The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00099

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewisli Flondlff&n
and MUM Alt OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Volume 4 Number 16
Hollywood, Florida Friday, August 16, 1974
Price 25 cants
1974 Allocations Committee Completes Its Work
Dr. Joel Schneider, chairman.
snd Dr. Samuel Meline, co-chair-
man of the Jewish Welfare
ration's Allocation Commit
announced that the commit-
tee has met. and after thorough
tied and study of the
mmittee reports it has ap-
r v id allocations to various
constituent organizations.
The committee recognized the
tendous growth of this area
and took into consideration the
need to provide services to our
minify as well as the tre-
.-r.er.rimi* needs of the people of
tr.e State of Israel.
Ec.h are reflected in the Fina\
Allocations listed on Page 2.
DR. JOEL A. SCHNEIDER
DR. SAMUEL MELINE
Fear Of Renewed War
Mounting In Israel

PLO Claims Zionist Plot
PARIS (JTA) The Palestine Liberation Organization
(PLOi has demanded the French government take steps against
what it calls "Zionist criminals'' planning a new wave of murders
In France.
IN A COMMUNIQUE, the PLO charged that a "new Zion-
ist plot aiming to attack all those militating for the freedom of
the Palestinian people" is being organized in Kurope and has as
Its main target the PLO representative in France.
The PLO demanded the French government confront these
threats and "pursue the Zionist criminals who have already
committed with impunity several assassinations in France and
who are preparing in plain daylight new actions of the same
kind." It further called on French authorities to "dismantle
once and for all the Israeli and Zionist secret service networks
in France."
.

JVetc ZOA President Urges
Recledieation to Zionist Cause
By YITZHAK SIIARGIL
(JTA) Fears
i j Uddle East war are
.;>. Israel.
Foreign Minister Abba
Mi voice to tl
a have warned that an-
Id break oat Lefcxe
. .car.
DEFENSE Minister Shimon
told the Knesset that
at which the I
- and technicians were
arriving in Syria had speeded up,
but there was no proof that they
re manning the sophisticated
new wea| has been giving Syria.
Meanwhile, the Israeli Defense
began speeding i rk i n
its fortifications along the Syr-
Ian, Egyptian and even Jorda-
nian lines.
ipaatkfefl >" aewe*
rial for the late Health Minister
Israel Barzilai, said in the next
s:.\ months there will either be
a further improvement in Israeli-
Israeli Chief Of Staff
New War By Year's End
AVIV (JTA) Chief
- Gen. Mofflechai Gur has
Ice to these warning
. new Middle East war is
s ssibility by the end cf the
eaking to the Israel-Amer-
ler of Commerce, Gur
said a situation could develop
. could lure the Arab st.ttts
inching a new war.
BUI GUI said the Israel De-
Force is preparing for the
by initiating new pro-
- to increase the work day
Army, intensifying train-
.-< and to improving the
of calling up the le-
s. I
He stressed that the Israeli!
Is both a defensive and anl
offensive fighting force, and-'
is the possibility that Is-'
night attack first.
As an example of situations
which would lead to a new war,
Gur cited such developments as
the United Nations trooj* being
' d to leave the buffer zones,
a feeling by the Arabs that they
can gain their political advant-
ages through a military cam-
paign coupled with the use of
oil pressure, and a decision by
Syria to launch a war on its own
because of its present heavy
stockpile of arms.
GUR SAID that if war breaks
out It will be conducted along
the lines of the Yom Kippur War
since no new weapons have been
introduced into the Mideast.
He said he did not believe that
missiles would be used agi
population centers if both sides
were interested in preventing it.
Defense Minister Shimon
Peres also warned of the pos-
sibility of a new war in six
months to a year, particularly
from Syria.
Arab relations or another war.
said Israei cannot stand on
the str.t is quo following the dis-
ement agreement.
PERES told the Knesset that
the Soviet Union was also sup-
plying the terrorist organizations
with arms and equipment. He
said other Fast European coun-
is well as Syria) Libya and
Ira."}, were also providing the ter-
rorists with weapons presumably
with the knowledge of the Soviet
nil.
The fear of an outbreak of a
row war enters on Israeli intel-
Ugence repoits that Syria is
planning another attack coupled
with the heavy Soviet military
build-up of that country.
At the same time, the Israelis
have been pointing to Syria's
re to begin rebuilding and
ulating tiie Kuneitia area
on the Golan Heights and the
slow-down of Egyptian efforts to
:i the Suez Canal area to
normal civilian life.
ISRAELIS have stressed that
a return to normalization oi the
Continued on Page 10
By SUE MACY
NEW YORK(JTA)Claiming
that "the American J? has lost
his Zionist commitment/' Dr.
Joseph P. Sternstein. the new
president cf the Zionist Organ-
ization of America, told a press
confi rence that during his term
of office the ZOA will conduct
an intensive campaign to educate
the public and restore that com-
mitment.
Dr. Sternstein, rabbi of the
Conservative Temple Beth Sho-
lom in Roslyn Heights, L.I.. out-
lined the first step of the cam-
paign, a program of seminars to
expose young adult >>ws and
their families to Zionism.
"WE .ARE on the eve of a
titanic politicil struggle in the
Jewish community outside Israel
and especially in America," said
Dr. Sternstein, citing the pres-
sure which is now building p
over this country's position in
the Middle East.
However, r.t the very time when
American Jewish support of Is-
rael is crucial, the American
community has failed in two im-
portant barometers of Zionist
strength, aliya and tourism to Is-
rael, he asserted.
Continued on Page 9-
Pope Supports
'Palestinians9
ROME (JTA) Pope Paul
VI has expressed his support of
the "legitimate aspirations" of
the Palestinian people.
In a letter to Msgr. John No-
lan, president of the Pontifical
Mission for Palestine, the people
said: "The Palestinians are parti-
cularly dear to us because they
are the people from the Holy
Land, because some of them are
followers of Christ and because
they have endured and continue
to endure many tragic suffer-
ings."
TIIE PONTIFF added that for
years the Palestinian refugees
have lived in inhuman conditions.
He said "such conditions have
provoked frustrations among
many Palestinians and in some
c ises caused such anxiety and
despair that they were driven to
acts of violent protest which we
deplore with sadness."
'PILGRIMAGE IN SEARCH OF PEACE'
Allon Describes Kissinger Meeting
WASHINGTON < JTA)
Israeli Foreign Minister Yigal
Allon and Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger met July 30
in what one State Department
source said was an effort to
"have some quiet diplomacy
here."
Emerging after a two-hour
meeting with the Secretary,
Allon said that they had begun
"a month's pilgrimage in search
of peace." The Israeli official
told reporters that he and Kis-
singer also discussed the next
round of negotiations for a Mid-
dle East peace settlement which
will possibly include the recon-
vening of the Geneva peace con-
ference.
IN A BRIEF statement to re-
porters after the meeting ended
late that afternoon both Allon
and Kissinger described the talks
as positive.
The Secretary said the talks
were a continuation of a "char-
acteristically friendly fashion" in
which meetings between the two
countries were held.
Allon thanked Kissinger and
President Nixon for their efforts
in achieving the disengagement
agreements in the Mideast and
said the talks had helped
"chart the course of peace in
the Middle East."
When a reporter asked about
the Palestinians. Allon replied
that "most Palestinians are Jor-
danian citizens and most Jorda-
nians are Palestinians."
ACCORDING TO sources, Kis-
singer is expected to urge Israel
to begin talks with Jordan rath-
er than with Egypt and also to
continue to sound out Israel on
the question of the Palestinians.
Even as the two diplomats
were conferring, President Nixon
announced he will nominate
Richard Murphy, a career diplo-
mat, as the first U.S. Ambassa-
dor to Syria since the Six-Day
War.
Murphy has been U.S. Ambas-
sador to Mauritania since 1971.
The resumption of diplomatic re-
lations between the U.S. and
Syria was announced by Nixon
and Syrian President Hatez As-
sad when they met in Damascus
June 16.
Meanwhile, the talks between
Allon and Kissinger took place as
tension in Israel heightened over
the possibility of a renewed Mid-
dle East war by the end of the
year.
BECAUSE OF this, the United
States, preoccupied with the con-
flict in Cyprus for the last two
weeks, is expected to push for
some kind of movement soon on
negotiations to prevent a new
conflict. Kissinger is scheduled to
meet with officials from Egypt,
Jordan and Syria after his talks
with Allon.
The Allon-Kissinger talks were
also held against the background
of a visit bj King Faisal of Saudi
Arabia to Egypt and the depar-
ture of Yasir Arafat. Palestine
Liberation Organization leader,
for the Soviet Union.
Allon was also scheduled to
meet with Defense Secretary
James R. Schlesinger and with
Treasury Secretary William Si-
mon and congressional leaders.


r>
Pace 2
Mstntrfcna,* and Shotool Hollywood
Friday, August 16,
197J

'ftwuu l^L "t^
I 1 Hv'^^l hh^^ P -^T ~" *wtJ6 > <*
^11 ~
i m***""^ __________
Mrs. Livia Finamore, (left), receives a beautiful set of match-
ed Samsonite luggage from Mary Ellen Prehn, Trust Opera-
tions Officer of First National Bank of Hollywood. Mrs. Fina-
more won the luggage in the bank's 50th Anniversary
Treasure Hunt drawing. The name of the winner of a Polar-
oid SX camera, the July prize, was drawn Aug. 1 from the
treasure chest in the bank lobby.
Dr. Charlie Friedman Will
Try For 12th District Seat
Or. Charlie Friedman has en-
tered the Congressional race in
toe i2th District as a Democratic
candidate, running against J.
Ho'-hert Riffce.
His platform includes a com-
prehensive health security plan,
combatting inflation and protec-
tion for the basic rights of senior
citizens.
From his earliest childhood in
Newport, R.I., where he was born
45 years ago, Charlie Friedman
was influenced by his Cantor
grandfather, with whom he stud-
ied Heorew and Torah. His fa-
ther served as president of the
historic Touro Synagogue, oldest
r nasogue in the United States.
From them came his commit-
r -It1* me survival of Judaism,
strengthened by a summer at an
Israeli kibbutz in 1953 working
in the watermelon fields.
He has returned to Israel sev-
eral times for extended stays, and
(Mb -art in a summer institute
of Biblical archeology and He-
brew studies in 19b;< with his
wife, Sandra. His children attend-
ed Israeli summer camp. Tha
Friedman's eldest daughter, Deb-
bie, recently returned to a kib-
cutz on the Golan Heights where
she lived and worked during the
Ycm Kippur War.
A recent trip to Russia turned
into a harowing adventure when
the Friedmans were harassed by
K^iB r>ol;re a? *h"v attended *
L'ag B'Omer picnic with the
"Jewish Refusniks" of Moscow.
Char'ie Friedman has not con-
fin?d his interests to one area,
they range from religion to horti-
culture. Both Friedmans have
studied several foreign language*,
including Spanish and Russian,
and are particularly fluent in
German and Hebrew, which stood
them in good stead on their ex-
ten*ive travels. As an accomplish
ed tennis player, he has played
in several local tournaments.
Another hobby developed since
becoming a resident of South
Florida 15 years ajro is Fried-
man's interest in gardening and
citrus cultivation. He has become
an umateur expert, having taken
* petal course*- at the University
of Florida and Broward Commu
nitv Copies.
OR. CMAXUE fRICDMAN
At present, and for the past 14
years, Dr. Friedman has practiced
general dentistry from his office
in Carol City. He resides in Hol-
lywood Hills with his wife, his
sun Bernard, lb, and daughter
Jenniier, 14, students at Nova
High School.
Running a campaign that is
staffed almost solely by volun-
teers, Dr. Friedman has taken a
leave of absence irom his dental
practice in order to devote him-
self to mseting and talking with
Broward County residents.
He serves on Temple Solel's
Religious School Committee, is a
member of the board of directors
of the Friends of the Touro Syn-
agogue National Historic Shrine,
the ZOA, and has been an active
worker on the annual campaign
with the Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion, in addition to serving on
the Federation's Commission on
Jewish Education.
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
TEACHERS
7th, 8th & 9th GRADES. ALSO
SEVERAL HEBREW POSITIONS
OPEN.
TEMPLE BETH El 920-75125
Hillel Day School
Executive Board
Members Named
Michael Scheck. president of
l!;e HUM Community Day
School; mimed the -members at
the executive board for the 1974-
-,:, school year. They include
Irving Canner, Finance; Irving
Cirulniek. House; Dr. Joel Den-
nis, president emeritus and
Building Fund; Mrs. Peslie Den-
nis, Registration; Gary Dubin.
At Large; Dr. Lee Duffner, Edu-
cation; Ben Genad, Trtnsporta-
tion and Men for HUlel; Herbert
Gold. Budget and Personnel.
Also Mrs. Bertie Kuttler, sec-
retary; Irving Kuttler, At Large;
Dr. Meron Levitate, vice presi-
dent; Arthur Lipson, treasurer;
Harry Rosen, Legal Affairs;
Robert Ross, At Large; Gary
Scharlat, Public Relations; Dr.
Arnold Sheir. At Large; Mrs.
Judy Silvermen, PTA; Mrs.
Betty Weinbcig. Women for Hil-
lel; Sen. Sherman Winn, At
Large; Judge Arthur Winton.
Grant-in-Aid; William Wolowitz,
Site and Development, and Mor-
ton Zemel, Religious Affairs.
New memlers of the board of
governors for the coming year
are Dr. and Mrs. Waliace Fin-
gerer, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rosen.
..ir. and Mis. Alan Bos torn, Mr.
and Mrs. Joseph Golden and Dr.
and Mrs. Leon Roth.
Rabbi Albert Mayerfeld lias
assumed his resixinsibilities as
the new principal of Hillel. The
school, entering its fifth year.
has a record enrollment for the
'74-'~5 year and is proceeding
with plans to build a new fa-
cility
Hillel offers a well balanced
program of Engish and Hebrew
studies for students from nur-
sery through the eighth grade.
Bus transportation is provided
for the North Dade and South
Broward areas from Miami
Lakes as far north as Tamarac.
Applications for students are
still Leing accepted. For further
information, call the school of-
fice.
JTA Bureau
Receives
Threats
PARIS (JTA) The Eu-
ropean Bureau of the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency was threat-
ened with "explosion and execu-
tion" by a secret right-wing or-
ganization Tuesday.
A man claiming to speak for
the organization "Dcriverance"
told Duty Editor Reine Silber.
"Slogans, explosions and execu-
tions. The Jews out of the coun-
try." When Miss Silber told him
to repeat the message, he hung
up.
The "Deliverance" group, be-
lieved to consist of neo-Nazis.
..ed violent anti-Semitic slo-
gans on Paris walls several
months ago. Today's threat
seems to indicate that the group
is making a certain progression
in its campaign, having passed
from slogans to explosions and
preparing "executions" now.
JTA has informed French Se-
curity about the threat. In rec-
ent months the JTA Bureau has
adopted a number of basic secur-
ity precautions such as keeping
its fiont door locked at all times
nnd asking all visitors to identify
themselves before being let in.
1974 Allocations
UNITED JEWISH APPEAL .
REGULAR FUND ....................
;- : r.GKNCY FUND.........
iwns >< LOCAL AND REGIONAL AGENCIES
5 H$I4)
1 *
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations: ............
( University of Miami
Iversltj c Florida
< Florida State University
B'nai P.'rith W men i I Hollywood...........
B'nai B'ritb Youth Organtnttoa ...............
Camp Ka-Dae-Mah...........................
Chaplaincy Committee ....................
j)jugiaa Garuens-Jev i.-h line lor the Aged
Hebrew Acacemy of Greater Miami.........
Hill, 1 CommunitJ Pay School ..............
Jewish Children's Service of Atlanta........
Jewish Family Service of; Broward County ...
South Floi ida Jewish Community, Centers ...
S-4.MKI.00 )
1.7504&)
750.00 I
I,
NATIONAL SERVICE AGENCIES
American Association of Jewish Education..........
Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds ..
(A> Social Work Student Scholarship......
Dropsie University................................
Hebrew Union CollegeJewish Institute of Religion
National Jewish Welfare Board....................
North American Jewish Students Appeal...........
United Hias Sen ice ..............................
'
!
I 287J
12,1! ,
I
o
I
5CC'.(K

:
3.500J)
NATIONA1___COMMUNITY RELATIONS
AND < I I.TIKAL AGENCIES
America Israel Cultural Foundation ..................
American Jewish Committee
Appeal for Human Relations ....................
American Jew Ish C< ingress ............................
Anti-Defamation League ol B'nai B'rith................
B'nai B'rith National Youth...........................
Jewish Labor Committee..............................
Jew ish Telegraphic Agency ............................
Jewish War Veto: ar.s .................................
Joint Cultural Appeal .................................
National Conference on Soviet Jewry ..................
National Jewish Community Relations Advisory Council..
Dees......................
Synagogue Council of America ........................
m
7
I
:
6
60
.
.1
I
30C.CC
Community Calendar
No Scheduled Events
im
^x Ansel Insurance Agency"V
Ansel Wittenstein *'
AH Forms of Insurance
Including
Homeowner! Automobile Jewelry
2430 Hollywood Boulevard Hollywood
9239518 9453527
HUMAN'S
FUND
AMERICAN
RIVERSIDE
IN HOLLYWOOD.
Riverside. South Florida's leading Jewish funeral
director for over 35 years now provides services to
all communities of Broward County from our
modern and convenient chapel at 5801 Hollywood
Boulevard In Hollywood.
920-1010
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel. Inc., Funeral Directors
Other Riverside Chapels in the
(ireater Miami area:
NORTI1 MIAMI BEACII 16480N E 19* Avenue'H7 8691
MIAMI BKACI1. l'Hh Street & Alton Road &3M 151
1254Normandy Drive 531 1151
MIAMI & CORAL GABLES Douglas Road at S.W. 17th Street
4432221
Riverside also serves the Nen York Metropolitan area with
Chapels in Manhattan. Bronx. Brooklyn, Far Rockaway and
Mfestcheater.
Murray N. Rubin. FIX


Friday, August 16, 1974
*"Jewl*t Fhrldiairi and Sholar of Hollywood
Page 3
Letter To Hollywood Family
From The Soviet Union
Dear Phyllis, Steven, Daniel,
Mitchell and Lora:
Congratulations for the happy
school vacation of your children
and we wish that they shall en
joy this school vacation in the
best meaning of this wordRest.
We wish that they shall enrich
themselves with good impressions
and get stronger so they can be
prepared for the oncoming suc-
cesses of their study and personal
life, and the.little one we wish
to grow and become strong and
you should have only happiness.
As we can judge from your
letter in your house a lot of at-
tention is being paid to the chil-
dren, therefore, they are so
lucky and you, in turn, are lucky
as well.
We will be very happy to be-
come acquainted with you
through photographs and we
from our side will send you bet-
ter pictures than the ones we
sent you previously in the previ-
ous letter. We would like to read
about the success of your family
from each one individually. G-d
should only give all of you health
and happiness.
Our Genitchka was in Moscow
on the 27th of June. She sent you
a telegram but to make the tele
phone call to you as well as to
her parents in Israel was not pos-
sible.
What you were tfiinking that
perhaps not all of our letters
reach you is possible, but if this
letter reaches you we can tell you
once again "Ttoere is no happy
news." As you can understand,
everything is as it was previously.
In all our activities and going to
various different offices they are
answering sometimes as follows:
a> We will see what we can do.
b) It is possible that we get a
refusal from on high, and so
forth.
No matter what the answer is
it is very little help to us and
leaves us little hope. The only
hope that we have is that ours
and your prayers will reach G-d.
In the course of this situation
your telephone call to us brought
to our house a strong pull on the
strings. In our situation and at
our age to patiently accept all of
these activities is working on our
nerves. Frankly speaking your
interest in our affairs is like a
balm for us for which we are very
grateful.
We would be very nappy if it
will be possible to give you our
thanks in person when we meet.
However this meeting with you
has been delayed for so long that
no one knows when it will hap-
pen and if we will have the
strength to hold out.
We do not even know how to
thank you, my dear relatives,
that you remember us and find
time to write to us and your in
terest in our fate and we are so
far away. Sometimes we can lose
our patience but we find one help
in the hope of your letters and
that you are so interested in us.
Our children, Genia and Yri-
(he is our son) and Mishenka are
now on vacation but most impor-
tant is that we need a lot of en-
ergy and this help will only come
from G-d. My husband in his
prayers always remembers' you
and is thankful to G-d that will
are with us. Please write; we will
be very happy.
Be happy and healthy. We wish
health and happiness to your en-
tire family, friends and relatives.
With deep love, wishing you all
the best.
LEON & BELLA
Prime Minister's
Mission Departs
Sunday, Aug. 25
The Prime Minister of the
State of Israel, Yitzhak Rabin,,
has invited selected Jewish lead-
ers from throughout the U.S. to
meet with him in Israel late this
summer in order for them to wit-
ness the present situation which
now exists.
Meetings have been set up
with Golda Meir and Prime Min-
ister Rabin.
Allen Gordon. Albert Yorra,
David Yorra, Moses Hornstein
and Herbert D. Katz of Holly-
wood will be participating in this
mission which departs Ft. Laud-
erdale on Sunday, Aug. 25.
Upon arriving in New York
that day, the group will imme-
diately transfer to the Kl Al ter-
minal where they will be greeted
by David S. Rivlin. Ambassador
Consul General of Israel and
then continue on to Israel for a
short four-day conference.
Tea For Prospective Members Held
By Meadoicbrook Group Of Hadassah
A tea for prospective members -
of the newly organized Meadow-
brook Group of the Hallandale
Chapter of Hadassah was held
recently at the home of Mrs.
Juiius Shrager.
Sky Lake First
5735 Member Of
UOJCA In State
Rabbi Dov Bidnick, spiritual
leader of Sky Lake Synagogue,
North Miami Beach, recently an-
nounced that his was the first
Synagogue in Florida to become
a member (for the new Jewish
calendar year 5735) of the Union
of Orthodox Jewish Congrega
tions of America.
The UOJCA provides syna-
gogues throughout America with
Kashruth guidance, NCSY activi-
ties and many invaluable services
to all Jews.
Rabbi Bidnick also announced
the completion of the Ma'alot Me-
morial Campaign in which $1066
WM sent to Mayor Aaron Nah
mias, of Safad, Israel, for the re-
habilitation of the wounded and
a memorial to the dead children
(killed at Ma'alot) who came
from Safad.
Mrs. Leonard Volpe of the
Florida Region of Hadassah was
c :est speaker. Also present were
Mrs. .Albert'Aaron, Hallandale
Chapter president, and Mrs.
Louis. "Siegel, membership vice
president.
The group's pro-tem officers
include Mrs. Allan C. Gould,
president; Mrs. Julius Shrager,
education vice president; Mrs.
Millard Skult. fund-raising vice
president; Mrs. Abraham Fass,
membership vice president; Mrs.
Harry Sobel, program vice presi-
dent; Mrs. Benjamin J. Glad-
stone, corresponding secretary;
Mrs. Philip Birnbaum, financial
secretary; Mrs. Mortimer Gellis,
recording secretary; Mrs. Joseph
Manz. social secretary; Mrs. Mor-
ris Malamed, treasurer; Mrs. Jo-
seph Arkin, program chairman,
and Mrs. Moses Plager, donor
chairman.
The group plans additional
teas, and invites interested per-
sons to attend. Further details
may be secured by contacting
Mrs. Abraham Fass.
YOUNG ISRAEL of HOLLYWOOD
announces
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
to be held in
EMERALD HILLS
Rosh Hashanna Sept. 17 & 18
Kol Nidre Sept. 25
Yom Kippur Sept. 26
For Information Call
962-3728 989-7324 962-1540
MARTIN W. TREIBER, M.D., P.A.
Jokes Pleasure in Announcing
The Association of
JOSEPH B. ESTERSON, M.D.
IN THE PRACTICE OF
INTERNAL MEDICINE and CARDIOLOGY
TEL. 925-1439
2526 E. HALLANDALE BCH. BLVD., HALLANDALE
MARLO RENTAL APTS.
HOLLYWOOD HILLS
fUKNISHED AND UNfUKNIiHtD
3500 POLK STREET
Dode 625 4345 Brownrd 9893030
30 Different Buildings
WEDDING, BAR-MITZVAH
AND COMMERCIAL
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done at reasonable prices
Contact: Saul Rosen at
966-5785
WE DON'T ADVERTISE
LOW PRICES
WE GIVE THEM!
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1200 N. FEDERAL HWY. ^^
I 921-6800 HOLLYWOOD 947-3411
3X
Senior Friendship Club Meetings
To Resume At Temple Beth Shalom
The Senior Friendship Club of
Temple Beth Shalom will meet
every Tuesday at noon at ttae
Temple Assembly Hall beginning
Aug. 20.
A discussion meeting followed
by card and luncheon parties,
musical interludes, skit, holiday
celebration and fund raising
projects will be on the agenda
for the coming season.
Vice President of Entertain-
ment Dorothy Kowitt is in charge
of arrangements. Those interest-
ed in joining may call Mrs. Rose
Blonder, president, or Max Weiss.
From Sunday, Aug. 25, until
Tuesday, Aug. 27, the Senior
Friendship Club will hold a gala
White Elephant Sale at the tem-
ple's Assembly Hall, from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m.
Sermon Topics At Beth El
Sabbath Vesper Services
Sabbath Vesper services will be
held at Temple Beth El, Friday,
Aug. lfi, at 3:15 p.m. Harvey M.
Rosenfeld, Assistant Rabbi, will
conduct services and deliver a
sermon on "Observations On Be-
coming a Rabbi."
Friday, Aug. 23, at 8:15 p.m.
Rabbi Rosenfeld's subject will be:
"Harmony and Holiness." Mrs.
Rosenfeld will bless the Sabbath
tapers. Memorial prayers will be
recited at the conclusion of each
service.
arnett
lanK
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
-^ift?nHk* INTERIOR DECORATINO FASHION FABRICS
t^^^p^ BM"r o* MAUANDAll, INC 805 N. FEDERAL HWY. HALLANDALE. FLORIDA Phone: 923-0564
Custom Msds DRAPER S I'd BED SPREADS SHADES SLIP COVERS UPHOLSTERY
IRA L. HUNTER
Vice President
Hollywood Phone:
925-7517
Dade Phone:
865-0522
Shields & Company
members principal securities exchanges
7300 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach, Yla. 33141
DR. BRUCE J. FEINSTEIN
OPTOMETRIST
Announces the opening of his office for
the general practice of Optometry
at
3176 UNIVERSITY DRIVE
PARKWAY PLAZA, MIRAMAR
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
Telephone
963-2020
Me lie Painst & Supplies
HARDWARE PAINT. INC
HOUStWARES Ac GIFTS
NOME DECOR ACCESSORIES
Bath / Closet Accesseriit
fettrittf *liaws Raom Dividers
W(i>Jen Shades
Dratery Rt4s
Salisaiar
Key 4 Lock Work
Store Hours 7:30 A.M. 6:00 P.M. Closed Sundays
111 EAST BEACH BOULEVARD
NALLAftDALE, FLORIDA MOM
PH0RE S2T-0SSC
Artificial flcffirs
Ftllait
Plait*
Patio Furniture


Pace 4
UWM rkrMiir emd Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, August 16, 1574 \
Thoughts of War
The most horrifying prospect is to contemplate another
war in the Middle East.
And yet ft is a distinct possibility one which we
have been harboring since the Oct. 22 ceasefire imposed
by the United States and the Soviet Union through the
United Nations when, to Soviet officials gleeful at the pros-
pect of a shattered Israel, it had become abundantly clear
that the Israelis were on the way to inflicting yet another
resounding defeat to both Egypt and Syria.
President Anwar Sadat can forget quite easily that his
Third Army was surrounded in the southern Sinai by vic-
torious Israeli forces and that this army was saved by the
U.S. Soviet intervention.
He can forget that his Second Army was similarly em-
barrassed on the Egyptian side of the Suez Canal, deep in
Egyptian territory.
He can talk about an Egyptian victory because now
hi* troops an ensconced in what was once Barlev Land.
Syria: The Sorest of Losers
But the Syrians can not forget so easily. They have
back the territory Israel conquered as a consequence of
the Syrian Yom Kippur treachery.
They also have back Kuneitra. conquered in 1967, but
not the precious Mt. Hermon. In fact, Israel is still very
much alive in Golan.
And so, the Syrians are restive. Indeed, they have
always been the fiercest of fighters and the sorest of losers.
But today, it is more than vengeance they want.
They are franker than any other Arab nation, except
possibly King Faisal's Saudi Arabia, that they want no
Israel at alL They are dedicated to that principle, and
there is evidence they intend acting on it, possibly even
before Geneva.
Evidence points not only to the Russian buildup ol
Syria at a pace far more furious than ever before, but to
the fact that Damascus has made little or no move in the
direction of rebuilding Kuneitra and the other territory it
wrested from Israel in the October, 1973 war.
Rebuilding of war-torn Arab territory relinquished by
Israel as the occupying power was part of the ceasefire
arrangement.
Realities of the Middle East
This ceasefire principle was to hold true not only for
Syria, but especially for Egypt which, with U.S. assistance,
is now clearing the Suez Canal.
The Egyptians are clearing the canal, there is increas-
ing talk that Israeli shipping will not have accese to the
canal, and Egypt has yet to begin rebuilding of the towns
and villages along the canal.
This can only mean that both Syria and Egypt are
operating on the presumption that these critical areas re-
main future battlegrounds.
For all these reasons, talk of a new war is increasingly
frank in Israel these days. It makes no one happy. It merely
focuses on the realities of Middle Eastern affairs.
UJA's Hopeful Message
Paul Zuckerman, general chairman of the United Jew-
ish Appeal, back from a mid-July meeting of the World
Assembly of the Jewish Agency in Jerusalem, has an en-
couraging word.
Israel has turned around. "No longer is there talk,"
he said, "of weariness, or of exhaustion" that followed the
Yom Kippur War.
And that, he said, is as it should be. "We most cer-
tainly can not be tired of the miracle that is Israel, or of
our newly fortified Jewishness."
All of which means, for American Jews, that with the
spiral of inflation in Israel that makes the U.S. inflation
look like a Sunday picnic, with the bone-crushing tax
structure that Israelis must bear, our need to give grows
daily.
Forget if we can talk of another war. What must be
remembered is that the crisis of the last war continues
unabated.
During these summer vacation days, when most of us
would rather relax and forget our responsibilities, we must
redouble our efforts, our thoughts, our giving to make
Zuckerman 8 words particularly meaningful.
"We most certainly can not be tired of the miracle that
is Israel."
Real Panic is Money Market
By JOSEPH ALSOP
Los Angele* Times Syndicate
WASHINGTON. About all
the country hears about now-
adays is Watergate, Watergate,
Watergate. But in reality. We
already have a near panic on
the long-term money market.
If this goes on and gets worse,
we shall also have a panic on the
short-term money market.
And that is the last step be-
fore a general bust.
THE SION8 are all too plain.
At the beginning of an intermi-
nable Washington week, the
tough, able chairman of the Fed-
eral Reserve Board, Arthur
Burns, cut a badly needed vaca-
tion in half to come back to
Washington. A day later, Secre-
tary of the Treasury William Si-
mon went to the White House to
present the most solemn warn-
ings to President Nixon, in ad-
vance of his own scheduled trip
to the Middle East.
On Capitol Hill, meanwhile,
Chairman Wilbur Mills (D.,
Ark.) has been grimly prodding
his somewhat recalcitrant House
Ways and Means Committee for
a tax bill that will act as a tonio
to the money markets.
MORE GENEROUS treatment
of capital gains taxes; maximum
taxes on unearned or dividend
income no higher than the pres-
ent 50 percent maximum on
earned income; more rapid amor-
tization for industry's new in-
vestments these are the main
points of Rep. Mills' program.
, None of these highly signifi-
cant facts has attracted atten-
tion. The equally significant de-
velopments in the money mar-
kets themselves have been so
routinely communicated that thej
also need some underlining.
FOR EXAMPLE, the Colum-
bia Gas Co., one of the most
solid and profitable utilities com-
panies on the East Coast, recent-
ly failed to float a fairly modest
bond issue, although the bonds
would have paid 12.5 percent,
long term, at the price of issu-
ance.
You have to go pretty far back
into American history to find a
respectable bond issue finding no
takers with a yield of 12.5 per-
cent.
Again, the city of New York,
which has regained a good credit
rating, also failed to float a $400
million bond issue.
THE SOLITARY offer for this
big package of tax-exempt bonds
would have left New York City
paying just under 8 percent for
the borrowed money.
City Controller Harrison J.
Goldin not unnaturally said,
"no."
Whether you run a state or a
city or a big industrial company,
you have only two choices if you
need to borrow long-term money
and cannot get it. You can cut
your expenses sharply or you can
go into the short-term money
market.
In many cases like that of
New York City the second
choice has been all but unavoid-
able.
THIS HAS already caused the
"most fiendish" pressure on the
nation's banks for short-term
money. The phrase quoted was
actually used by three of half a
dozen leading bankers and bank
directors polled just prior to
writing of these words.
In sum, the near panic in the
long-term money market is also
near to causing the short-term
money market to dry up.
If both long-term and short-
term credits are unavailable, ex-
cept at totally prohibitive rates,
you automatically get an econo-
mic situation that will produce a
bust.
THE BEST analogy is the un-
intentional extermination of
four-fifths of the population of
5
Iraqor about 20 million neoLle
at that time by the taJaE
Mongols in the 13th century.
Iraq then depended on a most
complex irrigation system, with
canals needing exhaustive clean-
ing each winter. The Mongol con-
querors did not have the tech-
nical knowledge to call up the
forced labor to clean the canals.
First the Httle ones clogged.
Then the big ones clogged. Fj.
naJly, the whole system clogged-
there were no crops, and famine
became general.
THE ROLE of water in an ir-
rigation system is almost exactly
comparable to the role of credit
in a modern high technical econ-
omy. If credit had not dried up,
mainly because of the inflation
rate, we should be experiencing
a boom.
There are at least 50 major in-
dustries, by Rep. Mills' always
well-informed estimate, that now
need to expand importantly to
serve their markets.
The steel industry, for in-
stance, should be Investing $3.5
billion a year until at least 1980
for both expansion and moderni-
zation.
REP. MILLS' program is
mainly designed to get frighten,
ed money out of hiding. Secre-
tary- of the Treasury Simon,
meanwhile, wants to add the oth-
er half of the necessary remedy
a severe program of "demand
restraint" to bring down the in-
flation rate.
This kind of program has al-
ready brought down the West
German inflation rate to only six
percent, or one-half the U.S. rate.'
But there is always Water-
gate. By Watergate, the public
dialogue is deformed; the Presi-
dent is paralyzed, and the Con-
gress is reduced to an Idiots'
talking shop. These priorities are
beginning to seem a bit odd.
Impeachment Recalls Jefferson
By MAX LERNER
Les Angeles Times Syndicate
NEW YORK In this sum-
mer of our discontent, with a
presidential impeachment hang-
ing over the months following
Independence Day, the massive
figure of Thomas Jefferson looms
as a standard against which to
measure the leadership of the
present republic.
Jefferson was America's first
philosopher-king. All Presidents
are kings of a sort.
THEIR POWER is fabulous
and inescapable; only some Pres-
idents use it better than others,
and some (as we have been dis
covering 1 abuse it worse.
It is rare to find a philosophic
mind in a President.
You can count them on the fin-
gers of one hand. Jefferson was
the supreme instance, one of the
leading philosophers of his time,
but also the greatest of its po-
litical practitioners.
ADD JOHV Adams, his pre-
decessor in office gnarled,
cranky, yet a considerable think-
er; and James Madison. Jeffer-
son's successor not the kind of
fighter and star Jefferson was,
but solider and more disciplined
in his thinking.
Add Abraham Lincolnrough
hewn, unschooled, but a towering
figure as political thinker as well
as doer.
Round out the quintet with
Woodrow Wilson, who was not
really on the level of the rest
a college professor rather than
an original thinker.
JEFFERSON IS mostly re-
membered and revered because
he wrote the Declaration of at-
dependence, but he was a com-
plex, tangled, little-understood
man, less of a saint and more of
a s.ner than we usually take
him for.
Some uneasy questions have
been raised about him in recent
years. My own answers have to
be briefer and more summary
than I should like.
WAS HE a great American
thinker? Yes. he was: a proto-
Populist reformer, a champion of
"Nature and Nature's God," an
ecologist, a theorist of democ-
racy, an educational thinker, a
humanist.
We have never had such a
combination of intellectual quali-
ties in the Presidency since him
and probably never will again.
Was he a great President?
That is a different question.
Great intellectuals are rarely
great presidents. Dumas Malone,
Who has spent his life as Jeffer-
son's biographer and defender
insists that his first term u as a
great one, and his second far
from the failure it has been pic-
tured.
MY OW\ feeling is that Jef-
ferson was at his most effective
as a militant party organizer ar.d
party leader more than any
man, the creator of the Amer-
ican party system but that he
was less great as President ex-
actly because his genius lay :n
defining and fighting the poeti-
cal enemy.
Especially in times of great
tension, a President who gets to
the summit of power by his mili-
tancy must be a conciliator and
unifier after he gets there.
Did Jefferson exceed the limits
of the Presidency? One could
argue that he did, especially in
cutting some constitutional cor-
ners on the Louisiana Purchase.
BIT THERE was nothing cov-
ert and skulking about what
he did, nothing for the aggran-
dizement of his own political po-
sition. Was ba a libertarian?
Prof. Leonard Levy has argued
that his pursuit of militant op-
Contlnneri on Page 9-
#Jem'sti Meridian
-~i mmm sraauna muimm
Hn/rvx^^ 12 "* *'h X1H. Fla. 33138 Phone 873-460I
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE T ..,, ,,,
Telephone 373-460S
Box 2973' M|AMI- Florida '3'i
SUZANNE SHOCHET 6EI.MA M. THOMPSON
Executive Editor AmlM.nr in Publisher
<
f
t

tailor and Publishsr ""_";"".V ""JL"-."-"*= bm..m/i m. '.' -
""" Executive Editor Assistant to Publisher
Th. 1 K GOODMAN. New. Coordinator
OfWT*h. M.r,edh,r!..D0*,!?0t 0u" The K.ahruth
" rn, Marchandise Advertised In Its Columns
s~ond.aa,. fJSSKSSSfi*- JeWl8h F,0r,d'"
gf^ Ben Baiter. Marl
ee. Worldwide New, serl!JV,P,'h!- "-* "n *ni. ri.r.
eoeistion of Indian.Jswfsh rI.J?at'0n"' Editorial Aaaociation, America
BVRrVif.-------^^_^WWr%. and the Florida Presa Aaaoc
OL BSCRIPTION RATH' it!T~.------"----------_______________________
Request. (Local Area) On. Tsar 14.00. Out or Town Open
Volume 4
Friday, August 16, 1974
. ..... "' wcwibii r icriuian
id at Miami. Fla.
federation of Greater Hollywood Shofar Editorial
Hnr. v Sheldon Wlllena. Chairman: Ross Becker-
^"n_N>vlns. Dr. Norman Athln. Robert N. Kernel
the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
'ic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndi.
lional Editorial Aaaociation, American Ae>
pers, and the Florida Preaa Association,
Number 16
28 AB 572*


V
Friday. August 16. 1974
* leni-if n-orta/i&r and Shofar of Hollywood
Pags 5
They Hum 'Hail To The Chief
Cohn And Baer Announce
Murray's Appointment
[
- "My sons are more capable
than me", said Melvin Baer. the
Patriarch-Chief of the well-
known Baer tribe which numbers
15 immediate members.
He holds council in a tepee
called Baer's Furniture.
i THE CHIKF actually retired
eight. years ago. And, actually,
the whole world Jewish tribe is
encompassed by his love and ef-
forts.
I would have been happy with
one store," said the Senior Baer.
"but as each of my sons left col-
lege, they'd want to come into
the business."
Melvin Baer has throe sons, all
totally committed to their Jew-
ish communities: Alan, Bobby
and Jimmy, ami. as he says. "It
was a compliment that they
wanted to be with me."
' Baer will tell you, while he's
looking down writing a letter, "I
don't do details. They do it all."
Then he raises his head, smiles
and says, "I don't do anything."
For a retired man who doesn't
do anything, he's kept mighty
busy.
IV Bl'SINESS, he continues
to join his sons in major deci-
sions such as opening a new Boca
Raton store.
'But, for the most part, the
Gentleman-from-Indiana devotes
most of his energies to some-
thing he'loves as dearly as fur-
niture. He calls it "charity."
Melvin Baer. who last year
chaired the Federation '74 cam-
paign 6o notably and deserved to
rest, is not the kind of man who
cures to rest. Therefore, this
year in the 75 Campaign. Lewis
E, Cohn joins him and they've
become cochairmen.
Baer's charitable reputation in
the Hollywood Jewish communi-
ty is nothing new. It followed
him here from South Bend. Ind..
where he w as an original mem-
ber of the Committee of 100. a
board member of the Chamber
of Commerce, board member of
Teirtple I5cth hi and a vice pres-
ident of UJA.
UK ALSO served as president
and national board member of
Junior Achievement, treasurer
an i board memlier of the Family
and Children's Center of North-
ern Indiana and member of Boy
MELVIN BAER
Scout Council.
Baer served on Father Hes-
burg's South Bend board of the
University of Notre Dame.
He, however, is a graduate of
the University of Michigan. Class
of '29.
Baer is a thoughtful man. To
keep you from counting on your
fingers under the desk trying to
figure out his age, he smiles a
mind-reading kind of smile and
volunteers. "I'm 67."
He's also fast to add. point-
ing to a painting on the wall di-
rectly facing his desk. "I don't
feel 67 when I look at that." His
sons had gifted 'The Chief with
an art work depicting a luscious
example of woman.
But that's make-believe.
TIIK KKAL woman in his life
is named I.ucile and she's been
his woman for 44 years. (Catling
the signals from the bench. I
The Baers. over those years.
have not only travelled through
life together but also, all over
the world.
"The only place we've missed
is Africa", he says. "We were
even in Rangoon when they gave
you 24 hours to get in and out."
Even though they've been to
Mexico five or six times, they
are planning t<> go again shortly.
However, the Baer family is a
cloeeknil family and the second
generation members enjoy travel
also.
Nazi Named Bv Chile
PARIS (JTA> The new*
per Le Monde said that a want-
N.izi war criminal has been
Itemed head of the Chilean gov-
ernment's information services,
Hie "Direction de Inteligencia
llacional."
The paper identified him as
Walter Rauff, a former SS chief
Wsponsiblc for the deaths of
SOme 100.000 Jews from Poland,
Yugoslavia and the Ukraine dur-
ing World War II.
THE LE MONDE report was
the latest to charge that the
former Nazi held a high post in
the military junta-ruled Chilean
regime.
Only last week, the Chilean
Embassy In London denied those
reports in a statement to the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency, stat-
ing that "nothing could be fur-
ther from the truth."
According to Le Monde, Rauff
was in charge of deporting Tunis-
ian Jews to forced labor camps
during the war. On one occasion,
he personally commanded troops
who broke into a synagogue in
an attempt to round up 2,000
Jews. Le Monde said.
In 1944. Rauff served as head
of security police in Milan.
AFTER THE war. he settled in
Chile where he became a mer-
chant.
In 19bi, West Germany de-
manded his extradition to face
war crimes charges but it was
denied because Chile's 15-year
statute of limitations had ex-
pired, the paper said.
Tiro JDL Members Put On Probation
NEW YORK Two members of the Jewish Defense League
were convicted of juvenile delinquency in Manhattan Federal
Court for dousing a Soviet diplomat with beef blood near the
Soviet mission to the United Nations.
Mitchell Rein. 18, of Brooklyn, and Zelig Spirn. 19, of Far
Rockaway, N.Y., were placed on probation and ordered to pay
up to $50 for cleaning the spattered clothes of German M.
Kosenov, the second secretary at the mission.
The spattering took place during a demonstration near the
mission on March 15, 1973. German was the key witness for the
prosecution at the trial last June.
Federal Judge Harold R. Tyler, Jr., in announcing probation,
said he was being "far more tolerant of your persons and rights
than you were to a man who was a stranger to you."
When this happens. Lucile and
Mel .lan his fiiefttls Brtdress him)
leave their Parker Plaza abode
and move in for two and three
weeks at a time to do pleasur-
able baby-sit tin
"We baby-sit between Holly*
wood, Ft. Lauderdale and In-
diana". Baer smiles. "It enables
my daughters to travel."
"I THOUGHT you only had
sons."
"My sons' wives are daugh-
ters!"
Their names are Aviva, Terri
and Marjorie and like all other
members of the Baer family, the
triumverate of young women are
highly active in their respective
Jewish communities.
"We are very conscious of
family", Baer said. "It's my life
outside of charity."
He "qvells" as he looks to the
picture on the office wall. It's a
family picture taken on the oc-
casion of his 65th birthday when
he was surrounded by children
and grandchildren.
But then, "qvelling" takes
time, so the man jumps up and
says, "I had to be at a Federa-
tion meeting 15 minutes ago."
He doe?, however, take the
time to explain why his Federa-
tion work is a devotion. "I love
it because I'm doing good for
Jews of Israel, the aged and the
youth of our local community."
"I'd rather do for others and
so would my family", said "The
Chief as we walked quickly be-
tween the aisles of furniture sit-
ting at attention.
You could almost hear them
humming, "Hail To The Chief."
R. G.
Lewis E. Cohn and Melvin H
,Baer, cochairmen of the JWF '7"i
campaign, have jointly announc
ed the appointment of Harold
Murray to the position of cam
paign associate.
Murray has been a Florida res-
ident for the past two years when
he was executive director of
Southeast Florida region of
American Friends of Hebrew
University. He received his B.A
degree at University of Torontr
in Canada and then graduated
Western Reserve Universitv
Cleveland, Ohio, where he obtain
ed a Master's degree in Social
Administration.
His background is diversified.
He has been executive director of
both the YM-YMHA of Bergen
County ana tJJA in Hackensack
N'.J. He was director of the Com-
munitv Affairs Department of the
American Jewish Committee,
New York, an:! a'so served as the
executive director of Kducational
Alliance In New York.
Murray ha.-, also taught at the
School of Applied Social Sciences
at the University of Pittsburgh
Graduate School, the New York
School of Social Work at Colum
bia University, the Graduate
School at Yeshiva University
and was a consultant to the Dean
of the School of Social Work at
\delphi University. Garden City,
Long Island, N.Y.
He is a memoer of numerous
professional associations and ha.i
been a board member of nine
civic and Jewish organizations.
Murray resides in Miami Beach
with his wife. Florence, an art
teacher, and their three children,
Deborah, 12, Susan, 17, and Alan,
25.
At the time of the announce-
HAR0LD MURRAY
ment. Murray said, "I look for-
ward to a productive and enjoy-
able activity and association with
the leadership of this community
in pursuit of Jewish community
life both here and abroad."
Last Call To Register
For Mission To Israel
Hil'crest Hollywood Mission to
Israel, scheduled Oct. 21 through
Nov. 4, is in its final planning
stages.
If interested, it is vitally im-
portant that you contact Robert
Kerbel, JWF executive director,
this week. Phone the Federation
office NOW!
FIVE MAJOR PROBLEMS OF TODAYS
HEBREW DAY SCHOOLS:
1. Overcrowded classes that deprive your child of individual attention.
2. Poor English curriculums which can hinder your child's chances of
higher education.
3. Weak spiritual guidance in the areas of Jewish identity and love for Israel.
4. Inexperienced teachers who cannot cope with your child's innate curiosity.
5. Soaring educational costs that drain hard earned savings you need for
your child's future.
ONE SOLUTION:
1. YESHIVA DAY SCHOOL OF MIAMI.
990 N.E. 171 St.
Tel. 651-0711
I
HOLLYWOOD'S LABORATORY
-OR PROCESSING KODAK'S COLOR FILMS
SaJhern
Main Store and Plant
2000 NORTH DIXIE HIGHWAY
PHONE: 920-8021
Monday thru Friday 8 to 5:30
Saturday 9:00 to 1:00
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
Branch Stores
4551 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
PHONE: 981-8555
1804 N. UNIVERSITY DRIVE
PHONEi 962-0999
Monday thru Friday 9 to 6:00
Saturday 9:00 to 1:00


Pfin O
Page 6
*Je*isti FhrMkMl <* Sfaofar of Hollywood
Friday, August 16, 1974
Young Leaders Council Plans
Programs For 1974-75 Year
),000 Gift Will Help Build
Third Wing At Research Institute
BARRY HOLEVE
DR. STANLEY MARGUUES
m.
imiriiniiur-iHi i. .;'!
&Ms <-/ <3ec By BOB KERBEL, Executive Director,
lewith Welfare federation of Greater HolJvwoW
JllWta 1.1 II.IIIIIMMIII'" i til "I......i '. i. I" 'I Mi'mil! I.
The present Mediterranean situation concerning the small island
of Cyprus has great import for us in understanding our relationship
to Israel and Israel*s needs.
Two members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization
(NATOi, Turkey and Greece, who had agreed to come to each
other's aid if either one was attacked by another |>ower, are now
fighting over the divided Island which sits in the Mediterranean
off the coast of Turkey. There is a paper cease fire but Turkish
troops continue to land on Cyprus and fighting continues.
The Western Kuropean nations who are NATO members, espe-
cially Great Britain, are at a table in discussions with Turkey and
Greece and as they talk, more killing and more shelling takes place.
It is interesting that no condemnation of Turkey for invading
Cyprus has come about no Security Council emergency sessions
insisting on immediate withdrawal of troops no ma6sive airlift
of U.N. troops into Cyprus the United Nations forces there are
powerless. Neither Greece or Turkey has been labeled aggressors.
Secretary Kissinger has not flown to the Island, and it appears that
the world just sits reading the newspapers and listening to reports.
Had one of these two countries been Israel, what would have
been the world's reaction? The Security Council's deliberations?
What would the pressures have been from the two great world pow-
ers the United States and the Soviet Union? Are guarantees of
support and aid worth anything? Wouldn't Israel have been labeled
an aggressor and condemned had they been involved? Wouldn't
world pressures be placed on Israel to come to "some accommoda-
tion'1" Wouldn't Israel be labeled intransigent for not giving up land
it occupied after being attacked and being threatened with annihila-
tion?
I think we can now better understand that guarantees of as-
sistance really are meaningless that Israel must remain strong
internally and militarily to defend itself because they cannot depend
on anyone other than Jews.
We all realize the American government has been of tremendous
help to Israel, both in military and economic grants and loans, but
doesn't this serve an important purpose for America? Isn't it now in
the best interests of the United States to support Israel? Doesn't the
political and economic climate of a country determine its allies and i
who receives help?
What wouUI-haujifn to aid for Israel if the political and economic
climate of the Urliterf States changed? Where then can Israel look
for support to the Western Kuropean countries to the 3rd
world or must it look to itself?
If the survival of Israel is to be insured, Israel must depend
upon its own resources and abilities coupled with the continued al-
liance with world Jewry, and most especially, the American Jewish
people. Without that internal strength and security, there goes in-
tegrity.
A small Island in the Mediterranean is being chop]>ed up a
little piece of land on the Mediterranean seacoast, Israel, is
threatened from all sides. Where are the world's peace makers?
Yes, Israel is learning more than ever before that it must depend
upon itself, and we, as Jews, should realize that it is only us who can
be depended upon for help to our brothers and sisters.
No world condemnation of the terrorists who killed innocent
people in Kiryat Shmona or Ma'alot came forth. The condemnation
concerned Israel's retaliation.
Kven if we accept the fact that the United States was of tre-
mendous help to Israel, and without the United States, Israel pos-
sibly could not have survived after the October 6th treacherous
attack, I call your attention to the Kalb Report whiqh opened in
the July 1st issue of Time magazine and concerned the State and
Defense Departments' dragging of heels in supplying necessary mili-
tary aid for Israel.
As I See It the situation in Cyprus has made us acutely
aware of the need for Israel to become extremely strong econom-
ically and to develop the military ability to defend itself for, un-
doubtedly, no one else will give a damn when the chips are down.
The Young Leaders' Council
Executive Committee, under the
direction of newly appointed
president, Dr. Stanley Margulies.
has been meeting to plan pro-
grams for their 1974-75 year.
A Recruitment Committee,
headed by Barrv Holeve, will be
composed of the following repre-
sentative group of newer Young
Leadership members including
Dr. Louis Kurland, Dr. Ronald
Marx, Louis Pleeter, Jerome Sol-
koff. Dr. Steve Weisberg. Michael
Block and Jeffrey Mann.
Wednesday. Sept. 11. a cocktail-
buffet dinner will take place with
the topic for the evening being:
"What's New In The Young Jew-
ish Community." The speaker is
to be announced.
Thursday, Oct. 10, the group
will participate in a joint pro-
gram with Women's Leadership
Institute to welcome speaker
Manheim Shapiro.
Rabbi And Mrs. Malavsky
To Host Sisterhood Coffee
Temple Beth Shalom's Rabbi
and Mrs. Morton Malavsky will
host the first Sisterhood coffee
of the new season at their home.
4918 Taft St., Hollywood, Tues
day, Aug. 27, at 8 p.m.
The evening has been planned
for prospective members. In addi-
tion to an address by Dr. Malav-
sky. there will be informal talks
by Mrs. Fdward Hoffman, Sister-
hood president, and several of
the vice presidents Those who
are interested in attending are
urged to contact Mrs. Ruth Glas-
er, membership vice chairman.
A $100,000 gift has-been made
for a third wing in the NCJW
Research Institute for Innovation
in Education in the Hebrew Uni-
versity's School of Education
complex on Mount Scopus. Jeru-
salem.
Eleanor Marvin, national presi-
dent of NCJW, expressed grati-
tude to Rosetta and Jules Stan-
dig, whose efforts as trustees of
the estate of their uncle Morris
I. Lewisohn, were instrumental
in obtaining this contribution.
Rosetta Standig is president of
N'CJW's Teaneck, N.J.. Section.
Mrs. Marvin stated, "The Mor-
ris I. Lewisohn Memorial Wing
in Education is an exciting addi-
tion to N'CJW's Research Insti-
tute because it provides space
for the continuous growth we are
witnessing in the Institute's pro-
grams."
Mrs. Marvin also announced
that a Morris I. Lewisohn Memo
rial Fellowship Endowment Fund
n to be established with an ad-
ditional g'ft of $30,000 in con
junction with the Research Insti-
tute.
"Annual grants will be award-
ed." Mrs. Marvin said, "to worthy
and needy Israeli graduate stu-
dents in the field of education
for the disadvantaged. They will
be known as Morris I. Lewisohn
Fellows, and their studies will be
an ongoing contribution to the
programs and goals of the Insti
tute."
The NCJW Institute, establish
ed in 1969. is an action-research
center designed to develop and
evaluate new educational meth-
ods, materials, practices and serv-
ices for the educationally disad-
vantaged in order to speed their
integration into Israel's modern
society.
Rosetta and Jules Standig will
be honored for their role in the
Lewisohn contribution during the
special dedication- eeremonj: of
the Research Institute's new Mt
Scopus facilities, which will take
place during NCJW's second Is-
rael Summit Conference in No-
vember 1974.
Tne National Council of Jew-
ish Women, founded in 1893. U
one of the oldest major American
Jewish women's organization*, lu
100.000 members are committed
to a broad program of commit-
nity service, social and legisla-
tive action and education
and in Israel.
Temple Israel Of
Miramar Tickets
Now Available
Teroole Israel of Miramar High
Holy Day tickets are now avail
able to members only.
Tickets will be issued to mem-
bers who are in good standing
(i.e.. current in their dues, with
no outstanding pledges or tui-
tion) and seats will be assigned
on a first come, first served ba-
sis.
Members wishing to determine
their balance are urged to ca
the office between 9:00 a.m. ind
4:00 p.m., Monday through Fri-
day.
Non-members may purchase
tickets beginning Aug. 20. For
further information, call the
Temple office.
Mrs. Ferdie Holds Meeting
Mrs. Evelyn L. Ferdie, newly
elected president of the Ladies
Auxiliary. Department of Florida,
Jewish War Veterans, held the
first meeting of newly elected de-
partment officers and chairmen
at her home recently.
ANNOUNCING
GRAND OPENING
of
AMERICAN BANK
OF HALLANDALE
merican
lank
allandale
PLEASE COME J/V AND MEET OUR STAFF
SSllT^ June Mowers
Phyllis R F,nc DoUy -_^__
Thomas L Baert Joan Burfield
Elizabeth, A. Self Diane ^^
Pat Goldberg Mary Afm Turkinfton
Thomas Davies
*
3131 W. Hallandale Beach Boulevard
Pembroke Park, Florida
(2 blocks West of 1-95)

MEMBER FDIC
Affil.ated with Amorkan Bank of Hollywood
Telephone
962-1620
.


Friday. August 16, 1974
*kni%tntricUair of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
Ladylove
Grandpa... The Nicotine Czar
Join JWF Women Now... Help
Make That Division Strong
By RITA GOODMAN
I believe my age was approxi-
mately 30 when I started reading
the local obituary column to see
if anyone 30 had passed away
that day.
It was like a crap game. If I
was still reading, then I was also
stili winning.
THE OTHER DAY I was con-
ducting a coffee and carrot cake
seminar on life in which all the
attendees, friends of my daugh-
ter, were in their twenties.
Norman happened to mention
he is into the "obituary-reading
synirome." (An early bloomer/
warrior.)
Jimmy said, "Look what hap-
pened to Adele Davis. Lived on
all those vitamins and health
foods and dies."
I interjected, "Adele Davi9
wasn't exactly 16, you know,"
and added, "her life was obvious-
ly full and interesting."
While they were mulling that
around, I thought about all these
v tung people being prematurely
concerned about life's crap game.
LOOKING AT THEM. I said,
"As far as I can figure it, a per-
son has two things going for
them.
'The first is to select parents
of hearty stock.
"The second is the fact that
y-.'i're only as old as your ar-
teries."
On the strength of this state-
dent, they nibbled more carrot
cake thereby jamming their
youn? arteries with cholesterol,
their pancreas with sugar and
Lheir taste buds with pleasure.
One advantage of middleage is
surrounding yourself with young
; -'i>;>le and talking with an air
of authority on subjects you
know nothing about.
THEY LISTEN.
. and since I had an audi-
ence. I decided to expound on
my theory of heredity playing a
large part in survival.
'My Grandpa Coojicr," I said,
"had approximately 12 heart at-
tacks. He'd fall into a coma, the
Whole family would gather to sit
an 1 cry and eventually, he'd
o[ien his eyes, look around and
ask. "What are you all doing
here?"
The family would dis|>erse un-
Once Again
The
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JACOB
JEROSOLOMSKI
Will Official* at the

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RITA GOODMAN
til the next seizure.
In the interim, one by one, his
care would wear his daughters
down.
When it was my Mother's
turn, she lasted two years before
her nerves got jangled.
So. Grandpa went to Aunl
Ida's house. Her hair got greyer
than Grandpa's during his tenure
of residence.
FINALLY, they all gathered
together to discuss the fact that
their father was going to leave
a lot of wornout children in hia
wake if something more physi-
cally sensible wasn't arranged.
Grandpa went to live at The
Jewish Home for the Aged.
He loved it.
First of all, there was around- ,
the-clock medical attention. No
more midrile-of-the-night SOS's
for a doctor.
Secondly, Grandpa had kind of
a C/ar-complex; he loved to di-
rect and rule people.
All the people at the Home
paid court to him for they re- \
membered "Meyer the big
cattle man."
(Those with memories un- |
touched by senility used slightly '
different expressions such as
"cattle thief" and "tough
S.O.B.")
BE THAT as it may. his chil-
dren visited regularly. I remem-
ber well.
Grandpa, at age 85, still
smoked cigarettes. He would
take a scissor, cut the cigarette
in two and practically set fire to
his beard in lighting the 50 per
cent product.
It was wartime and cigarettes
were scarce. Everyone considered
Grandpa to be doing his part in
austerity.
Uncle Ben, who was in the
wholesale tobacco business,
would say, "Pa, you don't have
to do that. I'll bring you a car-
ton."
Nevertheless, the following
week, the carton would be gone.
. and Grandpa would say,
"Ben, maybe next week you
could bring two cartons."
The children, befuddled with
visions of their father sitting in
a constant cloud of smoke, de-
cided Grandpa didn't have time
for heart attacks anymore be-
cause he was so busy smoking.
FINALLY, on one of our Sun-
day visits, the director of the
Home, asked to speak to Mom-
ma and Uncle Ben. "I think you
should be aware." he said, "it
has come to our attention that
your father is selling cigarettes
to everyone at ten cents apiece."
At 85. Grandpa wad running a
thriving black market at the
Jewish Home for the Aged!
... of course, cutting his own
in half to make them go farther.
". and that is my heredity,"
I told the young people .
... as I lit a cigarette.
The Women's Division of Jew
ish Welfare Federation has beiV
busy with pre-campaign meetings
as well as structuring social pro-
grams for the months ahead.
One sneak preview that they
look forward to is the appearance
of Manheim Shapiro, noted Jew-
ish group dynamics leader and
scholar, at a luncheon scheduled
for Thursday, Oct. 10.
Incoming officers of Women's
Division are: Marcia Tobin. pres-
ident; Karen Margulies, campaign
vice president; Meral Ehrenstein.
educational vice president; Ellie
Katz, educational vice president
and Ilene VV'cisberg, leadership
development vice president.
The Executive Board of Worn
en's Division is committed to
providing strong educational and
campaign leadersnip.
You will he hearing more
its total program shortly. Join in
this year's endeavor to make
Women's Division a strong and
viabie entity.
-: -b *
What is Young Women's Lead-
ership" If you want to know,
mark down the evening of Sept.
12 on your calendar. Those in-
terested in participating in Worn
en's Leadership programs spon-
sored by JWF, telephone 927-0538
and place your name on the in-
vitation list.
Public Libraries
Receive Copy Of
ADL Publication
Thirteen Broward County li-
braries and all 15 public libraries
in Palm Beach County are re-
ceiving complimentary copies of
"The New Anti-Semitism," which
is the latest in a series of Anti-
Defamation League publications
on prejudice and bigotry in the
world today.
Arthur Teitelbaum, Florida Re-
gional Director of the ADL, stat-
ed, "We are certain that the res-
idents of Palm Beach County will
find "The New Anti-Semitism" to
be insightful and interesting
reading
"The book exposes and docu-
ments the current strain of a dis-
ease which has plagued the Jews
throughout history," he added.
The donation of the books to
the libraries was made possible
by a grant from the Florida As-
sociation of B'nai B'rith Lodges.
jhe KOSHER
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HOTEL
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BREAST FORMS AND BRAS FITTED


Page 8
Jenist Fk>ridB&F d Shaiar of Hollywood
Friday, August 16, 1974
I
Send A New Year's Message To A Soviet Jew
As a way of expressing a vis-
ible sign of support to Soviet
Jewry in their fight for freedom,
the Soviet Jewry Committee of
Jewish Welfare Federation of
PJplljjwood .te-now selling affec-
tion of Jewish New Year's cards
to be sent to Soviet Jews.
The packet, which is $1.00, con
tains card! printed in Russian
and includes names and addresses
of people to whom they should be
sent.
Let Russian Jews know they
have not been forgotten. Buy a
packet of New Year's cards at the
federation office TODAY!
You'll feel good about your
gesture.
SO WILL THEY!!!
OT EBPEEB CLUA H KAHAbI
Historic Torah Being Lent To
Temple In The Pines By Family
As a "contribution," a Torah
has been "k-nt" to Temple in the
Pines by an anonymous donor.
is >
RPHBET EBPEflM 0CP
Mbl BAC HE 3AEbIJlM!
GREETINGS FROM
Till: JEWS OF USA AND CANADA
TO THE JEWS OF USSR.
WE HAVE NOT FORGOTTEN YOUl
Service Program Endorsed
NEW YORK (JTA) Amer-
ican and Canadian university and
college professors, in cooperation
with the Zionist Council of the
Arts and Sciences, academic arm
of the American Zionist Federa-
tion, have endorsed the American
Zionist Youth Foundation's "Proj-
ect Etgar" program which seeks
to recruit high school graduates
and college-age men and women
for volunteer service in Israel.
THE ACADEMICS will boost
the program among their student
fcody on their university and col-
lege campuses.
The goals of these academics
in supporting the AZYF's "Pro-
ject Etgar" campaign is to call
attention to the manpower needs
of Israel and to continue the aid
to the kibbutzim and cooperative
villages.
Many men and women are now
completing their six-month volun-
teer service and are returning to
the homes, schools and busi-
nesses
"Project Etgar" seeks to re-
cruit additional volunteers to
work in Israel.
THE PROGRAM requires a
volunteer to sign up for a six-
month period during which he
takes an intensive six-week He-
brew language course, spends
three months working on a kib-
butz or moshav, and an additional
six weeks of work in a work, job
environment of his own prefer-
ence.
Interspersed throughout the
program will be opportunities for
the volunteer to participate in
educational seminars, to tour the
country, and attend cultural ac-
tivities.
Subsidies on a limited basis
will be available for those requir-
ing financial assistance.
Hollywood B'nai B'rith
Hollywood Chapter No. 725,
B'nai B'rith Women, is presently
reorganizing and invites women
from the Greater Hollywood 'Hal-
landale area to join. General
membership meetings are held
the third Monday evening of each
month at the Home Federal Bank
Building. Hollywood.
Women Reorganizing
For further information, pros-
pective members may contact
membership vice president. Mrs.
Marjorie Schiffman or Mrs. Da-
vid Levine, Chapter and Council
Trustee.
RAHBI HAROLD fffCHTM
The family which owns the
Torah has made a practice of
loaning it to new congregations
throughout the world. In the past
75 sears, this treasure has been
in Russia. Belgium. Paris. Con-
necticut. Chicago. Memphis, Mis-
sissippi and will shortly enhance
the services at Temple in the
Pines.
This Torah will be read during
the forthcoming Hi^h Holy serv-
ices when two Torahs are tradi
tionally used.
In preparation for the High
Holy Days, the appointment of
Rabbi Harold Richter to conduct
the services has been announced.
IT V,,- .,..., ,,. ].. 5^,^,0^ a f,nn
gregation in Scrantdn. Pa:, and
also Temple B'nai Raphael in
North Miami Beach.
. .Fi>ltty. at^dXJ.jxirj., the.Tem-
ple will have a special memorial
service in memory of the late
Mot- Rosen conducted by Lee
Seligman.
Temple Beth El
Sisterhood Event
Benefits Blind
The annual Beth El Sisterhood
mid-summer event to aid its
Service to The Blind'' will be
a luncheon and card party to be
held Monday. Aug. 26. at 11:10
a.m. in the Tobin Auditorium oi
Temple Beth El.
Mrs. Harold M. Ratner. chair-
man, will be assisted by Mrs. Al-
fred Mazzarino. Mrs. Martin Reno.
Mrs. ulia Murrow. Miss Dora Vh
Mis. Julia Murrow, Miss Dora Ul-
Fass. Mrs. Stanley Chartoff. Mrs.
Roslyn Emanueb and Mrs. Stuart
Kal'man.
Mrs. Caryl Feldman. founder of
Sisterhood's "Service to The
Blind" and chairman of the com-
mittee since its inception, has an
nounced the addition of two blind
certified proofreaders who are
working with the committee now
in preparation of books for the
visually handicapped in our
schools.
For tickets and reservations
call Mrs. Harold Ratner or Mrs.
MelYln Freedman at the temple
???AskAbe???
By ABRAHAM B. HALPERN
QIESTION: What is the
meaning of HaHalah?
MBS. ANNA BROWN
Hollywood
ANSWER: Kabbalah is a He-
brew word meaning receiving, or
that which is received. It there-
lot-' also meant tradition.
"The term Kabbalah originally
denoted the oral tradition which
w Written I.aw. but in the twelfth
century it was adopted by mys-
ti< l in .lenote the alleged conti-
nuity of their mystical tradition
from early times." (The Stand-
ard Jewish Encyclopodia, page
1087)
All authorities agree that in
the beginning the word Kabbalah
diil not especially denote a mys-
stiial or estoteric tradition. It is
generally believed that Moses on
Mount Sinai received the Writ-
ten Law Torah She'Biktav,
arid in addition he also received
the Torah She'Eal Peh, the Oral
Law.
In the Talmud, Kabbalah is
used for the extra-Pentateuchal
parts of the Bible, and in i>ost
Talmudie literature the Oral
Law is also called Kaballah.
However, from the twelfth
century onward, it began to be
used for the esoteric teachings
of Judaism and Jewish mysti-
cism. Today, in its wider sense,
it signifies all the successive
esoteric movements in Judaism
that evolved from the end of the
period of the Second Temple and
became active factors in the his-
tory of Israel.
The subject of Kabbalah is
very complex and complicated,
anrl there' are many sources
which discuss it in great detail.
One of the most important liter-
ary products of Kabbalah is the
Book Zohar Torah.
The word Zohar means splen-
dor. Tradition attributes its au-
thorship to the Palestinian Sage,
1 '.
M

""\k ^Hb '*.
ii
\
abi Mtram
Ralibi Simeon Bar Yohai. (2nd
century C.E.) It is a commentary
and Interpretation on sections of
the Pentateuch iThe Five Books
of Moses i and parts of the Ha-
giographa (Songs of Songs, Ruth,
Lamentations).
The basic premise of the Zo-
har, as indeed of all Kabbalah, is
that the material world is mere-
ly the visible aspect of an un-
seen reality. The Kabbalist reads
the Torah not only as a docu-
ment of history or a code of law,
but as a mystical account in "ci-
pher language", as it were of the
dynamics of the hidden Divine
life underlying creation. Accord-
ing to many sources, the Kab-
balist knows how to decode the
esoteric meaning of Scripture.
It is interesting to note that
in Israel, in the modern Hebrew,
the word Kabbalah is used at the
reception desk of hotels, and if
you desire a receipt for a pur-
chase, you ask for a kabbalah.
For those interested in reading
about Kabbalah and Jewish mys-
ticism in greater detail, there
is a lengthy article with cross
references to many other articles
in the Kncyclojiedia Judaica, Vol.
10, pp. 489-654. There is also a
very' detailed and extensive bib-
liography at the end of the ar-
ticle.
EDITOR'S NOTE: Please send
your questions to: ???ASK
ABE???, Jewish Floridian and
Shofar, 1909 Harrison St., Holly-
wood, Florida 33020
Blend Of Luxury And Convenience

In every resort city or popular
offshore site there is always one
hotel just a cut above the rest in
service, facilities, attention to de-
tail and know-how the experi-
enced traveler's first choice.
Such a hotel is Halcyon Balmoral
on Nassau's Cable Beach .an
inviting blend of luxury and
convenience in all respects.
This elegant resort property
was originally founded as a pri-
vate club in 1947 by Sir Oliver
Simmons. A stately pillared
clubhouse was erected on 14
acres of what was then exclusive-
ly residential beachfront. In
1967. a 145-room Manor House
was built.
Today. Halcyon Balmoral fea
tures 220 rooms which include
the Manor House and villas. Hal-
cyon Balmoral is more cordial
and less commercial, and hence
better able to provide more per-
sonal attention to guest needs
than the average hotel. Its food
quality sets it apart, as does an
atmosphere of relaxed, congenial,
quiet comfort.
In 1973, Halcyon Balmoral
formerly the Balmoral Beach
Hotel was acquired from the
titled Englishman who built it
by Court Line Ltd.. Britain's fast-
est growing travel organization
with interests in airlines and ho-
tels throughout the Caribbean.
In the wake of new ownership,
all rooms and villas have been
centrally air conditioned, redec-
orated and refurbished. Roger N.
W. Westoby, general manager of
the hotel, explained: "The Hal-
cyon Balmoral is a very individ-
ual hotel and we intend to keep
it that way. The original owner
created a hotel of great charac-
ter and sophistication appealing
to people who want to be treated
as individuals. The first thing
we do is offer more space: al-
though we may be smaller than
most of the mass market hotels
in room capacity, all our Manor
House rooms, for instance, have
their own private dressing
rooms."
Halcyon Balmoral Hotel on Cable Beach
Halcyon Balmoral offers its
guests many exclusive features
not to be found elsewhere in
Nassau. As an example, it is tne
only hotel with its own strictly
private island a 30-acre pri-
vate island half a mile offshore
across Cable Beach lagoon, with
three secluded beaches.
"A total experience in luxu-
rious living" best describe-, this
unique island getaway a blend
of old world elegance with con-
temporary excitement. Air con-
ditioned rooms, most with ocean
view; private island beaches;
hotelside pool; gourmet dining in
the finest tradition; all water
sports; tennis and golf; and near
by casino gambling and nizht
life.
You'll find the Halcyon Bal
moral is run with unusual effi-
pany's global operations. Food
ciency not a small part of
which reflects the parent corn-
preparation and service at Hal-
cyon Hotels gets more than
p ing notice. Food is a major
interest of Court Line a rriulti-
national corporation that directs
more than two dozen companies
in almost every facet of travel,
transportation and leisure indus-
tries.
Sumptuous menus, combined
*ith first-class accommodations
and a full spectrum of recrea-
tional activities topped off
by an intriguing island atmos
P.nere assure that your spe
cial individual vacation or group
function will be pleasantly dif-
ferent and a lingering memory
you'll long to recapture.
H
'


Idery, August 16, 1974
"Jewlst ncridiinn and Shafar of Hollywood
Page'ft
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Only Sure Way To Peace
ADL Leaders Meet With French
HTOR, FleridUn-Shofar:
Witt the strong possibility Of a
crmanent peace finally being es-
ablished in the Middle East be-
veen Israel and the Arab states,
is most vital that Israel be left
rith borders that can be defend-
by her. eran though theoretic-
there will be guarantees,
aties and all sorts of promises
lade that have been broken be
ore.
What finally seems to be
Emerging is the realization that
|he only sure way to a perma
sent peace is the economic
rowth and well being of all the
mintries involved, especially
Sgypt, Syria and Jordan, who do
[not have the oil billions of Saudi
Arabia and the other oil Sheikh
Joms.
Israel, in spite of having 85%
of her budget go for necessary
military supplies for her defense,
has already proven that she can
prosper, if she is left at peace.
The United States is the State of
Israel's strongest and friendliest
ally, and also depends upon Is
rael to help supply her Mediter-
ranean activities.
We call upon all of our Con-
gressional and Senatorial repre-
sentatives to continue their sup-
port of Israel, as they have done
in the oast, so that peace and
prosperity may finally come to
the lands where Our Western re-
ligions originated, and still find
their fountainhead of inspiration.
SAM 1. PERRY. President
Broward Zioaist District
PARIS (JTA) A delegation
of the American Anti-Defamation
League visiting hew i met .with
several French Jewish commun-
ity leaders.
The French Union of the B'nai
B'rith invited the delegation
which consisted of ADL co-direc-
tor, Arnold Forster; the president
of the ADL Civil Rights Depart
ment, Lawrence Peirez: the direc
tor of the ADL European Depart-
ment, Owen Racbleff: and the
representative of the ADL Israel
Department. Erwin Shapiro.
THE AMERICANS met with
the president of the French B'nai
b'rith, Jean Pierre-BJoch, and
the president of the Representa-
tive Council of the Jewish Institu-
te American guests at the Paris
Hilton.
During the reception, Forster
announced he had written a let
ter to West German President
Walter Scheel on behalf of Mrs.
Klarsfeld. who last week was
sentneed to two months in prison
by a West German court for the
attempted abduction of a former
Paris Gestapo chief now living in
West Germany.
tions of France Rosenthal.
Georges Bloch. president of the
European District of the B'nai
B'rith, Jean Paul Elkannon, Paris
Consistory president, and Nazi
hunter, Beate Klarsfeld and her
husband were among those who
attended a special reception for
IN HIS letter, Forster said the
legal proceedings against Mrs.
Klarsfeld contradict West Ger-
many's anti- demanded they be declared null
and void.
He urged the West German
leader to exert his authority to
bring about a speedy ratification
of the Franco-German treaty deal-
ing with war criminals pending
since 1971.
Scientists Protest Ban on Seminar
As Max Lerner Sees It
Continued from Page 4
sition editors was the "dark
;ie of the moon" in the cosmos
Bf his larger belief in freedom.
Was Jefferson's position to-
ward the blacks a reactionary
>ne? No. it wasn't. He took an
enlightened position on the
slaves in terms of his day, but
he didn't bieak the mold of his
ime.
AFTER ALL, Jefferson was
!the leader of the plantation
elite, who focused his fire on
P>ig government and on the new
ommei-cial and financial elites,
ind he remained a planter.
The final question: Was Jeffer-
on a moral man? Fawn Brodie
lias explored this sympathetic-
ally in her recent "Thomas Jef-
ferson: An Intimate History."
I go with her symi>athetic ap-
proach. A lonely man after his
wife's death, Jefferson didn't be-
r-me an ascetic, and he broke
ie sexual codes.
There was Maria Cosway. the
ficvely American lady in Europe,
Iwith whom Jefferson dallied
Iwhen he was ambassador at
[Paris and to whom he wrote his
[passionate lyrical outburst
1 'Dialogue Between My Head and
My Heart"
THERE WAS his black mis-
tress. Sally Hemlngs. who bore
him children and with whom he
had a deep and tender relation-
ship.
Despite these lapses from the
formal code. I count Jefferson a
moral man more so perhaps
than some who stuck with the
code but took their frustrations
out on adventures in power.
Rabbi Rosenfeld
Conducting The
Beth A Inn Service
Services at Temple Beth Ahm.
Hollywood, will begin at 8:15 Fri-
day. They will be conducted by
Rabbi David Rosenfeld. English
lay reader will be Alex Chaskes.
Saturday, the services will be-
gin at 9:00 a.m. with Rabbi David
Rosenfeld in charge. English lay-
reader will be Morris Wasser.
The Oneg Shabbat and Kiddush
will be sponsored by Ms. Pauline
Schwartz.
Hebrew School registrations
are now being accepted and tick-
ets for High Holy Days may be
obtained at the temple during the
week, afternoons from 12:30 p.m.
to 3:00 p.m. and evenings 7:30 to
9:30 p.m.
NEW YORK (JTA) Two
groups of American scientists
have issued a statement deplor-
ing "the destruction by Soviet au-
thorities of the unofficial scien-
tific seminar" which was to have
begun recently in the Moscow
apartment of Prof. Alexander
Voronel.
The statement, issued by the
executive board of the Commit-
tee of Concerned Scientists and
the International Board of Spon-
sors and Advisors of the Inter-
national Seminar, protested
against "the harassment and im-
prisonment of many of the semi-
nar's organizers" including Vo-
ronel.
"WE PROTEST the Soviet gov-
ernment's refusal to permit these
scientists neither to exercise their
internationally-recognieed right
to emigrate, nor to function as
. scientists within the Soviet
Union,'" the statement declared.
"We are convinced that these
repressive actions by the Soviet
government against leading scien
tlsts wishing to emigrate and
other outspoken scientists, violate
implementation of bi-national co
operative scientific agreements."-
fundamental scientific and hu-
man principles and endanger the
At the same v.mr, it was re
ported here that Vitaly Rubin, a
leading sinologist and one of the
organizers of the aborted semi-
nar, is being charged with trea-
son. The Greater New York Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry, in re-
porting the charge, said that the
maximum sentence for that of-
fense, under Soviet law, is death.
SCIENTISTS from the two or-
ganizations, including 10 Nobel
Laureates, cabled President Nix-
on and Secretary of State Henry
A. Kissinger in Moscow recently
warning of the threat to the ful-
fillment of cooperative scientific
agreements between the U.S. and j
the USSR caused by the Soviet
Union's continuing violation of
basic principles of international
scientific cooperation.
"The establishment of and par-
ticipation in bi-national scientific
cooperation and exchange pro-
grams must be conditioned on
the right of scientists to freely
communicate and travel for schol-
arly purposes, to function as
scientists Inside their countries,
and if not so permitted, to emi-
grate without harassment." the
cable warned.
RUBIN HAD been rebuffed re-
peatedly in his efforts to emi-
grate to Israel, Soviet authorities
reportedly saying they did not
want a man with Rubin's exper-
tise on China to go to the West.

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New ZOA President Urges
Rededication to Zionist Cause
Continued from Page 1-
Emphasizing that he does not
believe "if you don't go on aliya,
you are not a Zionist." Dr. Stern-
stein said that nevertheless the
recent decline in aliya indicates
an ovtrall decline in American
Zionist consciousness.
"The precipitous drop after the
October War of American tour-
ism to Israel." said Dr. Sternstein,
"is a result of our own failures.
It is my conviction that to re-
vive Zionism ZOA must put a
major effort on educating the
young generations."
THE FIRST step in this educa-
tion program, called the Young
Zionist Fellowship Seminars, is a
series of programs lasting a week-
end to two weeks and aimed at
the age group of 25-40. Its objec-
tive is "to expos? these young
people to the Zionist experience
and educate them to the Zionist
community and personal involve-
ment, with the possibility of lead-
ing to aliya," Dr. Sternstein said.
The meetings, which will take
place at five locations through-
out the country, will invite these
people and their children to ex-
perience Israeli cultural life,
hear lecture* on Judaism and
Zionism, and take part in discus-
sions on those subjects.
ZOA's new program will be
aimed at the 2540 age group be-
cause, according to the ZOA
president, "The potential for ac-
tive Zionists in this group is very
significant."
HE SAID since the develop
ment of the State of Israel in
194C there have been no real, suc-
cessful programs of Zionist educa
tion in the United States.
"I believe there is a Zionist
thesis to Jewish life," said the
new president. "Zionism is a
word for the responsibilities of
Jews to the Jewish people. When
you assume responsibility in
American Jewish life, you must
assume it in world Jewish life as
well."
Israel, said Dr. Sternstein, is
the focal point of American Jew
ish life, and it is the job of a
Zionist organization to bring all
Jews to recognize this fact.
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Please send me literature on the above.
NAME:
Information Needed For Publication
All synagogues in the Greater Hollywood area are requested
to send their High Holy Days schedule and a complete Bar
Mitzvah and Bat Hftsvah schedule commencing in September.
Please list complete name, name of the parents, date and
where the service will be held. Send all information to: Rita
Goodman, News Coordinator, Jewish Floridian & Shofar. 1909
Harrison St., Hollywood, Florida 33020.
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Chapels available in all
communities in New York and
throughout the Miami.
W Palm Beach areas
Repre


Page 10
+JenistfUridlic}r and Sbofar of Hollywood
Friday, August IB. 1974
Teen Scene
i
By PAIX KERBEL
Although I dop't usually share
my personal family experience
with you, I would like this op-
portunity to share with you a
beautiful experience which took
place during our summer vaca-
tion in Rochester, New York, our
former home.
It was a Saturday morning,
the first week of July. As the
synagogue has always played an
important part of my sixteen
years of life, we were going to
attend our former congregation,
Temple Beth-El, the synagogue
where I was Bar-Mitzvah. It was
there that I was introduced to
prayer so I consider Beth-El my
starting place.
When I entered the sanctuary,
I was astonished to find 500
congregants assembled on such
a beautiful July morning. People
of all ages filled the seats which
re-implanted my belief that pray-
ing has no gap. Everything look-
ed and felt the same. The Rabbi,
Hazzan (Cantor) and Torah
reader were all there. The Rabbi
smiled at our family. As I was
asked to read the Torah many
months before, both my brother
and I were given Aliyahs. The
warmth of the congregation was,
as always, glowing at full force.
As in most congregations, the
entire service was chanted by
the Hazzan; excluding the Torah
service. The only difference is
that this congregation prays
with the Hazzan. Remember, the
congregation that prays together
stays together.
Here comes the best part: a
combined rap session and ser-
mon!!
The Rabbi was teaching us in the
the pulpit and with a roving
microphone, walked around the
congregation discussing the To-
rah portion and other topics with
us. He brought up questions and
members of the congregation
raised their hands and answered
or asked about other points of
concern. I finally strtV a vision
come true. The Rabbi discussing
a topic with us and not to us.
The Rabbi was teaches us in the
true sense of the word.
After this twenty minute ses-
sion, the Rabbi invited all of the
young people of the congregation
to rap with him. He asked ques-
tions like "What will you do dur-
ing the summer to be a better
Jew?" You'd be surprised at
some of the bright answers he
received.
Possibly, we could follow in the
footsteps of Temple Beth El, as
maybe, by having a more infor-
mal service (I don't mean unor-
thodox or unconservative for
there is a quite a difference),
more Jewish people will be
"turned on" with prayer instead
of being turned off. If we set the
warm, unified mood of a close-
knit "family" (as I consider a
congregation a family), then per-
haps all Jews, and even more im-
portant, the youth of the Jewish
community, will carry on in the
tradition which has linked one
generation to another for thou-
sands of years.
If we feel and find a purpose
in prayer, then Religious Ju-
daism has a chance to survive. If
we continue to be the audience of
the service instead of part of the
main act, then, as I see it, there
is little hope.
& *
I would like to welcome home
the Broward County Teen Tour
to Israel, which returned from
a four week visit to our land the
end of July. In the next issue I
will report on their visit, their
emotions and experiences.
Comments to my column by
members of the community are
welcomed.
Shalom L'hitraot!!!
Services
HALUNDALE
HALLANOALE JEWISH CENTER
(Conservative). 416 NE 8lh Ave.
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz, Camto*
Jacob Danzmer.
, NORTH MIAMI IEACN
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22n Ralph P. Klngalay, Cantor Irving
Shulkea. 37
NORTH BROWARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. Liberal. 3501 Univer-
sity Dr. Rabbi Max Weitz. 44
HOLLYWOOD
VOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
(Orthodox). 3891 Sterling Rd., op-
posite Hollywood Hills High School.
Kre'0-n- L.r Frank Stem.
Saturday. 9 a.m. '
TfeMHut Btiri EL (Reform) 1381 S
14th Ave., Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffe. Aasiatant Rabbi Harvey M.
Rosenfeld.
BETH SHALOM (Tempte) Conserva-
tive. 4601 Arthur *.. Rabbi Morton
Malavaky, Cantor Irving Gold.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (Coneervativo).
310 SW 62nd Ave., Hollywood.
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal). 5001
Thomas St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Rob-
ert Frazin.
TEMPLE SLNAI (Conservative). 1201
Johnaon St. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield.
Cantor YatMJda Heilferaun.
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Conservative)
6920 SW 35th 8t. Raool Avrom
Orazin.
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES (Conserve.
tive) Pinea Middle School, 200 No.
Douglas Rd., Pembroke Pines,
Rabbi Aaron Shapero.
Special Children's Services
Planned At Temple Beth Shalom
Bar Mitzvah
SCOTT BEK EMI A t S
Scott, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jo-
seph Berenhaus, will be Bar Mit-
vah, Saturday, Aug. 24, at Temple
Solel.
tr tr
LANNY KEITH MARKS
Lanny, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Richard Marks, will be Bar Mit-
vah, Saturday, Aig. 24 at Temple
Solel.
fr & ARTHUR KURLAND
Arthur, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Abraham Kurland, will be Bar
Mitzvah, Saturday, Aug. 24, at
Temple Israel of Miramar.
Fear Of Renewed War
Mounting In Israel
T Continued from Page 1
two areas as provided in the dis-
engagement agreements would
be proof of Arab willingness to
reach a Mideast settlement.
Another cause of concern in
Israel was the arrival of King
Faisal of Saudi Arabia in Cairo
for a nine-day visit to Egypt.
Faisal crossed the Suez Canal to
see the positions Egyptian troops
have taken up since the Israeli-
Egyptian disengagement agree-
ment.
The main purpose of his visit
was reportedly to discuss with
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat
how Saudi oil wealth and diplo-
matic leverage can be combined
with Egyptian military strength
in support of the Arab cause
against Israel.
Sadat was expected to seek
Faisal's support in his attempt to
reconcile King Hussein of Jordan
with the Palestinian terrorists.
MEANWHILE IN Lebanon,
terrorists and members of the
right-wing and Christian Phalan-
gist Party have been fighting
with machine guns and rockets
in a suburb of Beirut.
Two terrorists and a civilian
were reported killed, and 10 i>eo-
ple were injured. Lebanese Pre-
mier Takieddin Al-Sohl postpon-
ed an official visit to Libya in an
effort to calm the situation. The
Phalangists see Lebanon's future
as being linked with Western Eu-
rope, while the terrorists, who
include Christians as well as
Moslems, support Pan-Arabism
and socialism.
The warnings of a new war be-
gan picking up in intensity here
when Gen. Mordechai Gur, the
Chief of Staff, in telling a meet-
ing here of the Israel-American
Chamber of Commerce that tne
Arabs could start a new war by
the end of the year, stressed that
Israel must prepare itself spirit-
ually, mentally and organization-
ally for the eventuality of a new-
war.
HIS WARNING followed -a
similar one from Peres in a
weekend television interview.
Their remarks are seen as part
of an effort to convince the mili-
tary and the public of the seri-
ousness of the situation and the
need for all-out preparedness.
As part of the new prepared-
ness, the army extended its work
day to run until darkness. More
reserves are scheduled to be call-
ed up, particularly those in stor-
age and maintenance who will be
working around the clock in or-
der that combat vehicles will be
ready for use.
The army is also preparing for
trial call-ups of reserve units and
at least one will be conducted
over the radio.
tV>>VvVVVvVVvV f
28 AB 7:36
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
l*r>r>r%r>r\*Ar%A^A*<^**rWVW

DRIVING A GAS HOG?
BURNING UP MONEY?
/ it/.
CALL 921-2211
The Gas Mileage and Performance
Specialists For Complete Information
Automobiles Campers Trucks Vans
iiililllll.
.iiiill.
Inquiries regarding Temple
Beth Shalom membership and
tickets for th Hih Holy Days,
should be directed to Sylvia G.
Gordon, executive secretary, by
visiting or phoning the office,
Mondays through Thursdays, 10
a.m. to 5 p.m., and Fridays 10
a.m. to 12 noon.
All seats are reserved on a first
come, first served basis and non-
members as well as members will
be accommodated.
Dr. Morton Malavsky, rabbi of
Beth Shalom, will conduct the
holiday services assisted by Can
tor Irving Gold and a profession
al adult choir. Services will be
held for children and teenagers
in the school building, at no
charge. They are not required to
have tickets. The youngsters'
services will be geared to their
level and interest and times will
coincide generally with those of
the adult services.
Registrations, schedules and
school information are available
by calling Mordecai Ophcr, direc-
tor of education, regarding day
school, Sunday school, Hebrew
school. The school office also has
RABBI MORTON MALAVSKY
information pertaining to nurs-
ery', pre-kindergarten and kinder-
garten departments. Youth pro-
grams are being scheduled by
Shirley Cohen, youth coordinator.
Hasidic Jews Fight
Court Redistricting
NEW YORK (JTA) Fed-
eral District Court Judge Walter
Burchhausen has reserved deci-
sion on a charge by Hasidic Jews
that the newly-drawn state as-
sembly district lines that divide
in half their community of 35,-
000 persons in Brooklyn's Wil-
liamsburg section discriminates
against them in favor of Blacks
and should be thrown out as un-
constitutional.
Nathan Lewin, attorney for the
United Jewish Organizations of
Williamsburg, an umbrella group
for more than 100 Jewish groups
in the area, charged here that
the U.S. Department of Justice
had "strong-armed" the State
Legislature to make the Hasidim
the "victims of a racial gerry-
mander" by insisting that the
new 57th Assembly district in
Brooklyn be at least 65 percent
Black to insure the election of a
Black assemblyman.
DURING THE day-long testi-
mony, Richard Scolaro, executive
director of the legislative com-
mittee that drew up new lines
for 28 legislative and congres-
sional districts in Brooklyn and
Manhattan, admitted that the
"sole reason" the Hasidim could
not be kept in one district was
this Justice Department demand.
Scolaro said the only way to
provide a Black majority in the
district was to include 15,000
Hasidim in the 56th Assembly
District which is now 80 percent
Black making the 57th 65 per-
cent instead of 61.5 percent
Black.
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Uctasod ft hsurtd


Friday, August 16, 1974
and Shatar of Hollywood
Page 11
I' !:!,- ^cifmour ^T). jLict
> *-
man
Where is American Jewry Going?
V ITU
S\, if ever, has an ad-
fetration been subjected
Fa battery of continuous
^as the present one. and
saying grace has been
singer.
tan Is for impeachment
svvrred by the defenders
us to consider the
?" vnts in the domain of
affairs, where Dr. Kis-
presides.
LINGER HAS received the
^eace Pi i/.e and more re-
a national straw ballot
Kissinger leading all po-
ies in |>opularity.
le an achievement for "our
as Sadat likes to call
icre is a parallel to it, we
in the career of another
boy, Ben.
"1$ a hundred years back
|ier Queen Victoria Ben-
DMMI ran the British
|re. He too was noted for a
spectrum. He was the out-
rig figure at the Congress
i:* when the European
gathered even Bis-
Ik was an admirer of Dis-
PRAELl SAID. The world
by imagination" and he
lied to the world's imagina-
So ap;>arently does Kissin-
,11ie day when the swords
jined into plows has not ar-
des;>ite Dr. Kissingei 's ed-
itions have not indicated
reduction in their bombs and
lies, but nevertheless there
feeling that something has
accomplished. Look at
ka. For some years we have
[no relations with her.
(e couldn't even get any chop
from it but now they are
east talking and we have
gotten accupuncture.
pSRAEIJ TOO was especial-
-.teiested in the Middle East.
"a; s his name might have
a wee bit psychologically to
Iwith it. Disraeli moans from
i.c\. Disraeli might properly
called an early pre-Herzl
nist j
le was the author of "The
tadrous Story of David Al-
t'." a fictional presentation of
trje attempt in the 12th cen-
^y by Jews to regain Jerusa-
Msraeli's career should be an
liraiion. to all yo in-; people.
her. Disraeli made his political
[W trying to make his first
h in Parliament he was
tried down. "Sit down, sit
'n, they called. Disraeli sat
K*n' "b't he shouted back, "You
jfs will one day be glad to lis-
to me."
'0 ACTUALLY he didn't say,
IU gxiys." He spoke a better
gtfah. After all. Disraeli was
an outstanding writer. He
one of the best novelists in
-and. He did tell his hecklers.
Aever. that the day would
me when they would hear him.
pi of course it did.
pisraeli encountered anti-Sem-
n. "I would rather vote for
Devil than foi you," one man
I to him.
"In tue event your friend is
at a candidate, can I co nt on
jur supptjK?" said Disraeli.
le had it and he knew hu-
On nature; Politicians are al-
lays Icing approached by j>eo-
who expeet to be remember-
b' t h (reryone? "How is the old mal-
Disraeli would ask when
idn't remember the fellow.
Everyone then was sure Dis- .
not forgotten. Who hw /
"an old"malady ol some soil.' (
..rpHE FUTURE of the Jewish Community in
America," edited by David Sidorsky (New
Yr.k Bft'ie Books. S11.R3. 324 pages), is a col-
lection of excellent essays by 11 prominent aca-
demicians.
The aeas covered include synagogues,
schools, identity and affiliation, demography, per-
spectives, and youth. It is a thinking man's book.
DESPITE ITS title, there are few prognos-
tications about the future and these few do not
depict a future Jewish communiy suffused with
lich Jewish values.
We recommend for immediate reading the
a tides by Dr. Ostrow. Seymour Fox, James
Sleeper, and Charles S. Liebman..
All the scholars miss the hsues that loom on
the horizon. Among these issues that will deter-
mine much of the future course are: What is the
future of our national defense or service organi-
zations if local Community Relations Committees
assume overlapping roles?
WHY SHOULD Jewish Federations support
conflicting philosophies of national organizations
HMD as was exemplified in the De Funis case and
on "Affirmative Action"?
How can the voices of the masses of con-
tributors be heard in Jewish community affairs
conducted by Federation leaders that merely
present a facade of democracy and who regard
their knowledge as omniscient?
Should there be a reconsideration of the
Mtfver Report of 1949? Should there be a com-
pulsory merger of some Jewish organizations or
at least of some of their functions or activities?
WHO IS to dictate direction and tone of
public relations, information and propaganda
about Israel?
What will happen to our youth if Israel's
kibbutz movement turns to more private control
and Israel's socialist political figures lose their
political power?
"SOCIOLOGY IN ISRAEL," by Leonard
Waller (Westport, Greenwood Press, $12.50. 314
pages), is a compendium of sociological research
carried on in Israel over the last twenty years.
It is a companion for Simon Herman's "Israelis
and Jews."
Dr. Weller is chairman of the Department of
Sociology at Bar-Han University. He discusses in
non-professional terms education, inter-ethnic re-
lations, criminology, failures of the schools, and
a myriad of other topics.
The tables of comparisons in the achieve-
ments, finances, relationships, goals, and animo-
sities between Ashkenazim, Sephardim and
Oriental Jews shows that Israel's internal prob-
lems equal her external problems.
..I.e. 1
*
\~jallob
Brooklyn Study Finds for Orthodox
a SURVEY of attitudes of members of Ortho-
dox Jewish families in the Boro Park section
of Brooklyn has indicated that while there is a
generation gap there, most of the young Jews
still express deep commitment to the values
of their Orthodox parents, a Brooklyn Colllege
sociologist has reported.
Egon Mayer repo.ted that the data for his
study were obtained mainly from two separate
surveys: intensive interviews with 65 Boro Park
families randomly chosen from the telephone
directory, and a mail questionnaire sent to
Young Israel Intercollegiates, with 44 question-
naires completed and returned.
THE SUBJECT of the Young Israel survey
was religious attitudes and attitudes toward
e ders Mayer reported he found that 63.8 per-
cent cf the jOung respondents indicated, on
luestions dealing with the Orthodox character of
the community, that they were saisfied with the
community and 84 percent declared they intend-
ed to remain Orthodox thioughout their lives,
while 91 percent said emphatically they would
never join a Conservative or Reform synagogue.
But the survey also found that 52 percent
were diisat.sfied with the lack of political ac-
tivities in the community, with 56 percent partic-
ularly dissatisfied with the purported lack of
sufficient political activities on behalf of Israel.
MAYER SAID 54 percent indicated they ei-
ther did not care about or were dissatisfied with
the opinions their parents expressed about their
lives or projects.
The family interviews, Mayer reported, indi-
cated various sources of conflicts between sons
and daughters with their parents. He reported
that a frequent source of conflicts with elders
among the boys was over their preferences :n
hair styles, clothing styles and their militancy
in the defense of Jewish interests.
Mayer reported in the current issue of the
Journal of Jewish Communal Service, lie de-
scribed the report as a summary of his find'igs.
FOR GIRLS the major source of inter-gen-
erational conflict was their desire for advanced
secular education and contemporary clothing
styles, particularly those that violated "parental
norms of sexual modesty," the sociologist de-
claied.
He reported that the survey of the 65 fam-
ilies also produced a 'somewhat surprising" dif-
ference in the level of religious education be-
tween those under 25 and those over 25.
In the under-25 group. 30 percent more had
formal and advanced yeshiva education than
those over 25. Of those over 25, 30 percent had
received only informal or no religious education
compared with those under 25.
Barbra Streisand's New Film Hit
Hollywood
DARBRA STREISAND, in the hit movie "For
Pete's Sake," appears as a newly-wed, unso-
phisticated tomboy clowning her way through
the taylor-made screenplay by Stanley Shapiro
and Mau:ice Rirhlin in the best tradition of such
visual comedians as Chaplin Keaton and Harold
Lloyd.
Never as youthful and less glamorous, the
girl "Henry" is enmeshed in sheer unsurmount-
able problems trying to help her cab-driver hus-
band Pete (Michael Sarrazin) to get the dough
tor a col.eye education by picking a "sure" win-
ner on the stock market.
RAISING THE money for the shares from
loan sharks, caught between two underworld
ptouds. she is thrown into the hands of an alert
madam who buys off her contract now skyrocket-
ing with astronomic interest figures.
Since Mrs Cherry, the owner of a stable of
girls, is portrayed by Molly Picon with delicate
charm, the story never becomes vulgar and lewd.
Barbra. in overalls instead of dressed, in a non-
s.nging. down-to-earth role, is more sympathetic
to the audience than ever.
"For Pete's Sake" al who, l.ko Barbra. won her Academy Award a
few years ago for her very first film role. M-.
Pa:sons portrays the quite obnoxious sister in-
law, with Wil.iam Redfield as her hen-peeked
spouse.
THE UNPRETENTIOUS entertainment fea-
ture was produced by Ray Stark's company, with
Phil Feldman as executive, and is released by
Columbia.
(Zcrl
A20th ffliiorv
Jeremiah
From Sicily
Haifa
TYESCLNDANT of a Sicilian
fami'y, Anthony Peranio
came to Israel from his native
New York in 1955 because he
identified with Zionism, and be-
cause he saw in Israel an oppor-
tunity to live a free, pioneering
and challenging 1 ife. His wife,
Rita, was Jewish, but Tony came
here without any formal relig-
ious, political or national ties.
In the nineteen years that have
elapsed, he has emerged as the
country's leading battler in the
fight against air and water pol-
lution,* noise menace, nuclear pol-
lution threat, road accidents
anywhere and everywhere that
the disorganized public is faced
by danger to the quality of hu-
man lite as a result of the en-
croachment of industrialization
and governmental apathy.
Peranio feels a deep personal
sense of responsibility for what is
happening because the dangers
are caused by modern technol-
ogy, and he is an engineer.
He teaches his students at the
Technion, where he is associate
professor of civil engineering in
the Centre for Environmental
Research, that technology has an
obligation to society over and
above the provision of comfort
and convenience.
TO THE public Tony Peranio
has become a symbol of the
struggle against faceless corpo-
rations. Some look upon him as
a Don Quixote, tilting his lance
at the windmills of progress.
He has led demonstrations
against public nuisance: he has
gone on television: he wields his
pen, not with satire, but with
facts thst are difficult to refute.
He has taken the case of the
public into the courts.
His latest battle is against
nuclear power plants, which the
government wishes to locate
along the central coast of the
country. Tony Peranio grants Is-
rael's need for energy, but he
maintains that the sitting of the
proposed stations would consti-
tute a dire threat to Israel's se-
curity.
No matter what assurances we
may receive from our Arab
neighbors or from international
powers, there could always come
a Yom Kippur Day in 1990 when
an enemy attack on these prime
targets, by conventional means,
would, release a flood of our own
radioactive materials upon the
centres of our population and
make the heart of Israel immedi-
ately uninhabitable, not to speak
of the immediate holocaust that
would occur.
TONY PERANIO also sees the
multiplication of private passen-
ger cars as a threat both to the
air which we breathe and to
human safety. He is campaigning
for the development of new
means of clean, mass transporta-
tion. The trouble is. engineers
are assigned to immediate tasks
of creating luxury and comfort.
Where is the long range vision,
for the creation of a new and
better sodi ty, he asks.
He looks grim when he watch-
es the belching smoke of the ce-
ment factory, which continues to
beamudge the landscape for
miles around Haifa-
PERANIO AND his public-
minded a lies have been able to
obtain the passage of government
regulations governing some of
the nuisances which are destroy-
ing life, but many of them are
inadequately worded and laxly
axoreed.


Page 11
+JenistrJIwMfofl cmd Shofar oi Hollywood
Friday, August 16, 1974
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1454 Alton Road 672-5353
SOUTH OAOE
9001 S. Dixie Hwy. 667 7575
HIALEAH/PALM SPRINGS MILE
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CUTLER RIDGE
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OAYTONA BEAM
907 Volusia Ave 255-7487
<^85 E. Tamiami Tr. 774-4443


Full Text
Friday. August 16, 1974 and Shaiar of Hollywood
Page 11
"i '-. .."-..

O^wwtoMr J}. JZicL
man
HIT,
tev Made Good
LOOM, if ever, has an ad-
pinistration been subjected
eh a battery of continuous
Jk. as the present one. and
ov.e saving grace has teen
kissinger.
lands for impeachment
nswered by the defenders
C us to consider the
i -nts in the domain of
|gn affairs, where Dr. Kis-
fr presides.
|s>iMJER HAS received the
e Pi i.re and more re-
a national straw 1 allot
re.i Kissinger leading all po-
fitrr.ires in [x>pularity.
ite an achievement for "our
as Sadat likes to call
fiere is a parallel to it, we
in the career of another
sh boy. Ben.
ij a hundred years back
cti Queen Victoria Ben-
I ;ireli ran the British
lire. He too was noted for a
pectrum. He was the out-
fiflUre at the Congress
si i:i when the European
ns gathered even Bis-
was an admirer of Dis-
f ska ELI SAID. "The world
fled by imagination" and he
lied to the world's imagina-
jSo apparently does Kissin-
P"l lie day when the swords
jined into plows has not ar-
daspita Dr. Kissinger's ef-
Itions have not indicated
reduction in their bombs and
lies, but nevertheless there
[feeling that something has
accomplished. Look at
For some years we have
bo relations with her.
couldn't even get any chop
:rom it but now they are
fast talking and we have
; gotten accupuncture.
SRAELI TOO was especial-
treated in the Middle East.
I] 8 his name might have
wee bit psychologically to
ith it. Disraeli means from
Disraeli might properly
balled an early pre-Heizl
fct |
was" the author of "The
praus Story of David Al-
a notional presentation of
lie attempt in the 12th cen-
by Jews to regain Jerusa-
aeli's career should be an
ration to all yo ;n people.
Disraeli made his political
| trying to make his first
in Parliament he was
down. "Sit down, sit
they called. Disraeli sat
""b''t he shouted back, "You
will one day be glad to lis-
lo me."
ACTUALLY he didn't say,
guys." He spoke a better
lb. After all, Disraeli was
outstanding writer. He
one of the best novelists in
Hid. He did tell his hecklers,
per, that the day would
when they would hear him.
lof course it did.
^raeli encountered anM-Sem-
I WOUM rather vote for
Svil than foi you," one man
hint
the event your friend is
candidate, can I co nt on
upi on?" said Disraeli.
had -,'.it and he knew hu-
Inatuie. Politicians are al-
belng approached by peo-
1u> ftfpeet to be remem' e.-
how can you remember
|one? "How is the old mal-
Disraeli would ask when
Blent remember the fellow.
ryone then was sure Dis-
1 not forgotten. Who har
malady oi some soi
Wkre is American Jewry Going?
fc.fllE FUTURE of the Jewish Community in
America," edited by David Sidorsky (New
York. Banc Books. S11.S3. 324 pages i. is a col-
lection of excellent essays by 11 prominent aca-
demicians.
Th# areas covered include synagogues,
schools, identity and affiliation, demographv. per-
spectives, and youth. It is a thinking man's book.
DESPITE ITS title, there are few prognos-
tications about the future and these few do not
depict a future Jewish communiy suffused with
rich Jewish values.
We recommend for immediate reading the
articles by Dr. Ostrow. Seymour Fox, James
S.eeper, and Charles S. Liebman..
All the scholars miss the issues that loom on
the horizon. Among these issues that will deter-
mine much of the future course are: What is the
future of our national defense or service organi-
zations if local Community Relations Committees
assume overlapping roles?
WHY SHOULD Jewish Federations support
conflicting philosophies of national organizations
such as was exemplified in the De Funis case and
on "Affirmative Action"?
How can the voices of the masses of con-
tributors be heard in Jewish community affairs
conducted by Federation leaders that merely
present a facade of democracy and who regard
their knowledge as omniscient?
Should there be a reconsideration of the
Mclver Report of 1949? Should there be a com-
pulsory merger of some Jewish organizations or
at least of some of their functions or activities?
WHO IS to dictate direction and tone of
public relations, information and propaganda
about Israel?
What will happen to our youth if Israel's
kibbutz movement turns to more private control
and Israel's socialist political figures lose their
political power?
"SOCIOLOGY IN ISRAEL," by Leonard
Waller (Westport, Greenwood Press, $12.50. 314
pages), is a compendium of sociological research
carried on in Israel over the last twenty years.
It is a companion for Simon Herman's "Israelis
and Jews."
Dr. Weller is chairman of the Department of
Sociology at Bar-Han University. He discusses in
non-professional terms education, inter-ethnic re-
lations, criminology, failures of the schools, and
a myriad of other topics.
The tables of comparisons in the achieve-
ments, finances, relationships, goals, and animo-
sities between Ashkenazim. Sephardim and
Oriental Jews shows that Israel's internal prob-
lems equal her external problems.

Brooklyn Study Finds for Orthodox
A SURVEY of attitudes of members of Ortho-
dox Jewish famines in the Boro Park section
of Brooklyn has indicated that while there is a
generation gap there, most of the young Jews
still express deep commitment to the values
of their Orthodox parents, a Brooklyn Colllege
sociologist has reported.
Egon Mayer repo ted that the data for his
study were obtained mainly from two separate
surveys: intensive interviews with 65 Boro Park
tamilies randomly chosen from the telephone
rfkectory, and a mail questionnaire sent to
Young Israel Intereollegiates, with 44 question-
naires completed and returned.
THE SUBJECT of the Young Israel survey
was religious attitudes and attitudes toward
e ders. Mayer reported he found that 63.8 per-
cent cf the ,oung respondents indicated, on
questions dealing with the Orthodox character of
the community, that they were saisfied with the
community and 84 percent declared they intend-
ed to remain Orthodox throughout their lives,
while 91 percent said emphatically they would
never join a Conservative or Reform synagogue.
But the survey also found that 52 percent
were dissatisfied with the lack of political ac-
tivities in the community, with 56 percent partic-
ularly dissatisfied with the purported lack of
sufficient political activities on behalf of Israel.
MAYER SAID 54 percent indicated they ei-
ther aid not care about or were dissatisfied with
the opinions their parents expressed about their
lives or projects.
The family interviews. Mayer reported, indi-
cated various sources of conflicts between sons
and daughters with their parents. He reported
that a frequent source of conflicts with elders
among the boys was over their preferences in
hair styles, clothing styles and their militancy
in the defense of Jewish interests.
Mayer reported in the current issue of the
Journal of Jewish Communal Service, he de-
scribed the report as a summary of his findings.
FOR GIRLS the major source of inter-gen-
erational conflict was their desire for advanced
secular education and contemporary clothing
styles, particularly those that violated "parental
norms of sexual modesty," the sociologist de-
claied.
He reported that the survey of the 65 fam-
ilies also produced a "somewhat surprising" dif-
ference in the level of religious education be-
tween those under 25 and those over 25.
In the under-25 group, 30 percent more had
formal and advanced yeshiva education than
those over 25. Of those over 2), 30 percent had
received only informal or no religious education
compa:ed with those under 25.
t^idn e w ^t^ uft
Barbra Streisand's New Film Hit

Hollywood
OARBRA STREISAND, in the hit movie "For
Pete's Sake." aprears as a newly-wed, unso-
phisticated tomboy clowning her way through
the taylor-made screenplay by Stanley Shapiro
and Maurice Richlin in the best tradition of such
visual comedians as Chaplin Keaton and Harold
Lloyd.
Never as youthful and leu glamorous, the
girl "Henry" is enmeshed in sheer unsurmount-
able problems trying to help her cab-driver hus-
band Pete (Michael Sarrazin) to get the dough
lor a eoLege e lucation by picking a "sure" win-
ner on the stock market.
RAISING THE money for the shares from
loan shark?, caught between two underworld
rrouos. she is thrown into the hands of an al.rl
madam who buys off her contract now skyrocket-
ing with astronomic interest figures.
Since Mrs. Cherry, the owner of a stable of
girls, is portrayed by Molly Picon with delicate
charm, the stoiy never becomes vulgar and lewd.
Barbra. in overalls instead of dressed, in a non-
singing, down-to-earth role, is more sympathetic
to the audience than ever.
"For Pete's Sake" also stars Estelle Parsons
who, like Barbra. won her Academy Award a
few years ago for her very first film role. Ms.
Parsons portrays the quite obnoxious sister in-
law, with WiLlam Bed-field as her hen-pecked
spouse.
THE UNPRETENTIOUS entertainment fea-
ture was produced by Ray Stark's company, with
Phil Feidman as executive, and is released by
Columbia.
A 20 Jeremiah
From Sieilv
Haifa
DESCENDANT of a Sicilian
fami'y, Anthony Peranio
came to Israel from his native
New York in 1955 because he
identified with Zionism, and be-
cause he saw in Israel an oppor-
tunity to live a free, pioneering
and challenging life. His wife,
Rita, was Jewish, but Tony came
here without any formal relig-
ious, political or national ties.
In the nineteen years that have
elapsed, he has emerged as the
country's leading battler in the
fight against air and water pol-
lution, noise menace, nuclear pol-
lution threat, road accidents
anywhere and everywhere that
the disorganized public is faced
by danger to the quality of hu-
man lite as a result of the en-
croachment of industrialization
and governmental apathy.
Peranio feels a deep personal
sense of responsibility for what is
happening because the dangers
are caused by modern technol-
ogy, and he is an engineer.
He teaches his students at the
Technion, where he is associate
professor of civil engineering in
the Centre for Environmental
Research, that technology has an
obligation to society over and
above the provision of comfort
and convenience.
TO THE public Tony Peranio
has become a symbol of the
struggle against faceless corpo-
rations. Some look upon him as
a Don Quixote, tilting his lance
at the windmills of progress.
He has led demonstrations
against public nuisance: he has
gone on television; he wields his
pen, not with satire, but with
facts that are difficult to refute.
He has taken the case of the
public into the courts.
His latest battle is against
nuclear power plants, which the
government wishes to locate
along the central coast of the
country. Tony Peranio grants Is-
rael's need for energy, but he
maintains that the sitting of the
proposed stations would consti-
tute a dire threat to Israel's se-
curity.
No matter what assurances we
may receive from our Arab
neighbors or from international
powers, there could always come
a Yom Kippur Day in 1990 when
an enemy attack on these prime
targets, by conventional means,
would, release a flood of our own
radioactive materials upon the
centres of our population and
make the heart of Israel immedi-
ately uninhabitable, not to speak
of the immediate holocaust that
would occur.
TONY PERANIO also sees the
multiplication of private passen-
ger cars as a threat both to the
air which we breathe and to
human safety. He is campaigning
for the development of new
means of clean, mass transporta-
tion. The trouble is. engineers
are assigned to immediate tasks
of creating luxury and comfort.
Where is the long range vision,
for the creation of a new and
better society, he asks.
He looks grim when he watch-
e.- the belching smoke of the ce-
ment factory, which continues to
besmudge the landscape for
miles around Haifa-
PERANIO AND his public-
minded allies have been able to
obtain the passage of government
regulations governing some of
the nuisances which are destroy-
ing life, but many of them are
inadequately worded and laxly
ewoi ced.


Page 10
vJenisfi flcriaHan and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, August IB, 1974
Teen Scene
i
By PAtX KERBEL
Although I don't usually share
my personal family experience
with you, I would like this op-
portunity to share with you a
beautiful experience which took
place during our summer vaca-
tion in Rochester, New York, our
former home.
It was a Saturday morning,
the first week of July. As the
synagogue has always played an
important part of my sixteen
years of life, we were going to
attend our former congregation,
Temple Beth-El, the synagogue
where I was Bar-Mitzvah. It was
there that I was introduced to
prayer so I consider Beth-El my
starting place.
When I entered the sanctuary,
I was astonished to find 500
congregants assembled on such
a beautiful July morning. People
of ail ages filled the seats which
re-implanted my belief that pray-
ing has no gap. Everything look-
ed and felt the same. The Rabbi,
Hazzan (Cantor) and Torah
reader were all there. The Rabbi
smiled at our family. As I was
asked to read the Torah many
months before, both my brother
and I were given Aliyahs. The
warmth of the congregation was,
as always, glowing at full force.
As in most congregations, the
entire service was chanted by
the Hazzan; excluding the Torah
service. The only difference is
that this congregation prays
with the Hazzan. Remember, the
congregation that prays together
stays together.
Here comes the best part: a
combined rap session and ser-
mon.'!
The Rabbi was teaching us in the
the pulpit and with a roving
microphone, walked around the
congregation discussing the To-
rah portion and other topics with
us. He brought up questions and
members of the congregation
raised their hands and answered
or asked about other points of
concern. I finally stow a vision
come true. The Rabbi discussing
a topic with us and not to us.
The Rabbi was teaches us in the
true sense of the word.
After this twenty minute ses-
sion, the Rabbi invited all of the
young people of the congregation
to rap with him. He asked ques-
tions like "What will you do dur-
ing the summer to be a better
Jew?" You'd be surprised at
some of the bright answers he
received.
Possibly, we could follow in the
footsteps of Temple Beth El, as
maybe, by having a more infor-
mal service (I don't mean unor-
thodox or unconservative for
there is a quite a difference),
more Jewish people will be
"turned on" with prayer instead
of being turned off. If we set the
warm, unified mood of a close-
knit "family" (as I consider a
congregation a family), then per-
haps all Jews, and even more im-
portant, the youth of the Jewish
community, will carry on in the
tradition which has linked one
generation to another for thou-
sands of years.
If we feel and find a purpose
in prayer, then Religious Ju-
daism has a chance to survive. If
we continue to be the audience of
the service instead of part of the
main act, then, as I see it, there
is little hope.
ir & -tr
I would like to welcome home
the Broward County Teen Tour
to Israel, which returned from
a four week visit to our land the
end of July. In the next issue I
will report on their visit, theii
emotions and experiences.
Comments to my column by
members of the community are
welcomed.
Shalom L'hitraot!!!
Services
HALUNDAU
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
(Conservative). 416 NE 8th Ave.
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz, Cantos
Jacob Danzlaar.
, NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22niJ Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingaley. Cantor Irving
Shulkei. 37
NORTH BROWARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. Liberal. 3501 Univor.
aity Or. Rabbi Max Weitz. 44
HOLLYWOOD
VOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
(Orthodox). 3891 Sterling Rd., op-
posite Hollywood Hill. High School.
Hre^a-n- Ur Frank Stein.
Saturday, 9 a.m. '
TfcMr-i-t bbiH EL (Reform) 1361 S
14th Ave., Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffe. Assistant Rabbi Harvey M.
Rosenfeld.
BETH SHALOM (Tempre) Conserva-
tive. 4ai Arthur 8*- Rabbi Morton
Malavsky, Cantor Irving Gold.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (Conservative).
310 SW 62nd Ave., Hollywood.
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal). 8001
Thomas St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Rob-
ert Frazin.
TEMPLE S'NAI (Conservative). 1201
Johnson St. Rabbi Oavid Shapiro.
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield.
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun.
MIPAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Conservative)
6920 SW SMh St. Rabbi Avrom
Drazin.
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES (Conserva.
tive) Pines Middle School, 200 No,
Douglas Rd., Pembroke Pines.
Rabbi Aaron Shapsro.
Special Children's Services
Planned At Temple Beth Shalom
Bar Mitzvah
SCOTT BERENHAUS
Scott, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jo-
seph Berenhaus, will be Bar Mit-
vah, Saturday, Aug. 24, at Temple
Sold
ir LANNY KEITH MARKS
Lanny, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Richard Marks, will be Bar Mit-
vah, Saturday, //jg. 24 at Temple
Solel.
Cr -b -ft
ARTHUR KURLAND
Arthur, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Abraham Kurland, will be Bar
Mitzvah, Saturday. Aug. 24, at
Temple Israel of Miramar.
Fear Of Renewed War
Mounting In Israel
T Continued from Page 1
two areas as provided in the dis-
engagement agreements would
be proof of Arab willingness to
reach a Mideast settlement.
Another cause of concern in
Israel was the arrival of King
Faisal of Saudi Arabia in Cairo
for a nine-day visit to Egypt.
Faisal crossed the Suez Canal to
see the positions Egyptian troops
have taken up since the Israeli-
Egyptian disengagement agree-
ment.
The main purpose of his visit
was reportedly to discuss with
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat
how Saudi oil wealth and diplo-
matic leverage can be combined
with Egyptian military strength
in support of the Arab cause
against Israel.
Sadat was expected to seek
Faisal's support in his attempt to
reconcile King Hussein of Jordan
with the Palestinian terrorists.
MEANWHILE IX I^ehanon.
terrorists and members of the
right-wing and Christian Phalan-
gist Party have been fighting
with machine guns and rockets
in a suburb of Beirut.
Two terrorists and a civilian
were reported killed, and 10 i>eo-
ple were injured. I^ebanese Pre-
mier Takieddin Al-Sohl postpon-
ed an official visit to Libya in an
effort to calm the situation. The
Phalangists see Lebanon's future
as being linked with Western Eu-
rope, while the terrorists, who
include Christians as well as
Moslems, support Pan-Arabism
and socialism.
The warnings of a new war be-
gan picking up in intensity here
when Gen. Mordechai Gur, the
Chief of Staff, in telling a meet-
ing here of the Israel-American
Chamber of Commerce that tne
Arabs could start a new war by
the end of the year, stressed that
Israel must prepare itself spirit-
ually, mentally and organization-
ally for the eventuality of a new
war.
HIS WARXIXG followed -a
similar one from Peres in a
weekend television interview.
Their remarks are seen as part
of an effort to convince the mili-
tary and the public of the seri-
ousness of the situation and the
need for all-out preparedness.
As part of the new prepared-
ness, the army extended its work
day to run until darkness. More
reserves are scheduled to be call-
ed up, particularly those in stor-
age and maintenance who will be
working around the clock in or-
der that combat vehicles will be
ready for use.
The army is also preparing for
trial call-ups of reserve units and
at least one will be conducted
over the radio.
28 AB 7:36
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
?
,AA*M*%AAAAs*a*s**aa*k*kMlVMWVV*>
A*
DRIVING A GAS HOG?
BURNING UP MONEY?
^V/
/- *:
CALL 921-2211
The Gas Mileage and Performance
Specialists For Complete Information
Automobiles Campers Trucks Vans
Inquiries regarding Temple
Beth Shalom membership and
tickets for the Higb/Hpby Days
should be directed to Sylvia G.
Gordon, executive secretary, by
visiting or phoning the office,
Mondays through Thursdays, 10
a.m. to 5 p.m., and Fridays 10
a.m. to 12 noon.
All seats are reserved on a first
come, first served basis and non-
members as well as members will
be accommodated.
Dr. Morton Malavsky, rabbi of
Beth Shalom, will conduct the
holiday services assisted by Can-
tor Irving Gold and a profession-
al adult choir. Services will be
held for children and teenagers
in the school building, at no
charge. They are not required to
have tickets. The youngsters*
services will be geared to their
level and interest and times will
coincide generally with those of
the adult services.
Registrations, schedules and
school information are available
by calling Mordecai Opher, direc-
tor of education, regarding day
school, Sunday school, Hebrew
school. The school office also has
RABBI MORTON MALAVSKY
information pertaining to nurs-
ery, pre-kindergarten and kinder-
garten departments. Youth pro-
grams are being scheduled by
Shirley Cohen, youth coordinator.
Hasidic Jews Fight
Court Redistricting
NEW YORK (JTA) Fed-
eral District Court Judge Walter
Burchhausen has reserved deci-
sion oh a charge by Hasidic Jews
that the newly-drawn state as-
sembly district lines that divide
in half their community of 35.-
000 persons in Brooklyn's Wil-
liamsburg section discriminates
against them in favor of Blacks
and should be thrown out as un-
constitutional.
Nathan Lewin, attorney for the
United Jewish Organizations of
Williamsburg, an umbrella group
for more than 100 Jewish groups
in the area, charged here that
the U.S. Department of Justice
had "strong-armed" the State
Legislature to make the Hasidim
the "victims of a racial gerry-
mander" by insisting that the
new 57th Assembly district in
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Brooklyn be at least 65 percent
Black to insure the election of a
Black assemblyman.
DURING THE day-long testi-
mony. Richard Scolaro, executive
director of the legislative com-
mittee that drew up new lines
for 28 legislative and congres-
sional districts in Brooklyn and
Manhattan, admitted that the
"sole reason" the Hasidim could
not be kept in one district was
this Justice Department demand.
Scolaro said the only way to
provide a Black majority in the
district was to include 15,000
Hasidim in the 56th Assembly
District which is now 80 percent
Black making the 57th 65 per-
cent instead of 61.5 percent
Black.


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