The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00096

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
Page 2
+JmlS* flortdUan d **<** <* Hollywood
Friday July 5, 1
Soviet Jewry

i
When Western Pressure Mounts, It Counts
By FRAN NEVINS
Exit visas have finally been is-
sued to Professor David Azbel,
his wife and son. Azbel recently
Completed a marathon hunger
strike which attracted world wide
attention.
Also granted a visa and now
in Israel are Yankcl Khantsis,
who spent a two-year term in
prison, and Valery Kukui. who
was imprisoned for three years.
HOWEVER, hundreds upon
hundreds of visas are being de-
nied. Many must wait years in
discomfort and humiliation hop-
ing for the dream of Israel to
come true. While waiting, they
are harassed.
Yuri and Anna Bcrkovsky. lead-
ing activists in Novosibirsk, were
arrested recently after a search
of their flat. Unemployed since
1172 (date of application), the
Berkovskys went to a legal mar-
ket to sell som" of their belong-
ings to buy food. They were close-
ly watched and photographed.
While they were gone, the KGB
searched their aDartment. found
a revolver, and arrested the
couple. Their daughter was given
into the custody of her grand-
parents and the apartment was
sealed.
The couple, now awating trial,
previously conducted Hebrew les-
sons in their aoartment and help-
ed prepare other Jews in the
community to leave Russia. The
Novosibirsk community has al-
ways been small, and this most
recent harassment makes it even
weaker. Please write in their be-
half.
ALSO NEEDING support is
Prof. Alexander Tiemkin (Dent.
of Physics and Astronomy. Tel
Aviv University) who is still try-
ing to get his daughter Marina,
14, to join him. Marina has been
given "special drugs which have
an injurious effect on her psy-
chology."
Given drugs to provoke hal-
lucinations, Marina seems to have
an artificially-induced psychosis,
said Tiemkin.
Boca Raton Leader Named
To UAHC's National Board
NEW YORK, NY. A. D.
Stein of Boca Raton has been
named to the national board of
the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, oldest congrega-
tional body in North America,
representing 715 Reform syna-
gogues and serving 1.1 million
congregants.
A lay leader who has been pro-
minently identified with various
phases of the religious movement
both through his own Boca Ra-
ton Hebrew Congregation, the
L'AHC region and the national
institution, Mr. Stein was named
at the UAHC's recent spring
board meeting in New York.
EXCELLENT
BAAL TFILAH
Nmsoch, Conduct Services in Tradi-
fienol Manner, Seeks Position. Coll
537-57.6 (Miami' Ant. 106, Be-
tween S-10 A.M. 1 5:30-10 P.M. 1
"When my friends aporoaeh
her. she is afraid with madness."
Previously, Marina had consid-
ered herself an "Israeli citfeen,
desperatelv waiting to reach her
homeland.'' Prof Tiemkin has ap-
pealed to Soviet leader Brezhnev
as well as his ex-wife but to no
avail.
IN MOSCOW, Victor Pol=ky re-
mains in danger of being im-
prisoned for a maximum of three
years. The indictment charges
Polsky with "violation of rules of
safe movement or operation of
transport." II" is said to have
caused an accident involving a
19-yearo!d who had suicidal
tendencies.
Friend* of Polsky are concern-
ed that Moscow authorities will
disregard favorable witnesses
who were at the scene and will
frame Polsky in order to im-
prison him. Since he is one of
the oldast Otkazniki ("refuse-
niks") and veil known among
concerned Soviet Jews, this mat-
ter is very serious in its implica-
tioaa for the Jewish movement.
Write to Procurator General
Roman Rudenko; USSR: RSFSR:
Moscow. Pushkinskaya 15A. De-
mand that the charges against
Victor Polsky be dropped im-
mediately. Also write Anatoly
Dobrynin in Washington.
if &
JEWISH ACTIVIST and Pris-
oner of Conscience" Alexander
Feldman was severely beaten by
a criminal prisoner after serving
three consecutive 15-day periods
in a "punishment cell." Fledman,
imprisoned on a trumped-up 42-
month term for allegedly striking
a woman, has become a great
concern to the Jewish commu-
nity.
Siegel Appointed Director
Of Education, Temple Solel
Richard D. Siegel has been ap-
pointed the first full-time direc-
tor of education at Temple Solel.
the Liberal congregation serving
the Greater Hollywood area and
surrounding communities.
The announcement was made
by Rabbi Robert P. Frazin, I. A.
Durbin, president of the congre-
gation, and Daniel Klein, chair-
man of the Religious School Com-
mittee.
Mr. Siegel, a South Florida
resident for the past 20 years,
brings a total educational, ad-
ministrate, youth and camping
experience to his new position at
Temple Solel. He served as the
director of education of Temple
Sinai of North Dade, where he
was responsible for developing
and directing the entire educa-
tional program encompassing the
Primary through Adult depart-
ments.
Mr. Siegel was also the assis-
tant program director at the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations' Coleman Camp-Insti-
tute at Cleveland. Ga., which is
the Reform Jewish Camp for the
Southeastern United States and
the Bahamas.
He is the educational consul-
tant for new Liberal and Reform
synagogues in the Southeastern
Region of the United States and
in this capacity is responsible for
development of curricula, in-
service teacher training, and
structuring adult and family edu-
cation programs.
The first Floridian to have
been elected to the Executive
Board of the National Associa-
tion of TemDle Educators, the
Federation of Liberal Jewish
Educators in North and South
America and Israel, Mr. Siegel is
chairman of the Curriculum
Awards Committee for the entire
Reform Jewish movement and
lecently was elected to the Religi-
eu Education Association of the
United States and Canada.
Mr. Siegel has received a pub-
lic commendation from Gov.
Reubin Askew for his outstand-
ing o-forts in behalf of Jewish
His fiancee, a teacher, has been
threatned by the headmaster of
the schorl th3t she will lose her
job. Meanwhile, Feldman has ap-
pealed to the Soviet Prosec->r
General to be transferred to an-
other prison camp.
THERE WF1E two perform-
ances at the Coliseum Theater in
London last monthby the Bol
shoi Ballet inside, and by hun-
dreds of demonstrators outside
who forcefully but peaceably
protested the repression of Jews
and others in the USSR. It ap
peared the out ide performance
generated greater interest t^an
the one inside, for London critic-
found it b-l >w Dar for the world
famous companv.
Students affiliat d with Stu-
dents Strug. 1? for Soviet Jewry
(SSSI) pretested directly inside
the Soviet pavillion at Expo '74
in Spokane. Wash this month.
The: wore Soviet Jewry T-shirts.
SUMMER FOR many of us
means travel and vacation, new
experiences, or 11 haDs jufl tak-
ing it easy. However, for Soviet
Jews, the heat is still on. more
than ever. Taking it easy is im-
possible.
Because of President Nixon's
visit this summer, many activists
are being arrested and imprison-
ed to decrease th;' chance of
demonstrations. Since this is a
common practice in the Soviet
Union, it i* necessary for us, free
and concerned Jews, to be out-
spoken about our views and con-
vey them to our elected officials.
SOMETIMES it is hard for us
to believe that our single letter,
phone call or telegram can be
of any benefit. This is not so.
When Western pressure mounts,
it counts. So take time out this
summer to write at least three
times (one for each month) to
the addresses below:
1. Your Congressmen (recon-
firm your supoort for the
Jackon'Mills-Vanik amend-
ment).
rV
\
David Azbel, 63 year cl
Moscow physical cherr.J
who was imprisoned lcr
years under Stalin, staged i
l~-cay hunger strike beic
being issued a visa and
lowed to emigrate with
wife and son.
2. The President.
3. Soviet Ambassador Anal
Dobrvnin. Soviet Embu|
1125' 16th Street. N
Washington, D.C. 20*
(about individual case-
in general).
4. Soviet Leader Lcon-d Er
new USSR RSFSR. Ml
COW, The Kremlin. >ib
individual cases or in .
eral).
TOR ALL letters to the S<
Union, use registered air n\
with return receipt, if pos
If your letters axe returc
r'ease send them to SSSJ.
West "2nd Street, Suite 30, if
York. NY. 10023. If you are pi
ning a trip to the USSR. pie.
contact the Jewish Welfare Fl
oration in Hollywood for in:
mation or how and where to ~1
Soviet Jewish activists.
RICHARD 0. SICGU
education in Florida
An honors graduate of the Uni-1
versify of Miami. Mr. Siegel re-
ceived his Bachelor of Arts de- >
gree in Political Science and
History and is a candidate for the
Doctoral degree in Educational
Administration and Supervision.
He was also a student in the
Graduate Studies Program at the
Hebrew Union College Jewish :
Institute of Religion. Cincinnati,'
Ohio, as well as a scholarship re
cipient at Yeshiva University ir
Naw York City.
An active -peaker and author
in behalf of oppressed Soviet I
Jewry. Mr. Siegel is the vice '
chairman of the South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry as
well as the chairman of the Con-
ference Committee on the Plight,
of Jews in the Soviet Union and i
Arab nations of the National As-:
sociation of Temple Educators, j
His civic memberships include '
the American Jewish Congress. I
Dadeland Lodge of B'nai B'rith.!
the Zionist Organization of Amer-
ica and Golden Glades Lodge No.
334 Free and Accepted Masons. I
Ansel Insurance Agencyf| fund
Ans&l Wiff.... J
Ansel Wittenstein
All Forms of Insurance
Including
Homeowners Automobile Jewelry
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Friday. July 5. 1974
VJewisti ftoridK&jn and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 3
surviving the hell of soviet interrogation
By ARNOLD BRUNER
The "interrogation" by the
secret police had left a perma-
nent mark on the prisoner. He
had lost the wse" of tits legs and
he kept lapsing Into unconscious-
They carried him back to his
bare cell in the lowest reaches
of the prison. It was deep winter
in Russia and the unheated dun-
geon was bitterly cold. They de-
posited him in a heap on the
cement floor.
DURING THE night, a guard
doused the prisoner with water
to revive him. The water turned
to ice and froze him fast to the
floor. It became a daily routine.
Each night the prisoner would be
soaked, and each morning the
guard would pry his semi-cons-
cious body loose with a spade.
This could be the scene from a
bad melodrama set in the Middle
Ages. It is, in fact, part of the
life story of Yaakov Kluntsis.
aijed 47, who was imprisoned in
the Soviet Union on May 18. 1970.
a robustly healthy man. and
emerged nearly four years later
an invalid.
In March, 1970 Khantsis, a
truck driver in Kishinev, had two
wishes: to move to Israel and
when this request was denied, to
find out why.
HE STILL wonders how these
simple desires could have in-
furiated the authorities to the
point of snatching away his free-
dom, cutting him off from his
family, beating him. torturing
him. keeping him alone in a dark
and frigid cage for 18 months,
starving him. maiming and crip-
pling him, treating him like a
lunatic, and in the end trying to
trick him into misdeeds that
would prolong their hold on him.
In his flat on the edge of Hai-
fa's unlovely industrial plane, he
told his story to a stranger for
the first timea four year cata-
logue of horrors that eclipses
the first 43 years of his life, and
dominates his consciousness
whenever he reaches for his
crutches to rise.
The ordeal of Yankel Khantsis,
as he was then known, began in
May. 1970. when he journeyed to
the state offices in Moscow to
demand a reason for the rejection
of his request for a visa.
NCJW National Board Holds
Annual Meeting In New York
The National Board of the Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women,
at the conclusion of its four-day
annual meeting in New York, ex-
pressed disagreement with Presi-
dent Nixon's recently articulated
policy on detente, an apparent
withdrawal from an earlier U.S.
position of concern for Soviet
Jews.
Eleanor Marvin, national presi-
dent of NCJW, stated that "a
repressive campaign to restrict
emigration in the face of a known
backlog of thousands of requests
for exit visas underscores the
sharp deterioration of the condi-
tion of Soviet Jews.
"The granting of a visa to Va
lery Panov and his wife Galina
Ragozina clearly reflects a po-
litical gesture on the eve of
President Nixon"s trip. This ac-
tion also demonstrates that
manifestations of concern for the
peoples of the world by organiza-
tion;, international bodies, or
even governments can scarcely
he considered interference in the
internal affairs of other nations
and do have a positive result on [
the cause of human rights." she i
said.
The board, the hitrhe't nolicv-
making authority of NCJW, call-
ed upon the American govern
merit to seek everv npportuiiy \
to persuade the USSR to grant
to its citizens basic cultural, re
ligious and human freedoms, in-
tluding the right tn emigrate.
In addition, thf hnjrd encotir-
jagrd President Nixnn to take full
(advantage of his diplomatic
prerogative! on hi forthcoming
Jnn-to convey such an appeal to
the highest levels of Soviet iU-j
thority.
In a separate action, the board
nended the rvtrnordinarv
mansfrip of Secretary of
s Henry A. Kis :n"or. whose
lL efforts were so vital to the
achievement of a disengagement
/ agreement between Israel and
Syria.
On the subject of constitutional
one 'f NCJW's mol ur
pent priorities, the bna-d o>
r'.ored. recent ittermts by legisla
to minify Simrwne Cour*
through constitutional
amendment-.
dficallv 6fl notenthi
treats to th h of the
itution were 'he prooosed
amendments refat-d to Court
rulings on abortio" nravers in
public schools and -ehool deseg-
regation.
On the subject o' "ivacy, Mrs.
Marvtll said, "Rev'-t'o^s of il-
lec;at wiretapping. jr-veUlance by
the military forces ~"1 "thi*r gov-
ernment agencies, r~d a compila-
tion of personal information by
government and private groups,
indicate a most serious threat to
personal privacy.
"We urge Congress to enact
legislation to prohibit secret rec-
ord-keeping systems and improp-
er use of information, to give
easy access to records and feas-
ible means of correcting inac-
curacies. Without such safe-
guards, individual rights of
privacy are endangered."
The board expressed concern
over the failure of Congress to
enact legislation providing am-
nesty to all those young men put
in legal jeopardy by their resist-
ance to the war in Indo-China.
Prompt action on this issue was
strongly urged.
The National Council of Jew-
ish Women, founded in 1893. is
one of the oldest major American
Jewish women's organizations. Its
100.000 members are committed
to a broad program of commu-
nity service, social and legislative
action and education both in the
United States and in Israel
He was told to get out. He then
went to a foreign consulate to
seek i.Vercession, and when he
left the building he was seized,
thrown to the pavement, beaten
and kicked in the ribs.
HE CRAWLED for refuge under
what turned out to be a police
car. Two policemen hauled him
out. struggling, forced him into
the car and choked him into sub-
mission. He was taken first to
the Botkin Clinic and then to a
jail, where he was locked up for
the night before being taken to
another jail a three-day drive
from Moscow.
Two days later, he was in the
hands of the KGB secret police
at Petrovka, where he was con-
ducted to the basement. His jail-
lers told him he was to be pun-
ished for going to the foreign
consulate, and then beat him
about the face and head with
brass knuckledusters.
They told him that orders had
come from above" that he was to
be charged with hooliganism and
given two years in prison. They
permitted him to write a letter
to his wife. Niza. telling her to
visit him and wait for his trial
in Moscow.
SHE WAS to bring their daugh-
ter, Golda. and their son. Leonid,
then aged 19 and 14 respectively.
However, the family was not
permitted to witness his trial on
Aug. 17. He was convicted on the
evidence that he had struggled
with police near the foreign con-
sulate, and had kicked their car.
The sentence was two-and-a
half years, handed down without
benefit of counsel for the prison-
er, who refused a lawyer. The
court made no effort to press one
on him.
KHANTSIS was taken to
Vietlak camp No. 231 25 in the
XJral Mountains, under "tltrict
regime." He shared a barrack
with 119 murders, theives and
other felons. He was the only
Jew.
COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMITTEE
of the
Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood
1909 Harrison Street, Hollywood, Florida 33020
I would like tickets for the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra per-
formance in the Miami Beach Audtorium Thursday, Oct. 3, 1974.
Enclosed it $...............in payment for ._.......... tickets at $5.00
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(Make checks payable to Jewish Welfare Federation)
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arnett
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He claims that he was singled
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treatmentthe prisoners subject-
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grabbed most of his food, which
consisted mainly of bread; he was
allotted the hardest work in the
camp. His complaints fell on the
deaf ears.
The most expensive mistake
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A,


Page 4
<-Jelst fhrktlar and Shofar ot Hollywood
Friday July 5, 1974
wJewistiFlcridian Belly Dancer Vs. Yad Vashem
C and PI.ANT 120 N E th St.. Muml Fla. Ull! Phone STS 40t *
M4 NMtM* Ul Ull IIIH HllliIB
OVFKE and PLANT 120 N.E. 6th St., Miami. Fla. 13112 Phone STS 40t
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 373-460$
P.O. Box 2973. Miami. Florida J3101
FRED K. SKOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SELMA M. THOMP80N
Editor and PubtUjher Executive Editor Assistant to Publiaher
RHI1WIIIIAS, ni Coo I WWW I ~ '
Tin Jewish Plondian Does Not Quarantee The Kaehruth
Of The Merchandise Advertieed In Its Columns
Published Bl-Weekly by the Jewish Floriilian
Becond-Clave Postace Paid at Miami. Fla.
Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood Shofar Editorial
ADVISORY COMMITTEE Dr. Sheldon Willena. Chairman: Ross Becker-
man, Ben Salter, Marlon Nevlns. Dr. Norman Atkln. Robert N. Kerbel
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndi-
cate, Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association, American As-
sociation of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Ical Area) One Year 14.00. Out of Town Upon
Request.
Volume 4
Friday, July 5, 1974
Number 13
15 TAMUZ 5734
Questions For Mr. Nixon
In 1972 when President Nixon visited the Soviet
Union, Jewish activists were arrested. Mr. Nixon has vis-
ited the Soviet Union again and over thirty Jewish acti-
vists have been imprisoned and all activists' telephones
have been "temporarily disconnected."
The President announced at the Annapolis graduation
that we have no right to interfere in the internal policies
of other countries, and yet, at the same time, the Soviet
Union is a participant of the Declaration of Human Rights
of the United Nations which guarantees emigration of citi-
zens to countries or their choice. Immigration from the So-
viet Union has been cut 50% during the first six months
of 1974 compared to the same period during 1973.
One should ask Mr. Nixon if since we are not to be
involved in the internal affairs of other countries, why
then were we involved in Viet Nam why have we sent
troops to Lebanon. Guatemala, Dominican Republic and
Cuba?
Are we not, as Americans, vitally interested in the
rights and freedom of people everywhere? How can we
have true detente with a country where detente is strictly
one way our giving to them? Can we stand by idly
while people are imprisoned and harassed for no other
reason than their wish to live in freedom as Jews?
Mr. President, how do you answer these questions?
SALT for Our Wounds
Hardly has he returned from the Middle East, then
President Nixon is off again this time to Moscow.
Some pretty shocking things emerged out of the Pres-
ident's talks with Arab leaders, like the atomic arrange-
ments with Egypt, for example.
And these were announced statements and positions
one can only wonder about what was more shocking
and unannounced.
All of which is by way of saying even before the
President gets down to business in Moscow that Amer-
icans must once and for all come to be assured that the
administration will not be "unannouncing" them into the
poor house at best and to death at worst.
These extremes pretty much run the gamut of our na-
tional concerns commercial agreements with the Com-
munists and arms limitations agreements, too.
The Nixon wheat deal of more than a year ago is
breaking our backs at the supermarket today. It proves
that Communists can outdo the capitalists when they've a
mind to.
We can only pray that, this time, the President does
not rub SALT into that and other yet-to-be unannounced
wounds.
For the Jewish community, there are special concerns:
the exit of Jews from the Soviet Union and the new Middle
East "detente." We have more potential wounds than
other Americans, and we hope Mr. Nixon is tender with
them in Moscow.
Equality for Women
Beth David Congregation's move to give full and
equal rights to its women congregants, including being
counted in the Minyan, is both novel and revolutionary.
Spiritual leader Rabbi Sol Landau initiated implemen-
tation of the move following the majority opinion rendered
by the Law Committee of the Rabbinical Assembly last
fall.
Not everyone at Beth David is satisfied. Some con-
gregants have divided feelings about it.
Still, a Miami synagogue is taking a unique stand on
a modern issue. While the Bible speaks of the "Woman of
Valor," Jewish tradition in practice has lagged far behind
in the matter of women's equality.
Whether or not the Beth David move will hurry up
the women's rights drive in Jewish religious matters is
now open to the community's observation.
A T LEAST I shall never forget
-^ the look on President Nixon's
face when that belly-dancer hov-
ered over him during Anwar Sa-
dat's festivities staged for the
Nixon visit in Egypt.
Or Henry Kissinger's eyes
when the belly-dancer, in an out-
burst of erotic affectation, ran
her fingers through his hair.
BOTH MEN trod the line be-
tween proper embarrassment
and ill-disguised salaciousness. It
was good to see that America's
leaders are frankly human.
But the belly-dancer speaks
volumes beyond either of their
looks in response to the bland-
ishments of Eros. She was part of
a carefully-planned celebration,
and to be sure, her role was
merely to provide some diver-
tissement from the presumed ri-
gors of the Nixon-Sadat talks.
After all, men do have a right
to relax.
WHAT I AM getting at is that
the way in which men relax says
much about their culture and ci-
vilization
We pass judgment on the Ro-
mans by staging a brutal gladia-
torial match in the Colosseum
between, say, Charlton Heston
and Stephen Bo>u. and then cap
it by filming a concluding
thumbs-down scene in which the
shrieking crowd demands the
blood of the vanquished "cow-
ard."
We pass judgment on our-
selves by showing a beer-glazed
American popping peanuts as he
watches a football game on tele-
vision on a Sunday afternoon and
then flakes out in a euphoria of
alcohol as thp crowds leave the
arena for home.
THIS DOES not mean that the
Romans did not have a Cicero, a
Virgil, an Epictetus.
Or that we don't have a Jeffer-
son, a Wallace Stevens, an Emer
son or Pierce.
What it does mean is that the
Romans were cruel and without
compassion, and that we are ex-
hausted by our search for hap-
piness in triviality.
If we were to pursue the point,
we might say that, certainly, we
have progressed beyond the Ro-
mans.
TODAY'S FOOTBALL player
is yesterday's gladiator, except
that we bar human sacrifice, the
spilling of blood as proof of
man's mastery over himself.
The football game abstracts
our atavistic cruelties into a so-
cially acceptable symbol: the
bone crushing scrimmage, the
decapitating tackle and, the ul-
timate triumph, the touchdown.
BUT THE truth is that our
beer-glazed American, in his pur-
suit of pleasure, is not far re-
moved from the Roman who
went to the Colosseum to see a
killing. He is just as intent on
murdering" the "enemy."
And he is just as intent on
murdering himself as a conscious
being, whether through beer in
front of the television set. or by
merging with and becoming a
part of the mass hysteria at the
arena.
And so. we can draw some
pretty pessimistic conclusions
about ourselves as a people
and in parallel with the Roman
decline and fall, if we wish.
AND ALL of this trom a Sun
day afternoon in the Colosseum
or at a football game.
To return to the original
point: The belly-dancer speaks
volumes not only about President
Nixon and Dr. Kissinger, but also
about the Egyptians themselves,
particularly President Sadat, who
obviously gave his approval that
the Nixon-Kissinger team should
be entertained in that way.
And also, of course, about the
Israelis.
WHAT THE belly-dancer says
can best be understood in con-
trast to the Israelis and the cere-
mony they staged for President
Nixon at Yad Vashem.
In Cairo, regaled by flesh, the
President was torn between the
frank delight of his human feel-
LTMMt
mmmtmm <
Mindlin
. --.1
taXTUUBflHssI I
ing and his "Thou Shalt Not"
Christian imperative -d "Thou
Shalt Not" take delight in the
passionate moment, especially
not when hundreds of millions of
people are watching you.
At Yad Vashem in Jerusalem,
it was not flesh with which he
was regaled, but the word. At
Yad Vashem, the President was
invited to "enjoy" himself in a
singularly Jewish way with an
intellectual and judgmental eye
on history.
Continued on Page 13
As Max Lerner Sees It
By MAX LERNER
LA JOLLA, Calif. If the United States meets the fate of
the Roman Empire in its decline and fall, some will- assign
it to the fleshpots of New York, some to the corruptions of
Washington. But there is a sizable group which will pick the
expanse of ocean, mountains and cities of the plain that we call
California.
Which will be right? All of them. And all will be wrong.
New York stands as a symbol of economic power, the intellec-
tual elite and the communications empire.
WASHINGTON STANDS for political power and the polit-
ical elite. California is the end of the road where extremes meet,
illusions fuse and anything is possible.
Each is a source of decay and the death drive. But each
also is an envelope through which the life force bursts, stream-
ing across the nation.
The point about America, which both its haters and lovers
miss, is that the death drives and the life forces operate in it
together, interlocked in a mortal embrace.
I have half-adopted California this spring quarter, commut-
ing from New York City to teach here. No one who exposes
himself to this state for even a brief stretch ever remains the
same.
Not that I shall ever give up New York, whose roots are
in me as mine are in it the New York that E. B. White
wrote about, "which not to have known would be like death."
BUT CALIFORNIA is in truth, in this latterday-era, the
Newfound Land of Americans, whose dreams start and end with
it, whose violence and creativeness seem part of its backdrop,
and who frels less absurd about acting out their fantasy life
here than wherever they come from.
The evidence for decline and fall seems to be written large
enough for anyone to read. Take the political kidnaping of
Patricia Hearst, the huge food handout, the SLA shootout with
the Los Angcies police, the latest tape in which she expresses
her defiance, the legends growing around the whole episode.
Granted that It could have happened anywhere but It did
happen in California.
OR TAKE the cults and the occultism. Most historians link
the decline of Rome with the bizarre religious cults that arose
toward the end of the Empire.
America today witnesses a mushrooming of cults of gurus
sacred and profane, of devil possession, of exorcism. They are
everywhere, but mostiy in California.
Or take open sexuality. There is a persistent belief among
the ir.ora.ists that, more than anything else, Rome fell victim
to sexual decadence.
Sex is getting pretty open around the country, as any his-
torian of the current erotic breakthrough will testify. But there
is only one Sandstone.
SEVERAL YEARS ago I interviewed its founders John
and Sue Williamson to learn something about their philoso-
phy. They felt that the taboos we place around candid and open
sex are the source of many of our neuroses.
They ran into legal troubles and had to abandon their ex-
periment of direct sexual encounters in the setting of a ranch-
house club.
But it has just reopened with a grand fanfare, graced by
talks from Gay Takse and Dr. Alex Comfort a stranger com-
mencement than any being held anywhere this June.
COMFORT IS an English poet, novelist, gerontologist and a
visiting savant at the Center for the Study of Democratic Insti-
tutions at Santa Barbara, as well as the author of the joyously
written "Joy of Sex," which may be found as a pillow book in
a couple of million American households, pads and hideouts.
He feels I gather from a published interview that the
privacy with which we continue to invest the sexual act is the
expression of our hostile fear of strangers.
I should myself have thought that it is our way of keeping
our sense of uniqueness, even as we strain to break our lowli-
ness by reaching out sexually for another person.
THERE IS MUCH of the gullible and credulous in Calttor-
nia along with the energy and violence, the revolutionary liays-
tique, the cult of sexuality.
But there is also a genuine effort to reach out for the life
force beyond the familiar and accepted, even beyond the world
of the senses into whatever lies there.
Nor is it true only in California. With all our miseries,
there is still something in America that draws the world's ener-
gies to it, and some of the world's best minds and spirits. 1
We see America now for what it is a society corruptible,
incalculable, impossible which makes it still the-fabulous
country.


Friday, July 5, 1974
*'JfWisti Fktrkfian emd Shofar Page 5

B'nai B'rith W omen Present
Plaque To JDCs Samuel Haber
c
/
A piaque honoring the Joint
Distribution Committee "for 60
years of aid and comfort to Jews
throughout the world" was pre-
sented to Samuel L. Haber re-
cently" at the 122nd annual con-
vention of District One of B'nai
B'rith by the B'nai B'rith Women
at the Concord Hotel in Kiame-
sha Lake. N.Y.
The Joint Distribution Com-
mittee, which was established in
November 1914. will celebrate
its 60th anniversary at its annual
meeting in December. Mr. Haber.
who addressed the B'nai B'rith
women at the opening session,
characterized the JDC as an
agency which has organized pro-
grams of rescue, relief and reha-
bilitation for Jews in need "any
where in the world" since the
creation of the JDC in 1914.
DURING THOSE years, the
JDC brought aid and comfort at
one time or another to needy
Jews in some 70 countries at a
cost of over $1 billion, Mr. Haber
said. "This year alone we are
bringing help to some 350,000
Jews in some 25 countries and will
be spending about $30 million,"
he added. The JDC receives the
bulk of its funds from the cam-
paigns of the United Jewish Ap-
peal.
Mr. Haber noted that the Jew-
ish world has changed drastically
since 1914. "Our Jewish geogra-
phy today is vastly different. Not
only because of the great tragedy
of the loss of six million but since
the end of World War II vast
displ./ements of our people have
also taken place. Our generation
. has been characterized as one of
flight and rescue," he said.
4n the Moslem/Arab world in
North Africa and the Middle East
there were close to one million
Jews in 1948. Mr. Haber said.
There are today fewer than
SAMUtl HABER
152,000. Most of them emigrated
to Israel. Some, especially those
who lived in Algeria, made their
way to France. Despite the sharp
reduction in the Jewish popula-
tion of that area JDC still car-
ries on widespread health, wel-
fare and educational programs in
Morocco. Tunisia and Iran. It also
manages to channel some relief
to the entrapped and imperiled
Jews of Syria, he added.
EVEN GREATER changes have
taken place in Eastern Europe,
Mr. Haber said. "Almost without
interruption during 60 years of
our work JDC has carried on a
program in Eastern Europe, Even
in the bleakest days of the War-
saw ghetto, of the concentration
camps, we managed to bring
some help to stricken Jews and
our effort to rescue them never
faltered."
In Rumania, after an absence
of 18 vears JDC was invited to
resume operations in 1967 by the
Government. "This is the only
country in Eastern Europe ex-
cept for Yugoslavia where we
have an open program directly
operated and controlled by the
JDC." he said. This program is
currently providing a broad range
of aid to some 18,000 of the
90,000 Jews in that country.
In Western Europe virtually all
of the Jewish communities have
been rebuilt and require little
additional help from the JDC, he
said. France is the one exception,
he added. There was a tremen-
dous influx of refugees into
France after World War II, rais-
ing the population from about
150,000 to about 600,000 today.
AS A RESULT, Mr. Haber said,
continued JDC aid is needed to
help the community solve the
problems of integration, jobs and
housing for newcomers, most of
them from the North African
countries.
Most important, Mr. Haber
said, has been JDC's work in Is-
rael, where the agency has al-
located close to 40 per cent of
its annual budget. JDC has de-
veloped programs for the aged,
for handicapped children, f or
chronically and mentally ill. It
has developed programs for train-
ing professionals and other man-
power for various health and wel-
fare agencies and has provided
financial aid for over 150 yeshivot
with some 20,000 students.
He warned that conditions in
Argentina and Chile have dete-
riorated and bear watching and
noted more limited programs in
India. Shanghai and Spain and
Portugal, all of which are im-
portart "in the survival of
Jewry."
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:
Page B
+JewistiFk>rktiain <*"* Shofar oi Hollywood
Friday July 5. 1S74
Profile
A Big Woman On Our Campus
When Marcia Tobin walks into
* room, she brings with her a
charisma provoked by eyes which
look oriental.
Marcia is about as oriental as
a lady can be when her family
comes from Alabama.
WHEN HER grandfather,
Joseph Cohen, arrived from Rus-
sia to settle in a small Alabama
town populated by only 1,500
people, there was one other Jew-
ish family in residence. It was
Inevitable he choose his bride
from that family. Joseph, who
graduated from Auburn Univer-
sity with honors in chemistry,
was both brilliant and quiet.
"I was always around him,"
Marcia says. "When he talked,
you listened. He made me an
ware person."
THERE'S another aware per-
son in Marcia Tobin's family. Her
name is Jennifer, she's Mi years
old and even though she appears
to be busily painting her toenails
green with crayons, her ears are
tuned in.
When asked by her mother
how she knew the answer to an
eavesdropping subject, Jennifer
answered, "I thought to my
brain."
Marcia Tobin thinks to her
brain, too.
That's why she will be Presi-
Sapir Named
To Chair
Jewish Agency
Continued from Page 1
gladly have served under Pincus
chairmanship.
Sapir described the Jewish
Agency as a "true and practical
expression of the identification
of the Jewish people with our en-
deavors'' In Israel.
"Let us build here a society
based on a foundation of social
justice, a nation living ir. peace
with its neighbors," he declared
in his acceptance speech.
HE STRESSED the suD-wrt of
world Jewry for Israel, observing
that "we were all brothers in
time of anxiety as well as part-
ners in a venture of creation...
All Ihi; we have done in accord-
ance with the ancient Jewish tra-
dition that "all Jews arc respon-,
6ib!e for one another." he said.
He had warm praise for Mrg.
Heir, referring to her as "This
great woman tc whom we all owe
so much "
The Herut and General Zionist
factions abstained when Sapir wai
elected WZO Executive chair-
man.
Prof. Howard Ableson, of
Herut, said his group did not vote
for Sapir because he opposed a
national unity government for Is-
rael.
HERMAN WEISMAN, of the
General Zionists, said his faction
had favored Leon Dulzin for the
post. Dulzin. who was acting
chairman since Pincus' death and
who continues to serve as Jewish
Agency treasurer, praised Sapir
for undertaking leadership of the
Zionist movement even though it
meant giving up an important
government position and pros-
pects for an even higher one.
Dulzin presented a $701.6 mil-
lion Agency budget for the fiscal
year that began Apr. 1.
dent of JWF Women's Division
this year.
"I've always been a very active
person." At the University of Mi-
ami she was president of AE Phi
Sorority for two years, won a
Student Union Award and ap-
peared in "Who's Who."
SHE LAUGHS when she re-
calls the teasing. "The guys used
to call me 'Big Woman On Cam-
pus'."
Now Marcia Tobin is a big
woman in Hollywood Jewish com-
munity circles.
She moved here nine years ago
and taught school until Jennifer's
arrival. "That's when I became
active in Women's Division. I
wanted to get other young wom-
en involved. Women starting
families like myself."
Marcia. who admits to being
good at organizing, setting up
and managing, held a highly suc-
cessful program along with Ellie
Katz and Charlotte Brody that
year for sixty women. The next
year the figure rose to 150. Soon.
many women were involved.
Women's Leadership Institute
evolved and it has mushroomed
from there.
SHE HAS been Women's Divi-
sion Campaign chairman for the
past two years.
As Marcia says, "The, city was
growing and with it, more needs
occurred. We make up the com-
munity so when we work for,
censes, we're also helping our-
selvi
Jennifer, at that point, having
dressed herself for comoany, ask
ed if she could heip herself,
to a d mghnut
Once Again
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"Only with milk," Mommy com-
promised.
... and then sounds of "Sesame
Street" became background for
a discussion on Marcia Tobin
Mother.
"I FIND it difficult to put my
Jewishness in words," she said.
"If our children see our involve-
ment, no matter their age, they
become involved."
Jennifer Tobin has lit Friday
night candles since she was three.
She refers to prayers as "talk-
ing to G-d." Last October, during
the Yom Kippur War when her
Mommy was deep into the emer-
gency, Marcia asked as she placed
her daughter in bed, "Do you
want to talk to G-d?"
"Yes. I want to tell G-d to tell
those Arabs to leave those Jews
alone!"
OF THE two Tobin ladies, it's
Jennifer who prefers to cook! "I
like to make a meal in 15-20
minutes." Marcia says. As a re-
sult and with the help of a large
freezer, she does things like fif-
teen quarts of soup and five meat-
loaves all at one time.
Her real interest is working
with her hands: sewing, knitting
and needlepoint. As she displays
a half-completed work of art,
Marcia admonishes, "Jennifer,
stop standing on your head."
"I'm not. I'm a bridge," she
answers up-side-down.
AS YOU watch the Tobin-
bridge against the wall, your eyes ,
also take in the crystal fruit bowl |
filled with fresh goodies, the
linen napkins and most of all, a
warm feeling of home.
"Making a home is a fulltime
job. It's most important," explains
Marcia Tobin whose mother also
makes her home with the girls.
"As much as you work in the
community, vou must remember
your family."
Marcia also remembers some- '
thing her grandfather Joseph
said. "You can go anywhere with
the truth."
ANYWHERE this year is a big
job ahead as President of Wom-
en's Division.
But then, Marcia Tobin is the
"Big Woman On Campus."
Hollywood campus, that is!
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Henry's Sorry-He Thought
Israel Knew All About It
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM(JT A) St cre-
tary of State Henry A, Kissinger
told Israeli leaders last week that
he had been under the (mistaken)
impression that Israel was aware
of the US-Egyptian negotiations
for Egypt's purchase of a nuclear
reactor, negotiations which had
been proceeding since the spring,
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
learned from highly placed
sources here on June 20.
Kissinger said he bad assumed
his top assistant, Undersecretary
of State Joseph J. Sisco, or Sisco's
deputy Roy Atherton, had men
tioned it in diplomatic conversa
tions with Israeli envoys in Wash
ington.
The US-Egyptian negotiations
were held quite openly by an
Egyptian delegation in Washing-
ton in April and senior officials
believe that Israeli intelligence
was at fault in not having learn-
ed of them.
THIS IS especially so since
stories abott the U.S.-Egypt nu
clear accord appeared in two
Cairo newspapers in April.
Kissinger who sought during
the Nixon visit here to allay Is-
rael's fears of the deal and
placate its anger at not having
been informed, told Foreign Min-
ister Yigal Allon that a "bureau-
cratic mistake" had led to the
U.S. failure to inform Israel last
week of the impending inclusion
of the nuclear deal in the Nixon-
Sadat joint communique.
Apparently, there had been
intention originally of menticJ
ing the deal in the communkju
BUT NIXON, who sought
lend his Mideast visit as muq
substance as possible in the fa
of criticism at home that it w
unnecessary, decided to inclui
it, the JTA learned.
Kissinger thereupon cabled Si
co at home to inform "concern,
parties," assuming he would i
form the Israel Embassy amo
these.
But by administrative ovi
sight only Congressional and A
ministration "concerned partii
were informed, and the news
the agreement took Israel by s
prise.
AS TO Israel's fears and doubj
the Secretary stressed in priv
as in public at his news confel
ence here that effective contra
would apply to the supply
uranium to Egypt.
To justify the deal he told
raeli leaders that Germany, Brtf
ain. France and Canadaas w
as Russiahad been waiting
line for the chance to sell Egy
a reactor.
In effect, he said, reactcdj
could be bought from any
these countries on the cpJ
market, with far fewer contr
strings attached.
DR. STEPHEN M. ORDET
CHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIAN
announces the opening
of his new office at
3891 STIRLING RD., Ft. Laud.
(OPP. HOLLYWOOD HILLS HIGH SCHOOL)
HOURS
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TELE: 989-4200
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OPTOMETRIST
Announces the opening of his office for
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I


Friday. July 5. 1974
+Jm>tsll fhrHkUl and Shoiar of Hollywood
Paga 7
Y -
Reach Out To Soviet Jewry... Write A Letter
.
i... .
By PAUL KERBEL
For those of us who don't really have anthing to do this sum-
mer, or have free time, here is an opportunity to help the Jews
of the Soviet Union: "OPERATION SOVIET JEWRY WRITE-
IN."
This project plays an extremely important and urgent role in
the present Sovidt Union crisis. Its purpose is to provide Soviet
Jews with moral support and encouragement and to show the Soviet
Government that the Jews of the United States are concerned with
their b;ethren.
By writing to Soviet Jews, you are increasing their chances of
attaining freedom and raising their morale during their effort to
gain their humanitarian rights. Dr. Esther Aisenstadt. who was al-
lowed to emigrate to Israel said, "The Russians kept 900 cards and
oniy let me have 60 of them, but they knew that I had 1,000 friends
in America."
Here is how you do it!!!
1. The correct way to address a letter to the USSR is:
Republic (a., Ukrainian SSR & Latvian SSR)
City
USSR
Street address and apt. number (note: Kv means apt.)
La=t name, first name
2. Send letters "registered airmail" with return receipt requested.
Ask for insurance on the letter up to $13 its FREE. Say
there is something important (such as artwork) in the enve-
lope. The registration, postage and receipt request will amount
to approximately $1.60. Check at the post office.
3. If the letter is returned, send it to the Student Struggle for
Soviet Jewry for vital documentation. Address is: 200 West
72nd Stieet Suites 30-31/New York 10023.
4. If neither the letter or the receipt is returned after a month,
file a 'tiaeer-' at the Post Office. If nothing happens within
another month, file a claim for the insurance money which you
may receive approximately a month after the claim is made
and use the money to send more letters.
5. The most important thing is DO NOT GIVE UP!!! Don't be dis-
couraged if you never receive a response because the letter
writing serves an extremely important role. Please don't think
it's a waste of time.
6. About the letter writing: The initial letter should be written in
general terms. State that you received the address from good
mutual friends and would be happy to correspond. Keep your
letters warm, sympathetic, personal and positive.
7. Commemorate Jewish holidays and other appropriate occasions
with your correspondent.
8. Do not discuss political topics or mention any American organi-
zations. The tenor of content for the messages never should be
anti-Soviet. Tell each person that many people are concerned
with their plight and that they should not lose hope.
9. The response you receive will set the tone for further corre-
spondence. Some Soviet Jews will write openly while others pre-
fer the correspondence be of a more general nature.
10. Be sure to answer all letters received from Soviet Jews prompt-
ly! In any event, continue to write!
11. If you receive a letter, we would like to publish it in this
paper, so please send it to:
Teen Scene/Jewish Floridian
c/o Jewish Federation of South Broward
1909 Harrison Street
Hollywood 33020
Below is a list of Soviet Jewish activists. Don't pick names
from just the top; select names from the whole list.
On behalf of our Soviet brethren, thank you for your time and
effort. GOOD LUCK!
Vladimir Shakhnovsky; Moscow A-183, proyezd Cherepanovikh 70
kv 76
Mikhail Goldblatt; Moscow 1-53. ul Kalanchevskaya 29/31 kv 72
Pavel Men; Moscow 123154, Bulvar Gen. Karbysheva 16 korp 1 kv 70
Vladimir Prestin; Moscow B-207, ul Uralskaya 6 korp 4 kv 11
Lev Kanevsky; Moskovskaya oblast, posiolok Malakhovka 2 ul
Malakhovskaya 33
Mikhail Chlenov; Moscow 125475, ul Zelenogradskaya 23 korp 5 kv
466
Valeri Krizhak; Moscow 125057, ul Peschanaya 8 kv 56
Vladimir Titov; Moscow 125130, ul Kosmodemianskikh 9v kv 36
Naum Rappoport; Moscow 107061, Bolshaya Cherkizovskaya 10 korp
10 kv 181
Nina Tarasova; Moscow 106043, 9 Parkovaya 11a kv 40
Iosif Begun; Moscow G-2, ul Vesnina 4 kv 6
Zinovi Gluzberg; Moscow 107061, Bolshaya Cherkizovskaya 10 korp
10 kv 188
Lev Aruin; Moscow M-519, ul Chertanovskaya 29 korp 2 kv 135
Boris Braiter; Moscow 125047, ul Gotvalka 18 A kv 83
Victor Polsky; Moscow, Krasnokazarmennaya 23 kv 62
Pavel Abramovich; Moscow E-484, 16 Parkovaya 39 kv 65
Natalia Khvesina; Moscow 103009, ul Gorkovo 6 kv 300
M. Kharkova; Moscow 125445, Le ningradskoye shosse 128 korp 1
kv 48
Maya Braginskaya; Moscow E 425, 9 Parkovaya 47 Korp 2 kv 4
Natalia Krylova; Moscow K-25, ul Pushkinskaya 4/2, kv 34
Nina Bibichkova; Moscow 124125, ul M. Rashovoy 23 A, kv 55
Evgenia Galperina; Moscow, ul Pervomaiskaya 14, kv. 33
Dina Beilina; Moscow 107061, Bolshaya Cherkizovskaya 6, korp 3,
kv 53
Vladimir Slepak; Moscow 103009. ul Gorkovo 15, kv 77
Girgory Burle; Moscow, Petrovka 17, kv 7
Boris Tsitlonak; Moscow E-425, ul 5 Parkovaya 54/1, kv 23
Mikhail Agursky; Moscow 117485, ul Profsoyuznaya 102, korp 5,
kv 176
A Rapoport; Moscow 117311, ul Stroiteley 7, korp 2, kv 50
Mark Lvovsky; Moscow 129041, Astrakhansky per. 19, korp 2, kv 1
M. Shoichet: Moscow, Uralskaya 3, kv 109
Vladimir Elshtein; Moscow 121359, ul Yartsevshaya 23, kv 85
Lev Kogan; Moscow, Medvedkovo 129221, ul Tikhomirova 9, korp 3,
kv 187
Alexander Bolshoy; Moscow 117485, ul Profsoyuznaya 102, korp 11,
kv 121
Vitali Rubin: Moscow Center, Telegrafny per. 7, kv 3
Yefim Tsatskin; Moscow K-55, ul Lesnaya 41, kv 8
Yuri Kamishov; Moscow 119285, 2 Mosfilmovsky per. 21, kv 105
A. Galperin: Moscow, ul Nizhnia Radishevskaya 10, kv 1
A. Gofman; Moscow V-313, Lcninsky pros. 86, kv 167
L. Varshavsky; Moscow, ul Sadovo kudrinskaya 21 A, kv 8
V. Levchak; Moscow, ul Korolenko 9 A, kv 15
A. Aronova; Moscow, Rublevskoye shosse 109, koip 3 kv 49
O. Chikovani; Moscow pros. Vernadskovo 93, kv 87
A. Shteinberg; Moscow, Shabolovka 30, kv 23
Victor Brailovsky; Moscow, pros. Vernadskovo 99, korp 1, kv 128
Mark Danenberg; Moscow, Poriadkovy per. 19. kv 26
Vadim Gelfer; Moscow, ul Malaya Gruzhinskaya 33, kv 60
Evgenia Lokshina: Moscow, ul Lobachev=kovo 60, kv 49
Ida Nudel; Moscow, ul Yunikh Lenintsev 79, korp 6, kv 28
Israil Varnavitsky; Leningrad 194017, pros. Marisa Toreza 102, korp
2. kv 19
Valeri Ladyzhenpky; Leningrad 194265, ul Luzhskaya 4, korp 1, kv
263
Alfred Khvoroshan: Leningrad, ul Zamshina 52. korp 2. kv 90
Yosif Tamarin; Leningrad 198020, pr. Ogorodnikova 52, kv 2
Anna Khaikina; Leningrad, Baltiskaya 2/14, kv 187
Lev Pritsker; Leningrad, Novostroyek 27, kv 56 J
Poiina Epelman; Leningrad, proyezd Nauki 41, kv 24
Anna Kiseleva; Leningrad V-178, 12 Linia 15. kv 2
Boris Rubinshtein; Leningrad. Gavrskaya 11, kv 88
Avraham Elinson: Leningrad M 234, ul Pulkovskaya 3. kv 70
Mikhail Fischeliov; Leningrad V-151, ul V.O. Nalichnaya 36, korp
*. ^ 308
Lev Shapiro, Leningrad 190068, kanal Griboyedova 80. kv 13
Abram Tesler; Leningrad F-2. Vladimirsky pr. 13. kv 12 ^
Yosif Blikh; Leningrad, per. Dzhambula 19, kv 5 9
Giigory Goman; Leningrad, pr. Mayorova 28, kv 8
Girsh Yosfin; Leningrad, Basseynaya 183, korp 4, kv 205
Vladimir Oliker; Leningrad, ul Basseynaya 103. korp 1, kv 158
Mikhail Strugach; Leningrad. Bolshevistsky pr. 6 korp 2 kv 176
Aba Taratuta; Leningrad, pr. Kosmonavtov 27 korp 1 kv 71
Yefim Feigin; Leningrad, per Dzhambula 7 kv 23
Alexander Yampolsky; Leningrad 192123, ul p. Lavrova 47 kv 12
Iosif Tsirulnikov; Leningrad 195067, Annilov pr. 32 kv 107
S. Kozanevich; Leningrad 190125. pr.. Rimskovo Korskakova 47 kv 30
L. Kleiner; Leningrad 196002, ul B. Moskovskaya 6 kv 41
Angelina Pieretz; Leningrad. Moskovski prosp. 4 kv 6
Arnold Ludmirsky; Leningrad 196234, ul. Ordzhonikidze 41, korp 1,
kv 82
Dina Podrazhanskaya; Leningrad 199178, V.O. 15 linia 50 kv 10
Isac Poltinnikov; Novosibirsk 102, ul. Voschod 1, kv 12
Yuri Berkovsky; Novosibirsk 630037. ul Novogodnia 36 kv 40
A. Bayer; Novosibirsk 630096, ul Nevelskovo 9 kv 19
Alexander Roizman; Novosibirsk 630105, ul Kropotkina 94 1 kv 31
BYELORUSSIAN SSR
Lev Ovsischer; Minsk, ul. Yanki Kupaly 17. 30, kv 112
MOLDAVIAN SSR Jfj |
Ber Reznik; Kishinev, Chernishevskogo 72, kv 54
UKRAINIAN SSR \
Mikhail Mager; Vinnitsa, ul. Karmiluk 37, kv 6
Israel Fishman; Chernovitz 3, ul. Internatsionalnaya 6. kv 1
KOMI ASSR tj
G. Abram; Vorkuta, ul. Pushkina 21, kv 10 ,-LJT


Page 8
*Jmistincridia*
and Shosar of Hollywood
Friday Jury 5. 1974
Abortion Struggle Boiling Over on the Hill
Continued from Page 1
the health and life of the mother
and can regulate or entirely
prohibit the procedure when
a woman is in the last three
months of pregnancy.
On Mar. 7. the Constitutional
Amendment Subcommittee of
the Senate Judicial y Committee
held hearings on the abortion
proposal. The Orthodox Rabbin-
ical Council of America, repre-
sented by a single rabbi J.
David Bieich of New York's Ye-
shiva University testified in
support of the Buck.ey amend-
ment
Rabbi Bieich said that, accord-
ing to the ancient religious code
of Halacha, unless the mother's
life is in imminent danger of be-
ing losi, an abortion would be
"tantamount to homicide."
ORTHODOX JEWRY was
therefore listed by both oppon-
ents and proponents as support-
ers of the Buckley amendment to
outlaw abortion in cases where
the physical lite of the mother is
not at stake.
However, an informal poll of
Orthodox rabbis in the Washing-
ton, D.C., area last March indi-
cated that there is no one voice
ror trie Rabbinical Council.
There were difterences about the
definition of "reasonable medi-
cal certainty" as well as dis-
agreements over the question of
mental health.
If the Buckley amendment be-
comes the law of the land, abor-
tion for psychiatric reasons
would be outlawed.
Rochester's Rabbi Moses Tend-
ler, a PhD biologist, a former
chairman of the same Medical
Ethics Committee and an equal-
ly-distinguished academic expert
in Orthodox opinion and medi-
cine as is Rabbi Bieich, said the
danger to the mother need not
be "imminent." He said the
threat may even be a "remote
possibility."
THERE WERE only tw areas
of complete Orthodox agree-
ment: "permissive abortion," as
provided under the Supreme
Court during the first three
months is a violation of Halacha;
foetal health, or abnormality in
itself, has nothing to do with
justification for abortion. The
mother's life and to most, her
health as well takes prece-
dence under Jewish law, and
only she is taken into account in
making a Rabbinic decision.
For Jam, abortion has special
significance because of Tay-
Sachs. A hereditary affliction of
infants, medically classified as
"lethal," Tay-Sachs is carried on
a gene by one of every 30 Jews
of reproductive age having a Eu-
ropean ancestry.
The child is normal for often
as long as a year. Then it be-
comes blind, has neurological
symptoms such as convulsions
and difficulty in swallowing.
Deafness and incapacitation, fi-
nally ending in a fatal coma, fol-
low. These children seldom live
longer than five years, usually
three or less.
ACCORDING TO William Ga-
vin, an aide to Sen. Buckley, Tay-
Sachs was never taken into ac-
count until May 7, when Subcom-
mittee witnesses were question-
ed about the disease by Ken-
tucky's Republican Sen. Marlow
Cook. Scientists giving expert
testimony described it to the
Senators.
They said there is no treat-
ment nor cure now, and there is
none expected within the fore-
seeable future. Nonetheless, Ga-
vin said, the wording of the
Buckley amendment would pro-
hibit an abortion in such cases
unless the mothers are proven to
be in danger of committing sui-
cide.
Jan Liebman. a Jewish woman
???AskAbe???
QUESTION: What is the mean-
ing and origin of the Magen
David?
ISOBEL C. ISSERLIS
Miami Beach
ANSWER: According to the
Encyclopaedia Judaica, Mager
David, Hebrew for Shield of
David, is a hexagram (a six point-
ed star), formed by two equilat-
eral triangles which have the
same center and are placed in
opposite directions.
From as early as the Bronze
Age, it was possibly used as an
ornament and perhaps as a
magical sign in many civilizations
and regions as far apart as Meso-
potamia and Britain.
In the Second Temple period,
the hexagram was often used by
Jews and non-Jews alike, along-
side the pentagram; the five
pointed star.
On stones found in the excava-
tion of the synagogue of Caper-
naum on the shores of Lake Kin-
Tieret 'second or third century
C.E.), the Magen David was fdund
side by side with the pentagram
and the swastika in its original
form prior to its use in reverse
by Hitler. Thre is no reason to
assume that it was used for any
purpose other than decorative.
The ornamental use of the
hexagram continued in the Mid-
dle Aces, especially in Moslem
and Christian countries. Some-
times drawn with slightly curved
lines, it appears in early Byzan-
tine and medieval European
churches.
earlier than its application to the
hexagram It occurs as a designa-
tion of God in the third benedic-
tion after the reading of the Haf-
torah and is similar to the
expression "Shield of Abraham"
in the first benediction of the
Amidah.
ABE HAWtRN
It was only in the 18th and
19th centuries that the hexagram
began to be used as a symbol of
Judaism. The prime motive be-
hind the wide diffusion of the
sign appears to have been the
desire to find a striking and sim-
ple sign to symbolize Judaism.
This led to the ascendancy of
the Magen David in official use
on ritual objects and in many
other ways. Almost every syna-
gogue used it. Innumerable com-
munities and private and charit-
able organizations stamped it on
their seals and letterheads.
From such general use, it was
taken by the Zionist movement.
The very first issue of "Die
Welt," Herzl's Zionist Journal,
bore it as its emblem. The Magen
David became the symbol of new
hopes and a new future of the
Jewish People.
When the Naiis used it as a
"badge of shame" which was to
accompany millions on their way
to death, it took on a new dimen-
sion of depth, uniting suffering
and hope.
While the State of Israel, in
its search for Jewish authenticity,
chose the Menorah, a much old-
er Jewish symbol, as its emblem,
the Magen David was maintained
on the national, formerly Zionist,
flag. It is now widely used
Jewish Ufa.
in
and a member of the staff of
Planned Parenthood, said no
opinion of Orthodox law has
been officially cited except Rab-
bi Bleich's, and for this reason.
Orthodox Jewry is listed as an
opponent of abortion unless the
mother will die from the preg-
nancy. Reform and Conservative
Jewry have taken united stands
against restrictive legislation.
Ms. Liebman said she hoped
the subcommittee would hold a
second hearing for religious tes-
timony so other spokespeople for
Orthodox Jewry can be heard.
"IF MANY rabbis think like
Rabbi Tendler," she explained, "I
certainly wish they would speak
out, because that opinion is not
on the record of the Subcommit-
tee."
However, other opinion is on
record in Jewish periodicals. In
the Winter, 1968, issue of the
Orthodox quarterly, "Tradition,"
an article, "The Jewish Attitude
Toward Abortion," by Dr. Fred
Rosner, of the Maimonides Med-
ical Center, concludes that:
"Abortion is permitted by
most Rabbinic authorities where
a medical or psychiatric threat
to the mother's life exists. Many
authorities permit abortion not
only if her life is in danger but
even if her health may deterio-
rate by continuation of the preg-
nancy. A small minority of Rab-
binic opinion allow therapeutic
abortion for reasons such as in-
cest, rape tad fear that a mal-
formed child may be born."
DR. ROSNER pointed out that
the last reason cited, the mal-
formed child, is permissible be-
cause of the effect of such a
pregnancy on the mother's
health. He also included "an-
guish, shame or embarrassment"
but stressed that this is a minor-
ity view.
A "pulpit rabbi" a spiritual
leader of a neighbornood congre-
gation with no special qualifica-
tions said he feels passage of
the Buckley amendment would
take away his religious options.
Declining to be named, he ex-
plained. "Suppose I see a woman
who was tested and knows her
baby will have Tay-Sachs," he
said. "She isn't suicidal; she has
no previous psychiatric history.
But she is so depressed she can't
take care of her other children,
doesn't cook meals nothing
She just sits and broods~ind
tries.
"IN A CASE like that," h
continued, "the way the law i,
now, I can tell her that, accord
ing to Halacha, it would not be
a sin to have an abortion. As a
matter of fact, for her own
health and for the sake of her
other children. Orthodox law
may require her to have an abor-
tion.
"But if the Supreme Court is
reversed, it wouldn't matter what
I tell her the Halacha says. An
abortion would be illegal. My
rights as her religious counselor
would be taken away by the gov-
ernment "
Ms. Liebman feels that if more
Orthodox Jews aie made aware
of the impact of the Buckley
amendment on their private
lives, they would write letters to
the Senate's Constitutional
Amendment Subcommittee and
permit such opinions to be
known.
"As of now," she said, "the
Rabbinical Council of America
and Orthodox Jewry are definite-
ly considered to be opposed to
abortion unless the mother will
die. If that's not true, then the
record has got to be changed."


Holocaust Must be Studied
In Schools, Educator Says

By Special Report
NEW YORK The American
Association for Jewish Education
has called for instruction in the
Holocaust era to be made "an
integral part" of English and so-
cial studies curricula in the pub-
lic schools.
Testifying at a public hearing
here last week, AAJE educator
Max Nadel said that "if we can-
not face the truth and reality of
the Holocaustno matter how
frightful, shocking or depressing
its evil will become blurred
and will be ready to reappear in
a new generation, in another
place, when society goes awry."
CONSULTANT to the AAJE's
Commission on Jewish Studies in
Public Schools, Nadel was invited
to testify at a hearing convened
by New York State Assemblyman
Stephen J. Solarz at American
Jewish Congress headquarters.
He. reported on a 1970 study
of how public school social
studies textbooks treated Nazi
persecution of minority groups.
disclosing that 21 of 45 texts
which were examined either
slighted, minimized or glossed
over the subject, while another
13 omitted it entirely.
Many textbook publishers
"have encouraged their writers
to ignore the Holocaust or to
make a vague reference to it as
a minor event in a devastating
Second World War." Nadel said.
THIS ATTITUDE supports the
view of teachers who are in-
clined to pass over the event
quickly and vaguely probably
because it seems impossible to
view such a catastrophe in his-
torical perspective, or with any
rationality," he said.
"The record is even sadder"
in public school English litera-
"The Diary of Anne Frank" is
"The Diary of Anne Frankk" is
the only Holocaust work studied,
Nadelhimself a former English
department chairman at the
Bronx (N.Y.) High School of
Sciencedeclared.
Even though novels and stories
of American Jewish writersto-
gether with the works of Black,
Hispanic. Asian and other ethnic
groupsare now taught in such
classes, "we hesitate to teach
Holocaust literature," he said.
"The reason, I believe, is that
we are fearful to do so. We can
accept the cruel, the horrible,
the gruesome, the absurd in a
world of fantasy.'Du* we cacao',
do so in a world of reality.t
TO FACILITATE the introduc
tion of study on the Holocaust in
public school courses and in
those of Jewish schools and-Chris-
tian parochial schools as well
Nadel urged that curricula be re-
examined; textbooks corrected
and, in part, rewritten; and addi-
tional works and materials pre
pared, particularly in combina
tion with audio-visual instruction
"The specter of what the Nazis
did to their enemies must haunt
the world for generations,*' he
said, "so that any time man turns
brutally against a neighbor he
will be halted by a horrifying
vision that will stay his hand."
ACCUSATIONS fLY ACROSS JHOVf/HWTS
Rabbis Hold Conf ab on Beach
Raobi Louis Bernstein, presi-
dent of the Rabbinical Council
of America, the largest Orthodox
rabbinic body ir the United
States, accused leaders of the
Conservative and Reform move-
menu of trying to blackmail the
Israeli people by implying that
financial aid would be condition-
al upon Israel's acceptance of
their religious ideologies.
The charge was vigorously de-
nied by the leaders of the two
non-Orthodox movements.
RABBI ALEXANDER M
Schindler. president of the Union
of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions (Reform), said the charge
was "irresponsible and Rabbi
Bernstein should either produce
the evidence or apologize to Con-
servative and Reform leaders,"
Rabbi Bernstein's remarks
were contained in his address at
the opening of the RCA's 38th
annual national convention at the
Caribbean Hotel in Miami Beach.
the question of Who is a Jew'
would result in a diminution of
financial aid to Israel and other
boycotts."
HE ADDED that "these mes-
sages were published in the Jeru-
salem Post and other newspa-
pers, including the insertion of a
telegram to Suulamit Aloni,'' a
Cabinet Minister.
Rabbi Joseph B. Glazer, exec-
utive vice president of the Cen-
tral Conference of American
Rabbis, the rabbinic branch of
Reform Judaism, called Rabbi
Bernstein's accusation "utterly
false." "deeply resented" and
"disappointing in terms of what
seems to be an attempt to twist
what we are doing."
Rabbi Glazer said the Reform
movement has been "extremely
careful to avoid any kind of co
ercive element in our stand on
the subject."
organizations, denied the charge
of blackmail.
They said Rabbi Bernstein was
apparently referring to a tele-
g-am sent May 6 to the leaders
of the three political parties in
Premier Yitzhak Rabin's coali-
tion government urging that a
Law of Return not be changed
since it would mean that Reform
and Conservative Jews in Israel
and abroad would be classified
as "second class" Jews.
They noted that the telegram
warned that if these Jews be
came "second class" it would
have a "deleterious effect: on
moral, political and financial sup
port of Israel."
RABBI KELMAN said this
statement was not. intended^ to
lessen support "of; Israel in jany
way. Rabbi Segal said this was
not blackmail but a realistic ap-
praisal of how some Jews might
feel.
The two Conservative leaders
u u ... """"" D*-n. RABBI WOlJ-'w -- llle two Conservative leaders
and tbSSPt "S "the messa** Uve^ip"den^ '^^ th>t Conservative jYws
and Ref!fr by the Consetive binical Lsemblv of a ^ haVe not been uked to withr,old
and Reform synagogues and rab- and Rabbi BeTnirH cL^"'03' finanl "PPrt but instead 5-
hini i^M "'*"?B8ues and ra- and Rabbi Bernard n--.i I,nw>cial support but insteaf fi-
binic bodies to the political lead- tive director TSL ,? LiT"" nanci1 id I1 from'the
er^hip b, Israel lmD.ied that ^^TaS^S Z r *"" diaSp0ra w" **> *>
vative rlbbS and svn^nser majority of ** lunds *"
raooinical and synagogue Reform and Conservative Je*s.
implied that any
change in the Law of Return on


Friday, July 5. 1974
+Jenisll fk>rkfiain and Shatax of Hollywood
Page 9
*J
*
:-*-
fr
* :
m$y m K .

Hi9NCtiK().W
W-wo
^M

Wi***- 1

Mrs. Mary Fine, center, accepts Branifi International plane
tickets to Hawaii for her and her husband, Louis, from
Bette Eden, branch manager and assistant vice-president
of Hollywood Federal Savings new offices at 7880 West
Oakland Park Boulevard in Sunrise. The Fine's week-long
vacation to Hawaii plus S600 cash and land arrangements
was awarded as part of the open-house celebration of the
new Sunrise office. The Fines live at 2700 Sunrise Lakes
Drive West.
Conservative Rabbi Says
He'd Bar Orthodox Vieics
On Halachic Questions
:
33
e-
rs
in
li-
a
td
in
el
ed
im
>e
Id
on
w
us
to
ny
'as
P-
ERIE. ft. (JTA) Declar-
ing that the halachic positions of
Orthodox rabbis "can no longer
be accepted as valid expressions
-o4 Jewish living," a Conservative
rabbi here has announced he will
no longer accept Orthodox con-
versions or divorces as valid.
Rabbi .Mordecai Kieffer, of
Congregation Brith Sholom, also
announced that Jews bringing
hira documents attesting Ortho-
rndex-^erevBrsieo "will have to un-
dergo immersion in a Mikveh
. under my supervision."
HE ALSO declared, in a state-
ment in his synagogue bulletin,
that divorce documents signed by
an Orthodox Beth Din (rabbin-
ical court) "will have to be re-
written by the Beth Din of the
.Rabbinical Assembly," the asso-
- ciation of Conservative rabbis.
He said, "these steps are nec-
essary to insure that the halacha
has been faithfully followed, an
assurance which the Orthodox
rabbinate is no longer in a posi-
tion to provide."
He said, "I now declare them
to be out of bounds."
RABBI KIEFFER asserted that
"we can no longer tolerate divi-
siveness caused by halachic aber-
rations" and that "to insure that
the halacha is being properly in-
terpreted and used, we must
plate in ascendant positions the
leadership of Finkelstein over
Femstein.'Waxman over Unter-
man, the Rabbi Kieffer over the
Gerer Rebbe."
The references were to Rabbi
Louis Finkelstein, former chan-
cellor of the Jewish Theological
Seminary; Rabbi Moshe Fein-
stein, a leading Orthodox schol-,
ar; Rabbi Mordecai Waxman.
president of the Rabbinical As-
sembly; and to Rabbi Isar Un-
terman, former Israeli Ashke-
nazic Chief Rabbi.
Rabbi Kieffer opened his an-
nouncement with a denunciation
of efforts of the Orthodox estab
lishment in Israel to make tc-
ceptance by the National Reli-
gious Party in the government,
finally formed without the NRP
by Premier Yitzhak Rabin, con-
tingent on a change in Israel's
Law of Return barring accept-
ance as Jews of immi grants con-
verted by non-Orthodox rabbis.
HE ASSERTED that "gather-
ing moral strength from the Is-
raeli rabbinate. Orthodox rabbis
in this country have taken sim-
ilar steps to invalidate the
conversions, however halachic, of
other rabbis."
He charged that in New York,
"many Orthodox mikvehs have
been closed to Conservative rab-
bis for use in conversion."
He said the halachic process
"is not the province of any
group" and that "the Orthodox,
by their behavior, have shown
themselves to be out of touch
with the halachic method and
to be out of touch with Jews."
Art-Drania Classes
For Seniors To
Begin This Week
The Jewish Community Center
of South Florida will be offering
art and drania classes for senior
adults this summer. The six week
program begins Monday and ends
the week of Aug. 12.
Gertrude Borenstein, instruc-
tor, will teach the basics in draw-
ing, including perspective and de-
sign in pencil, charcoal, pastel
and water colors.
Art classes will be on an in-
dividual basis and bisic mate-
rials are included in the fee for
the six week course. This class
meets Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to
noon at Temple Sinai, 1201 John-
son St., Hollywood.
Evelyn Lewis, instructor for
the Creative Drama Woikshop,
will teach the recreational, so-
cial and intellectual aspects of
theatre. The two main areas of
emphasis will be technical pro-
duction and creative improvisa-
tion, which will culminate in de-
velopment of the "J.C.C. Senior
Adult Players." The class meets
Thursdays from 10 to 12 at Tem-
ple Sinai.
For additional information, call
the Jewish Community Center.
Eugene J. Klein
Dies In Hungary
Eugene J. Klein, of 3246
Buchanan St., a longtime resident
of Hollywood, passed away sud-
denly Wednes-
day. June 5,
while vacation-
ing in Buda-
pest. Hungary,
with his wife.
Mr. Klein was
born in Hun-
gary in 1893
and has resided
in the United
States with his
wife since 1921.
Eugene Klein He formerly
lived in Mans-
field, Ohio and has been a resi-
dent of Hollywood since 1952.
Mr. Klein was a charter mem-
ber of Temple Beth El.
Surviving members of his fam-
ily include his wife. Joli, and a
son. Dr. Robert E. Klein of Mans-
field. Ohio.
Three beaming Shaare Zedek nurses pose with the three
sets of twins born within hours of each other at the hospital |
last week.
Twins At Shaare Zedek Put
Doctors, Nurses On The Run
1
Doctors at Jerusalem's Shaare
Zedek Hospital worked at a 'dou-
ble-time" pace last week as three
sets of twins were born within
three and a half hours.
Hospital obstetricians and Is-
rael Ministry of Health experts
could not recall a similar case of
triple twin births in one day, let
alone in the space of one mcrn-
ing. One obstetrician stated that
the odds against the multiple
birth were as large as if the six
had been born together as sex-
tuplets.
Shaare Zedek's busy day began
at 9:15 a.m. when Mrs. Margolit
Hazan, a 29-year-old Jerusalem
housewife, gave birth to twin
daughters.
Two hours later. Mrs. Dina Ra-
hamim, also of Jerusalem, de-
livered twin boys, and at 12:30
p.m. another set of twin girls
were born to Paulette Avital. All
the mothers and infants were re-
ported in good health.
For Dina Rahamim. the twin
birth is an unexpected burden.
Her husband, who is blind, is
employed as a rug weaver, and
the couple has six other chil-
dren.
Upon hearing of her circum-
stances, the staff of the hospital
began contacting various sources
to obtain help for the family. The
"Brith Milah" (circumcision)
ceremony and reception for the
twin boys will be paid for by
Shaare Zedek Hospital.
The shift during which tbe
triple twins were born was on*
of the most fruitful in the history
of the veteran Jerusalem hospi-
tal, as 10 children were bor
within five fours. Last year there
were 2.557 births at the hospital*
a figure which is expected to in-
crease significantly during 1974k
JWV Auxilaries'
Weekly Calendar
The activities of the Depart,
ment of Florida-Ladies Auxiliary.
Jewish War Veterans, for this
week are:
William Kretchman No. 730 o*
Fort Lauderdale: A ward gams*
party at the Veterans Administra*
tion Hospital, Miami, Saturday
evening.
West Miami No. 223: A regular
monthly meeting at 8:15 p.m.
Thursday, July 11, in the home of
Past Auxiliary President Char*
lotte Mittler. Stanley Mielkt*
Dade County Coordinator for Uni-
tarian Federal Food Cooperative,
will speak on "Help Beat The
High Cost of Living." Jerri Bart*
lett. euxiliary president will pre-
side.
Murray Solomon No. 243: A
regular business meeting at 9
p.m. Thursday. July 11, at tha>
First Federal, 2750 SW 22nd St,
Tanya M. Levine, president, will
rres'dp.
Wildfire
in the south.
There's no
future in it.

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Ovtrttvf
iWnu.buMO lot T~t
pvMK food ,\j[f
july Treasure
o! the Month
July is Vacation time. Picture time. Polaroid time. and
YOU may win that magic picture taking Polaroid SX-70
absolutely free in the First National Bank's JULY
Treasure Hunt. Just till out your calendar coupon and
deposit it in our lobby display.
first nflTionnL bri-iw
OF HOLLVUJOOD IS

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Page 10-
+JeiS*nt>rkHaHn Friday July 5. 1974
U
Lady Lojk
A Dog's Life
As a child, I never had a dog.
My best friends, the Kreicher
tuias, had a dog named Ronald
C'olman who was christened same
in honor of their mother's fa-
vorite movie actor at the time.
He had manse.
Tfce dog. Not the actor!
However, everyone says that
life begins at forty and it did
for me.
A dog's life ... I received my
first dog.
I WAS in my bedroom resting
and contemplating my traumatic
birthday when the children enter-
ed and placed a small black some-
thins in my arms.
He licked my face and cap-
tured my heart.
We named him Taxi.
Taxi was a wirehaired poodle.
He wore a coat of hair which
resembled a Brillo pad with four
legs and a tail.
Over the years, he chafed chil-
dren on bicycles, ran after gar-
bane truck tires, slept snuggled
next to me. protected our family
and fathered his own.
His children were white Taxis
and although they lived several
blocks away, he paid a call on
them each day.
He was a concerned parent.
He was al when our family decision to V"e
separately came about.
THE CHILDREN and I were
to remain in the U.S.. but their
father was moving to the Baha-
mas. He would be alone but we
woold be together os it was de-
cided Taxi would go with him.
Once a month, the children's
father, who piloted his own air-
plane, would fly the family dog
over to us for a weekend visit.
Oitr friends were dismayed
that the amicable agreement pro-
vided for custody of a dog to
come home one weekend a month.
But then, everyone was happy
and that's the purpose of separa-
tions in the first place.
One month Taxi didn't appear.
He had run after the final truck.
The children's father buried
him in his backvard under a beau-
tiful bougainvillea bush and we
both told each other that neither
would ever get a dog again.
PASTING WITH peoole is
emotional. And Taxi was oeople.
I understand from the children
that their father now has, not
one. but two docs.
... and me, ihe ladv who vow-
ed never to get another, has a
guy named Rinno who is never
more than two paws behind.
One year ago, I'd just moved
to Key West, was living alone in
a big house writing a book and
decided I needed a watchdog.
At the Humane Society, as I
walked around, all the dogs be-
came excited, barked and jumped
RITA GOODMAN
at the prospect of a mistress.
ONLY ONE lay there in a deep
depression looking like he need-
ed a psychiatrist more than a
home.
Naturally, he was Rinno.
Maybe he couldn't see me for
he's mostly sheep dog and I still
don't know if he has eyes.
I felt very safe living alone in
my big house with my watchdog.
We loved each other dearly
and I knew he would let no harm
come to me.
Rinno and I had a daily ritual
in Key West.
Each morning 1 would draw the
drapes, flide open the big glass
doors and let Rinno out in our
marvelous backvard while I pre-
pared our breakfast.
ONE MORNING, I walked to
the doors to tell him breakfast
was ready but before I could call
out. the words stuck in mv throat
as I SDotted a man's lea hanging
over the side of the hammock I'd
hung from two trees.
Rinno was prancing around
sniffing grass. And minding his
own business!
In whisper tones, I called his
name. I didn't want to disturb
the VISITOR. Or BODY. Or what-
ever.
After getting him in the house,
I relocked the doors, redrew the
drapes the phoned the police.
Rinno really was a great pro-
tector. He went at the poliee-
maif s leg... and escorted the
hungover wino to the fence from
whence he'd sprung looking for
a place to sleep
It was then the thought oc-
curred to me that perhaps I
should move.
Today life is more realistic.
Rinno, protector-of-winos. has two
beer and wine bars in Ft. Lauder-
dale named after him.
... and I have lots of locks and
chains on our door.
WEDDING, BARMITZVAH
AND COMMERCIAL
PHOTOGRAPHY
done at reasonable prices
Contact: Saul Rosen at
966-5785
7e*tfUeutt6e Pine*
Conservative)
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF THEIR
? NEW HEBREW & RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
Hillel Students
Graduate From
Eighth Grade
Graduation exercises for the
eighth grade of the Hillel Com-
munity Day School were held
Wednesday, June 12, at the
school.
The graduates were Adina,
daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Morde-
chai Adler; Ava, daughter of Dr.
and Mrs Bennie Berman; Loren
Goldman, son of Mrs. Karl Cohen
and Milton Goldman; Carla.
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Michael
Saxon; and Michael, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Lewis Turgel.
Rabbi Dov Bidnick, principal,
presented the students with
graduation certificates. The guest
speaker was Rabbi Ralph Glix-
man of B'nai Israel and Greater
Miami Youth Synagogue. Michael
Scheck. president of the school,
brought greetings on behalf of
the officers and board of gover-
nors.
The school, which offers a well
balanced program of secular and
religious studies from nursery
through eighth grade, serves the
North Dade and Broward areas
with buses to all areas including
Tamarac. For the coming year,
bus service will be extended to
Miami Lakes.
22 Hillel Tots
Receive Diplomas
At Graduation
The Hillel Community Day
School held graduation exercises
for 22 Kindergarten children
Tuesday. June 11, at the I la I lan-
dale Jewish Center.
Abraham J. Gittelson of the,
Central Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion was the guest speaker. The
children presented both English
and Hebrew poems, songs, and a
playlet entitled -Rachel at the
Well."
Mrs. Dorothy Gruen, the
secular teacher, and Mrs. Shula I
Leshetz, the Hebrew teacher,
were assisted by Mrs. Adrienne
Berger and Mrs. Ro;ia Grabina in
preparinp the program.
The following children received
diplomas from Rabbi Dov Bid-
nick, principal; Ashira Bunder.
Jerome Camel, Tammv Dennis,
Jodi Feldman, Adina Gelnowski,
Andrea Klein. Michael Langel,
Craig Moore. David Platt. Dan
Rogovin and David Rothenberg.
Alo Dayna Rothnberg. Amy
Seinfeld. David Sheir. Sharon
Sher, Jodi Silverman. Jonathan
Simon. Robert Singer. Ezra Sut-
ton. Sarina Warren. Debbie Wo-
lowitz and Fred Zemel
\
CREATIVE & INNOVATIVE CLASSES
For G'cds Kindergarten 7
(BAR & BAT MITZVAH PREPARATION)
SPECIAL ELECTIVE COURSES
Covering oil phate* of Judaism for Grades 8-10.
4 SMALL INDIVIDUALIZED CLASSES
* For Further Information
f and Registration
CALL: 922-1491
Hillcrest-Hollywood UJA Mission j
Departing For Israel Oct. 21
The Hillcrest community, in co-
operation with the Jewish Wel-
fare Federation, will conduct a
15 day United Jewish Appeal
Mission to Israel, departing from
Fort Lauderdale airport Monday,
Oct. 21, arriving in Israel via El
Al Airlines Tuesday, Oct. 22.
Chairman Alvin Hess said,
"There are many ways to see Is-
rael, but only through the trip
that we are sponsoring can you
have the singular opportunity of
meeting top leaders like Presi-
dent Katar; seeing what your
contributions are doing for the
people of Israel; of experiencing
the Israeli's Israel instead of just
the tourist's; and of living in-
stead of just viewing this unique
adventure which is Israel."
In Israel the group will be
joined by Mr. and Mrs. Sol Entin,
Nathan Pritcher and Sid Cher-
nuchin, of Hillcrest.
The Mission will be geared at
a leisurely pace with time for
optional trips to Eilat and Sinai,
the Western Wall. Yad Vashem.
Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and the Gal-
ilee.
There will also be visits to
Safed. an armed force base, a
new development town built from
the wilderness, an Absorption
Center with newly arrived Soviet
Jews and an old age home.
Group members will stay at de-
luxe hotels in Tel Aviv and Jeru-
salem, as well as spending a night
in a kibbutz guesthouse in the
far north. An Israeli breakfast
will be served every day, lunches
and dinners on full tour days,
and on the last evening, a fare-
well cabaret party.
The cost from Fort Lauderdale
will be SI. 150 per person. (Small
ALViH HISS
additional charge for single sup-
plement). If you wish to join
the group in New York, the cost
will be $1.050 per person. As
space is limited, please phone the
Jewish Welfare Federation office
for information on reservations.
'7HE CHOSEN
CHILDREN"
A contemporary group of Young
Jewish Singers and Instrumentalists
performing Israeli and American
music are available far various
organizations. Contact Bud Breitbarl
681-7212 or 448-2684 or Howard
Neu 895-3880 or 893-5343.
KKURASH.T
-
Phone 923-2461
Branch Office 7991 Johnson St.
Main Office 2429 Hollywood Blvd.
Phone 966-9300 or 947-3332 Toll Free
Stanley S. Kurash Our Large Staff of
and Naomi R. Kurash Qualified Associates
Ready To Servo You.
t
MARL0 RENTAL APTS.
HOLLYWOOD HILIS
fUKNISHtD AND UNFURNISHED
3500 POtK STRCET
Dade 625-4545 Broward 9893030
20 Different Bvitdintt
NOW OPEN
Formerly Lindy's Farms
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
MILK EGOS
790 E. Hallandale Boulevard
Open Doily & Sunday 8:30-5:30 P.M.
921-9529 WE DELIVER
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920-8705 *
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PATIENT CARE SERVICES


]
t
Friday, July 5, 1974
*Jt**tef> ffr>rl Page 11
Jews Suffer as Prelude to Nixon Visit
LONDON (JTA) With
PresidentNixon now in Moscow
to take f#t in his t!HM"iummit
conference with Soviet leaders,
the new wave of harassment and
repression of Jews seeking to
leave the USSR continued un-
abated while the rate of emigra-
tion remained at an extremely
low level, Jewish sources in the
Soviet Union report.
Id Chernovits, Albert Koltu-
nov, an official of the Jewish na-
tional lottery, was sentenced to
five and a half years in a strict
Israel Reports
Renewed Summer
Travel Interest
NEW YORK An increased
interest in travel to Israel is be-
ing reported by travel agents and
hotels in Israel, according to
Amram Zur, representative of the
Israel Ministry of Tourism for
North America.
Zur, wno recently returned
from a-trip to Israel, noted that
recent headlines, with their em-
phasis on peace, may be having
an impact on those potential
tourists who were holding back.
"Many of the new bookings be-
ing reported in Israel seem to
be coming from the European
continent, whose citizens are ap-
parently less affected by the
world economic dislocation than
the American public," said Zur.
Zur says that some of the
United States trave. agents are
reporting queries regarding Fall
travel. One effect of the newly
reauced tensions is that people
are now willing to plan further
ahead, he said.
regime prison for alleged brib-
ery.
'"ttt 'ArVD HIS wife, Genia, had
applied for exit visas to go to
Israel shortly before the charges
were brought.
Two other Jewish activists,
Yuri and Anna Berkovsky, of
Novosibirsk, were arraigned on
charges of speculation and illegal
possession of firearms which
carry minimum penalties of five
years imprisonment, the sources
repo:ted.
According to the sources, there
is not a shred of evidence that
the Berkovsky couple committed
the offenses they are accused of.
In Moscow, the trial of Viktor
Polsky on charges of reckless
driving continued after the court
rejected a defense motion for
dismissal on grounds of insuffi-
cient evidence
THE PRIVATE telephones of
Jewish activists in Moscow re-
mained disconnected and the
phones of Prof. Alexander Ler-
ner and Ilya Korenfeld have al-
ready been reallocated to non-
Jewish subscribers.
Another activist, Vitaly Rubin,
has been given 15 days to find a
job or face a year's imprison-
ment on charges of "parasitism,"
the sources reported.
Meanwhile, Jewish scientists
preparing to participate in an
international seminar scheduled
to be held in the apartment of
Alexander Voronel on June 27,
the day of Nixon's arrival, have
been called up for military serv-
ice although hitherto they had
been exempt.
JEWISH EMIGRATION from
the Soviet Union, which has been
running far behind last year's
Swiss says cheese.
Swiss says fondue.
'Swiss Knight says delicious ffiings imported from
'Switzerland: 6 foil-wrapped wedges of plain or as-
sorted Gruyere Cheese, perfect for snacks, parties,
lunch boxes. And for en-
tertaining, Swiss Knight
Fondue in a classic recipe
of Gruyere and Emmental
cheeses, white wine and
Kirsch. Swiss Knight*
CheeseSwiss Knight*
Cheese Fondue. More than
that you cannot say.
.Gerbor Cheese Co., Inc., Stamford, Connecticut 06905
rate, continued to decline.
Only 1,225 Jews left Russia in
May compared to the 1973 aver-
age of 3,000 departures a month,
the sources reported.
Supporters of Soviet Jewry
continued to react strongly to
the worsening situation in the
USSR.
The Washington Committee
for Soviet Jewry announced that
its members sought to disrupt
Soviet-U.S. telephonic communi-
cations through June 21 to pro-
test the disconnection of the
phones of Jewish dissidents in
Moscow.
The committee said it acted in
conjunction with groups through-
out the U.S.
A hunger strike began in front
of the Soviet Embassy in Wash-
ington in sympathy with the fast
of the Goldstein brothers in Tbi-
lis, Soviet Georgia, both physi-
cists who have been refused exit
visas and subjected to harass-
ment.
IN NEW YORK, Jewish organ-
izational leaders demonstrated
outside the Soviet airline office
Friday in an expression of sol-
idarity with Jews in Russia who
fasted on the fourth anniversary
of the Leningrad hijack trials.
Addressing a Jewish audience
in New York. Sen. Henry M
Jack-on U.S. government of having "de-
liberately attempted to misrepre-
sent to the American people"
what the issue is in the Jackson
Amendment linking U.S.-Soviet
trade to an easing of Soviet emi-
gration restrictions.
"I am not impressed when the
White House tries to dismiss the
wholesale violations of human
rights in the Soviet Union as
none of America's business,"
Jackson told the Jerusalem Great
Synagogue dinner at the Plaza
Hotel.
Jackson said that his amend-
ment, "far from intruding into
the internal affairs of the So-
viet Union, simply, conditions
eligibility for certain U.S. eco-
nomic concessions on respect for
the right to emigrate, which is
specifically affirmed in the Uni-
versal Declaration of Human
Rights and in other international
agreements which the' Soviet
Union itself has ratified."
%1 MB KfffBfl, Extcafhrt Director,
ttwitk W.Jfore ftdtration et r.rtater HcHtweo*
ai.i iwiii in...... '^!
What are all the active community minded people doing these
days? Meetings have endednearly everyone has had their donor
luncheon, elections, awards and honors. Vacations have started, chil-
dren are now in camp and with the summer rains upon us. it is even
difficult to find time to golf, swim or play tennis. So where are you
all?
From what I see, the involved neorl" are still involved planning
and developing programs for the fall. Meetings appear to be taking
place zt a more relaxed pace but just as often. Ideas are being ex-
pressed, innovations developed, dates reserved on the Community
Calendar, and each group is getting to work with new officers who. in
many cases, are together for the first time.
At the Federation, plans are being made for presentation to the
community of our new proposed By-Laws on August 11th along with
a new slate of officers, a new Board of Directors, and yes. even a new
name. The Cultural Committee of the Community Relations Commit-
tee is busy planning to participate in ticket sales for the Israeli Phil-
harmonic which will be in our area Oct. 3.
The Women's Leadership Institute and the Men's Young Leaders
Council are planning the;r programs for 1974-75. A new Jewish com-
munity chaplain has been employed for a one year pilot program to
provide chaolaincy service to unaffiliated Jews in our hospitals and
public institutions. A new assistant director will join our staff in
July. The Jewish Community Centers has developed senior adult pro-
grams for the summer and also tween and teen activities for our youth.
Camp Ka Dee-Man is running at capacity. There is already discus-
sion concerning next year's programs.
Jewish life, therefore, goes on. and the work of Federation and
all Jewish organizations exemplifies the continuity of our people.
Though this is a vacation period for some, it is a work period for
others. Our temples have hired new educational directors and prin-
cipals, new youth directors, new associate and assistant rabbis. AH of
these additions along with the ongoing staffs are for the purpose of
enriching our Jewish community.
Life augurs well for us. As the fastet growing community in tha
United States and with multiple thousands of Jewish people seeking
this area as their new home, the future looks bright and promising.
May your summer be full of productivity, relaxation and revital-
ization.
Cuisine Is A Gourmet's Delight
Dine often enough at La Chan
dellc, Nassau's most elegant culi-
nary rendezvous, and you'll swear
you've just travelled around the
world.
The impeccable dining room at
the posh Halycon Balmoral Hotel J
on Cable Beach with seating
for about 300 consistently
pleases guests with its tempting
of fin" wines and inter
national cuisine prepared to a
gourmet's delight. La Chandell.
i> ists the finest ambience of any
rest itirant In Nassau, being com
pletely European in concept.
The menus at La Chandelle
change daily. A typical week's
selections might include such
palate pleasera a-: avocado, smok-
ed salmon, a quiche or the chef,
ie (soups offer an imagina
tive selection West Indian
Curry, Mulllgatawney, Iced Brea<'
Fruit, Couch Chowder or Mines
trone.)
Under entrees you may dis-
cover Bahamian crawfish in s
number of versions, veal 'cordon
bleu', chicken kiev. shish kebal
and whatever fresh Bahamian fish
happens to be available at the
moment as well as excellent
imported steaks, chops and lamb.}
Couple all this with a supreme'
wine list which features labels of
some 50 wines currently available
in the cellar.
An imposing crystal chandelier
imported from Madrid glitters a
warm welcome to evening meals
at La Chandelle. The newly-refur-
bished dining room is spacious
and handsomely appointed. Else
where. Halcyon Balmoral has
three bars and offers room serv-
ice for everything from simple
snacks to five-course meals.
On the other side of the lush
Palm Patio, the more informal
Hibiscus Room has its own special
Halycon Balmoral Hotel on Cable Beach
nights usually once or twice
a week. One evening might be
Beefeater Night, featuring roast
beef with a distinct Scottish menu
to support i' and a gin or two.
one would imagine, to usher it
in Other national nights feature
food and wines from such charm-
ing, far-away locales at Italy and
Mexico.
Be sure to stick around for the
luscious Sunday buffet. Not only
Balmoral guests but visitors from
other hotels, and the Nassau
social circle gather for lunch to
the hypnotizing rhythm af a
steel band. Picture yourself sav-
voring roast suckling pig, roast
beef, outstanding hot and cold
specialities all in a truly mem-
orable dining atmosphere.
Dining al fresco on the Palm
Patio is a major attraction .
and once the moon replaces the
sun in the sky, there's dining
and dancing under the stars.
\\ hatever your pleasure fine
food, superb service, and an un
forgettable atmosphere are des-
tined to combine to give you an
evening of unmatched delight.
H


Page 12
*Jmisi>fk>ridriair? md stofar Hollywood
Friday Tol? 5, 1974

i
Belfast Jews Stand Fast in Face of War
:
Continued from Page 1
of--its population rrom emigration
since the U-cuMes began nearly
six years ago. arid Its marriage
and birth rates have dropped
dramatically.
Nevertheless. I counted over
70 coneregants in synagogue on
the Sabbath morning when the
general strike had just begun. It
is housed in an impressive and
beautiful building in a modern
style, orened in 1954. and sur-
rounded ly a small complex of
communufti buildings:
The scheme bears witness to
the optimism which once prevail-
ed regarding the future of Bel-
fast's community. Today, there
are inevitably some doubts about
the wisdom of the original proj-
ect.
IN THE absence of a qualified
minister, the service was ably
conducted by the chazan who had
practically dragged himself from
his sick-bed. and a delightful
touch was added by the en-
thusiastic participation of several
small boys.
The dkit*a-whieh. recently led
to the resignation of the rabbi
has left a deep impression and
exemplifies the problems which
face a small community which
cannot afford the luxury of more
than one synagogue.
If the incumbent is to do his
duty and maintain the unity of
the community, he must clearly
have such qualities of diplomacy
Mideast Technology Gap Closes
TEL AVIV(JTA)A Haifa Technion scientist joined Israeli
political figures here in expressing their fears that the American
decision to supply Egypt with nuclear potentialities would endanger
the area and put it into a nuclear race.
Former Defense Minister Mo-
; she Dayan. just returned from a
i visit to the U.S., repeated his
warning that if Egypt is able to
exploit the nuclear cooperation
agreement for non-peaceful pur-
poses in the future, then Nixon's
I Tisit will go down as "a fatal and
historic mistake."
"AL*. I can say is that I was
surprised by the announcement,"
i Dayan told reporters at Ben
i Gurion Airport, when he return-
ed from a ten-day visit to North
America.
In Haifa, Prof. Joseph Rom,
of the Technion Aeronautic De-
partment, said that the U.S.-
Egyptian agreement on nuclear
cooperation will substantially ad-
vance Egypt's ability to reach an
atomic option.
Any attempt to present the
agreement in its peaceful indus-
trial aspect and to evade the
strategic aspects of this agree-
ment would be a grave mistake,
he said
HE RECALLED that the Rus-
ranged "Skud" missiles, which are
tians with the 300 kilometer-
ranged "Skud" missiles, which are
adaptable to carry a nuclear war
Solel Sisterhood
Plans Activities
For Coming Year
Temple Solel's Sisterhood and
Men's Club are busy planning
many new activities for the com-
ing year, including Temple Solel's
presentation of the Broadway
Musical "Paiama Game" under
the direction of Mrs. Stanley
Emas.
Sisterhood is extremely enthu-
siastic about the success of its
"service to the community" proj-
ects. According to Mrs. Robert
Frazin. chairman of the taping
for the blind, the Broward Com-
munity College blind students
are most grateful for the a3=ist
anee.
Another project is visiting the
homes for the aged. Mrs. Anne
Brudno is chairman of the Com-
mittee.
Sisterhood is planning a mem
bership coffee in July, accord-
ing to membership vice presi-
dent Mrs. Arthur Kail. A rum-
mage sale is planned for August.
Prize Goes To
MD Researcher
HAIFA T!)e first Reuven
Ziegler Medical Research Prize
for "an original contribution of
a young medical researcher" was
awarded here at a ceremony held
at the Medical School of the
Technion Israel Institute of
Technologv.
The Prize bears a cash award
of IL 3.000.
The winner is Dr. Shlomo Raz,
of the Urology Department of
Hadassah Hospital, who was cited
for his experimental work in
urology concerning neural con-
trol of the lower urinary tract.
He is continuing this work
with an eye toward applying it
clinically in the rehabilitation of
persons with injuries of the
spine who have difficulty con-
head, and now the Americans are
granting the Egyptians that know-
how that would enhance their
technological ability and scientific
capabilities to reach a nuclear
option.
The agreement announced by
President Nixon would greatly
close the scientific and techno-
logic gap between Israel and the
Egyptians in the field of nuclear
science.
Prof. Rom said that in his
opinion Israel has to voice her
anxieties over the far-reaching
implications of the Egyptian-
American agreement and to ex-
press unreserved support in those
groups of the American Congress
who do see the dangers of the
agreement.
THE AGREEMENT, he said
introduces elements of a nucleai
race to the Middle East.
He recalled that under Amer-
ican pressure Israel has stated
it would not advance the nuclear
option" in the Middle East.
But now the Americans are
initiating a contribution to the
Egyptians that would close the
scientific and technologic gap be-
tween Israel and Egypt, and this
must be carefully examined as
far as strategic implications are
concerned.
It is not the question of some
quantities of uranium that may
be stolen.
IT IS THE scientific and tech-
nologic know-how that will be ac-
cumulated by the Egyptians and
would enable her to reach a nu-
clear option in a shorter time
than without that knowledge.
Moreover, he stressed, the
knowledge needed for the opera-
tion of a nuclear reactor for
peaceful r-urno^es is similar 19
that needed for war purposes.
Another senior scientist said
that a similar agreement with Is-
rael may be of demonstrative
value only as Israel already has
the knowledge in this field.
He warned that "small scale"
nuclear weapons may even reach
the hands of terrorist groups.
PROF. NAFTALI Shafrir, head
of the nuclear Engineering De-
partment at the Technion, said
that at an international sympo-
sium on means of controlling
nuclear reactors for peaceful pur-
poses, it was clearly concluded
that tjiere is no problem in evad-
ing control of international
bodies, and in the long run. with
some patience, it is possible to
accumulate the necessary mate-
rials for other purposes than
peaceful.
Dayan noted that the agree-
ment with Egypt was not wholly-
negative in that it would increast
American influence in the Aral
world.
AT THE same time, he stressed
that the mere fact that the agree
ment provides for the U.S. super
vision indicates that the nuclear
energy produced by the proposed
plant could be used to produce
nuclear weapons.
He also expressed concern that
the U.S. would not always be in
a position to exercise its control
over the use Egypt makes of the
nuclear plant.
He cited the example of India
as a country that has received
foreign aid to produce nuclear
energy for peaceful purposes and
has now managed to produce its
own atomic device.
Apart from that. Dayan point-
ed out that Egypt has no short-
age of energy sources in view of
the recent oil strikes, and the
vast hydroelectric potential of
the Aswan Dam which has not'.
vpt h"-"! fnllv exnlnit^d.
and leadership as will make him
acceptable to the various strands
whieh compose the warp and
weft of the average body of Jew-
ish opinion.
IN EFFECT, this is a plea for
the introduction of a more en-
lightened approach ihan has been
evident up to the present. Bel-
fart has shown that it deserves
this kind of consideration.
No member of the Jewish com-
munity has. fortunately, become
a physical casualty of the violence
which staiks the streets of Ulster
but the dangers are ever present,
and meetings and social gather-
ings have had to be seriously
curtailed, especially at night.
Jews have played an active
and honorable part in the civic
life of Belfast, but in the present
sad situation they believe that the
best contribution they can make
is to mind their own business
and pray that the fratricidal
strife will end.
They are fond of relating the
common experience of many who.
on being stopped in the street
by a freelance militiaman and
asked whether he is Catholic or
Protestant, will reply that he is
a Jew and will then be met with
the further question "Yes, but
are you a Catholic Jew or a Prot-
estant Jew?"
I WAS told the same story by
a Quakerwith the substitution
of agnostic for Jew.
Perhaps this serves to illustrate
the remarkable resemblance of
the Ulster problem*\ Palestine. Catholics and Pft>te>
Utttl are not fighting about
theologyas they did at the time
of the Reformationany more
than Israelis and Arabs are in
conflict about the Bible versus
the Koran.
In each case, the quarrel is
about who should rule a small
country which each claims is
theitve by right. Both conflicts il-
lustrate the problems, as Harold
Jackson identified them in one of
the Minority Rights Group re-
ports, of the "double minority."
The Protestants are a majority
in Ulster and a minority in Ire-
land as a whole. The Jews are a
majority in Israel, and a minority
in the Arab lands. All are backed
and supported by co-religionist
sympathizers abroad.
OF COURSE, there are also
wide differences in the two cases,
especially in the historical back-
soil, the Arabs hold the same na-
tion responsible for granting the
Balfour Declaration which first
enabled lewish settlement to take
place on a massive scale.
Is the analogy true or false?
If it is true then we have perhaps
some lessons to learn from the
ground. But it is worth noting
that if the Irish consider the
English were responsible for
planting the Protestants on their
tragedy of Ulster. Fear of
domination, whether real or
imaginary, not reason, is the
cause of most suffering.
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.'I


r, July 5. 1974
+Je*lst fk)ridliar) cad Shofar of Hollywood
Page 13
[ero Says New Preemptive Strike Possible
SL AVIV (JTA) A Yom
pur War hero said here that
el would have to launch war
(inst Egypt if that country be-
to develop nuclear weapons.
en. (Ret.) Ariel Sharon,
kse division in Sinai smashed
rugh Egyptian lines to estab-
an Israeli bridgehead on the
bank of the Suez Canal last
>ber, told the graduating
at the Haifa Technion that
el would have no choice bul
vage preventive war if Egypt,
tin a few years, is on th
(e of producing atomic weap-
lis would not be necessary
the Americans not agreed to
yide Egypt with a nuclear
fetor, said Sharon, a Likud .MK.
& ft ft
ZOA National Convention
JEW YORK Nearly 1,000
bgates from throughout the
Ited States attended the 77th
iional convention of the Zionist
kanization of America here
High Sunday, June 30, at the
York Hilton Hotel. Leading
Flators, addressed the conven-
i. including Sen. Jacob K.
pts. Sen. Gale W. McC.ee, Sen.
ert A. Taft, Jr., and Cong.
|en E. Reid.
en. Javits addressed the open-
session on Thursday evening
the Middle East situation. Her-
L. Weisman, president of
ZOA gave the keynote ad-
hs to the delegates.
lacques 1orc*yner, a past pres-
ent of the ZOA, addressed
convention Saturday night.
Max Nussbaum, another past
ssident presided.
The Big Gifts Luncheon was
held on Friday. Cong. Reid was
the guest speaker. On Friday
afternoon the delegates visited
the ZOA House, the new home of
ZOA's national headquarters. An
Oneg Shabbat was held Friday
evening. Rabbi David Polish of
Evanston, 111., and Samuel H.
Wang speaker
Another Oneg Shabbat took
place on Saturday afternoon
with the participation of Gideon
Patt. Member of the Knesset.
The convention Danquet in
honor of the outgoing president
of the ZOA, Herman L. Weisman
was held on Sunday, Dr. Emanuel
Neumann made the presentation
to Weisman. Sen. Taft, was the
guest speaker at the banquet.
ft ft ft
Open the Doors
PHILADELPHIA President
Nixon was urged by U.S. Sen.
Edward M. Kennedy to press for
"open doors for Soviet Jews"
when he meets Soviet leaders in
Moscow.
Appearing last week in Phila-
delphia before nearly 2.000 per-
sons at a Soviet Jewry Solidarity
Assembly sponsored by the Jew-
ish Community Relations Council
(JCRC) of Greater Philadelphia,
Kennedy described his dramatic
midnight meeting with Soviet ac-
tivists on his visit to Moscow
only weeks ago.
"After listening to them, I
bring you a message," he told
the crowd. "They remain com-
mitted to their ideal. They re-
main firm in their faith. And
they remain determined to live
in Israel in freedom."
ft ft ft
Withhold U.S. Recognition
NEW YORK The Anti-Defa-
mation League of B'nai B'rith
has called upon the United
States to withhold "diplomatic
recognition and formal relations"
from the German Republic (East
Germany) unless "a firm and de-
tailed advance commitment" is
made to pay reparations to vic-
tims of the Nazi era.
In a letter to Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger, Seymour
Graubard, national chairman of
the League, pointed out that the
German Democratic Republic has
never accepted its responsibility
as a successor state to the Third
Reich for Hitler's criminal acts
" made any redress to his vic-
tims.
He contrasted this attitude
with that of the West German
Government wh'ch, over a period
of many years, has made substan-
tial reparation payments to Is-
rael and to individual victims of
Nazi cruelty who survived the
Holocaust.
ft ft ft
Collection on Holocaust
BINGHAMTON, N.Y.A spe-
rjajl collection of books, docu-
ments, and other scholarly mate-
rials pertaining to the Holocaust,
in which millions of European
Jews died during World War II,
has been founded at the State
University of New York at Bing-
hamton.
Named in memory of Mrs.
Moses (Belle) Margolis, a Bing-
hamton-area resident for more
than 50 years, the Belle Margolis
Library Collection has received
generous financial assistance
from the Margolis family and
friends.
Mrs. Margolis came to Bing-
hamton in 1923 from Poland with
her husband, the Rev. Moses
Margolis. Rev. Margolis has long
been associated with Temple Is-
rael, which was located in Bing-
hamton for many years before
moving to its current site in Ves-
tal in 1968.
The Margolises lost 32 close
relatives in the Holocaust.
ft ft ft
Secret Contact with Arafat
ZURICH Citing "unimpeach-
able sources." the Neue Zuricher
Zeitung reports that the U.S. is
MINDUN
elly Dancer Vs. Yad Vashem
I*. onUnued from Page 4
SINCE FROM Jerusalem came
th the "Thou Shalt Not" in
first place "Thou Shalt
t" ii as Jewish as apple pie is
nerican the President was
|ng challenged to demonstrate
it. as a Christian, he had learn-
J the Jewish "Thou Shalt Not"
(well as the Jews know it them-
|ves.
Vt Yad Vashem, where the Hit-
rian holocaust is documented
the dark and sinster terms
[deserves, the Israelis served
the President an implied
rning against his permitting a
bond such holocaust as a con-
|uence of his new found
endships with Sadat, Assad &
i"OU COULD hear the voice of
hovah in it all. It was a solemn
basion perhaps too solemn
the President, who was being
Quired momentarily to subro-
the joys of his triumphant
idle East tour to the dour
imand of the Higher Hand of
was a difficult struggle he
to wage between his Chris-
imperative to prove himself
Irally by responding to the re- j
pous intensity of the moment
Jewish terms and his deeper
derstanding that it was really
political moment,
low can all of that best a bel-
dancer? It couldn't and
jln't and the President's face
owed it. In Cairo, it showed
pllation and playful embarrass-
ent. In Jerusalem, there was a
Sm and tortured look, boredom
Id forebearance.
|THE DISTINCTION between
lily-dancer and Yad Vashem is
)-: defined by Matthew Arnold
his "Hebraism and Hellen-
al though Arnold's is a
idy of the Jewish and Greek
litions, not Egyptian, and
sre is a huge difference be
en the Greek and Egyptian,
Greek serving as a founda-
knstone of western civilization.
(Still, Greece and Egypt were
both pagan, both anthropomor-
phic and polytheistic. and the
Greeks especially were poets of
toe flesh.
For Arnold in his essay, the
primary Jewish, discovery was
sin. the "Thou Shalt Not" fabri-
cated on Mt. Sinai.
SIGML'ND FREUD, in his
"Moses and Monotheism." says of
it that the Jewish Thou Shalt
Not," the Jewish revelation in
the desert, is the source of mod-
ern anti-Semiti-*
Judaism, mo.ified by the early
Christians, se' the buidcn of the
Sinaitic discovery on the shoul-
ders of Europe's pagans, who
were essentially Greek (and
Egyptian) in their perceptions of
life and the flesh.
In accepting the revelation of
Christ, the pagan-Christians pun-
ished the practitioners of the
Sinaitic revelation, the Jews, as
the root cause of their strange
burden.
THEY COULD not rebel
against Christianity, but they
could lash out at the Jews as the
progenitors of Christianity.
The belly-dancei In Cairo was
pure pagan, and Nixon's face in
still squarely backing UN Resolu-
tion 242 and favors the participa-
tion at the Geneva Peace Confer-
ence of Arab terrorist leader
Yassir Arafat.
Furthermore, according to the
newspaper, certain high-ranking
American representatives have
already established a secret con-
tact with Arafat.
The U.S. State Department is
increasingly persuaded that in
any final solution of the Arab-
Israel conflict, the legitimate
rights of the Palestinians will
nave to be taken into account,
according to the paper
ft ft ft
Telephone Service Terminated
HARTFORD. Conn. A tele-
phone service for a Bridgeport
Nazi group offering recorded
anti-Semitic and anti-Black mes-
sages was terminated June 17,
according to an announcement
by the New England Telephone
Co.
The utility previously had
taken the position that it could
not terminate the service with-
out being ordered to do so by the
State Public Utilities Commis-
sion, which had received many
complaints.
The commission said that with-
out prosecution of "an appropri-
ate report" to the telephone
company that such use of its
service was unlawful, it could not
order termination of the service.
Florida Abroad In Israel
Program Beginning July 8
Cairo was pagan tempered by the
revelation of Christ (the titilla-
tion vs. the playful embarrass-
ment).
Yad Vashem in Jerusalerr v as
pure Sinaitic -- not only a s"m-
boi of Nazi genocide but of the
Jewish "Thou Shalt Not."
N'ixon's face at Yad Vashem
was the terrain or, which the war
in him raged between:
Paganism on the one hand
and the Sinaitic Christian revela-
tions on the other the Mat-
thew Arnold view;
Christianity on the one hand
repelled by the Sinaitic as for-
eign to Christianity; and Chris-
tianity on the other as repugnant
to paganism (Nixon's tortured
look, his boredom, his forebear-
ance) the Freudian view.
IN ALL of this, the meaning
of Yad Vashem as a political
movement was lost in the shuf-
fle.
And. at least for that brief in-
stant in history, moral impera-
tives won out over flesh, for in
Cairo President Nixon had to
pretend he wasn't enjoying him-
self; and in Jerusalem, he had to
pretend that he was.
TALLAHASSEE Application
forms are now available for the
Florida Abroad in Israel Pro-
gram at the University of Haifa,
Israel. The program is to begin
July 8 and continue through the
academic year.
The forms may be obtained
from F.orida State University
campus coordinator Dr. William
Spencer in the Department of
History, or from the campus
committee in charge of recruit-
ment and evaluation. Commitee
members, in addition to Dr.
Spencer, are Dr. F. E. Asher,
economics; Dr. Bruno Linder,
chemistry; Dr. Monte Palmer,
government and Dr. Richard Ru-
benstein. religion.
Any student with sophomore
or above standing, attending a
Florida supported university or
junior college with a "B" aver-
age, is eligible to apply.
The cost of the program in-
cludes a $3,000 basic fee and an
State University System, for
academic course work and field
additional $500 charged by the
study taken under the Florida
faculty leading the program. The
entire cost includes round trip
air fare, room and board for an
entire year, some medical insur-
ance and tuition.
The program is being admin-
istered by th.- University of Flor-
ida and includes a one-week
orientation period in Gainesville
before departure for Israel by
chartered jet. The summer
months will be spen' on a kib-
butz affiliated with the Univer-
sity of Haifa and students will
live in dormitories or private
homes when September classes
begin.
Dr. Irving Goffman of the Uni-
versity of Florida will accom-
pany the group this summer and
Dr. Spencer of Florida State will
become the program director in
the fall.
PALMER'S -
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Price Increase Effective Jan. 1st, 1974


Page 14
*"J&*isti /Jrrerfinr omd Shofar of Hollywood
Friday July 5. 1974
Israel Intensifies Attacks on Lebanese
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON(JTA) Press
reponts from Lebanon that Israel
has Been intensifying its attacks
on Palestinian terrorists because
President Nixon gave the Israelis
a "green light" were angrily
denounced by the State Depart-
ment here.
The question was raised by a
newsman following Israeli raids
on terrorist camps in southern
Lebanon. The State Department,
however, deplored the continuing
violence in the Middle East in the
wake of the Israeli raids.
DEPARTMENT spokesman
Robert Anderson declared that
"the United States has not given
a green light to anybody. As you
well know the Secretary's (Kis-
singer's) six-month effort and the
President's trip show they are
bending every effort to bring
about a negotiated peace in the
Middle East."
Anderson added the American
fan is to encourage the moderates
In the area as indicated by the j
disengagement accords by Egyp'.
and Syria with Israel.
COMMENTING directly on the j
raids, Anderson said. "We de-
plore very strongly the continuing
action and reaction of cycles of
violence across the Lebanese I
border."
When a reporter suggested that
Israel is seeking to stir up trou- |
ble and undo the work of Presi- 1
dent Nixon and Secretary of
Beth Shalom's
New Officers
Are Installed
Temple Beth Shalom held its
annual meeting June 13. The I
general membership elected its
officers and trustees for the
coming year, and they were in-
stalled by Dr. Morton Malavsky,
spiritual leader of the temple."
Dr. Malavsky presented his an-
nual report, and Dr. Fred Blu-
menthal, who had been installed
as the 1974-75 president of the
congregation, expressed the con-
gregants' gratitude to Dr. Malav-
sky for his 11 years of service
to the temple, both as spiritual
leader and administrator.
Jack Shapiro was named hon-
orary president for life. Serving
with Dr. Blumenthal will be Dr.
Samuel Meline. Morton Levin
and Jack Berman. vice presi-
dents; Murray Cohen, treasurer;
Curt J. Schleimer, financial sec-
retary; Seymour Saniet. record-
ing secretary; Edward Kaplan,
corresponding secretary, and
Maurice Segall. assistant secre-
tary.
Serving as trustees wiil be Dr.
Earl Barron, George Barron,
Harry Cornfield. Norman Eiser.-
berg, Herman Ernstoff, Jerome
Friedman. Walter Gray, Frank
Gronowctter, Harry Indich, Rich-
ard Miller, Reuben Schneider.
Dr. Jerry Siegel. Bernard Titt-
man and William Wetser.
The advisory board inclu ies
Aaron Cohen, David l)u:
Herman Xiad. Dr. Barry Portnoy
and Is-io M -
l* :. 'I rni" i;..
r.-
Terrorists
Strike At \
Nahariyya
By Special Report
JERUSALEM "We will
continue a persistent and re-
lentless war" against the
terrorism of Arab guerrillas.
That was the reaction of
Israel Premier Yitzhak Ra-
bin to the latest terrorist
attack on Israel early Tues-
day.
THREE ISRAELI soldiers
killed three Arab terrorists,
who apparently infiltrated
from Lebanon, into the town
of Nahariyya.
Before the soldiers killed
them, the terrorists succeed-
ed in killing three Israeli ci-
vilians and a soldier. Eight
other Israelis were wounded
in the gun battle.
Nahariyya is a resort on
the Mediterranean Sea seven
miles from the Lebanese
border.
The Israeli civilian dead
included two chiidren, who
had been held hostage, and
a woman.
THE DEPARTMENT had also
deplored "the great loss of inno-
cent lives." Warren added that
"we deplore the continuing cycle
of violence" and the loss of "in-
* nocent lives." *
Israel intensified its air at-
tacks on terrorist strongholds in
southern and western Lebanon on
June 20 and identified in detail
the targets hit to refute Lebanese
claims that the air raids were
intended to terrorize civilians.
The Israeli jets struck for a third
and fourth consecutive day and
returned safely to their bases.
SAM-7 ground-to-air missile fire
was encountered over some of the
targets, a military communique
said.
A COMMUNIQUE issued June
20 said Israeli jets attacked ter-
rorist bases in southern Lebanon
for 20 minutes, beginning at
10:30 a.m. local time. A later
communique reported a 75-min-
ute strike at terrorist bases and
installations in western Lebanon.
The targets included terrorist
training camps, bunkers, garages
and command posts, according to
the communique.
Lebanon has c'aimed heavy
civilian casualties and property
damage from the Israeli air
raids. Israeli sources noted that
the terrorists deliberately locate
their bases in refugee camps or
near villages as a shelter from
air attacks.
THE COMMUNIQUE stressed
that all targets hit were clearly
identified and that every pos-
sible Drecaution was taken to
avoid damage to civilian pro-
According to the communique,
the targets of the air strikes in-
cluded: El Burj-el-Shimali, a com
mand post of the Popular Front
for the Liberation of Palestine-
General Command near Tyre on
the Lebanese coast.
The PFLP-GC, headed by Ah-
med Jilbril, is tUT terrofbt-'or-
ganization responsible for the
Apr. 11 Kiryat Shemona mas-
sacre; Ein el Hilba, near Sidon,
a command post of the Popular
Liberation Army; an El Fatah
garage and an encampment of the
"Armed Struggle" organization, a
group that infiltrates terrorists
into Israel.
Also. Ras el Din. near Rash-
diyeh in the Tyre area, a tent en-
campment of an El Fatah opera-
tional unit; and at Rashidyeh, a
camp of the Popular Liberation
Army and three terrorist bunk-
ers north of the town.
Nuclear Deal Hits Flack on Hill
THE TERRORISTS at-
tacked about midnight on
Monday, racing through the
streets of Nahariyya and
throwing handgrenades.
Army officers snouted to
the terrorists in an effort to
persuade them to give up.
They launched an assault
when the terrorists refused.
The Arab raid was on an
apartment building, and the
soldiers shot their way into
the building from the roof.
State Henry A. Kissinger, Ander-
son reported: "I have absolutely
no comment on that speculation."
Asked to comment on the Is-
raeli raids, White House spokes-
man Gerald Warren referred
newsmen to a statement by the
State Department which said
"Violence seeds the climate of
hatred which works against the
climate of any peace settlement."
FILLING IN
BACKGROUND
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON(JTA)The United States-Egyptian agreement
to provide Egypt with nuclear technology and fuel for peaceful pur-
poses, and a similar agreement with Israel, announced by President
Nixon during his stay in Israel, evoked reactions at the Capitol rang-
ing from hesitancy to outright opposition.
Qualified sources indicated the ._. ,, r ,
agreement with Egypt announc-
ed in Cairo by President Nixon
before his departure for Saudi
Arabia and Damascus on his Mid-
east tour, will undergo sharp
scrutiny and may ultimately fail
of approval.
BUT THE State Department
said it had consulted with key
congressional figures and found
no objections from them.
Rep. Melvin Price (D., 111.)
chairman of the Joint Congres-
sional Committee on Atomic En-
ergy, said the agreement would
be examined thoroughly. The
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee and the House Foreign
Affairs Committee also are re-
quired to approve such agree-
Religious
rices
Serv
Midweek 'Sunday School'
Seen At Temple In Pines
The Temple in the Pines Re-
ligloui and Hebrew School Board,
under the leadership of Mrs!
Martin Weisz, is considering an
innovative concept in class sched-
uling. The plan is to eliminate
all week-end classes, thus "Sun-
day School" would be held one
day mid-week.
Th:s innovation would permit
family week-end outings, avoid
early rising Sunday mornings,
and conflict with "Dulphin Foot-
'" : -'" It is anticipated
that this plan will enable fam-
Uies -o roend additional time to-
Parenl i desiring further
int" bool may
'-' Prin P I, Mrs. Rhona
DADE
Rabbi
Irving
3/
K

HAIUNDAIE
HALLANPALE JEWISH CENTER
(Conaervwtive). 416 NE 8th Ave
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz. Canto*
Jacob Danziaer.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI (Temole) of NORTH
18801 NE 22n<; Av. Reform
RalDh P. Kinfltley. Cantor
Shulkea.
NORTH BROWARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON.
OREQATICN. (R'-.rm> 3501 Uni.
varsity Dr.. Cora, -Springt. Rabbi
Max Witz.
HOUYWOOD
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
(Orthodox). 3891 Sterlinq Rd op-
ponte Ho.lywood Hills High School
President Dr. Frank Stein.
Saturday, v n m
TEMPLE BETH EL /Reform) 1?11 S
14th Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffe.
BETH SHALOM fTemptel Con.erva.
tive. 4601 Arthur S1.. Rabbi Morton
Maiavakv. Cantor irvinq Gold
M.PoLE BETH AHM 310 SW 62nd Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi
Salomon Benerroche.
TEMPLE SOLEl (Liberal). 5001
Thomaa St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Rob-
ert Fraxin.
TE,%!PLE S'NAI 'ContervoL/e) 1201
Jchnaon St. Rabbi David Shipiro.
Cantor Yer-.uda H..lbraur. ">
MMtAUM
T!oPL!w :3-PhEk, ffoiwervativej
Oraain 35,h St- Raot" Avrom
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE P>NES (Con.erv..
tive) Pmea Middle School. 200 Ni
Rahh9a.* RdiV p""">k. Pinel
Rabbi Aaron Shapero.
ments.
Three Senators who are mem-
bers of the Senate Foreign Rela-
tions Committee George Me-
Govern (D., S.D.), Charles Percy
(R.. III.) and Clifford Case, (R.,
N.J.) expressed negative reac-
tions.
McGovern said he opposed the
agreement in principle and said
President Nixon had no right to
commit the United States to
such a project without prior Con-
gressional approval.
Sen. Percy said that "while I
understand that Israel will be
provided the same technology
and equipment, I am deeply con-
cerned about the introduction of
nuclear Capabilities in the re-
gion."
Percy said that Egypt, twice in
seven years, "has attacked the
State of Israel and the nations of
the area have waged four wars in
the past 25 years."
Sen, Case was angered by the
abruptness with which he was in-
formed by the State Department
about the agreement and indi-
cated it could represent a very-
major change in U.S. policy.
AN AIDE said that if the nu-
clear agreement was part of the
disengagement process and has
not been communicated to the
Foreign Relations Committee.
"somebody is in real hot soup''
because the Case Act requires all
information on such agreements.
Sen. Jacob K Javiti (!!. X.Y.)
said the agreement "must be re-
ceived with grave reservations,"
adding it marked "a very
policy decision which could in-
volve the survival f Israel and
leeurity of the
!'., '
Sen. Henry M. Jackson (D.,
Wash), a member of the Joint
Committee on Atomic Energy,
said it was "a terrible shock that
the government would bring in
nuclear power plants where ter-
rorists operate with impunity."
SEN. EDWARD Kennedy (D.,
Mass.) said the announcement
raised a number of questions
that needed to be thoroughly ex-
plored by Congress "before any
final agreement is concluded."
Sen. John Pastore, (D., R.I.)
vice chairman of the Joint Com-
mittee, said Egypt should ratify
the 1967 global treaty against the
spread of nuclear weapons be-
fore the proposed technical aid
is approved.
Critics of the proposal ques-
tioned Egypt's trustworthiness,
noting that the rapprochement
between the U.S. and Egypt is
virtually brand new.
When the State Department
was asked what the result would
be if the Moslem Brotherhood
overthrew the government of
Egyptian President Sadat, a high
departmental source said he was
not prepared to make a judg-
ment.
BIT HE insisted that the In-
ternational Atomic Energy Agen-
cy and the U.S. Atomic Energy
Commission had safeguards
which would be incorporated in
the Egyptian agreement.
A top State Department offi-
cial acknowledged that Sadat had
asked for a nuclear plant in
January when Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger was negotiating
the Israeli Egyptian disengage-
ment accord.
However, when the official was
asked directly if the nuclear
technology plan was a part of
the disengagement process, he
hedged his reply. He said Egyp-
tian specialists were in Washing-
ton in late April on the project
AT THAT time, the Depart-
ment reported, Israeli experts
were here too, presumably for
the sane reasons. Officials said
two teams knew of each oth-
ii presence here.
Department officials said they
knew President Nixon and Is-
raeli Premier Yitzhak Rabin
would announce an agreement
in Uar to that with Egypt.
However, the officials said
Baud! Arabia and Syria had not
obtained such accords.
SUNDAY, JULY 7
Younf Professionals & Professional, ll-Seminar-8 pm_
SATi?RDAYfjUI.Y,i3'''1 ^^ ******* ""* *"""" "M*
SUNHAY^'u* *"""*-* PHoHywood.
Young Professionals & Professional IILive Band Dance
8 p.m.Gatsby's Restaurant, Hileah.
FRIDAY, JULY 19
Young Professionals L Professional; IISwim/Dance Party
8 p.m.Lenny's Hideaway. Miami Springs.
* i
15 TAMUZ 7:56 \
CANDLELIGHTING TIMF <
DRS. PECK a
SIDNEY J.
GLAZER. P. A.
PECK. M. D.
Bar Mitzvah
HENRY SCHULTZ
Henry, son of Mr. and Mrs
Robert Schultz of Temple Solel,
w:ll be Bar Mitzvah, Saturday
July 13, in Brookline, Mass.
VICTOR GLAZER. M. D.
APE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE ASSOCIATION OF
ALLAN R. KATZ. M. D.
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
OBSTETRICS a GYNECOLOGY
AT
1111 NORTH 35th AVENUE
HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33021
V
HOUH8-y APPOINTMfNT
TILCPHONI
OFFICE *al-2IOO



tKot'ert
Its Back
Friday, July 5. 1974
* lrW# V '- I :;|- ': ;r!:| ;; ..
To the Ozarks
For Sen. Fulbright
i\F SEN. J. William Fulbright,
^ toppled from the Senate by
Dale Bumpers after 29 >ears of
service in that select club, Wal-
ter Lippmann once asserted:
"There is no one else who is so
powerful and also so wise: and
if there were any question of re-
moving him from public life, it
would be a national calamity."
Vet the world-renowned chair-
man of the Senate Foreign Rela-
tions Committee has not only
been removed from his seat of
power but washed out by a po-
litical tidal wave.
AND THE nation waits to see
how his 73-year-old successor,
Sen. John Sparkman. '.he Alaba-
man who. didn't make it to the
top as Adlai Stevenson's running
mate in 1952, will work out.
Contradictions have been
deeply woven into Sen. Ful-
bright's career. For the Jewish
community, his icy attitude to-
wards Israel remains a sorrow- '
ful puzzle.
How could one who had the
ingenuity and the vision to con-
vert government funds realized
from the sale of leftover World
War II materials into the Ful-
brlght Fellowships be so myopic
about a Holocaust harrowed peo-
ple struggling to be free and se-
cure?
HOW COULD a scholarly Sen-
ator with a first class mind rele-
gate Israel to such a low place
among the nations of the world?
Where did he get the b-.ass to
Insist that the Senate was sub-
servient to Israel?
Why did tax deductions for
Americans giving to the State of
Israel fill him with such rancor?
Perhaps now that he has been
removed from the senatorial
scene, we should summon a bit
of the fund of our charity and
give him credit for that which
deserves commendation. When
the passions of demagogues rip-
ped away at fundamental Amer-
ican civil liberties. Mr. Fulbright
was both courageous and elo-
quent.
EARLY IN his career in the
House, he was one of only 94
members of that body to vote to
dissolve the offensive Dies Com-
mittee, then known as the House
un-Ame:ican Activities Commit-
tee.
He stood up like a soldier
gainst the diabolical behavior
of Joe McCarthy, fluffing off
that mountebank's idiotic refer-
ences to him as Senator Haif-
bnght.
And nobody sounded a more
stirring challenge to sweep Mc-
Carthyism from the American
scene than Sen. Fulbright did
when he warned in 1954: "The
swinish blight of anti-inteliec-
tualism is now a force in this
country as once it was endemic
in Fascist Italy and Germany and
as it is endemic today in Soviet
Russia."
He could sail into a McCarthy
yet keep comfortable company
with those who took their stand
at schoolhouse doors to block in-
tegration.
He signed the infamous South-
ern Manifesto when Senators
Gore and Kefauver did not; and
he joined willingly to fiiiDuster
FEPC legislation to a temporary
death.
WHEN DOROTHY Thompson
beheld Mr. Fu:biight early in his
career as lawmaker, she exclaim-
ed: "This man is destined for
greatness."
Is it possible that she left with
him then a pet gremlin an
anti-Israel fetish, guaranteed to
last a long season in the Senate?
OcywjoMr */j* d*-riet>
man
Babylon to Miami Via Jamaica
440ABYLON, by James Wellard (New York,
Schocken Books, $2.95, 224 pp.) is a story
that makes archaeology, cryptology, history", and
some Biblical accounts come alive.
The author's credentials as a scholar are
sound. Although some of his interpretations
mizht not be to the liking of Orthodox, his rea-
soning is presumptively correct.
MANY POSITIVE and negative injunctions
WOM incorporated in the Bible and prophetical
writings by Moses and other divinely inspired
writers in order to prevent the Jews from adopt-
in.; the practices of th idolatrous peoples sur-
rounding them in the Promised Land.
To understand many parts of the Eible. one
must study not only rabbinical exegesis but also
the mores and cultures of the neighboring civi-
lizations. Wellard casts new and interesting lights
on the Book of Daniel and on some of Jeremiah's
cautions.
SAMUEL J. HURWITZ was a professor of his-
tory and the recipient of many grants to pursue
his work on the history of "Jamaica" < New York,
Praeger Publishers, S9.50, 273 pp.).
His widow, Edith, is credited as co-author of
the book. The history is a pedestrian account
characterized by deficiencies and inadequacies.
The role of the Jew in Jamaica's first two cen-
turies of development is much greater than the
i. i
What God Seems to a Youngster
authors indicate.
THE AUTHORS fail to identify the early
Portuguese as Jews, which they were, or to note
their place at different times in the societal
stratum.
It is disappointing to note the lack of an in-
terdisciplinary approach to historiography and
the failure to discuss the ethnic integration of
the population groups and the sociological forces
which hindered integration of Blacks and Jews.
One of the few interesting points made is that
when the free Jamaican Negroes became the
equal of the whites, they adopted the anti-Semi-
tism of the white Chritians.
"THE DEEP South States of America" by
Neal R. Peirce (New York, W. W. Norton & Co.,
$12.05, 528 pp.) is required reading of the people
in Dade County. The sub-title of the book reveals
the purposes and goals: People. Politics and
Power in the seven States of the Deep South.
The section on Miami Metro is an excellent
synthesis.
The author makes no mention of the Jewish
population in any area. For Miami Beach, he
inferentially raises the questionshould the city
be a playground for tourists, or should it have a
permanent residential base with a cultural and
civic life divorced from glamor, or can it be all
things to all people?
A YOUNGSTER named Leslie Stewart has given
us a "picture of God" which vividly strikes
homp.
I share Leslie's statement which I found in
the bulletin of the Fairmont Temple of Cleveland,
Ohio:
"GOD. OR some unknown force we call by
that name, is the creator and unifying center of
the entire universe. God has no shape or form
that I as a human being can understand. In fact,
He is everything I and the rest of mankind do
not understand and about life itself and the uni-
verse.
"I can only understand God. therefore, in hu-
man terms. God is not Superman, a Santa Claus
or a Lone Ranger to me. He is not someone whom
I call on to save me to answer my selfish needs
or desires. But rather He is my partner; He is
a natural part of me.
"GOD IS purely spiritual to me and very per-
sona!. I experience' Him; I "feel" His presence.
"I reach Him through love and thoughts.
Sometimes this takes the form of prayers and
sometimes in my actions.
"I also see God through this wonderful world
He has created, the world of nature. I also see
God through people people who imitate His
goodness and moral standards by trying to work
with Him to perfect His noble experiment, the
world we live in."
Ullliiil'ilfi !.- i:'r!! i I'l #i
Portrait of an Israeli Policeman
Haifa
JSRAEL HAS one police force, covering the en-
tire country, and it is represented in the
Cabinet with a Minister of Police.
Like the constabulary in other countries. Is-
rael's police force has also been subjected to
much criticism, particularly for the way in which
they handle demonstrations. It is the kind of sit-
uation in which the police will inevitably be
blamed.
IF THE demonstration gets out of hand, and
begins smashing things up, as an uncontrolled,
hysterical mob always will, the police are blamed
for ineffectiveness.
And if they stand firm and control the mob
before it erupts, they are accused of being ruth-
less. It is always the inciters who complain.
AT A time when the news in the press is not
always cheerful or heartwarming, it was good to
read recently the story' of 'he image at least one
policeman has created for himself in his own
community.
It was the tale of Eli Shahar, a 39-year-old
custodian of the law, who constitutes the entire
police department of the town of Mizpe Ramon
in the hill- of the central N'egcv, population 2.300,
THE STORY was told by Menahem Michel-
son in the afternoon tabloid. Yediot Aharonot I
should like to think there are many other Israeli
policemen like Eli Shahar.
Eli is on 24-hour duty. When he locks up the
police station, he takes his duties home with him.
IUMMMMMHMMHHHM1
It i there that citizens frequently seek him out,
especially the children.
Where el=e in the world would a youngster
make his way to the officer on duty and complain:
"The teacher pulled my ear, and it hurts. Please
help me, Eli."
WHEN A doll disappeared from the local
kindergarten, Eli was sent for. When housewives
quarrel among themselves, Eli is asked to arbi-
trate and make peace.
When food supplies fail to arrive from the
north, the citizenry make a bee-line to Eli, To
them he personifies officialdom at its best, be-
cause he takes their problems to heart and seeks
solutions.
ELI WAS born in Tunis and came to Israel as
a child with his parents and eight brothers and
sisters. Now he has a wife and four children.
For all his extrovert and friendly nature, he
refrains from becoming too friendly with his
neighbors or with local merchants. After all, if
they have a brush with the law he must be ob-
jective in his handling of the situation, and this
would be difficult if he were dealing with friends.
MOTHERS IN Mbpch Ramon know how to use
the full weight of police influence when disciplin-
ing their children. But it is not: 'If you misbe-
have, 111 call the policeman."
Next time you "re touring Israel perhaps you
may wish to stop off at Mizpeh Ramon and pay
your respects to the police department. But be-
ware that you don't speed. Eli enforces the law.
...... -u.i... .........
Literature
To Make Dayan
A Wealthy Man
\TOSHE DAYAN is being of-
1 k fered an advance of $400,000
for his memoirs. Besides royal-
ties.
This is quite a sum. The book
will no doubt have a worldwide
sale But it won't approach the
sales of a book by an earlier
Moshe. Perhaps Israel should in-
gtitute suit to get royalties on the
book by the first Moshe. as the
next of kin to the author.
If they could, Israel would
have enough money to run the
country, without taxes.
WHAT A book the Bible has
been. If there is anything at all
linking the nations of the world
today, it is due to the Bible Jew-
ish mystics foretold the day when
Jerusalem would spread itself
and fill the world.
In a sense, the Bible accom-
plished this. In most countries
un t 11 more recent tunes, the
people knew as much about Is-
rael as they did of their own
country.
Lloyd George. British Prime
Minister, said he could name all
the Kings of Israel, but not all
the Kings of England.
DAYAN probably never ex-
pected to make any fortune writ-
ing a book. Neither did another
generalGrant. Towards the end
of Grant's life, he h?J financial
difficulties, but his memoirs saved
him.
In an earlier period, celebrities
did not do so well. Thomas Jef-
ferson wrote a number of books,
including an autobiography, but
never made any money from
them.
But he loved booksto read as
well as write He had the largest
library in America.
In the latter part of his life,
he endorsed the note of a friend
and thereby su; ained a money
loss which brought the wolf to
his door, and thenhis books did
save himCongress bought his
library.
IN THE War of 1812. the Brit-
ish had burned the Library of
Congress, and the Jefferson
library was purchased as a
nusleus for a new Library of
Congress.
Even with this aid. when Jef-
ferson died, Monticello would
have been lost to the country but
for a Jewish admirer. Uriah P.
Lew. who bought the estate, pre-
venting it from being broken up.
Later Monticello was made a na-
tional memorial.
Uriah P. Levy might have writ-
ten an interesting book himself.
He I'd a very' adventurous life,
startinc at twelve as a cabin boy
and winding up as a Commodore.
Fought duels. Fought anti-Semi-
tism
GOETHE WROTE his greatest
work in his eighties. A teen-ager
in Amsterdam wrote a book not
so many years ago which has been
translated into fifty languages
and Otto Frank, the father of the
author of Anne Frank's diary,
says the work is now being tran-
slated into Chinese.
Prank is constantly being asked
about his daughter.
Jnffer-on liked books, but his
friend. Patrick Henry, once bor-
rowed a cony of Hunre's essays
from him and returned it un-
read
HENRY WASN'T a reaxler. He
was a liver Maybe it all depends
oi the liver. Some people get
along without reading or. writing
bo^ks.
.Wfei on co' Id not excite an
sndlenee m H"nrv could, but
Hen'v could not have written
the D-claration of Independence
no'- rendc th" contribution to his-
ton- that Tpfforson made.
Beniamin Disraeli said when
he felt like reading a book, he
wrote one instead.


Page 16
v.Unistntridliain nd Sho#,r of Hollywood
Friday July 5. 1974

HOLLYWOOD
FCDCRAL'S
CKTRRvnGflaza
'
i.
Monday, June 24 thru July 26
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Federal office. You can get a fine Toshiba color TV, or a
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According to the sum you deposit of $500 or more (see chart
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j


Full Text
Page 10-
+Jewisti flcricHaun and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday July 5. 1974
Ml
Luly Logk
A Dog's Life
As a child, I never had a dog.
My best friends, the Kreicher
twits, had a dog named Ronald
Colnan who was christened same
in honor of their mother's fa-
vorite movie actor at the time.
He had mange.
The dog. Not the actor!
However, everyone says that
life begins at forty and it did
for me.
A dog's life ... I received my
first dog.
I WAS in my bedroom resting
jir.il contemplating my traumatic
birthday when the children enter-
ed and placed a small black some-
thing in my arms.
Hp licked my face and cap-
tured my heart.
We named him Taxi.
Taxi was a wirehaired poodle.
He wore a coat of hair which
resembled a Brillo pad with four
legs and a tail.
. Over the years, he chafed chil-
dren on bicycles, ran after gar-
bage truck tires, slept snuggled
next to me. protected our family
and fathered his own.
His children were white Taxis
and although they lived several
blocks away, he paid a call on
them each day.
He was a concerned parent.
He was al when our family decision to, I've
senarately came about.
THE CHILDREN and I were
to remain in the U.S.. but their
father was moving to the Baha-
mas. He would be alone but we
wogld be together os it was de-
cided Taxi would bo with him.
Once a month, the children's
father, who piloted his own air-
plane, would fly the family dog
over to us for a weekend visit.
Our friends were dismayed
that the amicable agreement pro-
vided for custody of a dog to
come home one weekend a month.
But then, everyone was happy
and that's the purpose of separa-
tions in the first place.
One month Taxi didn't appear.
He had run after the final truck.
The children's father buried
him in his backvard under a beau-
tiful bougainvillea bush and we
both told each other that neither
would ever get a dog again.
FARTING WITH people is
emotional. And Taxi was oeople.
I understand from the children
that their father now has, not
one, but two dogs.
... and me, '.he ladv who vow-
ed never to get another, has a'
guy named Rinno who is never
more than two paws behind.
One year ago. I'd just moved
to Key West, was living alone in
a big house writing a book and
decided I needed a watchdog.
At th Humane Society, as I
walked around, all the dogs be- J
came excited, barked and jumped I
RITA GOODMAN
at the prospect of a mistress.
ONLY ONE lay there in a deep
depression looking like he need-
ed a psychiatrist more than a
home.
Naturally, he was Rinno.
Maybe he couldn't see me for
he's mostly sheep dog and I still
don't know if he has eyes.
I felt very safe living alone in
my big house with my watchdog.
We loved each other dearly
and 1 knew he would let no harm
come to me.
Rinno and 1 had a daily ritual
in Key West.
Each morning 1 would draw the
drapes, slide open the big glass
doors and let Rinno out in our
marvelous backvard while I pre-
pared our breakfast.
ONE MORNING. I walked to
the doors to tell him breakfast
was ready but before I could call
out. the words stuck in mv throat
as I spotted a man's lea hanging
over the side of the hammock I'd
hung from two trees.
Rinno was prancing around
sniffing grass. And minding his
own business!
In whisper tones. I called his
name. I didn't want to disturb
the VISITOR. Or BODY. Or what-
ever.
After getting him in the house.
I relocked the doors, redrew the
drapes the phoned the police.
Rinno really was a great pro-
tector. He went at the police-
'marfs leg ... and escorted the
hungover wino to the fence from
whence he'd sprung looking for
a place to sleep
It was then the thought oc-
curred to me that perhaps I
should move.
Today life is more realistic.
Rinno, protector-of-winos. has two
beer and wine bars in Ft. Lauder-
dale named after him.
... and I have lots of locks and
chains on our door.
WEDDING, BARMITZVAH
AND COMMERCIAL
PHOTOGRAPHY
don* at reasonable prices
Contact: Saul Rosen at
966-5785
'?????????'
(Conservative)
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF THEIR
j NEW HEBREW & RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
!
CREATIVE I INNOVATIVE CLASSES
For Grades Kindergarten -7
(BAR & BAT MITZVAH PREPARATION)
SPECIAL ELECTIVE COURSES
Covering all phase* of Judaism (or Grades 8-10,
SMALL INDIVIDUALIZED CLASSES
For Further Information
and Registration CALL: 922-1491
Hillel Students
Graduate From
Eighth Grade
Graduation exercises for the
eighth grade of the Hillel Com-
munity Day School were held
Wednesday, June 12, at the
school.
The graduates were Adina,
daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Morde-
chai Adler; Ava, daughter of Dr.
and Mrs Bennie Berman; Loren
Goldman, son of Mrs. Karl Cohen
and Milton Goldman; Carla,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Michael
Saxon; and Michael, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Lewis Turgel.
Rabbi Dov Bidnick. principal,
presented the students with
graduation certificates. The guest
speaker was Rabbi Ralph Glix-
man of B'nai Israel and Greater
Miami Youth Synagogue. Michael
Scheck. president of the school,
brought greetings on behalf of
the officers and board of gover-
nors.
The school, which offers a well
balanced program of secular and
religious studies from nursery
through eighth grade, serves the
North Dade and Broward areas
with buses to all areas including
Tamarac. For the coming year,
bus service will be extended to
Miami Lakes.
22 Hillel Tots
Receive Diplomas
At Graduation
The Hillel Community Day
School he'd graduation exercises
for 22 Kindergarten children
Tuesday. June 11, at the Hallan-
dale Jewish Center.
Abraham J. Gittelson of the,
Central Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion was the guest speaker. The
children presented both English
and Hebrew poems, songs, and a
playlet entitled -Rachel at the
Well."
Mrs. Dorothy Gruen, the
secular teacher, and Mrs. Shula i
Lesheti, the Hebrew teacher,
were assisted by Mrs. Adrienne
Berger and Mrs. Roua Grabina in
preparing the program.
The following children received
diplomas from Rabbi Dov Bid-
nick, principal; Ashira Bunder.
Jerome Camel, Tammv Dennis,
Jodi Feldman. Adina Gelnowski.
Andrea Klein. Michael Langel.
Crai? Moore, David Platt. Dan
Rogovin and David Rothenberg.
Alo Dayna Rothnberg. Amy
Seinfeld, David Sheir, Sharon'
Sher. Jodi Silverman. Jonathan;
Simon. Robert Singer. Ezra Sut-
ton. Sarina Warren. Debbie Wo-
lowitz and Fred Zemel
Hillcrest-Hollywood UJA Mission j
Departing For Israel Oct. 21
The Hillcrest community, in co-
operation with the Jewish Wel-
fare Federation, will conduct a
15 day United Jewish Appeal
Mission to Israel, departing torn
Fort Lauderdale airport Monday,
Oct. 21, arriving in Israel via El
Al Airlines Tuesday, Oct. 22.
Chairman Alvin Hess said,
"There are many ways to see Is-
rael, but only through the trip
that we are sponsoring can you
have the singular opportunity of
meeting top leaders like Presi-
dent Katzir; seeing what your
contributions are doing for the
people of Israel; of experiencing
the Israeli's Israel instead of just
the tourist's; and of living in-
stead of just viewing this unique
adventure which is Israel."
In Israel the group will be
joined by Mr. and Mrs. Sol Entin,
Nathan Pritcher and Sid Cher-
nuchin, of Hillcrest.
The Mission will be geared at
a leisurely pace with time for
optional trips to Eilat and Sinai,
the Western Wall. Yad Vashem.
Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and the Gal-
ilee.
There will also be visits to
Safed. an armed force base, a
new development town built from
the wilderness, an Absorption
Center with newly arrived Soviet
Jews and an old age home.
Group members will stay at de-
luxe hotels in Tel Aviv and Jeru-
salem, as well as spending a night
in a kibbutz guesthouse in the
far north. An Israeli breakfast
will be served every day, lunches
and dinners on full tour days,
and on the last evening, a fare-
well cabaret party.
The cost from Fort Lauderdale
will be SI.150 per person. (Small
AlVIN HISS
additional charge for single sup-
plement). If you wish to join
the group in New York, the cost
will be $1,050 per person. As
space is limited, please phone the
Jewish Welfare Federation office
for information on reservations.
"THE CHOSEN
CHILDREN"
A contemporary group of Young
Jewish Singers and Instrumentalists
performing Israeli and American
music are available for various
organiiations. Contact Bud Breitbart
681-7212 or 448-2684 or Howard
Nee 895-3880 or 893-5343.
^KURASH,
REALTORS
IMC

Phone 923-2461
Branch Office 7991 Johnson St.
Main Office 2429 Hollywood Blvd.
Phone 966-9300 or 947-3332 Toll Free
Stanley S. Kurash Our large Staff of
and Naomi R. Kurash Qualified Associates
Ready To Serve You.
1
MARIO RENTAL APTS.
HOUYWOOD HIUS
fUKNISHCD AND UNFURNISHED
3500 POiK STMET
Dade 625-4545 Broward 989 3030
30 Different Butliinqs
NOW 0PEH
Formerly Lindy's Farms
FRESH FRUITS I VEGETABLES
MILK EGGS
790 E. Hallandale Boulevard
Open Doily I Sunday 8:30-5:30 P.M.
921-9529 WE DELIVER
V,
I
looks e tools n is 'aoly pin
o< fie body And n m^ be worn right
no*! to fit (km in an ordinary b'J1
weight. fuilnss an0 |t so lh
clothes retaui the portect symemcol
Mrs Etta Luongo.
Accredited Su'gtcal Specialist
CALL FOR *
APPOINTMENT *
1021 Mayo Street (Rear of Breedings Drug Store) t
PATIENT CARE SERVICES


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FILES


Friday, July 5, 1974
KJtafoft fh>rl(Man and Shofar erf Hollywood
Page 11
Jews Suffer as Prelude to Nixon Visit
LONDON (JTA) With
President Nixon now in Moscow
to take 0ttr' in his HUM "summit
conference with Soviet leaders,
the new wave of harassment and
repression of Jews seeking to
leave the USSR continued un-
abated while the rate of emigra-
tion remained at an extremely
low level, Jewish sources in the
Soviet Union report.
In Chernovits, Albert Koltu-
nov, an official of the Jewish na-
tional lottery, was sentenced to
five and a half years in a strict
Israel Report*
Renewed Summer
Travel Interest
NEW YORK An increased
interest in travel to Israel is be-
ing reported by travel agents and
hotels in Israel, according to
Amram Zur, representative of the
Israel Ministry of Tourism for
North America.
Zur, wno recently returned
from a-trip to Israel, noted that
recent headlines, with their em-
phasis on peace, may be having
an impact on those potential
tourists who were holding back.
"Many of the new bookings be-
ing reported in Israel seem to
be coming from the European
continent, whose citizens are ap-
parently less affected by the
world economic dislocation than
the American public," said Zur.
Zur says that some of the
United States travel agents are
reporting queries regarding Fall
travel. One effect of the newly
reduced tensions is that people
re now willing to plan further
ahead, he said.
regime prison for alleged brib-
ery.
""lift AND HIS wife, Genia, had
appiied for exit visas to go to
Israel shortly before the charges
were brought.
Two other Jewish activists,
Yuri and Anna Berkovsky, of
Novosibirsk, were arraigned on
charges of speculation and illegal
possession of firearms which
carry minimum penalties of five
years imprisonment, the sources
reported.
According to the sources, there
is not a shred of evidence that
the Berkovsky couple committed
the offenses they are accused of.
In Moscow, the trial of Viktor
Polsky on charges of reckless
driving continued after the court
rejected a defense motion for
dismissal on grounds of insuffi-
cient evidence
THE PRIVATE telephones of
Jewish activists in Moscow re-
mained disconnected and the
phones of Prof. Alexander Ler-
ner and Ilya Korenfeld have al-
ready been reallocated to non-
Jewish subscribers.
Another activist, Vitaly Rubin,
has been given 15 days to find a
job or face a year's imprison-
ment on charges of "parasitism,"
the sources reported.
Meanwhile, Jewish scientists
preparing to participate in an
international seminar scheduled
to be held in the apartment of
Alexander Voronel on June 27,
the day of Nixon's arrival, have
been called up for military rv-
ice although hitherto they /tad
been exempt.
JEWISH EMIGRATION from
the Soviet Union, which has been
running far behind last year's
Swiss says fondue.
Swiss Knight says delicious ffiings imported from
'Switzerland: 6 foil-wrapped wedges of plain or as-
sorted Gruyere Cheese, perfect for snacks, parties,
lunch boxes. And for en-
tertaining, Swiss Knight
Fondue in a classic recipe
of Gruyere and Emmental
cheeses, white wine and
Kirsch. Swiss Knight*
CheeseSwiss Knight*
Cheese Fondue. More than
\
that you cannot say.
rate, continued to decline.
Only 1.225 Jews left Russia in
May compared to the 1973 aver-
age of 3,000 departures a munth,
the sources reported.
Supporters of Soviet Jewry
continued to react strongly to
the worsening situation in the
USSR.
The Washington Committee
for Soviet Jewry announced that
its members sought to disrupt
Soviet-US. telephonic communi-
cations through June 21 to pro-
test the disconnection of the
phones of Jewish dissidents in
Mo-cow.
The committee said it acted in
conjuncUon with groups through-
out the U.S.
A hunger strike began in front
of the Soviet Embassy in Wash-
ington in sympathy with the fast
of the Goldstein brothers in Tbi-
lis. Soviet Georgia, both physi-
cists who have been refused exit
visas and subjected to harass-
ment.
IN NEW YORK, Jewish organ-
izational leaders demonstrated
outside the Soviet airline office
Friday in an expression of sol-
idarity with Jews in Russia who
fasted on the fourth anniversary
of the Leningrad hijack trials.
Addressing a Jewish audience
in New York. Sen. Henry M
Jack-on (D., Wash.) accused tht
U.S. government of having "de-
liberately attempted to misrepre-
sent to the American people"
what the issue is in the Jackson
Amendment linking U.S.-Soviet
trade to an easing of Soviet emi-
gration restrictions.
"I am not impressed when the
White House tries to dismiss the
wholesale violations of human
rights in the Soviet Union as
none of America's business,"
Jackson told the Jerusalem Great
Synagogue dinner at the Plaza
Hotel.
Jackson sai.l that his amend-
ment, "far from intruding into
the internal affairs of the So-
viet Union, skMily^conditions
eligibility for certain U.S. eco-
nomic concessions on respect for
the right to emigrate, which is
specifically affirmed in the Uni-
versal Declaration of Human
Rights and in other international
agreements which the' Soviet
Union itself has ratified."
By BOB KMSH. txecutue Director.
Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater Heflvwao*
.....''
Cerber Cheese Co., Inc., Stamford, Connecticut 06905
_i_..........i iiiiiiiiinm......................nnrnii~nni r
What are all the active community minded people doing these
days? Meetings have endednearly everyone has had their donor
luncheon, elections, awards and honors. Vacations have started, chil-
dren are now in camp and with the summer rains upon us, it is even
difficult to find time to golf, swim or play tennis. So where are you
all?
From what I see. the involved neorle are still involved planning
and developing programs for the fall. Meetings appear to be taking
place at a more relaxed pace but just as often. Ideas are being ex-
pressed, innovations developed, dates reserved on the Community
Calendar, and each group is getting to work with new officers who, in
many cases, are together for the first time.
At the Federation, plans are being made for presentation to the
community of our new proposed By-Laws on August 11th along with
a new slate of officers, a new Board of Directors, and yes. even a new
name. The Cultural Committee of the Community Relations Commit-
tee is busy planning to participate in ticket sales for the Israeli Phil-
harmonic which will be in our area Oct. 3.
The Women's Leadership Institute and the Men's Young Leaders
Council are planning the;r programs for 1974-75. A new Jewish com-
munity chaplain has been employed for a one year pilot program to
provide chaolsiney service to unaffiliated Jews in our hospitals and
public institutions. A new assistant director will join our staff in
July. The Jewish Community Centers has developed senior adult pro-
grams for the summer and also tween and teen activities for our youth.
Camp Ka Dee-Mah is running at capacity. There is already discus-
sion concerning next year's programs.
Jewish life, therefore, goes on. and the work of Federation and
all Jewish oreanizations exemplifies the continuity of our people.
Though this is a vacation period for some, it is a work period for
others. Our temples have hired new educational directors and prin-
cipals, new youth directors, new associate and assistant rabbis. All of
these additions along with the ongoing staffs are for the purpose of
enriching our Jewish community.
Life augurs well for us. As the fastet growing community in the
I'nited States and with multiple thousands of Jewish people seeking
this area as their new home, the future looks bright and promisin:.
May your summer be full of productivity, relaxation and revital-
ization.
Cuisine Is A Gourmet's Delight
Dine often enough at La Chan
delle, Nassau's most elegant culi-
nary rendezvous, and you'll swear
you've just travelled around the
world.
The impeccable dining room at
the posh Halycon Balmoral Hotel
on Cable Beach with seating
for about 300 consistently
pleases guests with Its temptin'-'.
Br ;.. of fin'* wines and inter
national cuisine prepared to a
gourm fs delight. La Chandell.
b >asts the finest ambience of any
1 uranl In Nassau, being com
pletcly European in concept.
The menus at La Chandellc
chang A typical week's
. tions might include such
palate-pleasers a-: avocado, smok-
ed salmon, a quiche or the chefs
terrine (soups offer an imagine
live selection West Indian
Curry, Mulligatawney, L-cd Bread
Fruit, Couch Chowder or Mines
trone.)
Under entrees you may dis-
cover Bahamian crawfish in a
number of versions, veal 'cordon
bleu", chicken kiev. shish kebab
and whatever fresh Bahamian fish
happens to be available at the
moment as well as excellent
imported steaks, chops and lamb.
Couple all this with a supreme
wine list which features labels of
some 50 wines currently available
in the cellar.
An imposing crystal chandelier
imported from Madrid glitters a
warm welcome to evening meals
at La Chandelle. The newly-refur-
bished dining room is spacious
and handsomely appointed. Else
where. Halcyon Balmoral has
three bars and offers room serv-
ice for everything from simple
snacks to five-course meals.
On the other side of the lush
Palm Patio, the more informal
Hibiscus Room has its own special
llalyron Balmoral Hotel on Cable Beach
nights usually once or twice steel band. Picture yourself sav-
a week. One evening might be voring roast suckling pig, roast
Beefeater Night, featuring roast beef, outstanding hot and cold
beef with a distinct Scottish menu specialities all in a truly mem-
to support i* and a gin or two. orablo dining atmosphere,
one would imagine, to usher it Dining al fresco on the Palm
in Other national nights feature Patio is a major attraction .
food and wines from such charm and once the moon replaces the
ing. far away locales at Italy and i,un in the sky, there's dining
Mexico. and dancing under the stars.
Be sure to stick around for the Whatever your pleasure fine
luscious Sunday buffet. Not only food, superb service, and an un
Balmoral suests but visitors from torccttahle atmosphere are des-
other hotels, and the Nassau tined to combine to give you an
social circle gather for lunch to evening of unmatched delight,
the hypnotizing rhythm f a H


r, July 5. 1974
-Jenist fk>rMfrUl and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 13
[ero Says New Preemptive Strike Possible
[TEL AVIV (JTA) A Yom
lippur War hero said here that
Irael would have to launch war
gainst Egypt if that country be-
in to develop nuclear weapons.
Gen. (Ret.) Ariel Sharon,
Ihose division in Sinai smashed
Vough Egyptian lines to estab-
sh an Israeli bridgehead on the
bank of the Suez Canal last
ctober, told the graduating
ass at the Haifa Technion that
irael would have no choice but
wage preventive war if Egypt
ithin a few years, is on th
frge of producing atomic weap-
ns.
This would not be necessary
ad the Americans not agreed to
rovide Egypt with a nuclear
eactor. said Sharon, a Likud MK.
ir tr -to
ZOA National Convention
NEW YORK Nearly 1,000
elegates from throughout the
fitted States attended the 77th
kational convention of the Zionist
Organization of America here
hrough Sunday, June 30, at the
few York Hilton Hotel. Leading
egislators, addressed the conven-
(on. including Sen. Jacob K.
tits. Sen. Gale W. McGee, Sen.
jbert A. Taft, Jr., and Cong,
^gden E. Reid.
Sen. Javits addressed the open-
ig session on Thursday evening
the Middle East situation. Her-
in L. Weisman, president of
ZOA gave the keynote ad
ress to the delegates.
Jacques lorciyner, a past pres-
ident of the ZOA, addressed
(the convention Saturday night.
|Dr. Max Nussbaum, another past
| president presided.
LEO MINDI.I.N
The Big Gifts Luncheon was
held on Friday. Cong. Reid was
the guest speaker. On Friday
afternoon the delegates visited
the ZOA House, the new home of
ZOA's national headquarters. An
Oneg Shabbat was held Friday
evening. Rabbi David Polish of
Evanston, 111., and Samuel H.
Wang speaker.
Another Oneg Shabbat took
place on Saturday afternoon
with the participation of Gideon
Patt. Member of the Knesset.
The convention Danquet in
honor of the outgoing president
of the ZOA, Herman L. Weisman
was held on Sunday, Dr. Emanucl
Neumann made the presentation
to Weisman. Sen. Taft. was the
guest speaker at the banquet.
6 t? &
Open the Doors
PHILADELPHIA President
Nixon was urged by U.S. Sen.
Edward M. Kennedy to press for
"open doors for Soviet Jews"
when he meets Soviet leaders in
Moscow.
Appearing last week in Phila-
delphia before nearly 2,000 per-
sons at a Soviet Jewry Solidarity
Assembly sponsored by the Jew-
ish Community Relations Council
(JCRC) of Greater Philadelphia,
Kennedy described his dramatic
midnight meeting with Soviet ac-
tivists on his visit to Moscow
only weeks ago.
"After listening to them, I
bring you a message," he told
the crowd. "They remain com-
mitted to their ideal. They re-
main firm in their faith. And
they remain determined to live
in Israel in freedom."
& -tr -Cr
Withhold U.S. Recognition
NEW YORK The Anti-Defa-
mation League of B'nai B'rith
has called upon the United
States to withhold "diplomatic
recognition and formal relations"
from the German Republic (East
Germany) unless "a firm and de-
tailed advance commitment" is
made to pay reparations to vic-
tims of the Nazi era.
In a letter to Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger, Seymour
Graubard, national chairman of
the League, pointed out that the
German Democratic Republic has
never accepted its responsibility
as a successor state to the Third
Reich for Hitler's criminal acts
w made any redress to his vic-
tims.
He contrasted this attitude
with that of the West German
Government wh'ch, over a period
of many years, has made substan-
tial reparation payments to Is-
rael and to individual victims of
Nazi cruelty wh<- survived the
Holocaust.
it ir it
Collection on Holocaust
BINGHAMTON, N.Y.A spe-
rjal collection of books, docu-
ments, and other scholarly mate-
rials pertaining to the Holocaust,
in which millions of European
Jews died during World War II,
has been founded at the State
University of New York at Bing-
hamton.
Named in memory of Mrs.
Moses (Belle) Margolis. a Bing-
hamton-area resident for more
than 50 years, the Belle Margolis
Library Collection has received
generous financial assistance
from the Margolis family and
friends.
Mrs. Margolis came to Bing-
hamton in 1923 from Poland with
her husband, the Rev. Moses
Margolis. Rev. Margolis has long
been associated with Temple Is-
rael, which was located in Bing-
hamton for many years before
moving to its current site in Ves-
tal in 1968.
The Margolises lost 32 close
relatives in the Holocaust.
i> h ix
Secret Contact with Arafat
ZURICH Citing "unimpeach-
able sources," the Neue Zuricher
Zeitung reports that the U.S. is
still squarely backing UN Resolu-
tion 242 and favors the participa-
tion at the Geneva Peace Confer-
ence of Arab terrorist leader
Yassir Arafat.
Furthermore, according to the
newspaper, certain high-ranking
American representatives have
already established a secret con-
tact with Arafat.
The U.S. State Department is
increasingly per.-uaded that in
any final solution of the Arab-
Lsrael conflict, the legitimate
rights of the Palestinians will
nave to be taken into account,
according to the DaDer
it it it
Telephone Service Terminated
HARTFORD. Conn. A tele-
phone service for a Bridgeport
Nazi group offering recorded
anti-Semitic and anti-Black mes-
sages was terminated June 17,
according to an announcement
by the New England Telephone
Co.
The utility previously had
taken the position that it could
not terminate the service with-
out being ordered to do so by the
State Public Utilities Commis-
sion, which had received many
complaints.
The commission said that with-
out prosecution of "an appropri-
ate report" to the telephone
company that such use of its
service was unlawful, it could not
order termination of the service.
Florida Abroad In Israel
Program Beginning July 8
Belly Dancer Vs. Yad Vashem
ontinued from Page 4
SINCE FROM Jerusalem came
forth the "Thou Shalt Not" in
the first place "Thou Shalt
Not" is as Jewish as apple pie is
American the President was
being challenged to demonstrate
that, as a Christian, he had learn-
ed the Jewish "Thou Shalt Not"
as well as the Jews know it them-
selves.
At Yad Vashem, where the Hit-
lerian holocaust is documented
in the dark and sinster terms
it deserves, the Israelis served
up the President an implied
warning against his permitting a
second such holocaust as a con-
sequence of his new found
friendships with Sadat, Assad &
Co.
YOU COULD hear the voice of
Jehovah in it all. It was a solemn
occasion perhaps too solemn
for the President, who was being
required momentarily to subro-
gate the joys of his triumphant
iddle East tour to the dour
mmand of the Higher Hand of
od.
It was a difficult struggle he
ad to wage between his Chris-
an imperative to prove himself
orally by responding to the re-
gious intensity of the moment
n Jewish terms and his deeper
lierstanding that it was really
political moment.
How can all of that best a bel-
ly-dancer? It couldn't and
didn't and the President's face
showed it. In Cairo, it showed
titillation and playful embarrass-
ment. In Jerusalem, there was a
grim and tortured look, boredom
and forebearance.
THE DISTINCTION between
belly-dancer and Yad Vashem is
best defined by Matthew Arnold
in his "Hebraism and Hellen-
ism," although Arnold's is a
study of the Jewish and Greek
traditions, not Egyptian, and
there is a huge difference be-
tween the Greek and Egyptian,
the Greek serving as a founda-
tionstone of western civilization.
Still, Greece and Egypt were
both pagan, both anthropomor-
phic and polytheistic, and the
Greeks especially were poets of
tne flesh.
For Arnold in his essay, the
primary Jewish, discovery was
sin, the "Thou Shalt Not" fabri-
cated on Mt. Sinai.
SIC.MLND FREUD, in his
"Moses and Monotheism," says of
it that the Jewish Thou Shalt
Not," the Jewish revelation in
the desert, is the source of mod-
ern anti-Semiti--*-
Judaism, modified by the early
Christians, se' the buidcn of the
Sinaitic discovery on the shoul-
ders of Europe's pagans, who
were essentially Greek land
Egyptian) in their perceptions of
life and the flesh.
In accepting the revelation of
Christ, the pagan-Christians pun-
ished the practitioners of the
Sinaitic revelation, the Jews, as
the root cause of their strange
burden.
THEY COULD not rebel
against Christianity, but they
could lash out at the Jews as the
progenitors of Christianity.
The belly-dancei in Cairo was
pure pagan, and Nixon's face in
Cairo was pagan tempered by the
revelation of Christ (the titilla-
tion vs. the playful embarrass-
ment).
Yad Vashem in Jerusalem v as
pure Sinaitic -- not only a sym-
bol of Nazi genocide but of the
Jewish "Thou Shalt Not."
Nixon's face at Yad Vashem
was the terrain or which the war
in him raged between:
Paganism on the one hand
and the Sinaitie-Christian revela-
tions on the other the Mat-
thew Arnold view:
Christianity on the one hand
repelled by the Sinaitic as for-
eign to Christianity; and Chris-
tianity on the other as repugnant
to paganism (Nixon's tortured
look, his boredom, his forebear-
ance) the Freudian view.
IN ALL of this, the meaning
of Yad Vashem as a political
movement was lost in the shuf-
fle.
And. at least for that brief in-
stant in history, moral impera-
tives won out over flesh, for in
Cairo President Nixon had to
pretend he wasn't enjoying him-
self; and in Jerusalem, he had to
pretend that he was.
TALLAHASSEE Application
forms are now available for the
Florida Abroad in Israel Pro-
gram at the University of Haifa,
Israel. The program is to begin
July 8 and continue through the
academic year.
The forms may be obtained
from Fiorida State University
campus coordinator Dr. William
Spencer in the Department of
History, or from the campus
committee in charge of recruit-
ment and evaluation. Commitee
members, in addition to Dr.
Spencer, are Dr. F. E. Asher,
economics; Dr. Bruno Linder,
chemistry; Dr. Monte Palmer,
government and Dr. Richard Ru-
benstein, religion.
Any student with sophomore
or above standing, attending a
Florida supported university or
junior college with a "B" aver-
age, is eligible to apply.
The cost of the program in-
cludes a $3,000 basic fee and an
State University System, for
academic course work and field
additional S50C ciiarged by the
study taken under the Florida
faculty leading the program. The
entire cost includes round trip
air fare, room and board for an
entiie year, some medical insur-
ance and tuition.
The program is being admin-
istered by th.- University of Flor-
ida and includes a one-week
orientation period in Gainesville
before departure for Israel by
chartered jet. The summer
months will be spent on a kib-
butz affiliated with the Univer-
sity of Haifa and sudents will
live in dormitories or private
homes when September classes
begin.
Dr. Irving Goffman of the Uni-
versity of Florida will accom-
pany the group this summer and
Dr. Spencer of Florida State will
become the program director in
the fall.
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Page 12
mJmMl Flcridiair and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday 1% 5, 1974
i
Belfast Jews Stand Fast in Face of War
Continued from Page 1
of.its population rrom emigration
saice the troubles began nearly
six year; ago. arifl Its marriage
and birth rates have dropped
dramatically.
Nevertheless. I counted over
70 congregants in synagogue on
the Sabbath morning when the
general strike had just begun. It
is heu-ed in an imDressive and
beautiful building in a modern
style, erened in 1934. and sur-
rounded ly a small complex of
com manual buildings:
The" scheme bears witness to
the optimism which once prevail-
ed regarding the future of Bel-
fast's community. Today, there
are inevitably some doubts about
the wisdom of the original proj-
ect.
IN THE absence of a qualified
minister, the service was ably
conducted by the chazan who had
practically dragged himself from
his sickbed, and a delightful
touch was added by the en-
thusiastic participation of several
small boys.
The dift|utrwliieh, recently led
to the resignation of the rabbi
has left a deep impression and
exemplifies the problems which
face a small community which
cannot afford the luxury of more
than one synagogue.
If the incumbent is to do his
duty and maintain the unity of
the community, he must clearly
have such qualities of diplomacy
Mideast Technology Gap Closes
TEL AVIV(JTA)A Haifa Technion scientist joined Israeli
political figures here in expressing their fears that the American
decision to supply Egypt with nuclear potentialities would endanger
the area and put it into a nuclear race.
Former Defense Minister Mo-
she Dayan. just returned from a
visit to the U.S., repeated his
warning that if Egypt is able to
exploit the nuclear cooperation
agreement for non-peaceful pur-
poses in the future, then Nixon's
visit will go down as "a fatal and
historic mistake."
"AL* I can say is that I was
surprised by the announcement,"
Dayan told reporters at Ben
Gurion Airport, when he return-
ed from a ten-day visit to North
America.
In Haifa, Prof. Joseph Rom,
of the Technion Aeronautic De-
partment, said that the U.S.-
Egyptian agreement on nuclear
cooperation will substantially ad-
vance Egypt's ability to reach an
atomic option.
Any attempt to present the
agreement in its peaceful indus-
trial aspect and to evade the
strategic aspects of this agree-
ment would be a grave mistake,
he said.
HE RECALLED that the Rus-
ranged "Skud" missiles, which are
tians with the 300 kilometer-
ranged "Skud" missiles, which are
adaptable to carry a nuclear war
Solel Sisterhood
Plans Activities
For Coming Year
Temple Solel's Sisterhood and
Men's Club are busy planning
many new activities for the com-
ing year, including Temple Solel's
presentation of the Broadway
Musical "Pajama Game" under
the direction of Mrs. Stanley
Emas.
Sisterhood is extremely enthu-
siastic about the success of its
"service to the community" proj-
ects. According to Mrs. Robert
Frazin, chairman of the taping
for the blind, the Broward Com-
munity College blind students
are most grateful for the assist
anee.
Another project is visiting the
homes for the aged. Mrs. Anne
Brudno is chairman of the Com-
mittee.
Sisterhood is planning a mem-
ber>hin coffee in July, accord-
ing to mcmber*hin vice presi-
dent Mrs. Arthur Kail. A rum-
mage sale is planned for August.
Prize Goes To
MD Researcher
HAIFA The first Reuven
Zieg'.er Medical Research Prize
for "an original contribution of
a young medical researcher" was
awarded here at a ceremony held
at the Medical School of the
Technion Israel Institute of
Technologv.
The Prize bears a cash award
of IL 3.000.
The winner is Dr. Shlomo Raz,
of the Urolory Department of
Hadassah Hospital, who was cited
for his experimental work in
urology concerning neural con-
trol of the lower urinary tract.
He is continuing this work
with an eye toward applying it
clinically in the rehabilitation of
persons with injuries of the
spme who have difficulty con-
head, and now the Americans are
granting the Egyptians that know-
how that would enhance their
technological ability and scientific
capabilities to reach a nuclear
option.
The agreement announced by
President Nixon would greatly
close the scientific and techno-
logic gap between Israel and the
Egyptians in the field of nuclear
science.
Prof. Rom said that in his
opinion Israel has to voice her
anxieties over the far-reaching
implications of the Egyptian-
American agreement and to ex-
press unreserved support in those
groups of the American Congress
who do see the dangers of the
agreement.
THE AGREEMENT, he said
introduces elements of a nucleai
race to the Middle East.
He recalled that under Amer-
ican pressure Israel has stated
it would not advance the nuclear
option" in the Middle East.
But now the Americans are
initiating a contribution to the
Egyptians that would close the
scientific and technologic gap be-
tween Israel and Egypt, and this
must be carefully examined as
far as strategic implications are
concerned.
It is not the question of some
quantities of uranium that may
be stolen.
IT IS THE scientific and tech-
nologic know-how that will be ac-
cumulated by the Egyptians and
would enable her to reach a nu-
clear option in a shorter time
than without that knowledge.
Moreover, he stressed, the
knowledge needed for the opera-
tion of a nuclear reactor for
peaceful nurno^es is similar to
that needed for war purposes.
Another senior scientist said
that a similar agreement with Is-
rael may be of demonstrative
value only as Israel already has
the knowledge in this field.
He warned that "small scale"
nuclear weapons may even reach
the hands of terrorist groups.
PROF. NAFTALI Shafrir, head
of the nuclear Engineering De-
partment at the Technion, said
that at an international sympo-
sium on means of controlling
nuclear reactors for peaceful pur-
poses, it was clearly concluded
that tiiere is no problem in evad-
ing control of international
bodies, and in the long run. with
some patience, it is possible to
accumulate the necessary mate-
rials for other purposes than
peaceful.
Dayan noted that the agree-
ment with Egypt was not wholly-
negative in that it would increast
American influence in the Arab
world.
AT THE same time, he stressed
that the mere fact that the agree-
ment provides for the U.S. super
vision indicates that the nuclear
energy produced by the proposed
plant could be used to produce
nuclear weapons.
He also expressed concern that
the U.S. would not always be in
a position to exercise its control
over the use Egypt makes of the
nuclear plant.
He cited the example of India
as a country that has received
foreign aid to produce nuclear
ener;jy for peaceful purposes and
has now managed to produce its
own atomic device.
Apart from that. Dayan point-
ed out that Egypt has no short-
age of energy sources in view of
the recent oil strikes, and the
vast hydroelectric potential of
the Aswan Dam which has not'
vet h""M fnllv evoloitod.
and leadership as will make him
acceptable to the various strands
whieh compose the warp and
weft of the average body-of Jew-
ish opinion.
IN EFFECT, this is a plea for
the introduction of a more en-
lightened approach ihan has been
evident up to the present. Bel-
fart has shown that it deserves
this kind of consideration.
No member of the Jewish com-
munity has. fortunately, become
a physical casualty of the violence
which staiks the streets of Ulster
but the dangers are ever present,
and meetings and social gather-
ings have had to be seriously
curtailed, especially at night.
Jews have played an active
and honorable part in the civic
life of Belfast, but in the present
sad situation they believe that the
best contribution they can make
is to mind their own business
and pray that the fratricidal
strife will end.
They are fond of relating the
common experience of many who,
on being stopped in the street
by a freelance militiaman and
asked whether he is Catholic or
Protestant, will reply that he is
a Jew and will then be met with
the further question "Yes. but
are you a Catholic Jew or a Prot-
estant Jew?"
I WAS told the same story by
a Quakerwith the substitution
of agnostic for Jew.
Perhaps this serves to illustrate
the remarkable resemblance ^f
:h? Uhter problem* to- that of
Palestine. Catholics and Pfbtes-
tanta are not fighting about
theologyas they did at the time
of the Reformationany .more
than Israelis and Arabs are in
conflict about the Bible versus
the Koran.
In each case, the quarrel is
about who should rule a small
country whieh each claims is
their/* by right. Both conflicts il-
lustrate the problems, as Harold
Jack-on identified them in one of
the Minority Rights Group re-
ports, of the "double minority."
The Protestants are a majority
in Ulster and a minority in Ire-
land as a whole. The Jews are a
majority in Israel, and a minority
in the Arab lands. All arc backed
and supported by co-religionist
sympathizers abroad.
OF COURSE, there are also
wide differences in the two cases,
especially in the historical back-
soil, the Arabs hold the same na-
tion responsible for granting the
Ealfour Declaration which first
enabled /ewish settlement to take
place on a massive scale.
Is the analogy true or false?
If it is true then we have perhaps
some lessons to learn from the
ground. But it is worth noting
that if the Irish consider the
English were responsible for
planting the Protestants on their
tragedy of Ulster. Fear, of
domination, whether real or
imaginary, not reason, is the
cause of most suffering.
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