The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00098

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewisti Floridi& in
Volume 4 Number 5
and SIIOFAK OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood Florida Friday, August 2, 1974
Price 25 cents
New By-Laws To Be Presented At Annual Meeting
The Annual General Member-
ship Meeting of Jewish Welfare
I Federation will be held on Sun-
day. Aug. 11, 1974, at the Holiday
Inn, 4000 South Ocean Dr., Holly-
wood, at 10 a.m.
Norman Atkin. M.D., president
cf the Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion of Greater Hollywood, an-
fr.ounced today that afier careful
study and development, new By-
Laws will be proposed at the
Annual Meeting. A significant
change will be the recommenda-
tion that the name become "The
Jewish Federation of South Brow-
ard County, Inc." Dr. Atkin stated
that the name change reflects
the Great development of not
j only Hollywood but also Hallan-
dale, Miramar, Pembroke Pines
i and Dania. Since the Federation
is responsible for these areas, it
was indicated that the name
should reflect the enlarged scope
[ of the area served by Federation.
Another resolution to be pro-
posed will be that the Board of
Directors shall be composed of
twenty-one Directors elected by
the General Membership, the two
immediate past presidnets. Nor-
man Atkin, M.D. and Jesse Martin
and up to seven Directors, either
automatically entitled to a posi-
tion on the Board by virtue of
holding a specific office or posi
tion in or on a Federation com-
mittee, beneficiary agency or
other Jewish religious or com
munal activity.
It is also resolved that the fol
lowing positions and people shall
be entitled to a position on the
Board of Directors: Stanley Mar-
gulies. M.D., President of Young
Leaders Council. Mrs. Marcia
Tobin, Women's Division Presi-
dent. Rabbi Avrom Drazin. rep-
resenting the Rabbis of South
Broward County and James Fox
Miller President of Jewish Family
Service.
Upon the approval of the new
By-Laws, an election will be held
of new officers, nominees to
serve on the Board of Trustees.
The newly appointed leader-
ship of the Federation Women's
Division will be installed at this
meeting which is open to the
public.
NOKMAH ATKIN
[Kissinger Future Seen
Growing Darker Daily
BUT ONIY TO JORDAN
Israel Ready to Give
Back Most of W. Bank
JERUSALEM(JTA)Israel would be willing to give most
of the West Bank back to Jordan provided it was not turned into
a separate Palestinian state, Commerce and Industry Minister
Haim Barlev declared here.
Speaking to reporters accompanying U.S. Treasury Secretary
William E. Simon. Barlev said as long as the area captured in
the 1967 war remained part of Jordan, "we are willing to give
back most of the territory of the West Bank."
BUT BARLEV, a formed Chief of Staff, said if Israel returns
territory it must have secure borders. "We are willing to com-
promise on the areas, but this does not mean we are willing to
hand ourselves and our future security totally over to Arab good-
will and international guarantees."
Barlev criticized the American plan to provide Egypt with
nuclear reactors and fuel, saying that "in one leap it would bring
the technology of Egypt to a level where it could easily move into
more dangerous areas."
He said if Egypt became a nuclear power it could be a "very
high risk not only to Israel but to the rest of the world." Bui
Barlev said prospects for a peaceful solution in the Mideast were
favorable because Egypt has decided to give first priority to
economic development.
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) DiscuS3ion here of
feenrj A. Kissinger's future is not whether he
|\, resign u Secretary of state but when and
ie will step out of the position he assumed
| last September.
LIBERAL commentators agree
;:er may leave but for dif
perent reasons. The Seci ctary.
Ill -... has incurred President
[Nixon's d.*p'.ea>ure for b. ing
1 identified daily in the media as
[a diplomatic maskian and as
[America's number one hero for
nfl w. rid diplomacy at his
| pace.
The implication is that the
'. simmering in domestic
problems, is a "yes man" to his
subordinate on foreign policy
h the President cherishes as
: domain of eminence in the
I storical record.
A French source said the Pre?i
. could not and would not al
Kissinger to continue in his
[Cabinet after hearing the Secre-
tary lay the blame on the military
cf both superpowers for the fail
lire to reach agreement on nu
clear weapons at the recent Mos
cow summit conference. The
French analyst compared Kis-
singer's remark with that of Jac-
ques Servan-Schreiber.
Resignation, "within weeks." some of the coun-
- principal conservative"voices are now saying
He will leave the Cabinet, they say. to help formei
New York Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller, his prime
political sponsor and friend, groom for the Repub-
lican Presidential nomination in 1976.
Rabbi Harold Richter Becomes
Jewish Chaplain of Broward County
Dr. Norman Atkin, President
of Jewish Welfare Federation of
Greater Hollywood, and Dr. Stan-
k> Marguliea, Chairman of their
Jewish Chaplaincy Study Com-
mittee, announced today the ap-
pointment of Rabbi Harold Rich
ter to the newlv created post of
Jewish Chaplain of Broward
County.
The announcement was made
in conjunction with the Jewish
Federation of Greater Ft. Lauder-
dale and the Broward Board of
Rabbis as the position will be
funded by both Hollywood and
Ft. Lauderdale Federations.
Rabbi Richter. who assumed
his poat August 1st, will conduct
RABBI HAKOID KICHTU Continued on Page 10
Military Analyst Gen. Marshall
Predicts New War in 3-5 Years
HUNTSVILLE, Ala.(JTA)
A major war will break out
again in the Middle East in three
to five years, the time it would
take for Israel and the Arabs to
restore their military capabilities.
This dire prediction was made
here July 14 by Brig. Gen.
'Ret.) S. L. A. Marshall, the noted
historian and military analyst
who received nationwide acclaim
for his analysis of the tactics of
Israel and the Arabs during the
Yom Kippur War
MARSHALL, who has been a
military consultant to Israel and
occasionally to the Pentagon, said
it would take another three to
five years to train replacements
for the young Israeli. Egyptian
and Syrian leaders killed in the
war.
The same amount of time
would also be required by the
Soviet Union and the United
States to rebuild the military
arsenals of their client states,
he added.
HE ALSO observed that the
Palestinian problem would by
then still remain unresolved, and
the USSR would press for an-
other war in the hope of restor-
ing absolute control of the Suez
Canal to Egypt and unhindered
Continued from Page 3
Rabbi Baruch Korff presents a copy of his book. "The Per-
sonal Nixon: Staying on the Summit." to President Nixon at
Nixon's estate in San Clemente, Calif. Rabbi Korff, presi-
dent of the National Citizens Committee for Fairness to the
Presidency, based his book on a long interview with the
President on May 13, as well as a series of written answers
given by Mr. Nixon to Rabbi Korff's written questions.
Nixon Denies Charges
In Rabbi Korff Talk
SAN CLEMENTE (JTA)
President Nixon has publicly
denied, for the first time, alle-
gations that he was anti-Semi-
tic, citing his vigorous political
and military backing for Israel
and his appointment of Jews,
including Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger, to the key
posts in his Administration, as
proof to the contrary.
The allegations stemmed
from news media reports in
May that the President used
anti-Semitic slurs and other eth-
nic epithets during private con-
versations in the White House
with aides in February and
March. 1973. purportedly re-
corded in taped conversations.
THE REPORT was immedi-
ately denounced by J. Fred
Buzhardt, counsel to the Presi-
dent, as a "fabrication."
The President's rejection of
the charge was made to Rabbi
Baruch Korff, head of the Com-
mittee for Fairness to the Pres-
Continued on Page 9-


POQ.1
+Je*i$t)fkrfdk*r
end Shotar ol Hollywood
Friday. August 2, 1974
BOOK REVIEW
f "The Jewish Catalog"
\
( '* By PAUL KERBEL
"The Jewish Catalog," a do-it-
yourself book on Judaica. is with
out doubt, the best selling Jew-
ish book in today's modern Jewish
world. Compiled and edited by
Richard Seigel of New York and
Michael and Sharon Strassfeld of
Somerville, Mass.. this fascinating
catalog represents what was
thought to have been a "Mission:
Imoossible;" a broad scope of
Judaica invest:gated from several
aspects and presented from dif-
ferent perspectives.
In order to understand the
manner in which the catalog was
written, you must read the intro-
duction which explains simply
the book's development and con-
struction.
The Jewish Catalog is a book
which I feel belongs in every
Jewish home. There is something
for everybody .. Every Jew can
gain something from the catalog.
Caution: Do not attempt to read
thi-= book the way you read a
novel: at one sitting. This is a
reference book and in order to
gain the most from it, it must be
read slowly. This book reads un-
evenly for each section is present-
A Russian Jewish Father Waits
In Israel For His Daughter
Dear Mrs. and Mr. Roth,
I am moved by your struggle
for my daughter Marina, a Jew-
ish girl, who struggled courage
ously against all Soviet power for
her desire to live to Israel, to
te a proud Jewees and not a
Jewess of silence! She is the vic-
time of Soviet Gestapo, wh-ch
took vengeance on her for this
proudness. for her struggle. And
not only the vengeance. This is
the precedent, the example for
other Jews: for the exit visa you
may pay by your children. The
Soviet power use different meth-
ods to prevent Jews to emigrate
to Israel. It deprives them of job
and thereupon arrests them be-
cause they do not work! The KGB
arrests Jewish aliah activists for
demonstration and before other
important events. The KGB men
organize the shadowingtwo cars
and 5 KGB apes for one activist,
they switch off the telephone of
Jews, they overhear telephone
talks, organize provocations fol-
lowed by detention in concentra-
tion camps (the case of Alexan-
der Peldman for example.) But
the most disqusting method is
the using of children as the
means of blackmail. The God will
re-.r pardon of this terrible
crime!
The mockery of Marina lats
more than one year and a half.
A'l attempts to reducate her was
unsuccessful. The communist
ganasters are merciless. They
provoked on my daughter the
mental disorder. I cannot reore
sent that the mind of my littl?
daughter now is not clear, that
hnr head i5 occuoied bv fear-;,
delirium, by feeling of hopeless-
ness and despair, that all her
heroic and painful struggle was
useless. In Moscow, she is like
a-re?ted. My mother phoned her
10 to 15 times in each day. Marina
do not take the telephone in gen-
era:. It is forbidden. The shadow-
ing in the school (the Commit-
tee of Young Communists Leagu-
organized it and the schoo!-ch;l-
dren participate in these diso.u:t
ing actions), the shadowing at
horn?th- shadowing during 2A
hours! This may drive mad an
adult person! I received the in-
formation from Moscow that now
Marina is in a pioneer camp, but ;
the address is unknown. Evident
ly it is dangerous for her mental !
health to place her again in the !
s.milar conditions, which pro-
voktd the mental disorder. But!
it i? necessary to isolate Marina.
to prevent possible contacts with |
Jewiih activists in U.S.S.R. and ]
with foreign tourists. They (KGB
and Marina's mother also) don't
be worried by Marina's health.
They need of Marina ill. who can-
not struggle for her aliah.
I am sure that the flux of let-
ters protesting against this cruel-
ty, anti-semitism and injustice is
uscfull to save Marina. She is the
example for all Jewish Young
People in Russia and must be
saved. The worst cruelty and
sadistic is that they demand of
Marina to forget not only Israel,
but also the father. It is the true
torment. More of one year and a
half we arc separated and isolated
one from another. She even don't
receive my letters and cannot
write me, we cannot talk by tele-
phone.
The letters to Marina's moth-
er must send to her work: Maya
Reyskaya. Institute of Defectology
of the Arademy of Pedagog Sci
MM of the USSR. Pogodinka
Street 8. G-117, Moscow, USSR.
It is useful to send letters to the
director of this institute Mrs. Ja
Vlasova. (the same address) and
to the President of the Academy
of the Academy of Ped. Science
of the USSR, Moscow, USSR.
Maybe the appeals to the Amer
ican Astronauts participating in
collaboration with USSR will be
usefull.
With many
best wishes.
thanks and very
Yours sincerely,
Alexander Temkin
ed from a different angle. Do not
expect to respond to each section
in the same way for, frankly, al-
though you can read the whole
book, not every section will draw
your interest.
The first time you pick up the
catalog, look over the table of
contents and select the areas
which interest you the most and
those which you think vou want
to learn about. Read those sec-
tions first. If you like what you've
read, start again and read the
whole book, because you will find
areas in which you've never been
interested in before but will now.
As the editors say in the intro-
duction, "you can plug in wher-
ever you want." Those of you
who are artistically talented will
turn to the areas which describe
how to make Hallah. Kipot. Can-
dles, Tallit. Mezuzot. etc. Others
will f'nd the sections on Kash-
ruth. Shabbat. the Jewish Calen
dar. Blessinei. and Weddings of
great importance and interest.
There is a travel section on Is-
rael. Western Europe and the So-
viet Union. Those interested in
Scribal Arts, Music, Jewish Films.
starting your own Jewish library
and the Jewish press, have much
to look forward to. In addition
to all of this, there is a guide to
Jewish Women's activities, com-
munities, a devotional guide and
much more.
The Jewish Catalog is an excit-
ing col'ection of far rangin;
topics that should interest any
Jewwhether steeped in tradi-
tion or just discovering Judaism
to become personally involved
in aspects of Jewish ritual life,
customs, cooking crafts, and crea-
tion.
The Jewish Cataloc is different
from any other Jewish reference
book in that the emphasis is not
only on knowledge but toward
the practical side of things as
well. The compilers of the catalog
blieve that Jewish life is a very
physical experience and the vari-
ous sections of the book, besides
providing important information
and ideas, are designed to help
you live and experience Jewish I
life in a creative and personal
way.
The material is presented with
a love and honesty that makes
the book a iov to read.
IRA L. HUNTER
Vice President
Phone:
865-0522
Shields & Company
members principal securities exchanges
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If 101 KEKBlI, Ixtcwtfit Mrecter.
Jtmith WtHart f4ru1im ef Qrtattr Htlltwi
:..-, .. ~i, .
~-.
It's pood to be back. Vacations are wonderful for we pct
away fronrttoe normal routine of every day life. We can step
back and see where we've been going and where we wish to go
more clearly when we've been away from our daily tasks. I must
admit that one of the greatest holiday joys was being far from
a telephone. You return with new perspective, thinking and
renewed energy.
One week that I was gone was spent at a Executive Direc-
tors of Federations conference. Thirty executives from interme-
diate size communities from coast to coast met not only informal
session', but also informal discussions and together acted as a
think tank for each other. It is the only time during the year
that the professionals pet together to discuss mutual concerns
with each other It is also the time when wo try to help each
other with our problems. The week was most fruitful.
For fou.' days we had as our Scholar-in-Rcsidence, Rahhi
Irving Greenhorn, one of the most inspirinp and dedicated lead-
ers of the Jewish community of America. He helped U analyse
the purpose of the Federation movement. He pave- us more in-
sight into the significance of the Holocaust: issues facing the
American Jewish Community and Israel.
The philosophic questions that he raised, and the chal-
lenges he presented, were inspiring to everyone. Rabbi Green-
berg enabl-d us to define the fact that the Federation should
be the coordinator and stimulator for Jewish activities servicing
the entire communitythat it needs to work cooperatively with
Synagogues and Temples, the social agencies and Jewish organ-
ization* in the community to continue to find the means and
methods to insure perpetuation of Judaism in America, but. at
the same time, be greater than the sum total of all of them. He
helped us to understand why the American Jewish community
must not disappear and why it must become stronger as it serves,
at this time In history, as the strength for world Jewry.
In our discussions about Israel, we talked of the need fcr
the Israeli Jewish community to understand that they are part
of the total Jewish community. They must, therefore, understand
their position and must not set themselves apart from the rest
of us.
The renewed enthusiasm and vigor I now have since return-
ing, will, I hope, help me to be of greater service to the entire
community. We of South Broward have a job to do. We need
to develop programs necessary for our community, provide funds
to implement these programs, raise the monies necessary to aid
Jews ail over the world, (especially in Israel), and to recommit
ourselves to the concept that being Jewish places an important
obligation upon us not only to our own but to all people.
I know that you see it as I see it.
RIVERSIDE
IN HOLLYWOOD.
Riverside. South Florida's leading Jewish funeral
director for over 35 years now provides services to
all communities of Broward County from our
modern and convenient chapel at 5801 Hollywood
Boulevard in Hollywood.
920-1010
RIVERSIDE
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Other Riverside Chapeis in the
Greater Miami area: : .
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Riverside also serves the New York Metropolitan area with
chapels in Manhattan. Bronx. Brooklyn, Far Rockaway and
Westchester.
Murray N. Rubin. F.D.


. .Friday, August 2, 1974
+Jen>lsI> norkttar id Shofar of Hollywood
Page 3
Lady Logic
Please Distinguish Your Cigarettes
I've always had an underground
feeling that I'm really a little
girl masquerading in life as a
grown lady.
It was confirmed a few days
ago.
I went to Disncyworld for the
first time.
The trip came about unexpect-
edly. I was having dinner with
my friend, Skip, and his daugh-
ter, Margie, and they were dis-
cussing their plans to drive up
early the nexj morning.
When I mentioned, "I've never
been there." they invited me to
join them.
I mentally added up my res*
ponsibilities to the next day and
answered, "Sorry."
When we parted, Skip said,
"We'll be stopping at my office
in Stuart on the way. Call if you
change your mind."
The next day my girlfriend,
Marie, said, "I loved Disney-
world."
My daughter. Barbie, who's
been to Disneyland in California,
said. "I'll care for the dog. Go."
I phoned and left a message:
Meet the 6:15 Shawnee Flight."
At the airport, Marie and I had
time for a fast drink. "To your
first trip to Disneyworld," she
toasted over her scotch.
The sight of two fifty-year-old
biddies sipping to such a toast
caused immediate neck-turning
and underbreath whispering.
When the stewardess said,
'Please Distinguish your cigaret-
tes," I laughed and knew a good
time was in store for me.
Margie, her cousin. Van, and
Skip were hanging on the gate
waiting as the antique DO 3 taxied
toward them.
We all climbed into the white
Cadillac chariot and proceeded
To tKe hotel:
We thought.
This isn't the way. Daddy,"
said Margie who was making her
seventh run on Disneyworld.
Thirty miles later. Daddy
agreed.
Eventually, we were on a mono
rail sitting with the driver in
his front compartment, whizzing
through the lobby of a hotel and
I was bug-eyed from the sight.
Skip made the first rule: "If
any of us get seDarated, we meet
at THE CASTLE."
Margie and Van wanted to go
to "The Mad Tea Party" first
Figuring I could get some cool
iced tea, I did too.
The teacups, as it appeared
seat two people at a time and
fling them around violently while
everyone screams from instan'
whiplash.
Skip, who was already suffer
ing from a stiff neck, said. "I
didn't come here to end up in thf
Gen. Marshall
Predicts New
Mideast War
Continued from Page 1-
Russian access to the Indian \
Ocean.
The 71-year-old analyst also;
blamed Secretary of State Henry !
A. Kissinger for tipping off Egypt
that Israeli intelligence knew
when the war would begin.
As a result. Marshall stated.
Egypt launched its attack earlier
in the day while Israel was still'
preparing for it.
MARSHALL made this state-
ment to newsnmn before address-!
ing the local Association of U.S. j
Armies, a national group of ac-'
tive and retired army officers, on :
his recent tour of the Mideast
battleground.
Mrs. Meir, he said, ruled out a I
preemptive strike on the grounds
that Israel might lose U.S. sup-
port but toW a few "friendly am
bassadors an* an American gen-
eral."
sw
RITA GOODMAN
hospital."
We watched the children. And
planned someting less physical
as, by then, the temperature was
reading 94 degrees and all sys-
tems GO.
"The Swan Boat" was selected;
a leisurely cruise along the Magic
Kingdom waterway. Margie and
Van found it dull after the tea-
cup episode.
So, I purchased a big hat com-
plete with Mickey, Donald and
Pluto running around the brim
and allowed Van to chauffeu;- me
on "Mr. Toad's Wild Ride."
In time, I expect a complete
recovery.
We'd planned to lunch in the
Castle but their cuisine was
French and our mini-guides were
high on thoughts of cheeseburg-
ers.
We ate them like hyped up
vultures.
After wed seen alot of things,
including a "Flight To The Moon"
and a trip on a "Magic Carpet,"
and the sun was taking direct
potshots at our bodies, it was de-
cided by "Daddy'' that we'd go
back to the hotel to swim; then
return in the evening to close
up the world at midnight.
G-d Bless young children. They
dove and swam for hours.
Daddy dove in once, cracked
his neck in three more places and
remained immobile on a chaise
lounge while Auntie Rita, whose
feet were nearing total wipeout,
brought him cool drinks.
By eight o'clock, we were re-
cuperated and back on the mono-
rail headed for "The Haunted
Mansion."
Due to the fact that 120,000
other people had decided to join
in that evening, the four of us
stayed close together.
Arriving at our destination,
Skip and I said it at the same
time. "Where are the children?"
Fifty thousand children but no
sien of the two we started out
with.
Being an ex-Marine, Skip kept
his cool. "Let's go to the Castle,
They'll be there."
We elbowed our way through
a parade, over a river and up to
the castle.
No children.
We elbowed our way down
from the Castle, over a river and
back to the Haunted Mansion.
No children.
The cool ex-Marine's temper
was by then hot. "When we find
them, we arc not only not going
to the Haunted Mansion, but we
are going home!"
I then did an over the river
and through the parade run by
myself while he did guard duty
at the Haunted Mansion.
No children.
We were having a cigarette
during time-out when we both
spied two scared looking kids
holding hands while their heads
turned from side to side.
"Stay here. Let them find us,"
fumed Daddy-O.
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1200 N. FEDERAL HWY.
J 921-6800 HOLLYWOOD 947-3411
Margie is going to be a marvel-
ous wife someday. She walked
up to her father, threw back her
lovely blonde hair and scowled,
"Daddy, where have YOU been?"
The tough ex-Marine answered,
"We'd better hurry if we're go-
ing to the Haunted Mansion."
From Van's explanation of
where they'd been, we undoubted-
ly passed each other fourteen
times.
Driving down the Turnpike to-
ward home, Margie decided we'd
play airplane.
Daddy was the pilot. The one
with the stiff neck.
Van was the co-pilot. The one
with the Mickey Mouse hat.
Margie was the stewardess. The
one with the blue balloon.
I was the passenger. The one
with the crunched feet.
We all fastened our safety belts
and the stewardess said, "Please
Distinguish your cigarettes."
arnett
anK
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
MARTIN W. TREIBER, M.D., P.A.
Jokes Pleasure in Announcing
The Association of
JOSEPH B. ESTERSON, M.D.
IN THE PRACTICE OF
INTERNAL MEDICINE and CARDIOLOGY
TEL. 925-1439
2526 E. HALLANDALE BCH. BLVD., HAUANOAIE

DRS. PECK & GLAZER, P.A.
SIDNEY J. PECK, M. D.
AND
VICTOR GLAZER, M. D.
ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE ASSOCIATION OF
ALLAN R. KATZ, M. D.
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY
AT
1111 NORTH 35th AVENUE
HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33021
HOURS BY APPOINTMENT
TELEPHONE
OFFICE 9S3.210Q
-
4
Culto-n Md
DRAPERIES
|nd
BED SPREADS
INTERIOR DECORATINO
FASHION FABRICS
805 N. FEDERAL HWY.
HALLANDALE. FLORIDA
Phono: 9230564
SHADES
SLIP COVERS
UPHOLSTERY
Marine Painst & Supplies
HAWOWAWe PAINT. INC
HOUSEWARE3 fir GIFTS
HONE DECOR ACCESSORIES
Bath / Clout A ccessarits
ftMtftl Wltflaws Rm Dividers
Wiiitw Shafts Artificial Fltwart
Drajtry Rttft Ftlia:t
lallsaiar Plaau
Key & Lock Work Patio Furniture
.. 'Art
Storo Hours 7:30 A.M. 6:00 P.M. Closed Sunday!
IN EAST BEACH BOULEVARD
HALLANDALE, FLORIDA MM
PHONE 327-OWi


Page 4
9-JcnHt-fkrkfian nd Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, August 2, 1974
The Path to Justice
There has always been evidence to suggest that the
Lord works His Will in most mysterious ways.
One should not be surprised. His is not the fault that
men visit agony on their fellow men.
But His is the glory when oppressors get their due.
Such is the case in the strange story of Nazi hunter
Beate Klarsfeld.
Last week, we noted in these columns how contrary
justice seems that a Cologne court sentenced her to two
months for trying to apprehend Nazi war criminal Kurt
Lischka while Lischka goes about his business free and
unpunished.
The ruckus that ruling raised forced West German
legislator Ernst Achenbach to go on television and appease
critics of the Cologne court's verdict.
Achenbach might better have kept his counsel, if not
wisely certainly well. And, above all, silently.
Cr -tr *
Good Cause for Hosannahs
Now that he has appeared publicly in defense of the
verdict, it turns out that Achenbach was chief of the Polit-
ical Section of the occupying forces in Paris during World
War IL
According to a leading French news magazine,
Achenbach himself signed orders authorizing the roundup
of French Jews for deportation.
To make it sweeter still, his ouster from the West Ger-
man Parliament is now being demanded.
Surely, this is cause for Hosannahs.
Dr. Kissinger's Future
We have frankly demurred from sharing the enthu-
siasm universally voiced for Secretary of State Henry Kis-
singer's peace efforts in the Middle East.
We are grateful for his and President Nixon's unstint-
ing support of Israel in the hour of her greatest crisis.
But we must also be frank to note that the Kissinger-
Nixon peace accord in the Middle East is a mirror image
of the accord arranged between North and South Vietnam.
That there is no peace in Southeast Asia, despite Dr.
Kissinger's being given a Nobel prize for his efforts there,
can not be denied.
What the future holds for Israel and the Arabs is dif-
ficult to predict. Still, as Gen. S.L.A. Marshall, the distin-
guished military analyst, remarked last week, war in the
Middle East is a certainty in the next three to five years.
We devoutly pray not, but the General's pessimism
doesn't speak well of Dr. Kissinger's efforts, however heart-
felt, either.
3- -6
Man Who Tells the Truth
All of which is by way of saying that despite our
misgivings, we will be sorry if the political analysts are
right to see Dr. Kissinger leave Washington.
Mostly, because the reason is so horrifying that he
dared to criticize President Nixon's detente meeting with
Leonid Brezhnev in Moscow on the basis that it yielded
nothing in the way of limiting the threat of war between
the two moniliths.
Secretary of Defense James Schlesinger's unabashed
remark the other week that "in all likelihood" there is still
civilian control of the Pentagon underscored Dr. Kissinger's
criticism.
In effect, the Secretary of State, if he will be hounded
out, will leave because he dared to tell the truth about
the President's phony detente.
Neither set of militarists, not the Russian nor the
American., submitted to civilian authority calling for a slow-
down on the road to Armageddon.
Again, if the analysts are right, Dr. Kissinger's ouster
would be the perfect flourish to the administration's pro-
file. Get rid of the man who tells the truth.
Latest Prince of Peace
President Sadat's performance on London television
was not an act of candor for which he must be applauded,
but of sheer bigotry voiced in the form of a threat
In the event he doesn't get his way, then he will re-
frain next time around from restraining unmentioned
Egyptian military authorities who want to sink the Queen
Elizabeth II, or any other civilian boat, just because it is
filled with Jews headed for a holiday in Israel.
We cue meant to believe that President Sadat's heart
is simply brimming with humanity at the same time
that he emphasizes his profound admiration for Adolf
Hitler.
Israeli announcements last week, such as Commerce
and Industry Minister Haim Barlev's that Israel is willing
to return most of the West Bank to Jordan, simply make
no impact.
Not even on the Middle East's latest Prince of Peace.
Students Move to Immobility
TN MY daily contact with stu-
dents from many of Florida's
colleges and universities. I find
repeated evidence of a vast
change that has occurred among
them.
As late as two years ago, they
were quarrelsome and rebellious.
The Establishment, including the
colleges and universities them-
selves, were "pig." That was
their way cf saying that it was
guided by heartless principles of
bourgeois self-interest.
UNTIL TWO years ago, stu-
1 MMfl
Mindlin
.jranoMl
tTiM0MBM
I
dents wore motivated by a fana-
tical hatred for Vietnam, which
they saw as a latter-day Korea,
and which symbolized for them
everything to which they were
opposed in their parents, their
teachers, the leaders of their
government.
World War II may have been
before their time, but with the
student's typical blindness to the
past, this war, too, was all of a
piece with the others. They all
were wars not of principle but of
dehumanizing national economic
aggression.
ABBY HOFFMAN and Jerry
Rubin were their literary' heroes
as for the beatniks before them
Allen Ginsberg had been the
hero.
And among the Black matinee
idols, they could take their pick
from Malcolm X, Stokely Car-
michacl or, for the more sophis-
ticated, Frantz Fanon.
For the emotionally diseased,
who hid their pathology behind a
hysterical rejection of the deca-
dence of "pig" values, but with
no alternatives as substitute for
what they dedicated themselves
to destroy, there was the drug
culture of Timothy Leary to ex-
cuse alienation or even senseless
violence.
It's hard to say what has spell-
ed the sudden change I detect
among students today. There are
many possibilities. Certainly,
Kent State scared them. Kent
State demonstrated that if you
kept attacking the "pigs" at some
point the "pigs" would strike
back.
FOR ALL of the Establish-
ment's own distaste for Kent
State, it was nevertheless a posi-
tive enough assertion that if you
play with firecrackers they are
Continued on Page 9
Nixon Detente Has Really Failed
By JOSEPH ALSOP
Los Angeles Times Syndicate
WASHINGTON Strip away
the understandable political
flackery. The results of the Pres-
ident's visit to the Soviet Union
then look fairly ominous. No oth-
er conclusion is possible on the
basis of the first reports of what
really happened.
Boiled down to the essentials,
what really happened was simple
enough. The President and Sec-
retary of State Henry A. Kissin-
ger went very far indeed to se-
cure some sort of ongoing under-
standing about strategic arms li-
mitation.
IT WILL be said and said
unjustly that this was because
the domestic political situation
made the President desperate for
"something to show" from the
summit meeting.
There was undeniable despera-
tion in the search for further
SALT progress, particularly in
the case of Secretary Kissinger.
But this was because both the
President and the secretary,
again with special emphasis on
Dr. Kissinger, have come to feel
that the onrush of technology is
causing the whole vast, ugly busi-
ness of strategic arms develop-
ment to get utterly out of hand.
Just what kind of deal was of-
fered to the Soviets is not known
as yet. This is one of the plain-
est proofs that the President and
the secretary went just as far as
they possibly could.
IN THE Pentagon, in fact, only
Secretary of Defense James
Schlessinger was consulted. Dr.
Kissinger's remark about the "in-
transigence" of professional mili-
tary men can only be taken to
mean that some or all of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff might have
objected strongly to the real of-
fer to the Soviets.
To the foregoing one must add
a further fact.
The summit atmosphere was
cordial; and General Secretary
Leonid Brezhnev and the other
Soviet leaders were plainly eager
to keep up all the now-familiar
appearances of what is called
"detente."
MARSHAL ANDREI Grechko,
for instance, positively went out
of his way to talk at real length
and with some intimacv with the
Presidents chief of staff, Gen.
Alexander Haig.
As defense minister, member
of the Politburo and second most
powerful figure in the Soviet
government. Marshal Grechko is
one of the most important men
in the world today.
The marshal is also one of the
least known of the world's lead-
ers outside the Soviet inner cir-
cle; for he is far from given to
being cozy with foreigners.
His long talks with Gen. Haig
(on whom he reportedly made a
deep impression) therefore mean
that the Soviet military chief was
JOtfMf ALSOP 1
doing his best to be pleasant like
all his colleagues.
BL'T IT is one thing to do your
best to be pleasant, and it is
quite another thing to do real
business, especially when the
lengths in order to do business,
as were the President and Secre-
tary Kissinger.
The American effort to do
business met with flat failure, at
least in the area of strategic
arms limitation.
Rather plainly, there was some
other side is going to great
Continued on Page 9-
^Jewish Florid kin
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone J7M60S
P.O. Box 2973. Miami. Florida 33101
Em ^/KjlfoT ^USSS ""OCHBT SELMA M. THOMPSON
r-uDiisner t-xecutlvc Editor Am.lst.iiit to Publisher
Th. i V f!'V)DMAN M -T.linator
******* pj^^KSj.^^jew,sh -
ADVISO^^m,\ff,TTKFera,lr,nr0c!?rr,R,er H">-wood Shofar Editor!.!
man. Ben salter. Marlon "NeVina n, "v^'"'""- Chairman: Hoa. Becker-
-----------------------------"" waving. Dr. Norman Atkln. Robert N. Kerbe)
Emir's wsyjr Te!?arrb:^'h^w"h *** *" *"*
eate. Worldwide New. Serv? iBJj|c A<>"c^ Svn Art. Feature Syndl-
^CKtPTlO.N HAT^nL^TATeirSn-, Tear M.. Out o, Town V^n
Volume 4
Friday, August 2, 1974
Number 15
14 AB 5734


f Friday. August 2. 1974
+ legist fh ridHhun SHofir of Hollywood
Page 5
Profile
Saga of The Jewish Butterfly
"You're early," he said to me
while dashing into the room to
place a long distance call.
Lewis K. Cohn runs a 24 hour-
day. It doesn't run him.
This is the man who 'retired"
seven years ago.
. To slow down Lewis F. Cohn
is to handcuff a butterfly for he
flies through life and on his way,
he touches many other lives.
This year Cohn will co chair
the J"WF Campaign with Melvin
Baer. ,
He'll hnve that time to use
since there's a slot left open
which, for the past two years, was
filled by being President of Tem-
ple Beth El.
Cohn didn't always have time
for an active community life.
First, he had to get eollege
under his belt. He has a BA from
Renssalaer Polytech Institute.
At that time, although the Cohn
family lived in Troy, New York,
Conn's father had orange grove
interests in Palestine.
The family went over on a sup
posed three month visit. They
stayed three years!
"They were turbulent times of
Arab uprisings against Jews,"
Cohn says, "and the British Army-
needed people who could com-
municate in English, Arabic and
Hebrew."
Cohn, who by then had learned
to speak Arabic and Hebrew, be-
came an interpreter for the
British Army.
Three years later, he was
wounded and as he says. "There
was a commotion over my being
an American citizen." so he was
mustered out of service.
As he prepared to leave Pales-
tine for Troy, his mother asked,
"Please stop in Hartford (Conn.)
to see mv 'landsleit'."
He did. He also met a read-
he.tded girl named Anne Radeen.
He never did go on to Troy.
Within a year, Anne and Lewis
were married C hn says, "I be-
came basy ,.- rin< a living."
Even whi e moved to Flor-
ida fifteen years ago, Cohn was
still active in business.
It was seven years ago; when
he "retired" 'and moved to Holly-
wood that Cohn was finally able
to transfer his drive and imagi-
nation over to Jewish community
life.
"I wouldn't have left Palestine
had I known it would become a
Jewish State." Cohn explains.
Since it did and hi< roots were
already hare, he works witli his
heart in that direction.
In addition to havine served
Health ('are Has
jdenlers In Three
|S. Fla. Loeations
Health Care Services patient
are centers can put an entire
lospital room in the home from
bed to a breathing machine?
Health Care accepts Medi-
are patients who have reached
;x>int in their recovery when
ey can be cared for in their
n homes.
Trained professionals are
available for consultation in the
icy ol the patient'* house .
anii the rental equipment will be
delivered free to the patient.
Health Cam flsaillm will fit
: tiinjieilic appliances according
o the physician's instructions.
uaUfied male ami female fitters
ill assist either in the home,
X in Health Care's fitting
ms. S|iccial appliances are '.
vailalile ror patients recovering \
from breast surgery and os-
tomy patients are cared for by
trained prod ssionsd specialists.
Health Care Services patient
care centers are in Hollywood,
al 1S21 Mayo Street in the Mayo
Shopping ( enter. in Miami i
Beach at 2005 Collins Ave., and I
at 1525-B So. Andrews Ave.,
Fort Laudenii
I
tell > mi. 1 showed Gary how to
week." He adds, "I was on the
cross country track team in
school."
Anne Cohn then looks at him
in surprise. "I didn't know that,"
she exclaimed.
Well, she's only been married
to Coiin for 35 years.
It takes time to catch up with
him!
R.G.
Temple In The Pines Sisterhood
Holds First Meeting In New Building
Temple in the Pines has set-
Urn into its new facility at 1900
.";. University Drive; The Sister*
held its first meeting ie-.
cently with Thea Millcrman.
"lit. presiding. At present,
the Sisterhood numbers To me i-
bers, including the following new
members: Boubi Braslawsce,
Eiaine Krupidck, Anne Mai tin
ami Barbara Rothberg.
A bowling league is being or-
ganized oy Sisternood member?
Anne Goldstein and Sophif
Klein. Morning and afternoon
to :ms are bein^ formed in addi-
i, r. to a mixed league in the
evaflit
A conk look which will be
made up of favorite recipes from
.Si terhood members, i^ in the
<. Coordinator for
ranz,
a gourmet cook.
Parents may register their
children for religious school by
contact in'.' Rhona Sandman,
principal, at the temple office.
Classes will be conducted in the
portables of Pines Middle School.
UWI5 COHN
as President of Temple Beth El.
he is a vice president of the
American Jewish Committee, on
the Board of Trustees of B'nai
B'rith, Officer and Board of Di-
rectors member of Jewish Wel-
fare Federation and on the Board
of Trustees of Jewish Commu-
nity Centers.
When speaking of the latter.
Cohn's interesting color eyes light
up. "I want to formulate a viable
program to give Adult Citizens
a reason for living. Many are
near poverty level and no one is
paying attention to them."
In cooperation with JCC Direc-
tor, Myrna Amsel, Cohn has com-
mitted himself to a pilot program
of specifically planned events for
Adult Citizens.
"It's time we stopped giving
lip service, do something and
give these people dignity,'" Cohn
says with a flourish of a hand
which held a cigarette until three
weeks ago.
The Lewis E. Cohn home could
use a switchboard operator in
residence. The phones ring in-
cessantly.
... and while the man speaks,
you have the opportunity to look
around.
Scrools of Honor on the walls.
Bridge trophies. Bowling trophies.
Art from Israel. Children's pic-
tures.
Anne and Lewis Cohn's son,
Lawrence, is a psychiatrist.
His son. Gary. 6. is the apple
of Grandpa's eye. Cohn is fast to
THE ANSWERS
TELL THE STORY
WHO GIVES A WRITTEN GUARANTEE
ON DRY CLEANING DRAPERIES ?
*W//Jf*ias
OTHERS
NO SHRINKAGE
(Length & Width)
NO COLOR LOSS
NO FABRIC SHREDDING
SQUARED EVEN HEMS
HEADERS
RETAIN CRISPNESS
AT cSLpet/af^. A Trained Professional Carefully
Removes And Rehangs Your Draperies Spotlessly
Clean and Wrinkle-Free .
vtu
CLEANERS
& TAILORS
CERTIFIED COLD FUR STORAGE VAULT ON PREMISES
NOW WITH TWO FINE
LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU
1500 EAST COMMERCIAL BLVD.
FORT LAUDERDALE PHONE: 771-5815
500 EAST HALLANDALE BEACH BLVD.
HALLANDALE PHONE. 922-6268-927-5333
(formtrly Ihi Houl* ol LO'flnt)
(MIAMI) PHONE: 944-5242
If It's not cZZpeH'oC .
It's not guaranteed In writing.
i
AUGus/Ireasure
of the Month
Two lucky people, winners of the August "Golden Value
Coupon" drawing will be flying to New York as our guests.
They'll be the winners of the "Plaza Suite" which includes:
4 days and 3 nights at the luxurious Plaza Hotel; a romantic
carriage ride around Central Park; temporary membership
in the Playboy Club; air fare, both ways. Anyone can win-
just deposit your August calendar coupon in our lobby dis-
play. The drawing will be held September 3rd.
PIAZA SUITE
H
&64tafo& 50?/eaAs andfeWux StillGmu*i7vist.'/
FIRST nRTIORRL BRRN
OF HOLLVUJOOD

C
BS
V,,orut
BROWARD COUNTY S SENIOR BANK Servinf Continuously Since 1924
Affiliated with
FIRST NATIONAL BANK Of HAllANOALE
HOLLYWOOD NATIONAL BANK
FIRST NATIONAL BANK Of MIRAMAR
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF MOORE HAVEN
Members Federal Reserve System
2001 HOLLYWOOO BOULEVARD
P.O. BOX 49
HOLLYWOOO, FLORIDA 33022
PHONE 920-4567
Each depositor insured to $20 000 by FDIC
1


Page 6
JeMi HcrMkui *** Hoiyod
Friday, August 2. 1974
Their Faith Remains Intact
(Editor's Notr: Even though
me Soviet Jews arriving in Uh
rael are flmtlnj; living conditions
crowded and job powtiMHties
slowed down due to backlash f
the Vum Klppnr War, their faith
remains intact. We thought you
would like to read a realistic
viewpoint In the letter reprinted
below:)
Dear Robert:
Once again, I am writing this
letter to let you know about our
life.
As I wrote to you previously,
we arrived in Israel the 8th ol
March, 1974. Adel's health was
awful. Directly from the airport,
she was taken to the hospital,
where she still is. Her health, I
am sorry to tell you, did not im-
prove. We, myself and my son,
visit her regularly, but she docs
not always lecognize us.
I,eon and I are living in a
building, sort of a hotel, in which
we have a small room, in which
there is also a kitchen. We pre-
pare lood for ourselves. Leon at-
tends school half a day. and I
study Hebrew in the Ulpan
(School for intensive Hebrew
study I. My trying to find work,
so far, has not been successful,
but I an-, hoping that I will find
work.
Adel's hospital is about 20 M
lometers from where we are liv-
ing. We have to go there by bus.
We have to lose many hours to
go and return, and we have lit-
tle time. Leon was also accepted
in a music school for gifted chil-
dren, and he has to practice
playing the violin no less than
four to five hours a day. The
conditions for his practice are
impossible, and, therefore, the
question about an apartment is
one of the most important ques-
tions. Regarding a permanent
place where we will live so far
no one has discussed it with us.
My friends are living here a
year, some a year and a half,
without a permanent place, and
some of them hope to buy an
apartment privately.
At any rate, don't think that I
am despondent. No one should
even think I am despondent. In
spite of all of these situations
we have to try to do everything
in order to solve some of our
problems.
What I feel sorry about is that
many of my friends who are spe-
cialists are in the same situa-
tion and sometimes worse. The
most difficult situations are my
friends who have humanistic
professions.
Of course, we must help our
land to solve very difficult prob-
lems, and regarding this, we
have to hope for the best.
But, with reluctance, we are,
nevertheless, invited to partici-
pate in public life, even though
we are convinced that we could
work and produce, we are very
much devoted to our land.
Nevertheless, a detailed con-
versation with you and with
your colleagues would be possi-
ble only in a personal visit. It is
impossible to write everything.
I hope your plans to come to Is-
rael in August have not been
changed and our meeting about
which I am dreaming impatient-
ly, is going to happen.
It is an affront that many get
frightened with the dificulties
and do not come to Israel, but
worse yet, many who cannot un-
Teniple Beth Shalom Sisterhood
Plans Activities For Coming Year
Temple Beth Shalom's Sister-
hood is busy planning many ac-
tivities for the coming year, ac-
cording to Mrs. Edward Hoff-
man, president.
Among leading events will be
a Labor Day Picnic jointly spon-
sored by Sisterhood and Men's
Club; presentation of a play, to
be presented at the first general
meeting Sept. 9; Torah Fund
Campaign Oct. 23; Youth Lunch-
eon Nov. 13, and Art Auction on
Dec. 7.
Sisterhood also plans a mem-
bership coffee in September, and
continuing activities during the
season will be mah jongg and
bowling leagues as well as a
new book review and discussion
group.
Ladies interested in joining
Beth Shalom's Sisterhood should
300,000 Expected To Attend
International Boat Show
More than 300.000 persons are
expected to attend the 1975 Inter-
national Boat Show in the Miami
Beach Convention Center Feb. 20-
26, according to John Rogers,
executive manager of the mam-
moth seven-day show.
A new addition to the center,
now nearing completion, will add
100,000 square feet of space to
the show.
call Iwrs. *-cer couer, member-
ship vice president, for further
details.
ZOA Elects
Rahbi Shapiro
Rabbi David Shapiro, spiritual
leader of Temple Sinai of Holly-
wood, was
elected to
serve as a
vice president
of the Zionist
Organi-
zation of
America dur-
ing the ZOA's
recent 77th
annual con-
vention in
New York
City.
Announ-
cement of
Rabbi Shapiro's election was
, made here by Sam J. Perry,
president of the Broward Zionist
District.
Rabbi Shapiro, who recently
returned from a visit to Israel
and Europe, has been a dedicated
Zionist all his life. A native of
Israel, he has been active in the
ZOA's Southeast Region for
more than 20 years. For five of
those years, he served as its
president.
RABBI SHAPIRO
NOW OPEN
We are Direct Receivers of Fresh A Sah Water Fish A Seafoods
PARKWAY FISH MARKET
fa New Parkway Plaza
3126 South University Drive
Miramar
963-2668
LI. Flounders Rod Snappers Florida Groupers Mackerel
Sea Trout Pompano Dolphin Fresh Salmon Halibut
Cod Fish While Fish Carp
-jerstand the situation, especially
characteristic in the beginning ot
the resettlement, do not hold
out, and are leaving the land and
this almost kills our many years
of hard work to organize Aliyah
(Immigration into Israeli. This
situation causes us to suffer, but
I am not suffering from this and,
most important, it is very possi-
ble without too much dificulty to
liquidate these reasons which are
responsible for not coming to Is-
rael and leaving Israel. However,
some do not accept this with
reason. But, we hope and believe
and have faith in the fact that
the younger element of the gov-
ernment will understand the
needs of Olim (New Imigrants)
and the need to do everything
possible that the Aliyah shall not
stop.
With faith that my own prob-
lems as well as the public prob-
lems will be solved, I end my
letter with the hope to see you
soon.
Your Mikhail and Leon
Inquiries Invited
By Beth Shalom
Inquiries are invited regarding
Temple Beth Shalom member-
shio and Hieh Holy Day tickets
and reservations for members
and non-members. Sylvia S. Gor-
don, executive secretary, will be
handling these projects at the
temple office.
Mordecai Oplier. director of
education, is now available at
the school office; he will provide
information regarding the He-
brew and Sunday sc'.iool depart-
ments and day school for mem-
bers and non-members.
For information regarding the
pre-school departments, includ-
ing nursery, pre kindergarten
and kindergarten, call school of-
fice.
Shelly Herold Temple Soiel's
Nursery-Kindergarten Director
I. A. Durbln, President, Rabbi
"Robert P. FraSin, and Mrs. Lor-
raine Ganon, Chairman of the
SHELLY IIKKOLD
Nursery School Committee, have
announced that Shelly Herold
has reen chosen as teaching-di-
rector of the Nursery-Kindergar-
ten School at Temple Solel in
Hollywood.
Mrs. Herold holds a Bachelor
of Art's and Master of Science in
Education degree with emphasis
on Child Development and Clin-
ical School Ps /etiology. Her ex-
perience with young children in-
ct"des teaching in New York and
Florida, teaching-director of her
own nursery school in Illinois.
and pre-school director of a New-
York Day Camp. Her special tal-
ents which serve as instructional
aids. Incl"de ventriloquism, arts
and crafts and the writing of
children's plays, songs and
stories.
Mrs. Herold's creative pro-
gram at Temple Sole! will em-
phasize the" need" to'"Experience'.'
a multiplicity of materials and
situations in ten "discovery -
areas," each geared towards the i
development of the basic percep-
tual, visual-motor and thinking
skills necessary for all future
learnings. Based on.the major
premise that each child is
unique and learns in his own
special way, each class size will
be limited.
Shelly Herold is married to
Frederick S. Herald, M-D. and
has two children, David Mare
and Caryn Michele.
School registration forms are
available at the Temple office,
5100 Sheridan Street, or by
phoning 989-0205.
Dr. David Lehman
Seeks House Seat
David J. Lehman, Jr., M.D.,
founder and president of the
Dangerous Substances Guidance
Center Inc., of Broward County
and "The Starting Place." has
announced his candidacy for the
Iistrict 97 seat in Florida's
Ho.:se of Representathe*.
Dr. Lehman has been practic-
ing in Hollywood since 1954 and
is a Diplomate. American Board
of Internal Medicine, and Asso-
ciate, American College of Phy-
sicians. He served as a Major
from 1941-46 in the US. Army
Medical Corps and lost a son in
the Vietnam War.
Dr. Lehman's platform In-
cludes protection of condomini-
um and mobile home owners, and
he would support legislation aid-
ing the medically indigent, deal-
ing with drug pushers, reducing
overcrowding in public class-
rooms, and preserving pure
drinking water.
Summertime Is Goombay Time
Nassaua vacation playground
conveniently located just a cou-
ple hundred miles off the Florida
Uold Coastis a land of perpet-
ual sunshine and blue-green wa-
ter... but it's much more than
that.
This beautiful Bahamian city,
known and loved by so many,
changes almost constantly!
All the quaint graces and charm-
ing customs continue, but new
attractions bewitch.
Plush resort accommodations-
like those you'll find at the famed
Halcyon Balmoral Hotelmake
most holiday budgets happy and
fulfilling beyond imagination.
Brilliant sunshine, pristine wa-
ters, powdery white sand beaches,
aii endless variety of water sports
and remarkable historic sites all
combine to place an exclamation
point after Nassau's claim to
fame.
Nassau is star-dusted with en-
tertainment, international chefs,
Lady Luck at the Paradise Island
Casinoa cosmopolitan character
PLUS smiling faces and friendly
dickering at the native straw
market.
In a rented car or taxi, you can
tour all of New Providence Island
in a day. New Providence is only
21 miles from east to west A
circle trip of the island is only
60 miles. Going west along Bay
Street, only four miles from the
center of Nassau lies Cable Beach
where the Halcyon Balmoral Ho-
tel is located.
Temperatures in the Bahamas
are ideal year-round. The Gulf
Stream keeps the islands warm
and balmy in the winter months,
and southerly trade winds keep
them cool and comfortable be-
tween May and September. When
it rains, showers come and clear
quickly. The clothes you bring
Halycon Balmoral Hotel en Cable Beach
depend entirely upon the kind of
holiday you are planning and the
time of year.
Many of the gracious Georgian
structures you'll find in Nassau
are built of coral limestone and
date from 1812. You'll want to
pack plenty of film to capture
these and other scenes out of a
bygone era. Everywhere in Nas-
sau the past and the present
merge.
Summertime is Goombay time
in the Bahamas., rhythmic music
... colorful native costumes
exuberance revelry are
known to overwhelm and trans-
port bystanders into eager par-
ticipants. Other highlights of the
Goombay Summer include special
Bahamian delicaciesseen" as
conch fritters and aouwe -4ae
:ream; Goombay shopping bar-
gains; folklore shows dramatizing
island history; and nighttime
parades.
Nearly half-a-mUlk>n visitors
experience the thrill of Goombay
Summer annually, a goodly por-
tion of the yearly total of some
1.5-million tourists.
Once you get Nassau in your
blood, you'll long to returnbut
there's no time like the present
to start charting your first island
adventure ... for sure, It won't
be your last
I


Friday. Augat.2. 1974
+Jkmi%*norlk1kr Sh^w of Hrtsrwood
PctCJO 7
? ? ? Ask Abe ? 8il"1 A New Years Messase To A Soviet Jew ^J
By ABRAHAM B. HALPERN
Question: What is the origin of
the mode of cantillation, the
chanting of the reading of the
Torah and other books of the
Bible?
Clara Yaches
Highland Park, N.J.
Answer In Jewish tradition,
the formal reading of certain
books of the Bible in worship and
in study is carried out with a
musical intonation. This is done
according to accents employed in
the biblical text to mark sentence
structure and the manner of
cantillation.
These accents are called in He-
brew, Taamin (accents). The
tunes or melodic phrases which
these Taamim designate are call-
ed in Hqbrew, Nesinot (melodies)
and Tropes in Yiddish The word
Trop is ol Greek origin.
These biblical accents have
been classified in three svstems:
the Tiberian, the Babylonian and
the Palestinian. It is the Tiberian
system in which the signs used
are dots, strokes and segments of
circles placed sometimes above
and sometimes below the con-
sonants, that is how widely used.
Many of the accents are inter-
dependent. Certain accents can
follow only certain other accents.
Accents often logically interlock
in entire groups. All the accents
have names. The majority of
these names are Aramaic in ori-
gin.
These signs are of great help
for proper understanding of
biblical sentences. As musical
notations each accent conveys a
particular grouping of notes. The
type of chant thus produced is
called cantillation.
There is no exact knowledee
as to when these biblical accents
were first brought into use. Tradi-
tion attributes both vocalization
and accentuation to Ezra (5th
century B.C.E.). The oral trans-
mission of pausal stops and
musical declamation is very old.
However most scholars believe
that these Taamim wrre first!
introduced during the pcriorl i
TEMPLE SINAI
OF HOLLYWOOD
Is seeking qualified and en-
thusiastic directors for its
1974-75 USY and pre-USY.
Generous salary, commensu-
rate with ability. Call Rabbi
Listfield, 920-1577, Miami
Call 949-4012.
5OO-S00 of the Common Era. It
is believed that the actual signs
and their signification came from
the philologists of the Mediter-
reanean culture. But the signs
had to be adapted to Hebrew. Al-
though some researchers do not
consider them to be of Jewish
oriein. the manner of rendering
and the tune to be used was al-
most exclusively specific to the
Torah, and so is peculiar to the
Jews.
Public readin" of the Bible is
attested to. much earlier than the
establishment of the written sys
terns of accentuation. The prac-
tice of cantillation was not a
prominent part of Temple liturgy
but became so in the Synagogue.
Different Jewish communities
reflect varying musical styles, the
Sephardim showing Oriental in-
fluence and the Ashkenazim,
European.
There is a difference for the
cantillation of the Torah (the
Pentateuch the 5 Books of
Moses) and the reading from the
Books of the Prophets. The sys-
tem of cantillation for the Book
of Psalms. Proverbs and Job, dif-
fers from that of other Books.
Although the printed Hebrew
texts of the Bible carry these ac-
cents, the Torah Scroll has
neither these Trop siens nor
vowels. The reader therefore
must prepare himself for the pub-
lic reading and the chanting.
Editor's note: Please send your
questions to:
??? ASK ABE ???
Jewish Floridian and Shofar
1909 Harrison Street
Hollywood. Florida 33020
WELL KNOWN CANTOR of
New York, is now residing
permanently in Miami Beach
and seeks position for the
High Holidays. Call Cantor
Moishe Drozin at 534-6320.
WEDDING, BAR-MITZVAH
AND COMMERCIAL
PHOTOGRAPHY
done at reasonable prices
Contact: Saul Rosen at
966-5785
ft
DR. LEE WINTHROP
PODIATRIST FOOT SPECIALIST
Is pleased to announce the
opening of his office.
AT
EMERALD HILLS MEDICAL SQUARE
4460 SHERIDAN STREET
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33021
N Aaaamtmtnt 989-*
SHELDON WILLENS, D.P.M.
and
MICHAEL A. RUSH, D.P.M.
ANNOUNCE THE RELOCATION OF THEIR
HOLLYWOOD OFFICES FOR THE PRACTICE OF
PODIATRY
to
3829 Hollywood Boulevard
Phone 962-5801
other offices
599 S. Federal Hwy. 4124 S.W. 64rh Ave.
Oania, F4a. (Dayie Road)
Phono 921-0599 Dayie. Florida
Phono: 792-2500
As a way of expressing a vis-
ible sign of support to Soviet
Jewry in their plight for free-
dom, the Soviet Jewry Commit-
tee of Jewish welfare Federa-
tion of Greater Hollywood is
now selling a selection of Jew-
ish New Year's cards to be sent
to Soviet Jews.
The packet, which is $1.00.
contains cards printed in Rus-
sian and includes names and
addresses of people to whom
they should be sent.
Let Russian Jews know they
have not been forgotten. Buy n
packet of New Year's cards at
the Federation Office TODAY!
You'll feel good about your
gesture.
SO WILL THEY!!!
OT EBPEEB CllIA M KAHAAU
IIPHBET EBPE5IM CCCP
I
c
Mbl BAC HE 3AEbUIH!
GREETINGS FROM
THE JEW'S OF USA AND CANADA
TO THE JEWS OF USSR.
WE HAVE NOT FORGOTTEN YOU!
Hollywood Federal Announces
Zartolas, Transue Appointments
Geoige Zartolas has been
elected vice president and Rob-
ert G. Transue a staff appraiser
in the Appraisal Department of
Hollywood Federal Savings and
Loan Association, it was an-
nounced here by James M. Blanz.
president.
Zartolas has been in the finan-
cial field for ten years, and for
seven years was a general con-
tractor in Broward County.
A member of Hollywood Ro-
tary, he was educated at Brow-
ard Community and Miami Dade
Junior Colleges, and is treasurer
of the Broward County Chapter
of the Society of Real Estate
Appraisers.
Transue, who attended Bis-
cayne Community College, re-
cently joined Hollywood Federal
after spending four years in the
Air Force. He is a member of the
Society of Real Estate Apprais-
ers with SRPA designation.
K0BIK1 TKAHSUt GEORGE ZAJTT0US
LEWIS J.MANN
PHOTOGRAPHY
WEDDINGS BAR MITZVAHS PORTRAITS
PHONE 271-8089 7830 Camino Real
Miami, Fla. Suite 412
Gordon And Blank Speak At
Beth El Vesper Services
Temple Beth El Sabbath Ves-
per services will be at 8:15 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 2. Robert W. Gor-
don, past president and member
of the temple's board of trus-
tees, will officiate and deliver a
sermonette on "Jewish Is A
State of Mind."
Friday, Aug. 9 at 8:15 p.m. Dr.
Robert Blank, member of the
temple's board of trustees, will
conduct services and deliver a
sermonette on "Interesting As-
pects On Soviet Jewry." Mrs.
Blank will bless the Sabbath ta-
pers.
Memorial services will be re- ;
cited at the conclusion of both [
services.
^
PCOPLC VOU
con STILL
BCLIC vc in
HOLLYWOOD FEDERAL SAVINGS
fes.
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
HALLANDALE OFFICE: 240' E Hallandale Beach Blvd.

o
c
e set

9
GRAND OPENING
THE PATIENT CA CENTER
1821 Mayo St., Hollywood
920-8705
ORTHOPEDIC APPLIANCES FITTED FROM
YOUR DOCTOR'S PRESCRIPTION
HOME CARE MEDICAL EQUIPMENT
it HOSPITAL BEDS WALKERS
* WHEELCHAIRS COMMODES
* BREATHING MACHINES
0ST0MY AND INCONTINENCE PRODUCTS
BREAST FORMS AND BRAS FITTED
By Mrs. Etta Luongo, accredited Surgical specialist
Medicare
Patients,
RELAX!
Just call and ask eur rroinea" per-
MUMtl if yen are eligible fer medkare
paymcnti. We even mole* house calls
ana' hespitol calls, ona" art oHer yan
free delivery.
Call at ana1 joit sit Back ana1 relax.
J


Page 8
* (r w ;f nrrSrfimr end Shofer of Hollywood
Friday, Aucruel 2, 1974
" : \
jewisii Wo.fare .-'ederaiion executive committee members and their wives
were rscently entertained at a cocktail party by Dr. and Mrs. Norman
Atkin honoring Ambassador Ehud Avriel. The Ambassador was here to
meet with community leaders concerning the current situation facing Israel
at home and with its neighbors. Top left to right: David Yorra, Mrs. David
Yorra. Mrs. Albert Yorra, Albert Yorra Herbert Katz, Mrs. Herbert Katz,
Ambassador Ehud Avriel, Jesse Martin, Mrs. Jesse Martin, Allen Gordon,
Mrs. Allen Gordon, Dr. Stanley Margulies, Mrs. Stanley Margulies. Bot-
tom left to right: Mrs. Ben Salter, Mrs. Lewis E. Cohn, Mrs. Carolyn Davis,
Mrs. Abraham Halpern, Abraham Halpem, Lewis E. Cohn, 1975 Cam-
paign Co-Chairman; Dr. Norman Atkin, JWF President; Mrs. Marsha
Tobin, JWF Women's Division President; Ambassador Ehud Avriel and
Melvin Baer, 1975 Campaign Co-Chairman.

c
omtniin
it\j ^^alcnciar
SATURDAY, AUGUST 10
Federation Singles Swim Party9:00 P.M.Hollywood.
SUNDAY. AUGUST 11
Jewish Welfare Federation Annual General Membership Meet-
ing10:00 A.M.Holiday Inn, 4000 South Ocean Drive. Open to
the public
STEVEN P. KANNER, M.D.. P. A.
ANNOUNCES THE ASSOCIATION OF
STEVEN R. WE1SBERG, M.D.
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
MEDICAL ONCOLOGY AND INTERNAL MEDICINE
IN THEIR NEW OFFICES
AT
3449 JOHNSON STREET
HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33021
Hours by appointment
TELEPHONE: S63-6307
DRIVING A
in or call and obtain Information about
our unique EMISSION MODIFICATION
SYSTEM (Patent Pending #436897) and TUNE-UP
on a DYNOMOMETER. Equipment that enable* the
technician to make final teat* and adjustment* while car la
run from idle to 60 + mile* per hour. Increeae the gas
mileage on your car 30% or more
... and it's all done legally
AUTO TECHNICAL ASSOCIATES
2041 HAYES STREET. HOLLYWOOO, FLORIDA
PHONE 921-2211
OPEN EVENINGS AND SATUR0AYS FOR BUSINESS VANS
AN0 PICK-UP TRUCKS, BY APPOINTMENT ONLY
Alao Specializing in Front End Alignment and
Brake Service. Major and Minor Tune-Upa.
Air Conditioning Service
JOHNSON tTKCET
Featured on Channels 4-7-51 the
Art Merrill Show WIOD and WKAT
Young Seeks Reelection To
District 95 House Seat
State Representative Walter
C. Young, D., of Pembroke Pines
has announced that he will seek
reelection to the District 95 seat.
Young is a member of the
House Committees on Business
Regulation. Education ami Kn-
vironmental Protection. A mem-
ber of the Florida Energy Com-
mittee and chairman of the Sub-
committee on Solar Knergy. last
month he was api>ointed to the
newly created select committee
to study rate policies of the elec-
tric utility companies.
w
^s
PCOPLC VOU
can still
MUC vc in
H0UYW00D FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
HALLANDALE OFFICE 2401 E Hallandale Beach Blvd.
I
DO YOl HAVE A Fill KM!
WHO
HI 1I\S THE CANDLE
AT DOTH ENDS?
GIVE THE ILTIMATE GIFT!
CANDLE IS 100% BEESWAX; IN WHITE,
GREEN, BLUE, APRICOT, RED, BLACK
FINE CERAMIC BASE; WHITE OR BLACK.
GIFT BOXED SET $4.50
Shipped in U.S.A. Add $1.75
-i-^=k.
MM 4% FOR USE Of
AUNH.C0NAS7!H CHUK
L
MORE FABULOUS THAN EVER"
906 E. LAS OLAS BLVD. FT. LAUDERDALE
1
HOLLYWOOD'S LABORATORY
FOR PROCESSING KODAK'S COLOR FILMS
Southern
iVKB
Main Store and Plant
2000 NORTH DIXIE HIGHWAr
PHONEi 920-8021
Monday thru Friday 8 to 5:30
Saturday 9:00 to 1:00
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
Branch Stores
4551 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
PHONE: 981-8555
1804 N. UNIVERSITY DRIVE
PHONE: 962-0999
Monday thru Friday 9 to 6:00
Saturday 9:00 to 1:00



jy, August 2. 1974
*"JeHiit rkjrada^tr and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 9
10 MINDI.IN
tudent&Change: Moving to Immobility
Continued from Page 4
^ely to blow up in your face.
Jut Kent State was only one of
factors militating against
atinuing student rebellion
^inst the Leary panacea to
DP out and turn on in say,
light Asbury, or even in a col-
classroom which could be
|ily disrupted by calling the
ofessor "pig" and his course
relevant."
[Certainly, the end of the war
Vietnam at least our mas-
ve involvement there also
kted as a sedative.
[THEN THERE were the legal
ghts accorded to young people
18, which demonstrated to
adeote that Uie.se rights have
ade no substantial difference in
eir own "oppressed" lives if
ything. they have found them
[disadvantage.
[Neither have these rights given
fern any significant power to
ige quickly or decisively in
ciety. what they purported to
Bid in contempt.
OWN observation is that
adents have tended in the re-
it past to take on the colora-
dii of students a decade or more
to. Disillusioned wih their first
bvolufjonary effort, they have
pddenly abandoned the struggle
lid become more "respectable" in
He sense that they are, them-
ivvs. acquiring "pig" qualities.
They worry about how they
will make a living. They begin to
doubt that a college education is
the answer to all their increas-
ingly bourgeois dreams.
TECHNICAL and para-profes-
sional short-term training pro-
grams are increasingly their
choice for the short-cut way to
acquire all the material advan-
tages that just a few years ago
they held in contempt: cars,
stereos, all the emblems of mid-
dle class achievement.
On an ideological level, they
still mouth all the proper utter-
ances vis-a-vis the oppressed
Blacks. Mexicans, the American
Indian.
But whereas it was "square"
to be religious a few years ago
(atheistic existentialism was the
philosophic rage or one of the
Oriental system for the achieve-
ment of spiritual serenity), to-
day Christian students are fana-
tical in their Christianity, and
Jewish students are fanatical in
their Zionism.
RECENTLY, I asked students
to read Mark Twain's "Reflec-
tions on Religion.' The Christian
students were incensed. It never
occurred to them that America's
most important humorist was so
bitterly atheistic.
Feeling betrayed by yet anoth-
er national hero, some of the
Christian students refused to dis-
cuss Twain's essay at all. Others
suggested it ought to be cen-
red. A few questioned my own
reasons for assigning it quite
as if (as a Jew) I was the devil's
atheistic advocate.
The Jewish students, in their
written responses, ever predicta-
bly humanistic, tended to agree
with Twain's rejection of a lit-
eral interpretation of the Bible
while at the same time dutifully
spelling God in that absurd way,
G-d. taught them by witless He-
brew school teachers in their
childhood.
THE THEOLOGICAL-ideoIogi-
cal Zionist confusion in their
minds these days is fascinating,
and even at their worst many
Jewish students show a vibrant,
forwaid looking view of the uni-
verse they must someday inherit
from their ciders.
For them. Judaism is real be-
cause Israel is real a notion
Orthodox rabbis find so repre-
hensible.
The Christian students suf-
fer none of this ideological pas-
sion not even the fascinating
confusion. They have inherited,
unblemished, their parents' anti-
Semitism, and they will pass it
on to their children when they
become parents themselves.
IN AN essay by Stokely Car-
michael on "Black Power." they
said all the "right" things about
oppression of minorities
In reaction to "Mein Kampf,"
by Adolf Hitler, one student said
her father told her that Hitler
was a genius.
But most of the others dutiful-
ly and properly thought his the-
ories about inferior and su-
perior races were absurd. From
the vantagepoint of protecting
Blacks, they tried to demonstrate
that Hitler's proof that nature
abhors mixing of species is false.
It can not, they correctly ar-
gued, apply to man, since all
men, regardless of race, are one
specie.
Bl'T WHEN I suggested that,
in the end, it was Jews Hitler
was talking about, not Blacks or
Mexicans or American Indians,
their tone changed radically.
The student whose father
taught her that Hitler was a ge-
nius promptly chal.enged the six-
million figure as a gross exag-
geration and, in fact, a propagan-
dists lie.
Another said that World War
II was fought to save the Jews.
WHEN I asked a group of
Christian students what they
thought of when they heard the
word. "Black." the answer in-
variably was "oppression."
When 1 asked what they
thought of when they heard the
word, "Jew," one woman student
responded, "minks and Cadil-
lacs."
Her answer brought titters in
the classroom, knowing glances
from student to student, many of
them piously wearing gold
crosses.
The fee'ine wa? that J<-ws
"control" everything. They have
Nixon Tells Rabbi Korfi He's Innocent
I Continued from Page !
money, power, operate the press
and the government. Black stu-
dents said that Jews are their
worst enemy.
I AM NOT sure that I prefer
today's "respectable" student to
the" rebellious reactionary of
several years ago. hard though
he was to take.
Today's is frightened, pretends
to be politically liberated and re-
ligiously conservative. Actually,
he is a piece of clay ready to be
molded by anyone who will
soothe his fears. Only his aiti-
Semitism is implacable and
growing.
Jews are in the highest places,
and they can not understand
why, only that there will there-
fore be no room for them in the
highest places. Their technical
training won't be able to equip
them to compete with Jews, "all
of whom" are university ge-
niuses.
EVEN ISRAEL has lost its
former fascination for college
students. A decade ago, they saw
Israel as a magnificent social ex-
perimentone of the last of the
world's democratic frontiers
and a justification for the "bad"
way in which the world treated
the Jews during the Hitler era.
Today. Israel is an oppressor
of the disadvantaged Arab mi-
nority, and since they are disad-
vantaged themselves, Israel and
Jews generally are their oppres-
sors here in America.
They see no relationship be-
tween this absurdity and the fact
that the world's favorable bal-
ance of payments will very short-
ly be entirely in oily Arab hands
a major reason for the fear
they feel about how they'll be
earning a living when they grad-
uate from college into an infla-
tion-ridden woi Id,
Sent. Nixon held a lengthy ln-
fcrview with Rabbi Korff on
f*y 13 and answered a series
written questions from Rabbi
Jorff on May 29.
I The President's response to
Oth sets of inquiries was pub-
ied in Rabbi Korff's new
iperback book, "The Personal
Nixon: Staying on the summn,-
published by Fairness FudIIsh
ers, which is controlled by Rab-
bi KorfFs committee. Rabbi
Korff visited the President at
the Summer White House here
July 16 and presented him with
a codv of the book.
NIXON SAID in the inter-
view that he had ordered the
tields Miami Beach Office Leads In New Accounts
Ira Laurence Hunter, vice
sident and resident manager
If Shields Miami Beach office.
|as been notified that his office
leading the firm in the 1973-
President's Challenge Pro-
ram, a new accounts contest,
k-hit-h was implemented in Sep-
ember. 1973.
H. Virgil Sherrill, president of
Shields & Company. Incorporat-
ed, members of the New York-
Stock Exchange, made the an-
nouncement.
Mr. Hunter and his family re-
side in Emerald Hills. He is exec-
utive vice president of Temple
Sole), Hollywood.
major mrtift of weapons to Is-
rael In the Yom Kippur War
over objections of many Admin-
istration officials and also re-
jected objections from the "so-
called Eastern elite" to his de-
cision to name Kissinger as Sec-
retary of State.
He also cited his appoint-
ments of Dr. Herbert Stein as
chairman of the Council of Eco-
nomic Advisors, Dr. Arthur
Burns as chairman of the Fed-
era! Reserve System, and Wal-
ter Annenbcrg, Jr., as Ambas-
sador to Britain, as among his
appointments of Jews to major
posts.
When he named James R.
Schlesinger as Defense Secre-
tary-, he told Rabbi Korff. a
hign ranking official said to
him: "Do you know Schlesin-
ger's background? Is he Jewish.
... He has a Jewish name."
NIXON SAID he replied that
he had no idea whether Schles-
inger was a Jew. that it would
not prove anything if he was
and that he had chosen Schles-
inger for the Cabinet post be-
cause he considered him the
best person to fill it.
Schlesinger was born Jewish
but converted.
h rAIMIK'S -
MIAMI MONUMENT COMPANY/* A
PERSONALIZED MEMORIALS
CUSTOM CRAFTED
IN OUR WORKSHOP
444-0921 -444-0922
3279 S.W. 8lh ST.. MIAMI
rosej
>h ixon Detente Has Really Failed
Continued from Page 4
soviet hesitation about the right
bourse.
The climax, in fact, was a Po-
litburo meeting so ultralong that
lie discussion can only have
een extremely careful and de-
ailed, which in turn caused con-
ideiable delay in the final So-
viet-American meetings.
ONE DOES not know, of
tourse, if there would have been
second Politburo meeting, with
entirely different outcome, if
lie President had ended by talk-
pareful. is what 'detente' is main-
about in the eyes of Amer-
ins; so I have to tell you, Mr.
jeneral Secretary, that the an-
ver I have been given here
leans the end of 'detente.'"
Rightly or wrongly, the Presi-
ent reserved that chilling mes-
sge for the next time around.
ing cold turkey to General Sec-
retary Brezhnev.
That would have meant the
President's saying: "Progress
with SALT, however slow and
Instead, the word for now is that
on the highest level of the Ad-
ministration a vast effort will be
launched of fundamental strate-
gic review and analysis. No doubt
that is no more than sensible.
But some plain facts also have
to be faced. In brief, the present
leaders of the Nixon Administra-
tion tried to limit the worst o'
the arms race with an offer to
the Soviets that would have
seemed almost sloppily generous
to many responsible people in
the U.S. government.
THAT OFFER was turr.ed
down flat, for good or ill and de-
spite an obvious Soviet desire to
preserve the atmospherics of
"detente."
That leaves th<- President and
the rest of us face to face with
the further ugly fact that losing
an arms race is the only thing
worse than being in an arms
race. That also raavea the Presi-
dent with no remaining shot in '
his locker except telling the So-.
victs and the American people
that "detente" has turned out to |
be a bust.
Doing just thai before it is too
late might even change the pres-
ent Soviet course.
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
Temple 3etfte
WemotlaC
Cjazdens
The only all-Jewish cemeterv in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beaulifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call: &','
920-8225 or write: *&*<. *r
"TEMPLE BETH EL "" ?&*&
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above.
NAME:____________________________
ADDRESS:
'Price Increase Effective Jan. 1st, 1974
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
JZeuill
Jnemoria] Chapei
LOCAL AND OUT Of STATE
ARRANGEMENTH
947-2790
1338S W. DIXIE HWV.. N.M.


Page 10
+Jewistifk>rkttan "< Shof.r of Hollywood
Friday. Augurf 2. 1974"
f

Israel Gets Panther Party
TEL AVIV(JTA)What Is-
rael needs least these days is a
third "Panther" group. But it ap-
parently has one.
Police disclosed here the exist-
ence of a group calling itself the
"Religious Panthers" patterned
after the "Black Panthers" and
their offshoot, the "Blue and
White Panthers."
I-HEIR EXISTENCE was dis-
ligious Party secretary general,
Zvi Bernstein, was turned over
to police. The envelope contain-
ed, a harmless piece of metal and
a note heaping insults on Bern-
stein i
Services
Young Professionals Plan
Discotheque Party, Dance
The Young Professionals and
Professionals II, serving Dade
and Broward Counties single
adults in their 20s through 40s
are co sponsoring a discotheque
dance party at thj Washington
Federal Bank Building. 633 NE
167th St., North Miami Beach,
Sunday at 8 p.m.
The first in a series of Monday
evening live band dances, at
T-J.'s. 3079 E. Commercial Blvd.,
Fort Lauderdale, will be held
Monday at 8 p.m.
State Rep. Dan Bass Seeks
Second Term In The House
South Broward's lone Repub-
lican in the Legislature, State
Rep. Dan Bass, will seek reelec-
tion to the Florida House. His
announcement removed specula-
tion in some quarters that he
might seek a Senate seat.
Bass was selected as one of
the "Top Five" freshman mem-
bers last year in a Ft. Lauder-
dale News survey of the 44
freshman House members.
Swim Party For Singles
The Jewish Federation Singles
of Broward will have a swim
Party in Hollywood on Saturday,
Aug. 10th at 9 p.m. Jewish sin-
gles women ages 25-50 and men
25-55, from Broward and Dade
are welcome. R.S.V.P. by calling
966-7892.
A general meeting will be held
on Tuesday, Aug. 20th, at the
Home Federal Building, Holly-
wood, 8:00 p.m. Coffee and con-
versation to follow.
HALLANDAUt JEWISH CENTER
(Conservative). 416 NE 8th Avn
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz, Canto*
Jacob Uanziaar.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingsley, Cantor Irving
Shulkes. 37
NORTH BROWARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON.
GREGATION. Liberal. 3501 Univer-
sity Or. Rabbi Max Weitz. 44
HOLLYWOOD
VOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
(Orthodox). 3891 Sterling Rd., op-
posite Hollywood Hills High School.
President Or. Frank Stein.
Saturday. 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1361 S
14th Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffe. Associate Rabbi Harvey M.
Rosenfeld.
BETH SHALOM (Tempre) Conserva-
tive. 4601 Arthur S'. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky, Cantor Irving Gold.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (Conservative).
910 SW 62nd Ave., Hollywood. Rabbi
Salomon Benerroche.
TEMPLE SOLEt (Liberal). 6001
Thomas St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Rob-
ert Frazin.
TEMPLE SINAI (Conservative). 1201
Johnson St. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield.
Cantor Yehuda HaUbraun.
M1RAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Conservative)
6920 SW Sth St. Rsddi Avrom
Orazin.
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES (Conserve,
tive) Pinee Middle School, 200 No,
Douglaa Rd., Pembroke Pines.
Rabbi Aaron Shapiro.
>TVNrNrV sfaj V*<>r>rV *W
14 AB 7:46
CANDLEUGHTING TIME
f
Once Again
The
Renowned Cantor
JACOB
JEROSOL.OMSKI
Will Officiate at the
w
HIGH HOLY DAYS
r< the
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Cftouin
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Reserve for Synagogue
Services & Holiday Meais
Finest KOSHER cuwot sarvtd
in our Ocwnfront dinint room
Under (u) Supervision
3 Meols Senreel
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for Reservations Call
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Enjoy The
HIGH HOLY DAYS
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Services Conducted
on Premises
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Serving
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Private Beach Pool
RESERVE NOW
For Reservations CALL
1-538-9045
Your Host
The F.RKOWITZ
ILY
OCEAN AT 41st ST.. MIAMI BEACH
DR. BRUCE J. FEINSTEIN
OPTOMETRIST
Announces the opening of his office for
the general practice of Optometry
at
3176 UNIVERSITY DRIVE
PARKWAY PLAZA, MIRAMAR
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
Telephone
963-2020
KABBI USTFItlD
Sununer Services
At Temple Sinai
Temple Sinai announces that
their regular schedule of Sab-
bath worship continues uninter-
rupted throughout the summer.
Services are held every Fri-
day evening at 8:00 P.M. and
Saturday morning at 8:30 A.M.
under the direction of Associate
Kabhi Chaim Listfield. Assisting
Rabbi Listfield are a full comple-
ment of Lay Cantors and volun-
teers of all ages from the Temjile
membership
Rabbi Listfield was ordained
this past May t>y the Jewish
Theological Seminary in New
York. He has won numerous
prizes and academic awards dur-
ing his Seminary years and grad-
uated magna cum laude from
Rutgers University where he
specialized in romance langu-
ages. He did graduate work at
Princeton and Yale Universities.
"The fact that well over 300
people came to services during
July proves that religion is not
on summer vacation," said Rabbi
Listfield. He urges all congre-
gants to come participate in
Sabbath worship.
The senior rabbi of Temple Si-
nai is Rabbi David Shapiro and
the cantor is Yehudah L. Heil-
braun. Jacob M. Mogilowitz
serves as president of the con
gregation.
Dubitsky Seeks Judgeship
Ira Dubitsky, candidate for
the Circuit Judge seat now oc-
cupied by Murray Goodman, was
a prosecutor in the Dade State
Attorney's Office from early
1967 until his recent resignation.
At the time he left to run, he
was head of the Major Crimes
Division.
Bar Mitzvah
MAURICE MENASCHE
Maurice, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Bcnoit Menasche, Pembroke
Pines, will be Bar Mitzvah, Sat-
urday. Aug. 17 at Temple Israel
of Miramar.
Rabbi Harold Richter Becomes
Jewish Chaplain of Broward County
Continued from Page 1-
weekly religious services at South
Florida Mental.. Hospital as well
as administer to the needs of Jew-
ish hospital patients and penal
insitution inmates who find them-
selves in need of religious coun-
seling.
Rabbi Richter was born in Chi-
cago, 111. He received his rab-
binical training at the Hebrew
Theological College of Chicago,
and at the Mesifta Torah Vodaath
in Brooklyn, where he was ordain-
ed. He also studied at the Jewish
Theological Seminary, the Uni-
versity of Illinois, Emmanuel Col-
lege, and the University of Mi-
Rabbi Richter has served as
spiritual leader of congregations
in Nanticoke, Pa.; Olyphant, Pa.;
South Haven, Mich.; Miami, Fla.;
Gloversville, N.Y. and for the
past 2'i years, he has been the
rabbi of B'nai Abraham Syna-
gogue in Easton, Pa.
He has also served as Michigan
Regional Secretary of the Zion-
ist Organization of America; sec-
retary' of the Rabbinical Associa-
tion of Greater Miami; treasurer
of the Capital District Board of
Rabbis in Albany, N.Y.; and sec-
retary of the Easton-Phillipsburg
Clergy Association. Rabbi Richter
is a member of the board of the
Family Counseling Service of
Northampton County and a board
member of ProJeCt, an ecumeni-
cal organization which fosters
service projects for needy fam;-
lies and individuals of the Eastcn
..area. .
While in Gloversville, Rabbi
Richter edited a weekly column
entitled "Your Rabbi Speaks" fcr
the Jewish World of the Albany-
Schenactady area. He was alsol
religious counselor at Fultoir
Montgomery Community College
in Johnstown, N.Y. and served as
chaplain at the Tryon School fat
Boys in Johnstown. While in|
Easton he has been Lecturer in,
Hebrew in the Language Depart
meitt at Lafayette College where
he taught the first year Introduc-
tory Course of Modern Hebrew.
He has also been active at the
Hillel Society of Lafayette Col-
lege.
Rabbi Richter has always acted
as Educational Director of the
religious schools of his congrega- j
tions holding weekly study groups
on Jewish literature, varied
topics of Jewish interest and th*
study of Hebrew, for the adults
of the Synagogue. He has also
helped organize Scholars in -
Residence weekends where Jew-
ish scholars of national renown
participate in teaching and dis-
cussion.
Rabbi Richter is married to the
former Dcvera Dernis Of Miami
Beach. They have three children,
Joseph. 7; Miriam. 6; and Saul, 3.

I
Enjoy Family Camping
In Beautiful
Highlands, North Carolina
AUGUST 18-25
at Camp Highlander
Owned and Operated by
PINE CREST SCHOOL
A fun-filled week close to nature with varied
outdoor activities for the entire family
including Nature hikes, Rock Sliding and
Water Sports.
FAMILY CABINS AW
HOME COOKED MEALS INCLUDED
For information please call
Mr. Fred R. Lawman, Pine Crest School
Phone 772-6550, Ext. 69
i
i
FIVE MAJOR PROBLEMS OF TODAY'S
HEBREW DAY SCHOOLS:
1. Overcrowded classes that deprive your child of individual attention.
2' h^tcat^iCU,UmS WhiCH C3n hind6r V0Ur Chi,d's ^nces of
3. Weak spiritual guidance in the areas of Jewish identity and love for Israel.
4. Inexperienced teachers who cannot cope with your child's innate curiosity.
5- Jour 2ST2K CStS ^ dfain h3rd earned ~m you need for
ONE SOLUTION:
1. YESHIVA DAY SCHOOL OF MIAMI.
990 N.E. 171 St.
Tel. 651-0711
:


s.
cuwowr
. jCiet
man
Sacred Mushrooms Catholics. Jews
R ALMOST threemillenia, Judaism and -
Christianity did little to have their disciples
rstand the other faith. In fact. Christianity
all it .could to instill hatred of the Jews in
|=tcndom.
e ecumenism of recent vintage had produced
h dialogue but onlv miniscule advances in
rfaith accommodation.
NE OF the problems facing Christianitv is
' it is predicated on the life and death of
s. Any change in the accepted beliefs con-
ing Jesus and any undermining of the ve-
ty of the Gospels might result in incalculable
age to the Faith.
udaism is a historical religion and has played
n veneration of personalities and places,
re is no Jewish observance of the birth or
'h of Moses, there are no Jewish saints, and
religious homage is paid to even our greatest
olars.
Jewish don't even agree on the location of
lint Sinai. The Jewish Bible is holy regard-
of whether one believes or disbelieves that
ses is the author.
REVISIONIST and liberal Christi-n theolo-
s a-e concerned with the historicity of much
he Synoptic gospels. Geza Vermes in his book.
'Jesus the Jew." (Macmillan Publishing
York, $6.95. 286 pp.) supplies much "To disturb
Christian concepts of Jesus.
The book is a worthy successor to Klausner's
Jesus of Nazareth." Vermes posits that Jesus
was a Galilean hasid with the title of "rabbi,"
meaning teacher.
The author differentiates between Palestinian
Hebrew Christians, who were the original dis-
ciples, and the Hellenestic Pagan Christians who
created a different, if not mythical, Jesus.
JOHN M. ALLEGRO, a noted philologist, in
"The Sacred Mushroom and the Cross," (Bantam
Books. New York, $1.65) believes that fertility
rites and sexual symbolism are the foundations
of major religions. He asserts that the ancient
world was obsessed with phallic symbols and
that the verbiage of religious history is of sex-
ual origins.
"Servants of God or Masters of Men?" by
Victor Daniel Bonilla (Penguin Books. $2.65. 304
pp.) is a polemic against the inhuman treatment
of Colombian Indians by Capuchin monks. The
anathemas of Pope Pius XI and the failure of
Colombia to separate Church and State have led
to the abuses of the Indians which are a shame
to Christianity, to Colombia and to humanity.
Friday, August 2, 1974
Page 11
Day Schools Being Sought
In Ten Small" Communities
xt-hcli V en
ael a Leader in World Sports
Tel Aviv
^R A physically small country,
Israel stages more sports
nts and participates in more
Irnarional competitions than
other nation its size in the
Id.
the course of every five-
cycle, two international
I* ^%PPel and Mac"
n. are conducted here with
feast 1,000 guest athletes from
|e 26 countries competing in
respective games. Last year
the year of the Maccab'ah.
year is the year of the Ha-
lliada.
IERE ARE 800 Hapoel clubs
Israel with 100.000 members,
year the organization, the
rts arm of the Histadrut. will
celebrating its 50th anniver-
with its 10th set of interna
lal games.
Jnlike the Maccabiah which h
po only to Jewish athletes, the
poeliada includes competition
some of the greatest sports
formers in the wor'd.
)urinj the 1971 games, such
lymaian cha/npions as Kipchogc
fcino. John Aku-Bua. Mike Bur-
a. Rodney pattison. Sandra Nel-
Charley Green. Julius Sang
Rob?rt Oiko participated in
r specialties.
|CONCEIVED as a convocation
I-abor athletes, originally, the
ipoeliadi has mushroomed into
liniature Glvmoics. For exam-
|e. the I'n'ted States, which no
lgef activates competition
I *: MHHi MM '";|
among the labor unions, dis-
patches the best athletes that the
AAU and colleges can collage at
the time of competition.
Next year the dates are set for
May 1 to 9, which coincides with
the Pan-American games. Despite
the conflict in schedules the U.S.
will be well represented here.
Martin L. Cohen, of Local 105.
president of Hapoel USA, here
for a preparatory meeting on be
hulf of the upcoming Hapoeliada,
has gone on record indicating the
U.S. will send its largest delcga^
tion ever.
COHEN IS of the opinion that
there will be 50 to 60 athletes
from the States competing in the
upper level strata of competition,
with possibly 40 youngsters of
the Jewish faith contesting in
events to be conducted at their
skill levels.
Marty, a vice president of the
U.S. Committee Sports for Israel,
and a member of the Hacken=ack
YMHA board of directors, urged
the delegates convened here to
arrange competitions for Jewish
athletes of lesser ability than the
world renowned stars and his
suggestion has been adopted.
Yoseph Inbar. general secre-
tary of Hapoel. and his organizing
committee, have commenced set-
ting up planning groups to ac-
commodate Jewish athletes in
addition :o the world's finest
jeeks. Consequently, you can look
for young boys and girls who
compete in the National Jewish
Welfare Board orbit, for example,
making their debut in their first
international competition against
Israelis and other Jewish young-
sters from around the world in
their age and skill brackets.
AN EFFORT will be made dur-
ing the coming school year
to establish ten Hebrew day
schools in smaller Jewish com-
munities in the United Stats,
ranging in population from 1.000
to 7.500 Jews, according to Torah
Umesorah. the National Society
for Hebrew Day Schools.
The decision to undertake such
an effort was made in response
to a resolution adopted by some
400 principals and administrators
of Hebrew day schools in North
America, meeting at an annual
convention in Atlantic City.
THE FIVE-DAY convention
was held und'r auspices of th?
Nat'onal Conference of Yeshiva
Principals and the National Asso-
ciation of Day School Administra-
tors, affiliates of Torah Umeso-
rah.
Dr. Joseph Kaminetsky, nation-
d director of Torah Umeso--ah,
said th"re were 25 communities
in the United States with Jewish
pomihtions of between 5.000 and
7.5C0 and tiiat all but five had
day schools.
He aio renorted that there
were 22 day schools in cities with
,Ic"-i=h oo^ulitions of htwenn
1.000 and 5.000 and that five of
those communities lacked day
schools. The Torah Umesorah
goal is to create day schools in
those ten communities, he said.
THE PRINCIPALS and ad-
ministrators al=o appioved a
rcso'ution to integrate in the day
school curricular current events
within the frame of reference of
a Jewish world view.
The school officials agreed
that such issues as United Na-
tions votes and the Watergate
scandal belong properly within
the religious curricula of the
day schools in which moral values
arc stressed.
Rabbi Bernard Goldenberg. To-
rch Umesorah director of school
organization, said that current
events are taught at present, as
is American and world history,
in the general portion of the
school curriculum.
Accordingly, he said, the Jew-
ish significance of such events
as the crusades and the French
rcvo'ittion. and current events,
such as UN activities and Water-
gate, are noc being conveyed to
the students.
HE SAID Tor^h Umesorah had
been a*kc(i by the principals and
the administrators to begin pre-
para'ion or news reports, incor-
porating a rel'gioiu evaluation, to
be supplied for the religious seg-
ment of th? day school curricula
and that planning for that service
was underway at the day school
agency.
The school officials also pro-
/Hiied a national enrolment cam-
paign for Hebrew day schools,
wider financial support from Jew-
ish communal funds for day
schools and b?tter job security
and benefits for faculty members,
along with :ncreased professional-
ization for both principals and ad-
ministrators.
Haiiti Topol Plays Italian Galileo
Hollywood
IIAIM TOPOL, humorou6-earthy as "Sallah" and
"Tevya," for a ihange of pace now portrays
on the screen the title role in Berthold Brecht's
"Galileo." dealing with the tragic plight of the
physicist and astronomer of the Italian Renais-
sance who refused to compromise with truth
even if ordered to do so by the Pope himself.
Topol had played the part before in his own He-
brew production on the stage in Tel Aviv.
In Hollywood, director Joseph Losey collabo-
rated with the German author on th? English
language text and a quarter of a century ago
co produced the world premier at the longd funct
Coronet Theater with the late Charles Laughton,
who then essayed the part of "Galileo." a charac-
ter symbolizing non-conformity anytime, any-
where.
BRECHT AND Losey themselves were called
to take u stand a year later ar.d refused to recant.
Now Topol is the first truly international star
to come out of Israel and portray a figure from
history and world literature.
Sir John Giclgud will appear opposite him in
Ely Landau's presentation within the Second Sea-
son of the American Film Theater.
The \ ture is scheduled to go before the
cameras at the studios of London and on loca-
tion in Europe.
HENRY WEINSTEIN, the American Film
Theater's vice president for creative affairs also
announces for production in England, filmization
of David Storey's "In Celebration" with Alan
Bates, while the Landau group prepares in Holly-
wood the previously announced Eichmann picture
"The Man in the Glass Booth," from the Westend
and Broadway drama by Robert Shaw.
Arthur Hillcr ol "Love Story" will direct. The
title role erupted by Donald Pleascnce will be
enactrd by Max milian Schell who most recently
returned from Germany where he portrayed the
factual character of SS Car>tain Eduard Rosch-
man. h^ad of the concentration camp of Riga in
"The Odessa Fib," from the book by Frederick
Forsyth.


MiiMurr
Golda's Thrilled to be Back in Role of a Full Time Grandmother
/' OI.DA MEIR is glad to be free of her post. She says
she looks forward to the pleasure of cooking for
her children and grandchildren. What's the pleasure of
running a government compared to making tzimmes?
Tzimmes makes everyone happy. All parties like it. No
one pickets your tzimmes.
Golda started in Israel as a farmer in a kibbutz.
She is g'ad to b? going back to the farm.
MADE US think of another case. A man who was
a farmer and after many years away from the farm,
happy like Golda to get back to it.
Lived in Virginia This man owned a farm as big
as a whole kibbutz. Tall and Impressive looking but
once had the imaU pox and you could see the scarj
on his face.
His father died when he was bar mitzvah and he
People said he couldn't tell a lie, which was not true.
Anyone who puts his mind to it can tell a lie but
he didn't unless it was absolutely necessary.
HIS FIRST name began with the same letter as
Golda's. HTs name was George. His mother's name was
nrimmii................nm iMiiiiiimnii .........n....................iiih
Marv. She smoked, but he didn't. There are a lot of
pictures of him. It is on the postage stamp. I am refer-
ring to George Washington.
Washington was the head of the government in
2W Sci
twartz
turbulent days. The war of the American Revolution
had barely ended before the French Revolution erupted
and there were the Napoleonic wars to which there
were sharp repercussions in America.
There was for a tm virtually undeclared war with
France and troubles with England.
Weahfnctan said on quitting his post as President
that he had been denounced as though some common
th-.ef: that people said of him that he lusted for power.
He said he would rather be on the farm than Emperor
of the world.
WASHINGTON was in a much more bitter mood
than Golda when he q>iit office. The Jewish mood to-
day is not so happy. Israel is now marking its 26th
annh rsary. For the full time of its existence the
hoii T'.y of the Arabs has continued. Such is the lament.
So what?, we ak. Consider the ease of America.
nning with Washington'.- administration, America
I : li ed to have troubles with England until they
e:upted in another war the Wai of 1812, a period of
some forty years.
Th.^ Octrb"r war with its unhappy beginning left
a bad taste, but consider what runnened to the U.S.
at the beginning of the War of 1812.
The American force which was counted on to take
Canada, itself surrendered to the British.
, ., mm m i '"" 111 ; l......; i.....: n 'N"; '' ......:
-..... i I" ..hi -i:.......' ''' ."


Page 12-
*JmM"fhr&tW) mi Shofw of Hollywood
Friday. August 2,
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TERMS
AVAILABLE
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CCNIDtl MIAMI
5300 NW 27th A.e 634-1556
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Bud I Doojias Road 446 8101
NOITH MIAMI
13360 NW 7tn Aye 681 8541
M MIAMI ISACH
1700 HI 163 St 945 7454
MIAMI HACH
1454 Anon Road 672 5353
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9001 S. Dine Ky 6677575
HIAUAK.RAIMSPPIN.SMIU
1275 49th St 822 2500
CUTLER HI0SE
20390 S Dme Hwy 233 5241
HOMESTEAD
30100 S Federal Hwy. 2471622
HOUYWOOD
497 S State ltd 7 987O4S0
Open Mon. Wed. Fri Till 9 p M
.. littOHBAU
1130 W. (rowi/d Brvd 525 3136
FT LAUWIDllE
1740 E Sonnje Blvd 5257568
fUNTATIIW
311 N State ltd 7 5872186
fOMPAMO HACK
3151 N Federal Hwy. 9434200
WIST PALM MACK
515 Soutti Ome 832 3044
Bwvt-A
UUPAM/N. PUHKACal
532 N Lake Blvd 841 2544
rr hum
2604 South 4th St 464-8020
vttOIUCH
755 2Ht Street 5671174
0ILANM
421 N Oranie Blouom Tr. 422 3161
0ILAHW
3620 f Colon* Of 196-1141
INTEA PAM
199 I Orlando An. 6455305
DATTDNAIUCM
907 Voluia An. 255 7417
NAPLU
2085 Tamum Ii. 7744443


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