The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00100

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
0Jewislli Flleri'dlii jlume 4 Number 17
and SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood, Florida Friday, August 30, 1974
i-rice 25 cents
Katz Assumes Presidency Of Federation
At the recent annual meeting
^f Jewish Welfare Federation of
)llywood, held at the Holiday
Inn, all proposed amendments to
he By-Laws were approved; the
lost notable being the adoption
Lf a new name. Approval of the
khange to JEWISH FEDERA-
TION OF SOUTH BROWARD,
iC, was unanimous.
In handing over the gavel to
^ewly-elected president, Herbert
Katz, Dr. Norman Atkin, out-
joing president, paid tribute to
Catz, Melvin and Robert Baer.
Lewis E. Cohn and all workers
who were so diligent in raising
the "74 Campaign figures to $2.7
million from the previous $800,-
000 when he assumed his presi-
dency.
He remarked on the success of
programming of the Committee
of Jewish Life under the direc-
tion of Mrs. Ellie Katz and the
first effort of a Jewish Com-
munity Center program under its
new director, Myrna Amsel.
Tribute was also paid to Dr.
Joel Schneider for his effective
presidency of Young Leaders
Council, with a special com-
mendation to Mark Fried.
Dr. Atkin thanked the office
staff for a tremendous job done
during his tenure of office and
said, "I have been privileged to
serve as president and I know
the new president will continue
with the great zeal he has had in
all his past offices."
The new president, Herbert D.
Katz, was then introduced.
Katz is U.J.A. regional chair-
man, past campaign chairman of
Federation Campaign, past pres-
ident of Young Leaders Council
and is on the board of directors
of The Joint Distribution Com-
mittee. He resides in Hollywood
with his wife, Ellie, and five
children; Laura. Tom, Sally,
Walter and Daniel.
In assuming his new office,
Katz explained the changes in
the by-laws and functions of the
board of directors, executive
committee and board of trustees.
He then smilingly revealed
plans for a new building to be
completed in approximately six
months before thanking the
membership for their attendance
and adjourning his first meeting.
Serving with Katz will be Rob
ert M. Baer, first vice president;
Samuel M. Meline. D.M.D., vice
Newly elected officers of the Jewish Federa-
, tion of South Broward, Inc., were installed
by its outgoing president at the recent an-
nual meeting. From left to right are Dr.
Samuel Meline, vice president; Herbert D.
Katz, incoming president; Dr. Norman Atkin,
outgoing president; Lewis Cohn, treasurer;
Nathan Pritcher, secretary, and Robert M.
Baer, first vice president.
othamites Air Protection
By SUE MACY
NEW YORK (JTA) Rep-
sentatives of Mayor Abraham
eame's office and the city po-
ce department promised better
)!ice protection for synagogues
other religious institutions,
specially on Manhattan's Lower
ast Side, after meeting here
ith a Jewish delegation follow-
1g a demonstration outside City
all by some 35 persons led by
;e Jewish Defense League.
One of the demonstrators.
ir.d
Rabbi Julius Neumann, a former
Commissioner of Human Rights
for New York City and now a
candidate for Councilman in
Manhattan, said that the demon-
stration was precipitated by the
death Aug. 8 of Arnold Roth. 43,
an observant Jew who was at-
tacked in front of his Lower East
Side shoe repair shop.
ROTH, who was active in Jew-
ish social work, was the latest
victim in an ongoing flood of
violent crime, vandalism and ha-
WORLD JEWISH CONGRESS AUSPICES
Caribbean Jews Plan
Curacao Hemisphere Meet
NEW YORK (JTA) Un-
I der the auspices of the American
Section of the World Jewish Con-
I gress, representatives of nine
Caribbean Jewish communities
will meet in Curacao Aug. 29 to
Sept. 1 to discuss their common
problems and to plan together
concerning cultural and educa-
tional programs.
This was announced here Aug.
14 by Jacques Torczyner, chair-
man of the WJC-American Sec-
tion.
HE EXPRESSED the hope
that among the benefits that will
emerge from the meeting will be
a common program to enable the
small Caribbean communities not
only to share their resources with
eaeh other, but also to use avail-
able human resources of the vast
Jewish.community of the U.S.
Lavy M. Becker, honorary con-
sultant to the WJC on Small Jew-
ish Communities, has visited ev-
ery Jewish community in the
Caribbean at least once, and the
decision to convene the upcom-
ing conference was taken as a
result of a visit he made to the
area last fall.
Becker will be one of the par-
ticipants in the conference. Yitz-
hak Pundak, Israeli Ambassador
to Guatemala, will be the speaker
at a dinner session, and Rabbi
Martin Levin, the newly-appoint-
ed rabbi of Shaarei Tsedek Con-
gregation, Curacao, will be the
leader at an Oneg Shabbat study
session.
Continued oa Page 5
Former New York Gov. Nel-
son Rockefeller is President
Gerald Ford's nominee as
Vice President of the United
States. Confirmation by a
majority of both the Senate
and the House will mean that
Rockefeller succeeds to the
office Ford held himself only
a few weeks ago.
Turning over the gavel to
Herbert D. Katz (left) new
president of the Jewish Fed-
eration of South Broward, is
Dr. Norman Atkin, who has
served in that post for the
past year.
rassment which has taken place
in the New York Jewish com-
munity, said Rabbi Neumann.
The City Hall meeting was at-
tended by Joe Erazzo, assistant
to Beame. and four representa-
tives of the police department, in-
cluding Sgt. Edwin Dahlem, the
officer in charge of the investi-
gation into Roth's death.
Two JDL members and three
other members of the city's Jew-
ish community, including Rabbi
Neumann, also attended.
New Power Struggle
Among Arab States
By EHUD YAARI
JERUSALEM For the first time since the Yom Kippur -ar,
a serious power struggle has developed among the Arab states. There
are even some indications of the formation of new blocs and group-
ings, different in both composition and common denomination, from
those in the near, prewar past.
The spark which relighted the
inter-Arab controversy was the
Sadat-Hussein agreement an-
nounced on July 18. There were
two main points there:
FIRST, Egyptian officially de-
clared that the Palestinian Li-
beration Organization does not
represent the Palestinianas liv-
ing in Jordan, thus stripping Yas-
sir Arafat of his claim to be sole
representative of the "whole
Palestinian people."
Second, Egypt dropped its op-
position to an Israeli-Jordanian
disengagement arrangement.
Immediately afterwards, both
President Sadat and King Hus-
sein took two practical steps: on
July 23 Sadat presented Arafat a
clear-cut ultimatum to start a
dialogue with Jordan over the
question of Palestinian partici-
pation in the Geneva Peace Con-
ference.
At the same time, Jordan,
backed by Egypt, demanded a
postponement of the all-Arab
summit conference, scheduled for
Sept. 3. in Morocco.
THE OI'TCOMF. was an up-
roar. The PLO strongly rejected
the new formula signed by Sadat
and Hussein, accusing Egypt of
"plotting against the unity, le-
gitimate rights and self-deter-
minition" of the Palestinians.
Continued on Page 14
PACESETTER CHAIRMAN
Moses Horiistein
Accepts Top Post
Melvin Baer and Lewis E.
Cohn, co-chairmen of the Jewish
Welfare Federation's 1975 Cam-
paign, have announced Moses
Hornstein's acceptance of the
position of chairman of the Pace-
setters Division.
Mr. Hornstein commented,
"The other day in Washington,
D.C., while visiting the home of
Israeli Ambassador Simcha Din-
itz, he told me. 'If a Jew cries
in Kiev, he is heard in Jerusalem.
If a Jew is murdered in Jeru-
salem, we cry in Florida.' Never
have Jews been so linked to one
another.
"This realization has encour-
aged me to accept the responsi-
bility of chairman of the Pace-
setters for our 1975 Combined
Jewish Appeal drive."
The first meeting will take
place at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Sept
9, at the home of Melvin Baer.
Mr. Hornstein will be return-
ing then from the Prime Minis-
MOSIS HOffNSTUN
ter's Mission to Israel and will
share his views with those work-
ers in attendance.


Paqe 2
-ten is* ncr/dkr>
and Shofar of Hollywood
Soviet toy
Trade Fair Shows Latest In
Sopliisticated Surveillance
"Crimtechnika 74," a trade
fair exposition in Moscow dis-
playing the latest in crime con-
trol equipment was not sure
whether or not US. firms would
jarticipate. The fair, held in Au-
gust, awaited the decision of
U.S. Commercv Secretary Frede-
rick Dent, who had been con-
sidering the advisability of ex-
porting such items as personal
surveillance, observation and in-
formation gathering devices.
Dent issued rules to discourage
U.S. participation; they could ex-
hibit, but could not sell sophisti-
cated devices without specific
licenses. "'Any instruments and
equipment particularly useful in
ciime control and detection
would require licenses before
ales could be made." Dent said.
Such sales would be studied
stringently before permission
would be granted.
BIT CBITK'S are extremely
skeptical of United States in-
volvement, saying that the de-
vioes could be used by the KGB
against Jewish groups, other
groups or individuals.
The Student Struggle for Sovi-
et Jewry termed the participa-
tion "a completely immoral act
which can only further the abili-
ty of the Soviet police to wipe
out any voice of dissent in the
Soviet Union."
Senator Henry Jackson asked
the subcommittee on investiga-
tion to look into the matter.
In late July. Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger met with 17
leaders of major Jewish organi-
zations. The leaders told him
that the 40 per cent drop in emi-
gration in recent months must
be reversed and free emigration
must be made available to those
Jews who wish to leave. They
also urged that the Prisoners of
Conscience be released. Kissinger
said he "understood their con-
cern and was pursuing the mat-
ter."
This, of course, was before the
Moscow Summit and prior to
President Nixon's resignation. We
must show renewed strength and
commitment to the plight of
Soviet Jews. Since we now have
a new leader in the White House,
perhaps he will listen to our in-
invidual pleas for human free-
dom. Continuous correspondence
to Washington is extremely ef-
fective.
IN CONGRESS. Representa-
tive Edward Koch's (D-N.Y.)
proposal to forbid the Export-Im-
port Bank from granting tlie
USSR any loans ol credit unti
the trade till is adopted was ap-
proved. In the Senate. Henry
JachBOfl and Adlai Stevenson
Lave introduced an amendment
seeking to prevent loans from
the Export-Import Bank to the
Soviet Union.
The trial of 44-year-old Victor
Polsky, a Jewish scientist ac-
tivist, began Aug. 18 in Moscow.
Polsky was arrested on what
Jewish sources said was a
trumped up traffic charge and
he faces a maximum three year
sentence under Article No. 211
of the Soviet Criminal Code.
MOSCOW witnesses said a 19-
year-old girl threw herself in
front of Polsky's car in an un-
successful suicide attempt. At
first Polsky was exonerated, but
later Miss Tatyana Zhukova and
her parents had the police report
changed. Valery and Galina
Panov participated in their first
protest in London on Polsky's
behalf.
Crediting foreign support for
his emigration, Panov said, "You
have not only helped us, you
have given fresh hope to the en-
tire Russian intelligentsia, as
well as opening the way for more
of our people." Then he turned
his comments to the Soviet
Union: "KGB, let Victor Polsky
go to Israel."
M. MtRON LC/iJAJS
*.. SfAMUr MAftGUllfS
Time To Doff Our Masks
By RABBI HAROLD RK'HTER
Jewish Chaplain of
Broward County
A few months ago, Dr. Eugene
Boiowitz, the noted Jewish edu-
cator, writer and lecturer wrote
a book entitled, 'The Masks
Jews Wear." He stated his be-
lief that most of us are really
more Jewish than we would be
willing to admit. It is a "new
twist" to the American Jew's
dilemma and a theme that came
to mind when I thought of a
strange visit I made to a Jewish
patient in a Broward County
hospital recently.
My work as a Jewish Chap-
lain of Broward County brings
me in touch with every type of
Jew imaginable and many that
you could not imagine: It is one
of the features of my work which
makes my life interesting and
full of surprises. As I introduce
myself to hospital patients, I re-
ceive all kinds of responses
from ecstatic joy to "So what:"
expiessed verbally and non-ver- '
bally.
In the incident I nm about to
relate, the patient, after my brief
introduction, graciously extendc i
his hand and exclaimed, "Rabbi,
I will say hello and that's it."
Since I was not there to intrude I
upon an individual's privacy. I
would have graciously taken ,
leave us the:" are BtaaSfOUS Jew-
ish patients who extend a',
heartier welcome.
However, a Talmudic injunc-!
e tn mind at this point:
"Follow every request your host
makes except the one in which
he says 'go'." Intuitively, I
sensed there was more to come
and so I graciously sat down
and. strangely, he did too.
The man then spewed forth:
"I am angry with God!" (he
spoke mostly Yiddish! Perhaps
he saw I was not taken a back
by his outburst The shtetl
Jew says: "If God would have
lived in the shtetl. they would
have broken His windows!"
In these i"ays, :t is good to
see a Jew who is not indifferent
to God, but who has some feeling
for Him. pro or con
The patient then changed his
theme and tone and bragged of
his son's Jewishness and how, in
his work, he often has occasion to
act as a "lay-rabbi." He went on
to tell me how he looked forwar i
to Passover, for then his "Jew-
ish" son would come to visit and
lead a real traditional seder.
As the conversation continued,
he told me that at the delicate
age of 11, God had taken his
father from him and that he was
still very angry. Since then, he
has very rarely entered any
synagogue.
I explained to him that he
may have missed a great many
spiritual joys and warm oppor-
tunities for friendship because
he had estranged himself.
As the High Holidays ap-
proach, I wonder how many of
us are like my slightly-confused
patient who not only denied out '
c.o.-eness with Judaism, but ac-
tually missed out on its many
goodies because >>; tome frozen
anger or other excuse.
To put it sn terms of the bo k
I mentioned: 'The Masks Jews
Wear." it's time to doit" our |
masks as Jews.
Chaplain's Schedule
The Jewish Federation of South Browa d Inc. announces
that Rab'. i Harold Richter, i
will be visiting ti n'a
at tasis;
Mondays d.*,.,,-* Community and
South Flori la State HaspU
Wednesday- Hollywood M H is-
pital.
Fridays o khm Uas Hesi ;ui.
Th< RaW : will also visit n
" ititutions In the S
n l)e will visit nstitutioi
Fort Uuderdale on T
F>r further information, please contact The Jewish
tion Offiee at 1909 Harrison St.. Hoi .... .. ;..
Rakbi Richter
in j
TRAVELERS
u
Ansel Insurance Agency 1
Ansel Wittenstein **
All Forms of Insurance
FIREMAN'S
FUND
AMERICA*
Including
Homeowners Automobile Jewelry.
2430 Hollywood Boulevard Hollywood
923 9518 945 3527
Young Leaders Council Sets
Programs For 1974-1973
Dr. Stanley Margulies. presi-
dent Of the Jewish Federation's
Young Leade:s Council, an-
nounced that after a summer of
planning, the 1974-1975 program
has t;een set.
The first program, in Septem
ber. will be a buffet dinner out-
lining the purpose and function
of Young Leaders CouitCtL
Subsequent programs, a num-
ber of them With ipomai and
held jointly with the Women's
Leadership Institute, will includt
Jewish 'group encounter sessions,
the Jewish view on ixiiitical in-
volvement, programs on Israe
and the holocaust.
In addition, special mte:e-i
groui s are being established with
Dr. Meron Levitats acting as
chairman. These programs wi!'
indue broad discussions, more in-
tensive educational programs op
Jewish involvement and lectures.
Young Leaders Council is o;n
to young men of the South Brou
ard area who are interested in
learning more about themselves,
the Jewish community and their
role in its futuie.
Interested persons should
tact the Jewish Federation olfi
for additional information.

Secretary of State Henry Kis-
singer Tuesday night r
c e i v e d the Distinguish
Service Medal at the 55th
nual convention of the Ame
ican Legion on Miami Beach
Dr. Kissinger addressed
mass audience of Legior
naires on .U& tareiga ate
I
RIVERSIDE
IN HOLLYWOOD.
Riverside, South Florida's fading Jewish ft
- ctor for over 35 years now provides services IJ
all communities of Broward Countv fn irfi
n rn and convenient chapel at 5S01 \{, -
Boulevard in Ho
920-1010
RIVERSIDE
i Inc/Funera Din I re
Otherl
L6480N.E.19I \.
Sti et&Aft [151
I
; ,.
N.R n.F.D,


iday. August 30. 1974
*JfeNfM Hurt/Man and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 3
^empte^Beth Shalom Registration, Hadassah^femberghip
High Holy Day Tickets Available Chairmen Hold Meeting
Tei5j'ie Beth Shalom school
ration v. >1 continue during
Ve hours at the school office
lowing departments: nur-
^-h.iK.crcaiien. Suiy&ytchoq],
jc^rew school and day school.
Pordecai Opher, director of
| -on, is available for ap-
btntments ana information. In-
brma'ion pertaining to the
i Bth programs for the coming
iear may also be secured from
hirley Cohen.
High Holy Day reservations,
ckets and membership informa-
Dn are being handled by Sylvia
S. Gordon at the Beth Shalom
administrative oijjces. Holiday
tickets are available to non-mem-
te:s in the main sanctuary.
** Dr. Morton Ma'avskywflT'cori-
duct the services assisted by
Cantor Irvine floW and profes-
sional choir. Special services will
be he:d lor teenagers BBd chil-
dren in the school tSuTOing,
gea:ed to their level.
Times will eojncide with the
adult services and children and
teenagers w-iU not need tickets
to attend their services.
Temple In The Pines Elections
Schedule*! In Early September
The Temple in the Pines of-
Ice, located at 1900 N. Univer-
|ty Df:, is now open daily from
am, to 1:00 p.m. Inquiries re-
ading temple membership are
ivited. Membership chairman
en Rosh may also be contacted.
Principal Rhona Sandman is
pecpting religious and Hebrew
heel applications for children
grades 1 through Confirma-
on it the temple office.
[A nominating committee has
ken appointed, with elections
iheduled for early September.
ff "Wasserman chairs the com-
mittee Nyhieh includes Lynn Gar-
finkle, Les Berger, Renee Se'.ig-
man and Steve Shutter. Any
temple member wishing to serve
as a temple officer or on the
board of directors is urged to
contact a committee member im-
mediately.
The temple presently has a
Senior Young Judea group. Plans
are being made for the formation
of junior and intermediate
groups.
A special Israeli nite is sched-
uled for Wednesday, Sept. 11.
Chairman for the evening is Bob
Kapit.
A meeting of all membership
chairmen of the Hollywood Chap-
ter of Hadassah was held recent-
ly at the home of chapter chair-
man, Mrs. Harry Bagdan.
The groups represented by
their chairmen were Beach, Mrs.
Katherin Sollins: Golda Meir,
Mn Benedict Grosman; Hall-
mark. Mrs. Jack Silberstein;
H'tid. Mrs. Sol Pelish: Henrietta
Szo'd, Mrs. Charles Fine: Hill-
crest, Mrs. Millie Unterberger;
Mt. Scopus, Mrs. Melvin Freed-
rr.an; Sabra, Mrs. Celia Rindner,
and Shalom, Mrs. Daniel Janow-
sky.
Dr. Chorles Saporito To
Discuss 'Sex And Singles'
Next Wednesday, at 8 p.m.
The 3w i>h Federation Singles of
Browaid County will have a dis-
cjssiinn by Plantation psychia-
trist Dr. Charles Saporito on the
topic "Sex and the Singles" at
the Community House, 2020 S.
Andrews Ave., Ft. Lauderdale.
The Jewish Federation Singles
invites women ages 25-50 and
men 25-55 to a house party in
North Miami Beach Saturday,
Sept. 28. Additional information
may be secured from the Federa-
tion offices in Hollywood or Fort
Laurterdale.
kriyisory Council Leaders Issue Formal Statement
|i wi& D. Cole, chairman, and
Biah. M. Minkolf, executive
|re -chairman of the National
Knsfi-iSoinmunity Relations Ad-
froryT-Vuiiea issued the follow-
i statement, in the wake of the
ikeup in Washington.
I'The American democratic
Item, has surmounted an un-
ecedenteri challenge. On the
of the American Bicenten-
_. our constitutional democ-
by has once again proved it-
-a- government of laws, not
Irs. Blank Will
Guest Speaker
each Group of Hadassah will
ve an open meeting. Monday,
pt. 9, at 12:361 pan. in Galahad
Jth,. 3801 South Ocean Dr.,
^llyttuoil.
Irs. Robert Blank, wife of a
jminent Hollywood dentist,
.11 be the guest speaker. She
Jl discuss her recent experi-
ce in the Soviet Union and
II play a tape which was
Juggled out of Russia.
prs. Henry Schwartz, program
irman, will discuss the signifi-
ice )f the approaching High
'ays and introduce the
tst speaker.
ill members are invited to
|ng their friends. Refreshments
Jl be served.
of men. We welcome the spirit of
rededication to our basic goals
of justice and equality and the
unalienable rights to life, liberty,
and the pursuit of happiness.
"We welcome Mr. Nixon's re-
assertion, as one of the last acts
of his presidency, of the goals of
international peace and domestic
harmony, for which we have re-
peatedly stated our support, and
we trust that history will honor
his positive contributions.
"We commend Gerald Ford's
vigorous affirmation that he will
continue to pursue these goals.
We wish President Ford well and
offer him all encouragement and
cooperation in efforts directed
toward the establishment of true
peace in the world, with genei
osity, security and justice for all
nations whether mighty or small,
toward domestic prosperity, fill'
employment, equality, and un-
hindered exercise of constitu-
tional rights and liberties, anr"
toward the recognition and en-
hancement of human rights foi
every person on this earth.
"We shall continue, in coopera
tion with other groups dedicatee1
to the nation's welfare, to main-
tain that eternal vigilance which
is the price of our liberty."
IS THSRE A condominium or apartment house which
WOULD LIKE ITS OWN RABBI? IF SO, PLEASE LET ME KNOW.
Write
RABB' 5.C., P.O. BOX 2973, MIAMI, FLA. 33101
MARTIN W. TREIBER, M.D., P.A.
.Takes Pleasure in Announcing
The Association of
JOSEPH B. ESTERSON, M.D.
IN THE PRACTICE OF
INTERNAL MEDICINE and CARDIOLOGY
TEL. 925-1439
2526 E. HALLANDAIE BCH. BLVD., HAUANDALE
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
TEACHERS
i, 8th & 9th GRADES. ALSO
pVERAL HEBREW POSITIONS
PEN.
NMPLE BETH El 920-7225
MARL0 RENTAL APTS.
HOllTWOOD HILLS
| fUKNISHEtt AMD UNfURNISHtD
3500 POLK STREET
pde 625-4545 Broward 989 3030
30 Mffr*Mt Buildings
froniNG, 8AR-MITZVAH
Ai.D COMMERCIAL
PHOTOGRAPHY
'Htkj *treasonable price*
Ecnrac&Sairi Rosen at
WE DON'T ADVERTISE
LOW PRICES
WE GIVE THEM!
HOUYWOODHfordi
1200 N. FEDERAL HWY.
5 921-6800 HOLLYWOOD 947-3411
Askew's Reelection Will Bring
State A New Lieutenant Governor
The reelection of Gov. Reubin
Askew this fall would bring to
the Administration a new lieu-
tenant governor State Sen.
Jim Williams of Ocfiia
In the new administration.
Lieutenant Governor Jim Wil-
liams would also be named Sec-
retary of the Department of Ad-
ministration, which has several
primary responsibilities in the
management of state govern-
ment.
Williams would bring to the
post, business experience that
dates back to 1947. Since 1962,
when he retired from the mining
business, Williams has success-
fully owned and operated citrus
groves and a cattle ranch. Wil-
liams would apply this business
experience to the business of
managing state government,
Gov. Askew said.
The Department of Adminis-
tration is responsible for putting
into effect the state budget in
all agencies, the personnel and
job classifications for state jobs,
the retirement plans of the state
and counties and for all long-
range state planning.
Williams has served as a State
Senator since 1968, where he has
provided legislative leadership in
environmental protection, educa
*.l /*?'
1 #11
Gov. Reubin Askew Sen. Jim Williams
tinn. fiscal responsibility and tax
reforms for which he has won
numerous Most Valuable Legisla-
tor awards.
This experience will be put to
use in the new administration,
for as Lieutenant Governor, Wil-
liams will also be coordinator of
the administration's legislative
program. i
Rep. Murray- Dubbin. Dade
County campaign chairman for
Gov. Askew. *"i! nam-"4 ^'iami
Beach Councilman and former
Vice Mayor Leonard O. Wein-
stein, as campaign director for
Miami Beach. Weinstcin will
head a newly formed Committee
responsible for getting out the
vote on Miami Beach which in-
cludes civic leaders, club presi-
dents, office holders and former
government officials.
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
arnett
lanK.
Cui'o-n Vde
DRAPERIES
M
BED SPREADS
INTERIOR DECORATING
FASHION FABRICS
805 N. FEDERAL HWY.
HALLANDAIE. FLORIDA
Phone: 923-0544
SHADES
SUP COVERS
UPHOLSTERY
DR. BRUCE J. FEINSTEIN
OPTOMETRIST
Announces the opening of his office for
the general practice of Optometry
at
3176 UNIVERSITY DRIVE
PARKWAY PLAZA, MIRAMAR
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
Telephone
963-2020
Marine Painst & Supplies
HARDWARE PAINT. INC
HOUSEWARES & GIFTS
HOME DECOR ACCESSORIES
Bail. Closet Accessories
feMtftt WI Wisew Shade*
Dreamy Rait
Kilfeaiif
Key & lock Work
'Art
Stare Hours 7:30 A.M. 6:00 P.M. Closed iyB
139 EAST BEACH B0ULEV
HALLAHDALE, FLORIDA HC0S
PHONE S2T-0S8S
Artifkial Flawars
FBltac*
Plait*
Patio Furnh


Page 4
Mmfrf Fhrklian <* a"*" of Hollywood
Friday, August 30, 1974
I
Ford Makes Changes
IT IS already clear that there are changes afoot in
Washington. Hardly has President Ford had the opportuni-
ty to adjust himself to the demands of his new office than
he assured the nation that foreign policy, in Harry Tru-
man'6 words, "is a continuing thing."
This meant there.wouM be no immediate change or^
even long-term alteration of ""the course in foreign affairs
set by President Nixon and Secretary of State Dr. Henry
Kissinger.
BUT ODDS ars that the U.S. decision to keep hands
off the Cyprus situation was not really Dr. Kissinger's,
although that is what we are meant to believe.
Odds are that it was President's Ford's. The guestion
is whether President Nixon would have made the same de-
cision.
The fact is that a hands-off policy in the struggle be-
tween Greece and Turkey was tantamount to support of
Turkey's aggression against the Mediterranean island
state.
DID PRESIDENT Ford's baptism under fire leave him
unequipped to act more decisively?
Or did he act decisively that is to say, did he
deliberately choose to stand off as part of a new direction
in U.S. foreign affairs?
The attack on the American embassy in Nicosia on
Monday, in which Ambassador Roger Davies was killed,
demonstrates how important the answer to that question
is at this time.
And how important it may be to a general evaluation
of our stance in the Mediterranean and the Middle East
during the years ahead.
He Will Govern-Not Rule
CERTAINLY, on the domestic front, President Ford has
shown a forthright determination to gain control of a
chaotic American economy that went from bad to worse
in the waning days of the Nixon administration.
At least, the President has shown by his words that
this is what he intends to do.
Coupled with the relief that the agony of the Water-
gate investigation is over so far as the nation is concerned,
if not for Mr. Nixon himself, President Ford is the recipient
these days of everyone's wholehearted support.
WE JOIN in offering our own hope that wounds may
now begin to heal, that President Ford will govern, not rule,
and that his governing process will be open,, accessible
to all for observation and amenable to modification if need
be by public debate.
From the beginning, President Ford put it well: There
will be no more enemies, only adversaries.
it -7 -tr
Bearing the Burden Alone
THE DEPARTURE of Richard Nixon is a personal trage-
dy he must come to grips with alone.
We shall not easily forget his continuing support of
Israel during Israel's darkest hour.
When Israel stood alone in the world against two in-
vading Arab armies and troops from numerous other Arab
nations supporting them, it was Richard Nixon who single-
handedly turned the military might of the U.S. into the
desperate hands of the beleaguered Israelis.
That is a part of Mr. Nixon's foreign policy stance that
will stand him in good stead in the pages of history.
IN ADDITION to giving Israel the wherewithal to save
herself, it mitigated an Arab arrogance that even now is
intolerable at the gas tank, in the banks of the western
world, and in American investment enterprises that has
yet to be felt.
Still, there can be no flinching from the quality of his
statesmanship that undid him. That is what the Congress
acted against during those five critical days in early
August, and it is essential that we understand this.
Whatever his positive achievements in the presidency,
the burden he now bears in his isolation at San Clemente
is one that he shouldered himself.
No one can help him carry it not even those who
are grateful to him for some of the other things that he did.
An Exquisite Gentleman
THE DEATH of Mayor Chuck Hall saddens us. Mr. Hall
was a South Florida fixture.
One did not think of him as a politician with partisan
interests. In a world of people constantly struggling "to
get ahead," Mr. Hall stood serenely, the exquisit gentle-
man, an almost old-fashioned symbol of some bygone era
when it was possible to live the good and gracious.life.
THIS SPIRIT, he shared with everyone around him.
The style of his life was such that he suggested there
was nothing old-fashioned in it, and South Floridians re-
sponded to him in such a way as to demonstrate that virtue
and selflessness are always qualities to be admired.
That they are always qualities that can inspire a com-
munity.
Chuck Hall, gentleman, is gone. We mourn his pass-
ing.
Studies of Nixon to Proliferate
nPflE BRUCE Maizlish psychiP-
trie study of Richard Ni'.on
will be making increasingly im-
portant reading .luring the days
ahead.
In hMtu&f.-%h ar\lrai*o*
fc-ssor performs some long-dis-
tance analysis of Nixon, including
the years Nixon was in treatment
with Dr. Arnold Hutchnecker.
THE STUOY first came to the
fore in the aftermath of the furor
over the dumping of Sen. Tom
Eagleton in the 1972 presidential
campaign when the Democrats
"discovered" that Eagleton had
been hospitalized on several oc
casions for emotional reasons.
No one cared about the Maiz-
lish revelations then. The study
made about as much impact on
the campaign as Watergate itself.
Now that Nixon has gone
home, the study will surely come
into its own on a tide of many
other such studies undoubtedly
-
Mindlia
i-rwnl
t't'i!'."-""-^
being written at this very mo-
ment.
LET THERE be no flinching
from the fact that many careful
observer'; of the Nixon personal
ity could, and did. predict the
course his political career would
take.
The thumbprint of his twisted
destiny was there to be read more
clearly than the prints of most
\
TO GVOTAKPIHe STKK
other public fibres who. jjke or
dinary run-oWHe-mUK pt-opie"
manage fairly successfully to con'
tain (and conceal) their baser
instine|s.f j ^
<- fetal* i# the ffofii afljl the su.
preme irony about Nixon. Chars,
ed with concealment, he could
neither contain nor conceal these
instincts with any degree of 5UC.
cess at all. The tapes, his mania
for recording his own downfall
are a clear example of this '
AND THAT was the point of
the Maizlish study, which demon-
strated that Nixon's profound
emotional problems brought to
high public office must end in
disaster for himself if not for
the nation.
Who will ever forget Nixon's
painful, irrelevant ramblings in
his farewell address?
Hi* statement that what
America needs today are "mere
plumbers";
His assurance that not a sin-
gle member of his inner circle
had been financially enriched by
the experience.
FORGET HIS obsession with
death the deaths 01 his bro-
thers. Teddy Roosevelt's young
wife, his mother and father all
of this. Nixon's vision of his own
death and a surrogate for brutal
self-punishment
The reference to "plumbers"
and the assurance that no one
had been personally enriched by
serving in his administration are
more than examples of N.xoa's
failure to be able to perceive the
ironic moment, as most commen-
tators would have it .
They are more likely flights
from a reality that has always
been too painful for him in the
same way that his self-punishing
ramblings about death in his
farewell saved him from the
need to look at the tormented
faces of those living people sur-
rounding him on camera he had
so cruelly betrayed h..- wife
and daughter*
THE SPATE of Maulish-type
Dooka we can expect in the fu-
ture will clearly deal with these
ar.d other facets of Nixon's fiaw-
Continued on Page 13
THEATRE OF ABSURD
Spotlight 011 Moscow 'Justice*
By TOVA KAMINS
NEW YORK (JTA) A
crowd of lunch-iime onlookers in
front of the New York Public
Library on Fifth Avenue witness-
ed a "theater of the absurd" this
week.
It was a surrealist dramatiza-
tion of "justice" in the Soviet
Union performed by seven pro-
fessional New York stage ac-
tresses to call public attention to
a "complete mockery of justice"
taking place at that hour in Mos-
cow where the trial of Victor
Pol-ky was scheduled to begin.
HOWEVER, IN Moscow, the
trial of Polsky was postponed
without any explanation, accord-
ing to the National Conference
on Soviet Jewry. Polsky, a noted
Jewish physicist, and a dissident
and activist, has been charged
with "reckless driving."
Kings County District Attorney
Eugene Gold, chairman of th*
Greater New York Conference on
Soviet Jewry, the group that
sponsored the demonstration, saw
the pending Moscow trial as
nothing l-.'ss than a cruel form of
harassment of Polsky for apply-
ing for a visa to emigrate to Is-
rael.
"The Polsky case is the first
in a new series of trials that will
be conducted by the Soviets in
a stepped up campaign to terror-
ize countless other Jews and dis-
courage them from attempting to
emigrate," said Gold introducing
the tableau on the Public Li-
brary steos.
POLSKY, who specializes in
photo-electronics and has 12 pat-
ents to his credit, applied for an
exit visa in 19(58. He was fired
from his. .job,, labeled an enemy
of the state and hounded by
poliee ever since, a Conference
spokesman said.
He is now accused of running
down-a-19-year oil Russian wom-
an. Tatyana Alcksandrovna Zhu-
kn\a.'the. daughter of a Soviet
official In fact..Gold explained.
the "victim"JhreV twr- If in
frort of PolsHy*S r licide
attempt after Quarreling with her
parents. \ r. -
Because of-ftrisfa's "reantat _n
as a spokesman^ ie>r Llw."-'p
emigration movement." Hi -
authorities sejz'ed.thc- ppr*'
to exploit the incident, GokfcMid.
"We can readily e?. from the
case of Victor Pofcjjiy apd many
l.ke him that Justice and human
rights have virtually.ho meaning
in the USSR when it comes to
Soviet Jews," Goy.stated.
wJewisti Florid fan
...1 Minnii 01 lmuiiii ii*H 1 tttmni ..^^ .
OrriCE and PLANT 120 N.B. (th St.. Miami, Fla. SS1 '.".fti-mt ''?**
iOLLYWOOB OFFICE Telcphon
PC\ Box 297J. Miami. FloriCa MM*

FRET) K SHOCHET
Editor and PubHaher
SUZANNE SHOCHET Sn.yitrh&r^^'^'^f
BmcuUvi !:. r AssUtoot to l^1 nf
'ilTA OOODMAN. x.ws n>ai aimjru.
The Jewish Plondian Does Not Guarantee The Kasfcruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In It* Columns
Published Hl-Weekly by the .Jewish Florl^ar. Z
*econd-Cla.- Po.faee Paid at Miami. Fla. I
\nvi(r,'T';v\'il,'^-,l'''l,'ra' "" "f "renter Ho1lywo.nl Sl,7,fnr W *
mnu 11L l^,"u?.rKK ~ '- ~" : Will :,s. ClmTrWiit: R ;: -: *",
""" t}e" s*1Ur- Kwioi Nevlna, i>r. Nonnn AtkAG 3Wt*rl N. --f_ i1
KIPTION RATES: (Local Area) On, Year $4.0*. O^Tof~ V -
Reou.-t
Volume 4
Friday, August 50, 1974
12 EL-VL $734


:
Friday. August 30. 1974
*" knist fhrHimr and Shaiar of Hollywood
Page 5
Hollywood Physician's Book
On 'Masada' Published Here
B> RITA GOODMAN
Dr. Donald Berman, a Holly-
wood physician whose family
dates their local origin back 40
years and whose grandfather
was a founding member of
Temple Beth Shalom, recently
-hed a book entitled, ".Ma-
sa.ia."
WHEN ASKED why a success-
| professional man would be-
an author of subject mat-
te:' diverse from that profession,
the lector appears to sit quietly
reflecting upon his boyhood.
"My feeling is that more
stories of this nature should Ik-
brought to the attention of Jew-
ish youth rather than rei>etition
of the same stories in Hebrew
schools." he responds.
"I was never told of Masada
anl so many other inteiesting
episodes in our history other
than histories of holidays," he
adds.
Dr. Berman, who is a former
vice president and present board
member of Temple Sinai and also
a former cochairman of the Pro-
fessional Division of JWF Cam-
paign, did all the necessary prep-
arations for a career as a phy-
si in before his book edged its
way into his life.
A GRADUATE of Miami
[ Beach Senior High School, he re-
[ceived his Bachelor of Science at
\ the University of Miami where
\ he graduated Cum Laude and
then went on to Tulane for his
i Doctor of Medicine.
From there, he became a
I U.S. Army Captain serving at
r I'.-'. Army Captain serving at
both Walter Reed Hospital in
Washington and Ft. Benning,
[Ga., where he was Division Sur-
\ geon with the Second Infantry.
Along the way, he also ac-
I quired a lovely wife named Lee,
land three children: Lynn, Maria
land Jill.
After four service years, he re-
I turned to Hollywood to set up
[private practice.
It was in 1967 that Dr. Ber-
[man first became aware of Ma-
[sada by reading Yigal Yadin's
^Jhe KOSHER
fCiioum
HOTEL
Ceaafetety hi Ceoaitwut
Miami Beach's
Number ONE
KOSHER HOTEL
FIRST m Ser,ce
FIRST in Hospitality
FIRST in entertainment
5
Enjoy The
HIGH HOLY DAYS
Wilh The BERKOWITZ FAMILY
Traditional Holiday
Services Conducted
on Premises
By the Renowned
Cantor LEIB RASKIN
Serving
GLATT KOSHER CUISINE
Maahgiach on Pramiaaa
3 Meali Served on
Sabbath and Holidaya
TV in AH Room*
Private Beach Pool
RESERVE NOW
Far ReservabMM CALL
1-538-9045
Your Hott
Th BERKOWini
IILY
Of. DONALD BERMAN
book on excavations at that his-
toric place.
HE'D NEVER before heard of
it!
Now he explains, "I've always
had a more than average interest
in biblical history. After I read
Yadin's book, I began to read of
Masada as a hobby."
He went on to read 19 such
books and had never, at that
time, set foot on Israeli soil.
After the '67 War had taken
place, the doctor found time
from his busy practice to take
Lee's hand and go together.
He explains, "Then, it wasn't
like today. You had to take a
land lorry over dirt roads from
Arad to Masada, then climb the
old Roman ramp."
QUESTIONED about his emo-
tions of 110811/ being there, he
sighs, "It overwhelmed me to see
where it was located and to wit-
ness the magnitude of the task
that faced the attackers of that
type in a wilderness."
Dr. Berman looks at you and
says, "There's so many things
that go through your head when
you really know the story."
When Dr. Berman returned to
his practice in Hollywood, part
oi his heart remained at Masada.
HE STARTED his book.
Then, from demands upon his
time, it had to be put aside.
However, in 1972, a "bashert"
kind of thing occurred in Dr.
Berman's life. An Israeli physi-
cian needed a vacation.
The Hollywood physician
(complete with wife and three
Once Again
The
Renowned Cantor
JACOB
JEROSOLOMSKI
Will Officiate at the
-
HIGH HOLY DAYS
Mtha
Located on the Ocean >-'
at 21t St.. Miami Beach
O PLANNED ENTERTAINMENT
e FREE PARKING
O FREE CHAISE LOUNGES
Reserve for Synagogue
Services & Holiday Meais
Fineat KOSHER cursirat tarvtal
in out Ocaanttont dimne; ream
Uaer (5) Suatrvrwon
w MfUl tvfJinrM Ml
t-kaWtta M-Mj------
^BaTfJiaj m nej!
All
IBRVc NOW
Far Raiarvatiant Call
538-6631
or 531-1744
MURRAY ENGEL
Gen. Manager
children) travelled there to spell
him for five weeks.
The Berman family lived in
Nahariya, seven kilometers south
of the Lebanon coast, where the
Doctor attended to the needs of
the people of five villages.
They met many Israeli fam-
ilies, were invited to their homes
and travelled to archaelogical
sites when time permitted.
One day, the Bermans spent
several hours with a Greek who
hail a dig underway on the road
between Akko and Safed (A
Roman bath was being uncov-
ered, i
IT WAS AFTER this second
trip, "When my children became
impressed with the spirit of Ma-
sada," that Dr. Berman returned
to the writing of his book.
It required additional research
and took four months to com-
plete.
Now that his published work is
a reality, the doctor reflects up-1
on the drive which made him do
it. "I think I wanted more people
to know about this episode in.
Jewish history. There has been
bo much dwelling on the pas-1
sivity of Jewish martyrs that I
thought people should be made '
aware of a spirit of aggressive-
ness in self defense.
"Today, Israelis are aggres-
sive and true Sabras," he says ;
with fervor.
It is interesting to note that
Dr. Berman's book, "Masada", I
bears a copyright date of 1973. j
He planned it that way. To com-
memorate the falling of Masada
to the Romans in the year 73.
His way of saying, "I shall not
forget."
(Dr. Berman is available for
local speaking engagements.)
Caribbean
Jews Map
Curacao Meet
Continued frorV Page 1
THERE WILL be a number, of
separate meetings with Jewish
teachers from the various islands
to discuss with them their spe-
cial requirements.
The Jewish population of the
Caribbean is about 5,000, the
largest communities being those
of Puerto Rico, Curacao, Jamaica
and Surinam.
At the annual meeting held recently by the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward, Mrs. Marcia Tobin was installed as
president of tho Women's Division. Incoming Federation
president Herbert D. Katz administered the oath of office.
ELECT
CATHLEEN "CATHY"
ANDERSON
State Representative-District 97
Democrat
It is rare to find someone with Mrs. Anderson9s
background and dedication who is willing to
run for public office purely for the opportunity
of serving people of Broward County.
Your support and vote for Mrs. Anderson wiU
be greatly appreciated by all of my associates
and by me.
Sincerely
(Signed) Harry M. Permesly, M.D.
Pd. Pol.
1


J
Paqe 6
+JeM nbriM&n <="* Shofar of Hollywood
Friday. August 30. 19^ "
Letter to the Editor
When Was It Ever
Easy?
EDITOR. FloridtTn-Shofar:
Israel is a remarkable coun-
try. Her people have come from
a hundred different countries.
First generation pioneers have
passed on, for the most part. Is-
rael's newer and present genera-
tion, educated by the govern-
ment, is producing a new kind
of society and a new kind of man
and woman.
The process of molding people
from so many different coun-
tries, with literally scores of dif-
ferent languages, into an out-
standing group of high quality
human beings, is truly a com-
bination of the proverbial eight
wonders. In ISM. 80. per cent of
the Israeli population was of
European oitgin. : born in Israel and orientals com-
prise two thirds of the total.
The bible records the pro-
phetic reunion of the Jews in the
Holy Land, and "The Law of Re-
turn" was automatically insti-
tuted in May, 1948. the Day of
Israeli Independence. It was also
designed to secure and maintain
the manpower needed for res-
toration of the country and its
rapid development as a haven
for survivors oi the holocaust
and victims of internal anti-Sem-
itism.
The "Law of Return" was
meant to develop manpower, to
create a powerful army to meet
the Arab threat of annihilation.
Certainly the American Jews
have not heeded the call of the
"Law of Return" in any sub-
stantial percentage. We American
Jews have responded to the cry
for financial aid, we have substi-
tuted money for blood and tears.
A small price to pay for identity
and oride in our birth as Jews.
This year of 1973/74 will go
into history's pages as the turn-
ing point in Israel's fight for sur-
???AskAbe???
By ABRAHAM B. HAM'fcliN
Question: Why are the colors
of the Israeli flag blue and
white?
JERRY SC'UREIBER
Montreal, Canada
Answer: According to the En-
cyclopedia Judaica, the Israeli
flag in its present form is the
flag of the Zionist movement.
As soon as the State of Israel
was establish flags and emblems arose. Public
opinion was unanimous in favor
of proclaiming the flag of the
Zionist movement as the State
flag. But there was some appre-
hension.
"It was not until six months
after the State had been pro-
claimed, that the form of the
national flag was officially de-
termined; it was to be the flag
of the Zionist movement, con-
sisting of a white rectangle, with
two blue stripes along its entire
length and a Shield of David in
the center made up of six stripes
forming two equilateral tri-
angles.
"In the original resolution, the
color of the stripes and the
Shield of David was described as
'dark sky-blue' but this was later
changed to "blue' for better vis-
ibility at sea." (Encyclopaedia
Judaica, Volume (!, page 1337)
In the Diaspora there was no
Jewish army or panoply of State,
and therefore there were no
flajrs in Jewish public life.
The Shield of David acquired
its status as a recognized Jewish
symbol only in the middle of the
17th or 18th century. (See Ask
Abe column Jewish Floridian
and Shofar. July 5, 1974, Page 8)
The combination of blue and
white as the colors of the Jewish
flag is first mentioned in the lat-
ter third of the 19th century.
The poet I., a. Frank! in his
l>em "Zivei Eretz Yehudah"
published in "Hav; z/elet" (the
AUHAiratN
28th of Tamuz 5638 July 29,
1878) wrote:
"All that is sacred will appeal
in these colors:/White as tht
radiance of great faith/Blue
like the appearance of the firma-
ment."
The Zionist flag in its present
formtwo blue stripes on white
background with a Shield of
David in the center was first dis-
played by the Boston B'nai Zior
Society in 1891.
However it was not known to
the delegates of the first Zionist
Congress held in Basle, Switzer-
land, in August 1897. David Wolf-
sohn created the flag of Z1on on
the model of the Tallit (the
prayer shawl) which as he
pointed out was the traditional
flag of the Jewish people. He
added the Shield of David.
In 1933 the 18th Zionist Con-
gress decided that by long tra-
dition, the blue and white flag is
the flag of the Zionist organiza-
tion and the Jewish people.
It is interesting to note that
Winston Churchill issued a so-
cial order designating this flag
as the official flag of the Jewish
Brigade Group in World War II.
KUITOR's XOTE: Please send
all questions to:
??? ASK ABE ???
Jewish Floridian ;ind Shofar
1909 Harrison St.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
Attention: Women Only
Women's Leadership Institute sponsored by Hollywood
Jewish Federation invites young women of our community to
participate in its future programs, according
to Ilene Weisberg, chairman.
"If you are interested in Joining' us at
our first meeting, Thursday. Sept. 12, at 8:00
p.m.. please call the Federation office,
921-8810) and place your name on our in-
vitation list." she adds.
"Don't miss out. We have planned a truly
exciting year and would like to include you."
The Women's Leadership Institute is a
group of young women who seek to learn
themselves and their Jewish community.
Iltnt Wtisbem
and understand
rival Everything that has hap-
pened before, all the miracles of
agricultural, technical, and mili-
tary achievement are now being
jeopardized by the world's
great powers. Israel's efforts
toward peaceful co-existence with
her neighbors are pitted against
powerful oil interests and the
control of the Suez Canal.
the disorganized ianaticism o|
the Arab States has fallen easy
prey to the diabolical schemes
of the U.S.S.R. for Israel. This
is the year of decision. For Is-
rael, this is the year for action.
Again, and in greater dollar
strength, American Jews must
respond to the call to the des:
perate need!
My trips to Israel only reafc
firm the need for your helping
hand right now. Your interest in
the fate of the homeland is im-
portant.
Examine your deep devotion to
the cause of a new nation dedi-
cated to the proposition that a
Jew is a human being equal to
non-Jews. What is such a propo-
sition worth to you? To your chil-
dren? To their children? Their
children's children??
Let us put a definite value on
it!!
Let us say that last year you
donated a total of X dollars. This
year that sum should be doubled.
Israel is faced with the awe-
some threat of the major powers
deciding to favor the Arab na-
tions.
Ft may not be easy for some of
you to meet the challenge of
doubling your contribution to the
emergency fund, but then "When
was it ever easy to be a Jew?"
EDWIN A. DINCIN
HalUndale
Dr. Charlie Friedman Democratic
Candidate For Congress Seat
Dr. Charlie Friedman makes
no bones about his status as a
non-politician, and an idealistic
American.
As a Democratic candidate for
the U.S. Congress in the 12th
Congressional Distiict against
J. Herbert Burke, Dr. Friedman
knows it is time to send a non-
politician to Washington who car
use common sense to correct out
nation's problems.
In answer to the question
"Why are you running?" the
Carol City dentist answers, "I
am one of those people who has
come to the realLation that I
can no longer sit back and com-
plain that the people of America
are not being properly represent-
ed.
"I have traveled far and wide
and I know that this wonderful
country of ours is the greatest
and most altruistic form of gov-
ernment the world has ever
known. I love America and I can
help America! That is why I am
running."
Dr. Friedman's platform in-
cludes a comprehensive health
security plan for all Americans.
a war on inflation and protection
for the basic rights of our senior
citizens.
"The elderly in our society
have oeen neglected," he says.
"These people should have the
right :.) work without losing
their social security pension.
PR. CHAWUt FRIEDMAN
Vets Feted At Party
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Fran'.-
bla.i, Mrs. Rae Chasin and Mrs. S.
Ward recently hosted a party for
veterans at the Miami Veterans
Hospital. The party is a regular
function of the Robert K. Franz-
blau Jewish War Veterans of the
U.S.A., Miramar Post No. 177
and Auxiliary.
"The rights of the conJomini-,
urn owners must be protected on
a Federal level. Stop hidden
charges and inadequate di*|
closures. Condominium owner
should receive fair treatmeir
concern.ng the inequities of >
year leases and recreation lease
All legislation should be retr
active to include present con
dominium owners," the Holly
wood Hills resident declares.
"We need a war on Inflation,
he adds. "We must eliminate ta
loopholes and outrageous ta
breaks for industries or ind-
vidua's who are not carryiri
their fair share of the natiom
burden. Let's stop governmer
waste and balance the budget"
Dr. Charlie Friedman is con>
mitted to bring back honesty aw
integrity to the Federal Govern
ment. He is looking forward t
representing you in Washingtut
Campaign headquarters are k
cated at 28^ HoUywuwt Bri
Hollywood.

For A Change Of Pace...


incentive meeting for your cor-
poration, or a convention of any
sort. Nassau in the Bahamas
would provide a delightful change
of pace and the Halcyon Bal-
moral Hotel is THE place to get
it all together.
Special meetings become even
more special when held at this
elegant yet relaxed island resort.
Superior accommodations and
personalized service make the
difference.
The hotel is designed for the
good taste of those who appreci-
ate the finest arrangements and
facilities be they top produc-
ers, top echelon executives or
simply prized members of a
worthy organization.
Halcyon Balmoral is a com-
plete meeting facility self-
contained and well-appointed. The
hotel has a gift shop, beauty
salon and barber shop, bou'ique
for men's and ladies' apparel,
liquor store, straw market and
offers 24-hour laundry service
and dry cleaning.
For a chance of pace, your
group might like an outdoor'buf-
fet or barbecue, easily arranged.
For fun. there are surrey rides
into town for Bay Street snoo-
ping or simply seeing the sights.
Between sessions there is the
recreation room with ping-ponc
and billiards, or the large pool
area with oalm lined terrace for
relaxing. There's boat dock swim-
ming, too. lus an Invitina. in-
vigorating choice of recreational
pursuits, depending en how ath-
letic >xu feel,
feel.
Halcyon Balmoral has an un-
usually large selection of meet-
ing rooms. You can break out in-
to a variety of concurrent ses-
sions with each small group in
attractive, comfortable quarters
Groups of 30 to 250 fit comfort-
ably into the hotel, depending on
season.
Halcyon Balmoral Hotel on Cable Beach
With 110-volt current in the
hotel, you can be sure all your
audio-visual equipment can" be
plugged right in and ready to go.
Of course, at Halcyon Balmoral
you don't have to bring vour
projectors just your slides" and
films.
The hotel has a wide assort-
ment of equipment to fit most
meeting plans.
nvIY Tmnle you will find nn
oveihead projector, a 35mm slide
projector. L<5mm sound motion
Picture projector. 8mm silent
fi m projector, as well as screens
of assorted sizes plus lecterns
easels and blackboard even
a stage for your preservation.
If your sessions Include inter-
national audience-. Halcj >n Ba)>
moral can provide multil 1
translation. Stenographic service
also is available.
And when the work day is over,
your guests can rent cars, motor-
1.voles or motor scooters for ex-
ploring the island of New Prov-
idence, or they can try their
luck at a casino on Paradise Is-
land if they are so inclined.
Truthfully, you'll all return
homeas refreshed as from
vacation barely aware you'w
been on a "working holiday-
Come to think of it. even thai
doMB't sound half bad.
n


-Friday. August 30. 1974
+Jewist> flcrktian and St of ar of Hollywood
Page 7
Turks, Sick Men of Europe,
Now Suffer Poor Eyesight
Cellist Is First Artist To Be
Featured By Beth El Sisterhood
IT.
By TWWWfBWWRR
I.om Ajgil.. Ttnw Syndicate
,. NEW YORK The Turks,
on re known as the "sick men of
SEurtijie" and now exulting in
their View military strength, have
a different k wd of sickness
plaguing them their tunnel vi-
sion abojt emit-and means.
. They are blind: to the moral
and political consequences of
their military muscle as they
bomb towns, airports, hospitals,
Jaying waste to whole areas and
dislocating populations.
THKV HAD a grievance to
8ta*4 with, yes. in the anti-Ma-
kario6 ooup ott Cyprus. But the
"coup "has passed; the regime of
the colonels, has. fallen; the
democratic regime in Athens
wants peace and will pay any
price fpr it short of shattering
humiliation..
At Geneva the Turks smiled
and smiled, embraced the Greek
envoys and then went on to
extend their military mastery of
Cyprus.
They want partition of Cyprus,
the relocation of peoples and a
massive permanent military pres-
ence on Cyprus. And they will
doubtless get it.
GREECE IS helpless, heart-
broken about the casualties
among its nationals on Cyprus
[b_t powerkss to do anything.
The British Foreign Office, play-
I inc. an overseer role, seethes with
frustration and rage at the re-
lated Turkish betrayals of the
ctaie-fire. ,
. The UN Security Council feels
: helpless because none of the
Great Powers wants to take the
Meadowbrook 7th
lladaygrah Group
In liallandale
Mrs. Albert Aaron, president
ol Hnilandaie Chapter of Hadas-
sa and its six groups, Chai,
Fairways, Hemispheres. Inv
eria], Parker and Pla;.a Towers,
announces the formation of a
4evv gioup. Meadowbrook.
\ A tea was held recently at the
ho:rie of Mis. Jules Shrager. at
which the new group was offi-
riertiCated. Mrs. Leonard
past president of the
Sorida Region of Hadussah, was
|e J3 est speaker. On behalf of
Itttpter, Mrs. Aaron e\tend-
mtions and wished it
Hadassah is
.: by the addition of
nk. she said.
.' a lowbrook pro-tem of-
i Mrs. Ailan C.
Id, president; Mis. Jules
e lucation vice presi-
Ir.t: Mrs. MHlard Skint, fund-
vice president; Mrs. Abia-
I ':>.ss. n.emUership vice pres-
Mrs. Harry Sobel. pro-
:n vice president; Mrs. Mbr-
Malamud, treasurer; Mrs.
ittp Birnbaum. financial sec-
: Mis. Mortimer Gelus,
ing secretary, and Mrs.
..in Gladstone, correspond-
i ry.
r T.-.e chapter func-
.'li- have been formulated for
' 73 -. a-, ^i. They ii
P Membership Tea
at the Kalian-
ter; the Youth
i Jan.
23 at the Americana Hotel; the
fr :- n Tuesday, March
S ;it tie Diplomat Hotel and
(',.' "ss Luncheon Mon-
y. April 14, at the Eden Roc
ieir
1;
urn I
i H
:'u'
IV.'
hall
The Hallanriale Chapter and
fs seven grou;is w-ishes all its
feir.lers and their familUs A
ery Happy and Healthy New
Year. May this be a yes* of
Pt a. e for Israel and our people
everywhere.
lead. The NATO nations are also
powerless, and the Greek with-
drawal of its military units from
NATO comes after the de facto
Turkish deployment on Cyprus
of ships, planes and armor com-
mitted to NATO.
The United States is not pow-
erless but doesn't dare invoke
the power it has.
IT MESSED things up badly
while the colonels were in power
in Greece because of its concern
about the Mediterranean bases
and a fear that any move with
teeth in it would alienate the
Turks and make the Mediterra-
nean situation worse.
So Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger talks endlessly on the
phone with Premier Encevit of
Turkey, and Encevit talks of the
Turkish nationals who must have
their own enclave government
and Turkish troops forever.
Kissinger can't pack his dip-
lomatic briefcase and go off to
Geneva himself to work his
peace-making miracle.
ALL HE can do is to "deplore"
what is happening and threaten
to cut off military aid to both
Greece and Turkey if they go to
war. Which may or may not pre-
vent a full-scale war, except that
the Turks have been spreading
their one-sided war through Cy-
prus for weeks.
The lessons ought to be clear
enough to the world. Lesson No.
1: If you are a small nation and
have no direct Great Power pro
tector and no regional or ethnic
allies, you are stripped naked
before any national bully who
chooses to push you around.
The Turks chose their timing
shrewiily, with a new civilian le-
pime in a chaotic Greece and also
with a sharp constitutional crisis
in the I'nited States and the
transfer of presidential power.
LESSON NO. 2: The cold and
11d I man's New
Recipe Provides
A Taste Treat
There's no more appropriate
way to "t ti'.e New Sear than
with a ind-new taste treats
for holiday guests and family.
Your old specialties are enjoyed
\.... after year but here's a new-
one they're sue to love:
POACHED SALMON
WITH IBWELBB SAUCE
3 salmon steaks
1 small onion
2 celery ribs
l cai r >1
4 teaspoon Diamond Crystal
salt
Dash of whll | epi er
': cup Ht5mam"S Real
Mayonnaise
lairy sou- cream
M cup chopped radish
>; cup chopped cucumber
Vi c ip chopj ed green onion
1 teaspoon prepared mustard
Put salmon in shallow pan
with enough watet I.....w. mu
next fi > In < Meats. Bring to
eat and simmer 20
ites or until fish flakes eas-
Dratn, leservlns '* cuP
broth. Chili fish.
Mix together Helmhuvi Real
Mayonnaise, w
cucumber, green onion, re
ffartl broth; and mustard. Chill.
e with chilled salmon steak.
es 3 serviu "ce-
Be sure H e 11 m a n s Real
Ma;.onnaise Is on YOUR holiday
shopping list this year. It adds
zip to all your salads and sand-
wiches and makes this sauce ex-
tra-special!
naked use of war as an instru-
ment of national prowess hasn't
changed much. The Kissinger
peace-making diplomacy applies
to Great Powers' relations and to
areas where Great Powers have
stakes and leverage.
It doesn't apply to the Turks,
who see no one to pressure them
and who have their own leverage
in their strategic Mediterranean
position.
There is no peace-making ma-
chinery in NATO itself, which is
a loose array of disparate na-
tions around a defensive posture
and which yields to the black-
mailing potential of any of its
members.
AND NOT i moral voice is
raised, either in Europe or
America, to speak out against
the crudity and cruelty of what
is happening.
Lesson No. 3: The reason why
Greece is helpless is that its so-
called military regime ironically
had no military strength.
The colonels put up a hollow fa-
cade for the world to disguise
the empty shell behind it.
The Americans fell for it.
Worse than former Ambassador
Henry Tasca's closeness to the
military regime was the failure
of either the CIA or of other
j>olitical intelligence to report
what tne true weakness of the
regime was.
To work with a desperate re-
gime is often considered a part
of power politics, but to do it
without probing its hollowness
s to double the blunder.
Mrs. Harry Finer, Beth El Sis-
terhood president, will preside
at its opejiing luncheon and
meeting at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 10, in the Tobin Auditori-
um of the temple.
The program committee, head-
ed by Mrs. Joseph Shmelzer, has
worked during the summer
months to insure a season of pro-
grams geared to the interests of
the total membership.
The first artist to be presented,
at the opening meeting, is Rob-
ert L. Deutsch, associate princi-
pal cello of the Miami Philhar-
monic.
Mr. Deutsch, born in Miami in
1946, studied cello with Alfred
Stillman while attending John F.
Kennedy Junior High School in
North Miami Beach. He made his
debut in a solo appearance with
the Miami Symphonic Society in
1964.
Since that time he has toured
Europe and the Soviet Union
with professional musical groups;
made chamber and television ap-
pearances; served as contribut-
ing editor of "The Fugue" maga-
KOBEtr 1. DEUTSCH
zine and announced classical
music programs on radio.
"Tales of Hoffman" and "Kol
Nidre" are among the selections
Mr. Deutsch has chosen to per-
form for ft" Sisterhood.
Reservations are being taken
by Mrs. Charles Wolfe and Mrs.
Irving Green.
Tickets For Israeli Philharmonic
Performance On Sale At Federation
The Community Relations
Use I*ie of tucker or philhurmon
Committee of the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward, Inc. re-
ports that ticket sales for the Is-
raeli Philharmonic performance,
scheduled for 8:30 p.m. Thurs-
day, Oct. 3. at Miami Beach
Auditorium are moving along
The Hollywood CRC is proudly
playing a supportive role to
Temple Beth Sholom of Miami
in bringing this great cultural
event to tho people of our com-
munity.
Tickets for the concert are
available by calling the Jewish
Federation Office, 921-8810. and
are selling for $25. $20. $15, $7,
and $5. Transportation will be
provided for those who request
it.
In addition to the Philhar-
monic performance, Richard
Tucker, famed tenor, will be
guest soloist.
The cultural evening will mark
the passage of one year since
the Yom Kippur War.
To insure yourself of seats, call
now for tickets.
VOTE
DR. DAVID
LEHMAN
DEMOCRAT
FLORIDA STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 97
HERE'S PROOF OF DEDICATION
CHAIRMAN Broward County Council
on Aging
FOUNDER "The Starting Place"
Drug Information Center
CHAIRMAN State Committee on
Health Insurance
Member Medical Advisory Board
of"The Seed"
SPECIAL ASS'T. ATTORNEY GENERAL
in Charge of Dangerous Drugs D;vision
Me Has PROVEN
His Dedication To US!!
SHALOM
PLEASE VOTE SEPTEMBER 10
pd. pel. adv.David Lehman. Treas.


Page 8
+Jeistrhridliar and Shofa ol Hollywood
Friday, August 30. 197|

Profile
A Sage Who Never Went To College
His parents knew what they
were doing when they named
him Moses.
You're in his company only
about five minutes when you be-
gin to get the feeling that you're
listening to a sage.
This Moses's name is also
Hornstein.
Hornstein and his wife of 46
years, Gertrude, live in a mag-
nificent Hollywood home which
on one side has a lake and the
other, a golf course.
"I WANTED the lake and
open space so nobody could close
me in," said Hornstein. He then
further explained. "My wife
plays golf two or three times a
week. The golf course makes it
convenient."
The Hornsteins didn't always
live in such quiet elegance.
Forty-five years ago when he
was in the plumbing business
ami they'd oily been married one
year, a thins called the "depres-
sion" ha;>; ene! to the country.
"I lost everything," the man
said as he sa: a; the hand-tooled
leather desk. The one the
waste basket matches.
it was then .
into heavy engineering; teaching
elf engineering, in fact, for
Hornstein had neve:- gone to col-
lege.
"The Good Lord gave me op-
portunities and I was awake
enough to take advantage of;
them." he said before adding.
"There's also one other basic in-
gredient called hard work."
"Nothing comes easy," is the
kind of wisdom this local sage
spouts as the phone rings and
someone in another part of the
country is asking for Ion.
tance advice about a business
venture.
WITH THP; LORD coaching
him in the hard work, Hornstein
was able to rebuild the family
finances and forge a highly suc-
cessful business.
Today, Hornstein's son, Larry,
and his daughter Jud/a husband,
Eugene, are active in the busi-
ness while Dad is supposedly "re-
tired in Florida." I'm now a
consultant," Hornstein says as
the phone rings three more times
with people needing consulta-
tions.
While he's speaking, you listen
to a quiet, soft-spoken man who
tell you exactly "where it's at"
in a gentle manner which is also
very firm in his beliefs.
One thing for sure, Moses
Hornstein, the man who never
attended college, believes in edu-
cation.
He is one of the organizers of
Touro College in New York City,
a Liberal Arts School named for
the old first synagogue in the
United States. "I devote a great
deal of time to Touro," Horn-
stein said.
"We started three years ago
with 30 young men. This year a '
women's division has been start- f
ed and the enrollment is up to
approximately 200."
THE MAX'S EYES light up
when he tells you of Touro. The
same kind of expression that
comes through when he tells you
of his five grandchildren.
"Touro has a unique spirit and
its basis is Jewish tradition.
There aren't any signs telling
students that wearing a "yar-
mulka" is required but 98 per
cent of the students just wear
them because they want to," he
says.
Hornstein worked hard (back
to his basic formula i to found a
school where an intellectual Jew
could get a Liberal Arts educa-
tion without the usual university
trauma.
When asked for a definition of
the word "trauma," he looks you
in the eye and states quietly em-
phatic, "A professor who tells a
young person 'there is no G-d', is
a trauma."
ACTUALLY, Moses Hornstein
has been interested in Jewish
MOSIS HORNSTEIN
education for the past 15 years
"I spend most of my time with
it." he says as the phone rings
with another person-to-person
call to the Sage.
His feeling is. "We do a poor
job of Jewish education with the
generation growing now and it
was worse in the last. When the
assimilation rate is 35 per cent,
something's ivn
Other seats of learning which
receive Hornstein's attention is,
for one, the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America. They've
had his attention for twenty
years.
TEN OF HIE rast years have
also been devoted to Yeshiva
University.
He has been a Vice President
of the Synagogue Council of
America (the meeting place of
all three uraiKT.es of the Jewish
faith i for six years.
Hornstein is president emeri-
tus of the Hebrew Academy of
Nassau County after having been
their president for 17 years. He
is trustee emeritus of Hofstra
University after serving as a
trustee for 13 years.
Hornstein smiles, "I've had a
unique viewpoint no tradition
to influence my thinking because
I didn't go to college."
Moses Hornstein has been a
Zionist from "way back." He
says, "I can't understand people
who are afraid of dual-allegiance.
Theie is no such thing!"
YOU'D LIKE to sit and chat
with the man for hours, but his
schedule for retirement runs
tight.
Four hours hence, he's sched-
uled to fly to Washington to dine
with the Israeli Ambassador.
Two days hence, he must fly to
New York to attend a board
meeting of the National Bank of
North America where he is a di-
rector and since he's ahead.. <-
ing to be in New York, "I might
as well stay there two more days
because I leave for the Prime
Minister's Mission to Israel on
Sunday."
In defining his feeling for Is-
rael, he tells you. "Israel has be-
come a symbol to me of the re-
birth of our people. We must en-
courage and support it."
Locally, this year. Hornstein
will support it by becoming
Chairman of the Pacesetter's Di-
vision of Federation's '75 Cam-
paign. "I did it in New York so
I'm not particularly concerned."
he said. "It will take time but
we are well organized."
Well organized Mr. Hornstein,
a gentleman who is a gentleman,
personally escorts you to your
car.
BIT AS YOU'RE leaving his
library, the thought occurs that
not one framed award adorns a
wall.
When questioned, he smiles,
"There's only one award which
will go in my library. It says,
'Honoi ary Doctor of Science'
and it's from Hofsira Univer-
sity."
As you walk together, he says,
"It'r meaningful because I didn't
go to co e e."
But then. Moses Hornstein
must know sages don't have to
go '.< I colli
That's why the Lord, the one
he's 1 een following all these
years Trained him that way.
Women For Hillel
Coffee Kicks Off
New School Year
The Women for Hillel began
the '74-75 school year with a
membership.coffee in the home
of Mr. p;d Mrs. Alan Bostom '
2055 Nt 202nd St.. North Miami
Beach. Rabbi and Mrs. .Albert
Mayerfield were there to meet
and greet parents, grandparents,
relatives and friends of Hillel.
The new officers of Women for
Hillel for the coming year are
Mrs. Joshua Weinberg. presi-
dent; Mrs. Leon Roth, fund rais-
ing vice president; Mrs. Paul
Millman and Mrs. Joseph Gel-
nowski, membership vice presi-
dents; Mrs. Alan Bostom, pro-
gram vice president; Mrs. Ben
Genari, treasurer; Mrs. Martin
Tepfer, recording secretary and
Mis. Paul Camel, corresponding
secretary.
Eoth Women for Hillel and
Men for Hillel help supi>ort the
Hillel Community Day School in
its work to provide the youth of
North Dade and South B: 1
Counties with the finest in secu-
lar ami religious educati mi.
The new president of Men :> [
Hillel, Ben Genad, will work with
the following officers: Alan Bos-
tom. fund raising vice pres
William Siegel and Gary Schar-
lat, membership vie-e pres
Paul Camel, program vice
dent; Morton Zemel, treasurer;
Jerald Cantor, secretary, and
trustees Dr. Arnold Sheir. Irving
Cirulnick and Joshua Weinberg.
Soft
and
r

- ,r
spreadable
even when
ice cold!

PHILADELPHIA WHIPPED CREAM CHEESE
BRAND
TRY WHIPPED
PHILADELPHIA CREAM
CHEESE WITH ONION,
WITH CHIVES, WITH
PIMENTO, WITH
SMOKED SALMON
AIX THESE
KPAFT PHILADELPHIA WHIPPED CREAM CHEESES
CERTIFIED KOSHER
The one and only with that
matchless Philadelphia flavor
j Boon to the busy balabosta: the luscious spread that pops out o'
your refrigerator whipped-creamy-fluffyready for instant
use. Makes Philadelphia Brand Whipped Cream Cheese such
f a favorite. Everyone loves how it spreads so smoothly on even
the crumbliest crackers, matzohs, bread, and muffins. And that
(very special fresh Philadelphia flavorl
Keep plenty of Philadelphia Bra*d Whipped Cream Cheese or
hand, chilled and ready. For noshes, dairy meals, party dips-
serve right from those smart reusable aluminum bowls that
protect freshness.
GUARANTEED FRESH WHEN YOU BUY IT-
O* YOUR MONEY BACK FROM
----- Oivnion ol Kfllc* Crests* ^
KRAFT


Triday. August 30. 1974
vJettisii JfenMkM? tmd Sboter of Hollywood.
Page3
Annual Award Winners At Federation Meeting
SBsaSBBsai
Awards were presented to several of Hollywood's
most deserving workers at the annual meeting
held by the Jewish Federation of South Broward
recently. Piciure No. 1 shows Dr. Norman Atkin
eceiving a special "Past President's Award" a
2.000-year-old ceramic jug uncovered recsntly in
Israel from his successor, Herbert D. Katz. Dr.
Atkin was cited for his outstanding service, de-
votion and dedication to the Jewish community of
Greater Hollywood. In the second picture, Dr. Nor-
man and Nancy Atkin flank Robert M. Baer, first
recipient of the award recently established in their
name. Piciure No. 3 shows Martha Jacobson, re-
ceiving the Women's Division Award for out-
standing service in the development of the Wom-
en's Leadership Institute from Marcia Tobin, the
new Women's Division president. The picture at
right shows Dr. Norman Atkin presenting the Hy
and Belle Schlafer Young Leaders Award to Dr.
Meron Levitats in recognition of his service, in-
terest and devotion to the betterment of the com-
munity.
Katz Assumes Presidency Of Federation
Continued from Page 1
president: Lewis Conn, treas-
urer; anil Nathan Prltcher, sec-
retary.
The newly elected director!
and truste are listed below.
BOARD OF DIB8CTOBS
One I ear
Ross Beckerman
Moses Hornstein
Paid Koenig
Joel Schneider, M.D.
Phi;i;i Weinstein, Jr., M.D.
David Yorra
an P itchi r
A. J. Saiter
Two Fears
I. A. Durbin
f.X '.v. <;.: n
Abraham E. Halpem
}I. rl ert Katz
Meron Levitats, M.D.
Mrs. Stanley MargUies
; PitteD, M.D.
Three Years
Melvin H. Baer
Rore-t M. Baer
Lewis EL Cohn
Samuel Meline. D.M.D.
Swiss says cheese.
Swiss says fondue.
'
_. "^wiss Knight says delicious ffiings imported from
'Switzerland: 6 foil-wrapped wedges of plain or as-
sorted Gruyere Cheese, perfect for snacks, parties,
lunch boxes. And for en-
tertaining, Swiss Knight
Fondue in a classic recipe
of Gruyere and Emmental
cheeses, white wine and
Kirsch. Swiss Knight*
CheeseSwiss Knight-
Cheese Fondue. More than
Ithat you cannot say.
;Gert*r Cheese Co., Inc., Stamford, Connecticut 06905
Een Saiter
BOARD OP TRUSTEES
ton L. Abi
!...: e:t Baer
.. M. Beckerman
Mrs. Frances M. Briefer
n P. Caster, M.D.
Herman Corn
Mrs. Carolyn Davis
Milton Forman
Mark Fried
Charles Friedman. D.M.D.
H ward Ft e:.-t, M.D.
Joseph J. Gabel
Allen Gordon
Temple Sinai Sisterhood
Opening Season Sept. 4
Temple Sinai Sisterhood will
hold hold its first regular meet-
ing of the 1974-75 season Wed-
nesday in the temple's Social
Hall. 18801 NE 22nd Ave.. North
Miami Beach. Hostesses for the
day will be the ladies of Ruth
Circle.
Brunch will be served at 11:30
a.m., followed by a short general
: ( ting and an afternoon pro-
gram featuring Mrs. Mayer
Abramowitz, who will speak on
'Jewish Identity." Please call
Dottie Lipton for information
and reservations.
J ile ''Hi
David M. Hams
Wi.llam D. Horvltz
Mrs. Herbert Katz
Stanley Kessell, D.D.S.
*A. L. Mailman
Seymour Mann
Ma..; .? Meyers
Mis. Jack Miller
Bernard Milloff, M.D.
Jacob Mogilowitz
Sajl I. Xitzberg, M.D.
Harry M. Permesly, M.D.
Sam J. Perry-
Mis,. Robert Pittell
David Posnack
Mrs. Nathan Pritcher
Mrs. Een Saiter
Jose: h Schwartz
H. G. Schlafer
Jack Shapiro
Mrs. Gerald Siege!
Gerald Siegel
Max Sloane
Otto Stieber
Een Tobin
Sheldon Willens, D.P.M.
Albert Yorra
* Trustee for Life
HONORARY TRUSTEES
Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin
Rabbi Robert Frazin
Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe
Rabbi Morton Malavsky
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz
Kabbi David Shapiro
Hollywood BBW
Chapter To Mark
25th Anniversary
B'nai B'rith Women, Holly-
wood Chapter 725. is planning
a "Silver Anniversary" and paid-
up membership affair at h p.m.
Thursday. Sept. 12, at the Holi-
day Inn, 1925 Harrison St.. Hol-
lywood.
This is a complimentary affair
for paid-up members. It is open to
members, prospective members
and guests.
Miss Patricia Gayle will sins;
and play the accordion. Guest
speaker will be Mrs. Newton
HofStater, president elect oC
B'nai B'rith Women. District No.
5. Refreshments will be served.
Pros|>ective m embers and
guests please contact Mrs. David
LeVlne or Mrs. Majorie SehittV
man. Hollywood.
Rabbinical Association's
President To Be Installed
Rabbi Ralph P. Kingsley, spfe*
itual leader of Temple Sinai of
North Dade, will be installed a
president of the Greater Miami
Rabbinical Association Wednes-
day, Sept. 11, at a luncheon ii
the temple's Social Hall.
The luncheon, hosted by the
Sisterhood of Temple Sinai, wHI
be held in Rabbi Kingsley's honor
with members of the Rabbinical
Association and their wives am
guests.
p- env-'*"
ELECT LOU CHARNOW
TO CONGRESS
THE MAN WITH
THE RECORD OF
PERFORMANCE
If you are new to Florida ask any old time resident of Hollywood about Lou and
then vote your conscience for a man of Integrity ... sincerity ... background ... ma-
turity ... education ... guts ... and civic consciousness.
He bas fought for you for a public beach and against high risers. He has fought
against give aways. He Is now ready to fight for you la the Halls of Congress.
LOU STANDS FOR
1. Medical care for all.
2. Fair Social Security
tied to cost of living.
3. Consumer protection.
4. Integrity in government.
VOTE LOU CHARNOW FOR COMGRESS
THE VOICE OF THE PEOPLE.
DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY SEPTEMBER ItTH. 1*74
PD. POLITICAL AD. PD. FOR BY CAMPAIGN FUND OF LOU CHARNOW.
S. Elimination of waste.
S. Fall scale assault on Inflation.
7. Fair taies.
S. A National Park la
Broward County.
12TH DISTRICT



Page 10
*Jenist tk-Tkiiair, and Skofar ah. HoBywood
Friday. August 30. 1974
<2*ts r 801 HM(t, fxtofivc Dincttr,

Lady Logic
MMMMHMMIMMMWMMaiimWIMmwaM
As you read this column, I am aboard an El Al airplane returning
In :n Israel.
1 feel privileged to have accompanied six members of our com-
munity who responded to an invitation from the Prime Minister of
1st .it. to visit the country to witness their great needs and to re-pledge
their commitment to the forthcoming 1975 campaign.
As I write now and prepare for this trip, many things are occur-
ing. I've been in contact with my cousin, Mikhail Kerbel, who arrived
in Israel from the Soviet Union in March of 1974. He has told me of the
difficult time that he has had in adjusting to a new culture and
language. Especially difficult for him is the fact that his wife, who
had been extremely ill in the U.S.S.R., is now dying and he and his
young son are alone.
I will be meeting him for the first time and my stomach is already
in knots from the anticipation of our seeing each other. What will
we say to each other? Is there any way that I will be able to make
the burden of his adjustment easier? Is he an example of tens of
thousands of Soviet Jews who have arrived in Israel? What more
needs to be done for all of them? What obligations must I, and Jews
eyery here, assume to help them in their new life? There are so many
questions what answers will I have?
And what about my Israeli friends? The ones I will be seeing for
the first time in two years. Their letters have been much more sedate
since the October War. Never has there been a complaint, and yet,
I note the tone of their correspondence denotes frustration and sad-
ness. They question whether their lives will be spent going to war to
protect this little piece of land that is their home.
When they tell me of their increase in taxes and the tremendous
jump in the cost of food and staples (25 per cent increase in just a
few months), how can I discuss Americans inflation? When they tell
me that their living standards have decreased remarkably, can I
share with them the knowledge we in America, are living as well as
ever (though, of course, we do complain about the rising prices)?
When they explain that they have to give months of reserve duty
away from their families, can I tell them that I have not really given
up anything?
Though we will be in Israel only three days, there is much that
I want to accomplish. I know that I will only be able to see my
friends between midnight and 7:00 a.m. there will be no other time.
Days must be spent in determining for ourselves and with the leaders
of the Israeli government, the needs of Israel for this coming year.
I know that because of the dedicated leadership of this country,
we will do everything possible, especially in our South Broward area,
tp help our brother Jews in their time of need and crisis. I feel that
I' speak for all of us in giving assurance that our continued support
will be even greater.
As I see it ... we are quite fortunate to have been put in the
position to help others who are in need of our assistance.
May You Have A Sweet Year...
Say L'Chayim WWith Sabra Liqueur
On* of the most delicious ways
to wish friends and family "a
sweet year" is with the delicately
sweet, distinctively Israeli li-
queur Sabra. Nothing could
be more fitting for a holiday
toast! The fresh taste of the
Jaffa Orange, blended with rich
chocolate, herbs and spices pro-
vides a unique, warm flavor that
no other drink duplicates.
Sabra is perfect for sipping as
an after-dinner cordial with cof-
fee, but the adventuresome host-
ess will also enjoy preparing
this delicious dessert with it.
ZABLIONE SABRA
6 egg yolks
1 tablespoon Domino sugar
5 drops vanilla
3 ounces brandy
3 ounces Sabra
In double boiler over hot water,
whip egg yoll:s with wire whisk.
Continue whipping while adding
. brandy and Sabra. These
should be ari'led a little at a time
(not too fast as this will spoil
the Zablione'i heavy, creamy tex-
ture! until they are completely
blended in. The mixture will
emeige as thick custard. Zab-
lione traditionally is served hot
in long-stemmed glasses, but it
maj be chilled and served cold as
well. Serves five.
Or, try this exotic treat!
ISRAELI COFFEE
2 cups strong coffee
\i cup whipping cream
\a cup orange juice
M cup dark rum
"f* cup Sabra
Half fill large stemmed glasses ;
with coffee poured down the j
stem of a spoon. Add orange
Sabra and rum to each in
equal proportions, reserving a
tablespoon of rum. Top with
whipped cream (it is better if it
is not stiff) and sprinkle lightly ,
with sugar.
Heat tablespoon of rum and
flame, pouring flaming rum on
top of each. Serves fa p.
Maxim... The Oue Holiday Coffee
Maxim is the one freeze-dried
coffee that "perked coffee" may-
rave al out all year long.
That's why It's the ONE
you should serve during the Holi-
days.
Maxim is full of fresh-brewed
flavor because it actually
STARTS as fresh-perked coffee.
Then Maxim is fast-frozen into
big dark chunks with all the de-
licious coffee goodness "locked
in."
All you do is add boiling water
to "reactivate" its fantastic
flavor. What's more, because
Maxim is brewed full flavor,
you'll find you need less than a
oon for each cup you make.
For coffee that truly measures
up to the quality of your home-
made holiday delicacies, be cer-
tain you serve kosher freeze-
dried Maxim Coffeethe perked
coffee mayvin's favorite.
I'm A Professional Survivor

^^r^ftftOPMAN
Did you ever have a period in
your life when you felt like the
heavens were crashing boulders
upon your head?
LIKE MAYBE the whole
world was "out to get you?"
It is my sincere wish that it
ceases upon my person this
morning. (Three in the morning;
as I write.)
About six weeks ago, while at-
tending a perfectly lovely dinner
party, I felt a foreign object sud-
denly intermingle with my food.
Under the table, into a nap-
kin, I uncovered three caps from
my teeth.
UNDAUNTED, after rinsing
them, I placed them into my
purse, anticipating an early call
to the dentist.
However, the next day I was
invited to a perfectly lovely
brunch so depending upon my re-
maining teeth, I attended.
Why I was courageous enough
to endeavor a bagel, is beyond
me.
The bagel contained three
more caps upon the second
munch.
Since I only had six caps to
start with, I self-diagnosed a
terminal case of "leprosy-of-the-
gums," excused myself and went
home to stare into the mirror
and envision no teeth at all.
I WANTED TO CRY. But in-
stead, I made a dentist appoint-
ment.
"Dentistry in that foreign
country in wnich you lived ap-
pears medieval," he said.
He also quoted the price of
allowing me to go to lovely din-
ners and lovely brunches again.
My bank balance turned over
in its quasi-grave.
I elected to start with the ex-
traction of a tooth that was no
longer biting anything. And
scheduled it for a month hence!
MEANWHILE. I decided to
dwell on the pain in my right
elbow. Having had it for three
months and having self-diag-
nosed it as terminal bone cancer,
I decided since I was left-handed
anyhow, I'd ignore it.
I bought an elastic bandage
and continued to carry my 20
pound briefcase with my right
arm.
It was at that time, my daugh-
ter and I had a heart-to-heart
talk on the relationship of
mothers who think they know
everything and daughters who
want to find out for themselves.
MY (il ILT ranneth over.
So, at 7:00 the next morning
I went to the F!ea Market to for-
get the world as it appeared and
to drown myself in petty bar-
gains.
It was then I spotted the chair,
"if 8.000 coats of ignorantly
v
RITA GOODMAN
splashed black paint was stripped
off and the French cane re-
placed," I thought to myself, "it
would match my daughter's new-
ly purchased antique rocking
chair."
I PURCHASED it to assuage
my guilt feelings for being a
"this-is-the-way-it's-done" kind of
Mother.
I carried the chair, across
what appeared to be eight acres,
to the car.
When I phoned her. it required
all my waning strength to
ngujb^e "Please cj|l^tte doctor
ana tell him my back is out
again."
That visit was a bargain!
WHILE HE attended to my
tack. I slipped in the message
about the elbow. A tennis elbow?
Not bad considering I've never
played tennis.
In a fit of elation over the les-
sening of pain in these two areas,
I decided the tooth extraction,
would be "small potatoes."
I never heard of a "dry socket"
before but the "dry-socket-fairy"
must have found ten cents under
my pillow.
Hell hath no fury like a dry
socket scorned!
PAIN PILLS hath no dent.
. and a whole newspaper
due tomorrow.
I keep telling my children": "I
am a Professional Survivor" ...
I AM!! !
I am!
i am ..
Teen Scene
By STEVEN KERBEL
Shalom!
No, this isn't a mistake. I'm
Steve Kerbel, Paul's younger
brother, and I'm pinch-hitting
"Teen Scene" for him this week.
Paul is in the Blue Ridge
Mountains of North Carolina at-
tending a Leadership Training
Institute for the Southeastern
Region of United Synagogue
Youth.
Here is my brief autobi-
ography: Tm' 13'4 years old, a
former student of the Hebrew
Academy of Greater Miami and
presently a freshman at Nova
High School. I'm president of
Temple Beth Shalom Junior USY
and I'm also on the steering com-
mittee of the JCC 7th, 8th and
9th graders.
-tt -tr &
Now for the news: On Sunday,
Aug. 11, 55 teens from the JCC
7th, Mth and 9th grade group at-
tempted to conquer the ice skat-
ins.' rink at Polar Palace in Mi-
ami. In the two hour struggle,
we JCC'era used hot chocolate,
nerves of steel and plain old de-
termination as ammunition and
guess who won?
We, the People I When told to
remove our skates and prepare
for retreat, we begged for more
but our commanding officers
(Mrs. Mike Fried and Mr. and
Mrs. Gilbert Bitter) informed us
that there was a reward for win-
ning the battle.
All the pizza we could eat!
Yes, that cheese and tomato
Italian delight bribed us into
loading the buses fast and rid-
ing to Myers Pizza Parlor where,
we warmed our bodies after that
chilling experience. All in all, it
was a lot of fun and a great way
to spend a hot summer day.
b tr &
If you'd uke to have your teen-
agers put on our mailing list, call
the Jewish Community Center,
920-2089
to -it &
Temple Beth SbjilopirSY will
be holding its Armuaf Registra-
tion Bar-B-Que, Sept. 5. Seniors
(10th-12th graders): 6:00 p.m,
with Go-Carting tp. follow.
Juniors i7th-9th graders i: 7:00
p.m. with Roller Skating to fol
low. For more information, call
the Temple Youth Office,
966-2200.
Since this will probably be my
first and last opportunity to
write "Teen Scene." I'd like to
wish you all a Happy New Year.
Hollywood Federal Appoints
Carol MmmDI has been named
assistant secretary-manages of
the North Biscayne Office, and
Kathleen Mikulec assistant sec-
retary-assistant manager of the
Miramax Office of Hollywood
Fedeial Savings and Loan Asso-
ciation, according to association
; resident. James M. Blanz.
DO YOr HAVE A FRIEND
WHO
mrnam the caxdle
AT BOTH i:\DS?
GIVE THE ULTIMATE GIFT!
CANDLE IS 100% BEESWAX: IN WH'TE,
GREEN, BLUE, APRICOT, RED, BLACK
FINE CERAMIC BASE; WHITE OR BLACK.
GIFT BOXED SET $4.50
Shipped in U.S.A. Add $1.75
rax CM,*E FABULOUS THAN EVER"
** E. LAS OLAS BLVD. FT. LAUDERDALE
L


'
r, August 30. x974
+Jf**ist>norX09jn and Shoianr of HoQywood
Page 11
ord Takes Stand
*
\On Emigration
7r Russian Jews
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
ASHINGTON (JTA) President Ford has personally in-
himself in the U.S. effort to negotiate a solution to tht Soviet
ation issue and "very good progress" is being made toward an
ment on it between the two countries.
s was disclosed at a White ,
Jackson Amendment and Mills-
?? news conference by Sens.
ry M. Jackson (D., Wash),
juiam Klucolt (D., Conn.)
Jacob K. Javits iR., N.Y.)
concluding a 70-minute
Ikfast conference with Ford
[Secretary of State Henry A.
linger.
VE'BE MOVING in the di-
lon of an agreement.'' de-
Jackson, author of the
son Amendment to the
Reform Bill pending in the
e. There has been signifi-
i Russian movement. We hope
resolve the matter in time by
Congress," he said. The life
| the present Congress ends
3, 1975.
Jackson disclosed that Ford
Aug. 14 with the Soviet Am-
isador Anatoly F. Dobryoin
the Senator said, returned
Bier than expected from Mos-
"largely for this subject" of
ration.
3bryn>n also met w""tn Kis'
ger on Aug. 12 only hours af-
arriving from Moscow. Both
Btings were at Dobrym's re-
st, and it Is believed that the
net envoy "brought some-
ng" from Moscow on the emi-
^tion-trade issue.
I.VCKSOX RPVMLED that
srtain discretions" for the
esjdent will te worked out
1th Congress for his negotia-
Bn with the Soviet government
kt he and the other two Sena-
rs, leaders in the Senate for
ke emigration measure, insisted
|at the Jackson Amendment
er se will be in the bill."
|''We are exploring the possi-
Uities on how to rrlate the un-
standing between t*e Presi-
ent and the Congress and be-
peen the President with the
issians," Jackson said.
This means, he observed, that
Congress would grant Ford "cer-
authority" that he now does
not have in the legislation adopt-
as the Mills-Vanik Amend-
nent in the Trade Bill passed
{last Dec. 14 by a 4-1 margin in
the House of Representatives.
Tne understanding between
(the President and Congress, he
aid. will be "tied in between the
is and ourselves."
IN TIIKIR present form, the
Vanik measure, which are identi-
cal, call upon the Soviet Govern-
ment and other Communist coun-
tries to lift restrictions on emi-
gration if they wish to obtain
U.S. government trade benefits
and credits.
In indicating some compromise
on the legislative form to give
"discretions" to the President to
negotiate successfully, the Sena-
tors stressed that the objectives
of the legislation will be main-
tained.
"What we are seeking is, will
people be able to get out of the
Soviet Union who want to get
out and without harassment or
sanctions?" Javits asked.
"WE ABE satisfied the Presi-
dent will himself see to it what
we seek will be performed."
Jackson emphasized that he
seeks "a rational, sensible ap-
proach to free movement" of
people who wish to emigrate
"that is realistic and achievable."
By the President's personal
involvement, Ribicoff said, "we
get off dead center. A formula is
in the process of being worked
out."
The three Senators expressed
unqualified confidence in the
President's integrity on the is-
sue. "I am deeply impressed,"
Ribicoff said.
"The President has very, very
strong affirmative sympathy for
what we are seeking to do,"
Jackson declared.
JAVITS REMARKED that
"the role of the President will
prove decisive" in the agreement
"without in any way surrender-
ing the fine objectives" of the
Jackson Amendment.
Asked by the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency whether the
solution with the Soviets would
be :i writing Jackson, who had
previously said an agreement in
writing was essential, replied,
"There will be written ex-
changes" between the Senate
and the President.
The President, Jackson added,
would have to "guarantee" the
matter. "He assured us that the
guarantees are there," Jackson
said.
Sweet Unsalted
Mazola Margarine
For Fresh Taste
During the holiday week, when
you want a margarine that's
kosher, parve. sweet (with no
salt added), and low in saturated
fats, too what you buy?
If you're a smart homemaker,
you go straight to the margarine
section in your market and pick
out Sweet Unsalted Mazola. It's
good with dairy, good with meat
and it's good for you because it's
made with golden corn oil, so it's
low in saturated fats.
What's more, Sweet Unsalted
Mazola is also ideal for cooking.
It won't burn at normal frying
temperatures of 300 degrees to
350 degrees, like butter and most
other margarines do.
Here's a delicious recipe you
Can try with Sweet Unsalted
Mazola.
DAIRY T2UMMBS
1 pound Sunsweet prunes
4 cups boiling water
1 cup farfel
1 teaspoon Diamond Crystal
salt
2 tablespoons lemon juice
Mi cup honey
4 tablespoons Sweet Unsalted
Mazola Margarine
Wash the prunes and soak in
water for 1 hour. Bring to a boil
and add the farfel, salt, lemon
juice, honey and margarine.
Place mixture in baking dish.
Cover and bake in a 375 degree
oven 45 minutes, removing the
cover for the last 15 minutes.
Serves 6.
Kosher Z ion Adds
Beef Liverwurst
To Its Products
CHICAGO Kosher Zion
Sausage Company is adding a
strictly kosher beef liverwurst to
its strictly all-kosher line.
It will be made available in
two pound packages to restau-
rants and also to delicatessens
for resale to consumers. It can
be used fpr sandwiches or as a
spread.
The liverwurst, which can be
frozen for later use. carries the
seal of the Chicago Rabbinical
Council.
Company spokesmen said the
beef liverwurst will be in na-
tional distribution.
Crowd Demonstrates Against
Moisevev Dancers in L.A.
LOS ANGELES (JTA1
Two dozen demonstrators in
black and white pi i oner-type
hiforms walked out of a Moise--
ye\- Dance Company perform-
ance at the Shrine Auditorium
kug. 18 to protest the suppres-
sion of the rights of Soviet Jews.
Meanwhile, an estimated 500
[pickets marched in front of the
Auditorium to protest against the
I "harassment, Intimidation, and
Imprisonment" of Jews In the
Soviet Union.
MBSt OSCAR Lozabnick, chair.
Woman of the Commission on So-
viet Jewry of the Community
R ations Committee. Jewish
Federation-Council, which organ-
ized the rally, said groups from
as far away as Orange County,
San Gabriel, Covina, and the
west valley joined many Los An-
geles groups at the auditorium.
The performance took place
under police surveillance, appar-
ently because of a bomb blast on
Aug. 12 which did minor damage
to the front of the auditorium.
An anonymous caller later
took responsibility foe the blast.
claiming that it was in protest of
Soviet treatment of Jews.
SKN. JOHN V. Tunney (D..
Calif, i supported the protest ac-
tion with a statement sent to the
Commission on Soviet Jewry.
"So long as the Soviet Union
continues to severely hinder emi-
gration of Soviet Jews and har-
ass those who seek to exercise
their basic human rights." Tun-
ney said, "there will be an ulti-
mate barrier to real detente.
"Cultural exchanges, like the
visit of the Moiseyev Dance
Company to the United States,
play a useful role in bringing,
some understanding between peo-_
pie in our two nations, but such
visits cannot mask the horror of
Soviet policies which nullify hu-=
man rights."
Seagram's V.O.
Favorite Toast
The first Canadian, V.O. by-
Seagram, has become the fa-
vorite toast to the New Year in
many Jewish homes. Maybe
that's because V.O. is in a class
by itself among Canadian
whiskies.
Seagram's V.O. has been popu-
lar world-wide since 1857 then
as now the epitome of excellence
and uncompromising quality. Its
mellow smoothness and lightness
defy comparison.
So when you say "L'Chayim"
for 5735, say it with Sea-rani's
V.O. THE Canadian. There's
nothing more festive!
Maxwell House Coffee ... A
Tradition For Generations
What better way to say
"L'Shanah Tovah" than with a
delicious, steaming cup of .Max-
well House Coffee? This fine
product from General Foods has
long been a popular beverage In
Jewish homes. In fact, certified
kosher Maxwell House Coffee
has has been enjoyed in Jewish
households and at Jewish holi-
day dinners for over 50 years!
Whether you serve Instant or
Regulai Maxwell House, you're
always assured of coffee that's
"good to the last drop." It's the
perfectly satisfying end to any
Yomtov dinner. Be sure you have
plenty on hand this year for holi-
day entertaining.
MElCHELS
ky NORMA BARACH
For those of you who hesitate to use yeast, here i3 a very
simple bet tasty and attractive sweetroll. (You do have to refrig-
erate the dough overnight.)
SIMPLE YEAST ROLL
2 cups flour
'-k tsp. salt
1 tbbp. sugar
1 stick margarine
1 pkg. dry yea3t
4 cup lukewarm water
1 beaten egg
1 13-01. can almond pastry
filling or lekvar
Mix together flour, salt and sugar. Cut in margarine with
two knives until mixture resembles sand. Add yeast to water.
Then add yeast mixture and egg to flour mixture. Mix and knead
a few seconds. Put it back in the mixing bowl, cover with a
dish towel and place in refrigerator overnight. The next day,
divide dough in half. Roll each piece into a large, thin rectangle.
Spread one-half of the filling near one end lengthwise, pinch
ends in and roll like a jelly roll. Flatten with your hands. Put
in a lightly greased pan, rolled side down. Form into a crescent
shape. Cover and let rise in a warm place for about one hour.
Bake at 375' for about 30 minutes. While it is warm, frost it.
Decorate with blanched almonds.
FROSTING FOR YEAST ROLL
*i cup margsrine (melted) % tsp. brandy extract
1% cups confectioner's sugar Few drops of water
Mix all above together. Add just enough water to make icing
spreadable.
ft
ft
Now that school vacation is here, with children around the
house during the day, you may be looking for something differ-
ent to prepare for them for lunch or for a light supper. Here Is
something with special appeal for kids, although I've found that
adults like it too. Serve with a citrus fruit salad, cole slaw and
some cookies and ice cream for dessert.
CHEESY MANICOTTI
12 manicotti
1 lb. cottage cheese
(creamed)
8 slices American cheese
(grated)
2 large eggs
2 pints of spaghetti sauce
6 slices whole American cheese
Cook manicotti noodles according to package directions. Cool
until easy to handle. Mix 1 lb. cottage cheese. 8 slices grated
American cheese and eggs. Stuff manicotti with this mixture.
Grease a 9 x 13 inch pan. Put one-half of the sauce into the pan.
Put manicotti in the sauce in a single layer. Pour rest of sauce
over it. Top with six slices of cheese. Bake at 400 degrees for
30 minutes. Serves 5-6.
ft ft ft
ft
ft
It's that hot weather season again when a cool, refreshing
touch is called for in planning meals. My mother-in-law has a
favorite and easy-to-make summertime recipe which she has
agreed to share with you. And since it involves spinach, we can
assume it's good for you too.
SPINACH BORSCHT
1 10-oz. pkg. frozen '- tblsp. salt
chopped spinach 2 pcs. of sour salt
3 scallions (bulbs and stems) Suaar
5 8-oz cups of water Sour cream (for garnish)
Cut scallions into small pieces. Add spinach and scallions to
the water and boil for 10 minutes. Add sour salt, salt and sugar
to taste. Boil about 5 minute-. When it coo'.s. refrigerate. Garnish
with sour cream when ready to serve. Keeps about a week.
Serve- 3.
ft ft ft *
This is another oi.e of those cook-it-today-and-put-it-awny-for-
another-dav tvpe of dishes, perfect for those times when you re-
turn home after a busy day ar.d don't want to start from scratcn.
It features the use of beer, for an unusual flavor.
BEEF STEW WITH BEER
2 lbs. chuck, cut in
1-inch cubes
14 cup flour
4 tblsps. oil
3 medium onions, sliced
2 tblsps tomato paste
1 can heer (12 OH 1
1 tbl-i). parsley flakes
1 bay leaf
]4 tsp. thyme
j cup green beans,
drained
Put flour and meat in a paper bag and shake. Brown the
onions, then the meat in oil. Put all the ingredients in a pot and
cover. Bring to a fast boil, then simmer for 2'2 hours. Serves 4.
Good over noodles or rice.



Pago 12
+Jewlsti FhridSaM and Sholar of Hollywood
Friday, August 30, 1974
Sound The Great Shofar For Our Freedom
unnnS ?rw -inua ran
On this day of remembrance
Let us recall great men and whole communities
Cruelly cut off and surviving only in the memory
of our people.
On this holy day of life
Let us call to mind the pain and the glory
Of the martyrsof our brothers and sisters who
kept the faith
On the summits of Carmel, Gilboa and Zion,
By the waters of Babylon, the plains of the Pyramids
The slopes of Beitar and Massada,
The ghettocs of Toledo, Kishinev, Warsaw
and Damascus,
The chimneys of Auschwitz and Bergen-Bclsen.
On this day, on Yom Kippur,
Let us remember the terror and the agony of
our own time:
The choice of this holiest of days for the
treacherous attack
Upon Israel;
Let us never forget
The smoke-swept battlefields of Sinai and Golan.
Of Israel's defenders whose courage, we trust and pray.
Has opened a new path '
Towards a better, more peaceful order of life.
On this holiest of days
Write our people of our homeland in the Book of
Life, O Lord,
And keep us united in ever-growing strength.
Gather your people in from the corners of the world
As a testimony to the eternal vitality of Your Covenant,
Which is the essence of our inheritance.
While remembering the dead.
Let us act for the living:
Let us build on the foundations of truth;
Caring, helping and sharing in every way.
Let us pass on our heritage
From generation to generation
When the Law shall go forth from Zion,
Teaching the nations to live in love.
Sound the great Shofar for our freedom
To mark the end of waiting
And the cessation of lamentation.
Grant us all, O Lord, a life of dignity and understanding
Among the peoples of the earth.
And inspire us with courage to do what has to be done.
Our task is one-
All Israel is one.
The spn-iul prayer above will be distributed bj oly Days. Copies are also available by phoning the
the Jewish Federation of South Browurd In the Federation nit in-.
prayer Looks in all synagogues during the High II
On this Day of Reckoning
Let us not lose sight of the final threat
To the renewed collective life of the Jewish people;
Let us keep alive in our hearts the heroism
and the sacrifice
Hollywood realtor Louis A
Charnow. a candidate for the
Democratic nomination for the
Uth District seat in the U.S.
Congress, has lived and worked
in Hollywood almost 28 years,
and has served as president ol
the Hollywood-South Broward
Board of Realtors and as vice
president of the Florida Associa-
tion of Realtors.
Charnow was a founder and
first president of Temple Beth
Shalom, which was organized in
1952. and served in that capacity
for three years. He later was re-
elected to the post for subse
quent terms.
A past president of Sunshine
Lodge, B'nai B'rith, and Brow-
ard Zionist District, he has been
active in the Jewish Welfare
Federation of Hollywood for
many years, and is a member of
the Hollywood Chamber of
Commerce.
A member of the Citizens Ad-
visory Board of the City of Hol-
h-wood, Charnow has always
been active in civic affairs, and
is most proud of his role in the
LOUIS CHAINOW
fight to retain a 1V4 mile stretch
of beach for the citizens of the
city, still to be decided by the
courts.
Stop Demanded
To 'Challah' Fraud
David J. Lehman, Jr., M.D.,
founder and president of the
Dangerous Substances Guidance
Center Inc., of Broward County
and "The Starting Place," has
announced his candidacy for the
District 97 seat in Florida's
House of Representatives.
Dr. Lehman has been practic-
ing in Hollywood since 1954 and
is a Diplomate, American Board
of Internal Medicine, and Asso-
ciate, American College of Phy-
sicians. He served as a Mayor
from 1941-46 in the U.S. Army
Medical corps and lost a son in
the Vietnam War.
Dr. Lehman's platform in-
cludes protection of condomini-
um and mobile home owners, and
he would support legislation aid-
ing the medically indigent, deal-
ing with drug pushers, reducing
overcrowding in public class-
rooms, and preserving pure
drinking water.
pines
\ Stair 1 Tall
Vl in Florida's
^^ Future!
By Special Report
ALBANY. N.Y. A call to
protect the kosher observant Jew
from being misled by the decep-
tive use of the label, "challah,"
on an egg-bread product was
made by Agudath Israel of Amer-
ica, at a hearing of the Depart-
ment of Agriculture and Markets
held here.
The New York State agency
was considering proposed new re-
quirement that a bread called
"challah" must conform with
Jewish religious law.
DR. BERNARD Fryshman,
vice chairman of the Commission
on Legislation and Civic Action
of Agudath Israel of America,
asked the Agriculture Depart-
ment to expand its proposed reg-
ulations on "challah" to include
not only a requirement for kosh-
er ingredients, but also the de-
mand that the preparation of the
challah," such as the baker's
utensils, must also conform with
Orthodox Jewish religious law.
In his testimony, which was
well received by the State offi-
Carol Masselli, assistant secretary-menager at Hollywood
Federal Savings & Loan Association, presents Warren Bru-
baker of 3401 North Country Club Dr., North Miami Beach,
with a certificate for a free, seven-day Caribbean cruise for
two aboard the Mardi Gras. plus a S500 cruise wardrobe
from Jordan Marsh celebrating the opening of Hollywood
Federal's new North Biscayne office at 201st Street and Bis-
cayne Boulevard.
Hollywood Realtor Candidate For Dr. David Lehman
12th District Congressional Seat Seeks House Seat
OT EBPEEB CLUA H KAHAAM
nPMBET EBPEflM CCCP
Mbl BAC HE 3AEb1JIM!
GREETINGS FROM
THE JEWS OF ISA AND CANADA
TO THE JEWS OF USSR.
WE HAVE NOT FORGOTTEN YOU!
Send New Year's Cards
To The Jews Of Russia
As a way of expressing a visible sign of support to Soviet
Jewry in their fight for freedom, the Soviet Jewry Committee
of Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood is now sell-
ing a selection of Jewish New Year's cards to be sent to Soviet
Jews.
The packet, which is $1.00. contains cards printed in Russian
and includes names and addresses of people to whom they should
be sent.
Let Russian Jews know they have not been forgotten. Buy a
packet of New Year's cards at the Federation office TODAY!
You'll feel good about your gesture.
SO WILL THEY!!!
?
cials, the Agudath Israel repre-
sentative expressed that regula-
tions on consumer-protection
against "challah fraud" must, to
be effective, also eliminate the
possibility of using utensils which
were also used for non-kosher
baking, which would automatical-
ly make the product non-kosher.
DR. FRYSHMAN warmly
praised the Department of Agri-
culture and Markets for its ef-
forts to protect the unwary con-
sumer from fraud, especially
when deceptive practice can
cause him to violate his basic
religious faith.
In a statement released after
the hearing. Agudath Israel of
America' declared that New York
State's recognition that the use
of a generic term such as "chal-
lah" implies that the product is
kosher even though the descrip- [
tive word "Kosher" does not ap-
pear on the label, is a major for-
ward step in protecting the
kosher-observant Jew from be-
ing deceived by misleading eth-
nic labels.
FIVE MAJOR PROBLEMS OF TODAY'S
HEBREW DAY SCHOOLS:
1. Overcrowded classes that deprive your child of individual attention.
2. Poor English curriculums which can hinder your child's ohm*, rrf
higher education. w UT
3. Weak spiritual guidance in the areas of Jewish identity and love for Israel.
4. Inexperienced teachers who cannot cope with your child's innate curiosity.
5' J23SE2J C0$tS ^ draln "^ Mmed vou need for
ONE SOLUTION:
1. YESHIVA DAY SCHOOL OF MIAMI.
990 IM.E. 171 St.
Tel. 651-0711


IV,
August 30. 1974
+Jenisl Fkridfiftri and Shofar of Holly-wood
Page 13
30 MINPLIN
\ychiatric Studies of Nixon to Proliferate
Continued from Page 4
pisojwlity io. intricate detail.
own concern here is for the
rican people.
xon]s poilllcal career span-
fnore than a quarter of a een-
and in all that time, during
lhat public exposure, they
to perceive these flaws in
SAID before that his twisted
Jny was more legible, his
instincts less manageable
those of other men in pub-
Ife.
Be would be hard put to dis-
Lish between the unspeakable
Jfses of Nixon and, say, Lyn-
Johnson.
y. Johnson lost control of
[If only toward the end. For
seaminess. Johnson's whole
er pointed in the direction of
Magisterial concern for hu-
jty. Whether it was political
kdiency or conviction that set
Ion that road hardly matters.
THE FACT is, he traveled it
until "t^r1 in the end,
when they perceived so quickly
that his humanity had become
something else entirely, a nasty
dictatorial nature, the American
people, with a startling unanimi-
ty of will, forced him to abandon
the notion of another term in
office.
Why, then, did the American
people opt for Richard Nixon?
u hy did they not perceive this
dictatorial nature in him? It was
not a sudden thing either, as it
had been with Johnson. It was
there from the beginning.
From the beginning, Nixon be-
held no opponents to debate
ideologically, only enemies to
compromise and destroy.
Nor was there the mitigating
humanity in him at an earlier
time in his career as there had
been in Johnson.
THE ISSUE is not that the
American people have been judg-
ed and found wanting in their
failure, from the beginning, to
know the real Richard Nixon.
The issue is that, instinctively,
they wanted in their president
the manic character he offered
them, which somehow they be-
held as a benevolent Big Brother.
They bubbled over him like Ger-
many did over Hitler.
AND THOSE who objected
loudly, myself among them, to
this loss in the people of their
political and social self-esteem
were pilloried brutally. They
were hit hard personally and pro-
fesionally. The Enemies List was
the SS transferred to the Poto-
mac.
Then why aid ttie American
people pursue their own debase
ment? Why did they celebrate
the man who debased them?
There c?n be no doubt that they
did. Even in the end it was not
the people who sent Nixon home.
It w,as,JJiie- Congress, for a change
acting against its own sense of
political expediency and the mis-
guided spirit of a nation that
would, from the beginning, have
preferred to forget the whole
thing.
Once, in his heyday, Nixon urg-
ed America to "kick that Com-
munist Congress and all of their
fellow-travelers in the teeth.''
TO REPEAT, why did the
American people celebrate him?
That is a question we'd better
answer and soon.
After the 1962 gubernatorial
campaign in California, Nixon
promised that "you won't have
Nixon to kick around anymore."
But in his farewell address the
other week. Nixon bid the nation
"au revoir." not good-bye. If we
fail to answer the question, like
MacArthur, he may make good
on his promise to return.
asser Wanted Private Print of 'Exodus''
iL AVIV Film director
Preminger disclosed here
l-he once sent the late Pvesi-
Gamal Abdel Nasser of
pt ;. print of his film "Exo-
for a private screening,
he film, which deals with
Its at the time of Israel's
in 1948, was banned
hout the Arab world, and
binger was black-listed.
it Nasser wanted a copy for
Civate screening. I sent him
btnei he thanked me for it,"
r.:nf;er said.
he director arrived in Israel
i. 14 to complete shooting of
[new actiun-suspense thriller
^ebud" which deals with kid-
I'injj. hijacking, refugees,
|b terrorists and Israeli intel-
he film stars Peter O'Toole
CIA .v.er.t. Another mem-
if the ca>'t is New York
Corner Mayor John V.
: -it
JTA liqreuu Threatened
LARK} -**-Th European Bu-
ll of the Jewish Telegraphic
ln>y was Uuoatened with "ex-
fion and execution" by a se-
right-win gorganization.
.Ir.iming to speak for
: ganizatloh, "Deliverance,"
JTA duty editor Reine Sil-
\. "sjogRBi explosions and ex-
11 ..-. The Jews out of the
Intry!"
|Vhen Ms. Silber told him to
eat t!;e message, he hung up.
JTA informed French se-
\ about the threat.
The "Deliverance" group, be-
to consist of neo-Nazis,
la.ed violent anti-Semitic sio-
a- m -Paris walls several
friths ago.
'> "fr &
Kisaiatex Ills Target
K-.'.V YORK Rabbi Meir
bane arrived here from Israel
said he was-going to organ-
'iemoiistrations against Sec-
|tary of State Henry A. Kis-
ser.
The for-mer leader of the Jew-
Deierise League was greeted
I about 100 supporters at Ken-
:iy Airport. He said the
lonstrations would take place
tside Kissinger's home and of-
in Washington duiing the
few (.seel.
| about time the myth of
Wry Kissinger as a savior U
tictureq." saTd' Kahane who
t active i.i demonstrations
|ains1 Soviet diplomats in
s. before lie moved to Israel
June, 1971.
Vie alleged that Kissinger's
->f peteirte with the Soviet
Nion weakened the U.S. and
lused the racriflce of i
-
behind the Iron Curtain."
-5
Sentenced To Death
LONDON The Bulgarian
High Court in Sofia has dis-
missed the appeal by Dr. Hein-
rich Spotter, the Bulgarian Jew-
ish economist, acainst the death
sentence imposed on him for
alleged espionage and has con-
firmed Dr. Spotter's conviction
and sentence.
The only way now to save the
life of the ^-year-old former
irian representative on the
Unite'1. Nations Industrial Devel-
opment Organization (UNIDO);
is through an appeal for clemen-
cy to To<:or- Zhivkov, the Bul-
garian head of state.
Dr. S; etter was sentenced to
death May 31 by the Sofia Dis-
trict Court following a trial
ista only four days. Only
his wife was admitted into the
courtroom.
Dr. Spetter was defended by a
distinguished Bulgarian lawyer,
secretary of the Lawyers' Guild,
and a member of the Communist
Party Velichko Ivanov. But the
District Court took little notice
of the defensc**a?torney's argu-
ments.
ir -it tr
Confident of Victory
JERUSALEM Beate Klars
feld told Hao^issah volunteers
and wounded soldiers at the
Hadassah Hospital here that she
is confident ot-winnmg her cam-
paign to have former Nazis pres-
ently immune in Germany de-
spite crimes against French
Jewry, brought to justice.
She said she found support
particularly among German
what is called the
"Klarsfeld Bill" legislation that
will cr.atic Me French govern-
ment to prosecute the criminals.
"I believe that women must
take more vigorous direct i>oliti-
ca! action for the causes in which
th< lelieve." Mrs. Klarsfeld
jat. r told members of the Hadas-
sah Council in Israel.
Black Nationalist Explains
JOHANNESBURG Zulu
leader Gatsha Buthelezi, Chief
Minister of the Kwazulu Legisla-
tive Assembly, explained the ob-
jects of Biack Nationalism in
South Africa to a large gathering
of Johannesburg Jews at Temple
Emariuel Hall here.
The meeting was arranged by
Johannesbuig's United Progres-
sive Jewish Congregation whose
Chief Minister, Rabbi Dr. Arthur
Super, introduced Buthelezi as
the man who more than any
other was the voice of the Black
community in South Africa.
Buthelezi said that South
Africa was unique in Africa in
that white people as well as
Black had "uecome indigenous
here. Each needed the other and
should work together for welfare
and progress.
He said Black nationalism had
taken much inspiration from
Jewish history in Biblical times.
fr ft *
Texans File Suit
SAN ANT1 INIO, Tex. A
federal court suit by 11 Jewish
delegates to the state Demoernt-
le onvent ion, asking the court
to enjoin opening of the conven-
tion on the fi'st day of the High
Holy Days, was supported here
in a friend of the court brief
filed by the southwest region of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. The state Republi-
can convention also is scheduled
to o[>en on Sept. 17.
The 250 Jewish delegates and
alternates to the Democratic
convention formally asked the
State Department executive com-
mittee to recess the convention
for two days but the committee
defeated a proposal for such
recess.
The suit declared that it was
unconstitutional for the Demo-
cratic Party to compel Jewish
delegates to choose between ig-
noring the Holy Day to attend or
to observe the Holy Day and
forego participation.
JWV Ladies To Attend
National Convention
Kvelvn L. Ferdie, president ol
the Department of Florida.
I^iiios Auxiliary of the Jewish
War Veterans, will lead a dele-
gation to the Jewish War Veter-
ans national convention to be
held at the Marriott Motor Hotel
In Philadelphia Oct. 17-25.
Past Department president
Irene Cooperman, of Auxiliary
No. 330. Miami Beach, will be a
candidate for national office.
Cathv Anderson
Demo Candidate
For Legislature
Cathlecn "Cathy" Anderson,
Democratic candidate for the
State Legislature, District,No.
97, is a native of Broward Coun-
ty1 presently employed by'-Bar-
nett Bank of Hollywood as as-
sistant cashier. Her husband,
Robert Anderson, a pioneer rev-
dent of Hollywood, is president
of the bank.
Cathy, a graduate of Pompano
Beach High School, attended
Broward Community College
and Broward Business College
(now Fort Lauderdale Univer-
sity). She served as president of
the Broward County Chapter,
American In-stitute of Banking
1969-1970, and was Broward
County Bankers' 1968 Woman of
the Year. She also served as
chairman of the Women's Com-
mittee, American Institute of
Banking from 1957 to 1967.
"My platform is very simple."
says Cathy. "I will listen to the
people of Broward County and
act in their behalf. I am con-
cerned about the deplorable
plight of our senior citizens ...
the problems of our youth .
and the problems of the average
taxpayer striving to pay taxes
and secure the necessities of
life."
The candidate, who says she is
concerned about corruption in
government, crime, the destruc-
tion of natural resources and
wildlife, misuse of land, crowded
conditions and over-population of
animals, has shown her concern
by working as a volunteer for
United Fund, March of Dime;:
Red Cross, Salvation Army and
Senior Citizens groups, served as
director of the Humane Society
of Broward County from 1971-
1973 and is founder and president
of Animal Birth Control for
Broward and American Cat So-
cieties.
A member of the Women's
Democratic Club of Brownrd
County, the National Wildlife
Federation. Humane Society of
the United States. American
Humane Society and Auduton
Society, she was honored for
meritorious humane service by
the Flotilla Federation of Hu-
:nane Societies in 1973.
h
PALMER'S ~ .
[MIAMI MONUMENT COMPANY/1
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
7empte 3etA 1
WemotlaC
gardens
The only all-Jc wish cemetcrv in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call:
920-8225 or write: r.-.r .:,.;i i
"TEMPLE BETH EL /?.*tVfe
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above.
NAME:_________________________
ADDRESS:
Price Increase Effective Jan. 1st, 1974
____ PHONE: __._____
PERSONALIZED MEMORIALS
CUSTOM CRAFTED
IN OUR WORKSHOP
444-0921 -444-0922
3279 S.W. 8th ST.. MIAMI
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
Jlem
Memorial Chapel
"JfWISH NJNt*Al DIPECrOftS"
#
LOCAL AND OUT OF STAT*
ARRANGEMENTS
947-2790
133B5 VV DIXIE HVVY.. N.M.


ASK YOUR
RABBI ABOUT US
JOHNSON-FOSTER
FUNERAL HOME, INC.
1650 HARRISON ST. HOLLYWOOD, FLA. PHONE: 922-7511
laul J. Houlihan, L.F.D.
fl
*
____


Page 14
+Jewlsti ileridttan <*** Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, August 30, 1974
New Power Struggle Divides Arab States Bar^^h
Continued from Page 1-
Several top leaders of the PLO
bluntly refused the Egyptian
dictate to make peace with the
Hashsmite monarch. thraatening
to fight back with So\ iet aid and
by enlisting support from other
Arab states.
The PI.O refusal threw the de-
licate in.ter-Arab balance into
turmoil. Gradually it turned out
that Syria. Kuwait. Tunisia and
others were taking negative at-
titudes to the Sadat-Hussein
agreement (backed by the
Saudis).
Syria refrained from direct at-
tacks on Egypt's moves tc cut
the wings of the PLO. But Pres-
ident Assad of Syria took the
lead in rejecting the demand for
the postponement of the Morocco
summit.
THIS WAS not a mere techni-
cal point, but a very important
part of the Egyptian plan. Sadat
wants to complete a Jordanian-
Palestinian compromise before
the summit.
If a summit convenes before
such compromise is reached, it
will mean an open split or even
a breakdown of his plan, because
a summit may easily be
railed tqre|f^irm the resf^itions
taken in November.* 1973, at the
Algiers summit, to ttie effect
that the PLO is the sole legiti-
mate representative of all Pales-
tinians, including those living un-
der Hussein's rule.
The controversy over the sta-
tus of the PLO and Hussein with
respect to the problem of Pales-
tinian representation no doubt
goes much deeper than that.
THE SYRIANS, for example,
are opting for a new war in the
near future. They realize that
they would not be able to get
further concessions from Israel
on the Golan Heights.
Therefore, they seek methods
to detonate the negotiations pro-
cess with the other Arab states.
Their support of the PLO is one
such method.
Their reliance upon Soviet
military aid unlike Egypt
Technion Studying
The Aging Process
By Special Report
HAIFA The answer to what
causes a living organism to grow
old and die is being sought by a
scientist at the Department of
Biology at the Technion Israel
Institute of Technology, and he
believes his results offer an ex-
planation.
Nearing the climax of years of
patient laboratory experimenta-
tion now being conducted in the
Horace W. Goldsmith Building at
Technion City, Prof. David Ger-
shon is confirming his hypothesis
that it is the programmed ac-
cumulation, with time, of faulty
protein molecules which form
enzymes in the living cell which
causes the cell to age and die.
PROF. GERSHON explained
that enzymes are the crucial
catalysts responsible for regulat-
ing the life of the cell such
processes as respiration, growth,
reproduction and the mainten-
ance of mechanisms which pro-
tect the cell from attack.
When eventually too many
faulty molecules build up in
these enzymes, the cell's proper,
Serve Sanka With
Your Honey Cake
Your ,, home made
honey ca serves the best-
tasting coffee you can find! So
this Rosh .".a-nanah make sure
you serve Sanka brand decaf-
feinated cot fee after holiday din-
ners and to c-sts who drop in
for "coffee an''."
If you've v. ner tasted it, you'll
be su:" at how smooth
Sanka t;; Vith 97 per cent
of the in removed from
Sanka. ; that ca. xxi coffee flavor
is re. o. No wonder
Sanka'. .1 largest selling
coffee i a!
Sui family and
friend ; rprisingly de-
licioi s iirand decaffe-
inatei :n.ig the holi-
days, ou use Freeze-
Driei. .or brew Reg-
ular the pot, they'll
r honey cake
more
is another. Syria's air force has
grown bigger than that of Egypt
throughout the last few months.
The rivalry between the Egyp-
tian-Jordanian-Sauui camps and
-tho Syi-**r.--P-Le*-Kvi*ait nes is,
of course, shaped along other
lines as well: how to exploit the
"oil weapon", what should the
Arabs do with their enormous
sums of dollars? the relationship
with the super powers, etc.
HOWEVER, there seems to be
an understanding not to let this
conflict develop beyond a certain
limit. Diplomatic and to some ex-
tent also propaganda confronta-
tion is acceptable. Direct politi-
cal clash to the verge of another
inter-Arab cold war is generally
regarded as a common night-
mare.
This is why one cannot con-
sider the present CTOupings and
realignments as fiozen or drift-
ing apart.
On the contrary: In spite of
the differences and the forma-
tion of informal blocs, efforts
are already underway to Unlit
the scope of the controversy and
seek, once again, "a solidarity of
on" through negotiations
and the ordinaryjjift&Sf *ve and
take.
IS SADAT the one who i< o
ing to do the taking" or will he
be compelled this time to make
some "giving"? If he "takes", it
means a Jordanian triumph over
the PLO. If he "gives" the vic-
tory will be Arafat's.
Israel watches this compli-
cated' game at close hand. But
watching is certainly not
enough. That is why the govern-
ment announced on July 21 its
readiness to start peace talks
with Jordan and reaffirmed its
refusal to sit with the PLO.
This declaration naturally add-
ed some strength to the Sadat-
Hussein agreement, but it could
not decide the outcome of the in-
ter-Arab haggling, now ap-
proaching its climax.
orderly functioning is impaired
and when this is simultaneously
happening in thousands (or mil-
lions) of cells in a living tissue,
then the tissue and in turn the
organ of which it is a part, can-
not perform its task and the liv-
ing being, whether a plant, ani-
mal or even a human being, be-
gins to show signs of deteriora-
tion, can no longer defend itself
from the stresses of its environ-
ment, and succumbs to disease
or injury and dies.
In 1970, the prestigious British
scientific journal, "Nature," pub-
lished Prof. Gershon's prelimin-
ary results which were the first
to show that it is the accumula-
tion of faulty protein molecules
which causes the malfunction of
enzymes in the cell.
HE THEN attacked the ques-
tion of whether this accumula-
tion is random or accidental, or
whether it is programmed as
an inevitable continuation or
consequence of the normal de-
velopment program of the or-
ganism dictated by its genetic
"instructions."
Prof Gershon's present tenta-
tive conclusions are that the pro-
cess is programmed and his cur-
rent work is being cai i ieu out to
prove this beyond go 1 t to the
scientific community
"Why are we doii: of this
work?" he asked. I answer
i sthat if we can fin I exactly
why aginj; occurs, t I lis sets
the stage for furthr ?rimen-
tation on ways to i the on-
set of aging in 01 ;, pos-
sibly humans, and > slow
down the rate of ; le ex-
plained.
"THIS IS why t [nstit Jte of
Child Health am i De-
velopment of the States
National Instil ealth
(NIH) is s .k fi-
nancially," ho
Prof. Ge : are
loin;' ca. i help
of an S i the
NIH and 1 10,000
Marks i -man
Science I
One c atric
researcl I r de-
laying the n all
levels of the that
people wo li and
would not fi
periods old
Community Calendar
TUESDAY. SEPT. 3
Beth El Sisterhood Board Meeting 9:30 a.m. Temple
Beth El.
Temple Beth Shalom Senior Friendship Club Meeting
Noon Temple Assembly Hall.
MONDAY, SEPT. 9
Temple Beth Shalom Sisterhood General Meeting 8:00
p.m. Temple Beth Shalom.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 10
Teinpie Beth El Sisterhood Buffet Lunoheon Meeting
11:30 a.m. Temple Beth L
Temple Beth Shalom Senior Friendship Club Meeting
Noon Temple Assembly Hall.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 12
B'nai B'rith Women for Hollywood, Chapter 725 Silver
Anniversary for Paid-up Members 8:00 p.m. Holi-
day Inn, Hollywood.
MARK SPENCER
Mark, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mel
Spencer, will be Bar Mitzvah,
Saturday, Aug. 31, at Temple
Sole!.
fr -ir .V
helen a: FOX
Heler.e. daughter of Mr. and'
Stanley Fox, will be Bat
Mitzvah, Saturday, Sept. 7, at
-olel.
*> ft ft
BRIAN PASTERNAK
Biian, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Leona:d Pasternak, will be Bar
Mitzvah, Saturday, Sept. 7, at
Temple Beth Shalom.
ft ft ft
HOWARD ROSNER
Howard, son of Dr. and Mrs.
Morris Rosner, will be Bar Mitz-
vah, Saturday, Sept. 7, at Temple
Beth Shalom.
ft ft ft
KEVIN 8HANMAN
Kevin Scott, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Neil Shanman, will be Bar
Mitzvah. Saturday, Sept. 7, at
Temple Beth El.
ft ft ft
MICHAEL LEVINE
Michael Robert, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Richard Levine. will be Bar
Mitzvah, Saturday, Sept. 14, at
Temple Beth El.
ft ft ft
SCOTT ROSS
Scott, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Emanuel Ross, will be Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday, Sept. 14, at
Temple Beth Shalom.
ft it ft
SHAWN OOk-DFARB
Shawn Craig. son of Mr. and
Mrs. Ronald Goldfarb. will be
Bar *;it;.va'i, Saturday. Sept. 14,
at Temple Solel.

WWWv AvWlHV'ft
i2 ELUL 7:22
CANDLELIGHTING TIMF
*... ,,.,...
Hollywood Federal Promotes
J. Primeau, M. J. Campbell
John G. Primeau has been ad-
vanced to vice-president and all-
branch operations manager of
Hollywood Federal Savings and
Loan Association, James M.
Blanz, president, announced.
Maurice J. Campbell moves up
to vice-president and manager of
the Davie office, the position for-
merly held by Primeau, who
joined Hollywood Federal in 1962
and previously was with the
Manufacturers National Bank of
Detroit.
Services
HALIANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
(Conservative). 416 NE 8th Ave
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz, Catntoi
Jacob Oanziger.
NORTH Ml/Ml BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22m: Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Klngsley, Cantor Irving
Shulkea. 37
NORTH BR0WARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. Liberal. 3501 Univer-
sity Dr. Rabbi Max weitz. 44
HOLLYWOOD
VOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
(Orthodox!. 3891 Sterling Rd., op-
posite Ho.lywood Hills High School.
President Dr. Frank Stein.
Saturday. !) a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) Ittl :
14th Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi Samu-i
Jaffe. Assistant Rabbi Harvey M.
Rosenfeld.
BETH SHALOM (Tempte) Conasrva
tlve. 4401 Arthur fi'. Rabbi Mortor
Melavsky. Cantor irvinn Gold.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (Conservative)
310 SW 62nd Ave., Hollywood.
TEMPLE SOLE! (Liberal) VOI
Thomas St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Rob-
ert Frazin.
TEMPLE SiNAI (Conservat. /) )1
^n"'"" S Pabhi Dsvld 8*,
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield.
Cantor Ye:.uaa Heilfaraun
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Conaarv i
6920 SW 3Sth St. Raooi A,
Drazin.
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES (Consrrvs.
tive) Pines Middle School, 200 No
Douglas Rd., Pembroke Pines
Rabbi Aaron Sh^pero.
YOUNG ISRAEL of HOLLYWOOD
announces
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
to be held in
EMERALD HILLS COUNTRY CLUB
Rosh Hashanna Sept. 17 & 18
Kol Nidre Sept. 25
Yom Kippur Sept. 26
For Information Call
962-1540 962-3728 981-3128
=11
^CMNLV
lWENII*.
FREE DEMONSTRATION
W ipeoalue laclutively ,n p#f
mon*nf hoir removal
SPECIAL
INTRODUCTORY
OFFER
00 PER
1 TREATMENT
ELECTROLYSIS, INC.
5603 Hollywood Blvd. 987-5559 f
MON thru FRI. 10 A.M../ P.M. SAT. 10 A.M. 2 P.MI
! DRIVING A GASH
j BURNING UP M0NI
1%-^V. .:
CALL 921-2
The Gas Mileage and f>erfo
HaVWiiMTranSnT?.
Automobiles Campers Trucks.^ Vans
'! '< .<-
' --K


Friday, August 30. 1974 +Jeist> fhridUan and Shotar of Hollywood Pago IS__f
i iim ii iignu
Basketball Sneaks
Up on Soccer
Tel Aviv
JF SOCCER doesn't watch out,
it's going to become the num-
ber two sport here. Basketball is
' making rapid strides and the na-
tional league is drawing as many
as nine to ten-thousand people to
some of its key games.
1 was startled to see 9.000-plus
at the Maccabi-Tel Aviv-Maccabi
Ramat Can contest. The Tel Aviv-
five, serving as the host team,
was only prepared for a crowd
of 5 090 fans, and it was caught
short with the number of turn-
I'stlle operator* available for the
flow of traffic which ensued.
IN PAST years, I've always
managed to park my car within
a radius of a block or two of
the Yad Eliyahu Stadium, but for
thi~ particular game, we parked
on a street at least three-fourths
[of a mile removed from the play
[ing site.
Ten days later, the Maccabi-
Tel Aviv organization was better
areaared with help in its game
igainst Hapoel-Tel Aviv. There
little question but that Mac-
cabi-Tel Aviv is the powerhouse
f the league.
AGAINST RAMAT Gan they
chipped the visitors by over 30
aints. However, it was clearly
lemonstrated that Larry Gordon
\l.Ramat Gan i far and away the
est player in Israel today.
Larry is a former All-Ivy
Leaguer from Columbia, who, up-
^n reaching the Holy Land. rc?is-
ered as a temporary resident
lather than as a citizen.
^Consequently, it is difficult to
avenim play on the national
tarn. Moves are being effected
[hereby Gordon will become a
Itizen and serve in the army,
hereby becoming eligible for in-
krnational competition with Is-
kel.
I The 40th Annual Passover In-
motional Tennis Championship
suited in Israel's top racquet
in. Yehoshua Shalem. taking
ht prize of $1,000 bv tenting
|t American Larry Parker. 7-6.
5-4, 1-6 and 6-3 in a hair-
|s:ng final.
\RKER, who hail! from
>u;ton. Texas and is playing
his third Pasver Tourna-
pr.t, collected $400 in prize
>ney.
twelve years ago, Elazar
Ividman whioned Australia"]
v\ HiUebrand. and that was
before the days of prize
Ir.py tennis. The women's
Icles crown went to New Zea
|<'."T. Judy Connor. The tour-
.nt was marred bv several
r> days, which took the edge
some of the participants
flNAI. ARRANGEMENTS have
\n made by the United States
hmittee Sports for Israel, in
Uun-tion with the U.S. Soc-
Football Association, to host
Israel national soccer '
in September and early Oct)
Richt after the Asian game'
Tehran the soccer team w'll
Irn to Israel for V ish
hona. after which it I
tntos where the bovi
D'av in the U.S. Ail Star 11
pur cities.
(irly in July the Israel age
9rd under soccei
cipated in an International
it at Hnrtwick College where
|bs from 11 countries ok-
ged boots.
|>UNTRIES EXPECTED to
[hoop squads included Cana-
Belglum. West Germany,
lerland, Holland. Hong Kong
Brazil. The United States
^.ittee Sports for Israel ar-
id for an American college
[to be included in the corn-
Son.
__
Novels to Please and Displease |
JLfflLLIONS of people bought "Portnoy's Com-
plaint," and many more heard of the book
thanks to publicity and rabbinic sermons. Philip
Roth's defamation of Jewish mothers and his
pseudo-autohiographical endless discussions of
the psychiatrist's couch and acts of lectual com-
bat brought him a fortune.
THERE ARE some who claim that he has
risen from the bed and couch to new heights of
literary brilliance.
His latest book reveals that he is still on
the couch and in bed. His "literary" vocabulary
is peppered with a proliferation of four-letter
words. The choice of the name. "Tarnapol," for
his protagonist, will remind some of Galitzianers,
since Tarnapol is a city in Austrian Galicia.
That is about the only thing Jewish in the
book although, for reasons I cannot fathom, Tar-
napol is characterized as a Jew.
Sex and the psychiatric couch appear to
be Roth's hangups. We bid "Goodby" to his "My
Life as a Man" 'N'cw York, Holt, Rinehart and
Winston, $8.95, 330 pages'.
DAIIX BEN Amotz is a European-born Is-
raeli whose book, "To Remember. To Forget"
(Philadelphia, Jewish Publication Society, $7.95,
399 pages i. translated from the Hebrew by Zeva
Shapiro, deserves to be a best-seller.
Here is an unusually talented author. He
weaves a rale with pathos, humor, and lov.
Amotz' novel concerns the trip of Uri Lam
from Israel to Germany in 1959 to secure re-
paration payments for the death of his parents
in a concentration camp and the loss of their
property.
This is incidental to the story of Uri himself,
who falls in love with and marries a German
Christian girl.
The u?e of flashbacks are reminiscent of
James Joyce's stream of consciousness, Uri's ru-
minations are occasionally Kafkaesque. and the
plot and narration are worthy of O'Henry.
THE TENDERNESS and affection between
Uri and Barbara are as poignant as some of the
scenes in the film, "Love Story."
The author has created people of culture,
erudition and passion. Nothing is contrived. The
same four-letter words that one finds offensive
and vulgar when spewed forth by Roth are, in
Amotz' book, natural and unobtrusive.
CHAYYIM ZELDIS' "Golgotha" (New York.
Avon, $1.25 222 pages) will offend devout
Christians because it is a novel of passion and
violence. Jesus is one of the participants in the
passion, and the Romans play the heavies with
their acts of barbaric violence.
The picture drawn of Jesus' disciples depicts
them as seamy individuals. The writing and
style are abominable.
.t-ii inif i

h^abbi t^amuel t^ffi
ver
Ecumenics Must Make Atonement
IN HER yellow pants suit the attractive woman
at the rostrum might have been an actress. But
she was a Christian theologian, publicly admitting
that much of the Jew-hatred in the world, in-
cluding Nazism, stemmed directly from the New
Testament.
That theme was reiterated frequently in a
remarkable conference staged recently on the
premises of one of the most majestic edifices in
the world, the Episcopal Cathedral on Amsterdam
Avenue in New York City.
FOR FOUR days learned scholars pondered
how the world could have permitted an Ausch-
witz. They also tackled the problem of how to
avoid another.
JEWISH savants, such as Rabbi Irving
Greenberg, Rabbi Emil Fackenheim, Elie
Weise), Rabbi Marc Tannenbaum. Rabbi Balfour
Brickr.er and others, also took part in the un-
usual series of seminars.
The most astonishing part of t'.ie gathering,
convoked by the ADL, the American Jewish
Committee, the Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations and the Cathedral's officials, Bishop
Paul Moore and Canon William Johnson, and a
cluster of Christian groups, was the confession
that Christianity itself has engendered xeno-
phobia.
THE CHRISTIANS freely admitted that the
New Testament often indulges in anti-Semitism,
that the Pharisees (who were the gentlest and
most earnest of men) have been unfairly stig-
matized, that Christians must atone for the blood-
shed they incited and ignored.
The subtitle of the convocation was "the
Beginning of a New Era."
If ecumenics can move men towards ron-
fessing their guilt then a new epoch of frater-
nalism may indeed be discernible through the
long, dark tunnel of misunderstanding.
-lit'J-ui HBSMI.........OHM !'. MM MMHUM
BSSSSeMSSBSMMSi I...... n<
Allon in the Place of Abba Eban
AMONG THE more striking changes in the Is-
rael Cabinet is the replacement of Abba
Eban by Yigil Allon as Foreign Minister. It will
not ho easy for Allon to create an image which
can compare with that of the eloquent orator
and intellectual whom he succeeds. The Indica-
tions are that Allon is seeking to change the
thrust of Foreign Ministry ai tivity completely.
For one thing, there will he less emphasis
on the personality of the man at th too. Al'on
will seek to operate by grand scale strategy and
by dramatic tatties.
WHEREAS EDAN was the formal diplomat,
always conformity to proper protocol in the usual
sense. Allon will utilize the kind of tactics in
diplomacy which gave the Israel armed forces
their once vaunted reputation by doing the un-
usual and tlie unexpected.
It is still not clear how much freedom of
action Allon Will have. Traditionally, the For-
eign Minister is not an independent agent.
He must accept the line determined by the
government as a whole, and it is usually the
Prime Minister who shapes the policies.
Abba Eban frequently found himself in a
difficult position when Golda Meir conducted
foreign affairs from her office and at ths
e i.'iie the Ambassador in Washington (then
Yitzhak Rabin) was not always as stihject to min-
i.-try control as Eban would have liked.
IT IS NO secret that the conflict created at
that time is responsible for Rabin's dropping
Eban when the former ambassador became Pre-
mier.
Alton's beginnings are affected bv two nega
live factors. Fir-*, he let it be known that he
wanted the position badly.
IN THE second place, he eomml ted a public
relal nu blunder last month. When annou
i" of Amerii i's offer to -anoly
b nucta t power plants Israel's reaction
was one of -hock and disappointment. Yet Allon
hastened to reassure his countrymen that th
was realty nothing to be disturbed -.bout. The
public Id it, in i he ha i I ack.
In his now office M'on inherits a highly
devrhped information program, set up by Eban,
and after some delays, now operating at high
gear. It is most impressive both in volume and
in content, though volume alone is not always an
assurance of quality.
Single Parent
Family Needs
>
Are Studied

A GROUP of Jewish agencies
se.ving northern Chicago
have joined efforts to provide
the wide range of services need-
ed by the growing number of
single parent families.
The inter-agi'ncy social service
project was described by Marvin
Bienstock, director of the Rogers
Park Jewish Community Center,
one of the participating agencies
during a two-day conclave on the
problem sponsored by the Na-
tional Jewish Welfare Board In
New York Hits-.
THE PARTICIPATING agen-
cies are the Jewish Family an!
Community Service, the Bernard
Horwich. Rogers Park and Henry
Hart Jewish Community Centers,
the Jewish Vocational Service,
the Virginia Frank Child Devel-
opment Center, the senior adult
department of the Jewish Com-
munity Centers of Chicago, the
Council for the Jewish Elderly,
the Ark and the Jewish Chil-
dren's Bureau. Bienstock said.
He noted that while there are
many resources for marital coun-
seling, when a couple decides to
end a marriage, the husband,
wife and children "often feel
there are no places to turn to
for help.
"THEY FLOUNDER through
legal, social and emotional crises
until they start to swim or until
they sink."
He reported there was a com-
. mon group of crises generally
affecting such families in dis-
solution. There is "the personal
traumas of failure, rejection,
anger or being totally over-
whelmed."
The family members also mast
deal with legal complications and
the attitudes of parents, friends
and relatives. The wife must
think about how she will support
herself
EITHER OR both parents
worry about the chPdren "who
typically have adjustment prob-
lems of their own."
He added that "new life styles
ar introduced for each family
member and with these come
concerns about serial competence
and acceptability."
He said that because problems
often involve religious issues,
rabbinic counseling was being de-
veloped for the program.
BECAUSE NO one agency
touches on all the problems, the
individual often Is prevented
from getting all the help he or
sh* really needs. Bienstock said.
Bv oo;r the agencies cooperating on the
fhiea r<) pr tiect "have made it
!)!c for individuals, couples
nr families to 20 to any one of
?he social work agencies and,
in t!i:!t co-tact, be heloei
11 get all th" needed assistance
: positive and supportive
he reported.
He cited as an examole the
,i; in ;' process of getting
a divorce who calls a Jewish
r abou' after-fehool pro-
' >r her chi! -e she
n- now go to work.
She is aska about other pos-
ling vocational
counseVne. legal services, family
competing, her social needs and
related problems
IF THERE i- an area in which
one of the other Participating
aeencies can help, he declared,
the center worker will provide a
name and number for the woman
to call and then pave the way
with a preparatory call.


Page 16
*UtaNtal fk>rictir>r ,nd Shof.r of HoUywood
Friday, August 30. 1974
Israel to Reject Jordan Fullback
..... .._.____. ,_ r..u _,., .un.iiH nersevere in its ated the Amen
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel
has rejected and will reject the
Jordanian demand for an Israeli
withdrawal from the Jordan Riv-
er as part of what Jordan terms
"disengagement of forces."
Reference to this subject in
the statement by President Ford
and King Hussein does not alter
Israel's stand.
THIS WAS stated Tuesday
night by the Foreign Ministry in
reaction to the President Ford
King Hussein statement in Wash-
ington.
In reply to questions by re-
porters on Israel's reaction to the
joint statement by the U.S. Pres-
ident and the Jordanian King
published Sunday in Washington,
the Foreign Ministry spokesman
said:
"THE GOVERNMENT of Is-
rael welcomes the declaration of
the U.S. President that his gov-
ernment would persevere in its
efforts for the attainment of a
just and durable peace in our re
gion. The President also em-
phasized the continuity of the
American foreign policy on this
subject, as on others."
The Fore;/n Ministry spokes-
man noted that in the joint state-
ment published in Jerusalem at
the conclusion of his visit in Is-
rael. President Nixon had reiter-
ated the American commitments
in respect of Israel's security and
her right to exist within secure
borders.
'THE GOVERNMENT of Is-
rael is prepared, as it has re-
peatedly declared, to strive for a
peace settlement with Jordan.
"Israel, however, has rejected
and will reject the Jordanian de-
mand for an Israeli withdrawal
from the Jordan River asJ>art of
what Jordan terms disengage.
ment of forces.
"Reference to this subject in
the statement by President Ford
and King Hussein does not alter
Israel's stand."
Beth El Vesper Services
Temple Beth El Sabbath Ves-
per services will be at 8:15 p.m.
Friday. Rabbi Rosenfeld will de-
liver a sermon on "That Rebel-
lious Son: Flexibility In Jewish
Tradition." Memorial prayers
will be recited at the conclusion.
VOTE FOR
CHARLES FRIEDMAN
DEMOCRAT
U. S. CONGRESS (SEPT. 10)


WE URGE YOUR SUPPORT
HE CARES ABOUT YOU
PETER A. KELLER
ROBERT J. BLANK
MORTON BALICK
MICHAEL RUSH, D.P.M
MEL BAER
JOSEPH M HOPEN
DR. FREDERICK BLUMENTHAL
ROSS P. BECKERMAN
STANLEY M. BECKERMAN
SHELDON WILLENS, D.P.M.
ALBERT J. KELLERT, M.D.
MELVIN H. BAER
MORTON S. LEVIN
JOEL D. SCHRAM, MD.
SAMUa M. MELINE, D.M.D.
DONALD S. ABELSEN
LEE EGGNATZ
HARVEY PERETZ, D.D.S.
SAUL NITZBERG, M.D.
PAUL RODENSKY, M.D.
LOUIS R. JOBLOVE, D.D.S.
JAMES FOX MILLER
STANLEY P. KESSEL, D.D.S.
DONALD BERMAN, M.D.
NORMAN ATKIN, MD.
SEYMOUR MANN
ANSEL A. WITTENSTEIN
ALVIN L. KRASNE, D.D.S.
JACK I. LEVY
ROBERT W. GORDON
SAMUEL FINKELSTEIN
ABRAHAM B. HALPERN
ROBERT M. BAER
BOB MAY
ABE DURBIN

Paid Political Adv. by Charlie Friedman Campaign Fur
I


Full Text
Friday. August 30. 1974
* ffnitt Fh rinlikttn and Shosar of Hollywood
Page 5
Hollywood Physician's Book
On 'Masada' Published Here
By RITA GOODMAN
Dr. Donald Berman, a Holly-
wood physician whose family
dates their local origin back 40
years and whose grandfather
was a founding member of
Temple Beth Shalom, recently
:-hed a book entitled, "Ma-
sa.la."
WHEN ASKED why a success-
| rofessional man would be-
:in author of subject mat-
: verse from that profession,
the doctor appears to sit quietly
reflecting upon his boyhood.
"My feeling is that more
stories of this nature should l>e
brought to the attention of Jew-
mth rather than repetition
of the same stories in Hebrew
schools," he responds.
"I was never told of Masada
and so many other interesting
episodes in our history other
than histories of holidays," he
adds.
Dr. Berman, who is a former
Vice president and present board
member of Temple Sinai and also
a former cochairman of the Pro-
fessional Division of JWF Cam-
paign, did all the necessary prep-
arations for a career as a phy-
sician before his book edged its
way into his life.
A GRADUATE of Miami
Beach Senior High School, he re-
Celved his Bachelor of Science at
the University of Miami where
he graduated Cum Laude and
then went on to Tulane for his
Doctor of Medicine.
From there, he became a
U.S. Army Captain serving at
MS. Army Captain serving at
both Walter Reed Hospital in
Washington and Ft. Benning,
Ga., where he was Division Sur-
geon with the Second Infantry.
Along the way, he also ac-
quired a lovely wife named Lee,
and three children: Lynn, Maria
and Jill.
After four service years, he re-
turned to Hollywood to set up
private practice.
It was in 1967 that Dr. Ber-
man first became aware of Ma-
sada by reading Yigal Yadin's
in, KOSHER
fCftoum
HOTEL
C..l.leI, M, CeaeiHeari
Miami Beach's
Number ONE
KOSHER HOTEL
FIRST in Service
FIRST in Hospitality
FIRST in Entertainment
$

Enjoy The
HIGH HOLY DAYS
With The BESKOWITZ FAMILY
Traditional Holiday
Services Conducted
on Premises
By tho Renowned
Cantor LEIB RASKIN
Serving
GLATT KOSHER CUISINE
Maihgiach on Premises
3 Meals Served on
Sabbath and Holidays
TV in AH Rooms
Private Beach Pool
RESERVE NOW
For R.r,.bom CALL
1-538-9045
.
Your Hast
Th BEJtKOWITT
ILY
OCEAN AT 41st ST.. MIAMI BEACH
M. DOMALD BfKtoAN
book on excavations at that his-
toric place.
HE'D NEVER before heard of
it!
Now he explains, "I've always
had a more than average interest
in biblical history. After I read
Yadin's book, I began to read of
Masada as a hobby."
He went on to read 19 such
books and had never, at that
time, set foot on Israeli soil.
After the '67 War had taken
place, the doctor found time
from his busy practice to take
Lee's hand and go together.
He explains, "Then, it wasn't
like today. You had to take a
land lorry over dirt roads from
Arad to Masada, then climb the
old Roman ramp."
QUESTIONED about his emo-
tions of finally" being there, he
sighs, "It overwhelmed me to see
where it was located and to wit-
ness the magnitude of the task
that faced the attackers of that
type in a wilderness."
Dr. Berman looks at you and
says, "There's so many things
that go through your head when
you really know the story."
When Dr. Berman returned to
his practice in Hollywood, part
oi his heart remained at Masada.
HE STARTED his book.
Then, from demands upon his
time, it had to be put aside.
However, in 1972, a "bashert"
kind of thing occurred in Dr.
Berman's life. An Israeli physi-
cian needed a vacation.
The Hollywood physician
(complete with wife and three
Once Again
The
Renowned Cantor
JACOB
JEROSOLOMSKI
Will Officiate at the
w
HIGH HOLY DAYS
etthe
Located on me Ocean v-"^
at 21ft St.. Miami Beach
PLANNED ENTERTAINMENT
FREE PARKING
FREE CHAISE LOUNGES
Reserve for Synagogue
Services & Holiday Meais
Finest KOSHER cunint served
ill out Oceanfront dinirtf room
Ueder (5) Suaervwon
i Mnh Served m
"WWIti en nCiNHafS
B.KEWVE NOW
All
Far Raiarvatianl Call
538-6631
or 531-1744
MURRAY ENGEL
Gen. Manager
children) travelled there to spell
him for five weeks.
The Berman family lived in
Nahariya, seven kilometers south
of the Lebanon coast, where the
Doctor attended to the needs of
the people of five villages.
They met many Israeli fam-
ilies, were invited to their homes
and travelled to archaelogical
sites when time permitted.
One day, the Bermans spent
several hours with a Greek who
had a dig underway on the road
between Akko and Safed (A
Roman bath was being uncov-
ered.)
IT WAS AFTER this second
trip, "When my children became
impressed with the spirit of Ma-
sada," that Dr. Berman returned
to the writing of his book.
It required additional research
and took four months to com-
plete.
Now that his published work is
a reality, the doctor reflects up- I
on the drive which made him do !
it. "I think I wanted more people j
to know about this episode in
Jewish history. There has been
so much dwelling on the pas-;
sivity of Jewish martyrs that I
thought people should be made
aware of a spirit of aggressive-
ness in self defense.
i
"Today, Israelis are aggres-
sive and true Sabras," he says
with fervor.
It is interesting to note that
Dr. Berman's book, "Masada",
bears a copyright date of 1973.
He planned it that way. To com-
memorate the falling of Masada
to the Romans in the year 73.
His way of saying, "I shall not j
forget."
(Dr. Berman is available for
local speaking engagements.)
Caribbean
Jews Map
Curacao Meet
Continued frorV Page 1
THERE WILL be a number, of
separate meetings with Jewish
teachers from the various islands
to discuss with them their spe-
cial requirements.
The Jewish population of the
Caribbean is about 5,000, the
largest communities being those
of Puerto Rico, Curacao, Jamaica
and Surinam.
At the annual meeting held recently by the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward, Mrs. Marcia Tobin was installed as
president of the Women's Division. Incoming Federation
president Herbert D. Katz administered the oath of office.
m
ELECT
CATHLEEN "CATHi
ANDERSON
State Representative-District 91
Democrat
It is rare to find someone with Mrs. Anderson's
background and dedication tcho is willing to
run for public office purely for the opportunity
of serving people of Broward County.
Your support and vote for Mrs. Anderson will
be greatly appreciated by all of my associates
and by me.
Sincerely
(Signed) Harry M. Permesly, M.D.
i.
Pd. Pol.


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E3A5MEMEU_ENCLFU INGEST_TIME 2013-05-24T23:12:08Z PACKAGE AA00014307_00100
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


Page A
*Jm9&fhtimar> md ***** 1 Hnywood
Friday, August 30, 1974
Ford Makes Changes
IT IS already clear that there are changes afoot in
Washington. Hardly has President Ford had the opportuni-
ty to adjust himself to the demands of his new office than
he assured the nation that foreign policy,, in Harry Tru-
mans words, "is a continuing thing."
This meant ther^would be no immediate change or_
even long-term" alteration of"'the course in foreign affairs
set by President Nixon and Secretary of State Dr. Henry
Kissinger.
BUT ODDS are that the U.S. decision to keep hands
off the Cyprus situation was not really Dr. Kissinger's,
although that is what we are meant to believe.
Odds are that it was President's Ford's. The guestion
is whether President Nixon would have made the same de-
cision.
The fact is that a hands-off policy in the struggle be-
tween Greece and Turkey was tantamount to support of
Turkey's aggression against the Mediterranean island
state.
DID PRESIDENT Ford's baptism under fire leave him
unequipped to act more decisively?
Or did he act decisively that is to say, did he
deliberately choose to stand off as part of a new direction
in U.S. foreign affairs?
The attack on the American embassy in Nicosia on
Monday, in which Ambassador Roger Davies was killed,
demonstrates how important the answer to that question
is at this time.
And how important it may be to a general evaluation
of our stance in the Mediterranean and the Middle East
during the years ahead.
He Will Govern-Not Rule
CERTAINLY, on the domestic front. President Ford has
shown a forthright determination to gain control of a
chaotic American economy that went from bad to worse
in the waning days of the Nixon administration.
At least, the President has shown by his words that
this is what he intends to do.
Coupled with the relief that the agony of the Water-
gate investigation is over so far as the nation is concerned,
if not for Mr. Nixon himself. President Ford is the recipient
these days of everyone's wholehearted support.
WE JOIN in offering our own hope that wounds may
now begin to heal, that President Ford will govern, not rule,
and that his governing process will be open,, accessible
to all for observation and amenable to modification if need
be by public debate.
From the beginning, President Ford put it well: There
will be no more enemies, only adversaries.
Bearing the Burden Alone
THE DEPARTURE of Richard Nixon is a personal trage-
dy he must come to grips with alone.
We shall not easily forget his continuing support of
Israel during Israel's darkest hour.
When Israel stood alone in the world against two in-
vading Arab armies and troops from numerous other Arab
nations supporting them, it was Richard Nixon who single-
handedly turned the military might of the U.S. into the
desperate hands of the beleaguered Israelis.
That is a part of Mr. Nixon's foreign policy stance that
will stand him in good stead in the pages of history.
IN ADDITION to giving Israel the wherewithal to save
herself, it mitigated an Arab arrogance that even now is
intolerable at the gas tank, in the banks of the western
world, and in American investment enterprises that has
yet to be felt.
Still, there can be no flinching from the quality of his
statesmanship that undid him. That is what the Congress
acted against during those five critical days in early
August, and it is essential that we understand this.
Whatever his positive achievements in the presidency,
the burden he now bears in his isolation at San Ctemente
is one that he shouldered himself.
No one can help him carry it not even those who
are grateful to him for some of the other things that he did.
An Exquisite Gentleman
THE DEATH of Mayor Chuck Hall saddens us. Mr. Hall
was a South Florida fixture.
One did not think of him as a politician with partisan
interests. In a world of people constantly struggling "to
get ahead," Mr. Hall stood serenely, the exquisit gentle-
man, an almost old-fashioned symbol of some bygone era
when it was possible to live the good and gracious.life.
THIS SPIRIT, he shared with everyone around him.
The style of his life was such that he suggested there
was nothing old-fashioned in it, and South Floridians re-
sponded to him in such a way as to demonstrate that virtue
and selflessness are always qualities to be admired.
That they are always qualities that can inspire a com-
munity.
Chuck Hall, gentleman, is gone. We mourn his pass-
ing.
Studies of Nixon to Proliferate
npilE BRUCE Maizlish psychi?-
1 trie study of Richard NMD
will be making increasingly im-
portant reading ..uring the days
ahead.
In hfr%ti*f.-*h *farvlr*)-p*o*
fessor performs some long-dis
tance analysis of Nixon, including
the years Nixon was in treatment
with Dr. Arnold Hutchnecker.
THE STU>Y first came to the
fore in the aftermath of the furor
over the dumping of Sen. Tom
Eaglcton in the 1972 presidential
campaign when the Democrats
"discovered" that Eagleton had
been hospitalized on several oc
casions for emotional reasons.
No one cared about the Maiz-
lish revelations then. The study
made about as much impact on
the campaign as Watergate itself.
Now that Nixon has gone
home, the study will surely come
into its own on a tide of many
other such studies undoubtedly
""'I
fjgj-^jS^-^XSBMSCSn
Mindlm
;:-; -..:l
I.:""""':. I
being written at this very mo-
ment.
LET THERE be no flinching
from the fact that many careful
observers of the Nixon personal
ity could, and did. predict the
course his political career would
take.
The thumbprint of his twisted
destiny was there to be read more
clearly than the prints of most
what
TWECARRPTAWOTHE STICK
4
other public fifuros whi jjke ..
dinary run-oPthe-mUl. <.,:
manage fairly successfully to eon
tain (and conceal) their baser
instincts.* wr
H.tta*i#the M>tai them.
preme irony about Nixon. Char?
ed with concealment, he could
neither contain nor conceal these
instincts with any degree of suc.
cess at all. The tapes, his mania
for recording his own downfall
are a clear example of this '
AND THAT was the point of
the Maizlish study, which demon-
strated that Nixon's profound
emotional problems brought to
high public office must end in
disaster for himself if not for
the nation.
Who will ever forcot Nixon's
painful, irrelevant rambling? iD
his farewell address?
Hi? statement that
America needs today are
plumb* s";
His assurance that not a sin.
gle mvmher of his inner circle
had been financially enriched by
the experience.
FORGET HIS obsession with
death the deaths oi his bro.
thers. Teddy Roosevelt's young
wife, his mother and father all
of this, Nixon's vision of his own
death and a surrogate for brutal
self-punishment
The reference to "plumbers"
and the assurance that no one
had been personally enriched by
serving in his administration are
more than examples of Nixon's
failure to be able to perceive the
ironic moment, as most commen-
tators would have it .
They are more likely flights
from a reality that has always
been too painful for him in the
same way that his self-punishing
ramblings about death in his
farewell saved him from the
need to look at the tormented
faces of those living people sur-
rounding him on camera he had
so cruelly betrayed his wife
and daughters.
THE SPATE of Matehsh-tyje
i.ojks we can expect in the fu-
ture will clearly deal with these
and uther facets of Nixon s flaw-
Continued on Page 13

THEATRE OF ABSURD
Spotlight on Moscow 'Justice'
By TOVA KAMINS
NEW YORK (JTA) A
crowd of lunch-iime onlookers In
front of the New York Public
Library on Fifth Avenue witness-
ed a "theater of the absurd" this
week.
It was a surrealist dramalizi-
tion of "justice" in the Soviet
Union performed by seven pro-
fessional New York stage ac-
tresses to call public attention to
a "complete mockery of justice"
taking place at that hour in Mos-
cow where the trial of Victor
Polsky was scheduled to bejjin.
HOWEVER, IN Moscow, the
trial of Polsky was postponed
without any explanation, accord-
ing to the National Conference
on Soviet Jewry. Polsky, a noted
Jewish physicist, and a dissident
and activist, has been charged
with "reckless driving."
Kings County District Attorney
Eugene Gold, chairman of th3
Greater New York Conference on
Soviet Jewry, the group that
sponsored the demonstration, saw
the pending Moscow trial as
nothing less than a cruel form of
harassment of Polsky for apply-
ing for a visa to emigrate to Is-
rael.
"The Polsky case is the first
in a new series of trials that will
be conducted by the Soviets in
a stepped up campaign to terror-
ize countless other Jews and dis-
courage them from attempting to
emigrate," said Gold Introducing
the tableau on the Public Li-
brary steps.
POLSKY, who specializes in
photo-electronics and has 12 pat-
ents to his credit, applied for an
exit visa in 1969. He was fired
from his. .je-h.. labeled an enemy
of the' state and hounded by
police ever -i ice, a Conference
spokesman said.
He is now accused of running
down a -19-year oil Russian wom-
an. Tatyana Alcksandrovna Zhu-
ko\a. 'the. daughter of a Soviet
official. In fact..Gold explained.
the "victim ".'threw' ;,. r-!f in i
frort of Pols*j^s i licide 1
attempt after^uarreling with her
parents. -'_ r. :
Because ofPolsfcy > i'eolation
as a spokosriran for
jration rnoVcment." flu Soviet
authorities seiz'efj.thc pppo'tariity
to exploit the incident. Goj&Stid.
"We can readily ae*. 1
case of Victor PoFsJty ap-l many
l.ke him thatjustice anil human
rights have virtually .no meaning
in the USSR when it enc.es to
Soviet Jews," Coff stated.
fcJemsbFlcridmm \
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E, tth St.. Miami. Fla- 3ltt rhonef^*
-tOLLYWOOfc OFFICE T^lcr-honc !*$-*>
PC\ Coi 297*. Miami. Florida J3H>!
EH10*- 8HOCBET SUZANNE SHOfHBT SEl.MA' T'"\VS
fcdltor dn.1 PwiiHaher Hxe. utlv< BM U r AhattUDt M l'<
1ITA GOODMAN. New* Ooniin.-mr. -'
Th* Jewiah Plundian Doai Not Guarantee The- Kathtvth
Of Th* Merchandiaa Advertiaad In It* Column* :
PiiMinN-,1 |.\v..,.kty by the .Jewish FlortfUn :
iecond-Cli.** Postage Paid at Miami. Fla. j
aDVN*rn&' oS2Sl2*r*,lon or "renter Hollywood" ShT-raVE1-
m, 1.2TB2?.MMETEB ,,r 8heldon win-ns. Cl&rmtn Fl > 'J^,
""" "g" "*"r. M*rtoi Marina, Dr. Norman Atklr,; :R*rl v
SL-hsckiption rates: ,,,.it, Are7)"rjn, Yew M.* *JtT* W*0"
Reou<-'
Volume 4
Friday, August 30. 1974
: .-Ntimbeltf
12 tt-UL $':i