
On Tuesday, April 8 (the 25th
of Nisan in the Jewish calendar),
Jews all over the World will cele-
brate Yom HaShoah Day in
Commemoration of the Holocaust.
This day is a recent addition to
the Jewish calendar and is still
in the state of development from
the point of view of rituals, lit-
urgy and customs.
There is not yet enough per-
spective on this commemoration
to know what to say about it or
how to respond to it. The event
itself is still too real to be sym-
bolic. However. I would like to
commemorate Yom HaShoah by
sharing with you a poem written
on April 6. 1942, by Pavel Fried-
man, a prisoner of the Theresicn-
stadt concentration camp, entitled
"The Butterfly:"
He was the last, truly the last.
Such ye.'lowness was bitter and
blinding
Like the sun's tear shattered on
stone.
That was his true color.
And how easily he climbed, and
' how high.
Certainly, climbing, he wanted
To kiss the last of my world.
I have been here for seven weeks,
"Ghettoized."
Who loved me have found me.
Daisies call to me.
And the branches also of the
wh'te chetnut in the yard.
But I haven't seen a butterfly
here.
The last one was the last one.
There are no butterflies, here,
in the ghetto.
L'hitraot...
\
CANDLELlGHTING TIMff
16 NISAN 7:16
f
USF To Open
New College
This Fall
Yom Israel Celebration Scheduled
In Young Circle Bandsheil April 27

By Special Report
SARASOTA Florida high
school seniors this year are being
offered one of the education bar-
gains in the country. Beginning
in September they can get the
same New College education that
cost students S3.100 this year for
the regular state university tui-
tion fee of apprjximatc.y $600.
This comes at a time when
mosi private colleges and uni-
veisiiies and many public uni-
versities around the country are
forecasting at least 10 per cent
increases in tuition for students
beginning next September.
All of this came about earlier
this year when the Board of Re-
gents of the State University Sys-
tem approved a set of agreements
that will make the young, inno-
vative New College a college
within the University of South
Florida beginning this fall.
What makes it possible to of-
fer what was an expensive, priv-
ate education to Florida students
at greatly reduced cost is the
willinsn^ss of the Board of Trus-
tees of New College to continue
to seek private funds to help sup-
port the educational program
even after it becomes a college
of the University of South Flor-
ida.
As a USF college. New College
will maintain the same facultv,
the same admissions, standards,
and the same educational nro-
gram that hac Drought natioial
recognition to it durinc its first
ten years of academic life.
Although New Co'lee has al-
ways been open to Florida stu-
dents, co-t has always ben a
laree factor for manv anp>irants.
"With the tuition at New College
next fall the Mite as that of at-
tending anv of the =tate univer-
sities colWe officials are e\-
pr< ing many more state stu-
dents.
Since the apDroval of the final
aereement by the Regents cam"
onlv in January. New Co'l-"*e ad-
missions staff are busy trying to
aeouaint Florida students and
high shcool counters with the
newest college within the State
University System.
Thev said that stM*nM t"v
talk with on their visits to high
schools around the state convince
them that there will be a great
interest amons young people
from all parts of the state as soon
as the word gets ""it.
An admissions officer said that
New College experts to euro1!
an entering c'ass of more than
350 students in the Ml. a new
hi ah for the collece that has been
rated amone the top institutions
in the country.
1
Final plans are now being made
for- the Yom Yisrael Israel 27
Celebration taking place on April
27, from 5 to 7 p.m., at Young
Circle in Hollywood.
Representatives from various
youth groups in Broward County
met recently to discuss plans for
the music, drama, and dance pro-
gram that will feature the talents
of the young people of the com-
munity.
The program celebrating the
27th Anniversary of the creation
of the State of Israel will also
include exhibits and sales of Is-
raeli products. Israeli food, (pre-
pared by the Jerusalem Cafe and
'Sallah' 2nd
In Israeli
Film Series
Th second fi'm in the Irli
Fi'm Series being sponsored by
the Committee on Jewish Life of
tv,p .T South Florida "Sallah," will be
shown Sunday. Aon'l 6 at 8 n.m.
in th New Activities Building,
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
A comedv dealing with the
problems of the settlment of
refugees in the Jewish State.
"Sallah" stars Haim Topol. th*
internationally famous Isrli
film star.
A di*cussion led by Eliezer
Krn'l director of the Israel
Aliyah Center in Miami, an emi-
grant from America to Israel
will follow the showing.
Coffee and cake will be served.
Tickets may be purchased by call-
ing the Jewish Community Cen-
ters' office at .920-2088.
Restaurant) and an exhibit of art
created by the young people in
the community.
The entire audience will join
in the singing of Israeli songs,
led by Cantor Jacob Mendelson
of Congregation Beth Torah in
North Miami Beach at the con-
clusion of the Droeram.
This program is open to the
community at no admission
charge and is sponsored by the
Jewish Federations of North and
South Broward, the Broward
County Synagogue, B'nai B'nth,
Youth Organization, and Young
Judea. It is being coordinated by
the Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida.
arnett
ianK:
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
INTERIOR DECORATING
FASHION FABRICS
805 N. FEDERAL HWY.
HALLANDALE. FLORIDA
Phone: 923-0564
Cu'0-n Wtd
CRARERIES
BED SPREADS
Marine Supplies
HARDWARE & PAINT, INC
HOUSEWARES & GIFTS
HOME DECOR
PATIO & DINETTE FURNITURE
BATH/CIOSET SHOP
Beaded Windows Room Dividers
Artificial Flower*
Foliage
Plants
Patio Furniture
Window Shades
Drapery Rods
Wallpaper
Key & Lock Work
-Store Hours 7:30 A.M. 6 P.M. Closed Sun.
Ill EAST BEACH BOULEVARD
HALLAHDALE, FLORIDA MOBS
PHONE 927-0511
,
. ... Now picking and ship-
' ^s'^^_ ping Valencias and
4 -*l*JHHP^*^ Pink Seedless Grape-
fT^^HPi^ fruitsend some home
N^^ >f' to your family and friends.
ANGIE S GROVES
Bonded Fruit Shippers
1809 Wiley Street
Tel. 927-5447


Page 6-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, March 28, 1975
? Ask Abe ?
by ABE HALPERN
>~j
QUESTION: What is the mean-
ing and origin of the Mishnah?
Oakhurst. N.J.
Jacob Kaplan
ANSWER: Mishnah (pi. Mish-
nayot) is a Hebrew word derived
from the verb Shanah. meaning
to repeat or to learn. It was ap-
plied specifically to the study of
the Oral Law, essentially a mat-
ter of memorizing and recapitula-
tion.
Mishnah is contrasted with the
Mikra. the Written Law (from
Kara to read).
The body of ancient tradition-
al Jewish learning is three-fold:
(a) Halachoth. traditional state-
ments of law in categorical form;
(b) Midrash. exposition on the
Scriptures particularly of the
Pentateuch: Haggadoth. Scrip-
tural expositions of a non-Hala-
chic character, i.e. proverbs,
parables, narratives.
The word Mishnah refers to
the entire content of the tradi-
tional Oral Law and consists of
six divisions called Sedarim (or-
ders). Each order is further sub-
divided into Tractates and each
Tractate into chapters then each
into paragraphs.
The Mishnah and likewise the
Talmud are referred to by the
two Hebrew letters Shin and
Samech, pronounced Shas for
Shisha Sedarim (six orders).
The names of'.he six orders
are:
(1) Zer3'im (Seeds). Chief
contents: Agriculture and fruits
of the field. (11 Tractates).
(2) Moed (Festivals). The
Laws of Festivals and Feasts. (12
Tractates).
(3) N'a'him (Women). Chiefly
Laws pertaining to marriage and
Vow?. (7 Tractates).
(4) Nezikin (Damages). Main
CoMetts; civil and criminal law.
(.0 Tractates).
(5) Kodashim (Holy things).
Main contents: Sacrifices and de-
voted things, pertaining primarily
to temple services. (11 Tractates).
(6) Toharoth (Purities).
Laws of ritual purity and im-
purity. (12 Tractates). There is
a total of 63 Tractates.
The Talmud, a Hebrew word
meaning teaching, is commonly
used as a comprehensive term for
the Mishnah and Gemara which
are regarded as a single unit.
Gemara is an Aramaic word
meaning completion (i.e., of the
Mishnah). It designates the com-
ments and discussions around the
Mishnah.
There were two compilations
of the Talmud. It is "a unique
literary work, the result and rec-
ord of study and discussions over
a period of some eight centuries
by the scholars of the entire na-
tion working continually in the
academies of Palestine and Baby-
lonia." (The Encyclopedia of the
Jewish Religion, page 373).
The Palestinian Talmud is re-
ferred to as Talmud Yerushalmi
(The Jerusalem Talmud), and
the Bablyonian Talmud is called
Talmud Bavli.
Of the two, the Babylonian
Talmud has received more con-
tinuous and intensive study and
is regarded as the more authorita-
tive.
There are some Tractates of
the Mishnah to which no Gemara
has been preserved.
It has been estimated that the
Bablyonian Talmud contains
about two and a half million
words and is more than three
times longer than the Palestin-
ian Talmud.
According to tradition, the
Mishnah was compiled and codi-
fied by Rabbi Judah HaNasi (135-
220 c.e.) approximately in the
year 200 of the common era.
The scholars of the Mishnaic
period are called Tannaim (from
the Hebrew Tanna-to teach). The
scholars of the Gemara are called
Amoraim from the Hebrew/
Aramaic word Amar. meaning to
speak, interpret.
The Talmud and subsequent
interpretations and commentaries,
in addition to the Tannach (the
P Hagiographa), constitutes the
literary heritage of Judaism and
i= our contribution to Western
Civilization.
It is no wonder that for gen-
erations, in every Synagogue of
every ^htetle. there were groups
of men called Hevra Shas or
Hevra Mishnayis (Ashkenazi
term).
Daily and on Saturday after-
noon these groups of men would
sit around a table and study as
a group sections of the Talmud,
the Mishnah and Gemara. The
desire to study, to learn con-
tinues to the present time.
Editor's note: Please send ques- '
tions to
??? ASK ABE ???
c/o Jewish Federation of
South Broward
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood. Florida 33020
mwiiBfiiitvKi WE DELIVER! fash st service-
LAWN SAND*ROCK
MASON SAND-FILL
"AIJO lACCf O SANDcndKOCK bA*1> S"*' '""*' "* '
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CALL
983-7208
MM
TONY RIZZF
?$SL
6080 PCMMtOKE BO MOILVWOOO FLA
THE GROOM SHOP
BARBER-HAIR STYLIST
'THE LONG AND SHORT
OP IT IS THE CUT"
MEN oid BOYS
7S61 HOLLYWOOD BLVD. Pembroke pines
PLAZA COME ON IN OR CALL 981-1145
[OPEN SAT. HON. TUES. TMUHS. FBI TIL 7.CLOSED WED.
Creative Living
Plant Exhibit
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Shalom will hold a general meet-
ing Monday. April 7, at 8 p.m. in
the-twnpte'sssembly hall, accord-
ing to Mrs. Robert Kerbel, pro-
gram vice president.
The meeting will feature a
"Creative Living Plant Exhibit."
with Mrs. Jackie Eienberg dis
cussing ways in which a home
can be enhanced by artistic use
of flower pots, plants, macrame
hangers, and needlepoint. A
selection of special Dlants will
also be offered for sale.
The event is open to Sister-
hood member; and gusts. Re-
freshments will be served.
Mrs. Edward Holfman is Sis
terhood president: Mrs. Barry
Portnoy is Sisterhood fund-rais-
ing vice president.
Volunteer Help Needed At
Jewish Community Center
The Jewish Community Center
needs volunteer help from time
to time to keep up with the tre-
mendous volume of work. If you
would like to be a volunteer for
the Center, please call the office
at 920-2089.
The Center is also in need of
recreational items for the Teen
Coffee House such as ping pong
tables, upright piano and table
games such as nok-hockey, chess,
checkers, backgammon, scrabble
and monopoly. Contributions will
be gratefully accepted.
(Left to right) Dr. John Askin, Jack Gold, Otto Stieber,
Dr. Henry Bloom
Hollywood Towers Brunch March 2
Honors Jack Gold For Philanthropy
addre-sed the gathering.
Rabbi Malavsky, who just re-
turned from Israel, brought the
audience up-to-date on the situa-
tion there and the needs for the
survival of Israel and world Jew-
ry-
At a brunch meeting held in
the Social Had of the Hollywood
Towers Sunday. March 2. Otto
Stieber. Hi-Ri?e Chairman for the
1975 United Jewish Appeal Cam-
paign, presented a plaque to
Jack Go'.d in recognition of his
50 years of philanthropic act;vi-
ties.
Rabbi Morton Malavsky of Tem-
f'e Beth ^a'om in Hollywood
Dr John Askin. chairman, and
Dr. Henry Bloom, cochairman,
have pledged themselves to as-
sure Hollywood Towers i'f 100
per cent resident participation.
HAVE YOUR
INCOME TAX
Return Prepared By
Stephen M.- Golding Co.
TAX & FINANCIAL ACCOUNTANTS
EXPERIENCED QUALIFIED
FOR APPOINTMENT CALL OR COME TO OUR OFFICE
2116 TYLER ST., HOLLYWOOD
PHONE 923-3342
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that really cares. .
Introducing the newest Medicare-approved
skilled nursing service for the at-home patient
HOLLYWOOD HOME HEALTH AGENCY, INC.
Staffed by professionals who really care, Hollywood Home Health
Agency: registered nurses, home nursing aides and orderlies, social
workers, nutrition specialists, therapists Medicare also provides for
medical equipment and supplies .
Eligibility: Part "A" Hospital Insurance
following qualifying hospital stay
Part "B" Medical Insurance
with no requirement for prior hospitalization
To obtain service: call the Agency, care will begin
immediately after doctor approves
HOLLYWOOD HOME HEALTH AGENCY, INC.
2100 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Hallandale, Fla. 33009
PHONE: 920-3309
Emanuel Borenstein. A. C. S. W., Executive Director
"The home health people who really care. "



I Friday,
March 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 7-A
Richard Essen To Head 1975
Society of Fellows Campaign
The Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith announced thrs
week that Richard Essen, a well,
known and highly respected
community leader, was appointed
chairman of the League's 1970
Society of Fellows campaign.
The Scciety of Fellows, a na
1 tional urbanization of Jewish
communal leaders responsible foi
meeting ADL s financial goals, is
committed to doubling its 1974
goal throughout the State o!
Florida. To attain this objective,
ADL has selected t prominent
civic worker and attorney to
serve as chairman. Essen, a
lawyer in Miami, has long been
associated with fund raising ef-
fort- for charitable causes in our
community and brings with him
to this task many years of com
munity service.
Richard Essen, a former as-
sistant state's attorney, is a past
master of Hibiscus Masonic
Lodge, served for two terms as
president of Gold Coast Lodg? o'
Bnai B'rith, was cochairman of
the Hi-Rise Division of the Jew
ish Federation campaign from
1969 to 1972. is a member of the
National Discriminations Commit
tee of the ADL. Chairman of th,
Executive Committee of the R
gional Board of ADL. National
Vice Chairman of the Societv of
Fellows nf ADL, and is a m^ni
b'-r of the Board of Governors of
the Greater Miami Jewish Fed
eration and the Advisnrv Com

RICHARD ESSEN
mittee of the Bonds for Israel
organization.
George Bernstein. Chairman of
ADL's Florida Regional Board,
said "We are most fortunate in
having Richard Essen lead our
1975 campaign. With his vast ex-
pertise in organizational work
and fund raising activities, we
are convinced that we will attain
this year's ambitious goal."
The Society of Fellows oro
vides the funds whicn enable-
the An'i-Defamation League to
rrrv put its extensive efforts,
which inrl'ide fighting bigotry
and drcrtmination. combating
Arab extremism nnd nropaganda
in the United Stat"s. taking roun
termeasures against the Arab
boycott and working to insure
emial oinortunity for all griuns
Allington Towers residents held a brunch meeting in be-
half of the United Jewish Appeal March 9 honoring Dr.
Harry Newman (seated, left) with a plaque in recogni-
tion of his many years of philanthropic activities. Par-
ticipants included Melvin H. Baer, (seated, right) 1975
UJA cochairman, and (standing, left to right) Dr. Mar-
nin Feinstein, professor of Political Science at CCNY,
guest speaker; Eli Stiftel, chairman of the event who
made the plaque presentation; and William Siegel, Men's
Club president.
The Parker Plaza Committee responsible
for the success of its United Jewish Ap-
peal campaign includes, from left to right,
(seated) Betty Neft, Cochairman Morris
Markman, Chairman L. Paul Nestel,
Teddi Birner and Mrs. Hattie Ginberg;
(standing) Harry Firestone, Morris Alt-
man, Meyer Oshin, Frank Ginberg, Harry
L. Cohen, Lou Daniels and Louis Miller.
Parker Plaza $lfiOO Club Being Formed
Parker Plaza has formed a
$1,000 Club to be made up of
residents of the building who
have contributed that amount or
more to the 1975 United Jewish
Appeal Campaign, chairman L
Paul Nestel and cochairman Mor>
rls Markman have announced.
Sam Reckler, chairman of
Floor Captains, has organized a
special committee which will be
going from door to door solicit-
ing the few residents who have
not as yet given their gifts.
A special victory function is
being planned to celebrate the
100 per cent resident participa-
tion of Parker Plaza and also to
celebrate the fact they have gone
over their 1974 United Jewish
Appeal figure.
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS LABELS
BAGS BOXES
WIPES ___ i>
Jlb-blTi.
KirD
OWARD
APER A
ACKAGING
1201 N E 45 STREET
FORT LAUDERDALE
Bob Hoffman, newly elect-
ed president of the B'nai
B'rith Broward Palm
Beach Council, was install-
ed by Mel Fromberg in Ft.
Laudcrdale Sunday, March
9. Richard Gerstein was
guest speaker; Al Golden
was master of ceremonies.
Temple Sinai Men's Club To
Install Officers April 4
At the April 4 Friday night
service. Rabbi David Shapiro will
install the newly elected officers
and board members of the Tem-
ple Sinai Men's Club.
To be installed and also parti-
cipating in the service will be
Sidney Tery, president, G. Ben
Levin son, first vice president;
Abraham Edelstein, second vice
president; Sydney Burkholz,
treasurer; and Rubin Jacobs, fi-
nancial secretary.
ianobe pout fleet?
SEE
i^TTo Inc L^obMcr, inc.
Women's Hi-Fashion Shoes
468 N. E. 1st Ave., Hallandale
925-1545
I
The recent Young Leaders Council of the Jewish Fede-
ration of South Broward meeting dealnig with Jewish
mysticism was conducted by Wilford Kahn, (right) who
spoke on mystic interpretations and many aspects of the
Kabballah. With Mr. Kahn are Jeffrey Mann, (left) Bar-
ry Holeve and Mark Fried, members of the Council.




Page 8-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, March 28, 1975 Fr
Hillcrest-Federation Luncheon Raises $25,000
1.
,.
The women of Hillcrest joined
ranks with the Jewish Federation
of South Broward in raising over
Szo.OOO at a luncheon in memory
of Arlene Pritcher attended by-
more than 40C persons recently
at the Hillcrest Country Club.
The keynote speaker was Au-
thor Robert St. John, whose sub-
ject was "A Christian's Interpre-
tation of Israel.-'
Rabbi Harold Richter eulogized
the late Mrs. Pritcher who had
worked for the Jewish Federa-
tion for many years.
Cochairmen of the function
were Gertrude Entin, Eleanor
Rabins and Gloria Hess. Assisting
than bO women, including Eleanor
Weiner, Louise Diamond, and
Susan Miller.
Marcia Tobin, president of the
Women's Division, spoke on that
group's joining ranks with the
Hillcrest women to make it "A
Stronger and More Viable Divi-
Eleanor Rabins, Gertrude Entin and Gloria Hess.
Heated: Ada Lerner, Ann Weitz, Gertrude Falk, Ethel Balkin; standing:
Lee Appelman, Gert Kronevet, Eve Ratzan, Sylvia Amsterdam, Lil Free-
man, Harriet Bloom.
Melvin Baer, Eleanor Rabins
Gloria Hess and Nathan Pritcher.
Gertrude Entin,
i. w *. Eleanor Weiner, Susan Miller, Eleanor Rabins, Gertrude Entin,
Gloria Hess, Louise Diamond and Marcia Tobin.
Seated: Gloria Hess, Gertrude Entin, Ada Lerner; standing: Eleanor
Rabins, Sara Ottenstein, Eleanor Lerner.
Susan Miller, Eleanor Wiener, Eleanor Rabins, Robert St. John, Louise
Diamond, Gertrude Entin, Marcia Tobin, Gloria Hess.
Seated: Ruth Gottesman, Sally Winograd, Alice Berenzin,
Dorothy Bernstein; (standing) Nellie Shanler, Evelyn Lerner,
Dolly Rediker, Norma Fishbein, Tess Haber and Rose Ehrlich.
Oppose Trading in Arms
NEW YORK (JTA) Pollster Louis Harris has
reported in the New York Post that according to his
latest national survey, Americans oppose U.S. military
aid abroad by a majority of 65 to 22 percent and are
against the U.S. selling military equipment to other
counrties by a 53 to 35 percent majority.
"The people are deeply disturbed by the emphasis
in U.S. foreign policy upon military solutions to global
problems and by the escalating arms race among many
medium sized and smaller nations in the world," Harris
wrote.
"AMERICANS INCREASINGLY believe that mili-
tary shipments from the U.S. and other major world
powers inevitably heighten the prospects for war and
that the attempt to solve world problems by armed
conflit is bound to fail a belief perhaps cultivated by
the U.S. experience in Vietnam."
The Harris poll found that a 76 to 15 percent
majority feels that U.S. military assistance "makes
other countries too dependent on the U.S.," and a 78
to 13 percent majority feels U.S. military aid gets us
"too involved in other countries' affairs."
By a 54 to 33 percent majority, Americans feel
that by sending military aid to other countries, we are
"hurting our own economy," Harris reported.
Post Bar Mitzvah Youth To
Participate In Services
Rabbi David Shapiro and Rab-
bi Chaim Listfield of Hollywood's
Temple Sinai have invited poet
Bar Mitzvah students to attend
adult Sabbath services on March
29 as full participants to stress
the fact that Bar Mitzvah repre-
sents a beginning, not an end of
religious study.
Chanting the Haftarah will be
Scott Levin, son of Dr. and Mrs.
Philip Levin and grandson of
temple president Jacob and Mrs.
Mogilowitz. Brian Gordon, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Allen Gordon,
and Michael Lobel. son of Mr.
and Mrs. David Lobel. wiil chant
the last half of the Musaf Serv-
ice.
THE
TRAVELERS
0
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ApkaI Witt*cto.M SR22K2
Ansel Wittenstein
All Forms of Insurance
Including
Homeowners Automobile Jewelry
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Friday, March 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 9-A
Pictured at the March 6 luncheon held
by the women of La Mer are (left to
right) Louise Diamond, Israeli producer
Hy Kaluf, guest speaker, Karen Margu-
lies, Marcia Tobin, Eleanor Weiner, Eve-
lyn Stieber and Mary Golden.
Hy Kalus and Mary Golden
Women Of
La Mer Raise
Over $20,000
The Womc.i of La Mer under
the direction of Evelyn Stieher
raised over $20,OCO at a luncheon
held recently in that building'*
social hull.
The luncheon was attended by
more than 1.000 women who
strengthened their unity with the
State of Israel by making gifts
to this year's United Jewish Ap-
peal Israel Emergency Fund Cam-
_;ign.
Guest speaker for the day was
Hy Kalus, well-known film pro-
ducer from Haifa, who spoke on
tne needs of Israel today.
Many women in La Mer build-
ing are credited for such a suc-
cessful function.
Chairman of the building is
Evelyn Stieber who was assisted
jy Mary Golden and Corinne
Kolodin.
Rossmoor's First Phase To
Be Completed By Mid-April
Bahama Village, first construc-
tion phase at Rossmoor Coconut
Creek, will be completed by
April 15, according to Orion
Smith, construction director for
the adults only condominium
community beinp developed near
Florida Turnpike exit 24, near
Pompano Beach.
Bahama Village has 304 units
in 20 two-story villa-styled build-
ings. The apartments are offered
in five basic floor plans, from
studios to three bedrooms, two
baths.
Rossmoor Coconut Creek will
have over 5,500 residences in its
adult section. They will be in
'villages" which will follow the
general contour of the 18-hole
golf course and the community's
waterways system of lakes, la-
goons and canals.
Rossmoor Center, the $2 mil-
lion social and recreational com-
plex that will serve the overall
community, opened last month
and is now in use. The 18-hole
golf course has also been com-
pleted, and is in play daily.
A neighborhood swimming
, Pool, the first of several to be
buiit, has been completed in
Bahama Village. These pools are
in addition to the larger pool and
sundeck area at Rossmoor Center.
Construction will begin soon
on Nassau Village, Rossmoor's
second construction phase. Smith
reported.
Sales at the master-planned,
total environment community
continue steady, according to
Larry Uchin, vice president for
marketing and sales.
Both January and February-
figures were over $1 million. Ba-
hama Village is almost sold out;
approximately 70 units in Nassau
Village have been sold. Uchin
said.
Rossmoor residences are in the
$18,800 $42,400 price range, and
there is no recreation lease, no
ground lease. All deposits are
escrowed and bear interest to the
buyer at the passbook interest
rate.
Rossmoor Coconut Creek is be-
ing developed on a 600-acre site
near Pompano by Rossmoor Corp.
(AMEX). one of the nations
most successful community de-
velopers.
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL .
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Beacon Towers residents achieved an all-time high by
raising more than S5,000 for the UJA-IEF Campaign at
a recent function where 1974-75 campuign cochairman
Lewis Cohn (left) spoke on Israel's current needs, and
the f'.lm "Message of Life" was shown. With Mr. Cohn
are Isidor Bookbinder, Golden Isles cochairman, and
Morris Leivy (right) Beacon Towers chairman.
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL .
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INTERIOR DESIGNING
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ACCESSORIES FOR THE HOME
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The adult section is enclosed
within a 6-ft. privacy-security
wall; admission is by invitation-
admission only. Streets are pri-
vate, and the extensive security
features include mobile patrols
and a commiterii'ed emergency
communications system.
Pinkerton security officers are
on duty around the clock. Ross-
moor's Health Services Center,
with registered nurses on duty,
is also open 24 hours.
Residents have a wide variety
of recreational and entertainment
facilities available.
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MEMBERS PRINCIPAL SECURITIES EXCHANGES
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Philadelphia/San Francisco/Washington, DC. /White Plains
London/Paris


Page 10-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, March 28, 1975

Soviet Jewry
Plaza Towers Committee
New Version of 'Protocols' Salutes Greenbers>Forman
Published In Great Numbers
By FRAN NEVINS
A new version of the infamous
anti-Jewish "Protocols of The
)lders of Zion" has been publish-
ed by a Soviet printing house and
apparently reflects government
thinking, according to Yefim
Davidovich, a dissident Russian
Jew.
The new title for The Proto-
cols, a notorious anti-Jewish
work written in 1903 by a Czarist-
inspired Russian monk as a way
to justify the pogroms, is "The
Creeping Counter Revolutions,''
Davidovich writes.
Both works excuse anti-Jewish
practices as necessary to thwart
a threatened world takeover by
Jews. Davidovich said in a public
letter to the Soviet intelligentsia
which reached the West last
month.
The new work attempts to
cloak the odious anti-Jewish
sentiments "in the red garb of
Marxism ... with distorted quota-
tions from Lenin," writes Davi-
dovich.
It uses "slander and falsifica-
tion to try to present Judaism ns
a monstrously primitive religion
and the many centuriesold Jew-
ish culture as reactionary with a
subversive trend," he wrote.
"The Creeping Counter-Revolu-
tion" is written by Vladimir Be-
gun and was printed "in great
numbers," according to Davi-
dovich, by a Soviet publishing
house in Minsk.
"This letter is not a re-
quest for protection," stated
Davidovich. "I anpeal to the pro-
gressive Soviet intelligentsia to
protect its own people and its
own youth from the corruptive
But Ovsishcher told British
" sources that KGB interrogators
mentioned his application to
emigrate to Israel many times
during hours of questioning.
Many Soviet Jews jailed as
influence of such work.
"Anti-Semitism is the worst
enemy not only of the Jewish
people. It maims the souls of all
who come in contact with it,
whether they are victims or
executioners," he concluded.
* ft ft
Elena Tuoel has hpen exnelled
from the Leningrad Conservatory
in Leningrad for celebrating Sim-
chat Torah. One other student
was also reprimanded for taking
part in the celebrations, accord-
ing to the Board of Deputies of
British Jews.
ft ft ft
Ioif, Git'ia and Yan Monastir-
sky have been waiting to leave
the Soviet Union for over two
year:. Yan. the son. has been
foi bidden to emigrate because
he served in the Soviet armed
fcrces. Last month his father.
Iosif. was told he would not be
permitted to leave and was or-
dered to stop having contact with
foreigners.
& ft ft
The KGB is now trying to link
a number of Minsk Jews with il-
legal foreign currency dealings.
Lev Ovsishcher's home in
Minsk was searched for eight
hours last month in an attempt
to connect the Jewish dissident
with an accused black market
money trader.
prisoners of conscience have now
been transferred to Vladimir
Prison.
JCC Launches Wednesday Morning
Lecture Series for Senior Adults
A unique series of lectures foi
Senior Adults covering a wide
range of general interest topics
has begun at the Jewish Com-
munity Centers' Activity Build-
ing.
These lectures offer the Senior
Adults an opportunity to become
familiar with the most current
ideas in 'today's society during
two-hour sessions offered once
weekly. Each lecture deals with
a different topic.
Following are the lecture sub-
jects and dates:
April 2"Good Dental Health"
with Dr. Kenneth Levine, D.D.S.
' (Periodorttist) "Oral Health It
Could be Up to You"
April 8 "Life Safety" with
Paramedic Frank Kovarik, City of
Pembroke Pines
April 16"Law for the Lav-
man" with Michael Samuel, At-
torney at Law ill
April 30 "Is Retirement
Working Out as Well as You
Thought?" with Dr. Samuel Feld-
man, Psychologist, who will speak
on "The Philosophy of Aging."
May 7 "Re-education of Eat
ing Habits for Longer Life" with
Natalie Greenfield, lecturer from
Weight Watchers.
All lectures take place Wed-
nesdays at 10:30 a.m. at the Ac-
tivity Center Building of the
Jewish Community Centers, lo-
cated at 2838 Hollywood Blvd.
Contact Stephanie Engelberg,
Senior Adult Coordinator, at
920-2089 for further information
and reservations.
Parker Towers Celebrating
Israel's 27th Anniversary
The officers of Parker Towers
Committee for the Survival of
Israel and World Jewry have an-
nounced they will hold a 1975
United Jewish Appeal brunch to
celebrate Israel's 27th anniver-
sary.
The brunch will be held at
Parker Towers Social Hall on
April 20; the honoree and guest
speaker will be announced by the
committee early in April.
DR. HARVEY R. MARCUS
Announces the Opening
of his Office for the Practice of
PODIATRY AND
FOOT SURGERY
WEST BROWARD PODIATRY ARTS BLDG.
7070 TAFT ST. 9621800
During the first month at Vla-
dimir, prisoners get a food ration
of around 800 calories a day.
For comparison, thp recom-
mended U.S. government daily
allowance for a 154-lb. adult male
is 2.800 calories.
After this terrible first month,
prisoners get permission to buy
food, tobacco and soap in the
prison store but they are only
allowed to spend 2 rubles a
month.
Prisoners are forbidden to
write more than one letter every
two months and can only walk
outside their cells for a half
hour each day.
If a prisoner can survive six
months in Vladimir, he is trans-
ferred to the so-called common
prison-regime. He then has the
right to walk outside his cell
for an hour a dav. *g?ta one let-
ter a month and spend up to 3
rubles in the prison store per
month.
But the nrlonr must "till eat
mainly rotten aroat* and pota-
toes. BOOT a-,d rotten cabbage,
and poorly baked bread, accord-
ing to relatives of prisoners.
Yuri Vuclka. David Chernoglaz.
and Hillel Butman are prisoners
of conscience in Vladimir. Iosif
Mishener is exnected to be trans-
ferred there shortly.
ft ft ft
At Prison Camp Perm 35 con-
ditions are not much better.
For breakfast, prisoners get 10
grams of sugar and 14 ounces of
bread, which is expected to last
all day. Watery soup is also of-
fered.
At lunch, prisoners get some
more of the same soup.
Fish is served at dinner, but
the portion is minuscule (less
than an ounce per person). The
fish is often served with rotten
notatoes.
ft ft ft
Please protest these inhuman
prison conditions and the con-
tinued harassment of Soviet Jews
by writing:
Anatoly Dobrynin
Ambassador of the USSR
1125 16th Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C.
Following a cocktail party in
the apartment of Mr. and Mrs.
Nathan Greenberg, the '500 Clui/
war inaugurate** at the Plaza
Towers. All contributors of $500
and over to the CJA/IEF be-
came members of this group in
the Plaza North and South Build-
ings.
Leaders in the 1975 Campaign
for the two buildings are Nathan
E. Greenberg, general chairman:
Joseph Deutsch, chairman, and
Isaac Bressler and Jerome Eisen-
berg, cochairmen, Plaza Towers
South; Sam Finke, chairman, and
Lila Brecker and Ruth Suss, co-
chairmen. Plaza Towers North.
Committee members include
David Brecker, Harry Cohen, Ir-
ma Deutsch, Milton Fine, Ben
Forman, Sam Gottlieb. Abraham
B. Halpern, Karl Kopell, Leo
Lutzker. Sarah Lutzker. Emanuel
Prouse. Lewis Rubenstein, Em-
anuel Safran, Irving Suss. David
Weisberg, Elizabeth Weisberg
and Max Young.
A Plaza North resident, Mr.
Forman was born in White Rus-
sia and came to the United States
as a young man. He is a member
of the Kletsker Society, named
after his home in Russi.i. He is
also active in the Bay Ricjae Jew-
ish Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., and
the Masonic Lodge, as well as in
many Jewish communal and civic
institutions.
Mr. Greenberg, a resident of
Plaza South, was born in London
and lived for many years in Wash-
ington, D.C. He is a founder of
the Hebrew University in Jeru-
salem, a national board member
of Histadrut Foundation and a
memoer f the Prime-Minister's
Club.
Greenberg and his wife. Rose,
ate founders of Hadassah Hospi-
tal on Mount Scopus. He has been
active in almost every cause, par-
ticularly Israel Bonds.
Cruises Feature
Low Group Rates
City of Hope, Papanicolaou
Cancer Research Center and
B'nai B'rith are cosponsoring a
Caribbean cruise aboard the TSS
Mardi Gras April 26 featuring
low group rates, according* to
Sam Rosenkranz, president of
Bon Voyage Travel, Inc., North
Miami Beach.
The season's last weekend sin-
gles cruise will sail on the TSS
Atlas Friday. March 21; special
singles parties have been ar-
ranged, however, on the seven-
day cruises aboard the Mardi
Gras leaving April 26 and May
24. Singles summer cruises will
start June 27.
A special group tour to Israel
will leave Miami May 12; a color-
ful c! 'iration of Shavuoth >n
Kfar Gi!eadi will be included in
the tour, rates for which reflect
the effort of the travel industry
to break the inflation trend. Mr.
Rosenkranz said.
Call Lee or Suzanne at Bon
Voyage for detailed information.

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March 28, 1975
The Jewish Flondian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 11-A
ESTHER GORDON HOSTS COFFEE
TiVl ^3 IT i Ml m-j\
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p*v 1' M 1 1
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Mi
me 300 women attended the recent coffee at the home
Esther Gordon where more than $4,000 was raised
r the Jewish Federation of South Broward. Pictured
Dr. Arieh Plotkin, the guest speaker, whose theme
s "The Current Needs of Israel," are (top photo)
tty Kail and Phyllis Kramer, and Marian Levitats
ght); below he is flanked by Karen Margulies (left)
d hostess Esther Gordon.
until Meeting
''or Presidents
mdav March 30
lerbert Lelchuk. president of
Voshe Congregation in
Hi Miami and chairman of
South Florida Presidents'
Incil, announces a Council
}ting for presidents of af-
jted I'nited Synagogue Con-
fcations Sunday, March 30, at
a.m. at Temple Beth Moahe,
N'F 121st St., North Miami.
|e Presidents' Council will
with matters of prime im-
nce to the congregations
[particularly with the matter
l>e older adult both in and
fde the syns-jogues.
te discussion which will be
by Rabbi Seymour Friedman,
utive director of the South-
I Region United Synagogue of
pica, will concern the need
servicing those who are in
condominiums and hi-rise
regations.
peph Golden, president of
Southeast Region United
Igogue, will also participate
fe meeting. Among those ex-
I to be present are Dr. Fred
nenthal, Jacob Mogilowitz,
J. L. Tendrich, Herbert S.
huk, James Dingfelder, Nor-
[ Shwedel, Arthur Bloom. Carl
nberg, Judge Herbert Sha-
Louis Cohen, Seymour Ros-
IJerome Soowal, Jules Sha-
[and Robert Rapaport.
Rent-A-Car
LOW AS
A DAY
5c Per Mile
$5

CAR-BELL
MOTORS
520 S. DIXK HWY. HI WD.
?20-4141
Herbert Katz, president of
the Jewish Federation of
South Broward, has been
appointed to the United
Israel Appeal Board of
Trustees' and as a designee
of the VIA to the 1975 As-
sembly of the Jewish
Agency for Israel in Jeru-
salem.
Broward Teen Tour
To Depart June 15
Sponsored and arranged by the
Broward Board of Rabbis, the
1975 Broward Teen Tour of Is-
rael will depart on June 15 and
will include two days in Athens
plus sightseeing, Kibbutz and
Moshav experiences, and guided
visits to universities in Israel.
Round trip economy airfare is
$1,397, plus $3 and $25 registra-
tion fees which are non-refund-
able.
Both North and South Broward
Jewish Welfare Federations are
offering scholarship subsidies to
applicants who need them. For
scholarship information and in-
terview call North Broward Fed-
eration at 764-8899 or South
Broward Federation at 921-8810.
Dr. K. Still
On His
Cairo Run
Continued from Page 1-
ger brought from Kgypt last
Friday as unsatisfactory. Rabin
reportedly told the Secretary at
their meetings that Egypt's con-
ditions for a new settlement did
not meet Israel's demands for a
clear, public, written renuncia-
tion of belligerency by both
sides.
Kissinger, who spent Satur-
day in Damascus and Amman in
talks with President Hafez As-
sad of Syria and King Hussein
of Jordan, returned here late
Monday.
The American and Israel' ne-
gotiating teams were closeted in
the King David Hotel for three
hours, beginning at 6 p.m.
Kissinger cancelled plans to
attend a concert by violinist
Isaac Stern celebrating the He-
brew University's 50th anniver-
sary.
THE TWO negotiating teams
took time out for sandwiches in-
stead of a regular dinner and
continued their meetings late in-
to the night and then resumed
the sessions early in the morn-
ing.
Kissinger said afterwards that
"the two teams reviewed once
again the ideas which I brought
from Egypt and the Israeli te-
jlUoii to those ideas, ns well as
the considerations tne Israel]
Cabinet and the negotiating
team are asking me to take to
Egypt"
Meanwhile, Chief of Staff Gen.
MordechaJ Gur has warned that
several thousand members of the
so-called Palestinian Liberation
Army, controlled by Syria, are
deployed over a wide area of the
northern frontier ready to servo
as the spearhead of a general at-
tack on Israeli military and ci
vilian targets should the Syrians
decide to launch large-scale hos-
tilities in an attempt to sabotage
a seeond-sta*? agreement between
Israel and Egypt.
GUR VOICED his warning that
Israel's northern borders mav he
the first target of a new Middle
East war
Religious
Services
HALLANDALf
HAlLANPALE JEWISH CENTS*
(Conservative). 416 NE 8th Avt
Rabbi Harry E. Sehwartx, Canto*
Jacob Danziaer.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADfc
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingaley, Cantor Irving
8holkea.
NORTH BROWARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON.
GREGATION. Liberal. 3601 Univer
ity Or. Rabbi Max Weitx.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER, 875A
N.W. 67th St., (Coneervatlva) Rab-
bi Milton J. Orosa.
HOLLYWOOD
VOUNQ ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
(Orthodex). 3891 Sterling Rd. op.
poaite Hollywood Hills High School
President Dr. Frank Stein.
--------------
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1S1 i
14th Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffe. Atalatant Rabbi Harvey M.
Roaenfeld.
---------a---------
BETH SHALOM (Tampial Canaerva.
tlva. 4601 Arthur ttt. Rabbi Morton
Malaveky, Cantor irving Gold.
TEMPLE BETH .HM (Coneervatlva).
310 SW 62nd Ave., Hollywood.
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal). 6001
Thomas St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Rob-
art Frailn.
TEMPLE Slr-'AI (Conservative). 120\
ehneon St Rabbi David Snaoiro
Aaaociate Rabbi Chalm 8. Llatfleld.
Cantor Ve^uda Hallbraun
TEMPLE SOLEL (LlberaK 5100 Sher-
idan St.. Hollvwood. Rabbi Robert
Frazin. 41-C
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Coneervatlva)
920 SW 86th St. Raobl Avrom
Oraaln.
PEMBROKf PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES (Conaerva.
tive) 1900 N. University Dr.. Pern.
broke Pinea. Rabbi Aaron Shapero.
&Xts 1
By BOB KfRBU, Executive Director,
lewith Federation of South Broward, In*.
inn iniiiiiwiiiiMiasiiiiiiwiaiiiiiiianiiiiiiiii n '-""
For 3.000 years Pas=over has been celebrated to remind us of
our Jewish heritage and to give us a sense of being Jewish. It tells
us in the Haggadah that we are reliving the experiences of our
lorefathers.
Remember the first time you owned the door ... or saw to it
that your child, or your grandchild did" The door for Elijah. The
door that for each family becomes a charmed passage-way on Pass-
over night. That historic door with its two-way hinge. Opening out
to a faith and a vision of a better future. Opening in with its
welcome to the guest and the stranger.
For 3,000 years, the small, simple gesture of that open door has
somehow captured the larger meaning of Passover, its celebration
of Freedom. For 3,000 years, the sign on that door written into
the pages of the Haggadah has remained unchanged "Let all
who are in need enter and be fed and be served."
Here in our communitv. that ancient ceremony of the open door
continues lives and breathes. Alive and in practice in the
most solid a'.d down-to-earth fashion.
For ho'ndays. As well as everyday. Here, in town an open
door of concern and service to the disadvantaged. the poor, the ill,
the elderly ... to the needs of Jewish education and the quality
of Jewish life. An open door of service that we have and must con-
tinue to extend to thousands of courageous Soviet Jews making their
way to Israel, to our own shores and to all of Israel's newcomers
who depend on us in these critical times to see them through. An
open door of welcome that reaffirms at this holiday our family
sense that Jewish need and Jewish problems are equal and inter-
dependent in our eyes.
An open door, especially at this time in our national life. In
the face of today's troubled economic situation.
An open door to the promise of Elijah ... to our own determina-
tion that now, as never before, our community agencies and facilities
- our Federation family are here to find new resources, new-
means by which to serve our community better, as well as our
brothers and sisters overseas.
Remember once again as for all time your part in that
open door.
Mav I wish you and your family a Happy and Healthy Passover.
BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER HOLIDAY
FLAIR OPTICAL
SAM ROTHFARB OPTICIAN
CONTACT LENSES
Prescriptions Filled Broken Lenses Duplicated
Sun Glasses Ground To Prescription Laboratory on Premise
(Repairs)
DAL 927-2236
2723 Hollywood Blvd.
EDUARDO F. SALABERT, M.D.
Announces
The Opening of his Office for
GENERAL PRACTICE
6099 Hollywood Boulevard
Hours: By App't.
9-5 Daily
(Including Wednesday)
Telephone
983-6865
THE CENTER
PLACE
A Senior High Coffee House
EVERY SATURDAY EVENING
FROM 815 P.M.
Featuring ....
Music
Games
Dancing
Food
Relaxation
Everyone is Welcome!
FOR DETAILS CALL RAFI 920-2089


Page 12-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, March 28, 1973
Aquarians And Women's Division
Cosponsors Of March 5 huneheon
kThe v. men-of AqiSttius and
e women of MUfcJewish Fedei-J-^P
in el Soiitf^raTtvard, previo.i
rellectin?" two* different im
ages, merged destinie; into a
common cause when over $20,000
was collected at a luncheon held
in the Cascade Room of the
Aquarius Bui.dine March 5 for
the United Jewish Aooeal-I^rae'
Emergency Fund-Jewish Federa
tion.
More thalf MJQ, women attended
-the event ^ijPLW^j chaired bjf
Ajgft^oha pa^ij^^iirsd, by"
SarahN'twmark- and Ronnie
Fie'.ds.
The Arieh Piotkin, whose subject wa"
"What Is Really Happening In
Israel Today."
This is the first time such a
cosponsored luncheon has been
held for the Woman's Division.
Dr. Arieh Piotkin (center) was the guest
speaker at a recent brunch in the Golden
Bay Towers held in behalf of the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal Campaign. He is
flanked by brunch hosts Meyer Kaplan
and Jerry Gevirman; at left is Sam Stept,
chairman of the building's committee.
Ira Jablin is at right.
Dr. Arieh Piotkin, speaker at the Aquarius luncheon.co-
sponsored by the Women's Division of the J&wish' Fed-'
eration of South Broward, stands behind, three of the
women'responsible for the success of the function; Annd
Cohn, (left) Minnie Finkelstein and Ronnie Fields.
Representatives of various Broward Coun-
ty youth groups met recently to plan the
music, dance and drama program to be,
.presented by local talent at the April 27 ,
Yom Israel celebration in the Young
Circle Bandshell in Hollywood.
Young Professionals Calendar
SINGLES LIVE BAND DANCE The Jamestown Club,,2721 S. Bay-
. shore. Dr., Coconut Grove Sunday, March 30, 9, p.m.
SINGLES HOUSE PARTY on Miami Beach Saturday. April 5
9 p.m.
SEMINAR CF PSYCHCDRAMA The Washington Federal Bank,
633 NE lS7th St., North Miami Beach Sunday, April 6 8 p.m.
For more information and reservations, call 538-2884 in Dade,
9610717 in Broward.
The Aquarius luncheon March 5 was arranged by a *"
number of women residents and cosponsored by the
Women's Division of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward, including (from left) Ronnie Fields, cochair-
man; Minnie Finkelstein; Sarah Newmark, cochairman,
and Anne Cohn, chairman.
Listening to Women's Division president Karen Margu-
lies (right) at the Aquarius luncheon are Susan Miller,
(left) and Marcia Tobin.
Philip Olender, chairman
of Oxford Towers and
five other high-rise build-
ings in the Hollywood
Beach area, has reported
to the Combined Jewish
Appeal Israel Emergency
Fund that his building is
well organized in behalf of
the 1975 campaign. Mr.
Olender, an officer in the
Perfection Lodge of the
Masons, was active in De-
troit's B'nai B'rith, and
Shaare Zedek Synagogue.
He was also involved in the
Detroit Jewish Allied Cam-
paigns.
JEFFER
^^FUNERAL HOMES, INC.
DIRECTORS:
Irwin Jeffar
Madwin Jatlar Alvin Jaffar
188-11 HILLSIDE AVF HOUIS. LI.
1283 CONEY ISLAND AVE..BKLYN.
2127776-8100
13385 W. DIXIE HWY..MAMI
305/947-1185
RaaresaM by: Sonny Levin, f p.
625 S.0UVE AVE..WPALM BEACH
305/833-4413
Raamartaa : PMp Meana*. f 0.
Services available in all
communities in New York and
throughout the Miami.
W. Palm Beach areas
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL .
Hospitalization Sickness Accident Life Annuities
B. H. BERNARD, INC.
"Insurance Specialist"
1926 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33020
Barry Holeve, President
Phone 925-3251
PLANS AVAILABLE TO PERSONS WITH SIR'OUS
HEALTH PROBLEMS
Rrc
"1V/,en OL Cry Of despair J*
^JiearJ, 'J/ic Jew UH.opes .
rrayirs J-or Jfews Everywhere J~rom Jit*
38 'nai ', ijouth K^Jryanization \^*hapters J/t
J he Jhe Cjreatcr <-~ouncil and QfoU Lci^
Jj nai I) rith youth Council
(youth level!


riday, March 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 13-A
Hollybrook Rental Payments
May Apply Towards Purchase
While the energycruAh has
furtailed pWaSBWImei to a
p.eat degree because of the high
cost of fuel and uncertain eco-
nomic conditions, many country
dub-oriented condominium com-
munities are realizing a new surge
in sa'.es. according to Nat Garcia,
,a.es manager for Hollybrook
Go'.f and Tennis Club.
'People are now finding a
satisfying source of recreation
and relaxation in the surround-
ing atmosphere of their apart-
ment residences," he said. "At
Hoi ybrook Golf and Tennis Club
we <-::iphasize a particular life-
ityle rather than the more gen-
era', recreational facilities found
[n m isl large condominium d-'-
ve'.opments."
Two hundred acres are d?-
lo recreation with a Par
"2 Championship eolf course. 18
hole Executive Par 3 course, 8
tennis courts and four more to
come, 6 swimming pools, 20 shuf
fleb)ard courts, barbecues and
clubhouse, which are enjoyed by
more than 1,400 families living
in the 285-acre complex.
"The condominium community
that offers the most in the way
of necessities and amenities will
naturally draw the most atten-
tion." Garcia added, "and so we
have patterned our beautiful de-
velopment after the type of ex-
clusive country club facility that
sports and socially-minded pur-
chasm have, enjp^ed^n Jb.e
norrnem areas wnere most of
them formerly lived.
A unique rentai program is also
in effect at H< 1.ybrook Golf and
Tennis Club. Under the plan, 75
percent of rental payments may
be used as down payment when
the lease expires.
"The response has been excel-
lent," Garcia stated. "In these
difficult times, many people are
not in a position to buy im-
mediately, but under this plan
they can rent, u:e a large portion
of rent r ,,-nents for "\ircri3=ing
and at th-.- 'arr ti'oe obtain a
hedge against inf'.ation because
we guarantee prices for one
year."
All buildings in Ho.lybrook's
current construction schedule
have been completed and a total
of 54 buildings with 1710 apart-
ments have been built.
Among continuing events un-
der the supervision of a full-time
activities director, are Yoga
classes and body conditioning,
art instruction, handcrafts in-
cluding instruction in needle-
point, bargello and Japanese
Bunka, choral ^roup, ballroom
aancing. group dancing with a
program of line, circle and folk
dancing, tennis clinics, shows,
pool parties, clubhouse buffets,
golf tournaments, fishing parties,
tennis tournaments, duplicate
bridge and many more activities
t- 3"r.eal to individual tastes.
'Younger Than Springtime' Theme
Of Sisterhood's Donor Luncheon
"Younger than Springtime" is
the theme for the early spring
Donor I.unrheon of Temple Beth
El Sisterhood to be held at noon
Tuesday. April 8. at the Hillcrest
Country- Club.
Many ways and means have
been available to members to
earn the price of admission as
Donors. Sponsors or Patronsall
of whom will be listed in a "Pro-
gram Book." Monies earned from
this project support th* SistT-
hood projects, including special
events for th religious school,
service to the blind, state and na-
tional commitments.
Singer and actor Salvatorr. Ca-
val'aro. known in the tiWcal
WOr'.d a; -Salvatorr" will enter-
tain fo'.bwing the 1-ncheon. Sal-
vator? has annear'd mii=ica! bnth in thi-- country
and "u'ot)-- he "as re?orid
for M.G.M. Records and since
coming to Florida, has entertain-
ed at the Fontainebleau and
Diplomat Hotels, the Palm Beach
Spa, and the Boca Raton Country
Ciub.
Mrs. Melvin Freedman is the
Donor chairman; Mrs. Samue'
Sezzin cochairman. Committee
members include Mrs. Jack Wolff.
Mr. Tories Wolfe. Mrs. Theo-
dore Lifset, Mrs. Louis Sahm
Mrs. Harold Ratner. Mrs. Alfred
Mazrsrino, Mrs. Bernard Price.
Mr*. Ad Weinfeld. Mrs. Trud;
Zei-*er. Mrs. Sam Weinstein and
v'ce president* Mrs. Juius Hal
rern and Mrs. P.oslvn Emanuele
Mr*. Hnr-v Finer is ore-iden-
of th Si terh^od. an affiliate o
ths Nitional Vejipr-^i^n of Tern
pie Sisterhoods (NFTS) serving
' -" h ind humanitarian causes
Thousands Of Technical Jobs
Currently Available In Israel
[currently available in Israel.
n an ,,; the .. in terhn-ilov;/, tre
Israel Aii/ah Center has reoo.t
ei
Ther* is a demand in Israel
f>r over 1,0X1 technicians ar.ri
ski !el workers in addition to
[more than 5)0 engineers, in trie
areas of electronics, prod .ction
anl manufacturing. Many jo s
are also available to mechanical.
ci.'il and to a lesser degree.
j chemical engineers.
Israel recently anno-'need that
jten nuclear power stations will
I be built; the first is to begin
[operation in seven years. Expe-
lenced persons are needed for
we planning of these projects.
The availability of jobs in Is-
r' 'I extends a!so to systems
Its and computer program-
I.
*"- area of social services,
has approximately 6))
'' "S for qualified Social
and hundreds of oper.-
': school psychologists,
counselors and ac-
ts. Nearty 500 Jobs are
A "Vacation Guest Club" has
oeen established for persons who
rent from the developers. Two
persons per apartment may play
all the golf and tennis they wish
without paying membership dues
or greens fees.
On the Championship Course,
golf carts are required at stand-
ard rates. They also have full
use of :he Hollybrook Clubhouse
and satellite recreation centers,
which provide a swimming pool,
sundeck. shuffleboard and bar-
beque facilities.
Nearly 1.500 apartments have
been sod at Hoi vbrook and the
new rental program is designed
to rent some of the unsold units.
Apartments are rented either
fi'l'v furnished or f-'mish^d only
with carpet and drapes. Unfurn-
ished apartments are available on
annual lease for $260 a month
for two bedroom, two bath units
and $230 for one bedroom, 1%
bedroom apartment.
Fully furnished apartment* in-
clude all linens, dishes, cooking
utensils, etc. and are available by
the season or longer.
Each apartment has central air
conditioning and heat, an all-
electric kitchen with dishwasher,
waste disposer, two door, frost-
free refrigerator, counter top
range and custom designed cabi-
nets. All bedrooms have a walk-in
closet and tiled bath.
The newest addition to Holly-
brook is the Aqua Driving Rane
where golfers practice with float-
er balls that are driven into the
lake. The range is open to the
public and "rofessional instruc-
tion is available.
Hollybrook Golf and Tennis
Club is three miles west of Flor-
ida Turnpike off Hollywood Bou-
levard at Douglas Road. Model
apartments are on display from
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily at the Sales
Center. 900 Hollybrook Drive.
a-ai'aMe to n--rses. Physical and
occupational therapists.
"Despite Israel's obvious sec-
c.rit/ and economic problems
her development is continuing,
uion? the lints before the Yom .
Kiopur War," Alan Pakes. Is
rael Em-loyment Specia:ist at
the Israel Aliyah Center, said. !
i
'As a result of this, there Is
growing need for trained man- i
powe-. especially from North!
Ameiica."
In many areas the demand for
professional and skilled workers
is expected to increase since |
many of the manpower needs j
are geared toward industrial ;
and manufacturing sectors of
the economy rather than toward
consumer goods.
Details on these and other
o-enings can te obtained at the
Israel Aliyah (Immigrnt: n. I
Centers thtougho-.it the United
St er Krol', head of t!-e Vi/ah
Center in Miami at 4700 BLs-
e Blvd., Km. 335.
LEVITT
JIIemorial Chapel
JEWISH fUNtKAL Dftf CTOtS"
$
LOCAL AND OUT Of TAT
ARRANGEMENTS
947-2790
13385 W. DIXIE HWY.. N.M.
rAIMER'S -
MIAMI MONUMENT COMPANY'
PERSONALIZED MEMORIALS
CUSTOM CRAFTED
IN OUR WORKSHOP
l Al I l"l" Kl'-r
*M C921 444-0922
?"<> S W St1- ST MIAMI
Flanking Emil Conn, guest speaker at the first UJA-IEF
fund-raiser held by the residents of the Olympus, are
Mrs. Theodore Benson and Mrs. Edwin Novick, and Mrs.
Micky Kelman (right).
I
Bar Mitzvah
STEVEN CASTER
Steven, son of Dr. and Mrs.
Milton Caster, will be Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday, April 5. at Temple
Sinai.
a a a
NANCY GREENBLATT
Nancv. dauehter of Mr. and
Mrs. Lee Greenblatt, will be Bat
Mitzvah Friday, April 4, at Tem-
ple I-raol of .yiramar.
Committee members who helped to organize the first
Olympus Building United Jewish Appeal campaign func-
tion included (from left) Claire Goldberg, Sidney Lavine,
Col. Ray C. Burr us and Ivy Resnick.
Parker Dorado Launches Campaign
With Address By Hy Kalus, Film
An overflow group heard film
producer Hy Kalus of Israel
speak on the current situation in
Israel and saw the film. "A Mes-
sage of Life.", at a recent Parker
Dorado meeting.
Nat Malamuth. president of th?
Social Club, presided and thank-
ed the audience for its interest
in and support of the survival
of world lewry.
Norman Gordon, chairman of
the Committee for Israel and
Wor'.d Jewry, announced that all
res'dent* will b visited in the
ensuing weeks in an effort to
obtain maximum gifts.
He stated that early gifts in-
dicate a 125 per cent increase
over last year is to be expected.
Mr. Gordon's committee con-
sists of Nat Apoenzell;r. Lenore
Berger, Ben Duchin, Nathan
Edelman. Natalie Goldberg. Miri-
am Kessler. Harry Lewis. Evelyn
Lio. Nat Malamuth. Jeanne Mann,
Jenny Melnick, Ann Shapiro*,
Abraham Shrage and Maurice
Stoller.
i
ASK YOUR
RABBI ABOUT US
JOHNSON-FOSTER
FUNERAL HOME, INC.
1650 HARRISON ST. HOLLYWOOD, FLA. PHONL 922-7511
Paul J. Houlihan,
L.F.O.
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
Jempk 3etAt
Wlemotiai
gardens
The only all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surrounding, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call: /i'1% jrl
920^225 or_write:^_ ____________'..>:; ?>*
TEMPLE BETH EL /Wfc-.S?-
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above.
NAME: ___
ADDRESS:
__ PHONE:


i~
Page 14-A
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, March 28, 1975


Price of Peace is Pieces of Territory
NEW YORK (JTA) "If Israel wants peace, she
has to pay the price. And the price is territories," Egyptian
Ambassador to the United Nations, Esmat Abdel Meguid,
said here.
Meguid, Who was interviewed by David Susskind in
Susskind's late night TV talk show on WNEW, asserted th'St
Egypt is interested in peace in the Mideast and only wants
to regain its territories held by Israel since June, 1967 and
the "rights of the Palestinians" restored.
c
\t\j \^*aUndar
ovniviMni
TUESDAY, APRIL 1
Senior Friendship Club of Temple Beth Shalom Regular
Meeting Assembly Hall Noon
SUNDAY, APRIL 6
Israeli Film Festival Jewish Community Center, 2838
Hollywood Blvd the public is invited 8 p.m.
MONDAY. APRIL 7
National Council of Jewish Women Regular Meeting
Temple Sinai noon
Sisterhood of Temple Beth Shalom General Meeting
Assembly Hall 8 p.m.
TUESDAY, APRIL 8
Senior Friendship Club of Temple Beth Shalom Regular
Meeting Assembly Hall Noon
THURSDAY, APRIL 10
Temple Beth Shalom Men's Club A Carnival 8 p.m.
Sabra Group, Hollywood Hadassah General Meeting
Temple Solel 8 p.m.
i:ii!i':;ri.r I vn'M*
Diplomat Towers CJA IEF
Brunch Termed 'Successf uP
The officers of the Diplomat
Towers Committee for the Sur-
vival of Israel and World Jewry
held a brunch on behalf of the
C'JA-IEF 1875 campaign in the
Social Hall recently.
Mrs. Mathilda Brailove, an out-
standing national leader who has
just returned from Israel, talked
about the current situation in Is-
rael and pleaded with the over-
flow attendance to more than
double their gifts so that Israel
can survive and "all American
Jews can stand tall and be count-
ed."
Chairman Ben Axelrod and
Tina Peyton, chairlady, an-
nounced that the gifts collected
this year were double those of
the 1874 UJA.
A new committee made up of
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Schlenger,
Mrs. Florence Abend, Mr. and
Mrs. Sidney Altman, Joseph Pat-
terson, Ruth Gering, Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Beckerman, Anna B. Lev-
inson and Arthur Margolis is
planning personal solicitation to
assure 100 per cent resident par-
ticipation for The Diplomat Tow-
Admiring the Diplomat Towers plaque are Tina Peyton,
cochairlady; Ben Axelrod, chairman, and Joe Patterson.
HHBMIHHBHHI
"ISRAEL'S SECURITY can be
found only in peace and not in
territories,"' said Meguid^ who
tried to sound moderate and con-
ciliatory.
Anne Levinson, (left) was the 1974 Diplomat Towers
honoree. With her are Lewis E. Cohn, 1975 UJA co-
chairman; Mrs. Mathilda Brailove, guest speaker at the
brunch, and Mrs. Ruth Gering (right).
Meguid objected when the in-
terviewer called the PLO mem-
bers "terrorists and murderers,"
claiming that the Palestinians are
"one of the most sophisticated
and educated people in the mid-
east."
He said that Israel should talk
to the PLO and recognize it. He
also reiterated his government's
stand that the Geneva conference
should be convened with the par-
ticipation of the PLO.
"I have three sons." Meguid
said, 'and for them and my
grandchildren all I want is peace
and stability in the mideast"
"He also quoted Chaim Weiz-
mann who said that the conflict
between Israel and .tha .Palestini-
ans is a conflict "between two
rights."
"ISRAEL SHOULD acknowl-
e ans," the Egyptian ambassador
said.
Shlomo Avineri. professor of
political science at the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem, who was
interviewed by Susskind after
Meguid (the Egyptian ambassador
refused to appear together with
Avineri) said, in response to
Meguid, that Israel had recogniz
ed the rights of the Palestinians
back in 1847 when she agreed to
the partition.
"The Palestinians were the
ones who denied the right of the
Jews for self-determination and
statehood."
ACCORDING TO Avineri, m03t
of the Israeli .public jnd the
Rabin government recognize that
there is a Palestinian problem
that must be solved.
Referring to Meguid the state-
ment that Egypt recognizes that
Israel is a fact. Avineri said that
this may only be "a play on
words on the part of Sadat.
"Sadat did not say that Israel
is a legitimate fact." Avineri
pointed out. adding that means
that the "fact" is not accepted
and could be renounced any time
for the nuroose *f war.
Question Box
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
What is the purpose of
prayer according to Jewish
tradition?
Some rabbinic sources trace
the purpose of m-ayer to a com-
mandment in the Bible which
asks man to serve the Almighty
"with all your heart" (Deuter-
onomy 11:13). Prayer, then, is a
fulfillment of this command and
a means of serving the Almighty.
Other sources say that prayer
is a means of sacrifice. Original-
ly prayers accompanied the var-
ious sacrifices in the temple of
old. Since we have no sacrifcial
offerings today, at least the pray-
ers that once accompanied sacri-
fices are recited.
In prayer, man is somehow
sacrificing his ego and declaring
himself helpless without the Al-
mighty's aid. Some medieval au-
thorities claim that the quality
and quantity of the blessings
which comes from the Almighty
are determined by the effort of
man through prayer (Chunuch).
There are those who claim that
prayer serves as a means of man's
communication with the Al-
mighty, which is a rewarding
experience in itself. Others claim
that it is man engaged in a debate
with himself as to his worth and.
therefore, a judgement with the
Almighty Himself takes Dlace.
In prayer man transcends his
existence on the animal level and
rises to a higher leveli.e., a com-
municant with the Almighty. Man
thus elevates his self-esteem by
engaging in prayer. This, in turn,
some claim, makes man a higher
being who recognizes his hu-
man responsibility when he final-
ly asks himself. "Am I really
worthy of the Almighty's atten-
tion and consideration?" This
makes man strive to attain a
higher and more worthy level of
existence.
Perhaps most of all. as some
claim, man fulfills his need of
self-expression through prayer.
One of man's greatest frustra-
tions is his failure sometimes to
express himself and "get it off
his chest." Through prayer one
can accomplish this and thus re-
lieve anxiety and be better able
to evaluate his life.
wfi w\tr) oy) outstretched o.rn). ~~


friday, March 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 15-A
U.S. Training of Saudi Troops to Cease
WASHINGTON (JTA)
j>ep. Elizabeth Holtzman (D.,
^yil announced here that''the
Department of .Defense no long-
er will provide U.S. training free
0I charge to Saudi Arabian
troops.
Ms. ]loll/man said she receiv-
assurance from the chairman
of the House Subcommittee on
Foreign Derations, Rep. Otto
Passman 'D., La.) that al! train-
ing from now on will be on a re-
imbursable basis for Saudi train-
ees.
CXDEH THE legislation that
ha.l been adopted, S220.000 was
available for grants to Saudi
Arabia to pay for Saudi military
mining.
Although 538,000 of this
amount has already been obli-
gated tiie remainder will not be
spent.
Coii'iess'M/man Holtzman said:
"U.S. ii dining of Saudi Arabian
troops is a highly questionable
policy. If such training is provid-
ed, certainly U is sheer nonsense
to provide such assistance free
of charge. Oil-rich Saudi Arabia
is nol an impoverished nation
entitled to foreign assistance" at
the expense of the American
taxpayers.
DIWINOTHB debate- orr the
aid legislation last month. Ms.
Holtzman raised the question of
free U.S. military training for
the Saudians.
At her request, the chairman
of the House Appropriations
Committee, Rep. George Mahon
(D., Tex.) agreed to persuade
the Administration to work out
a more acceptable arrangement.
Her assurances from Passman
stemmed- from that. ..
The debate on free training of
Saudi troops was heated up by
the disclosure that the Vinnell
Corporation of Los Angeles had
ohtained a $77 million contract
to Irian the Saudi Arabian na-
tional guard to defend oil fields
in that countiy.
The contract was from the
Defense Department, but,, the
money will be paid by Saudi
Arabia.
Otto Stieber Addresses
Sea Edge Residents9 Brunch
An over-flow crowd of Sea
Edge Condominium residents
heard Otto Stieber, 1975 Hi-Rise
Chairman for the United Jewish
Appeal Campaign, describe the
need for their support to aid Is-
rael "during these most trying of
times," at the building's March 9
brunch.
Mr. Stieber reminded them
that Israel needs the support of
all American Jews, "not only for
its existence, but for its survival."
Chairman Herman Schulman
presented the UJA Award of
Honor to Louis Ludwig for the
outstanding philanthropic work
he has done for the survival of
Israel and world Jewry.
Mr. Schulman and Bert Sha-
piro, cochairman, announced thai
they have finished their 1975
United Jewish Appeal Campaign
with an outstanding participa-
tion figure by the residents of
Sea Edge.
Margit (Mrs. Adam) Mochnar,
chairlady of the Women's Divi-
sion of Sea Edge, has also been
highly successful; she reports
close to 100 per cent participa-
tion.
m '<*^C^*p
jk 1 fk' ^Mfl I if
From left to right are Louis Ludwig, Sea Edge honoree;
Mrs. Adam Mochnar, chairlady of Women's Division;
Herman Schulman, chairman; Otto Stieber, 1975 Hi-Rise
chairman, and Bert Shapiro, cochairman.
nron^ irons
Mimn an Tans'?
wishing you a joyous Passover
and health and happiness always'
4
where
shopping
PubllX pleasure


Page 16-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, March 28, is
UTIHEMKNIWWEJUEMIE
He stands hereprotecting his family miles away,
defending the future of his people.
When his thoughts turn to his own future, he
dreams of a university education... a home of his own.
But he cannot realize his dreams by himself.
He needs our help.
He does not stand alone. Let him know it.
We Are One
Give to the Israel Emergency Fund
JEWISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD INC
COMBINED JEWISH APPEAL ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
2838 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Florida. 33020
Telephone 921-8810
_


"cjewisll FloricHftn Friday, March 28, 1975
and Shofar of Hollywood Section B


Aficient Haggadahs: An Ancient Past
By ALFRED H. PAUL
AS YOU tell your children the
age-old story of the liberation
of the ancient Hebrews from
Egyptian bondage, wou.d you
like to illustrate the history with
a map, showing exactly where the
slaves fleeing Egypt had crossed
the Bed Sea, the tortuous paths
they wound through the Sinai
Desert for 40 years, the spot
where they crossed the Jordan to
enter Palestine, and the disposi-
tion of Israel's tribes in their
land of milk and honey?
There is such a map in exis-
tence. All you have to do is re-
call the Library of Hebraica and
Judaica, at New York University
and Prof. Abraham I. Kat^h.
THE MAP mentioned here is
in an old Haggadah. There an
other unique editions of the Hag
gadah in the library all run by
Dr. Katsh, later president of
Dropsie University. They are not
originals but they are filmed
copies of the originals on
microfilm.
Prof. Katsh has devoted years
of study, research and highly
complicated negotiations to ob-
tain microfilmed copies of these
very old Haggadahs as well as
of many thousands of other print-
ed books and manuscripts.
Through his unique efforts,
many thousands of such ancient
books, manuscripts and docu-
ments may now be studied by
Western scholars.
He has brought to this country
a mass of Jewish historical ma-
terials which, until he started his
project, were virtually unattain-
able unless one traveled to Lenin-
grad, Moscow or Budapest and
obtained the permission of the
Communist authorities to search.
ONE FINDS among his treas-
ures the filmed Haggadah which,
in parallel columns, tells the
story of Passover in four-languag-
es: Hebrew, Judeo-German (the
oldest form of Yiddish), Ladino,
and purest Italian (in Hebrew
characters).
One runs the film through an
apparatus and sees Haggadah il-
lustrations that are unique con-
tributions to Jewish art. Some of
these are the traditional illlus-
trations that one finds in all mod-
ern copies of the Passover story
the young son asking the Four
Questions, the oicturization of the
Continued on Page 2-B


Page 2-B
=
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, March 28, 197S
Ancient Haggadahs
Continued from Page 1-B
'manner In which the Passover
Seder was celebrated, and others
with which we are more or less
familiar.
But there are many other il-
lustrations that one rarely sees
in the Haggadah. There are
those which carry on their front
cover "portraits" of Moses and
his brother Aaron. There are
others which illustrate various
Biblical scenes for instance,
' one of them shows Jacob wres-
tling with the Angel.
OF EXTREME interest is this
fact, however: The Passover
story as we know it today really
does go back many centuries, as
shown on these copies of the
Haggadah. The illustrations mav
differ in form, in skill and
artistry, in various details, some
- are from wood cuts, some from
copper plates. But the story is the
same; the order is the same: the
feeling is the same. In these
vital respects, there is absolute
continuity from the earlier copies
printed on early presses in the
Middle Aaes. to the present.
Turning back to that map,
mentioned above, this reporter
found it one of the most fas-
cinating documents he has ever
viewed.
Of course, the route of the
Jews through the Wilderness was
imagined by the anonymous art-

ist. But scholars have checked the
map for its disposition of the
Tribes of Israel, and have found
the map reconstructing their po-
sitions accurately, as told in the
Bible.
DOWN IN the lower right-
hand corner, there is a female
figure, apparently riding an alli-
gator that's Egypt, so labeled.
One finds in accurate position to-
day's Eilat, the Dead Sea, the
Mediterranean coast (the Medi-
terranean is called the Big Sea),
and Lake Kineret. Jericho is
there, as are Hebron and many
other cities that we know in Is
rael todav. as well as many his-
toric landmarks and portions of
the Israeli terrain, including
mountains and valleys.
The man even shows the direc-
tions of the compass, except that
North, instead of oointing verti-
cally upward as our maps show,
is pointed in what we would con-
sider a Southwest oosition: how-
ever, if you turn to the North as
shown on the man. vou out the
picture into proner persoective.
Form Hungary alone. Dr. Katsh
has brought microfilms of 15.000
documents and books: many thou-
sands of others are from the
famous Baron David Guinsburg
collection in Leningrad.
WE FIND among his treasures
copies of documents dating back
to the year 1021. There are copies
of papers, written and printed,
in Hebrew. Arabic. Aramaic. Ju-
deo-German. Judeo-Arabic. Ladi-
no and Italian (in Hebrew
characters). There are liturgical
manuscripts.
There is a poem, heretofore
unpublished, by Yehudah Halevi.
There are letters exchanged
among famous Italian rabbis and
""rtfcgregants. dealing with* will-
nary, everyday affairs.
There are documents and frag-
ments of prayer books used by
the followers of Dseudo-Messiah
Shabbetai Zevi and there are doc-
uments pertaining to another
pseudo-Messiah. Solomon Molcho,
who was burned at the stake by
the Inquisition, at Mantua, in
1532.
There are works on astronomy
and medicine, and works by
Maimonides and a lexicon of the
Talmud anil Midrash (arranged
alphabetically) dating to the year
1582
THESE, TOO, if you consider
the story of Passover in its
broader aspect as the story of
a people who, liberated physical-
ly, proceeded to liberate their
own and the world's soirit
these too are part of the Passover
story.
Some 60 scholars from various
parts of the world, including Is-
rael, are at work in the library
of Prof. Katsh. studying many of
these books, documents and man-
uscripts. But for his work, a look
at these treasures would have
been impossible without unwel-
come and difficult and costly
trips to forbidden Russia and
Hungary.
The Western world has been
enriched by these microfilms.
And Jewish history and tradition
have been well served.
j-
How Can
Zionism Be
Anti-Semitic?
By
DR. FREDERICK LACIIMAN
Committee Votes on Foreign Aid
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
"The House Appropriations Com-
mittee has voted out a foreign
aid bill of $3.5 billion, including
$624.5 million for Israel and an
almost equal amount for three
of its Arab neighbors, but it
killed a proposal for screening
out possible Communist infiltra-
tors among emigrants aided by
U.S. funds, including Soviet
Jews going to Israel.
The screening proposal would
base enlarged on a proviso long
a part of foreign aid legislation
that committed the Intergovern-
mental Commission for Euro-
pean Migration (ICEM) in Ge-
neva not to assist emigration of
Communist sympathizers who
may wish to make new homes in
the Western hemisphere.
IN AN executive session last
week of the committee's sub-
committee handling aid funds.
a proposal was offered for hav-
ing ICEM, the UN High Com-
missioner's Office which usually
deals with African, migration
and Bangladesh going to Pakis-
tan, and the International Red
Cross join in barring aid to Com-
munists to emigrate in return
Jbr U.S. assistance.
Under the bill. ICEM is to get
$2.4 million; the U.N. office.
$l..'l million; and the Red Cross.
$5 million.
Opponents of the proposal, in-
cluding the State Department,
held the measure was a throw-
back to cold war tactics.
Rep. Les Aspin (D., Witc.)
aid it would interfere with Is-
rael's internal affairs and that
Israel could handle any such
matter itself. Aspin said that
ICEM helped the 17.000 Soviet
Jews who entered Israel last
y-iar.
NEITHER A record vote of
the full committee on the pro-
posal nor information on who
proposed the measure in the
subcommittee and what moti-
vated them was officially avail-
able.
A committee spokesman said
that he was not free to disclose
the identity of its sponsors since
this action was behind closed
doors.
The Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
cy learned, however, that the
screening'proposal was "made by
Rep. William V. Chappell Jr.
(D., Fla.)
The bill earmurks for Israel
$324.5 million in economic as-
sistance. $200 million in military
credit and $100 million in mili-
tary grants. In addition, $40
million was also voted for use
in helping the resettlement of
Soviet Jews in Israel and several
million dollars more was includ -
ed for schools and hospitals in
Israel.
The precise amount for the
schools and hospitals is not
available at the moment because
the overall amount of money is
to be prorated among several
countries.
EGYPT IS to receive $250
million in grant economic aid;
Jordan. $77 million; and for
Middle East requirements there
is $100 million which is under-
stood to be going to Syria.
In addition, Jordan is pro-
grammed for $94 million in mili-
tary grant aid and a credit of
$30 million.
':. hese military amounts, how-
ever, may be reduced since the
overa.l budget t~r military aid
is reduced. Isrr.-1's is specifically
slated.
The current ontinuing resolu-
tion carrying the aid program
expires Mar. 25.
The term "Semites" originally
referred to those peoples listed
in the table of nations (Gen. 10>
as descendants of Noah's son
Shem (Sem), his five sons and
their 21 descendants.
In all, 26 peoples derived from
him. These include the Elamites,
the Assurians. the Lydians. the
Arameans, and numerous Arab
tribes.
EARLY IN the development
of modern ethnology, however,
it was realised that the list in
Genesis combines peoples who
often have nothing in common
but geographic propinquity.
"Semite" was then defined by
the supposed physical character-
istics of the chief surviving rep-
EDITOR'S NOTE: In his ad-
dress to the United Nations
on the Palestine Question,
Yasir Arafat, leader of the
Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization, charged that Zion-
ism is anti-Semitic. Here-
with Dr. Frederick Lach-
man, executive editor of the
Encyclopaedia Judaica, ex-
plains the term, "Semite."
resentatives of the original list,
the Jews and the Arabs.
The misleading and evil re-
sults of earlier racial theories
have led to a restriction on the
use of the words, "Semite" and
"Semitic," so that today they
apply only to linguistic catego-
ries.
ONLY JEWS and Arabs speak
Semitic languages now, but in
ancient times the Akkadians, the
Amorites, the Babylonians, the
Phoenicians, ana the Canaanites
did as well.
(The "Hebrews" do not ap-
pear at all in the table of na-
Top Bishop Believes Israel Will
Be Included in Vatican Dialogue
CINCINNATI (JTA)
The head &f the National
Conference of Catholic Bish-
ops has predicted that the
Vatican would include the
question of Israel as part of
its new dialogue with the
Jewish community.
"As Catholics learn by
what essential traits Jews
define themselves in light of
their religious experience,
one of these traits will be
an understanding of the link
between the people and the
land," Joseph L. Bernardin,
Archbishop of the Roman
Catholic Archdiocese of Cin-
cinnati, and president of the
National Conference of Cath-
olic Bishops and United
said here on a special televi-
States Catholic Conference,
sion program discussing the
establishment of the newly-
created Vatican Commission
on Religious Relations with
the Jews.
THE PROGRAM was broadcast
by WLWT Cincinnati. The
Catholic leader appeared with
Dr. Alfred Gottschalk, president
of Hebrew Union College-Jewish
In-tin'tp nf Religion.
Both religious leaders analyzed
the recent Vatican statement call-
ing upon Catholics to enter into
dialogue, study, worship and
Joint social actions efforts with
members of the Jewish com-
munity. The program is being of-
fered for broadcast on stations
throughout the country.
Rabbi Gottschalk, who heads
Reform Judaism's Institution of
Higher Learning, stressed that an
"Urgent need exists for our
Catholic brethren to confront the
reality of Israel theologically and
to understand its real meaning to
Jews all over the world."
HE EMPHASIZED that Jews
were disturbed at the failure of
the Vatican statement to mention
Israel, "Although I understand
some of the reasons but don't
necessarily agree with them."
He stated that Catholics must
comprehend "the growing dimen-
sion of importance that Israel
holds to the Jewish Deople both
from a religious and day-to-day
living point of view."
Archbishop Bernardin assured
members of the Jewish com-
munity that "The purpose of di-
alogue is not conversion."
HE ASSERTED that while
Catholics "feel that they are ob
ligated to preach Jesus Cnrist ami
give witness to the Christian
gospel, the purpose of the dia
logue is to exchange information
tions; it is, however, generally
supposed that Eber, a descend-
ent of Shem (Gen. 10:21.25) is
their namesake and that deserve
to be listed).
At the beginning of the 19th
century, with the emergence of
nationalistic struggles, writers
began to distinguish between
races and to set one against the
other. This was especially true
in Germany where nationalist
agitators extolled the merits and
qualities of the Teutonic race.
Jews who up to then had been
included in the white race, were
now considered as a race apart,
an oriental one, according to the
Encyclopaedia Judaica.
A CONFUSION arose be-
tween languages and races, a
mistake which had grave conse-
quences. It was believed that the
nations who spoke European
languages which were thought
to have derived from Sanskrit,
belonged to the Indo-European
or "Aryan" race.
In opposition to them was a
"Semitic" race, represented by
the Jews and the Arabs. Prog-
ress in anthropology, ethnogra-
phy, and pre-history made most
specialists gradually abandon
these simplistic conceptions.
The "Aryan theory" continued
to gain adherents among the
general public, however, and the
anti-Jewish sentiment, from then
en was called "anti-Semitic."
THIS CONCEPT implied a
vague belief in the intellectual
or moral superiority of the
"Aryans" over the "Semites,"
the tragic consequences of which
are too well-known as to have
to be stressed once more.
In no way does it mean that we
want to proselytize and that we
want to turn the dialogue into a
process that would lead to con-
version."
Both agreed that the dialogue
must go beyond the nrofession.il
and institutional level to the
grass roots members of both
churches and svnagogues. They
concurred with th? guideline sug-
gestions that common study pro-
grams and coimmi*ii*v social ac-
tion efforts would be activitiej
that could be carried out.
South Florida Yom Haatzmaut
Celebration Set For April 15
South Florida Jewry will cele-
brate the 27th anniversary of
the founding of the State of Is-
rael April 15 with a communitv-
wide observance of Yom Haatz-
maut, Israel Independence Day.
in the Miami Beach Convention
Center.
The American Zionist Federa-
tion will sponsor the rally, which
officials of the AZF say will be
the largest observance of Yom
Haatzmaut actually held on Is-
rael Independence Day anywhere
in the United States.
rn 1973, a record-setting 8,678
persons attended Yom Haatz-
maut, and an attendance of 9,000
is expected this year, according
to Mrs. Milton Green, president
of the South Florida Zionist
Federation.
The program will feature a
i.___
musical presentation under the
di.ection of Shmuel Fershko, Is-
raeli composer and conductor
and musical director of Temple
Emanu-El of Miami Beach, and
a keynote address by a United
States Senator.
Working with Mrs. Green on
plans for the rally are members
of a committee which includes
representatives of Hadassah,
Pioneer Women, American Miz-
rachi Women, the Zionist Or-
ganization of America, Labor
Zionist Alliance. B'nai Zion and
all other Zionist organizations
in Dade and Broward counties.
Tickets for the rally may be
secured at the American Zion-
ist Federation offices in the 605
Lincoln Rd. Building, Miami
Beach. Organizations may se-
c-re blocs of tickets there.


Friday, March 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 3-B
Allon Makes Some Frank Points
By RICHARD YAFFE
London Chronicle Syndicate
ISRAEL'S DEPUTY Prime Min-
ister. Yigal Ailon, returned
home recently froJn an exhaust
infi and generally frustrating two
weeks in New York, where he
found the foreign ministers say-
ing nice things about Israel and
praising his address to the United
Nations General Assembly in
private meetings, but, with an
eye on the Arab States, acting
otherwise in public debate.
Speaking in Hebrew, a Ian
guage heard only for the first
time from a UN rostrum. Allon
delivered a reasoned survey of
the Middle East and the forces
that keep it from attaining peace,
but it changed nothing and failed
to advance his lone battle to
keep the Palestine Liberation
Organization from being recog-
nized as the voice of all Pales
tinians, and to speed up the pro-
cesses of peace-making.
HE WAS at it day and night,
pausing only for a few hours of
exhausted sleep, and it began to
tell on him as the visit drew to
a close. In sharper replies to
hostile questions, in a glare at
a questioner, which a correspond-
ent referred to as "Allon's death
ray," in his nervous inability to
sit still for a moment.
In bisapeech he made a quick
"roffr" cfWorizoV' of world prob-
lems, pausing to attack Syria
sharply for its mistreatment of
the handful of Jews left there,
and to appeal to the Soviet Union
"to show greater generosity, to
cease harassing those who have
applied to emigrate, to release
the prisoners of Zion, to open
the gates, and they will earn the
praises of civilized men every-
where for their humanity."
He did not react in his speech
to the statement of the Soviet
Foreign Minister, Andrei Gromy-
ko, in the General Assembly de-
bate, looking towards a resump-
tion of diplomatic relations with
Israelif Israel gave in to every-
thing the Arabs and Russia de-
manded.
HE WAS asked, at a meeting
with the UN press corps, for Is-
rael's reaction to this, and he
replied that "when he (Gromyko)
is ready to restore relations with
Israel, we shall respond on a
reciprocal basis."
Later, over coffee in the cor-
DEPUTY MINISTER ALLON
coiwiinmatf diplomacy
respondents' lounge, he ques-
tioned the wisdom of the Soviet
Union in breaking off relations
with Israel in the first place.
There ean be differences be-
tween States, even sharp ones,
which have relations with each
other and can be settled, or at
least mitigated, through dialogue,
he said, citing the case of Ro-
mania, the only Soviet-attached
State which did not break with
Jerusalem and with which there
are occasional disagreements
without causing a break.
He noted ironically that it took
24 years for the UN to issue a
call for peace jn the. Middle.East
but only when Israel had
turned the tide against its at
tackers who were heading for
another debacle
"IT IS not to the Security
Council's credit" that it took so
long, but, "at any rate, it was
progress and it is better late
than never."
Allon also saw the disengage-
ment agreements with Egypt and
Syria as "a measure of progress"
away from the three Arab no's
of Khartoumno peace, no rec-
ognition, no negotiations. The
agreements were "a first positive
step," and they came about as
the result of the Arabs' experi-
ence" in the October. 1973 War
and Secretary of State Kissin-
ger's "remarkable efforts."
"But there, too. the same grave
question presents itself: why did
it come so late, and why only
after bloodshed," when Israel
was ready all along to reach the
same kind of agreements con-
cerning the Suez Canal area and
the Golan Heights, and the Arabs
kept saying no?
"It could have been done with-
out the "cost of tens of thousands
of casualties on both sides."
ALLON GAYE these casualty
figures: 2,500 Israelis, 12,000
Egyptians and 3,000 Syrians
dead, with more than 40,000
wounded and many permanently
disabled.
"There is not. there cannot be
and there never will be a mili-
tary solution of the Arab-Israel
conflict." he declared, "which
persists beyond all reason and
beyond all political realism, a
conflict which saps the very mar-
row from the bones of all the
peoples of the area and. despite
the extensive resources of our
area, debilitates their economies
and their societies "
The aggressors in the Yom
Kippur War had three "marked
advantages which, under normal
circumstances, should have been
decisive": overwhelming man-
power, strength and modern so-
phisticated weaponry, initiative
and surprise.
And yet. the wheel soon turned
"in Israel's favor" and when the
fighting was stopped by the Se-
curity Council, the Arabs were
on the brink of defeat. He me-
tioned this without joy but with
Continued on Page IB



Page 4-B
=
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, March 28, 1975
^Some Frank Points
Continued on Page 4-B
sorrow, not wishing to exult in
the Israeli victory nor embarr Egypt or Syria. iUt*3\* '.
HE MENTIONED it to show
[that military solutiohj'InATtig-
failed, it was time to turn to
political efforts and to "refrain
.'rom provocative statements and
disparaging slogans."
Giving the Arabs more arms,
he told Russia, "might encourage
new aggression, but it cannot de-
cide the issue in a new war." But
if a new war is forced, "we shall
be ready."
The disengagement agree-
ments, Allon said, were not only
military but political in nature in
'that "the very fact of negotia-
tions" is a "political step for-
jward," and that any extended
period of tranquality contributes
;to the creation of a new climate
which makes Doible "a new dy-
inamic for a political solution."
Also, the disengagement agree-
ments include an important po-
litical paragraph which calls the
.agreements "a first sjep towards
a.just ajid durable.jjeace.." .
But the disengajoment agree-
ments are not enough. Allon
-said. "We must go forward with
negotiations without prior condi-
tions."
ALLON SPENT considerable
time on the Palestine question,
Reiterating that the Palestinians
rhave a natural Palestine home
in Jordan, and that the PLO rep-
'resents terrorists, not Palestin-
ians.
In line with this, the perma-
nent representative of Israel to
the UN, Josef Tekoah, declared
in a note to the Secretary-Gen-
eral, Dr. Kurt Waldheim. that
recognizing the PLO and giving
it status within the UN contrav-
ened the world organization's
charter because its objective "is
the destruction by armed force
of a member State of the UN."
He quoted liberally from the
PLO.'s charter and included a
long list of atrocities committed
by(U\e .organization and the ter-
rorist groups affiliated with it
A debate on the so-called "Ques
tion of Palestine," Allon de-
clared, "cannot fail to poison the
international atmosphere'* and
"may well condemn the prospects
of the negotiating process to fail-
ure, just when the first ray of
light has been glimpsed on the
horizon."
ALLON NOTED the predic-
tions of renewed war in the Mid-
dle East, but as far as Israel ii
concerned, it will "faithfully ob-
serve the ceasefire and separa-
tion of forces agreements on a
reciprocal basis until they are
replaced or supplemented by new
agreements."
But "we shall neither submit
nor lend ourselves to the black
mail of threats of war, or even
of war itself."
"We shall prepare for, the
worst, and hope and work for the
best.'' he told the Assembly.
Allon was asked why. in view
of his good English, he chose to
speak Hebrew in the Assembly
and he replied: "My Hebrew is
even better."
IT WAS more than that, of
course. States are increasingly
speaking in their own tongues
from the rostrums of the UN^ in-
stead of using the "official" lan-
guages English, French, Rus
sian, Spanish, Chinese and now
Arabic.
The Israeli mission supplied
the simultaneous translators with
an English translation of Allon's
address, 1
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MR. MARSHALL BERWICK of
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Friday, March 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 5-B
J
f
f
Preparing for the Holocaust
NEw,yop^rTr(JT^r-
.Nothing-. in mankind s his-
tory could have prepared or
warned East European Jew-
ry of the Nazi insanity in
planning to exterminate all
jews and everything Jew-
ish, Prof. Saul Friedlander
told an overflow crowd of
800 at the International
Scholars Conference on the
Holocaust.
I "The combination of a
pathological obsession with
Jews as bacteria a source
of moral infection com-
bined with
Nati
idetfloey of f
\ffynfrdUi i ver
an insanity among the
that went beyond the hu-
man," declared Dr. Fried-
lander, professor of interna
tional relations at Hebrew
university.
"THIS INSANITY, this view of
the Jews embodying a kind ol
cosmic principle of evil, was so
overwhelming," Friedlander con-
tended, "that nothing the Jews
did or did not do could have
radically changed the course of
events after the beginning of the
war."
60 PERCENT MAXIMUM
Drastic Tax Cuts Viewed
By Committee iii Knesset
--".
L By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) A special committee on tax
reform is expected to recommend that the rate at which
Israelis pay income tax said to be the highest in the
world be drastically reduced while many exemptions are
abolished or severely curtailed.
The committee, headed by Prof. Haim Ben Shahar of
Tel Aviv University, will submit its report tomorrow to
Finance Minister Yehoshua Rabinowitz.
According to reliable sources, the recommendations
include a reduction of the tax rate from 87.5 percent to a
maximum of 60 per cent of in- t. ,
Rabinowitz has promised that
they would go into effect by July
but most economists arid jurists
believe it is unrealistic to expect
major tax reforms to be insti-
tuted in only three months.
come. If adopted by the govern-
ment, almost 95 per cent of the
tax-payers will pay not more
than 35 per cent of their taxable
income, economic experts said.
BUT THE committee will also
recommend the abolition of tax
exemptions for professional lit-
erature, except for those profes-
sionals who can prove an abso-
lute need for it; it will also call
for an end to exemptions claimed
for clothing and car expenses and
for abolition of the special tax
arrangements that apply to cer-
tain groups such as airline pilots
who are paid partly in foreign
currency.
The Ben Shahar committee was
appointed by the Treasury to
study tax reforms in face of the
fact that the high tax rate dis-
couraged many people from
working overtime at a time when
workers are being urged to in-
crease their productivity.
RABINOWITZ HAS made it
clear that although, the govern-
ment would adopt part, if not all
of the recommended reforms, it
had no intention of reducing its
income.
While direct taxes will be cut
considerably, the difference will
be made up by indirect taxes
such as the 7.5 per cent sales tax
instituted by the government sev-
eral weeks ago and an added
value tax expected to be imposed
this summer.
The Ben Shahar committee was
acting on a purely economic level
but political considerations are
sure to enter the picture-when
their recommendations come up
for discussion in the Cabinet and
Knesset.
THE ATTITUDE of Histadrut
is expected to be crucial to their
adoption. Therefore, no one can
say when the reforms will be im-
plemented.
|ng on a major contro-
_ jf. the Holocaust
Conference sponsored by He
brew University's Institute of
Contemporary Jewry and the
United Jewish Appeal ~- Fried-
lander said, "The polemic around
Jewish resistance and the role of
the Jewish Councils (J Hpnrat)
is almoit secondary and has more-
importance on .i moral plane
than on the level of historic per
spective."
This was so. he contenls, be-
cause the murderous N'azi anti-
Semitism was fed by an element
of true insanity and the growing
disintegration of European
society elements totally inde-
pendent of the Jews themselves.
"The Jews were pictured as
outsiders, enemies, a symbol, a
bacillus, to galvanize the masses."
"THAT WAS the deadly logic
in the dialectic of anti-Semitism,"
said Friedlander.
Prof. Friedlander delivered hit
address as part of the Philip
Klutznick International Lecture
Series on Contemporary Jewish
Life and Institutions.
Klutznick, who was present at
the lecture, reinforced his sup*
port of the lecture series and the
need for such forums for Jewish
issues.
"This lecture proves the va
lidity and power of scholarship
in Jewish life," he said.
IN INTRODUCING Prof. Fried-
lander. Frank R. Laut-nbr?,
UJA general chairman said. "To
be a Jew today means to cherish
life. Judaism symbolizes the
sanctity of life. Auschwitz may
be inexplicable, but it is our duty
as Jews and as men to see that it
is never forgotten."
A Happy Passovw To All .
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Us
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I

I


------------------

Page 6-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, March 28, 1975
Passover for GIs Around World
By MRS. FRANCIS B1X>LSTEIN
Chairman, JWB Women's
Organizations' Services
JTVERY PASSOVER at 5 a.m..
New York time, the first
'Seder of any year anywhere in
the world is celebrated by a group
of Jewish airmen and sailors on
the island of Guam. From then
on, as the sun sets on each time
zone around the world, hour by
hour, a military seder takes place
during the next 24 hours.
The last large one is in Hawaii:
the very last one is on Wake
Islanda seder performed by two
or three men using solo-seder
packages provided by JWB. i
THE INTERMEDIATE places
include military personnel sta-
tioned in the Philippines, Taiwan,
Okinawa, Japan, Korea, Vietnam,
Thailand. Europe, Iceland, Green-
land, Alaska, Panama, United
States, Caribbean area, ships at
sea, weather and radar stations,
embassies the world over, Peace
Corps personnel in many coun-
tries, and patients in Veterans
Administration hospitals.
Once a year JWB becomes the
Passover planning by JWB for Jewish military families
and other personnel begins right after the previous Yom
Kippur. Here in Vicenza, Italy, Chaplain Nahum Cohen
(second from right), and Mrs. Judy Moren, lay leader,
oversee the loading of an airborne unit helicopter with
kosher food, Haggadot, and Passover supplies, made pos-
sible through JWB's Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy
and Women's Organizations' Services.
Anti-Semitic Piece Signed
fey TLO Member' Gradating
"What goes on here? Why are
they all of the same kind?" asks
the propaganda mailing. "Why
are we left out? Are we already
dominated by these people?
What about us? Are we too
dumb to participate in the af-
fairs of our country? What do
you make out of this unrealistic
setup?"
Making the rounds in South
Florida is a piece of anti-Semi-
tic propaganda reported this
week to The Jewish Floridian
both by individuals and organi-
, zations.
, The piece is "signed" by "an
!American (PLO) member" and
is labeled "Eye-Openers! Can
You See?"
The mailing calls "1975 the
deciding year" and the "last
chance to save our nation."
ARRAYED IN a semi-circle
around a box labeled The Pres-
ident" are 11 Stars of David.
They list "Weinberger, Secre-
tary of Welfare; Greenspan,
head of Economic Council;
Friedman, chief speech writer;
iNessen, press secretary; Kissin-
ger, secretary of state; Schlesin-
ger, secretary of defense; Si-
mon, secretary of the treasury;
Burns, chairman of the F.R.
(Federal Reserve) System; Seid-
man, financial adviser; Bern-
stein, federal insurance adviser;
and Levi, attorney general."
Beneath the box labeled "The
President," is another box with
'a Star of David titled Mrs.
Weidenfeld, secretary to Mrs.
Ford."
CONTINUES THE piece:
"They occupy the most impor-
tant positions in the administra-
tion. This is proper representa-
tion for over 210,000,000 Amer-
icans? What is the purpose of
this uneven way of representing
all American citizens? Eventual
Soviet style domination of
Americans?"
The piece urges: "Don't stand
for this outrage. Tell it to all
your friends and neighbors. Pro-
test to your Congressman. Have
copies made and spread them all
over."
Among others, Caspar Wein-
berger is not Jewish. Neither
are James Schlesinger, Arthur
Simon, Ron Nessen, nor Mrs.
Ford's secretary, Mrs. Weiden-
feld.
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL .
STUDIO OF WALL FURNITURE
UNIQUE CRAFT ACCESSORIES
4902 NA 2i* AVE. MIAMI. FLA. 33137 (3M) I73-3M1
Members ol the Industry Foundation of ASID
NHFL Resources Council
Exclusive Factory Distributor for' ********* ^>bfe
SHELVES UNLIMITE0
largest Kosher catering establish-
ment in the world. Passover re-
quires "Kosher LVPesach" food
items which only JWB can pro-
vide the world over in sufficient
quantity and in sufficient time,
with a helping hand from the
military logistical transportation
system.
And JWB does ityear in,
year out. You never hear of com-
ConUnued on Following Page
A HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL
PERRY'S of course
where the first in
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we extend holiday greetings
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Friday, March 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Passover for Our GIs
Page 7-B
Continued from Preceding Pa*e
plaints of being derelict in re-
sponsibility. The trust that has
keen plad n JWB has*-been
magnificently fulfi]j** $ f
Passover is "the holiday when
the largest percentage of Jewish
personnel in the military make
their identity known.
THE SEDER still weaves its
magic spell upon voung men and
their families, as it has for cen-
turies.
JWB receives more calls from
parents dealing with assurances
that their 6ons will have a Pass-
over seder or Passover supplies
than it does even at the High
Holy Days.
This is understandable. One
can still pray by himself. One
cannot celebrate the Passover
without otside help. The provi-
sions must be made available.
That is JWB's job.
How is that job accomplished?
How much is to be sent where,
and when, and in what amounts.
and throuch what channels of
transportation? How are all chan-
nels of communication opened,
to take care of such a small
minority of nersonnel dispersed
throughout the globe at thou-
sands of installations 86 well as
on ships at sea?
THE WORK on this project be-
gins immediately after Yom Kio-
pur. Meetines are held in Wash-
ington between representatives of
JWB and the logistical experts in
the offices of the three Chiefs of
Chaplains. The purpose c-f these
meetings is to set up the time-
table and write the directives
which provide JWB with the
necessary information1) the ap-
proximate number of Jewish per-
sonnel in the Tespective areas, 2)
where requisitions will be con-
solidated, and 3) the latest dates
of shipment from United States
ports which will guarantee their
arrival at least two weeks before
Passover.
The next problem is dealing
with sources of,supply, ^latzos
and other P"asso0e3iitem6 do not
Csally jo into jrcjiuctbn until
four month's Before Passover.
Yet the shipment of supplies
from U.S. ports must move no
later than three to four months
before Passover. Kosher supplies
cannot start a Passover produc-
tion system and then shut it off
to begin again a month or so
later.
EVERYONE, therefore, must
work within very delicate "dead-
lines" which will provide JWB
with the supplies it needs and
not increase costs by Kosher sup-
pliers starting production and
then shutting down.
One of the finest programs in
the Passover picture is the solo-
seder program. It is sent to such
personnel as will not be able to
attend a Seder in this country or
overseas.
It is intended for hospitals
where there may be only a hand-
ful of men who cannot travel to
the nearest Jewish community
for a Seder.
It is intended for two Jew-
ish airmen attached to the DEW
line radar complex on an island
in Baffin Bay.
It is intended for three sail-
ors on a ship leaving one of our
ports which will be on the high
seas during Passover.
It is needed for GIs who are
not able to attend the large
Sedorim because their special as-
signment keeps them in their
isolated areas.
It is for the Jewish military
attaches in countries around the
world where there are no local
Jewish communities.
It is for Peace Corps per-
sonnel deep in the hinterlands
of the countries in which they
serve.
These "Solo-Seders"each of
which contains matzot, gefilte
fish, chicken dinner with matzoh
balls, chocolate candies, a Hag-
gadah and Passover greeting card
are prepared for shipment in
JWB's stock room.
THE FUNDS for this wonder-
ful project come from contrib-
utions from local Women's Organ-
'ftifaons" Services1 groups all over
the country. Nearly 4,000 pack-
ages are sent out annually.
This program met with instan-
taneous success its first year and
has brought thrilling letters
which are so heart-warming that
while they bring a wide grin to
the face they cause tears to well
< ontinued on Page 9-B
^4 4*fcfo
QC
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5911 RODMAN STREET
HOLLYWOOD 33023
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HOLLYWOOD 33021



Page 8-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, March 28, 1975
We Must Feel We Were Personally Freed in Egypt
By WEI* CHARNIAK
WE ARB told, in our ancient
scriptures, that "every penoa
in every 'generation must regard
himself as having been person-
ally freed from Egypt." This
means, of course, that the Jewish
Feast of Passover has a special
meaning for all Jews. It is not
merely an occasion for a family
gathering, a Seder, which is fre-
quently glorified in story and in
song. It commemorates, as a
British-Jewish scholar (Morris Jo-
seph) once wrote, "a deliverance
which transformed a horde of
slaves into a people." And if you
acknowledge that with the Exo-
dus from Egypt the Jewish nation
was established, well then, Pass-
over is the birthday of the peo-
ple of Israel.
BERL KATZENELSON, one of
the leading Zionist leaders and
thinkers in Palestine (before Is-
rael was born) observed about
the Haggadah and the Bible
story of the Exodus that "I am
not acquainted with a literary
creation which can evoke a great-
er contempt for slavery and love
of freedom than the narrative of
the bondage and Exodus from
Egypt. And I do not know of any
other ancient memory so entirely
a symbol' of our present and fu-
ture, as the memory of the Exo-r.
dus from Egypt."
Rabbi Philip Goodman, in his
book, "The Passover Anthol-
ogy" (JPS), has culled the
above observations and thousands
more in a volume which, in all,
highlights the excitement, mean-
ing and overwhelming impor-
tance of Passover to the Jewish
people.
But I should like, at this time,
to veer away from the literary
and from the historical, to recall
personal memories related to
Passover and the Passover story,
in relationship not only to the
Jewish people but to a contempo-
rary American Jew, who seeks
enlightenment and illumination
from the festivals of his people.
THE SEDER, of course, is cru-
cial to any celebration of Pass-
over, and I recall, easily and
vividly, the various significant
Sedorim I have attended and in
which I have participated. Dur-
ing the Second World War, I,
like tens of thousands of Jewish
soldiers, sought our Army bases
and private homes were a Seder
was being held. I -and the rest
of the Jewish soldiers, 1 am .sure
made a greater effort to at-
tend a Seder during those distant
days than during peaceful days
in the United States.
Still, the appeal and magnetism
of the Seder carried over, and as
a parent, I also became sharply
aware of the attractiveness of the
Seder as a family gathering, as
an educational force for Judaism
and as an opportunity to recall
the miracle of the Exodus story.
BUT THE Passover holiday is
more than the Seder. It is a focal
point for stressing the leadership
qualities of men like Moses. Just
as Abraham Lincoln has become
a legend ar.d a myth to most
Americans, so has Moses become,
through the tale of the Exodus,
the most important Jew in Jew-
ish history.
As Ahad Ha-Am, the brilliant
Jewish thinker and essayist, has
said, Moses has led us not only
during the 40 years in the wilder-
ness of Sinai "but has led us for
thousands of years in all the
wildernesses in which we have
waadered since the Exodus."
Moses was .not a warrior, nor
;)mwaa he a.staUfSfjwn, J*ewas, how
ever, a prophet, and he repre-
sents all Jewish leaders who have
attempted to inspire and guide
the Jewish people.
IT WAS no wonder, then, that
when the military forces of Israel
first fought against the modern
Egyptians in Sinai in 1956, the
Jews of Israel considered their
soldiers to be part and parcel of
Jewish history, and that they
thought they were carrying on
the good fight begun by Moses
thousands of years ago.
The very fact that they were
in the Sinai desert the same
desert through which the chil-
dren of Israel wanderedgave a
continuity to Jewish life and
heroism. This is why I, and mil-
lions of Jews all over the world,
reacted with such great emotion
to the Sinai war.
We instinctively related our-
Sen. Stone Aims at Blacklist
WASHINGTON U.S. Sen. Richard Stone (D., Fla.)
noted this week that he has joined 32 other senators in co-
sponsoring a resolution (S.R. 100) aimed at breaking the
back of the Arab blacklist against American firms and in-
dividuals.
"The resolution says the Federal government should
consider using economic leverage to break the blacklist,"
said Stone, "by revising all forms of government support,
subsidies or assistance to Amer.
lean companies which modify
organizations or operating poli-
cies to give in to such discrimi-
nation."
"It also asks the President,"
noted Stone, "to examine this
country's trade relations and
suggests that countries that dis-
criminate in trade should face
the possibility that the United
States would cancel foreign aid
and arms sales to them."
ir ir
Jewish Cemetery Rumors
NEW YORKReports that the
Polish government intends to de-
molish the cemetery for Jewish
ghetto victims in Lodz are un-
true, it was announced by Agu-
dath Israel of America, national
. Orthodox Jewish movement.
This information was received
from Sen. Jacob K. Javits of New
York, to whom Rabbi Moshe
Sherer, Agudath Israel's execu-
tive president, had turned for
clarification.
has been partially boycotted by
artists sympathetic to the Is-
raeli cause. The "86th Salon des
Independents," now showing a
retrospective look at women
painters and sculptors since the
17th Century, noted that a
group of artists had refused to
participate.
Sen. Javits informed Agudath
Israel that he had learned that
there were no plans to destroy
any of the Jewish cemeteries In
Poland, and in fact several Jew-
ish cemeteries in that country
are under study for designation
as national monuments.
* ^ &
RabM Reelected
BUCHAREST Chief Rabbi
Moses Rosen was reelected to
the Rumanian Parliament in
last Sunday's general election.
6" TV *
Thespians Cancel Tour
VIENNAThe Vienna Burg-
theater may have to cancel a
planned tour of Israel because
some of the actors are afraid of
Arab terrorist activities.
Fritz Klingenberg, director of
the State-owned theater, said
. he was informed by several ac-
tors they could not go to Israel
"for family reasons."
But theater sources said they
cancelled their participation be-
cause of last week's terrorist at-
tack in Tel Aviv. The Burgthe-
ater was scheduled to start its
Kuest performances in Israel
Mar. 17.
TV & *
UNESCO Exhibit Boycotted
PARIS A. painting exposi-
tion, sponsored by UNESCO, l
"The presence of a few blank
canvasses is a manifestation of
our disapproval of an organiza-
tion, created to defend culture
throughout the world, which
exiles from its community a
people whose history is millen-
ary," the artists stated.
TV -if &
KIM Deaies Ramon
AMSTERDAM A spokes-
man for KLM, the Dutch Na-
tional Airline, has denied that
the airline had promised to
cease promoting tours to Israel,
ment that KLM would stop all
promotion of travel to Israel.
Responding to a statement is-
sued earlier by the director gen-
eral of the Arab Boycott Office
in Damascus, the KLM spokes-
man said the only promise made
to the Arabs was not to include
the occupied territories in KLM
travel folders on tourism in Is-
rael.
The spokesman said KLM has
long issued travel folders on
both Israel and Arab countries
and would continue to do so de-
spite the Arab boycott state-
* *
Directors Go To Jail
TEL AVIV Three former
directors of Habimah, Israel's
national theater, were sentenc-
ed to prison terms by a district
court here after their conviction
on charges of embezzling more
than IL 500,000 from the thea-
ter's funds between 1962 and 68.
Asher Sherf, who was the ad-
ministrative director of the fam-
ed company and allegedly re-
ceived the largest share of the
embezzled funds, was sentenced
to six years imprisonment, three
of which were suspended, and
fined IL 94,000.
Abraham Ninio, 57, a stage di-
rector, actor and former mem-
ber of Habimah's directorate,
got a three-year prison term of
which two years were suspend-
ed and was fined IL 43,000.
The third defendant, Mrs. Bat
Ami Elyashiv, 63, an actress and
former member of the director-
ate, drew a three-year suspend-
ed sentence and an IL 85,000
fine.
A Happy Passover To All
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selves to all Jews, past and pres-
ent, and recalled the agonies and
-uncertainties and- victories of
Moses and-his Jews.-
SO THE Passover story it both
the Sederwith Its careful ritual,
its reading of the Haggadah, its
ceremonial grandeur and tha
tale of Moses.
But there is another reason
why Passover is of such signifi-
cance to me in this era. The story
of Passover is woven into ths
fabric not only of the Jew as a
Jew but into the history of Israel,
which was once a distant dream
and is now a reality.
Those of us wfco follow tho
achievements of the people of Is-
rael cannot help but think of the
Passover festival throughout the
year.
< ENTURIES AGO, Egypt was
the force that threatened the
Jewish people and their exist,
ence. The same holds true today
Egypt remains, persistently, the
foe of Israel.
And when in 1956 I visited Is.
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Phone 920-2828
Season's Greetings
THRIFTY RENT-A-CAR
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Phone 927-1761
Health and Happines for Passover
WHITE SEAL, INC.
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2010 SHERMAN STREET 927-1795
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m
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1201 N. STATE ROAD 7
HOLLYWOOD 33021
A HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL .
Frank's Upholstery
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Custom Made Upholstery Slipcovers
Drapes Valences Bedspreads Window Shades
free Estimates
SHOP-ATHOMESERVia
Phone 966-2439
- --


1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 9-B
and saw,
territory
be-
and
J
^ and lked
J3 XTthe for.
rnited Nations, I recalled again
Art the struggle for Jewiah ex-
Jle has not yet been won;
J? the efforts of Moses have
id to he completed.
:AndwhenIsawtheSinai**
-t with my own eyes I felt
'how, that the old atory of
Paover as told in Exodus was
not s ancient as I had believed
it to be; that it still was with us.
and that 1 was part of it.
THE EGYPTIANS of the past
represented oppression and the
jews individual liberty. As I ob-
served and was impressed by the
work of the people of Israel in
reclaiming their land, in recreat-
ing the. desert, in opening the
land to Jews everywhere, 1 won-
wered why tt was that in the
twentieth century Egypt still
symbolized the "enemy" of pro-
gress and human liberty.
Thus, the wheel has turned
full circle. Moses lad a compara-
tive handful of men into a new
land the Promised Land, for he
fled slavery and insisted that his
people, once slaves, deserved to
live in iieedom on their own
soil.
Today, the Jews of Israel are
reliving the Passover story.
Again, they are building in free-
dom while on their borders stand
the Egyptians, cruel, oppressive
and unwilling to allow the Jews
to live in peace and rebuild their
homeland.
EVEKY INCH of Israeli soil is
drenched in history and the an-
cient Biblical places and names
are still with us.
The headlines in the Hebrew
newspapers, written in the im-
mortal Hebrew langoaoe, scream
the same ..ames like Mitzraim
(Egypt)--of the Passover era.
And, I am convinced, the Jews
of today, like the Jews of old.
wi'l conouer their timeless foes.
SO WHEN the Passover season
approaches, I am swept up by
the Sederwhich is the Jewish
ritual by Mo?es, who represents
Jewish prophecy and leadership.
It is, therefore, not difficult for
the Jew. regardless of his depth
of Jewish feeling and emotion, to
relate t3 the Passover story.
Passover for Our Gls

i
Continued from Page 7-B
up in the eyes. These letters ex-
press deep feelings of apprecia-
tion that, in the midst of caring
for vast numbers, JWB is also
concerned for the isolated in-
dividual.
In addition, one must pause to
express thanks to scores of
Armed Services Committees
around the country who invite
Gls to public sedorim in their
communities or provide home
seoprim and hospitality. Some
communities are able to do this
on their own. Some need help
and JWB provides them with
cash and supplies.
YOUR HEARTS would melt if
you could attend, for example,
the annual Seder at Northport
ii VA Hospitala mental hospital
where a group of 30 women
and men come in to prepare and
serve a Seder to over 200 pa-
tients.
For many patients it evokes a
deepseated emotional response
and is a first contact with
cherished memories and with
reality. It is truly a great "mitz-
vah."
This is a service which JWB
provides. This is a direct service
it is JWB in action. It is a
service which is unioe in the
Jewish community of America.
It is done with little fanfare. It
is done effectivelyand eco-
nomically.
YOU MAY well sit at your
\
Happy Passover To All .
Travel, Travel, Ltd.
2500 E. Beach Blvd.
HtllandaU- 921-1206
A Happy Passover To All
HERB DAMS
PLUMBING
2515So.Stat.Ro.d7
Phone 981-4100
Happy Passover
ROYAL
MARKET
1946 Harrison St.
922-4581
own sedorim this year comfort-
table in the feeling that the re-
sponsibility of the Jewish com-
munity to care for the Passover
needs of our military personnel
and VA patients is beiris carried
out in exemplary fashion.
The Passover, insofar as JWB
is concerned, will begin on any
given year at 5 a.m.. New York
time in Guam. Almost every hour
on the hour for the next 24 hours,
another JWB-sponsored seder will
take place around the world.
So it will bebecause thou-
sands of dedicated American
Jews who work with JWB and
provide its funding really care.
Happy Passover To All
BROWARD TYPEWRITER CENTER
5845 JOHNSON STREET 987-6560
HAPPY PASSOVER
FLORIDA COOLING, INC.
5888 JOHNSON STREET
983-9097
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Johnny's Messenger-Moving Service
5710 DEWEY STREET
Phone 983-8520
A HAPPY HEALTHY PASSOVER TO ALL
DANIA NURSING HOME
A skilled care facility
440 PHIPPEN ROAD
PHONE 927-0500 DANIA 33004
MARTIN STEYER-Administrator
41
*3+*PPH I '
assovcr
Dave Webb
Paint & Body Inc.
EXPERT BODY REPAIR
2117 S.W. 57th AVENUE
HOLLYWOOD 33023
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL .
NEADELS AUTO CENTER, INC,
540 SOUTH DIXIE HWY.
Phone 922^3428
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL .
THE HOLLANDER BAKERY
MOVING FROM 911 N. FEDERAL HWY.
to
3005 JOHNSON STREET
(Johnson Sq. Plaza Next to Winn-Dixie)
Phone 922-3396
A Happy & Healthy Passover
to the Jewish Community
BISCAYNE
MEDICAL CENTER
2801 N.E. 209th St. at Biscayne Blvd., Miami
Phone 932-0250
I
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL .
JACKS FURNITURE
2031 HARRISON STREET
Phone 923-3528
i
WILLIAM LEHMAN
LEASING CORP.
2269 N.E. 169th St., North Miami Beach
Phone 945-4201
CHOICE OF MAKES & MODELS
COMPACTS TO CADILLACS
LONG OR SHORT TERM LEASING
FINE LINE OF TRUCKS


Page 10-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, March 28, 1975

PERHAPS it was the thought
that maybe some of these
very same men had been fighting
alongside the Syrians in the war
of October, 1973, but I must con-
fess to feeling a little sick when
my wife and I drove into the
Moroccan Air, Force base which
was to be our home for ten
weeks.
I had arrived at Kenitra (form-
tly Port Lyautey), about 30 miles
north of Rabat, as a result of
having accepted to teach for a
year in American baes in Europe
to my compatriots in uniform.
THE MOROCCANS are very
sensitive about the American
presence. During the Six-Day
War and the Yom Kippur War,
King Hassan II even declared
that there were no American
troops at all in Morocco. And yet
the Americans are still there. To-
day there are about 1.100 U.S.
Navy "technical advisors" plus
their families.
These are the last of almost a
million GIs who during and since
the Second World War passed
through the French. American or
Moroccan bases of Morocco. The
American base (now become a
"presence") at Port Lyautey-
Kenitra holds the record for the
longest continuous existence.
Due to an odd set of circum-
stances, the Moroccans do not
have the same hostile attitude
toward the Americans as Arabs
elsewhere.
THAT MOROCCO was able to
acquire its independence from
.-Ml; 'W. !'.*,: m "I
.
...
Morocco's Jews
Of Kenitra
0
Dying Breed
By MARC S ALZBERG
London Chronicle Syndicate
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL .
THE OFFICERS AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Phone 983-8520 $710 DEWEY STREET
Agents for A-l Class Moving and Storage
JOHNNY'S MESSENGER
the French and Spanish with so
little actual fighting is in large
part due to U.S. support, based
on American opposition to colon-
ialism, naive perhaps and a little
hypocritical, but thought to be
a legacy of U.S. history.
"It's because the Americans,
full of good-will, do not know the
Arabs well enough," I was told
by one of the leader^of the Jew-
ish community. On the other
hand, a Moroccan lieutenant who
invited us to his house for mint
tea explained to me: "It's because
the Americans wanted to take
the place of the French here."
If the GIs are still in Morocco
(the only Arab country, apart
from Rahv>n. where there are
still American troops), it is be-
cause they are still useful to the
King.
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THE SMALL U.S. presence,
the little aerial bridgehead in
Kenitra, constitutes a visible
guarantee of the American com-
mitment in favor of the mon-
arch. In case of internal revolt
or attack by Algeria, more GIs
might be sent from the U.S. or
Germany to save the regime.
The Americans in Kenitra are
all the more easily accepted be-
cause they maintain a low pro-
file. The commander of this base,
all the sentries at the gates, and
the vast majority of the. soldiers,
are Moroccans.
Americans are forbidden to
leave the base in uniform, and
no American flag is visible, nor
Continued on Following Page
any American weapon. In a
strange pairing of fates, the GIs
of Morocco adopt the centuries-
old Jewish tradition of lowering
one's voice, bending one's knee,
getting along as best as possible.
HAPPY HOLIDAY GREETINGS
TOWN & COUNTRY COIFFURES
"Hollywood" "Sheridan"
4521 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood Poet Haste Center
981-8951 4545 Sheridan St
961-2255
A Happy Passover To All
FLORIDA COOLING, WC
5888 JOHNSON STREET
Phones 983-9097
983-4703
987-2567
A Happy Passover To All .
ROYAL
MARKET
1946 HARRISON STREET
Phone 922-4581
Happy Passover
8.X*l2&
FORMICO
FOOD CO.
5889 RODMAN STREET
HOLLYWOOD 33023
Happy
Passover

RINKER
MATERIALS
CORPORATION
3080 SHERIDAN STREET
HOLLYWOOD 33021


I March 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 11-B
y$ of Kenitra
nued on FoUowlnx P*e
o hold on to the essen-
ngly, the Americans in this
an base have not lost their
sympathy for Jews. It is
Icidental that the Navy has
i given the Jews of Kenitra
eat jobs on the American
I the base. (In exchange,
L'nitra Jews seem to have
.quite a few of their daugh
fands in marriage to the
EN I heard it said of a
Employee: "This Moroccan
steai you blind and will
good care of you. He's a
Unaware that I am a Jew,
kn-Jewish American soldier
ne what happened to him
while bargaining with an
Ifor a brass tray. Upon be-
fcllec! "Vehudl" because he
: to offer more money, the
ted to the Moroccan:
fgood to be a Yehudi. You
. to be one too."
i 600 Jews of Kenitra (rem-
|of a 1948 community of
share a sincere affection
"Yankees." The Rabbi of
ra. Yahia Benarroch. at his
lor nearly 40 years, a gentle,
Id man of goodness and
fosity, told me that the land-
!the GIs in Morocco in 1942
I seven miles from Kenitra)
pkc the coming of the Mes-
the Kenitra Jews, to be
American and Jewish is to
Ine all virtues. On his first
the synagogue, the young
ican Jewish sailor, knowin?
pr Hebrew nor French, is
Iheless automatically called
to the reading of the Law, and
invited to the home of someone
thereafter, or^more likely to three
different homes at once.
FEW AMERICAN Jews arrive
as bachelors and leave in the
same condition.
After two months in this Moroc
can base, the profound feeling of
insecurity and antagonism I ex-
perienced at first had mellowed
gradually into a hesitant accept-
ance. No Moroccan soldier among
the dozens I met and spoke with
ever brought up the problem of
Israel.
And yet these same Moroccans
had no qualms about discussing
the still more delicate problem ot
their King, to whom the young
Moroccans are overwhelmingly
oppo-ed.
Rightly or wrongly, they con
sider the Africans somewhat
responsible for the King, and the
Moroccan Jews as somehow in
league with him.
OUR MOST unforgettable mem
ory will not be. however, the
abuse heaped on Hassan. Rather,
it will be the holidays spent with
our friends of the community of
Kenitra: the Passover Sedarim,
the Mimouna feast at the end of
Passover, the "hiloula" pilgrim
age of Lag b'Omer to the tomb
of the venerated Rabbi Amram of
Ouezzane. and finally Shavuot.
just before our departure, when
from the pulpit the rabbi wished
us farewell and safe journey.
In Morocco, the Jews under-
stand what it is to move on. Dur-
ing our 75 days in Kenitra. five
families left. Each departure is
deeply felt as a permanent loss,
even that of a young American
Jewish couple there only briefly.
CUSTOMLINE
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Ruby and Ernie Extend
Best Wishes For A
Happy Passover
Question
Box5
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Why most there be a fixed
text for prayer?
Man is sometimes at a loss to
find the proper words with which
to express his emotions. The rab-
bis, realizing that man can be
"at a loss for words" have given
him an economical means of
"self-expression." This does not
prevent man from adding addi-
tional thoughts of his own words
at a certain fixed place in the
prayers.
Once having been able to ex-
press himself in the formal text,
man has "opened the door" and
thoughts may flow to him spon-
taneously. In fixed texts the rab-
bis have managed to express
most or all of man's basic needs
and emotions. Furthermore, a
fixed text is the means by which
a group can engage in communal
prayer.
The prayer of a group requires
that the entire group follow a
text in order to express their
needs in common. Official prayers
of the fixed texts of prayer are
always in the plural. Even if man
prays physically alone, he joins
a multitude of worshippers by
reciting the same prayer text as
they dp. thus solidifying a spirit-
ual unity with those both far and
near.
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL .
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2509 EAST IIAI.I.AMIAI.K BEACH BLVD.
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HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL
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Phone: 929-0222
Best Wishes
for a
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Pesach
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Phone 929-1657
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HOLLYWOOD 33023
-~-~*


Page 12-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Begin: The JKuesset's Hammer
By London ( hroakle
1|ENA<'IIKM BEGIN may be-,
the formal head of Israel's
political Opposition, but the real
ideological challenge to the Gov-
ernment is reflected in the cam-
pnign of the young religious ex-
tremists whose symbol is the
knitted yarmulka.
To Zvulun Hammer and his fel-
low firebrand in the National Re-
ligious Party. American born
Yehuda Ben-Meir, Israel's central
preoccupation today ought to be
her retention of Judea and Sa-
maria, the West Bank.
At 37, Hammer is still one of
the Knesset's youngest members,
a distinction which was uniquely
his when he first took his seat
five years ago.
HAIFA-BORN nd raised, a
product of Bnei Akiva. the re-
ligious branch of Nahal (the
Army's pioneering corps) and
Bar Han University, Hammer's
rise to political prominence has
been swift.
The NBP has been without
commanding leadership since the
death of Moshe Haim Shapiro in
1970 and has been given to the
principle of collective direction.
The growth of support for the
"Young Guard" (now enjoying
the formal backing of 20 per cent
of party members) reflects as
much the inevitable change of
generations as it displays the
chasm between their mental out-
looks.
Hammer and Ben-Meir draw
their support not only from the
fervent youth determined to set-
tle in the West Bank at any and
all costs but also from highly-
motivated religious intellectuals
in the universities and yeshivot.
COMPROMISE HAS been the
stuff of which 'politics, particu-
larly Israeli coalition politics.
have1 been made. But a new trend
has emerged in the NRP which
is no longer willing to go along
with the kind of Dreviously ac-
ceptable compromise within Is-
rseli societyone fostered bv the
traditional NRP leadership
whereby Labor ran the State and
the Mizrachi movement its re-
ligion.
Let us have a repolarization of
religious life, the rebels urge,
with Judaism making its mark on
all facets of society and not mere-
ly within narrow organizational
structures.
However, emohasis at pro^ent
is more on national than religious
GREETING
JERRYS
SALVAGE
4035 S.W. 18th STREET
983-0292
Happy Passover To All .
PHIL DAVIS
MEN'S SHOP
DtPlOMATMALl
HAUANDALE
Botany 500-Oipiomat Montini
Palm Beach Kuppenheimer
Phono 920-2370
1
Happy Passover To All .
CIRCLE
Driving School
MILT GOREN, Director
2231 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
PHONE 921-6966
MENAOHEH BEGIN
national
issues which puts them closer to
the Likud (Alliance) than to
Labor, the NRP's traditional
partner is a marriage of con-
venience of ten postulated as a
"great historical alliance."
THEIR MOST dynamic move
came recently when the Gush
Kmunim movement (one of the
key elements in Hammer's con-
stituency) succeeded by their
unauthorized attempts to settle
on the West Bank in raising the
issue to an emotional pitch which
demanded the nation's attention
and concern.
The approach of the Young
Guard is a manifestation of two
parallel drives against which lib-
eral interpreters of the Zionist
idea have been cautioning since
1967 the sanctification of re-
ligion in the name of national
unity and the sanctioning of na-
tionalism in the nan\ of religion.
The two principal points of the
Hammer-Ben-Meir political cam-
paign are the need for a Govern-
ment of National Unity and Jew-
ish settlement in Judea and Sa-
maria.
On the crucial settlement issue.
Hammer feels that the question
of legality, of which so much has
been made, is marginal, when
what in fact is involved is the
"heart of the nation, just as Je-
rUSIGm!*$ltV: k was- only
after the NRP Young Guard had
taken the initiative that the
whole Right-wing caravan sought
to capitalize on their ideological
base.
Their movement, its critics al
lege, implies the swamping o.
rationalism by a mystical vision
of redemption. But there is clear
ly much sober political method to
that mysticism.
Hammer admits to seeking the
establishment of "political facts"
and so to make it harder for the
Government (and the people, too,
when they come to vote on it)
even to contemplate any erosion
of Jewish sovereignty on the
West Bank
HE EXPRESSES satisfaction
that, while the objective is not
yet attained, a principal point
has been won, to make the strug-
gle one which is to be conducted
at public level and not one to
be decided in undercover diplo-
matic negotiations.
The security aspect he regards
as an ingredient to be added to
the emotional historical argu-
ments, but not the central fea-
ture. They display absolute con-
viction that their attitude in no
way constitutes a handicap to the
options for peace.
During the past year. Hammer
and Ben-Meir withstood the
pressures of traditional pre-
coalition bartering and won the
respect of the neutral public for
their sincerity. They are equally
capable though of arousing dis-
taste among ideological oppo?
nents who brand their "idealism"
as fanatical, anachronistic and
their methods as frequently de-
plorable.
THE VOTE of only 60-40 in
favor of the NRP's return to the
Government fold which they op-
posed, arguing that the NRP had
capitulated on all its demands,
is very much an indication of
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LB
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NORMAN & PAULINE PLATT,
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Main Office
2500 HOLLYWOOD BLVD. HOLLYWOOD, FLA.
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FURNITURE SHOPS OUR 61st YEAR
Ft. Lauderdale Showroom
524 N.E. dm Ave., on N. Federal Hwy.
PHONE: 763-4508
Monday thro Saturday 9 to 5:30
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2216 Hollywood Blvd.
PHONE: 922-3492
Monday thru Saturday 9 to 5:30
their present strength.
Hammer himself, offered
Cabinet seat, faced a classic po-
litical dilemma. Ought he to fight
what he describes as the danger
of "aw "unhindered lurch to the
Wftff'ifMitt within the coalition
or would he by h'is very presence
in the Cabinet be sanctioning
moves towards what he and his
colleagues seek to avoid at any
cost redivision of Eretz Israel.
In staying out, they stated
quite bluntly that they would op-
pose the Government (including
their own party) on any vote
concerning the West Bank's fu-
ture. At the same time, they say
they will not generate a solit
despite the exhortations of the
die-hard ideologues.
Why should they, confides
Friday, March 28, 1975
Hammer, when the trend in the
NRP is running very much their
way, and rapidly?
'ALTHOUGH IN the event' of
elections they could possibly
draw, off five of the NRP's ten
seats, why jeopardize the chances
of eventually peooupmg'the lot
as well as the highly intricate
network of institutions and pat-
terns of support which a long-
established movement like thj
NRP controls?
Meanwhile, the fact remain^
that Hammer and his colleagues
reflect a powerful new phenome-
non on the Zionist scene and an
approach which constitutes a
definite challenge not merely to
the established leadership of
their own party but one to which
the rest of the Zionist parties
are virtually obliged to respond.
Passover Greetings from
HARRY BAIN
ALLIED HEARING AID CENTER
62 5 S. State Reed 7
9B7-BS77
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL ..
EMERALD GARDENS FLORIST
4461 Sheridan Street
Phone 966-8262
>*
Good Health and Happiness For Passover
WEST HOLLYWOOD
KOSHER MEATS
148 South State Road 7
PHONE 962-5018
1
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL .
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL Phone 920-3411
TIRE "DISCOUNT CENTER"
"We Dare You To Compare"
MAJOR BRANDS GUARANTEED RETREADS
408 N. FEDERAL HIGHWAY (U.S. 1)
HAUANDALE, FLORIDA
Between Gulfstream & Hollywood Dog Tracks
JERRY LUBER, Proprietor
BANKAMER1CARD MASTER CHARGE
&4 &4ll
ESTESS INSURANCE
AGENCY
109 SOUTH 21 AVENUE
HOLLYWOOD 33020


arch 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 13-B
re Screening Refugees
ited by U.S. Programs
SEPH POI.AKOFF
|of refugees aided by
in emigrating to any
e world is being con-
the House Appropria-
mmittee. Its decision
lve Soviet Jewish emi-
Israel.
Ise Appropriation Sub-
] headed by Rep. Otto
|D.. La.) r.-'opted the
"insure against Com-
i executive session last
kiltration" in the emi-
jocessing.
led to the $9.4 million
ied by the committe?
finU'rnational agencies
Imigiants.
lourcos said the emi-
|m includ-? Soviet Jews
Bangladesh going ti
hd possibly South Viet-
Cambodian* desiring
Hrpa 'heir coun.tr.ies.
1 tn-AssIstance :A'tCias
Mn>cl cTrarances of
helped with direct
Ana- to emigrate to na
lc western hemisphere.
so has not affected Is-
E to Rep. Les Aspin
who has declared the
legislation would be
(i> istrous" io feiii-
old ihe Jewish Tele-
|gency that of the $9.4
he Intergovernmental
for European Migra-
) in Geneva would get
Ion ihc United Nation*-
High Commissioner for refugees
Jii.S.roiUtm. and th* I.nJernation-
al Red Cross, $3 million.
Last year, he sard ICEM as-
sisted- 55.000 emigrants, includ-
ing the 17,000 Soviet Jews who
entered Israel. ICEM primarily
helps European refugees going to
the western hemisphere.
The UN Commissioner's offic".
according to Aspin's aide, helped
about a million refugees in Afri-
ca last year and a quarter of a
million go from Bangladesh to
Pakistan in the past several
years.
THE RED Cross is less involv-
ed in the refugee movement, he
said.
The aide to'd JTA that the
proposal would interfere with the
internal affairs of Israel to check
out immigrants and that Israeli
authorities can do that to their
own satisfaction. He said he did
not think Aspin had met with
<* 's gn.thi#matter
:THB-S^Tfc*jtoartip*nt was'
4 -rrf^fW "''^oriFu^'^cWicernrd
with the Drooo-al. A high official
connected with refugee matters
said pri'vatelv it wbuW Mm per
the emigration program and be
seen as .a return to. cold war
tactics against the Soviet Union.
While ICEM has been helping
ar.ti-cornmunists and non-com-
muni'ts emigrate from Europe
sectors to the west for many
year*, it was noted, an extension
of the screening to include other
areas would seriously complicate
the efforts of international or-
(nWtlrm| to heln mit-'rants.
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL .
Accessories Unlimited
i3 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD, HOLLYWOOD
I'hon.- 983-2808
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL .
liUS HOCHMAN WILLIAM WEISS
SKYLORET
(l SOUTH UNIVERSITY DRIVE. MIRAMAR
Phone 981-1191
Cleaning Pressing Laundry
WYXONA CLEANERS
Phone: 922-5561
S. Dixie Highway, Hollywood, Florida
k HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL .
! us night or day (24 hour service)
for your nursing requirements.
ICAL PERSONNEL POOL
92G-4360
2500 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL .
[ale Carol Factory Outlets
Ladies Apparel
|Hs||andale Photte 920-3072
Miami Beach Fort Lauderdale
Pompano Lauderdale Lakes
Wiretap
Guidelines
. to. 1<
Examined
By UZI BENZIMAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Ministry of Justice has
recently prepared new leg-
islation on wire tapping,
aiming to fill the legal lacu-
na which exists on this sen-
sitive issue.
Until now, Israel has had
no specific law on wire-tap-
ping and the official expla-
nation to the new bill is that
it is designed to protect the
individual from encroach-
ments upon -his privacy and
at the same time to enact an
official procedure for wire-
tapping when, it is..needed in
the interests of national se-
curity.
TIIJB BILL.lays down a term-of
three-years imnrisanment for il-
legal wire-tapping. It also desig-
nates two categories of permis-
sible tapping: the first, for s?-
curity reasons, the second, for
preventing or investigating
crimes. Under the new bill, the
Premier would be the sole au-
thority empowered to permit a
wire-tap for security purposes.
The Premier's permission
would have to be given in writing
and would specify the identity
of the person to be investigated
and the means to be used to tap
his wire.
The Premier could exercise
this authority only if he were
convinced that the security of the
State justified such a step.
The permission Riven by the
Prime Minister would be for a
strictly limited period never to
exceed six months.
THE SECURITY agenci>s en-
titled to seek the Premier's con-
sent for a wire-tap are the Chief
of Army Intelligence, the Chief
of National Intelligence (the
Mossad wbich acts mostly
abroad), the i'h!f of tit- Gen-
eral Securitv Service (Shin Bet-
dealing with counter-espionage
and with internal security mat-
ters), and the Cnief Military
Censor.
If any of these agencies are
convinced that the security of the
State requires an urgent wire-tap,
they are authorized, under the
ne_w bill, to implement it for a
period of not more than 48 hours
and inform the Premier, who has
the right to cancel this step.
Authority to permit a wire-tap
aimed at prevention or investiga-
tion of crimes is vested in the
president of the local district
court. The permit issued by this
senior judge could specif the
identity of the person to be tap-
ped and the means of tapping
In urgent cases, the Police Min-
ister can issue a temporary per-
mit for a short time.
THE BILL has met with criti-
cism among several Cabinet Min-
isters and commentators. Some
argued that the Military- Censor
and the Chief .of the Mossad
should be emitted from the list
of acenciei entitlea 'o initiate a
wire-tap.
Inclusion of the censor, it wai
felt, might violate the principle
of freedom of the press.
HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL
BILT RITE MATTRESS CO.
17100 W. Dixie Highway, North Miami Beach
Phone 947-3090
i.-
. t.
1-------------!--------------------------------
PAS^^ER GREETINGS .'
POST HASTE PHARMACY
4401 Sheridan Street 989-6524
HtUWOOD CHEMISTS
100 N. 46 Avenue 987-8000
PRESCRIPTIONS DRUGS GIFTS
TTTT-
II
GREETINGS
LA CREPE DE BRITAGNE
RESTAURANT
1434 NORTH FEDERAL HWY., DANIA
Phone 927-4100
- -
-?--------...' .... ... ...----------------^-. i .-------------
-


PASSOVER GREETINGS
DR. & MRS. ALEX E. MARON
7744 Taft Street, Pembroke Pines
GREETINGS
CREATIVE SHUTTER & SHADE
EVERYTHING TO BEAUTIFY YOUR HOME
LAMPS-WALL GROUPINGS TABLE DECOR
VISIT OUR FACTORY SHOWROOMS
1050 SOUTH 56th AVENUE 961-6641
viay peace
be yours
during this
Pesach holiday.
FARTHING PLUMBING CO.
2301 S.W. 57th TERRACE
HOLLYWOOD 33023
Greetings
to our fnends
at die time of
Passover.
MARTIN COIN LAUNDRY
2105 NORTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY
HOLLYWOOD 33021
i


Page 14-B
The Jetajish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, March 28, lf^l
If
?he next
*xr 30 days, youshouwre



.,., Ji .!...... > You are about to find out
why a tire you never heard of
is the best tire for these times
Radically new. Radically different.
The only radial with steel sidewalls.
The I R I. Ail-Steel Radial is the world's first
all-steel radial tire for automobiles It's the
most economical tire you can own Because of
the radial design, you get more miles per gallon
of gas than from either bias or belted bias
tires Because of the exclusive I R.I. Ail-Steel
construction, you get thousands of extra miles
out of the tire itself We believe the result
is the lowest cost per mile of driving from any
kind or any brand of tire on the market today.
Our engineers believe the I.R.I. Ail-Steel
Radial drives safer, rides more comfortably,
steers more precisely and responds surer
than any other tire you can buy at any price.
We guarantee them for 50.000 miles. What's
more, Norton is so sure you'll find these
the finest tires you've ever had that if you
are not satisfied at any time within 90 days,
we will refund your purchase price in full.
No tricks. No hidden charges.
But, boil it all down and
you've got three basic
tire types to consider.
1. BIAS
2. BELTED 3. RADIAL
1. BIAS TIRES
Two. (out or sometimes even more plies (or
layers) of material cross under the tread at an
angle or bias to the center line of the tire. Generally
the cheapest tire to buy
2. BELTED TIRES
Similar to the bias tire with the addition of two
or more bells ot material that run around the tire
under the tread This combines a bias sidewall
with increased tread stability and improved
tread life.
3. RADIAL TIRES
Offer the most desirable features Cords of
material run from sidewall to sidewall crossing the
tread at 90 degrees Two or more belts of material
also run around the tire Price per tire is higher,
but cost per mile is lower.
Buying tires is tough enough.
You almost need an engineer's education to
understand tire advertising these days. There
are bias and belted and radial types. F-78's
and FR-78 s and 7 75s all of which fit the
same car. And nylon and rayon and polyester
and fiberglass and steel. And plies on plies.
AVAILABLE ONLY AT
NORTON
SINCE 1924
TIRE CO.
The strongest radial is an all-steel radial.
The I.R.I, is the only all-steel radial
automobile tire.
Conventional, so-called steel radials. put steel
to work beneath the tread only. One or two
belts of steel run the circumference of the tire
and fabric or fiber cords are used radially
sidewall to sidewall. The conventional steel
radial lire is only a steel-belted radial. This is
important in understanding the superiority of
an I.R.I. Ail-Steel Radial.
An exclusive design and engineering process
put more steel in the I R.I. radial than in any
other automobile tire. Two layers or belts of
steel cables (30 per inch) make sure the I.R.I,
tread stays open for maximum road contact
in all kinds of weather. This also reduces
friction, which is the biggest single cause of
tire wear.
A third barrier of steel cables replaces the
fabric (polyester, fiberglass, etc.) used in the
sidewalls of all other automobile tires. The
result is 100 per cent steel strength and
protection.
Rated Load Range D.
I.R.I. Ail-Steel Radials meet government stand-
ards equivalent to an eight-ply rating and it's
stamped on the side of every I.R.I, tire. Most
passenger tires even steel-belted radials
earn only a B or four-ply rating. Load Range D
means an extra margin of strength and safety
for all vehicles, even the heaviest of luxury
automobiles, station wagons or pick-ups.
Improved steel cable design means extra
comfort, too.
The I.R.I. All-Steel Radial uses a specially
designed steel cable engineered exclusively for
us. Each cable is wound of seven strands of
\:W.-i
CfNTER
BUDGET TERMS AVAILABLE
CENTRAL MIAMI5300 N.W. 27th Ave.634-1556
CORAL GABLESBird & Doiuclaa Road446-8101
NORTH MIAMI13360 N.W. 7th Ave681-8641
N. MIAMI BEACH1700 N.E. 163 St.945-7464
MIAMI BEACH 1454 Alton Road672-5363
SOUTH DADE9001 S. Dixie Hwy.667-7675
HIALEAH/PALM SPRINGS MILE1275 49th St.822-250*
CUTLER RIDGE20390 S. Dixie Hwy233-5241
WEST MIAMIBird A Galloway Rdx.552-6656
HOMESTEAD30100 S. Federal Hwv. 247-1622
W. HOLLYWOOD497 S. State Rd. 7987-0459
For the Store Nearest You Call 633-8635
1. The only tire with STEEL
sidewalls for strength and
flexibility, more protection,
more comfort.
2. Two belts of special filament
steel cable for maximum tread
strength. 30 steel cables per inch.
Total: Three layers of steel
beneath the tread.
3. Double steel protection here.
The only passenger tire with steel
on both sides of the bead
for sure-fire responsiveness.
4. All-weather computer-designed
tread.
three-filament wire. That's a total of 21 strong
steel filaments in each cable Yet. with all this
strength, the cable is as flexible as silk. The
result is a soft, luxurious ride.
The new year-round tread.
A special computer-designed tread configura-
tion was developed to make maximum use
of the strength built into the I.R.I. All-Steel
Radial. Now, the combination of steel and
tread design provides solid, road-holding
performance under all kinds of driving
conditions wet or dry. snow or summer heat.
The I.R.I, is an all-weather, all-year tire.
Why you haven't heard about I.R.I.
All-Steel Radials till now.
Compared with the giants of the tire industry,
I.R.I. is a relatively small company. Me
are growing steadily on a market-by-market
plan now reaching your city Five years
ago, we set out to produce a tire that was as
good as the finest imported tire available.
Because we had no conventional tire-making
equipment, we were free "to try anything."
We did. And came up with a totally new idea
that produced a tire even better than the one
we had set out to make The I R.I. All-Steel
Radial has been tested and re-tested. Subjected
to literally millions of miles of road-handling
experience. Now it's available here. Backed by
a 50.000-mile guarantee Sold and serviced enly
by proven leaders in the business.
MM.
INTERNATIONAL RUBBER INDUSTRIES, INC.
Extra safety. Extra comfort. Extra miles.
The finest tire you can buy. The I.R.I.
All-Steel Radial.
AUlHOtlZtD OUT ltU TORS FOR
| satisYactim^gummittieo $
J W TOUR HIMFT REniMOEO *
oeeenn.
BFGoudrirh
"v


28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Fage 1S-B
Miliral>'l;inn!li:ii:iTi.'1rt.i:i::i!ii:i:ri:''W,i.; I I r ..bi.-i.i .'i.in.i ..il

lembering Dr. Lowdermilk
By Sp^inl Report
WALTER Clay Lowdermilk died
Christian friends of Israel felt that
Should he preserved in a very living
Kudermilk, Rhodes scholar at Oxford
[became one of America's foremost
ler conservationists and had a special
Hoi.v Land.
ent to the Middle East by the U.S.
land the United Nations to study
|or reclaiming once fertile lands that
jeserts through centuries of neglect.
WORLD War II. Dr. Lowdermilk
portant and influential book, "Pales-
bf Promise," in which he outlined
Jfor reclaiming the Holy Land and
|jordan Valley Authority Power and
roject. The book had 14 printings
nslated into seven languages.
posals for the utilization of Pales-
Iresources for the benefit of all peo-
rea received wide acclaim and many
i were adopted by the government of
Dr. and Mrs. Lawdermilk were the
fcests of the Israel Government, at
I they pulled the levers and pressed
Ithat started the great pumps on the
lie Sea of Galilee, to force the water
m the headwaters of the Jordan River
ands of the Negev, around Beersheba,
|home town.
)\vi)i:hmii.k has rightly been hailed
Iher of the Israel water plan." In a
}ein, yet in respect, the Israeli refer
tul as "flowing with Lowdermilk and
the five years that Dr. Lowdermilk
Israel he also brought into being the
i' ';:.!..' !'.. : :.'..... '" "'lor1:! .
* *.
School of Agricultural Engineering at the presti-
gious Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa. It
now bears his name.
Years ago, speaking by radio from Jerusalem,
Dr. Lowdermilk ventured the observation that if
Moses had foreseen man's destruction of his sur-
roundings he might have added an 11th Com-
mandment which he put in these terms:
"Thou shalt inherit the holy earth as a
faithful steward, conserving its resources and pro-
ductivity from generation to generation. Thou
shalt safeguard thy fields from soil erosion, thy
living waters from drying up, thy forests from
desolation, and protect thy hills from overgrazing
by the herds, that thy descendants may have
abundance forever. If any shall fail in this stew-
ardship of the land, thy fruitful fields shall be
come sterile, stony ground and wasting gullies,
and thy descendants shall decrease and live in
poverty or perish from off the face of the earth."
The text, widely quoted, exerted a powerful in-
fluence in the cause of conservation.
THE LATE Dr. Walter Clay Lowdermilk re-
sided in Berkeley, California when he was not
traveling and working in other countries. His
widow, Inez Lowdermilk, looked upon by many
as a great woman in her own right, is still very
active at 85 and frequently participates in the
promotion of Israel causes.
She is noted for her inspiring lectures and
has authored a treatise entitled "Modern Israel-
Fulfillment of Prophecy."
The California Christian Committee for Is-
rael, based in Berkeley, has launched the project
of planting a forest in Israel as a fitting tribute
to the Christian with vision who did so much to
fulfill the divinely inspired words of Israel's
prophets, in redeeming the land that was desolate.
This project is being carried out in coopera-
tion with the Jewish National Fund.
HI!' n i
errarists Trained in Syria
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
WIV (JTA) The eight El Fatah terrorists
kited the Tel Aviv beach front here trained for
[ion at the Syrian naval and military base at
Ind set forth on it from Sarafant, a small anchor-
le southern Lebanese coast during the night of
Ind 3.
facts and other details of the operation were
jy the sole surviving terrorist, 23-year-old Mous"sa
land by the six El Fatah men and crew members
ton sailing vessel captured by the Israeli Navy
I, which had served as "mother ship" for the ter-
I'A'S STORY and
tie others confirm-
jal belief of Israeli
'hat the terrorist
^inated in Syria or
l;> retracted h i s
)aim that the gang
from Port Said
[crude attempt to
gypt by scrawling
and "Egyptian
(Army" on the ter-
ibbe" dinghy turn-
fce & 'red herring."
interrogation re-
Ifollowing information:
lion was conceived and
I long time ago by El
2 man who operates
Lname of Abu Jihad.
killers were recruited
lus F.l Fatah units and
takiya for basic train
lie full knowledge and
essings of the Syrian
who made their base
Ian authorities, in fact,
[the mission and the
rry it out.
20 DAYS before em
Ihe group was trans
Sarafant where they
additional training
provided with rubber
lie "Zodiac" type,
fere also given large
Israeli and Jordanian
lie event that they sue
I escaping into Jordan.
'night of March 2 and
pft Sarafant in their rub-
^and were picked up at
Riling vessel owned by
,i'*!'!'ii aBMMH
'""' I ..... I
FILLING IN
BACKGROUND
-.,mt. i BMK !-iri.i M *
mninuHMiiii*!!';'
a Lehanpsp national, Fabri A-Din.
The vessel is one of a type that
stiil plies in cjmmerce between
Levantine ports. It normally car
ries mixed cargOS betwee.n Beirut
and Cyprus but on this occasion
was chartered by the owner to
El Fatah It took the eight ter-
rorists to a point about 30 miles
off Tel Avi- and launched them
on their mission.
Israeli authorities apoarently
knew from the outset that the
terrorists must have been
brought within easy range of Tel
Aviv by a larger craft because
their rubber boats could not pos-
sibly have made the trip from
either Lebanon or Egypt.
AN AIR-SEA search was order-
ed and the sailing vessel was
spotted by Israeli aircraft Thurs
day morning on a northwesterly
course in the direction of Cyprus.
It was intercepted shortly after-
wards by an Israeli missile patrol
boat which sent a boarding party
aboard.
They found an air pump, fuel
and lubricating oils, items need-
ed to service "Zodiac" type rub-
ber dinghys. The six men aboard,
who protested that they were in-
nocent sailors, later admitted to
their role in the Tel Aviv at
tack. The vessel was towed to
Haifa by an Israel naval craft.
The El Fatah leader aboard.
Hamid Nadim. told Israeli au-
thorities that "my dutv was to
report back to Abu Jihad that the
naval part of the mission had
been completed." He insisted that
he was not a member of the ter-
rorist gang.
He said he was a native of a
village in the Samaria district ot
the West Bank who went to Leb
anon after hi- parents separated-
TWO CREW members. Mou-
hammed Abdul Rahum Juda. 31.
of Port Said, and Mouhammed
Hassan Sa'ad. 25. of Doumyat. a
vil'age in the Nile delta, identi
fied themselves as Egyptians.
Jumma'a. badly scarred from
the explosion at the Savoy Hotel,
told Dart of his story to reporters
and TV cameramen here after his
official interrogation. He said he
belonged to a Bedouin tribe in
the Beersheba region but was
born in Zarka. Jordan, and was a
member of El Fatah for the past
five years.
HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL
YHE GARDEN CENTER WITH THE GROW-HOW
HALLANDALE GARDENS
806 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY, HALLANDALE
PHONE 923-2070
Open Sundays 9-5
We Deliver
GREETINGS
BILL KELLEY
i ***%.
/CHEVROLET
601 NORTH FEDERAL HWY., HALLANDALE
Phone: 923-6571
HAPPY PASSOVtR TO ALL
CROWN HOME FENCE and
AWNING CO. INC.
5935 Johnson Street 983-8736
Custom Made Fine Aluminum Awnings
Storm Panels Hurricane Tested Finest Construction
BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER HOLIDAY
PARKWAY FISH MARKET
3126 SO. UNIVERSITY DRIVE, MIR A MAR
Phone 923-2668
HAPPY PASSOVtR TO ALL
EVELYN
COORDINATED INTERIORS
3413 GALT OCEAN DRIVE
PHONE 566-4400
BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER HOLIDAY
Wilton Manors Kindergarten
and Nursery
817 N.E. 28th STREET
STOOLS-BARS
DINETTES & THINGS
2010 S. BISCAYNE BLVD., NO. MIAMI Phone 932-4282
"World's Largest Display"
Stools for your bar, kitchen, pesthru from 15" high to 36" high
PASSOVER GREETINGS
KRAVIT JEWELERS
*nr um*H
mum Mvrr
>00 EAST HAILANOALE BEACH BOULEVARD
PHONE 921-6360
Best Wishes tor a Happy Passover To All...
STARDUST BALLROOM
1855 HOLLYWOOD BLVD. at 19th AVENUE
Public Dances Singles Couples Welcome
Every Friday, Sunday, Tuesday Telephone 920-3957

!.


Page 16-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, March &<
Passover.
m
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What do you think it really mea
in 1975?
On Passover, we pay homage to freedom,
knowing full well that the goals of mankind have
not yet been attained. It is a time for Jews to reaffirm
the Faith and Ethic forged from the experience of
Egyptian slavery and redemption centuries ago.
It marks the birth of the Jews as a free people.
As the Haggadah (order of service) is read
to those attending the family Seder, an awareness
of the continuity of Jewish history is created.
Recollections of former bondage are seen in the
context of modem achievements in national and
religious independence.
However, joy in these hard won advances is
tempered by the knowledge of what must yet be
accomplished. For the story told in the Haggadah is
a vivid reminder of the oppression that exists today.
It speaks for thousands of Jewish people in
need of a modem-day Moses to lead them out of
the wilderness of deprivation.
It evokes thoughts of those yearning for
liberty in the hostile environment of Syria and the
Soviet Union.
It strengthens our resolve as Jews, living in a
free society, to stand together and help our less
fortunate brothers and sisters in far-off lands
achieve their aspirations.
Passover, 1975 is the Festival of Freedom. It
is set against the awakening of Spring, the rekind-
ling of life. It reaffirms our faith that some day
there will be liberty for all. It gives hope that some
day all may live in peace and dignity.
PhMo couito* at The Create New YonVConffwnc* on Soviet Jevuy
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel. Inc/Funeral Directors
MIAMI BEACH: 1920 Alton Road at 19th Street
NORMANDY ISLE: 1250 Normandy Drive
MIAMI & CORAL GABLES: Douglas Road at S.W. 17th Stre*
NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 16480 N.E. 19th Avenue
HOLLYWOOD. 5801 HoMywood Blvd.
SUNRISE: 1171 Northeast 61st Avenue
Murray N. Rubin, F.D.


Full Text
"tJeWXSlll FlOrldhUlll Friday, March 28, 1975
and Shofar of Hollywood Section B

i
.
Afccrent Haggadahs: An Ancient Past
By ALFRED H. PAUL
AS YOU tell your children the
age-old story of the liberation
of the ancient Hebrews from
Egyptian bondage, wouid you
like to illustrate the history with
a map, showing exactly where the
slaves fleeing Egypt had crossed
the Bed Sea. the toriuous paths
they wound through the Sinai
Desert for 40 years, the spot
where they crossed the Jordan to
enter Palestine, and the disposi-
tion of Israel's tribes in their
land of milk and honey?
There is such a map in exis-
tence. All you have to do is re-
call the Library of Hebraica and
Judaica, at New York University
and Prof. Abraham I. Katsh.
THE MAP mentioned here is
in an old Haggadah. There ari
other unique editions of the Hag
gadah in the library all run by
Dr. Katsh, later president of
Dropsie University. They are not
originals but they are filmed
copies of the originals on
microfilm.
Prof. Katsh has devoted years
of study, research and highly
complicated negotiations to ob-
tain microfilmed copies of these
very old Haggadahs as well as
of many thousands of other print-
ed books and manuscripts.
Through his unique efforts,
many thousands of such ancient
books, manuscripts and docu-
ments may now be studied by
Western scholars.
He has brought to this country
a mass of Jewish historical ma-
terials which, until he started his
project, were virtually unattain-
able unless one traveled to Lenin-
grad, Moscow or Budapest and
obtained the permission of the
Communist authorities to search.
ONE FINDS among his treas-
ures the filmed Haggadah which,
in parallel columns, tells the
story of Passover in four-languag-
es: Hebrew, Judeo-German (the
oldest form of Yiddish), Ladino,
and purest Italian (in Hebrew
characters).
One runs the film through an
apparatus and sees Haggadah il-
lustrations that are unique con-
tributions to Jewish art. Some of
these are the traditional illus-
trations that one finds in all mod-
ern copies of the Passover story
the young son asking the Four
Questions, the cicturization of the
Continued on Page 2-B
I


Page 16-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, March
LET THEM KNOW WE ARE ONE
He stands hereprotecting his family miles away,
defending the future of his people.
When his thoughts turn to his own future, he
dreams of a university education... a home of his own.
But he cannot realize his dreams by himself.
He needs our help.
He does not stand alone. Let him know it.
We Are One
Give to the Israel Emergency Fund
JEWISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD INC
COMBINED JEWISH APPEAL ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
2838 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Florida. 33020
Telephone 921-8810


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