The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00109

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
mJewisb Floridiam
and SIIOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Dlume
5 Number 1
Hollywood, Florida Friday, January 3. 1975
Price 25 cents
Community Turns Out For Pacesetters' Gala
With Senator-elect Richard
Itone highlighting the black-tie
If fair, more than 350 area resi-
dents filled the Diplomat Ho-
Jel's Regency Room where they
fere welcomed by Moses Horn-
kein chairman of the Shcmrim
jojree honoring local Jewish
(adership.
Mr. Hornsteln expressed his
[leasuie at the response of the
Immunity at a time when
I ;s are facing serious
jonomic problems. "In spite of
iie financial crunch," he said,
(this community is aware that
C plight is much more
kvere."
"Things are hap|>ening in the
B.S. Congress," Senator Stone
Em the audience. "A trade bill
Lilli a .stipulation concerning
I igration of Soviet Jews
recommended. And the
bvernment is working on the
as well as backing Is-
I only democracy in
he Middle East."
IThe other guest speaker was
Joshe Rivlin, Director General
Continued on Page 6
Baer., Gordon Serving As
Chairmen of Beth El Dinner
SENATOR HECT RICHARD STONE; NATHAN PRITCHER, ARRANGEMENTS CHMN.
Melvin H. Bacr and Jules B.
Gordon have been selected as
chairmen of the 1975 Temple
Beth El Israel Dinner of State
which will be held at the Diplo-
mat Country Club Sunday, Jan.
19, it has been announced by
Robert M. Baer, president of the
Hollywood congregation.
To Ije honored at the Israel
Bonds dinner-dance is Louis E.
Conn, co-chairman of the Jew-
ish Federation of South Brow-
anl 1975 I'JA campaign. Conn
will receive the State of Israel
Masadu Award.
Baer, who is Cnhn's cocliair-
man, is a member of tlie execu-
tive committee and board of di-
rectors of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward. He is also a
member of the board of trustees
of Temple Beth El.
Gordon, financial secretary of
Temple Beth El and a member
of the board of trustees, is a
director of the Jewish Federa-
tion and was recently named co-
chairman of the Federation's hi-
rise campaign for the Galahad
buildings. Gordon is a meml>er
of the South Broward Israel
Bonds board of governors, and
has heen Instrumental in the
success of the Israel Bonds cam-
paign in the Galahads.
Baer also announced that Mrs.
Harry Finer and Leo Saltzstein
would serve as associate d
men of the Temple Beth El Is-
rael Bends dinner.
Reservations may be made by
calling the Temple Beth El of-
fice. The Stu Granger Society
orchestra will provide music for
dancing.
i i;in(.itii..'r.'"
Women's Division Represented At
Pacesetters 'Shomrim Soiree9
NOTED STATESMAN TO SPEAK AT TEMPLE SINAI
Although the Shomrim Soiree
bs a fund-raising event to
flic!) couples were invited,
tinen accounted for a substan-
; .portion of the evening's pro-
|The Women's Division's goal
the 1975 Jewish Federation
(mpaign is 300,000.
Among those attending the
lace Setters" dinner at the
Diplomat Hotel were Evelyn
Stieber, chairman of La Mer;
Lucille Baer, chairman of Parker
Plaza; Ann Cohn, cochairman of
Aquarius; and Karen Margulies,
campaign vice-president.
Also Phyliss Kracmer and
Eleanor Weiner, hi-rise work-
ers; Jo Ann Katz and A viva
Baer, Pace Setters' Division;
and Marcia Tobin, president of
the Women's Division.
Abba Eban To Visit Hollywood
m
Widely regarded as one of the
world's truly great orators. Ab-
ba Eban, former Israeli Minister
of Foreign Affairs, will speak
Monday, Feb. 3, at 8 p.m. under
the sponsorship of Temple Si-
nai.
Mr. Eban was born in Cape
Town, Union of South Africa.
From his youth, he spoke He-
brew as well as English fluently
and played a leading role In the
Zionist Movement. At Cambridge
University he specialized in Ori-
ental languages and was subse-
quently appointed lecturer in
Hebrew, Arabic and Persian lit-
c i at": e.
.During the Second World War
he was assigned to Jerusalem as
Liaison Officer of Allied Head-
ABBA EBAN
quarters to secure missions in
the Middle East and Europe. In
this period he travelled exten-
sively in Palestine and elsewhere
in the Middle Fast, frequently
lecturing in Hebrew and Arabic
and contributing in those lan-
guages to learned journals. Lat-
er he became Chief Instructor
at the Middle Fast Arab Centre
in Jerusalem.
After the war Mr. Eban en-
tered the service of thi Jewish
A ticy in Jerusalem. In 1947 he
participated in the final talks
with the Mandatory Covei ni
in London and the same
was Uie Agi ncy"s Liaison !
with the i nited Natioi S
Continued on Page 2
FRINCH SUPPLY MIRAGE JETS
<-N.
/ Peres: There are 3,000 Soviet
|AfRS. miJS KRAEMER, MRS. ELEANOR WEMER, MRS. JANET BERTMAN,
MRS. J0ANN KATZ
Troops Serving in Syria
i
MRS. KAREN MARGULIES, MMCTtt GENERAL M0SHE RIVL'N

By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) De-
fense Minister Shimon Peres esti-
mates that there are 3,000 Soviet
troops in Syria, some of them
manning Syrian positions, though
he can not say how many.
Replying to questions in the
Knesset, the Defense Minister
said some Soviet troops served in
anti-aircraft missile systems near
Damascus and operated electron-
ic air defense systems in other
parts of Syria.
ACCORDING TO Peres, the
Russians supplied Syria during
the Yom Kippur War and after-
wards with more than 1,000
tanks, many of the T-62 type; 300
jets, including 50 of the new
MIG-23s; and missiles, including
surface-to-surface "Skud" missiles
reportedly capable of reaching Is-
rael's three largest cities.
Peres reported that Egypt re-
cently received a shipment of
Mirage jets directly from France
for the first time rather than
through another Arab state as
was the case when the French
arms embargo on the Middle East
was in effect.
He said the French shipment
included three interceptors of
the Mirage 3-C type.
Peres also reported that Egypt
was due to receive 36 Mirages al-
together as part of a tripartite
transaction signed by King Faisal
of Saudi Arabia on his visit to
France several months ago.
The transaction will be com-
pleted in two years, Peres said.
No Power
Will Ever
Dislodge Us
NEW YORK (JTA) Israel
Ambassador Simcha Dinilz pre-
dicted here that if a new Middle
East war should erupt, Israel
"will fight it decisively, quickly
and victoriously.
"There is more energy in the
Jewish people than in all the
Arab oil wells together. No
power on earth will dislodge us
from the small but lofty Rock of
Israel.''


Page 2
+JmistFk>rkfian and Shofar ci Hollywood
Friday, January 3, lgrtj
CRC Protests Abba Eban To Visit Hollywood
Draw Replies
In reply to a recent letter from the Community Relations Com-
mittee of Jewish Federation concerning the ill-advised remarks of
General George Brown, Senator-elect Richard Stone has replied as
follows:
Jewish Federation of South Broward,
1909 Harrison Street
Hollywood, Florida 33020
Inc.
Dear Friends:
"Thank you very much for your letter concerning the statements
made recently by General George Brown. I was personally appalled
by the General's remarks.
"This is a country of freedom of speech, and that freedom
must be preserved, but a man in General Brown's position of national
and international stature should not harbor the prejudices that his
statements revealedno matter what segment of the population is
involved.
"The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff should be a respon-
sible man, both in his actions and words, especially considering our
growing concern over the preservation of Israel and the entire Middle
' East situation.
"When I take office as a United States Senator from Florida
in late January, 1975. I intend to question this matter further. I also
suggest that if you have not done so, you contact General Brown's
) Commander-in-Chief and give him your opinions, whether pro or con."
Most cordially,
Richard (Dick) Stone
United States Senator Elect
Also received by the Community Relations Committee was the
following letter from William Odom, Executive Assistant to the
Assistant Secretary of Defense in Washington:
I ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF DEFENSE
Washington, DC. 20301
Jewish Federation of South Broward, Inc.
' 1909 Harrison Street
Hollywood, Florida 33020
Dear Petitioners:
"On behalf of President Ford, I am replying to your corre-
spondence concerning the remarks made by General George S. Brown,
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, during a meeting with Duke
University law students on Oct. 10.
"As you may know, the President has rebuked General Brown
for this incident. In addition, the President, during a Nov. 14 press
conference in Phoenix, Arizona, declared: 'I think it ought to be said
that General Brown has publicly apologized to those who might have
' been involved in the comments he made. I have no intention of
asking General Brown to resign. General Brown has been an excellent
" Air Force Officer; he has been an excellent Chairman of the Joint
| Chiefs of Staff. He has made a mistake; he has recognized it. He is
I going to continue as the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff."
"General Brown has retracted his inaccurate and all-too-casual
' observations and has given a full apology for the incident. He has
expressed his distress that he has unwittingly done the nation a dis-
' service through his part in initiating this unfortunate controversy.
' As he himself has remarked publicly: 'I am both awed and appalled
by the divisiveness this incident has caused. I understand the upset
and dismay that have been expressed.' W*h typical forthrightness,
he has taken positive steps both to correct his error and to heal any
| wounds that he may have inadvertently caused in the society to
which he has been and continues to be so deeply dedicated.
"In this process. General Brown has made it clear 'that the
strategic direction of the armed forces in the defense of America is
my forte and is a full-time job. With this in mind, I intend to avoid
even the appearance of dealing with anything else.'
I "I enclose a copy of General Browns statement which expresses
, his regret for his comments at Duke University."
J
Sincerely,
William E. Odom
Executive Assistant
STATEMENT BY GENERAL GEORGE S. BROWN
i CHAIRMAN OF THE JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF
I deeply regret my remarks at Duke University which are cur-
rently being reported in the press. They were both unfortunate and
all considered-and certainly do not represent my convictions.
In particular, the remarks might mistakenly lead to the wholly
erroneous inference that American citizens and groups do not enjoy
in this nation the privilege of expressing their views forcefully.
What are called pressures lie at the very heart of democracy. We in
Defense know that: we experience pressures from contractors, pres-
sures from those opposed to defense expenditures, pressures from
foreign governments.
Moreover, my improper comments could be read to suggest the
American Jewish Community and Israel are somehow the same.
Americans of Jewish background have an understandable interest in
the future of Israel parallel to similar sentiments among other
Americans all of whom at one time or another trace their descent
to other lands.
I do in fact appreciate the great support and the deeD interest
in the nature of our security problems and our defenses that the
American Jewish Community has steadily demonstrated, and I want
to reemphasue that my unfounded and all too casual remarks on
that particular occasion are wholly unrepresentative of my continuing
respect and appreciation for the role played by Jewish citizens which
1 have just reiterated to the Jewish War Veterans.
1-1-76
Continued from Page 1
Commission on Palestine. He
was a member of the Jewish
Agency Delegation to the UN
General Assembly which present-
ed the Jewish case at the delibe-
rations leading up to the Assem-
bly's decision for the establish-
ment of the State of Israel.
Mr. Eban was appointed Is-
rael's Representative to the
United Nations in 1948 and in
this capacity appeared repeated-
ly before the bodies of that or-
ganization to state Israel's case.
In the Spring of 1949 he appear-
ed before the Political Commit-
tee of the General Assembly to
plead successfully for the ad-
mission of Israel to the UN.
Upon Israel's admission, on
May 11, Mrf. Eban became Per-
manent Representative. In Sep-
tember, 1950, he also became Is-
Broward County ,
Arthritis Assn.
Holds Election
The newly incorporated Ar-
thritis Association of Broward
County, Inc., a United Way'
agency, unanimously elected its
new officers for 1974-75 recent-
ly.
The officers include David I.
Stockwell, president; P. C. (Bud)
Price, sice president; Mrs. A.
Jerry Blanch, secretary, and
Mrs. Henry Balamut, treasurer.
The new administrative of-
fices, headed by executive di-
rector Betty Cooper, are located
at 2701 E. Sunrise Blvd., Fort
Lauderdale.
The newly elected directors of
the association are Mrs. Randy
Avon, Sr., Bill B. Bailey, D.C.,
Emanuel Borenstein, James Cox,
Richard K. Inglis, Esquire, Al-
bert Khouri, Peter Lawrence,
Robert Mills and Harry Powell.
The medical and scientific
committee members are Jose
Diaz, M.D., Michael Gordon,
M.D., Gordon E. Hill, M.D.,
Samuel Leone, M.D., Max Mass,
M.D., Norman Moskowitz, M.D.,
Howard Perer, M.D. and Wylie
T. Scott, M.D.
Maurice Revitz
To Chair Dinner
Honoring Stone
Rabbi Irwin M. Blank, presi-
dent of the Synagogue Council
of America, has announced the
appointment of Maurice Revitz
as chairman of the dinner which
the Council is tendering to Flor-
ida's newly elected U.S. Senator.
Richard B. Stone, Sunday, Jan.
19, at the Fontainebleau Hotel.
Mr. Revitz is one of Miami's
leading philanthropists and in-
dustrialists. Rabbi Irving Lehr-
of Temple Emanu-El, Miami
Beach, as honorary president of
the Synaeoeue Council of Ameri-
ca, the umbrella agency for the
three branches of American
Jewry Conservative, Orthodox
and Reform.
The Council's purpose is to
give the Jewish religious com-
munity a single address and a
united voice in all matters re-
garding which the three branch
es share a common concern.
The member agencies of the
Synagogue Council of America
are the six national rabbinic and
lay synagogal organizations
which together represent the
largest constituency in organized
Jewish lifeapproximately four
million synagogue-affiliated Jews.
l-J-75 .
rael's Ambassador to the United
States. At 35, he was the young-
est person to hold such a rank
among the diplomatic corps in
Washington. He retained both
posts until his resignation in
1959.
In October, 1958, the Board of
Governors of the Weizman In-
stitute of Science unanimously
elected him President of the In-
stitute.
In 1959 Mr. Eban returned to
Israel and entered politics as a
member of Mapai, the Israel La-
bor Party. He was elected to the
Fourth Knesset in November,
and, the next month, joined the
Cabinet as Minister without
Portfolio.
On July 3i. 1960, Mr. Eban
was appointed Minister of Edu-
cation and Culture, and on June
26, 19G3, became Deputy Prime
Minister under Prime Minister
Levi Eshkol. Following the res-
ignation of Mrs. Golda Meir as
Israel's Minister for Foreign Af-
fairs in January, 1966, Mr. Eba
was appointed to that post m
retained It until 1974.
Mr. Eban has received honor
ary degrees from New York iv
versity, Boston University n.
University of Maryland, Yesr'
University, the Dropsie Coliea
of Hebrew and Cognate Lear*
incr, Brandeis University and n
Hebrew Union College in C'r#
cinnati. He is a Fellov ,
World Academy of Art and S&
ence, Stockholm.
The author of numerous ai
tides and reports on the M; v'j
East, Mr. Eban's publicatioi.. .-".
elude "Zionism and thi>
World" (1949), "Britain's
die East Strategy (1947), V ,
of Israel" (19571, "Tide of N*
tionalism" (1958), "My P,
1968) and "My Country" (1973)
Tickets to hear Mr. F!ban are
available from the temple office,
1201 Johnson St., Holly
Please phone the office tor iddl
tional information.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IMPORTANT
CLIP AND PLACE WITH DRIVERS LICENSE
THE LAW IS IN CASE OF AN ACCIDENT
YOU CAN REQUEST YOUR OWN TOWING SERVICE.
SAVE Vi OF CITY OF HOLLYWOOD TOW RATES
IN CASE OF ACCIDENT REQUEST
HI-WAY
COLLISION SERVICE, INC
923-4282
Established 1962 24 Hour Towing
COMPLETE PAINT & BODY SHOP
2080 GARFIELD STREET, HOLLYWOOD
1
I

RIVERSIDE
IN HOLLYWOOD.
5801 Hollywood Boulevard,
920-1010
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel, Inc./ Funeral Directors
Other Riverside Chapels in South Florida; '
1171 Northwest 61st Avenue in Sunrise
* Telephones: 920-1010/584-6060
North Miami Beach, Miami Beach, and Miami.
Riverside also serves the New York Metropolitan area with chapels in
Manhanan.Broa\BrookliTi.FarRockawayandWestchter. M
Murray N. Rubin. FD.
i
i 1-3-7*


Friday, January 3, 1975
*JmM Fhridian and Shofar oi Hollywood
Page 3

Brandeis Women Sponsoring
Seminar At Nova University

The Brandeis University Na-
tional Women's Committee's
Creator Hollywood and Fort
Laudcrda'.e Pompano Chapters
are sponsoring a "University on
Wheels'' symposium from 9:30
a m. till 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan.
9, in Nova University Auditorium.
The theme is "Jewish Conscious-
nes in Contemporary America."
prof. Jacob Cohen of the
American Studies Department
will discuss "The New Anti-
Semitism: Reflections on the
Jewish Prospect in America." He
will also give a musical program.
Prof. Lawrence Fuchs. chair-
man of Brandeis University's
American Studies Department.
will si*ak on "The Jewish Fam-
ily: The Jewish Father for a
Change."
Prof. Ariella Goldberg of the
Near Eastern and Judaic Studies
Department will speak on
Wives, Concubines and Queens:
A Survey of Jewish Women
from the Bible."
Mrs. Ben Loerer, president of
the Greater Hollywood Chapter,
and Mrs. Morton Pine, president
of the Ft. Lauderdale-Pompano
PKOf. JACOB COHEN
Beach Chapter, will introduce
the speakers.
The chairmen of the two
groups are Mrs. Murray Levine
of Hollywood, Mrs. Theodore
Weissman of Lauderdale Lakes
and Mrs. Louis Golenberg of
Plantation.
Funeral Services
Held Sunday For
Arlene Pritcher
Services were held Sunday,
Dec. 22, at Riverside Chapel for
Arline Pritcher of Hollywood
who passed away Dec. 19. In-
terment was in Beth El Memo-
rial Park.
Mrs. Pritcher is survived by
her husband, Nathan; son Marc,
and daughter Lisa, all of Holly-
wood; her mother Grace Israel,
and father Irwin Bellin.
A vice president of the Nation-
al Council of Jewish Women, Mrs.
Pritcher was a member of the
board of the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida, the
Jewish Federation's Community
Relations Committee and Chap-
laincy Committee, and was a
past president of the Belleaire
Home, and member of the Board
of Jewish Family Services in
Cleveland.
Mrs. Pritcher served in vari-
ous capacities in mental health
associations in both Florida and
Cleveland, and was an active
participant in Bonds for Israel.
She was a member of the Tem-
ple Beth El congregation.
Nathan Pritcher is cochair-
man of the 1974-75 Jewish Fed-
eration's Metropolitan Division
campaign.
Beth Shalom Dinner Honors Jack Shapiro On Birthday
ZOA Group Plans Food Preparation To Be Discussed

i
To Mark Israel's
27th Year Early
Broward District, Zionist Or-
ganization of America, plans an
early Tribute to Israel marking
'its 27th Anniversary Wednesday,
Jan. 22, at 7:30 p.m.
Guest speaker at the event,
which will be held at Temple
Sinai, 1201 Johnson St., Holly-
n od, will be Jacques Torczy-
ner, past president of the ZOA,
chairman of the Administrative
Boarii, and cochairman of the
World Confederation of General
Zionists.
Mr. Torczyner, who served for
five years as president of the
American Jewish Congress, re-
cently visited Israel and will
give an eye-witness report of the
situation he found there, and
the developments which are so
"crucial for the Jewish people
and the Jewish State.
The traditional candlelighting
ceremony will be conducted by
Rabbi David Shapiro, spiritual
leader of the temple, with Rose
Perry as coordinator. Sam Perry.
president-emeritus, will be mas-
ter of ceremonies.
Me'. Reiser is current presi-
dent of the Broward Zionist Dis-
trict; Sam J. and Rose Perry
are eochairmen.
The Sisterhood of Temple
Beth Shalom will hold a general
meeting at 8 p.m. Monday, Jan.
6, in the temple's grand ball-
room, according to Mrs. Edward
Hoffman, president.
Feature of the meeting will be
guest speakers on the topic of
food preparation for special oc-
ca.-ions, gourmet recipes and
specialities involving love as a
main ingredient.
The Sisterhood Gift Shop will
be open one-half hour before and
after the meeting to permit pur-
chase from an outstanding selec-
tion of gifts.
The meeting is open to Sister-
hood members and guests. Re
freshments will be served.
MARLO RENTAL APTS.
HOLLYWOOD HILLS
FURNISHED AND UNFURNISHED
3500 POLK STREET
Dade 625-4545 Broward 989-3030
30 Different BuiUingt
1*0*0H4*i4m+0*&t&i0*0 w#w^#w#w PERSIAN RUGS
Persian Art (Rug) Gallery
Carrying art outstanding collection of
highest quality Persian Rugs, selected by
experts TO SUIT FLORIDIAN TASTE!!
Hand carved Jewish Traye, Paintings
Decorative Art Objects
KERMAN, KASHAN, QUM, TABRIZ]
And Many Others Including
CHINESE AND INDIAN RUGS
Direct at Wholesale Prices to You.
[|We Pay Cosh For Your Old Rugs
SAGE PLAZA
800 E. Hallandale Blvd., Hallandale
Daily 10 5 OPEN SUNDAY
929-4744 closed Saturdays
Rent-A-Car
* m LOW as
5
DAY
5c Per Mile
"Tl(0i.la*|~~
iIUi.|,A1,ii.,,.J
CAR-BELL
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520 S. DIXIE HWY. HIWD.
920-4141
Now picking and ship-
ping Tcngelos, Oranges
& Pink Seedless Grape-
fruit send some home
to your family and
friends.
ANGIES GROVES
Bonded Fruit Shippers
1809 Wiley Street
Tel. 927-5447
Reservations are being accept-
ed 'by Sylvia S. Gordon at Tem-
ple Beth Shalom for the gala
dinner and dance in honor of the
80th birthday of Jack Shapiro,
honorary president for life of
Beth Shalom and immediate past
president of the temple, Satur-
day, Jan. 11, with cocktails at
7:30 p.m. and dinner at 8:30
p.m.
Dancing will be to the band
of Julie Maina in the grand
ballroom, 1400 N. 46th Avenue.
Complete table reservations will
be honored so that groups will
be seated as i>er requests. For
additional information call the
temple.
S.8N.
KURASH,^
Phone 921-2902
Main Office 2429 Hollywood Blvd.
Phone 947-5654 Toll Free
Stanley S. Kurash
and Naomi R. Kurash
Our Large Staff of
Qualified Associates
Ready To Serve You.


arnett
ianK.
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
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Page 4
*Jewist rhridliari and Shoto of Hollywood
Fiiday, lanuary 3, 19.-/J
CLsditorial
Master Plan for Exodus
Jewish Agency Executive Chairman Pinhas Sapir's
report that the Soviet Union acceded to an annual exit of
Soviet Jews to the tune of 35,000 not 60,000 is in-
teresting for two reasons.
One is that Sapir has finally touched on the most
dangerous aspect of the master plan for a Jewish exodus
from Moscow's Egypt.
We have talked about it often enough in the past
and been criticized often enough for doing just that and
nothing else as if our being silent about it would make
it go away.
And that is that inevitably there would come a time
when the number of Jews willing to leave Russia but not
go to Israel would pose an embarrassment for Israel and
for diaspora Jewish leaders engineering the exodus.
The other problem Sapir's report highlights is that,
already, the nations of the world those bastions of
freedom in the west are reacting to the refusal of Soviet
Jews arriving in Vienna to go to Israel by putting up walls
around the possibility of emigration to their countries.
The Lesson Hasn't Been Learned
Take Belgium. Take West Berlin. Take all those mar-
velous democratic societies put to the torch by the Nazi
beast we saved from utter destruction in World War II.
Now, suddenly, up go the bars to Jews who might
want to find freedom in their bosoms.
Then, take the U.S. The U.S. itself eventually will
close its doors to these Jews, Sapir is now warning that
U.S. that turned the St. Louis away, but opened its heart
to Cuba, for example, without end.
We are delighted that our country took in refugees
from Cuba. In this, many of us saw the fruits of a bitter
lesson we had learned in the Nazi era.
We had learned in Cuba the lesson we refused to
practice in Hitler's Germany that a nation founded on
the hallowed principles of freedom can not turn its shoul-
der to the principles of freedom without doinq violence
to itself.
But if Sapir is right, then apparently we didn't learn
the lesson after all.
Like the benighted Europeans, those ancient bigots
whose "culture" we worship, we are prepared to turn
away new St. Louises, after airlifting refugees from Ha-
vana.
All of which is by way of saying nothing has chang-
ed. When it comes to Jews, the "enlightened" world's en-
lightenment somehow manages to flicker and burn out.
Is Columnist Alsop Right?
Los Angeles Times Syndicate columnist Joseph Alsop
has repeatedly made the point in his articles published
by us that we are headed for disaster in the Middle East
unless Washington clearly warns the Arabs that the next
Arab oil embargo will mean U.S. military intervention in
the Persian Gulf to break the back of the embargo.
Alsop argues that the point must be made, and now,
that the reason for a contemplated embargo would have
no bearing on such a U.S. military move not even a
new Israel-Arab war.
But, he argues, it is not in the nature of the milksop
Ford administration, or even of the Congress, to do any-
hing so firmly or even intelligently.
Well, now there is the demand signed by 71 U.S.
Senators sent to the President that he reaffirm this nation's
commitment to the survival and integrity of Israel and
that he press our European allies to rescue the by now
almost hopelessly bleeding principles of the violated
United Nations charter.
Have the Senators moved because they know in their
hearts the President will not move? Or do they really
mean it?
Is Alsop right in the end?
rA t Our Weakes t Since Korea
** .. *e *
MJenisti Flcridlfan
Mrf sHiimi ih but 11 ii inn i t niMiii
DmCE and PLANT HO N.B. 6th 8t, Miami. Fla. 33182 Jhone S7S-4MS
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 373-4605
', P.O. Box 2973. Miami. Florida 33101
I KED K- SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SELMA M. THOMPSON
t editor and Publisher Executive Editor Assistant to Publisher
RITA GOODMAN. News Coordinator
Tha Jewish Plorldian Does Not Guarantee The Kaihruth
f~^ Of The Merchandise Advertised In It* Columns ~
Published Bi-Weekly by the Jewish Floridlan
Pecond-eiass Pnstaae Paid at Miami. Fla.
Jewish Federation of South Broward. In<\ SHOFAR EDITORIAL
ADVISORY COMMITTEE Dr. Sheldon Wlllens. Chairman: Ross Becker-
Ben Salter. Marion Nevins. Dr. Norman Atkin. Robert N. Kerbel
Tha Jewish Florfdian hss absorbed tha Jewish Unity and tha Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndi-
cate, Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association, American As-
sociation of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year 5.00. Out of Town Upon
Request.
By JOSEPH ALSOP
WASHINGTON Relative to
the growing power of the So-
viets, this country today is far
weaker than at any time since
the eve of the Korean warwhen
U.S. weakness actually produced
Soviet-sponsored aggression.
As is proven by the hard ex-
perience of the last quarter-
century, the Soviets must be
studying the changes in the mili-
tary balance with eager delight.
BUT THE economic side of the
equation is every bit as impor-
tant as the military side. By any
real test, the U.S. today is grow-
ing poorer as well as weaker.
To say that we are poorer
than we were in the Truman
years, of course, does not square
with the statistics. In the inter-
val, we have grown affluent, as
they call it.
It is a condition that has tend-
ed to make large patches of the
United States look like an old
maid's favorite cactus plant,
which grows bloated and puffy
from overzealous watering.
AS I look back on my working
life, moreover, it seems to me
that in a very real sense we
were far, far more solidly rich
in the years when President Tru-
man had just launched the Mar-
shall Plan.
Our peak surplus on the bal-
ance of payments in that period
was not enormously less than the
surplus the oil producers are now
creaming off the Western coun-
tries.
Financing the Marshall Plan
and far more besideswas made
easy by that U.S. surplus.
In this country, the left-wing
economists' predictions of a
fearful postwar depression were
then proving to be total non-
sense.
BOOM WAS the danger rather
than bust. Abroad, by the same
token, both our European allies
and Japan were making a mag-
nificent recovery with our help.
Confidence was in the air in
Washington, while in Moscow the
more realistic Soviet economists
were in deadly danger because
Josef Stalin agreed with our own
left-wing economists.
By the affluence that later
came to America, much, much
good has been accomplished to
balance affluence's widespread
disfigurement of the face of our
land.
Statistically, too, despite the
current unemployment figures,
we are still much better off than
we were in 1949-50.
BUT WE have no confidence,
precisely because there are now
pretty good reasons to fear the
dire trouble for the West that
Josef Stalin used so wrongly to
expect.
That deathless optimist, Mr.
Micawber, kept saying in hi9
darkest hours, "Something will
turn up." The optimists nowadays
keep echoing Mr. Micawber. and
one must pray they are right.
But by any serious calculating,
the "something" that is most
likely to "turn up" will be per-
fectly disastrous.
Throughout this year, for in-
stance, the British have been tak-
ing in billions of Arab short-term
deposits and using them to cover
their own gigantic deficit on the
balance of payments.
THIS SINGULAR banking
practice means two things. It will
be fatal to Britain for the short-
term deposits to be withdrawn.
And it will also be fatal, although
slowly, for the short-term de-
posits to slop coming in.
In November, there were the
first faint signs that Britain
might cease to be able to use
Arab short-term deposits, i,
feet to pay the monthly bills.
IF THAT happens, there oil
be terrible trouble starting j,
London but ramifying througt
the United States and the Wtst
In Italy, again, a suspension o:
external payments is predicte,
by many insiders for this sprirvi
Meanwhile, U.S. banks, for^n
stance, have long since loueJ
many billions of dollars to lu
in different, seemingly profitta]
ways. But if external payment
are suspended by the Bank
Italy for any length of time. u
United States and other loaj
will be worthless; and this alot
might be quite enough to tout
off a financial earthquake.
FINALLY, of course, there ij
the eternal danger of war in a
Middle East. The U.S. goven
ment's insiders are more in
more inclining toward quotm
the chance of war within e:
months at about 70 per cent.
There is also 100 per cent c<
tainty of another Arab oil t>
bargo if war breaks outun'.cs|
the United States makes qu.t
clear, credibly and in advar.cj
that renewal of the embargo wi
be the signal for American mil
tary action in the Persian Gulf
But with a government an
Congress such as we have todi
any such U.S. action seems mo
unlikely.
CONSIDER, then, the econoi|
ic consequences of any one
this series of possible and
probable future development
added to the economic mala:
already existing.
Anyone should see that the coi^
sequences will be quite gravL
enough to affect the whole worll
balance and also to produce stiL
more of the mushiness that al|
ways tempts the Soviets to prob
.i
JDC Adopts $29 Million Budget
To Finance World Aid Programs!
Volume 5
Friday, January 3, 1975
Number 1
20 TEVETH 5735
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Joint Distribution Committee
adopted a budget of $29,935,000
for 1975 to finance its aid pro-
grams that reach 400,000 needy
Jews throughout the world.
The budget was approved by
more than 500 Jewish community
leaders from the U.S. and Can-
ada attending the JDC's annual
meeting at the New York Hilton
Hotel.
JACK D. WEILER of New
York, who was elected JDC chair-
man, succeeding Edward Gins-
berg of Cleveland who had serv-
ed in that post for three years,
said that more than a third of
the JDC budget will be used in
Israel where the agency serves
about 120,000 people.
He explained that the JDC will
be called upon to expand its
health and welfare services in
that country because of Israel's
heavy defense burdens in addi-
tion to providing for the secur-
ity and_ well-being of its people
and for the tens of thousands of
Soviet Jews who will be arriving
in 1975.
Weiler reported that in West-
ern Europe, the JDC's emphasis
will be on helping the French
Jewish community integrate large
numbers of newcomers, mainly
from North Africa, and in the
caring and maintenance of trans-
migrants in Italy and Austria.
He said these programs will
cost $3,790,000 and will aid some
70.000 people.
EXPRESSING A fervent hope
for peace in the Middle East,
Weiler declared: "What greater
boon could there be for the State
of Israel than an era of peace
in which to build and provide
secure homes and the good things
of life for its people and for the
tens of thousands of Soviet Jews
who will be coming in during
1975?"
Reporting on JDC programs in
1974, the agency's 60th anniver-
sary, Samuel L. Haber. executive
vice chairman, said that by the
end of this year JDC will have
aided some 400.000 Jews in 25
countries overseas at a cost of
about S30.654.OOO.
JDC programs in Israel ac-
counted for one-third of the
agency's total expenditure for
1974, about $10 million, Haber
said.
The bulk of it was for the
JDC/Malben program which pro-
vides a variety of health and re-
habilitation services to the aged,
handicapped and mentally ill,
and helping to overcome the
shortage of professional person-
nel through manpower training
programs.
IN ADDITION, Haber report-
ed that $1 million has been ear-
marked for aid to yeshivot and
cultural and religious institu-
tions and programs in Israel. A
third program is the Brookdale
Institute of Gerontology and
Adult Human Development.
Another large allocation was
for ORT. Aside from helping
Jews in Western Europe, JDC
also has regular operations in
Rumania and Yugoslavia. In the
former country JDC programs
aid some 16.000 of the 85,000
Jews remaining there, Haber
said.
In Yugoslavia about 700 Jews,
10 per cent of the country's Jew-
ish population, are aided by JDC-
supported programs.
In addition. Haber reported a
relief-m-transit program, initiat-
ed about 25 years ago, provides
assistance to tens of thousands of
Jewish families in the Soviet
Union, Poland, Hungary, Bul-
garia and Czechoslovakia.
Arab and Moslem countries ail
in North Africa some 37.01
Jews are assisted by the JDC
These countries include Moroco
Tunisia. Iran. Egypt, Syria, Lei
anon and Algeria.
THE JEWISH population id
the Arab and Moslem countnw
has declined from about 1,000(01
just after World War II to,
little over 100,000 in 1974. :*
her reported. Of these, aim
37,000 Jewish men, women u<
children are being assisted I
variety of health, welfare lad
educational programs. In Moroc
co, more than half of the remain
ing Jewish population of 22.00
are being aided.
In Tunisia, where the (
munity has declined from abw
100.000 in 1948 to about 8OO0ii
1974, close to 3.000 are aided ii
one or another JDC-supportei
program.
V. Nations'
Confirms
Violations
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA)-I-rlffl
sources claimed here that in
United Nations Disengagemm
Observers Force (UND0F) W
confirmed a Syrian violation o
the disengagement accord.
The sources 3aid that an i"
vestigation by UNDOF corrtfc
rated Israel's recent complain
that the Syrians have pi**
more tanks in the limited force
zone than allowed under
agreement some 90 tank m
stead of 75.


S^'QCjiday. JanuarY **. ""
+Jewish fk>ri Page 5
UN Official Replies To CRC Protest
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Rabbi Albert Mayerfeld, (left) principal of Hillel Commu-
nity Day School,, is pictured with Dr. Chaim Channel,
Jerusalem head of the Department of Torah Education in
the Golan, Mrs. Chamiel, and Chaim Greenstein, New
York head of the Torah Education Department of the
World Zionist Organization during their visit to Hillsl
Community Day School. The Israel educators visited
classes, met with teachers, reviewed curricular objectives
and achievements, and invited Rabbi Mayerfeld to par-
ticipate in the seminar for American Jewish educators.
HillePs Principal Attending
Winter Seminar In Jerusalem


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Rabbi Albert Mayerfeld. prin-
cipal of Hillel Community Day
School, left for Israel Monday to
attend the Jerusalem Educators
Winter Seminar, cosponsored by
the Torah Education Department
of the World Zionist Organiza-
tion and the Educators Council
of America.
The seminar will begin with
prayer services at the Kotel, fol-
lowed by a visit to Yad Vashem,
where Prof. I. Greenberg will lec-
ture on "Teaching About the
Holocaust Meaningfully."
The Administrator of Yad
Vashem will discuss questions of
our youth concerning the holo-
caust and the responses they re-
reive.
Joseph Goldschmidt of the De-
partment of Torah and Culture
will conduct several sessions on
the teaching of the History of
Israel (Toldot Yisrael).
Participants in the seminar
will visit many schools. Each
school visit will include dialogue
with the principal and attendance
at two sample lessons demon-
strating varying technical and
philosophical approaches.
Schools to be visited include
Tichon Maalah, Euolina De Roths-
child, Dugma, Tichon Himmel-
farb, Chorev, Hameiri, Nocham,
Midrashiat Noam, Moriah. Kib-
butz Shaalvim, Yeshivat Alon-
shevut Gold College. Yefai Nof,
Chinuch Atzamai. Netiv Mayer,
Korfman and Baal Shem Tov.
Between visits to these out-
standing institutions, lectures
will be given on "The State of
Israel Looks At The Future."
"Educational Research in Israel,"
"Teaching of Talmud." by Avra-
ham Ron. "Teaching of Bible*
by Nechama Laibowitz and "The
Problems of Absorbing Soviet
Jews."
One day has been set aside for
a Tiyul on the theme of "In the
Footsteps of King Saul and King
David." The department has also
made arrangements to meet and
interview candidates for posi-
tions as exchange teachers.
The seminar will conclude with
a farewell program followed by
departure from Israel Jan. 6.
Upstate Education Day Set
The Womerrs League of the
United Synagogue of America
will hold its Upstate Education
Day Thursday, Jan. 9 at Temple
Rodeph Sholom. Tampa. Florida
Branch President Marcy Levin,
Mildred Wolfstein, Sandi Niren-
berg and Sylvia Ziffer will be
among those attending.
Following is the text of a let-
ter from Bradford Morse, Under-
Secretary-General for Political
and General Assembly Affairs of
the United Nations which was
received by the Community Re-
lations Committee of Jewish
Federation in reply to its pro-
test against the recent Palestine
Liberation Organization's ad-
dress to that body:
"I sincerely regret that the
large volume of mail which has
been received at the United Na-
tions concerning the decision
taken by the General Assembly
on 14 October 1974 to invite the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion to participate in the delib-
erations of the General Assem-
bly on the question of Palestine
(Agenda item 108 of the twenty-
ninth session of the General
Assembly) precludes a more per-
sonal reply to your recent com-
munication.
"This decision, reached after a
vote of the General Assembly,
in which 104 Member States
favored the extension of the in-
vitation, with four opposed and
20 abstentions, has aroused con-
siderable public interest.
"I may add that the General
Assembly has exclusive respon-
sibility for its proceedings and
the decisions reached by its
Member States.
"May I also take this oppor-
tunity to tliank you, on behalf
of the Secretary-General, for
the interest you are takin .- In
this item nn the agenda of the
General Assembly."
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Beach Group To
Meet Jan. 15
Mrs. Lillian Schulman, pres-
ident, urges all members to at-
tend the Beach Group of Hadas-
sah meeting Wednesday, Jan. 15,
in the Galahad South Social
Hall. Refreshments will be serv-
ed. A 12:30 to 1 p.m. social will
be held before the meeting fea-
turing many new items from the
Boutique Shop.
Mrs. Ethel K. Schwartz, vice
president and program chair-
man, will introduce Rabbi Sam-
uel Z. Jaffe, spiritual leader of
Temple Beth El, Hollywood, who
will give a book review on "Gu-
lag Archipelago" by Aleksandr
I. Solzhenitsyn. This book has
been on the best seller list and
has been widely discussed.
A fund-raising card party and
luncheon will be held Wednes-
day, Feb. 14, at the Galahad
South Social Hall. Lillian Seigal
is chairman.
PLAZA BAKERY and
SANDWICH SHOP
(Baking done on premises)
THE FINEST BAKED GOODS *" *fir+> 1
and SUB SANDWICHES <-%zS*
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2430 Hollywood Boulevard Hollywood
9239518 9453527
\ Give the Joy
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A Season Ticket to
1 PINE CREST
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Jan Great PETER NERO in concert
y> with Davi Troncoso, Bass and Cecil Ricca, Drums &
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B A special Bicentennial Program with famed |'
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I February 3,1975 !
v?
n The thrilling adaptation ot Herman Melville's 7x
A MOBY DICK starring JACK ARANSON k
February 24,1975
3 The exciting due-guitarists
| LOS INDI0S TABAJARAS
March 17,1975
". Canada's National Dance Ensemble epitomizing
'i the Spirit of a Country in FEUX FOLLETS
April 14,1975
'-.' All Seats Reserved. Season Subscription: $22.50 |
!{ for information and reitrvatiom contact The Pine Cret Pub. *
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Page 6
*Jewislfhridiar and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, January 3. 1975
Community Turns Out For Pacesetters' Gala
Continued from Page 1
of the Jewish Arrency, who re-
marked \\...\ "partnership" was
the way in which Americans
ok at their relationship
with the Jews of Israel. "In thus
time of crisis.'" lie Bald, "the peo- audience that without a strong,
pie of Israel are counting on us vital American Jewish commu-
te kcc\> up our end of that part- nit/, Israel could not be I ip-
nership." ported.
Herbert Katz, president of the Nathan Pritcher was arange-
Jewi*a Federation, reminded the ments chairman lor the evening.
DR. A.VD MRS. NORMAN ATKIN
MR. AND MRS. 10UIS CONN
MELVIN BAER, NATHAN PRITCHER, MRS. ALLEN GORDON, LOUIS COHN
Rabbi Morton Malavsky, (left) Temple Beth
Shalom; Rabbi David Rosenfeld, Temple
Beth Ahm; Rabbi David Shapiro, Temple
Sinai; Rabbi Robert Frazin, Temple Solel;
Rabbi Avrom Drazin, Temple Israel of Mira-
mar; Dr. Samuel Jaffe, Rabbi. Temple Bsth
El; Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz, Hallandale
Jewish Center, and Rabbi Haroid Richter,
Broward County Chaplain.
MR. AND MRS. OTTO STIEBER
MR. AND MRS. ROBERT BAER
MR. AND MRS. HERBERT KATZ
*&
MR. AND MRS. MOSES HORNSTVN
I
MR. AND MRS. MEIVIN BAER
DRS. PECK and GLAZER, P.A.
SIDNEY J. PECK, M.D.
ViaOR M. GLAZER, M.D.
ALLAN R. KATZ, M.D.
ANNOUNCE THE OPENING OF A SECOND OFFICE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF GYNECOLOGY
AT
2500 E. HALLANDALE BCH. BLVD.
SUITE 311
HAUANDAIE OPFICE HUS. IY APPT.. 920-0227
NOW OPEN
Jamil's
Mart of the 3iitts
RFSTAUP.ANIAND10UNGE
HOttVWOOD S fAMHY STYLE RESTAURANT
STEAKS, SEAFOOD
CHOPS, ITALIAN CUISINE.
Dick B LUNCHES (ROM 1.S0 FROM 11-4
APPEARING NITflY Dinners erom ? 75 complimentary
FROM 5:30, [XCF.PT MON. beer or wine with dinness'oniy
Jamil's SUB AND PIZZA SHOP
EAT IN.. .TAKE OUT.. .OR WE DELIVER
3015 JOHNSON ST.961-9922
JUST WEST OF THE 1-95 OVERPASS
Johnson Square Shopping Center


Friday, January 3, 1975
Jewlst Meridian and Shofar oi Hollywood
Page 7-
Hallandale 6A'
Workers Meet,
Organize
The Hallandale Area "A"
Campaign Steering Committee
met recently in the offices of
HARRY GROSSMAN, ALEX RUBIN, ALtREO NEWMAN
A'eadowbrook Complex
We Are Here!... MIAMI BEACH'S FIRST
The KOSHEIl Sit:AH
HOUSE r
The Ultimate in Kosher Dining \, ,,
In An Elegant, Intimate Atmosphere *
Our Specialty: Broiled Steak Chicken,
Fish Shish-Ka-Bab Salad Ba
Imported Israeli Wines Serving
ONLY GLATT KOSHER MEATS
Opt* Sunday tkramah Thursday 5 W
Your Hosl MENASHE HIRSCH
For Reservations Phone: 1-531-4114 --Tit^otN' ~^
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On The Ocean l 21j| SI MIAMI 8EACH
Neil to the Sea Gull Hotel
<*9m
SAMUEL VJEINSTEM, MANUEL GERSGN, JEROME RUBENSTEIN
Fairways South
HENRY KLEE, MRS. RUTrl fEUERSTEM
Fairways Riviera
PAULA JACOBS, GLADYS GOODMAN
Fairways
LAVID H. UUttt, DR. BRUtiO WALDMAN
Golden Islet Drive
Jewish Federation for t!ie pur-
pose of o:"'ni/iog l'-.e va
buildings in that community.
Chairman of the area la
George Paley, with David Lurie
an I Al raham Halpern ac Ing as
rary chainiv-n. ( ;.....: :.m
array Feuerstein.
Members of the Steering Com-
mittee are Harry Grossman,
Alex Rubin an,I Alfred Nei
Meadowbrook; David Lurie and
Dr. Bruno Waldman, Golden
Isles Drive; Louis Lister and
Edward Dincin, Gulf stream;
Nathan and Martha Pasik, Gold-
en Isles; Henry Klee, Ruth Feu-
erstein, Hyman Wyman, Samuel
Toder, Arthur Weiner, Michael
Brown and Samuel Scht M
Fairways Riviera; Paula J;t" il a
and Gladys Goodman, Fairways;
Samuel VVeinstein, Manuel Ger-
son, Jerome Rubenstein, Fair-
ways South; Joseph Milkman,
Srlma Gersten, and Henry Fran-
kel, Fairways Royale.
The next organizational meet-
ing for the Hallandale Area is
scheduled Tuesday at 10 a.m. in
Temple Beth EL 1351 S. 11th
Ave., Hollywood.
IASING AND REHT-A-CAR
low low rates::
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Phone 9874085
6C27 PEMBROKE ROAD, HOLLYWOOD
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Sabra Offers Aa Extra Prize To
Seniors Cruise
Readers Of The Jewish Floridian *^*ZJF
The Sabra Intcrnaticnal Recipe
Contest which is being advertised
In The Jewish Floridian has b?en
expanded to give an additional
prize opportunity to car readers.
Any reader who sends a recipe
using Sabra, the liqueur of Israel,
as an ingredient will be eligible
to win a deluxe Sabra Mini
Chalice gift Set which includes
a bottle of Sabra and special
serving cups.
All entries will also bs eligible
for the grand prize of a trip to
Israel plus 40 ether fine prizes.
Send your recipes now to Sabra
International Recipe Contest, c/o
The Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
01-2973, Miami, Florida 33101.
Enter as often as you wish.
Each recipe should be sent in a
separate envelope. Entries must
be post-marked by Feb 28, 1975.
Singles Plan Tivo January Events
The Jewish Federation Singles
of Broward invite Jewish singles,
ages 25-50 for women and 25-55
for men, to the January func-
tions. Wednesday, Jan. 8. at 8
pm., Stanley W. Keiserman,
PhD., psychologist specializing
in psychotherapy, hypnotherapy
and biofredback, will speak on
"Hypnosis" at the American
Lung Assn., 2020 S. Andrews
Ave.
Thursday, Jan. 30. a Dinner-
Dance to celebrate the installa-
tion of new officers will be held
at the Camelot, Hollywood's new-
est private club. Cocktail hour
begins at 7:30 and dinner at 8:30.
Reservations limited so call early
Monday through Friday at the
F. deration offices
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Florida will pre-
sent a "Whale of an Event" for
Senior Adults on Jan. 16. They
will be going on a sightseeing-
lecture cruise aboard the Gray
Line Belle and then tour the
world-famous Seaquarium.
This will be an all-day ac-
tivity and the participants are
asked to bring their own lunch.
Registration is limited and
may be made only on a first-
come first-serve basis. For fur-
ther information, contact the
Senior Adult Group Worker
Stephanie Engelberg at the JCC
office at 920-2089.
J HOSPITAL ec,
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Page 8
+Je*isHFhrid/fur and Sholar of Hollywood
Friday, January 3, 1975
Louis Cohn To Be Honored
At Beth El Bonds Dinner
Lewis E. Cohn, cochairman of
the Jewish Federation of South
'Broward 1975 UJA campaign,
will receive the State of Israel
Masada Award Sunday, Jan. 19,
at the Temple Beth El-Israel
Dinner of State on behalf of Is-
rael Bonds at the Diplomat
Country Club.
According to Dr. Samuel Z.
Jat'te, spiritual leader of the Hol-
lywood congregation, the Masada
Award is presented by the Israel
Bonds Organization for notable
achievement in fortifying the
economic foundations of Israel.
The plaque, which bears the
Hebrew inscription ".Masada shall
not fall again," commemorates
the 1900th anniversary of the
heroic defense of the fortress of
Masada. the last Jewish strong-
hold to fall in the Roman con>
quct of Palestine
Cohn has been active in the
can: paign to further Israel's eco-
nomic development since the in-
ception of the Israel Bonds pro-
gram in 1951. and is presently a
member of the South Broward
Israel Bonds board of governors.
Former president of Temple
Beth El and cochairman of the
Jewish Community Relations
committee. Cohn is an officer and
member of the board of directors
of the Jewish Federation, and is
a vice-president of the American
Jewish Committee.
Active in a wide variety of
Jewish and civic organizations,
Cohn also serves as a member of
LOUIS COHN
the board of trustees of the B'nai
B rith Herzl Lodge in Hollywood
and of the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida.
Cohn lived in Tel Aviv as a
youth from 1935 to 1938 and has
returned to the Jewish state on
many occasions with his wife of
35 years, Anne. Earlier this year, j
he was honored by Israel Bonds
at a "Night in Israel" at the
Aquarius where he received the
Scroll of Honor.
Cohn has been a resident of
South Florida for 15 years, and I
retired from active business seven I
years ago.
Reservations for the Israel
Bonds dinner-dance may be made
by calling the Temple Beth El
office.
KICHI
'^V^V^Vr^V^^^V-
DETECTIVE AND
SECURITY AGENCY, INC.
HOLLYWOOD FEDERAL BUILDING
SUITE 203
6100 GRIFFIN ROAD, DAVIE
PHONE 792-4602
Investigate Report Ancient
Cemetery Was Leveled by Reds

ELIZABETH, N. J. (JTA)
A leading American Orthodox
rabbi reported that, at the re-
quest of the head of the Moscow
Jewish community, the Soviet
Ministry of Culture had sent a
special commission to Radin,
near Vilna, to investigate a re-
port that the ancient Jewish
Cemetery there had been
levelled.
The Radin cemetery included
the grave of the Chofetz Chaim,
regarded as the greatest Tal-
mudic scholar of modern times,
who died in 1933. Rabbi Pinhas
Teitz, a former member of the
Presidium of the Union of Ortho-
dox Rabbis of the United States
and Canada, said he had learned
about a letter from a Moscow
source, reporting a visit to the
Radin cemetery recently and a
discovery that a tractor had de-
vastated the cemetery, leaving
broken pieces of headstones and
monuments strewn over the
cemetery area.
ACCORDING TO the letter,
the grave of the Chofetz Chaim
had disappeared. The devastation
of the cemetery reportedly took
place sometime between Julv 10
and 22,Rabbi Teitz said he nad
learned.
He said he made the telephone
contact with Ephraim Kaplun,
head of the Moscow Jewish com-
munity, to inform him of the re-
ported devastation of the Radin
cemetery. Rabbi Teitz added
that, in two telephone calls to
Moscow, Kaplun informed him
that he had visited the Ministry,
of Cults and that a Moscow Uni-
versity expert on Jewish history
had explained to the Ministry the
significance for Jews of the Cho-
fetz Chaim and that Jews fre-
quently visited the grave in re-
spect to his memory.
Eban Helps Launch Worldwide
Celebration of Weizman Year
NEW YORK (JTA) The
100th anniversary of the birth
of Dr. Chaim Weizmann, the
scientist-statesman who became
the first President of the State
of Israel, was celebrated here
recently at a Weizmann Cen-
tenary Dinner, addressed by Ab-
ba Eban, former Israeli Foreign
Minister, and Nobel Laureate
Dr. Gerald M. Edelman, Vincent
Astor Distinguished Professor of
the Rockefeller University.
The dinner, at the New York
Hilton, under the auspices of the
American Committee for the
Weizmann Institute of Science,
was attended by a distinguished
national audience of 1,000.
PROCEEDS OF the dinner
will benefit research at the Weiz-
mann Institute in Rehovot. Eban,
Visiting Professor at Columbia
University's' Faculty of Inter-
national Affairs, a close associate
of Dr. Weizmann's, was speaker
on "Israel's Place in the World
Crisis."
Dr. Edelman's theme, science
and society, and Dr. Weizmann's
scientific legacy, were dis-
cussed by him under the title of
"The Two Faces of the Angel."
The development of the con-
structive resources of science, its
universality as the basis of hu-
man achievement, and the re-
creation of the Jewish State were
the twin loves of Dr. Weizmann
to which he devoted his entire
life. The future of Israel, he be-
lieved, would rest on three
pillars: science, security and
education.
THE WEIZMANN Institute of
Science was a 70th birthday gift
to Dr. Weismann, and encom-
passes the Daniel Sieff Research
Institute, established by Dr.
Weizmann in 1934 to "create
absorptive capacity for Pales-
tine."
Dr. Weizmann served as first
president of the Weizmann In-
stitute, from its founding in 1944
until his death in 1952. His home
on the Institute campus was Dr.
Weizmann's official residence aa
the President of Israel.
The recent program here was
the first in a year-long series of
programs to mark the Cente-
nary which was officially inau-
gurated in Israel Monday.
FORMER ISRAELI Premier
Golda Meir is president of the
World Committee for Chaim
Weizmann Centenary Cele-
bration. Meyer B. Weisgal, chan-
cellor of the Weizmann Institute
of Science, is the general chair-
man.
Three hundred and seventy
notables in science, education,
the arts, business and public
affairs, among them 60 Nobel
Laureates, and 26 heads of col-
leges and universities, have join-
ed an International Sponsoring
Committee for the Weizmann
Centenary.
L
"My husband's .
a "perked coffee" May vin.
He insists on Maxim.11
Maxim tastes like fresh
perked coffee because
.Maxim starts with fresh
perked coffee. Then it's
f reeze-dried into big dark
chunks-chunks of real
perked coffee. That's
Maxim. Fantastic flavor
by the cup or the potful.
..
K CERTIFIED KOSHER ^
MAXIM." The May vin's favorite for fine coffee flavor.


riday, January 3, 1975
V'Jenisti ffcracf/atn and Sbote ol Hollywood
Page 9-

???AskAbe???
QUESTION: How old was Isaac
when Abraham took him up to
Mt. Moriah for the sacrifice?
Name withheld upon request
ANSWER: According to the
Biblical narrative of the Akedah,
there is no positive statement to
indicate the age of Isaac. Ake-
dah is the Hebrew word meaning
"binding" which is used in the
Scriptures in connection with the
dramatic story of the binding of
Isaac by his father Abraham, in
the land of Moriah. (Genesi3
22:1-19:)
The key Hebrew word in the
narrative is "Naar" in the follow-
ing passage. "Then Abraham said
to his servants, 'You stay here
with the ass. The boy and I will
go up there; we will worship and
we will return to you.' (Genesis
22:5.)
According to an earlier trans-
lation of the Torah by Alexander
Harkavy (1863-1939), the word
Naar is translated as "lad."
Sometimes this Hebrew word is
used in connection with the
English word youth.
In the Encyclopaedia Judaica
article on the Akedah, Volume 1,
page 482, the following para-
graph appears. "The opinion is
found in the Midrash that
Isaac was 37 years old at the time
of the Akedah. Abraham ibn Ezra
(1C89-1164 C.E.) rejects this as
contrary to the plain meaning of
the narrative in which Isaac is
old enough to carry the wood but
young enough to be docile."
Apparently Ibn Ezra refers to
the exchange in the narrative be-
tween Isaac and Abraham. "Then
Isaac said to his father Abraham,
'Father!' And he answered. 'Yes,
my son.' And he said, 'Here is
the firestone and the wood; but
where is the sheep for the burnt
offering?' And Abraham said,
'God will see to the sheep for
His burnt offering, my son.' And
the two of them walked on to-
gether." (Genesis 22:7, 8.)
It is interesting to note that
even though Isaac was the in-
tended victim, the narrative in
Genesis and the Commentaries
on the Akedah emphasize the
Akedah as a test of Abraham.
It is repeated again and again
in the Commentaries that Abra-
ham with supreme self denial
was prepared to carry out the
divine command to offer up his
[' only son by Sarah as a sacrifice
to God. His hand was stayed only
at the last moment by an angel.
Having passed the supreme test
of faith. Abraham received an
affirmation of the divine bless-
ing. "I will bestow My blessing
upon you and make your de-
ASE HALPERN
scendants as numerous as tho
stars of heaven and the sands on
the seashore; and your descend-
ants shall capture the gates of
their enemies. All the nations of
the earth shall bless themselves
by your descendants, because you
have obeyed My command."
(Genesis 22:17, 18.)
From this point on. there is
no mention of Isaac in the nar-
rative of the Bible until the ac-
count of his marriage to Rebekah,
as told in detail in Genesis Chap-
ter 24. Following the affirma-
tion of the blessing, the narra-
tive states that Abraham re-
turned to his servants. They
went together to Beer Sheba. and
Abraham dwelt in Beer Sheba.
The following chapter in the
Bible tells about Sarah's death
in Hebron at the age of 127.
Abraham proceeded to mourn for
Sarah, purchased the cave of
Machpelah and buried her. There
is no mention of Isaac participat-
ing in the mourning of Sarah or
her burial.
Since Isaac was born when
Sarah was 90, he was 37 years
old when she died at the age of
127. But whether or not Sarah's
death was close in time to the
Akedah is not clear. Many school-
ars agree that the narrative in
the Bible clearly indicates that
he was much younger than 37
at the time of the intended sac-
rifice.
The Bible specifically states
that Isaac was 40 years old when
he married Rebekah (Genesis
25:20) This would indicate that
his marriage took place 3 years
after his mother's death.
One other interesting fact
about Isaac. Although he is one
of the three Patriarchs, he is
overshadowed in the Bible and
in the Commentaries by his
father Abraham and his son
Jacob.
Editor's note:
Please send vour questions to:
??? ASK ABE ???
c'o Jewish Federation of
South Broward
1909 Harrison Street
Hollvwood. Florida 33020
'We Should Write To Express
Appreciation To Sen. Jackson9
EDITOR, Floridian-Shofar:
While we are all grateful for
the understanding reached with
regard to the emigration of So-
viet Jews, as reflected by the
recent exchange of letters that
took place between Secretary of
State Kissinger and Senator Jack-
son, it is imperative that we fully
appreciate the following:
# That despite the Jackson
understanding it is by no means
evident as of this moment that
freedom of emigration will be
granted to all Soviet Jews who
wish to leave.
continue unabated.
That drastic acts of harass-
ment against Soviet Jews who
indicate their desire to leave con-
0 That under these circum-
stances it is imperative that we
continue our efforts on behalf
of Soviet Jewry, with particular
attention to the fate of Jewish
Prisoners of Conscience now
languishing in Soviet prisons and
work camps.
1 would like to call upon all
HMMH
!
OUR
READERS
WRITE
"Let Thy V/orit Be Brief*
Kohehth (Ecclit)
|l1l,,r.ii..iiliiiii.i|iiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiwin^r"
the leaders of our many organiza-
tions and the readers of The
Shofar to extend to Senator
Jackson the support he vitally re-
quires in his continuing efforts
on behalf of Soviet Jewry by
writing to him now and express
ing our aomeciation for these ef-
forts and the success he has so
far achieved.
SAM J. PERRY
Hollywood
Soviet Jewry
No Change
By FRAN NEVINS
Since the dramatic announce-
ment of a Jackson Amendment
"agreement" on Oct. 18, the
Kremlin's anti-Jewish stance ap-
parently has changed little, if
any.
The text of the two Jackson-
Kissinger letters declares it is
understood the USSR will:
# Place no "unreasonable oi
unlawful impediments" in
the way of applicants for
exit (as punitive draft, per-
mission of parents even
where the applicant is an
adult, punitive "criminal"
charges)
# Process applicants on a
first-come, first-serve basis,
with hardship cases han-
dled "sympathetically and
expeditiously"
0 Continue to suspend the
"education tax" (although
applicants are still paying
the 900 plus ruble "fees")
# Hold those applicants who
had access to "genuinely
sensitive" information no
Sabra Group's
Meetings Are
Rescheduled
The Sabra Group of Hadassah,
which has been meeting on the
third Thursday of each month,
will begin a new meeting sched-
ule starting with the Jan. 9
meeting. General meetings will
thereafter be held on the sec-
ond Thursday of each month at
Temple Sold, 5100 Sheridan
St., Hollywood.
The Jan. 9 meeting will be a
paid up membership meeting
held in honor of lifetime mem-
bers and new members. The spe-
cial program will feature a skit
performed by Hadassah mem-
bers, and gifts will be presented
to all new members.
Life members to be honored
include Faye Plum, Melvia Toll.
Shirley R. Sterner, Barbara
Fertman, Barbara Zeitlin, Recsa
Frecdman, Sue Towbin, Judy
White, Leona Brauser, D'vorah
Friedman, Ruth Gillman, Flor-
ence Goldschmidt, Isabelle Mil-
ner, Regina Poslun, Jean Kru-
ce*-. Ma-ion I-evitats, Anne Lip-[
schitz, Sheila Riger, Lee Rosen-
berg, Dons Hosunstein, Kstlier ;
Rosenstrauss, Jae Ruderman. |
Alice Stolman, Jesse Subotky,
and Beverly Gandell.
Highlight of the evening will
be audience participation in a.
game of -Hadassah Squares," a I
take-oft on the well-known TV
show. Dessert and other refresh-1
ments will be served before the ;
meeting in order to allow time |
for the full schedule.
Mrs. Leon Brauser, president!
of the Sabra Group, or Mrs.
Joseph Rindner, membership vice
president, may be contacted for
further information. All Hadas-
sah lifetime members new to
this area who have not as yet
affiliated with a group are cor-
dially invited to attend.
I
In Kremlin's Stance
more than three years
See to it that "the actual
number of emigrants would
rise promptly from the
1973 level and would con-
tinue to rise to correspond
to the number of applicants
and may therefore exceed
60.000 per annum." (Sen-
ator Jackson states in his
letter that 60,000 would be
considered a "benchmark,
a minimum standard of ini-
tial compliance")
Reopen phone, telegraph
and postal communication
"to verify compliance set
forth"
As the year closes, we must
face the discouraging fact that
the Soviet Union has little or no
intention of allowing Jews freely
to exit for another land. But we
must continue to add joy and
hope to Soviet Jews through let-
ters and packages and our active
involvement in organizations
whose efforts are to be ap-
plauded.
NEWS BRIEFS
# Sylvia Zalmanson mot with
Senator Jacob Javits with regard
to freeing the 40 Jewish Prison-
ers of Conscience. Javits prom-
ised to seek a clearer statement
on the POC's from the Soviets
via the Administration. He also
asked for a list of Soviet Jews
who have been harassed since tho
agreement was announced.
ft ->
In tho Omnibus Trade Re
form Act, the most-favored-na-
tion status plus the granting of
Government backed credits will
expire after 18 months. One
month before expiration date, the
President could ask Congress for
a one year renewal. If he does,
Congress could renew it by con-
current legislation within 60 days.
If no resolution is passed, the
trade benefits would continue un-
less within 45 days either House
voted to discontinue them. Re
newal would depend on whether
the Soviet Union lived up to
their agreements.
& tT ft
In Minsk, persecution is ap-
plied not merely to those Jews
who have applied for exit but in
every case after even the receipt
of an invitation from Israel. A
typical example is musician
Alexi Kribulin, a member of the
Minsk Ensemble. He received an
invitation but had not yet de-
cided whether to apply for exit.
He was called before a meeting
of the entire ensemble and ac-
cused of being "a fascist, a Zion-
ist pig. a murderer of Arab chil-
dren and a traitor." He was dis-
missed from the ensemble.
ft ft ft
# Also in Minsk, people are
being compelled to sign a form
at work which in effect says that
"1 promise net to write to. speak
to, or hear from any foreigner.
I promise not to go on any trips
abroad and if I break any of
these promises. I shall inform
responsible authorities." Thus,
Jews are afraid to go to work as
this applies directly to them.
ft ft ft
C In I^ningrad, activist Mik-
hail Strugach's telephone was
cut. In Moscow, Boris Tsitlonak
was arrested on the street, taken
to the police station, was accused
of "parasitism" and was warned
he is in danger of being put into
a psychiatric hospital.
- TALMEft'S -
MIAMI MONUMENT COMPANY/1
A ELK,N
PERSONALIZED MEMORIALS
CUSTOM CRAFTED
IN OUR WORKSHOP
444-0921 -444-0922
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The only all-Jewish cemctorv in Broward
County.Peaceful surroundings,beautifully land-
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For information call:
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Please snd me literature on the above.
NAME: '_________________________________________
ADDRESS:
PHONE:
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10CAL AND OUT Of STAT*
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SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
ASK YOUR
RABBI ABOUT US
JOHNSON-FOSTER
FUNERAL HOME, INC.
1650 HARRISON ST. HOLLYWOOD, FLA. PHONE: 922-7511
Paul J. Houlihan,
L.F.D.
4



I
I
Page 10
* knistncridlian and Sliofar of Hollywood
Friday, January
V ,
January 3, rSe*,
Fishbeins To Be Honored At
Hillcrest Dinner Jan. 26
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Fishbein
will be honored by the South
Florida Israel Bond Organiza-
tion at an Isiael Dinner of State
at the Hillc.est Country Club
Sunday, Jan. 26, according to
Miiton M. Parson, executive di-
rector.
The Fishteins will receive the
State of Israel Masada Award in
recognition of their outstanding
service on behalf of Israel's eco-
nomic development. The Israel
Bonds award commemorates the
1900th anniversary of the heroic
defense of the fortress of Ma-
sada. the last Jewish stronghold
to fall in the Roman conquest of
Palestine.
The Fishbeins moved to South
Florida several years ago from
New Rochelle, N.Y., where they
lived for over 20 years. They
were members of Rabbi Go!o-
vensky's Beth El Congregation
I there.
Fishbein is ective in the B'nai
B'rith Hillcrest Lodge following
a long association with the Tom
Payne Lodge in New Rochelle.
He is former associate chairman
for the Israel Bonds printing
and allied trades division in New
, York.
The Fishbeins, who recently
celebrated their 35th wedding
anniversary, have been to Israel
Religious
Services
HAlLANDAtE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
(Conservative). 416 NE 8th Ave.
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz, Canto*
Jacob Danzlaer.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingaley, Cantor Irving
Minna.
NORTH BR0WARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON.
GREGATION. Liberal. 3501 Univer.
lity Dr. Rabbi Max Weltz.

.uniMauttrrt
MR. AND MRS. MARRY fISHBtlH
on several occasions, and have a
deep devotion for the Jewish
state since it is the birthplace
of Mrs. Fishbein's parents.
Active in the Israel Bonds
campaign since its inception in
1951, the Fishbeins are members
of the Israel Prime Minister's
Club, an honorary society repre-
senting the most distinguished
Jewish communal and business
leaders throughout the United
States.
The Jan. 26 Israel Bonds din-
ner-dance at Hillcrest Country
Club is also under the sponsor-
ship of the B'nai B'rith Hillcrest
Lodge.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER, 87M
N.W. 57th St., (Conaervative) Rab-
bi Milton J. Groaa.
HOLLYWOOD
VOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
(Orthodox). 3891 Sterling Rd. op.
poaite Ho.lywood Hllla High School.
President Dr. Prank Stein.
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 13B1 S
14th Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffe. Aaaiatant Rabbi Harvey M.
Rosenfeld.
BETH SHALOM (Ternpie) Conserve.
tlve. 4601 Arthur 8*. Rabbi Morton
Malavaky, Cantor irving Gold.
TEMPLE BETH HHM (Conaervatlva).
310 SW 62nd Ave., Hollywood.
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal). 6001
Thomaa St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Rob-
art Frazln.
TEMPLE SINAI (Conaervative). 1201
Johnaon St. Rabbi David Shanlro.
Aaaociate Rabbi Chaim 8. Liatfield.
Cantor Yer.una HallbraUB.
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ,'^RAEL (Conaervative)
6920 SW tfith St Rappl Avrom
Drazin.
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES (Conaerva-
tive) Pinea Middle School. 200 No.
Douglaa Rd., Pembroke Pinea,
Rabbi Aaron Shaoaro.
| Hadassah Paid-Up Membership Tea Bar Mitzvah
Jan. 14 At Temple Beth Shalom
The Hollywood Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its annual
paid-up membership tea Wednes-
day, Jan. 14, at 1:00 p.m.
Mrs. Archie Kamer, Chapter
president, and Mrs. Harry Bag-
clan, vice president of member-
ship and chairman of the day,
urge that the change in location
be noted, as the dessert-coffee
will be at Beth Shalom Syna-
gogue, 4601 Arthur St., Holly-
wood, this year.
Mrs. Ethel K. Schwartz is
Chapter program vice president.
The speaker of the day will be
Mrs. H. Feinberg. past vice pres-
ident of the Miami Beach Chap-
ter, who is a member of the Re-
gional Board and coordinator
this year of the Regional Con-
ference to be held at the Du-
pont Plaza Hotel in Miami.
Joane Rodgers and Michael
Pasternak will entertain with
songs.
Ms. Rodgers has played ho-
tels, night clubs and condomini-
ums. She was a member of the
"Lively Ones," and appeared
abroad. She was seen as Aldoza,
a leading role, in the Hollywood
Playhouse Production of Man of
La Mancha.
Mr. Pasternak played Sancho
filmed a television series to be
aired on Ch. 2. His credits also
include the role of Motel the
Tailor in "Fiddler on the Roof"
at the Marco Polo Theater, and
he can be seen in "Lenny," a
current motion picture.
Membership chairmen are Mrs.
Katharine Sollins, Beach Group;
Mis. Benedict Grossman and
Mrs. Joseph Scheiner, Golda
Meir; Mrs. Jerry Layton, Hall-
mark; Mrs. Sol Pelish, H'Atid;
Mrs. Charles Fine, Henrietta
Szold; Mrs. Millie Unterberger,
Hillcrest; Mrs. Melvin Freed-
man, Mt. Scopus; Mrs. Joseph
Rindner, Sabra; Mrs. Daniel
Janowsky, Shalom.
The Publicity chairman is Mrs.
Louis Jacobs.
The membership financial sec-
retaries are: Beach Group, Mrs.
Max Blau; Golda Meir, Mrs. Da-
vid Shane; H'Atid, Mrs. Geral-
dine Newmark; Henrietta Szold,
Mrs. Charles Schantz; Hillcrest,
Mrs. Esther Weiss and Mrs.
Louis Weissman; Mt. Scopus,
Mrs. Marvin Wolf; Sabra, Mrs.
Joseph Taschman; Shalom, Mrs.
Helen Storfer.
MIRIAM LUSSKIN
Miriam, daughter of Dr. and
Mrs. Bret Lusskin, will be Bat
Mitzvah Friday, Jan. 3, at Temple
Sinai.
a a a
LISA RUTNER
Lisa, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Jack Rutner, will be Bat Mitz-
vah Friday, Jan. 3, at Temple
Israel of Miramar.
Cr & it
BRUCE FINE
Bruce, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Gerald Fine, will be Bar Mitzvah
Saturday, Jan. 4, at Temple Is-
rael of Miramar.
fr tr tr
EVAN DERISON
Evan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alan
Derison, will be Bar Mitzvah
Saturday, Jan. 11, at Temple Is-
rael of Miramar.
LAPIDUS
JACOH. SO. of S4.-.4 Braes Valley.
Houston. Texas passed awav Sun-
day in a Houston hospital. He had
made his home in Houston for the
past 2 years comlnc from Pittsburgh
Pennsylvania. Mr. l.anidus Is sur-
vived liy his wife Rom, 2 sons Al-
bert of Clear Lake City, Texas and
Harold of Houston; 3 Rrothers. 2
Sisters and 5 Grandchildren. Grave-
side services and Interment were
held Sunday. December 22. 1974 at
Emnnu-EI Cemetery In Houston.
Texas under direction of LEVY
FIWERAL. DIRECTORS. In lieu of
flowers, donations in memory may
be made t,, the Hematoloev Re-
aearch Fund of Texas Children's
Hospital. Houston. Texas
Community Calendar
FRIDAY, January 3
Young Professionals'House Party Lauderdale Lakes
3 p.m.
SATURDAY, January 4
Professionals IIHouse PartyMiami BeachS p.m.
SUNDAY, January 5
Young Professionals and Professionals IISeminar on Av
trologyWashington Federal, 633 NE 167th St., North
Miami Beach
MONDAY, January 6
Women's Division of Jewish Federation- "Road Show"Fed-
eration Board Room9:45 a.m.
National Council of Jewish Women Regular Meeting
Temple Sinainoon
TUESDAY, January 7
Miramar Chapter of Pioneer Women Board Meeting
Home of Sophie Golub11:30 a.m.
THURSDAY, January 9
Miramar Chapter of Pioneer WomenRegular Meeting
Miramar Community Center12:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, January 10
Sabra Group of HadassahGeneral MeetingTemple Solel
Young Professionals and Professionals II Seminar on
"Birth Control and Abortion"First Federal Savings
and Loan Assn., 900 NE 125th St., North Miami
8 p.m.
SATURDAY, January 11
Young ProfessionalsHouse PartyMiami Beach8 p.m.
SUNDAY, January 12
National Council of Jewish WomenAnnual Luncheon and
Card PartyOrangebrook Country Clubnoon
Israel Bond Dinner Diplomat Hotel6:30 p.m.
Young Professionals and Professionals IILive Band Dance
Party aboard the yacht "Sous Seas," 1900 N. Bay
Causeway, Miami Beach
TUESDAY, January 14
Hallandale Jewish Center Paid-up Membership Coffee
1:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, January 15
Temple Sinai SisterhoodAnnual Torah Luncheon (benefit
of Jewish Theological Seminary)Haber Karp Hall
Inoon
ORT, Hollywood Beach ChapterMeetingGalahad North
Social Hall12:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, January 16
ing, Americana Room, Hollywood- 8 p.m.
Jewish Family Service Board MeetingHome Federal Build-
__________^___
Hollybrook Country Club
Sponsors 'Night For Israel'
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Rappaport
will be honored by Israel Bonds
at a "Night for Israel" to be
held at the Hollybrook Country
Club Sunday, according to David
Ruttenberg, chairman of the
event.
The Rappaports will receive
the State of Israel Scroll of
Honor in recognition of their ex-
ceptional service in advancing
Israel's progress and welfare
through the economic develop-
ment program made possible
through State of Israel Bonds.
Rappaport has been active in
both the Israel Bonds drive and
the United Jewish Appeal cam-
paign at Hollybrook as well as
in Binghamton, N.Y., where the
Rappaports lived before moving
to South Florida. Chairman of
golf tournaments at Hollybrook,
he is vice president of the Men's
Golf Club.
Mrs. Rappaport, a tireless
worker for Hadassah for over
forty years, was among the or-
ganizers of the Hollybrook Ha-
dassah group. A past president
of the Temple Israel Sisterhood,
she has played an active role
with her husband in Israel Eonds
since the campaign's inception in
1951.
Emil Cohen, American Jewish
raconteur and vocalist, will pro-
vide a program of folk humor.
Eli Koenlgsberg is director of
activities at Hollybrook Country
Club. '
CANDULKJHTING TIME
20 TEVETH 5:23
?
Chaplain's Schedule
The- Jewish Federation of South Broward, Inc announces
that Rabbi Harold Richter Chaplain for South Broward Countv
Will be visiting the following hospitals on "a
regular basis:
Mondays Doctors. Community and
.south Florida State Hospitals.
Wednesdays Hollywood Memorial Hos-
pital.
Fridays Gclden Isles Hospital.
The Rabbi will also visit nursinr? homes
and |nal institutions in the South Broward
area. In addition, he will visit institutions in
For n./t'hor < Lauder(,aJe on Tuesdays and Thursdavs
For further mformat.on, please visit The Jewish Federa
TmSZ." 1909 Harrison St.. Hollywood or phone SS?o
-* *\
*%<


January 3, 1975
'Jenistlfhridiaui and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 11-
Hi-Rise Events Kick Off i Hi-RiseCommitteMapsPiris,
|-,^v -i r n Develops Campaign Calendar
\197d israel Bonds Campaign
Nights in Israel" will be
in the Hollywood-Hal-
kale area to begin the 1975
th Florida Israel Bond Or-
ization's hi-rise campaign, it
I been announced by William
fman, chairman of the South
(ward Israel Bonds board of
: iuors.
Jaradise Towers (Hollywood)
begin the slate of activities
Hi an event Wednesday star-
American Jewish humorist
iie Schaffer. Nathan Solomon
Israel Bonds chairman at Par-
fee Towers.
the following evening, Thurs-
f, Jan. 9, residents of both
fcch Plaza and the Aristocrat
lUywood) will rally on behalf
Israel Bonds in honor of Jan-
Stone and Bernard Gouz, re-
ents-elect of the State of Is-
Soroll of Honor presented
[recognition of outstanding
pee in advancing Israel's
ress and welfare,
abbi Alan A. Steinbach is
ling as Beach Plaza chair-
i; Irving Handler is cochair-
n. Aristocrat Israel Bonds
irman is Ed Orlin with Jack
ndon as cochairman. Eddie
kaffer is scheduled to enter-
fhe Bermuda, Jamaica and
WILLIAM WALLACE
Martinique (Halianciaie) will
hold a joint event Tuesday, Jan.
14, in honor of Max Geller, who
Will receive the State of Israel
Scroll of Honor. Murray Gold
is serving as chairman of the
event, with Schaffer as special
guest.
The next evening, Jan. 15, Al-
bert B. Lefton and David Breck-
er will receive the State of Israel
Scroll of Honor at Plaza Tow-
ers (Hallandale). Nationally-re-
nowned folk humorist Joey Rus-
HIAX CILLER
sell will entertam. Edwin Ster-
ling and Mrs. Ruth Suss are
chairmen.
Concluding this two-week peri-
od of Israel Bonds hi-rise ac-
tivity is a Jan. 15 event at The
Clifton (Hallandale) in tribute
to the late Ben Goldberg, who
was serving as Israel Bonds
chairman until his untimely
death a few weeks ago. The doc-
umentary film "War on Yom
Kippur," produced by the Israel
Defense Forces, will be shown at
The Clifton.
^^^^'"-^^^ BSK f
F ii!o s fcgPi- 5
|," jUk t"jk v 12
* 'SB
lecnor Marvin, National President of the National Council
Jewish Women, reaffirms Council's long-standing com-
mitment to education in Israel to Prime Minister Yitzhak
ibin at the Knesset banquet, attended by 150 delegates to
ke NCJW 2nd Summit Conference.
Eleanor Marvin Reports On
CJW3s Summit Conference
he kindling of Chanukah
in this year 5735 calls to
not only the miracle of the
that burned for eight
ts in ancient times, but more
Jem miracles as well," Elea-
Marvin, national president
J National Council of Jewish
pnen said when she returned
few York from NCJWs 2nd
imit Conference in Israel,
8re she and 150 Council worn-
| conferred with Israeli lead-
including Prime Minister
fchak Rabin, on the tremen-
challenges facing Israeli so-
' today.
In spite of the traumas Is-
has undergone in recent
kks and months terrorist
fngs, devaluing of currency,
acks at the United Nations
ve as visitors could see and
the underlying strength and
Jrmination of the Israeli peo-
Mrs. Marvin said. "This
Ity of hope is especially evi-
in the planning and con-
that is devoted to the fu-
of Israeli youth."
ecognizing that problems of
al integration are second
to defense needs, NCJW
[in the last six years focused
pcularly on the problems of
|Iren from educationally and
imically disadvantaged back-
inds.
trough the NCJW Research
|tute for Innovation in Edu-
at the Hebrew University
(rusalem, Council seeks new
hing methods to reach out
tiese disadvantaged children
speed their integration
^modern Israeli society, as
i and responsible individ-
uals. In addition, NCJW has pro-
vided educational materials for
Israeli youngsters through its
Ship-A-Box program for almost
three decades.
"Througsout our visit we
felt that we were experiencing
a miracle in the revitalization of
what Prime Minister Yitzhak
Rabin calls the 'Jewish trian-
gle'," Mrs. Marvin continued.
"The Jews in Israel, the Jews
in Western society, and the Jews
who live still oppressed in coun-
tries like the Soviet Union, have
been reaching out to one anoth-
er, reinforcing one another, and
out of this unity has come a
great creative force. This is our
modern Jewish miracle.
"By intensifying our ties with
Israel, we in the United States
can be inspired by Israel's cour-
age and faith, and in turn share
our resources with those who
are not yet free to live as Jews
... in this way, the hopes and
dreams of our people can flow
continually to and from all
points of the Jewish triangle,"
she said.
Support of education, together
with programs for social action
and community service both at
home and abroad, have been a
tradition in NCJW since its
founding in 1893.
The 100,000 member women's
organization operates in more
than 200 communities through-
out the United States. Current
priorities include protection of
Constitutional Rights, juvenile
justice, strengthening the qual-
ity of Jewish life, and the
NCJW Research Institute for
Innovation in Education.
Otto Stieber, chairman of the
Hi-Rise Division of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
reports that special campaign ef-
forts arc now being undertaken
to organize committees and plan
fund raising meetings during
January, February and March In
all hi-rise buildings.
At the most recent meeting of
the Hi-Rise Committee, reports
were given by the following:
Hallandale Area "A" Abra-
ham B. Haipern.
Hallandale West Jerome
Gevirman.
Hallandale East Robert Ko-
lodin and Norman Ellis.
Hollywood Beach East and
West cochairmen Jacob Men-
kes and Jr-e Perlstein. Additional
supplementation of projected
building programs was given by
Jules B. Gordon and Sydney
Holt/man, associate chairmen,
Hi-Rise Division.
A campaign calendar Is being
developed, which will provide in-
0110 SlItBlK
formation as to functions plan-
ned, s|>eakeis required, and spe-
cial programs to be undertaken.
January Calendar
Set By Hollywood
Section, NCJW
Hollywood Section, NCJW,
will hold its next general meet-
ing at 12:.10 p.m. Monday in
Temple Sinai, 1201 Johnson St.
Marilyn Howlaod and Andrea
Euston will talk and demon-
strate "PotSjand Plants," for the
home and gvfcien. Guests are in-
vited to briag sick plants for
diagnosis and possible cure.
Monday, Jan. 13, NCJW will
hold its annual luncheon and
card party at the Orange Brook
Country Club in Hollywood.
On Jan. 20, the Discussion
Group meeting will be addressed
by Dr. David Cox, Student De-
velopment Consultant at Brow-
ard Community College. The
subject for discussion will be
The Healthy Personality; the
place for the meeting, Home
Federal Building, Hallandale
Beach Blvd., and the time is 1
p.m. Members and friends are
invited.
NCJW will sponsor a Jan. 22
Mental Health Forum at Florida
State Hospital, University Drive
near Hollywood Blvd. Registra-
tion lor this forum will be at
8:30 a.m. Four sessions will be
held from 8:30 to 4:00 p.m.
There is no charge. Husbands
and friends are invited.
Emergency
Task Force
Takes Shape
With Joseph Kleiman acting
as chairman, an Emergency
Task Force is taking shape un-
der the auspices of the Commu-
nity Relations Committee of
Jewish Federation.
Purpose of the organization is
to get large numbers of people
mobilized in a matter of minutes
in the event of any crisis.
The objective of the task
force is to circulate petitions,
get letters to the editors of lo-
cal newspapers, or to man tele-
phones at times when the Jew-
ish community is aroused as it
was during the recent PLO pres-
entation at the United Nations.
Mr. Kleiman will announce
the composition of his commit-
tee shortly.
WILLIAM LIUMAN
MAX AMAZON
Bill Li ((man. Max Amazon Will
Lead UJA Campaign At Hemispheres
Bill Liftman, president of the
Israel Bonds Organization for
South Broward, has been ap-
pointed honorary chairman for
the United Jewish Appeal cam-
paign in the Hemispheres Build-
ing.
Leading the effort will be
Max Amazon, chairman of the
Hemispheres 1975 United Jewish
Appeal campaign.
During a meeting of the com-
mittee held Monday morning at
the Hemispheres, the committee
was organized and plans were
made for programs to obtain
maximum funds for Israel in the
Hemispheres Building.
Bob Roberts will be coordina-
tor of the campaign.
Yael Bar-Zakai Guest Speaker At
Feb. 5 Vanguard Committee Event ;
Hillcrest Country Club will be
the scene of a Vanguard Com-
mittee luncheon Feb. 5 as the
Women's Division of Jewish Fed-
eration continues its drive to
achieve the 1975 goal of $300,000.
Guest speaker at the affair
will be Yael Bar-Zakai, a pro-
fessor of Hebrew Literature and
Language at Tel Aviv University
who has been involved in work-
ing in the absorption centers
with Russian and other eastern
European immigrants.
Miss Bar-Zakai served as a
member of the Women's Army
Corps of the Israel Defense
Forces in 1960-62.
Hostesses for the day will be
Vanguard Committee members
Nancy Atkin, Candy Clark, Dor-
othy Fine. Betty Findelstein,
Brenda Greenman, Barbara Mil-
ler, Joyce Newman and Perle
Siegel.
Two Promoted By J. B. Hanauer Co.
YAEL BAKZAKAI
Elliot Friedman, president of
J. B. Hanauer & Co., municipal
bond dealers, has announced the
promotion of Paul Feinsilver to
vice president of the Hallandale
office.
Mr. Feinsilver, a former resi-
dent of Maplewood, N.J., is a
graduate of the University of
Maryland. He joined the Hanauer.
staff in 1971.
A graduate of the University
of Miami, Sanford Nusbaum,
formerly of Short Hills, N.J.,
has been promoted to assistant
sales manager at the Hallandale
office.


Page 12
*-Jntiffkrtaf/atr and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, January 3, 1075
I
Joint Meeting, Buffet Held By
Young Leaders, Women's Institute
I More than 90 members of the
Young Leaders' Council and the
Women's Institute of Jewish
Federation heard Aaron David
Rosenbaum, Director of Re-
search for the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee, ana-
lyst for The Near East Report,
and chief staff writer for Near
East Research, Inc. at a buffet
meeting held recently at Tem-
ple Solel in Hollywood.
The joint meeting format will
be repeated at Temple Solel Jan.
15 at 8 p.m. when the guest
speaker will be Gerda Klein, au-
thor of "All But My Life" and
"Where Were You in 1939?"
Mrs. Klein was born in Bie-
litz, Poland, where she lived un-
til the German occupation in
1939.
In 1945, the 4,000 women in-
mates of her Siiesian camp were
driven one thousand miles east-
ward toward Czechoslovakia by
the Gestapo. When the march
came to a halt there, there were
fewer than 200 survivors.
SUMNER KAYE, DR. STANLEY MARGUUIS AND AAROf DAVID RO'ZNB VJM
Off. STEVEN WEISBERG, MRS. MARY GARBER, Off HAL GARBER
AND MRS. JANET BERT MAN.
HEU
VITATS, PAUL K0ENIG AND MARSHA T0BIN
DR. STEVEN WEISBERG, MRS. ILENE WEISBERG
AND AARON DAVID ROSENBERG
MRS. SUE GUNZBERGER, MR. GERARD GUNZBERGER
MRS. DEBBIE GLAZER AND DR. VICTOR GLAZER

4-Hr. Seminar
Sponsored By
Pharmacists
The South Florida alumni
chapter of Rho Pi Phi Interna-
tional Pharmaceutical Frater-
nity is sponsoring a four-hour
accredited seminar Sunday, from
8 a.m. till noon in the audito-
rium of Washington Federal
Savings and Loan Assn.. 633 NE
167th St., North Miami Beach.
All South Florida pharmacists
are welcome. A continental
breakfast will be served.
Sid Paetro, director of Health
Education of the Health Depart-
ment of Broward County, will
speak on "Overall Activities and
Resj>on.sibilities of the Broward
County Health Department."
Dr. Jesse Arnold, director, and
Dr. Irving Strumpf, consultant
of the M.I.C. program, will speak
on "Maternity and Infant Care,
Project No. 547."
Paul M. Tocci, Ph.D., director
of Biochemical Genetics Lab and
Tay-Sachs Disease Testing Pro-
gram of University of Miami
School of Medicine, will discuss
"Research in Tay Sachs Dis-
ease."
Robert Lantos, director r>f
Pharmaceutical Services, Shands
Teaching Hospital, and associat"
professor and director of the
Graduate Program in Hospital
Pharmacy. ColleKe of Pharmacy,
University of Florida, will lec-
ture on "International Overview
of Pharmacy."
The committee in charge in-
cludes Ben Saks of Hollywood,
chairman; Lewis Goldner of Hal-
landale, Louis Cuttner of Holly-
wood, George Uded of North Mi-
ami Beach, Jacob Wolosin of
North Miami Beach, Alan Katz
of Hollywood, George Barron of
Hollywood, vice chancellor, and
Louis Golenberg of Plantation,
chancellor.
United Way
Pledges Top
$1 Million
Pledges to the 1975 Broward
County United Way campaign
leached nearly $1.2 million last
wei k. an estimated $40,000 ahead
of the campaign at this time last
year. Total dollars to >'ate pledg-
ed to the United Way are Sl.-
198,56420.
leading all divisions is the
transportation and utilities sec-
tion of the major groups with
$375,000, reaching 90% of their
goal. The education section has
reported more than $55,000
the bulk of which are school
board employees and 227c of
last year.
All major groups have reach-
ed 64 7' of their goal so far for
a total of $918,641.
The professional section has
raised $73,508.82; small business,
$15,853, and residential, $182-
599.87.
The 1975 United Way cam-
paign hopes to raise a $1.9 mil-
lion bare bones budget to pro-
vide funds to operate nearly 40
agencies.
Off. JOEL SCHNEIDER, DR. STANLEY MARGUUES
Wiesel Drama To Be
Televised Nationally
The film production of Elie
Wiesel's play. "Zalmen or The
Madness of God," which pre-
miered at Carnegie Hall as part
of the 1975 UJA National Con-
ference, will be telecast nation-
ally over Public Broadcasting
Service Stations Wednesday,
Jan. 8, at 9 p.m.
The play's author says, "This
is my song of songs to the spirit
of resistance and defense .
to the joy and celebration of So-
viet Jewry. The action which
takes place could happen today,
and in fact it does. For never
before as Jews have we been so
alone. Never before has there
been such need for unity and
solidarity."
Jules B. Gordon (left) presents the State of Israel Scroll of
Honor to Commissioner and Mrs. Jacob D. Menkes at a re-
cent "Night in Israel" held on behalf of Israel Bonds at
Galahad Hall III. Gordon was chairman of the Israel Bonds
event. Charles Lieberman and Murray Levine (not pictured)
were cochairmen.
In the first high-rise solicitation of the 1975 Jewish Federa-
tion campaign, a coffee will be held in the home of Mrs.
Lucille Baer, (second from left) chairman of the Parker Plaza.
Aiding Mrs. Baer will be Dorothy Markman and Rhona
Miller, with the date set for January 9th at 10 a.m. Also
present will be Mrs. Evelyn Stieber, (left) chairman of La
Mer; Mrs. Ann Cohn, chairman of Aquarius; and Mrs. Kar-
en Margulies. (right) campaign vice president for the Wom-
en's Division.
Displaying the State of Israel Masada Award they received
at the Temple Solel Emerald Hills Israel Dinner of State
are Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Goldstein, who were honored ct
the Israel Bonds event for outstanding service in fortifying
the economic foundations of Isael. Pictured are (from left)
Rabbi Robert Frazin, spiritual leader of Temple Solel, Mrs.
Frazin, Mr. and Mrs. Goldstein, and guest speaker David
Schoenbrun.
Plaza South And
Plan Intensive '75
At a leadership meeting pre-
sided over by Nathan Greenberg,
honorary chairman, a program
for the 1975 United Jewish Ap-
peal Campaign was formulated.
Leading the effort for the
Plaza South building will bo
Joseph Deutsch, assisted by
Isaac Bressler and Jerry Eisen-
berg, cochairmen.
The north building will be led
by Sam Finke, chairman, with
I.ila Breckor and Ruth Suss act-
ing as cochairmen.
A leadership meeting will be
held Sundav where a prominent
United Jewish Appeal speaker
will provide up-to-date informa-
tion on the situation in Israel, as
well as discuss new methods in
campaigning.
chairman Ha'landale West, and
Harold Murray, campaign asso-
North Buildings
UJA Campaign
A special "wine and cheese"
evening will be held in late Jan-
uary for all residents of both
buildings, and Sunday, Feb. 16,
will be the date of another UJA
campaign function.
Attending the planning meet-
ing were Jerome Gevirman,
ciate.
t
Members
Cabinet for the two buildings
elude South building Max
Young, Jerry Eisenberg. Karl
Koppel, Mr. and Mrs. Nathan
Greenberg, Isaac Bressler, Abe
Hal pern, Milton Fine. David G.
Weisberg and Joseph Deutsch.
North buildingBen Forman,
Sam Finke, David Brecker, L"W
Rubenstein. Ruth Suss, Lila
Brecker, Mr. and Mrs. Leon
Lutaker and Harry Cohen.


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