The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00092

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewisti Flondi&ai
ami S1IOI Alt OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Volume 4 Number 9
Hollywood, Florida Friday. May 10, 1974
Price 25 c;nts
Fear Dr. Kissinger's Demands
Of Israel May be Mounting
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) Uneasiness is growing here that
Secretary of State Henry A. Ki?singer is trying to achieve disengage-
ment of Syrian and Israel) forces mainly at Israel's expense and
without her willing agreement..
He apparently has discarded the long held U.S. policy of "non-
imposition" of an agreement in the Middle East and that the parties
themselves must negotiate it to
be effective.
A CONTRARY approach has
been projected by the Soviet
Union which has argued that the
superpowers must impose a set-
tlement.
Some analysis here feel that
Kissinger may have accepted the
Soviet view on this during his
talks with Soviet Foreign Minis-
ter Andrei Gromyko in Geneva on
April 29.
According to reports from the
specially-selected American cor-
respondents aboard Kissinger's
plane shuttling in the Middle
East, Kissinger himself used his
"moderating influence" upon Is-
rael to accept conditions that in-
clude surrender of territory in
the Golan Heights acquired in the
Six-Day War to protect Israelis
in the croplands below.
IN ITS present politically weak
and divided position and virtual
total dependence on U.S. weapons
and finances to pay for them,
the Israeli government is seen
here as probably unable to with-
stand Kissinger's familiar ques-
tioning argument to Israel that
says in effect, "What is your al-
ternative to peace except with-
drawal to where I suggest?"
While Israel is gloomy over the
costs of the Yom Kippur War, the
steady movement of U.S. policy
HIGH COURT SIDESTEPS ISSUE
Sharp Disappointment Is
Voiced in DeFunis Ruling
NEW YORK (JTA) Jew-
ish organizations which involved
themselves on both sides of the
De Funis case expressed disap-
pointment over the refusal on
Apr. 23 of the Supreme Court to
rule on the case on grounds it
had become moot.
Marco De Funis had complain-
ed that because of his race, he
had been denied admission to
Washington University Law
School as a result of the law
school's policy of easing admis-
sion requirements for minority
group students.
IN A 5-4 unsigned opinion, the
Supreme Court ruled the case
had become moot because De
Funis will graduate from the law
school next month.
After he was refused admission
in 1971, he obtained an order
from Justice William O. Douglas
which enabled him to enter and
stay in the law school while the
case was before the court.
The court said, in its ruling
that "if the admission procedures
of the law school remain un-
changed, there is no reason to
suppose that a subsequent case
towards support of the Arabs and
appeasement of Soviet diplomacy
in the detente policy, Arab lead-
ers are exulting over prospects
of achieving all their initial aims
in what is termed loosely as "dis-
engagement."
EGYPTIAN PRESIDENT An-
war Sadat, having regained the
Suez area, is now publicly calling
for "immediate implementation"
of UN Resolution 242.
He used the phrase three times
in his interview on ABC-TV's
"Issues and Answers" program
April 28. He gloated over the
"complete change in the attitude
of the United States towards us."
His reference to Kissinger as
the "miracle man" who will
achieve disengagement on the
Golan Heights is interpreted here
as meaning that the Secretary
will "suggest" Israel into capitu-
lation.
Some speculation also has been
heard here that at some point in
his Middle East talks a represen-
tative of the Palestine Liberation
Organization will be allowed to
sit in and meet the Secretary as
an opening wedge for Palestinian
participation in the Geneva con-
ference that the Kremlin is in-
sisting must be had.
MEANWHILE, Israel's Ambas-
sador to Washington Simcha Din-
itz said that there was no danger
of a general deterioration of Is-
raeli-United States relations.
But Dinitz. who arrived at Ben-
Gurion Airport to participate in
the preparatory talks for Secre-
tary- of State Henry A. Kissinger's
visit, said that there were sev-
eral "worrying appearances" in
the relations between the two
countries recently.
There was no logic in the re-
cent American vote condemning
Israel in the United Nations, Din-
itz explained, and this should be
a source of anxietw. At the same
time, he noted that the American
government continues to provide
military and financial aid to Is-
rael.
Majority for Impeachment
By Special Report
WEST HEMPSTEAD, NY.
The majority of this nation's
Jews today favor congressional
impeachment proceedings against
President Nixon to resolve the
crisis of Watergate, although na-
tional Jewish institutions, anx-
ious about American-Israel rela-
tions, still move cautiously on the
issue.
Rabbi Alexander II. Schindler.
president of the Union of Amer-
ican Hebrew Congregations, told
delegates from 109 Reform syna-
gogues in the greater metropoli-
tan area, that, "Our people have
not lost their liberal spirit or
moral judgment and recognize
that only a strong democratic
America, free from the decays of
Watergate, will assure our future
survival here.
"THIS MEANS that we will
continue to show our leadership
on fostering universal values
without neglecting specific Jew-
Continued on Page 12-
Campaign Leaders To Be
Feted At May 19 Brunch

The Combined United Jewish Appeal, Israel Emergency Fund
and Jewish Welfare Federation Car,
Greater Hollywood will have a brunch Sui
AK 1-'. at 10:30 a.m. at the Hiilcrest Coil
Ciub.
The 1974 Campaign leader.-hip, those pco-
l who lave wmked unstintingly in both
houri o." devoted effort and performance will
be invited to gather for a collective show of
appreciation.
Meivin Baer, 1974 Campaign chairman,
stated: This community has raised the great-
est amount of money ever because of the
dedication of many of its citizens. This has
been a traumatic year for all of us and our campaign personnel
has worked continuously since the Yom Kippur War. All of us
owe them a feeling of deep appreciation for the achievements
attained."
Meivin Botr
Opening Still Available
For Broward Teen Tourists
The Broward Teen Tour, a
unique opportunity for Broward
County youth to tour, sightsee.
ommended by his respective rab*
bi or youth leader.
The tour co-leaders Mrs. Shir*
ley Cohen and Mordecai Opher,
will interview each teenager with
his parents. For an appointment,
phone the Jewish Welfare Feder-
ation Office in Hollywood.
Mrs. Cohen has been involved
with Hol.ywooa community youth
for the past nine years. She led
the firot Teen Tour to Israel from
Hollywood in 1972. Her rapport
with teenagers is highly regarded
and her leadership for this tour
has been endorsed by the rabbis
and Federation.
Mr. Opher, Israeli born, has
been acclaimed as an educator
and although new to the Holly-
wood community, it is felt he will
be a most valuable person in
leading this 1974 Teen Tour.
IM1IIMMIIWMIWMIIIII''"*"""
DR. ROBERT PIT JELL
learn and gather experiences in
Israel, departs June 19. returning
July 16.
The itinerary has been devel-
oped and coordinated by the
Broward Board of Rabbis. Rabbi
Arthur Ab-.ams. president; Dr.
Morton Malavsky. Teen Tour
chairman. All plans have been
formulated in consultation and in
cooperation with Jewish Welfare
Federations of North and South
Broward. according to Dr. Robert
Pittell. Teen Tour chairman.
To be eligible, a teen must be
a high school student and rec-
Rabbis
Urging
Amnesty
By Special Report
NEW YORK The three
branches of American Judaism
have come out jointly in support
of amnesty.
In a policy statement adopted
by the Synagogue Council of
America, the national rabbinical
Continued on PaKe 13
first woman rabbi predicts: 'more coming'
By BEN GALLOB
rpHE FIRST woman rabbi in American history has
reported that ten women are currently studying for
the rabbinate in Reform and Reconstructionist semi-
naries and predicted that women will be ordained as
Conservative rabbis within the next ten years.
Rabbi Sally Priesand, the assistant rabbi at the
Stephen Wise Free Synagogue of New York, made
that prediction in a review of her experiences since
she decided that she wanted to be a rabbi, adding that
she had become a role model for young girls who have
been inspired by her example to work for the goal
of ordination.
SHE REPORTED her impressions and experien-
ces in the current issue of "Council Woman," the
quarterly publication of the National Council of Jewish
Women.
She declared that when she entered the Hebrew
Union College, the Cincinnati branch of the Reform
seminary. Reform Judaism had elevated the status of
women in many areas but it was "not yet ready for
the spiritual leadership of a woman."
She cited, as among her problems as a rabbinical
student, that while her professors were fair, "occa-
Continued on Page 5


Page 2
JmUi ncridHar and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, May 10, 1974
Schneider, Meline To Head
1974 Allocations Committee
Dr. Norman Atkin. president of
Jewish Welfare Federation, has
announced the appointment of
DR. JOIL A. SCHNtWtR
Dr. Joel Schneider as chairman
ot the 1974 Allocations Commit-
tee. Dr. Samuel Meline has been
appointed cochaiiman.
"Raisin? funds through the in-
strumentality of our Campaign is
the means by which we imple-
ment our great concerns and re-
sponsibility for on-going positive
program.; enhancing Jewish life
in Hollywood. America and Over-
seas" Dr. Schneider stated. "In
effect, we act out our Jewish tra-
dition and heritage through the
many causes that come to us for
support and which we embrace
in our annual campaign.
"The importance of raising
money is obvious and has more
meaning when we know WHY
we are raising it. The agencies
whose programs and finances we
study and support in our alloca-
tion process, represent the
WHY. "Uiey are Judaism in
action."
Working with Dr. Schneider
and Dr. Meline will be Lewis E.
Cohn and Dr. Stanley Margulies,
chairman and cochairman of Lo-
cal and Regional Agencies; Dr.
Meron Levitats and Mrs. Robert
f A viva) Bacr. chairman and co-
chairman of National Service
vies and Abraham Halpern
and Mrs. Maisha Tobin. chairman
and cochairman of National-Com-
munity Relation 1 and Cultural
Ag< ncies. Over 200 persons in
the community have been Inviti d
to serve on the subcommittees.
This year all the local agencies
will be asked to meet with the
Local Agency subcommittees.
The allocation process, to prop-
erly allocate the funds raised, is
second only to Campaign itself in
its importance. The allocation
meetings will begin the week of
W jp**^ j0m
^m "^ &***<&
I '
A. JtL

tty, \|
R ( >1 -j
Intensive Program To Enroll
'Shomrei YisraeF Launched
A special Israel Bonds cam-
paign designed to expand the role
of every Jewish family in support
of Israel's economy has been
launched in the Hollywood-Hal-
landale area, according to Wil-
liam Littman, chairman of the
South Broward Israel Bonds
board of governors.
The campaign will concentrate
on the enrollment of "Shomrei
Yisrael" (Guardians of Israel),
purchasers of $1,000 or more in
State of Israel Bonds.
Over 500 synagogues across the
United States have scheduled spe-
si" KURASH.""'"

INC
Main Office 2429 Hollywood Blvd.
Phone 923-2461
Branch Office 7991 Johnson St.
Phone 966-9300 or 947-3332 Toll Free
Stanley S. Kurash Our Large Staff of
and Naomi R. Kurash Qualified Associates
Ready To Serve You.
The first
Riverside Chapel
in Broward County
is now open
in Holly wood.
5801 HoUywood Boulevard
Telephone 920-1010
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPf L. PNC FUNERAL DIRECTORS
Otier Rw. at Chtpe's <" lit
Uitmi .*m. Smc" ft Lt^Ot'dtt Ho"r"0oc t'tss
16480NE 19thAv*m*. North Mum. Bjc" M7-SM2
1911 Street A Alton Rod. Mimi Beh JE 11151
1250Nwmndy0'ie M.am, Be ,:n JI1-11S1
Douj las RojflJI S W 17th Street MamiJI 11151
RiverSNfe 9*10 series lie New *o- Vrf'oeo'il*" m
wth ChteHl in Kanftallan. Iht B'cm.. t'totirt
rnKxttrnttnaltl fernon
Murray U. RuMn. FA _________________
oial events for May and June
specifically to enroll members of
their congregations as Shomrei
Yisrael.
The Shomrei Yisrael campaign
seeks to reach 10.000 families in
South Florida, each purchasing a
minimum of $1,000 to achieve $18
million in Israel Bond sales tow
ards South Florida's $35 million
qjota in 1974.
The i74 Israel Bonds cam-
paign has undertaken the respon-
sibility of providing the necessary
dollars for Israel's $1.07 billion
development budget, compared to
$642 million for the fiscal year
which ended Mar. 31. The devel-
opment budget provides the
funds for basic economic enter-
prises during the present crisis.
Sabra Group Of
Hadassah Meets
The Sabra Group of the Holly-
wood Chapter of Hadassah re-
cently held its first official meet-
ing at Temple Beth Shalom with
50 women in attendance. Guest
speaker was Betty Fast, member-
ship vine president of the Flor-
ida Region.
The newly formed board has
since held a meeting to plan the
coming months. Early in June a
pool and brunch party will be
held. The board will continue to
meet throughout the summer to
formulate programs and activi-
ties.
A recommendation was made
that future ?ir meetings be
hold on the third Thursday eve-
ning of each month with board
meetings on the lirst Thursday
morning of e^ch month.
Residents of the Emerald Hills-
Hollywood area who are not Ha
da-- -ah members but wish to join,
and those who have not re-
instated their past membership
from former areas, are requested
to call the president pro-tem
Mrs. Leon Brauser, or Mrs. Her-
man Stolman, membership vice
president pro-tem for further in-
formation.
Max Dimont Last Lecturer
In 'Symposia IF Series
DR. SAM MUM
May 13. with "Final Allocation
Reports" planned fjr the middle
of June.
> thor and spokesman en Jewish
history, will be the gue-t speaker
when Symposia II completes it-
three-part lecture scries at 8:00
p.m. May 23 at Temple Beth El,
Hollywood.
Sponsored by the Jewish Wel-
fare Federation of Greater Holly-
wood and the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida, the
Symposia has presented Phil
Baum and Marshall Skta e to
highly enthusiastic audience-.
Dimont. who e subject will be
"The Indestructible Jews Will
The Real Jewish HI tory St i
Forward Please." is author <>i
"Jews, God and History." r"i>-
ii l: one-volume historj ol the
Jews, Born In Helsinki, Finland.
be served du ing World War 11
with the Intelligence Service ol
i, Ameiican Army in France,
Belgium, and Germany,
Dimont has lectured from coast
to coast on Jewish history and in
Israel, he delivered a series of
speeches at the Weizmann Insti-
tute on the role <>f the Diaspora
in Jewish survival.
"Jews. God and History," now in
its 10th printing, has been trans-
lated into French and Hebrew,
and has also been published in
EnglanJ. The pape:back edition
MAX DIMONT
has sol I over UOO.OOO copies and
is now aNo in its 10th pr
Hi- 1 itest book. "The Inch
ible Jews." is an examination of
the historical factors behind Jew-
Hi survival beyond the normal
life span of a civilization.
Mr?. E'lie Katz, ehairman of
the Committee on Jewish Life,
repoi !s that tickets may !n pur-
chased at the Jewish Community
Center office or at the door
Women's Division 'Learn-In'
For '75 Leadership Planned
Mrs. Marsha Tobin. 1974 Wom-
en's Division campaign chairman,
announced at a recent campaign
evaluation meeting that an excit
ing "learn-in" is planned for the
whole State of Florida Women t
Division campaign leadership.
The meetings will be held on
Tuesday and Wednesday, May 21
and 22, at the Holiday Inn lo-
cated on Route 84. The agenda
calls for evaluation of the 1974
campaigns and development of
techniques for greater achieve-
ment in the 1975 Campaigns.
Tuesday evening, May 21, Zvi
Kolitz, prominent Israeli author,
movie and theatrical producer,
will speak on the subject: "Sur-
vival for What?" Attendance for
Mr. Kolitz' presentation is open
to all Florida women campaign
workers.
Mrs. Tobin requests that any-
one wishing to attend the mee't-
ZVI KOLITZ
ing featuring Mr. Kolitz. contact
her at the Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration office.
PCOPLC VOU
can still
bclicvc in
HOUYWOOD FEDERAL SAVIH6S
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
j^HALLANDALE OFFICE: 2401 E Hal^ndale Beach Blvd. A
THE
TRAVELERS
u
Ansel Insurance Agency'l
Ansel Wirtenstein *
All Forms of Insurance
including
Homeowners Automobile Jewelry
2430 Hollywood Boulevard Hollywood
9239518 9453527
FIREMAN'S
FUND
AMERICAN
IhivMvci tonrmu


Friday, May 10. 1974
*'J&vist)nuhUtUn and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 3
Jewish Family Service To J.emP^ In Pines Letter to the Edj
Hold Annual Meeting May 14
Jewish Family Service of Brow-
ard County will hold its 12th an-
nual meeting at 8 p.m.. Tuesday,
May 14, in the Town Hail Room
of the Home Federal Building,
1720 Harrison St., Hollywood.
The constantly expanding Jew-
ish community in Broward Coun-
ty has brought with it an ever-
increasing demand for the p.o-
fessional counselling services of-
fered by thii agency. Requests
from communities in the north-
ern end of the county have been
so numerous that the agency has
assigned a counsellor to that area
who is located in the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale offices, 707 N. Federal Hwy..
Fort Lauderdale.
More than 750 individuals and
families torn by marital conflict,
bewildered by the behavior of
children, concerned about grow-
ing old, or faced with pressures
and anxieties in a world of chang-
ing values and standards, have
sought help for their problems.
An additional 300 families were
given information and referral
services. Additionally, Jewish
Family Service provides an adop-
tion program.
Mrs. Richard Leben, nominat-
ing committee chairman, will
propose a slate for the board of
directors including Robert Baer.
Mrs. George Barron. Charle
Dubin. Rabbi Robert Frazin, Fred
Greene, Stanley Greenspun. Sey-
mour Levin, Mrs. Edward Licht-
man, Mrs. Herbert Heiden, Doug-
las C. Kaplan, Colonel K. J.
Lewis. Mrs. Joel Miller, Dr. Ed-
ward Nacht, Mrs. Arthur Plum
Sheldon Shaffer, Dr. Marvin
Shustcr, Mrs. Marsha Tobin, Dr
Joel Wilentz, Dr. Sheldon Wil
lens. Dr. Paul Winter;, Mrs. Sam
uel Winn and David Yorra.
Officers to be presented arc
James Fox Miller, president
Mark Fried, vice president;
Emanuel Borenstein. treasurer,
and Mrs. Richard Temlak, secre-
tary.
The nominatinu a n-mittce in-
cludes Mrs. Richard Leben, chair-
man: Fred Greene, Douglas C
K;ti> ,ir,. Mrs. taron Schecter,
1 Sei fer, Mi -. Richard Tem-
lak and Dr. Paul Winick.
Jewish Family Service o!
Broward County is ,i [ami y am
sney supp thi
d Way of Bi aunty,
The annual meel n
the total community Sit e
pec t Li limited, i sei. i
mould be made bj pho
ej o H< e. '
- Ved.
B'nai BVIrh
Opens Hollywood
Regional Office
Arnold I.. executive
vica president of District Grand
Lodge No. 5, B'nai B'rith, head-
quartered in Atlanta. Ga., has
announced the opening of a re-
gional office in Suite 950 of the
Hollywood Bread Building. 1747
Van Burton St., Hollywood.
District Grand Lodge No. 5
co\er> 168 louges from Maryland
to Key West and consists of
19.000 members of B'nai B'rith,
the oldest and largest Jewish
service organization in the world,
now in its 131st year.
The regional office will service
70 lodges with over 10.000 mem-
nrj in the State of Florida and
will he under the supervision of
regional director Col. Philip
Cohen.
Hollywood Mayor David Keat-
ing and Hallandale Mayor Milton
L. Weinkle cut the ceremonial
ribbon at the opening.
Those attending included presi-
dents and officers of Dade and
Broward County lodges as well as
the South Florida and Broward-
Palm Beach Councils of B'nai
B'rith Lodges, and other Jewish
community leaders.
JAMES FOX MILLER
and is also a major local reci-
pient of the Greater Hollywood
and Greater Fort Lauderdale
Jewi-h Federa'ions' funds.
Plans For School
Temple-In-The-Pines president
Jerry Seligman has announced
pians for a religious school,
Grades 1-6. this Fall.
Pre registration forms are
available and intce^ted patients
are urged to pre-register their
children immediately. It is im-
perative that a tentative school
loster be compiled so that suffi-
cient materials can be ordered
and teachers hired.
Plans have also been set for
the first Bar Mitzvah in the Con-
gregation, scheduled for Septem-
ber.
For further information, call
Mrs. Jerry Seligman. Mrs. Ric
Garfinkle or Mrs. Les Berger.
Dr. Rinkoff To Install
Hallandale Chapter of the
American Israeli Lighthouse will
hold a regular meeting and in-
stallation of officers Thursday.
May 16. at 12:30 p.m. in the First
Federal Savings and Loan Bldg..
183rd Street and Biscayne Blvd.
Dr. Solomon Rinkoff will install
the newly elected officers.
Let Vs Not Be Silent
RABBI FOR ME.
Challenging opportunity for Conservative rabbi of liberal philosophy in
small congregation r-. *- >< directions.
Cong. Beth Jacob Lewiston, Maine
Contact: Irving M. Bell, P.O. Bex 196, Lewiston, ME. 04240
Problems with your Sliding Door?
CALL
WINDOOR-ART
COMPLETE SERVICE
SALES INSTALLATION
Also best service for windows doors screens tub enclosures
Porches and balconies enclosures
CALL ANY TIME
123-1004 922-1354
2022 N. Dixie Highway, Hollywood
:
WE DON'T ADVERTISE
LOW PRICES
WE GIVE THEM!
HOLLYWOODRford
1200 N, FEDERAL HWY.
921-6800 HOLLYWOOD 947-3411
NEW!
Acoustical Vinyl
CEILING SPRAY
"with or without diamond dust'
Give New Life to Old or Cracked Ceilings
fr OFFICES -ft HOMES
NEW CONSTRUCTION
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE 989-3983
Dry wall Plastering Home Improvements j
BOWERS & SONS
Editor, .! u ish Floridian-Shofar:
If there ever -was a time when
the people in Israel required our
encouragement, it is now.
They need strengthening indi-
vidually and collectively; rela-
tives and friends, the govern-
ment, the Knesset, the press.
Call them or write to them.
Tell them not to falter, not to
despair, not to listen to voices
of doom and counsels for weak-
ness.
Tell them not to give up the
fight for Zionism, for Eretz Yis-
rael, for Jewish history, for a
great future for the nation.
Can and tell them that there is
neither room nor reason for de-
featism and retreat.
Tell them that we are with
them tha: America is with
them and they will not be let
down.
Let us reach Jerusalem with a
message of hope and courage.
For the sake of Zion, let us not
be silent.
SAM J. PERRY. President
Broward Zionist District
arnett
lanK
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
or
MAUAHDAlf,
INC.
C^.J'0-n Wide
DRAPERIES
rd
BED SPREADS
INTMIOR DECOMTINO
FASHION FABRICS
805 N. FEDERAL HWY.
HALLANDALE. FLORIDA
Phone: 9230564
SHADES
SLIP COVERS
UPHOLSTERY
>**-*
Merme Painst 2. -jpp.'ics
HARDWARE ft PAINT. INC
HOUSEWAI7E3 fir GIFTS
H8ME DECOR ACCESSORIES
Baik/Cltstt Accetftriti
BstHeti 9ii<4*s nm Dividers
*ia4dw Sit aft t Artificial flowtrf
Erc6$:y Rails Ftlilf*
taNviiac P!ait&
Key 4 Lock WorH Patio Furniture
Store Hours 7:30 A.M. '.30 P.M. Closed Sundays
139 EAST ?EACN BOULEVARD
HALLA&0AU, FLCWUA 33909
____ PHOMES27-fl5
X,ft BJHItfTHHBgg
*1
Licensed ft Insured
Hollywood. Florida
Nom Shipping ^ alencias
1 lb. CoconiU Patties 99c
Pink Seedless Grapefruit
99c a Peck
FRESH SQUEEZED OR iNGE &
GRAPEFRUIT JUICE
ANGIE'3 GROVES
1809 Wi EY STREET
BONDED GUT FRUIT SHIPPERS
TELEPHONE 927-5417



Page 4
+JewlS*fk)ridnan and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, May 10, 1974
vjenrstj Ftoridlian The Two Faces of Gen, Day an
>| miiii lli Of *-KI .Mi, lllil I \ Monu
OFFICE and PI.ANT 120 N.E. 6th St., Miami, Fla. 33132 Phone I73-460f
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 373-4605
P.O. Box 2973. Mi\mi. Fiorida 33101
FREI> K. SHOCHET SIZANNK 8HOCHBT SKLMA M. TMOMPSOX
Editor and PublUher BxacutlVfl BdUor Assistant to Pubin-her
RITA GOODMAN, Ni as Coordinator
The Jewish Ploridian Does Not Guarantee The Kathruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Column*
PubUabad iii-w.-.-ki.v by tba Jawlab Ftorldlaa
Second-Clues Postage Paid at Miami, Fla,
Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater H-tlvwood Shofar Editorial
ADVISORY COMMITTEE I>r. Bheldon Willens, rhairman: Ross Becker-
man, Ben Sailer. Marlon Nevlns, Dr. Xurman Atkln. Robert N. Kerhel
Tha Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Memcer of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndi-
cate, worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association. American As-
sociation of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
BUHSCKIPTION KATES: Kf'Oii'
rndcy. May 10, 1374
Volume 4
18 1YAR 5734
Number 9
Ill-Advised Pronouncement
While we are in general agreement with Rabbi Alex-
ander M. Schindler, president of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations, that what the nation most nseds
today is a resolution of doubts about Watergate and Pres-
ident Nixon's involvement, we find it difficult to agree with
the Rabbi that "the majority of this nation's Jews" favor
congressional impeachment proceedings as a way of get-
ting at the truth.
Statistics are dangerous things. They can be made to
say almost anything, given a clear end in the mind of the
pollster.
We are not suggesting that Rabbi Schindler's reliance
on the Harris Poll is without foundation only that it is
ill-advised.
To say that the majority of America's Jews favor im-
peachment proceedings is so sensitive a position to take
thct it would almost explicitly demand of Habbi Schindler
that he offer his proof first-hand, not second-hand.
Schindler conclusions based on Harris evidence
makes for shaky pronouncements.
Are We Double Dealers?
The 13-0 Security Council resolution censuring Israel
without so much as a single reference to Kiryat Shemona
is one more example of the meaninglessness of the United
Nations as a peace-making organization.
The UN's repeated anti-Israel stance underscores its
Third World character which the Soviet Union holds in as
much contempt as we are bewilderad by it, but manages
to exploit to its most explicit purposes.
This is all the more reason to regard with dismay, il
not anger and disappointment, the U.S. support of the
resolution.
No matter what U.S. Ambassador John Scali said to
explain his vote our concern that an anti-Arab vote
would hurt Henry Kissinger's mission to the Middle East
this week the fact is that such disgusting international
double standards will never give rise to justice.
If we are double-dealers at the United Nations, why
is there any cause to hope that we are not double-dealers
in our role as Israel's ombudsman?
Deciding Not to Decide
The United States Supreme Court has certainly side-
stepped the issue neatly.
Why rule in the Marco DeFunis case, when DeFunis
will be graduating shortly anyway? From the High Court's
point of view, no injustice has been done DeFunis in fact.
As for theory, well the fact makes the theory moot.
But the truth is that the Universiy of Washington ini-
tially made a decision based on a double standard one
for middle class whites and one for the presumably dis-
advantaged minority.
Somehow, DeFunis, a Phi Beta Kappa and magna cum
laude undergraduate, was caught in the crunch. We can
not argue against his belief that what happened to him
was reverse discrimination.
The U.S. Supreme Court, whose job it is to make such
decisions, has for the moment decided not to decide. Some
High Court.
More and More Meaning
The recent observance of the 31st anniversary of the
Warsaw Ghetto Uprising reminds Jews everywhere of one
of the most courageous chapters in their history.
It was also an occasion to remember and honor the
memory of the six million Jews who were the victims of
Nazi barbarism.
Most important of all, it was a time to renew our vow
to be vigilant against future holocausts.
The world was either silent or too passive during the
Nazi period. There was no outcry by governments.
Neither was there a world outcry on the occasion of
the Yom Kippur invasion of Israel last October. Or on the
occasion of the Kiryat Shemona massacre.
The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising has more and more
meaning for us as the years go by.
"1TOSHE DAYAN has two public
images one at home and
one abroad. Furthermore, they do
not square with one another.
At home, the current crisis in
Israel is causing many Israelis to
breathe a sigh of relief that fi-
nally -justice has been done" in
the case of Gen. Dayan. who is
not likely to survive political!)
under any circumstances: wheth-
er Yitzhak Rabin is successful in
formins a new Labor coalition,
or he has to icad his party to pot
luck in another general election.
OTHER ISRAELIS are more
f ank in the feeling that they are
with their country's
aging matinee idol who, through-
out the years, has brought them
little more than embarrassment
a- a result of the >o.did string I I
his personal exploits best leu im-
reported.
Thi* is not to say that he does
not have his admirers.
But the General's detractors
are in far fuller force, and
antedate by a decade and more
I Bel's -fault-finding" mania for
the outcome of the Yooi Kippui
War.
THEY WILL remind you that
after the 1956 Suez campaign,
which was the highpoint of his
military career, Dayan went into
the nosedive of a less than me-
diocre agriculture ministership in
the Ben-Gurion regime.
That the stunning Six-Day War
success was not hi;, as it is gen-
erally assumed outside i-
out Bar-Le\ s and Rabin's, among
othei.-.
And that his private life, which
in the jet set's scandal magazines
reads like a Vladimir Xabakov
tale of nymphettes, leaves much
to be desired in a high public
official.
ABROAD. OF course, the view
is entirely different. Abroad.
Gen. Dayan is the very symbol ol
Israel's pre-Yom Kippur success,
a record of achievement joining
latter 20th century humanism
experienced nowhere else in the
world wi'h frank capitalistic
chutzpah and even arrogance.
And since the war, he has been
seen as the very incarnation of
Israel's Arab "sympathies" her
will to trr.de occupied land for
security at the same time tha:
offers th" Arab v oriel cr
oiive branch nd both
erly understanding.
That is why there Is so mud
muddlement, especially in hi-l-
American places, since Golda
Meir quit the premiership.
It is not Mrs. Meir whose ios?
Dr. Henry Kissinger and even
Anwar Sadat mourns. It is Gen
Dayan's.
WITH GEN. Dayan gone, or so
the concensus goes, Israel is like-
ly to return to a harder line, and
the ceasefire we secured along
the Suez line and are now trying
to negotiate in Golan may just
possibly go down the drain.
The most pathetic thinking in
this arena of malnourished un-
derstanding is exemplified by th
columnists Evans and Novak,
longtime bellwether reporters of
the Nixon administration's vital
signs, and longtime critics of Is-
rael who would like to see her go
down the drain, too, together
with the ceasefire arrangements.
With Gen. Dayan soon to be
plucked from the Israeli political
arena, moaned Evans and Novak
the other day. gone is the hope
that Israelis will be returning to
the Arabs "massive amounts" of
the land she occupied in the Six-
Day War, and therefore gone is
the hope for peace anti-Semitic
style.
THIS STRANGE two-headed
view of Dayan can best be under-
stood in parallel with the career
of Abba Eban.
It is likely that Eban, also, will
not survive the current political
crisis whether or not Rabin
successfully meets Labor's almost
impossible challenge.
Since the earliest days of Is-
rael's rebirth, Eban has been
f.........."':'"
......::"".::.""-
Mindlia

c:::;::;:
worshipped abroad (mainly by
American Jews who find his
pukka South African-Cambi ii^0
accent so beguiling) while
regarded indifferently if not with
downright amusement'at home.
ON EACH occasion in the n;,-t
that I have written about either
or both of these men this way,
American readers have criticized'
me severely, some for "treas
others for "sharing" Jewish se-
nets with goyim who, the
Continued on Page 11
V> ?
m 'As.
Max Lcriier
Sees It
LA JOLLA, Calif. So the U.S. Supreme Court decided ;,,
wait il out on that widely debated case of Marco DeFunis again i
the University of Washington law school, and gave many th(
chance to accu-c it of sti addling and pussyfooting.
In the end the court won't be abie to escape the hot issue
.il who gets admitted to graduate and professional schools, on
what records.
AS THE five-judge majority held, the case may be moot for
DeFunis himself, who is finishing his law course. But the issue
won't remain mute. It is and will continue very lively.
In a nation where higher education is opening up to fam-
ilies, da-sea and castes that never had it before, the question of
what chances there are after college, and who gets those chance-.
has become a flaming one.
THE CHILDREN of the ethnic minorities have been stream-
ing into colleges under the open admissions policy. But. they
a k, of what use is college if they can't get into the professional
schools to nail down the best caieers? To which the whites who
gel squeezed out, even with better records, answer that the "af-
firmative action" which favors one set of ethnic groups means
r, verse discrimination" and a quota .system for the others.
DURING THIS sprinc quaiter I have been a teaching visitoi
at the U.S. International University at La Jolla, where there are
close to 1.000 students in the Graduate School of Human Rela-
tions, more than half of them working for the doctoral de
As the students talk about their backgrounds, two things
become clear about what is happening in the United Stales
ONE IS THAT the graduate and professional school mix
has changed into a mix of white ethnics, nonwhite ethnics and a
growing number of women, with a smaller percentage of U]
middle class males.
The second is that the age median is moving up. The*
mature men and women, mostly in their 30s, 40s and SOs man)
ol them shifting to their second or even third career, as the
post indujt.ial BOCiet) .-hills its needs.
It is exciiing to hold a seminar-room dialogue with people
who have experiences of their own t,i match yours and career
aim.- the) have thought through.
WHEN Wi: discussed the DeFunis issue in such a sel
it took on reality from the lives ot the students themselves.
I is t.) be reminded that, while the earlier elite; wen
haped on the power side, in politics and business, the newer
a e being shaped on the human personality side in
teaching, guidance, legal and health services, public remedial
mental health, diagnostics, communication, conciliation,
therapies.
No society can be a healthy one in which entrance to these
elites is made hard for any group.
VERY CLEARLY, the sons and daughters of the blue collar
class whites and nonwhites -- are moving into these areas
and giving them a new vigor.
I wish the Supreme Court judges could have been there,
taking part in our DeFunis case discussion. They would have
caught a sense of immediacy that might not have emerged from
all the friend-of-the-court briefs with which they were inundated
We went through all the now familiar arguments on both
sides. But then several studenU shifted the whole ground of
the case.
For the accepted ground seems to be that graduate and pro-
fessional schools can only take a severely limited number of
students, so that when the newer ethnics are squeezed in. it
squeezes out some of the earlier ethnics.
BUT WHY do we have to assume limited ground? In a s
ciety where we spend so much for nonessentials, we could surely
reorder the priorities and spend enough for postcollege training
to include both groups those with good backgrounds and rec-
ords, who have shown they can make the grade, and those with
lesser ones, who want the chance to show they can make it.
If education is a right for the young, why not for the older0
Why should it have to be an ethnic battleground?
IT WOULD need more teaching staff, yes, but that can be
managed. It would need more public money, but, given the oil
company profit figures, it strikes me there is money around
which could be used well.
fy\ thC Ume the Supreme Court gets back to these case-,
the delay will have been worthwhile if it gives the public mind
a chance to clear up the issue and shift the discussion to a
broader ground.


Friday, May 10, 1974
* Jewish Fkridliam and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 5
Woman Rabbi Predicts More to Come
"separate the contributions that
women can make from those that
men can make."
Continued from Page 1
sionally I sensed that some of
them would not be overly upset
if I failed."
IN HER fifth year, when she
was qualified to serve as a stu-
dent rabbi, she found that "some
congregations refused to accept
my services."
As she approached ordination,
she began to look for a position.
Some congregations refused even
tJ interview her, "but since I had
not expected anyone to welcome
me with open arms, I was able
to cope with the situation."
Rabbi Pries;.nd described the
offer of the post of assistant rab-
bi at the Manhattan synagogue
as a true blessing because her
rabbinical activities have not
been limited to on-j area of the
synagogue.
She conducts worship service,
preaching every Shabbat, teach-
ing both in the synagogue's adult
institute and in the religious
school, supervising the youth pro-
gram, advising a biweekly discus-
sion group, lecturing to the Gold-
en Age Club, counseling, "offi-
ciating at life-cycle events, and
attending all committee meet-
ings."
SHE ALSO reported she still
managed to find time to travel
and lecture "an activity which
has shown me that congregations
and rabbis are ready for change."
Rabbi Priesand's salary for this
busy round of rabbinical activi-
ties was not disclosed. A syna-
gogue source told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that Rabbi
Priesand was paid in accordance
with her skills and experience
and that her salary was in the
range of what a male assistant
rabbi would have received but
that the exact amount was not
being made public.
Rabbi Priesand reported that,
as far as the congregation is con-
cerned, she has been "extremely
well-received." Participants in
the synagogue's youth program
"relate to me as a young rabbi:
they feel free to speak openly."
She also reported a good rela-
tionship with members of the
Golden Age Club, whose mem-
bers "know that I believe in what
I am doing. That the women in
the congregation are proud of
my presence on the pulpit is in-
dicated by their comments fol-
lowing my lectures."
SHE ASSERTED that her ap-
pearance in a forum series often
becomes a "lesson in conscious-
ness-raising and gives women the
courage they n eed to demand
complete and full participation in
synagogue life." For young girls,
she declared, she had become "a
role model and many of them
who may previously have felt
that the rabbinate was not open
to them have been inspired to
work toward the goal of ordina-
tion."
She reported that the only area
in which people "have shown any
real hesitation is that of my of-
ficiating at funerals."
On the whole, she added, "my
colleagues in the Reform move-
ment have welcomed me warmly,
many of them inviting me to
Wildfire
in the south.
There's no
future in it.
h
dvertu _
tcntr,bytd lor
th# pubi>c good
6) IJJT
Help Prevent Finest Fires in the South
occupy their pulpits." Holding
that it was "still too early to
assess the impact of my ordina-
tion," she said it nevertheless
couid be considered part of a
definite movement "toward com-
plete and full participation by
women in the life of the Jewish
community."
SHE MENITONED, as an ex-
ample, in addition to the grow-
ing number of women studying
for ordination, that "liturgy com-
mittees are becoming increasing-
ly sensitive to the language of
prayer which has been tradition-
ally male-oriented."
Moreover, religious school text-
books arc being rewritten "and
little girls know that they hav
the option of becoming rabbis
and cantors if they so choose."
SHE DESCRIBED the recent
ruling of the Law Standards
Committee of the Rabbinical As-
sembly that women may be
counted in a minyan an indica-
tion of "an increasing sensitivity
towards the religious needs of
women within the Conservative
movement, a first step toward
"the ordination of women by the
Jewish Theological Seminary,
something which I predict will
happen within the next ten
yoar>."
She said she was opposed to
changes in Jewish Religious Law,
contending that "all options must
remain open." She said that as
long as there,are Jewish wom-
en who are satisfied with Ortho-
doxy, "they should have the op-
tion of living within the Ortho-
dox environment."
THOSE WOMEN who want "a
fuller and more complete partic-
ipation in synagogue life" can
choose from Consci vative Juda-
ism, Reconstructionism and Re-
form Judaism, she said.
Rabbi Priesand declared her
answer to the question as to what
special contributions women can
make to Jewi=h communal lift-
was that she felt it was unwise to
She argued that "we ought to
think in terms of what every in-
dividual has to offer rather than
what men and women have to of-
fer by virtue of their sex." She
added she was not convinced that
a woman rabbi had anything
more to offer than a male rabbi
"except perhaps in the area of
compassion since our society has
allowed women to be more com-
passionate and openly emotion-
al."
When congregations consider
hiring women rabbis, she declar-
ed, they should be asked: "What
does she as an individual have
to offer?" rather than "What
does she as a woman have to
offer?"
,'
>*

ISRAEL
\&
. MAIL THI&XOUPON TODAY
STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS
I SHOULD LIKE TO BE ENROLLED AS A MEMBER OF
SHOMRE! ISRAEL PLEASE SEND ME A CURRENT PROSPECTUS
OF THE ISRAEL RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT BONDS.
BONDS
..STATE-
-ZIP-
STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS
420 Lincoln Rood, Suite 2A, Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Miami Tel. 531-6731 Broward Tel. 922-9457


Page 6
+Je*ist> rkridHar and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, May 10, 1974
Soviet Jewcry
Novel Has Impact;
Makes Plight Real
By FRAN NEVINS
After reading Bernard Ma'.a-
Mld'l "The Fixer," I found my-
se.f contemplating the plight of
Jews who are in Soviet prison
today.
The novel relates the story of
innocent Vakov Bok. a fixer by
Inde, who spends two horrible
year; in prison on trumped up
charges before coming to trial.
H< is treated unequally and in-
humanely both by fellow prison-
ers and by authorities because he
is Jewish.
Sometimes it takes a highly
emotional novel to make us feel
the impact o: this treatment for
it docs happen to human beings
ef our faith who aiu born across
the ocean.
Presently in the Soviet Union:
Prisoner of Conscience
(POC) I?rael Zalmanson is being
p evented visits by his relatives.
Theoretically allowed a visit ev-
< hree months, Zalmansnn has
nit seen them since la*t year.
At labor camp.; at Perm,
POC's possessions are searched
and their lives are being made
more miserable than usual. In
Potma No. 19, Boris Azernikov
and Anatoly Goldfeld are not per-
mitted to have their relatives
visit nor to receive the 5-kilo
package normally allowed.
Alexander Feldman remains
in solitary confinement. He suf-
fers kidney ailments and was not
able to continue the heavy phys-
ical work. Relatives visiting him
were lefused permission to see
him or sr?ak to a prison author-
ity about him.
Prisoner Yuri Pokh, suffer-
ing from a defect since birth,
has been placed in a camp hos-
pital. Ironically, this was the
reason for his discharge from the
Red Army. After submitting doc-
uments to the emigration office
in Odessa, he was then served
conscription papers. When he at-
tempted to explain that he was
not eligible for army service on
the legitimate grounds of illness.
Pokh was arrested. After being
tried in the summer of 1972, he
was sentenced to 34 years im-
prisonment.
Yakov Suslensky recent ly
suffcied a heart attack while
serving a seven year sentence in
Perm. His wife, Margarita, has
sought intervention with the in-
tention of getting him transferred
to a place with adequRte medical
services and ultimately away
from the Soviet Union. She needs
encouragement. Her add* ess i;:
I SSR Moldavian SSR: Iiemle i.
Ulitsa I.unacharsky 3 3: Suslen-
sky, Margarita.
Letters to Soviet authorities
asking for equal and fair treat-
ment of prisoners, can bring
pi essure trom the outside.
it ir iz
The National Conference on
Soviet Jewry (11 West 42 Street,
New York i has prepared a 61
page USSR Prisoner of Consci-
ence Resource Book. Subjects
included in the book are the
backgrounds of trials of Jews,
arrest and trial procedures, com-
mon charges against Soviet Jew-
ish activists and prison camp con-
ditions. The book also gives sug-
gestions of ways to help, how to
write letters to prisoners and use-
ful addresses. The book, which
costs $1, sounds interesting and
involved.
ix Minutes after he returned from
fte Soviet Union where he at-
tended an unprecedented meet-
in with a group of Jewish dis-
sidents. Sen. Edward Kennedy
announced his continued support
for the Jackson Amendment,
which forbids trade concessions
to nations not al.owing fiee emi-
gration.
& -,V *
New York gubernatorial candi-
date Howjrd Samuels took the
important step of removing Pepsi
machines from his campaign of-
fice in protest of Pepsico's soft
drink sales in the Soviet Union
,le p te their awareness of Jewish
oppression.
BJf
TB
PCOPLC VOU
can still
bclicvc in
HOLLYWOOD FEDERAL SAVINGS
A
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
'.. -v.EOFFlCf -.lale Beach Blvd
Rabbi Drazin To Be Honored
At Temple Israel Breakfast
Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin will be
honored by congregants of Tem-
pie Israel of Miramar at a "Salute
ciation of Greater Miami, has
been spiritual leader of Temple
Israel since 1972. He was chap-
lain of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation in 1971, and rabbi at
the Israelite Center Temple in
Miami for six years prior to his
affiliation :.n Miiamar.
A vice president of Sholem
Lodge. B'nai B'rith (Miami),
Rabbi Drazin is regional chair-
man of the Rabbinic Alumni of
Hebrew Theological College in
Chicago.
Rabbi Drazin will receive the
State of Israel Bonds Scroll of
Honor at the "Salute to Israel"
presented "in deep appreciation
of exceptional devotion and serv-
ice in advancing Israel's progress
and welfare through the econo-
mic development program made
possible with the aid of State cf
Israel Bonds."
The Temple Israel event is part
of the Shomrei Yisrael campaign
being carried out to stabilize Is-
rael's economy.
RABBI AVROM DRAZIN
to Israel" breakfast Sunday. June
2. .'Iilto:: M. Parson, executive di-
rector of the South Florida Is-
rael Bond Organization, has an-
nounced.
Rabbi Drazin. president of the
Browa d Board of Rabbis and
secretary of the Rabbinical Asso-
* MORNINGSTAR'S JEWELERS *
PROTECT YOUR JEWELS!!!
Have Them Appraised by State Licensed Diamond Appraiser
WHILE YOU WAIT
119 N. 20 Ave. 923-2372 Hollywood
WE PAY CASH FOR
DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY
REGARDLESS OF CONDITION
JtlLCANPi PATES AGREE.
ZIP COPE SPEEPS
HOLIDAY MAIL
k.
pines
% Stan 1 Tall
Vl in Florida's
^ Future!
may Treasure
of the Month
3 exciting prizes for 3 couples. Trip 1: Disney
World's Magic Kingdom. Trip =2: The Space Ager,
Kennedy Space ix>rt and Walt Disney World. Trip
# 3: the Swing-around, covers the space center,
Disney World and Cypress Gardens for 3 days, 2
nights. Just fill out your calendar coupon and de-
posit it in our Lobby Display.
CMtotoy50&aAs... andSeWice StillGme&Vue/
first nRTionni. brrn
OF HOLLVLUOOD ii

FLORIOR
annusmrres ,
inc.
2001 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD
P.O. BOX 49
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33022
PHONE 920-4567
BROWARD COUNTY'S SENIOR BANK
Serving Continuously Since 1924
Affiliated with
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF HALLANDALE
SECOND NATIONAL BANK OF WEST HOLLYWOOD
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF MIRAMAR
MEMBERS FEDERAL
RESERVE SYSTEM
EACH DEPOSITOR
INSURED TO S20.0Q0
BY FDIC


Friday. May 10, 1974
'Jewish fhrkMaft an,i Shofar of Hollywood
Page 7
1 was recently asked what motivated me to become a Federation
executive.
My training had been in psychiatric social work and until 1967,
dealt with individuals and families who had problems.
The question is difficult to answer, but upon reflection, I feel
that there was one motivating force. As a social woiker working with
people's problems, I became aware that the milieu in which they
lived created a number of the problems which they faced. At the
same time, 1 saw moie and more that theie was a need for these
people and families to identify with something which gave them a
sen.-e of gratification and belonging. This was especially true from
having worked in Jewish communal seivice lor most of my profes-
sional career and feeling that the creation of a stronger Jewish en-
vironment for people to identify with, would be mo^t meaningful
for the suivival of Jews and Judaism.
And so, seven years ago, I became a professional with the Jew-
ish Federation movement.
Individuals change their life styles and patterns very slowly, and
yet, over a period of menths, changes can be perceived in many
cases. However, community movements are much slower because
moie people are involved, more relationships need to be estabiijhod,
more cooperation needs attainment and more forces are operating in
a competitive environment.
Be that as it may, change does take place. The community lead-
ership who work for these changes often become impatient. Under-
standably so. They demand the type of perfection demanded in their
businesses. This also is understandable. However, in working with a
community, there are many toices which operate beyond the con-
trol of the Federation because of their independence and wish to
provide their programs for their people.
The strength of Federation is in helping each organization and
group undeistand that although their programs are viable and im-i
portant, at thf same time, they must look at the total community
and their involvement in making it a better place for all.
In a very short period of time, there have been definite irdica-
tions that in one of the fastest growing areas of America, we dc
have the beginning sense of Community." In six short month; since
the Yom Kippur War besan, many, many people have become in-
volved in our Campaign; a Jewish Community Centers Progiam was
developed with excellent results; two series of Educative Symposia
were originated, one of which is now taking place and a beginning
Judaica Program now has approximately one hundred of our teen-
agers involved in Jewrih studies; a program developed by all the
Synagogues and Temples for teenagers ot this community regardless
of whether they are affiliated or not.
If we look back to less than a year ago we remember the mass
celebration we had honoring Israel with overflow audiences both at
Young Circle and one of our Temples. We can see the development
of a spirit in being Jews.
Without question there is much more to be done. Of course
there has been criticism about what has been done, but yet, at the
same time, there is forward movement. We cannot accomplish mira-
cles overnight. We can and are working toward increasing the effi-
ciency and operation of our Federation and developing the types!
of programs and staff necessary to meet the needs of our people.
As I see it all of us will benefit from a strong Federation
and community We need to care. We need to show our concern b
working together despite the trials and tribulations that become
evident so that we can not only be proud of our community, but of
being Jewish.
Children Enjoy
JCC's Spring
Holiday Program
The Jewish Community Center,
under the direction of Myrna
Amsel, reports a highly success-
ful Spring Holiday program con-
ducted during the time children
were cut of school.
In the elementary school cat-
egory, kindergarten through fifth
g.ade, 30 children enjoyed two
days of field trips to Imagina-
tion Farms, the Canine Training
Center of the Hollywood Police
Department, Hollywood Fire De-
partment and an outdoor day at
T-Y Park.
Two other days were spent at
Temple Beth El where they en-
gaged in drama, singing, games,
a:ts and crafts, scavenger hunts
and movies.
Some 63 children in the sixth
through eighth grade levels were
treated to a travel program which
included a trip to the Monkey
Jungle, Parrot Jungle and Polar
Palace.
For the 66 teenagers, it was an
evening of ice skating at the
Polar Palace followed by a pizza
party at a local restaurant.
'"We were really busy keeping
the plans flowing but it was cer-
tainly worthwhile because every
child appeared to be enjoying
the holiday," Ms. Amsel said.
HIGHLANDS: NORTH CAROLINA
Camp Highlander
A RESIDENTIAL CAMP FOR BOYS AND GIRLS
AGES 7-16 IN 2-4-5-9 WEEK SESSIONS
JUNE 15-AUGUST 18
PROVIDING SPECIALIZED PROGRAMS
INCLUDING HIGHLANDER ADVENTURE and
WILDERNESS KAMP (HAWK)
.....

Designed for boys 14 to 16 years ol age. the program deais not only wilh
the participant s ipiationship la his environment, but also with his relaiionship
lo hmiseil and others.
Contact Mr. A. W Rousseau. PINE CREST SCHOOL.
1901 N.E. 62nd St.. Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 33308
Phone: 772-6550
Robert M. Baer Elected
Temple Beth El President
At the 18th annual meeting of
Temple Beth El held recently, the
following officers were elected
for the coming vear:
Robert M. riaer, president; Dr.
Norman Atkin, executive vice
presidents; James Fox Miller and
Samuel Schwartzman, vice presi-
dents: Theodore Lifset, treasurer;
Jules B. Gordon, financial secre-
tary; and Milton Jacobs, secre-
tary.
The following were elected to
a one-year term as members of
the board of trustees: Judge Mor-
ton L. Abram, Jack J. Alexander.
Dr. Norman Atkin, Melvin H.
Baer, Robert M. Baer, Dr. Louis
Bennett. Dr. Robert Blank, Mrs.
Henry Cohn. Mrs. Irving Duskin,
Mrs. Harold Firestone, Dr. Abra-
ham Fischler. Alfred Golden,
Jules B. Gordon, Robert W. Gor-
don, Dr. Philip Gould, Irving
Green, Sanford Heims, Dr. Asher
Hollander, Milton Jacobs, Stuart
Kallman, Myer Kirsner, Dr. Ru
bin Klein, Hyman Kones, Dr. Al-
vin Krasne, Jack I. Levy, R.
Mitchell Lewis, Theodore Lifset,
James Fox Miller, L. Paul Nestel,
Dr. Saul Nitzberg, Irving Price,
Samuel Schwartzman, Bernard
Schinder. Joseph Shmelzer, A.
Pettie Weinberg and Charles S.
Wolfe.
ROBERT BAER
At the meeting, reports were
given by Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffe,
spiritual leader of the temple,
and Sydney D. Kronish, temple
administrator. Judge Abram pre-
sent Lewis E. Cohn. outgoing
pi evident, with a gift from the
temple in appreciation of his "un-
tiring efforts during his tenure."
gurdines
l^florido
sale!
POLYESTER KNIT PANTSUITS to fit and flatter most every
mother in town. So many great-looking styles, choosing is a cinch!
Sleeveless vests, short sleeve shirt-jacs. Western looks, embroi-
dery trims. All with pull-on pants. Pastels, checks, textures. 8-18,
but not in every style. Dresses 2. Reg. $22 to S26___ -17.99


Paae 8
+Jf>*istfk>ridlk>n and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, May 10, I974
Israeli film a_-tress De.:ilia Friealand was guest of honor
at the Fairways Riviera 74 Campaign brunch in the Diplo-
mat Country Club. With her in the top pictura are Ted
Marcus, (left) buildina cochairman, and Sam Todor, chair-
man. Below are Samuel Rosenberg, (left) Ruth Feuerstein
and Milton Spitz, who were among the guests.
Brunch speaker Dahlia Friedlanc and Michael Bloom, go-
chairman.
Among the brunch guests were Helen S. Landau (left) and
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Wien<.
ClarKare
aDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
a
a
a
D
a
D
a
D
D
D
D
a
D
D
a
a
a
D
a
a
a

ANY SIZE
LIVING ROOM,
DINING ROOM,
and H A L L.
$3900
'Whit* slightly hiohar
QtjAIHI JET CARPET CLEANING
m
24 HOUR SiHVICE 7 DAYS A W![K I
oniiiNCi show*
Dlf shag srtciAtisr-
MASIANS L OMIIMTALS
Mi C'b 0*l|lr Too"
FIMf A SMOKI OAMACE
INSUMAMCi ESIlMATtI
563-5544
ca--i -oa
M*CNI| CO.
ft
a
n
D
D
D
D
?
D
D
?
D
?
D
D
D
a
D
D
a
DDDDDDDDDDDDaDDDDaaB
Mrs. Blonder New
President Of
Friendship Club
Mrs. Rose Blonder was in-
stalled as president of the Tem-
ple Beth Shalom Senior Friend-
ship Club at a recent installation
luncheon. The installation was
performed by Dr. Morton Ma-
lavsky, spiritual leader. Cantor
Irving Gold sang the anthems.
Outgoing president, William
Weiser, received a plaque. A
check was presented to Dr. Ma-
lavsky for the new Sanctuary
Building Fund.
In addition to Mrs. Blonder,
the new officers are Mrs. William
Kowitt, vice president enter-
tainment and ways and means;
Mrs. Rose Bayard, cochairman
vice president: Mrs. Betty Miller,
vice president membership;
Mrs. Adele Gerber. fourth vice
presided; Mrs. Helen Kalish, re-
cording secretary; Max Weiss, fi-
nancial secretary, and Morris
Axinn, treasurer.
New trustees are Louis Bern- '
stein. Robert Etkin and William
Kowitt. Louis Berkman and M.
Alpert are sergeants-at-arms.
Members will meet every Tues-
day in the Temple Beth Shalom
Assembly Hall.
Broward Zionists
Celebrate 26th
Retired architect, Al Prober, a friend for 40 years of Fairways
South resident George Paley, presented Paley with a com-
munity sevice award in behalf of United Jewish Appeal at a
recent rally held at Temple Beth El, Hollywood. Paley, asso-
ciate area chairman for Fairways North and South and
Meadowbrook highrise for the 1974 Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion Campaign, was honored for outstanding and dedicated
service as Mrs. Paley and Mrs. Carolyn Davis, vice chair-
man of the Hollywood Beach Highrise Division, looked en.
Anni
THE STAFF OF
ANOTHER DIMENSION
INVITES YOU TO EXPERIENCE
THE LATEST IN HAIR DESIGN
ANOTHER DIMENSION
5980 S.W. 40th AYE., FORT LAUDERDALE
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT 962-0770
(100 ft. North of Stirling Road and North 58th Ave., Hollywood
versary
The recent meeting held at
Temple Sinai in Hollywood which i
celebrated the 26th Anniversary
of the State of Israel, was most
successful, Sam J. Perry, presi-
dent ot the Broward Zionist Dis-
trict, reports. It concluded reg- \
ular meetings for the season.
The meeting was chaired by-
Mrs. Rose Perry, membership
vice president, who was substitut- I
ing for her husband who is re- j
covering from an illness. She re-
ported that membership, particu-:
larly life membership, has gain- '.
ed considerably during the past
year.
Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffe, spiritual
leader of Temple Beth El, Holly-
wood, and Mrs. Jaffe became life ,
members. Most recent life mem-
bers are Dr. Morton Malavskv.
spiritual leader of Temple Beth
Shalom, Hollywood, and Mrs.
Malavsky.
The executive committee is
comprised of the following of-
ficers: Sam J. Perry, president:
Mel Reiser and Rose Perry, vice
presidents- Lillian Jacobson,
treasurer and Isadore Goldberg!
secretary.
Needlepoint Demonstration
Scheduled By 0RT Chapter
Erica and Pat will show their
original designs and demonstrate
a beginning needlepoint stitch to
members of Miramar Chapter of
Women's American ORT (Organ-
ization for Rehabilitation through
Training) at 8:00 p.m. Monday i
at the Hollywood Federal Build-
ing.
The public is invited. For addi-
tional information call Mrs. Mar-
\
X
X
X
X"
T"
s \ \
RASOR'S FOREIGN CAR SIRVICE
WE REPAIR VOLKSWAGEN, PORSCHE-AUDI
SPECIALIZING IN MOTOR &
TRANSMISSION EXCHANGE
VOLKSWAGEN PAINT & BODY WORK
983-1344
2315 S. STATE RD. 7, HOLLYWOOD
X
X
X
X
\
.
\
s
A.
tin cnnni M'-amar.
Y. WYCHE I
LET US BEAUTIFY YOUR HOME!
GENERAL
PAINTING \jj
CONTRACTORS
SPECIALIZING IN ROOF
AND HOUSE PAINTING
- PRESSURE CLIANING.
Licensed Insured
Call Us for
FREE ESTIMATES
f EL. 989-8629
Serving South
Jrfjword for Qy>r ]Q Ytorc |
241HOUR SERVICE
ESTABLISHED
1953
922-2177
Ahxtfi-UocU Ale Cx^iiiu^iH^
COMMERCIAL- RESIDENTIAL -
CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONING UNITS ONLY
1117 S. 30th AVI., HOLLYWOOD, FLA.
LICENSED
INSURED
"Ask For''
HERB HOCH
MECHANICAL
CONTRACTOR
CLASS I


Friday, May 10, 1974
+Jmi9li ncridHam and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 9
AT BIRCH STATE PARK PICNIC
150 Senior Citizens
Do Their Own Thing
By RITA GOODMAN
It took four buses to transport
them all from their everyday
livea in the Greater Hollywood
area to the woodsy picnic area of
Birch State Park in Ft. Lauder-
dale where tall stately pine trees
watched over them like little
child: en at play.
They did play, but children
no more. The 150 senior citizens
v, re afforded another fun-day
under the auspices of the Jew-
is Community Center, a bene-
ficiary of Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion.
An occasional cane, wheelchair
o: walker amidst the group of
retired men and women only
.v: ved to prove that undaunted
by infirmities of age, they were
still willing to push on in the
spirit of the day.
It was spirited.
Early, there was a haze. One
woman said, "It's chil.y ... 1
hope the sun comes out."
You can get skin cancer from
th lira," another admonished.
MOST WORE sweaters to pro-
tect themselves from the chi.l.
Bui the sun did shine and so
di I they.
Within five minutes of the
I ---' arrival, the park was a
kerboard of hot canasta
is played with fervor.
Each parson did their own
l walked to the Intercoastal
t i "watch the fish jumping."
A table of strangers Interro-
I i ach other. "Are you from
N tvt York?"
The Bronx."
v husband had a store
." They continued to swap
K: i:ix stories, their thing in
raon.
When the volunteers started to
light the barbeque coals, the
n-.-*n became superintendents of
oals. "Where's the caterer?"
''What time do we eat?'' was
"Chef calls it a complete
Spaghetti Dinnei
the kids call it
an Italian feast
And what a feast it is
ready tc serve in just about
12 minutes. Tender, freshly
cooked spaghetti. Lav-
ished with savory, piping
hot mushroom sauce, finely
seasoned and home-style
thick. Then topped with
zippy grated cheese,
u-m-m. Grandissimo ta'am!
And all the makings in this
one packageChef Boy-
Ar-Dee* Complete Spa-
ghetti Dinner. Keep plenty
on hand for thrifty, family-
pleasing meals.
COMPLETE
Spaghetti
Dinner
with MUSHROOM SAUCE
the overall early theme.
When the food did arrive, the
games, fish-watching and conver-
sations came to a sudden halt
FOOD BFCAME not unlike a
Social Security check. It gave
them a pood feeling.
And the cartons of hambur-
R"r hot do-s, salads and cold
drinks became a hornet's nest of
activity.
Only Myrna Amsel. JCC Direc-
tor, would think to buy cans of
a drink called "Purple Passion."
They drank and ate with pas
si on.
Ruth Levin*, a widow, said oi
her enjoyment. "I love picnics.
We always had them when the
children were small."
Bella and Bernard Wiesner
said. "This is our second trip.
You don't want to go by yourself,
so this is nice."
It was a first trip for Irene
Rosenberg who came along with
her sister and brother-in-law.
Anna and Moe Greenwaid. She
said. "It's beautiful scenery. 1
wouldn't have had the opportu-
nity otherwise."
The three agreed: "We don't
want to miss any trips."
It was also a first trip for Yella
Le.'kow of Hollywood. "I'm pleas-
ed because I'm not a social per
son and I don't drive." She
smiled, "I'm really happy."
Like the children celebrating
a birthday party in a nearby
area, the seniors in'-p.i jho ;n
i train ride through the lovely
BIRCH STATE PARK WAS SETTING FOR SENIORS PICNIC
park.
EXCITEMENT reigned when
the engine became derailed; no
one was hurt but many were
saying, "I can't wait to tell my
chi.dren I was in a train wreck."
After the stunach pangs were
quelled, accordionist Phil Straum
proceeded to do his thing. Jew-
ish songs permeated the fresh air,
Community singing competed
with the chir-irz b'*-H?
The dancing was lively and no
one seemed to tire.
THEY COULD have danced all
night. bu suddenly, night was
upon them, the day away from
routine was over and 150 happy
people reboarded the buses to
The volunteers, Chairman Mer-
al Ehren:tein, Wendy Rubin,
Candy Clark, Mary Gottlieb. Bar-
bara LaBeile. Ella Oliveri and
Pat Passon, all under the direc-
tion of JCC parttime group work-
er. Stephanie Engleberg, ended
up tired, charcoal smudged and
feeling very good about the day.
The following day, the letters
started arriving. Betty Schoen-
bach wrote: "For me, the day was
beautiful and I hope these out-
door functions will continue. It
means so much to all of us to be
able to be with others both
young and old."
Bee Vogel, Erna Pessel, Annie
Glass and Freda Nelson all af-
fixed the*- signatures to a lovely
piece of rose-petalled stationery
which read: "It was so good of
you to make our day bright.
Thank you again. Especially for
the 'kosher' lunch."
Mrs. Cele Miller's note to
Myrna Amsel spoke for many.
"We hope you can continue your
interesting programs throughout
the summer months. To people
who cannot afford long trips, this
is something to look forward to."
All of the guests were vocal
in agreeing: "The volunteers
were wonderful."
So were the trees, the songs
and the sound of happiness re-
verberating around Birch State
Park the day four buses delivered
150 nice people from Humdrums-
ville.
PURE POETRY IN PORCELAIN
Sayuri and Child. A mystical, magical work of art that is also a work of love. Second in a series of
mother and child studies by Edna Hibel, one of the world's most gifted artists. This numbered
collector's plate by Royal Doulton is limited to an edition of 15,000, world-wide.
A perfect gift for mother, 40.00
Gifts, at all jm stores
It's to your credit to say "charge it" at jm
FREE PARKING AT ALL JM STORES!



Page 10
* Jewish fkricffjtr and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday. May 10, 1974
Lady Logic
Momma And The Soul Brothers
By RITA GOODMAN
A short time ago, while brows-
ing aiounJ a magazine counter, I
spotted a copy of Jet. a publica-
tion about black people. Staring
out at me from that cover were
live young guys who refer to me
as "Momma."
Reading the title: "TAVARES:
Black Brothers Whose Destiny Is
Fame," I couldn't have been
more excited if they were my
own children.
I'd placed my faith in their tal-
ent as people and performers at
a time when a Jet cover would
have been considered fantasy.
In return, they'd placed their
faith in a woman they said had
"Jewish Soul."
THE FIRST time I saw them,
they were sprawled on drum
cases, suitcases and instrument
cases outside a Bahamas airport
dredging up "a case" against me.
I was over an hour late.
Their anticipated arrival time
and actual arrival time had not
coincided.
Nevertheless, the faded jeaned.
wildly afroed, handsome brothers
(blood brothers) spoke to me
kindly.
I was to coordinate their whole
two week engagement in our ho-
tel nightclub.
To coordinate the five Tavares
brothers is to coordinate a -Middle
East settlement.
They, too, go off in different
directions.
Butch was easy. He could be
found in one of two places: On
the golf course or eating a glacier
of ice cream in the coffee shop.
Tiny, the tallest and youngest,
who'd had to leave his brand new
first child a few days after its
birth, continuously studied the
selection of post cards to make
sure he sent a pretty one home
verv often.-
fooch, the one with smoulder-
ing devilishness written all over
his face, was always walking
somewhere like he had a real
destination but could be swayed
if you came up with a fast idea.
Chubby, who happened to be
very thin, sashayed around the
hotel pool area participating in
all the social activities. The egg-
toss was his favorite.
THE LEADER and oldest broth-
er. Ralph, was by far the worst to
find. He either remained in bed,
mentally tuning out the tele-
phone, or fifty feet underwater
tuning in the fish.
You had to own a wet suit and
PARADISE GARDENS, MAR-
GATE. Canal Home, central
AH, Garage, Screened Porch,
many extras, 7% Mortgage,
mid $30s, 7480 N.W. 6th
Court. Owner 943-3345.
. CHAZAN-
CANTOR
Wanted for over flow service
at Conservative Congregation
in Hallandale for the Yamim
Noraim. Telephone 920-9100
or 927-8040.
@@r!lMl(g
ALL MAKES
AND MOOELS
ROOM UNITS
CENTRAL
24 HOUR SdlVICC
BOB HAWTHORNE
AIR CONDITIONING
981-9819
3140 PEMBROKf RO.
diving tank to discuss business
with Ralph.
However, every night, seven
nights a week, three shows a
night, the brothers promptly got
it together, hip swivelled on to
the stage, smiled their five
matched sets of white teeth, turn-
ed on their vocal cords to "go"
and really WENT.
They mesmerized every audi-
ence. Some, intending to see one
show, yelled, More," alter the
third.
I was no exception.
Like a Jewish mother, I would
applaud as if I hadn't seen them
73 times before.
The Tavares returned to the
island every six months to per-
form and each time, the five
brothers would call out. "Mom-
ma," cluster around the white
lady, hug her en masse and rattle
the eyeballs of both arriving and
departing tourists.
For, by now, they'd sampled
my cooking.
Even Ralph surfaced from the
ocean an hour early when "Din-
ner at Momma's" was on the
agenda.
OVER THE COURSE of thoir
many engagements. I was to meet
the boys' diminutive mother
whom they adore, a sister, a cou-
sin, wives and assorted friends
who'd jet in from the States to
listen.
Kenny, our hotel's Bahamian
goif professional who resembled
the Jolly Black Giant, had mean-
while become the Poppa counter-
part. He helped me in my intel-
ligence network of "where are
they?"
The brothers named him "Jun-
gle Jim."
About four months after their
last visit, I received a phone call
from New Bedford (their home-
town) one day.
"Chubby has been shot. The
doctors don't know if he's going
to make it."
Kenny and I were stricken. We
called overseas to Massachusetts
often.
It appeared that while setting
up for a club date one evening,
an amplifier broke. Chubby dash-
ed off to another club where he
knew one could be borrowed. He
Rll A GOODMAN
not only found the piece of
equipment but he found his sis-
ter there being hassled.
Suggesting the man leave her
alone. Chubby was answered with
bullets in the belly.
The boys' sister was killed.
"He's mentioning "Momma"
and "Jungle Jim," Ralph said
over the transatlantic phone.
We reserved two seats on the
next day's flight to Boston.
AN UNLIKELY looking pair of
traveling companions, we posed
as a famous Bahamian golf pro
and his personal writer who cov-
ered all his tournaments. It dis-
tracted us from the seriousness
and length of our trip.
Only close relatives were al-
lowed in the intensive care unit.
Jungle Jim gained an instant
pass.
"I'm his aunt from the Baha-
mas." I said directly into the
woman's eyes, defying her to
challenge my complexion.
Chubby was a fighter but dy-
ing and to be a witness, a part of
me was dying too.
He clutched my hand feebly,
his hand feeling like a fire out of
control, and managed the words,
"Bahama Momma."
I told him I'd do the talking
and started a picture story de-
scribing exactly how he was go-
ing to recuperate on the island
he loved so much as soon as the
doctors said he could travel.
Kenny, standing next to me,
embellished on the story until we
both actually believed it.
Six months later, the Tavares
Brothers appeared on our night-
club stage again.
FIVE of them.
When I wasn't applauding, I
cried a lot.
City Of Hope Presents Awards
City of Hope, South Broward
Chapter, held its donor luncheon
at the Emerald Hills Country
Club recently.
It was chaired by Mrs. Sylvia
Shapiro and co-chaired by Mrs.
Betty Hoffman. Songs were pre-
sented by Lee Barry with music
by Frank Ramoni. Sr. and his
orchestra.
Awards were given member
for outstanding work and plaques
were presented by Mrs. Ruth
Portnoy, piesident, to Mrs. Miri-
am Finesilver. Mrs. Lee Rosen
and Mrs. Minnie Hirsh enrollinp
them in the City of Hope Million
Dollar Club.
Broward Copy Center Inc.
INSTANT PRINTING
Business Cards Wedding Invitations
Social Announcements
Complete Printing Service
6246 Pembroke Road, Miramar
Phone 966-5510
DOLPHIN PRODUCE
(Formerly Red Apple)
7100 Hollywood Boulevard
We will meet any competitive chain store prices
on produce
Phone 966-5995
Your order will be waiting
trie toils of sisypKus
U.S. Continues to Supply
Strategic Arms to Arabs
WASHINGTON (JTA)
."ontinued Ameiican supply of
irnu for Arab states was con-
firmed heie. The State Depart-
ment said that Saudi Arabia will
receive American military train-
ing, equipment and construction
' i weeding $300 million over the
next five or six years."
Meanwhile, the Moroccan gov-
ernment was reported also to
be making intensive efforts to
secure military support from the
U.S. too.
FOREIGN MINISTER Ahmed
Taibi Behima paid "a courtesy
call" on Secretary of Defiense
James Schlesinger "at the re-
quest of the State Department,"
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
was informed at the Pentagon.
Secretaiy of State Henry Kis-
singer also met the Moroccan of-
ficial in New York.
The U.S. has long been a sup-
plier of military aid to Jordan
and Lebanon, some of which were
gitts.
IN DISCUSSING the Saudi
Arabia U.S. military agreement
signed in Riad by U.S. Ambassa-
dor James Akens and Prince
Abdullah, head of the desert
kingdom's National Guard, the
State Department specifically
said Phantom jets were excluded
from the program.
VACATIONS COMING UP!
EXCESS WORK GOT YOU DOWN!
NEED A TEMPORARY SECRETARY!
Experienced legal and executive secretaries ready to assist
you on a temporary basis.
In the alternative, use your cassettes for dictation and deliv-
er them to our office. Your work will be returned within 48
hours. Pay only for actual work produced.
CALL 921-7040
S.O.S. SECRETARIAL SERVICES
680 N. Dixie Highway (Dixie Plaza) Hollywood
REFRIGERATION
AIR CONDITIONING
INSTALLATION
ROOM
UNITS
Carrier
CENTRAL
UNITS
KCSIDENTIAL COMMEKCIAL
987-4403 ROBERT KAPLAN
2129 S. STATE RD. 7 "


Friday, May 10, i974
"""JenistifkiridKair) and Shoiar of Hollywood
Page 11
Rabbi Albert Mayerf eld Is
JMew Principal Of Hillel
Michael ^.^fyjck. president of
the Hillel Community Day
School, has announced the ap-
pointment of Rabbi Albert May-
erfeld as principal.
Rabbi Mayeifeld brings to
Hillel many years of experience
in day school education. For the
past five years he has served as
executive and educational direc-
tor of the Cincinnati Hebrew Day
School where he introduced a
Hebraized Montessori pre-school
program. He was previously as-
sistant director of the Bureau of
Jewish Education, principal of
the Central Hebrew High School,
and instructor in the Adult Insti-
tute. Atlanta, Ga.
A graduate of Johns Hopkins
University, Baltimore, Rabbi
Mayeifeld received a Matter's
deg'ee in Educational Adminis-
tration from American Univer-
sity, Washington. DC. Tie was
ordained from Her Israel Rab-
binical College of Baltimore and
pursued poit graduate studies in
I :;( 1 at Ycshivoth Slabodka and
Chevron.
In 1973 Rabbi Mayerfe'.d was
elected to the board of Torah
Umesorah National Principals
Association. In Cincinnati he was
active in many organizations and
founded the Ohio Association of
Hebrew Day Schools.
Rabbi Maycrfeld and his wife.
the form'r Mis; I.iesel Hess of
Detroit, have three children.
The Hillel Community Day
School, nursery through eighth
| grade, selves Dade and Broward
counties as a traditional day
school with a well balanced pro-
Igram of religious and secular
1 education.
Hillel, in its fourth year of
existence, projects its largest
growth for the coming year. A
record number of student; have
already preregistered.
The school launched its build-
pi campaign last week with
RABBI AlBSRT MtRfELD
a cocktail party at the Scheck
home which also served as an
ocea.-ion to welcorA" the new
principal and his wife, according
to Marshall Baltuch, executive
director.
Dr. Joel B. Dennis, North Dade
othopedic surgeon who served
tie school as president during its
first three years of exigence, is
chairman of the builJing fund
lar.-.yaign. And the executive
board i- being organized by Irv-
ing Cirulnick and Ben Genad in-
to teams who will woik to sol-
idify previous pledges.
William Wolowitz i* in charge
of site development arri recrea-
tional facilities for the new build-
ing.
Hillel Community Day School
is supported by the rabbi* and
congregations of North Dade and
South Broward Counties and the
Greater Miami and Hollywood
Jewi-h Federations.
Beach Hadassah
Installation Set
In Galahad South
Beach Group of Hadas ah will
hold its installation meeting
Wednesday, May 15. at 1:00 p.m.
at Galahad South.
An original skit, "Wi'.lie-Lillie
Abee Hadassah." written by pro-
gram vice pre-ident Ethel K.
Schwartz, will be presented.
Prances Blaymore will portray
the Hadassah president and Ethel
Schwaitz, the husband.
In-tallation officer is Mrs. Sid-
ney Munter. vice president, who
is on the National Board of Ha-
dassah.
The following women are to be
installed: Mrs. William Shulman.
president; Mrs. Charles Seigal.
vice president-fund raiting: Mrs,
Kathryn Sollins, vi<-e president
membership; Mis. Henrj
Schwartz, vice president-program
and Mrs. Sid Dulberg. vice presi-
dent-education.
Also Mrs. Henry Eisenberg,
vice president Zionist Affairs:
Mrs. Jack Hurwitz, treasurer:
Mr*. Max Blau, financial secre-
tary; Mrs, Jack Lohman. record-
ing secretary-board; Mrs Mac
Shariro, recording secretary-
meeting and Mrs. Sadie Horowitz,
corresponding secretary.
A social hour will precede the
meting: members and pro
ive members are invited to at-
tend. Life members of other
groups are welcome.
???Ask Abe???
By ABRAHAM HAI.PERN
Question: What is the motto on
fche Vale University Seal?
Answer: Two Hebrew words
and the Latin
for light and
truth.
The two He-
brew words
are Urim anc'.
T h u m mim;
their meaning
is uncertain.
They appear
in the Bible
and arc in the
last sentence
oi the para-
graph d e-
^cribing the brea8tplate worn bj
Van.n. the High Priest.
Ail English translations, in-
cluding the Soncino Bible, trans-
late the original Hebrew as fol-
lows: "And thou shalt put in the
breastplate of judgement the
Urim and the Thummim; and
they shall be upon Aaron's heart,
(when he goeth in before the
pordi and Aaron shall bear the
judgement of the children of Is-
rael upon his heart before the
Lord continually." (Exodus
28:30)
In the footnote of the Soncino
Jible, Urim and Thummim are
Explained as meaning lights and
perfection. The Encyclopedia Ju-
flaica, Volure 16, page 8, ex-
plains Urim and Thummim as "a
priestly device for obtaining ora-
cles."
The Encyclopedia Judaica fur-
ther explains Urim and Thum
lim with a quotation from the
Talmud Tractate Yoma Page 73b.
To the names of the 12 tribes
engraved on the breastplate were
added those of the three Patri-
irchs, together with the word
Shevet ("tribe") so as to encom-
pass the whole alphabet.
Explaining the name Urim as
"those whose words give light'
and Thummim as "those whose
words are fulfilled,' the Rabbis
explain that the oracle was af-
fected by rays of light shining on
the letters or protruding from
them and foiming themselves
into groups (Yoma 73b). so that
the High Priest could read it.
Aci the Encyclopedia
Judaica, there is no biblical in-
formation on the appearance of
the Urim, the mat'rial out of
which they were made, or the
technique of their use. Some
scholars define the two words as
teaching and truth.
It i- significant that the found-
ers of Yale us d these words,
taken Horn our Torah to express
the goal or ideal of Yale.
Th's is one more example of
the fact that the early Bettlers of
this country wore students of He- |
brew and the Old Testament.
EDITOR'S NOTE: Mr. Halperr. '
will answer questions or.
FACT, not opinion.
REUNION The Miami Cen-
tral High School Class of 1962 is
planning a reunion Aug. 17. For
information contact Tom Sewvll.
Hollywood CPA, who is serving
as reunion committee chairman.
Mir a mar JWV To
Present Evening
Of Jewish Drama
The Robert K. Franzblau Post
and Auxiliary No. 177, Miramar,
of the Jewish War Veterans will
present "An Evening of Jewish
Theatre" Tuesday. May 14. at
Temple Israel of Miramar at 8:00
p.m.
Dorothy Kowitt is producer anr1
music arranger and Sylvia Licb
erman is musical coach.
Performers are: Gittel. Shirlcv
Finestein: Tevye, Esther Agen:
Yente. The Matchmaker. Sylvia
Lieberman; Achmendrick, Sarah
Schatz, and The Rabbi, Sylvia
Lieberman.
The Daughters are: Bluma
Florie Director: Shprintz. Lynr
Asnin; Faga, Bea Alpert; Tob>
Fora Sarafen. anil Tzipa, Minni
Frank.
Rabbi Drazin of Temple Israel
in Miramar will greet the guests
Featured speakers are Howar'
Melinaon, first junior vice com
mander, Department of Florida
and Mrs, Rose Shorer, past na-
tional president.
Mrs. Belie Mfllman, vocalisl
will perform Hebrew. Yiddish
and English songs of internation-
al origin.
CONSERVATIVE CONGREGA-
TION In Hallandale is interest-
ed in a Yourtg Man to conduct
at an over flow service the
Schachreisim during Yamin
Noraim- capable also, if pos-
sible, to read the Torah, blow
the Shofar and lead in the
English readings. Telephone
920-9100 or 927-8040.
BRILLIANT OF HOLLYWOOD
2101 S.W. 59th Avenue
(1 Block East of U.S. 441 (State Road 7) &
1 Block South of the Treasury.
Phone 989-8155
AUTO BAKE PAINTING
Deluxe Fine Luster and Finish
Synthetic Enamel $69.99
2 Year Written Guarantee 3 Coats of Paint
Mrs. Rubinoff Consultant Speaker
At Women's League Installation
Mrs. Lillian Rubinoff who has
been cited as "Woman of the
Year," will serve as consultant
MRS. EDWARD RUBIi.jfF
speaker for the Florida Branch,
Women's League for Conservative
Judaism, installation Tuei lay
evening at the Eden Roc Hotel.
Incoming officers and board tj
I).- Installed by Dr. Morton Malav-
sky of Temple B.-th Shalom in
Hi 11; wood arc: Mrs. .Morton Le-
irin president; Mrs. Allan Niren
Mrs. Aaron Apoiefied. Mrs.
Joel Rottman. Mrs. Howard Oser,
Mrs. Albert Solo and Mrs. Bwald
Ziffer. vice presidents: Mrs. Al-
bert Winston and Mrs Lawrence
Scherr, secretaries; Mrs. Malvina
Frerdman. financial secretary.
Attending the conference from
Temple Beth Shalom are Mir.es.
Malvia Toll, Marilyn Hoffman,
Ruth Kerbel, Marie Portnoy. Re-
nee M indel, Leslie Bouer and
Carol Friedman; from Temple
1- sel in MiramarAdele Step-
per. Arlyn Bunin. Ruth Koster,
Phyllis Drazin and Joanne Lee,
and from Tempi? Sinai. Jeanne
Waldorf, Malvina Freeman. Marcy
Cameron. Ina Wachman and La-
Verne Miner
Mrs. Rubinoff who has received
the Community Leadership award
from the Jewish Theological
Seminary, has held many branch
offices including president of the
New J( rsey Slate Branch, where
she lived. On the national level
Mrs. Rubinoff worked for leader-
ship, membership, speakers bu-
leau and as consultant. She is
presently national parliamentari-
an and chairman of Policy and
lit visions Committee.
The Women's League for Con*
servative Judaism is the parent
body of Sisterhoods of Conserva-
tive Synagogues in the United
States, Canada, Mexico and P-iertn
Rico. It brings together 200,000
women in it 5 800 Sisterhoods, in
23 branches. It also gives guid-
ance and service to overseas
women's groups in Israel and
other parts of the world. Wom-
en's League was founded in 1918
by Mathilda Schecter, wife of Dr.
Solomon Schechl t. second presi-
dent of the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America.
If you can spend some time,
even a few hours, w ith someone
who needs a hand, not a handout,
call your local Voluntary Action
Center Or write to "Volunteer,"
\fcashington.D.C. 20013.
The National Center tor
Voluntary Action,
V
..WOuoa uKiHri H. P.M* f *1
NOW OPEN
Formerly lindy's Farms
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
MILK EGGS
790 E. Hallandale Boulevard
Open Daily & Sunday 8:30-5:30 P.M.
921-9529 WE DELIVER
WELBILT CHRYSLER MR TEMP CARRIER
COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL
AIR CONDITIONING
Total Capability for Design, Installation and Service
ALCO CORPORATION
AL ABRAMS
ESTABLISHED 1956 -
SERVICE ALL MAKES
LICENSED BROWARD AND DADE
MAIN OFFICE 2055 N.E. 151 STREET
947-9012 947-2490

CALL... THE EXPERT IN
AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING FOR YOUR HOME
CUSTOM DESIGNED INSTALLED SERVICED
ALL NATIONALLY KNOWN BRANDS
INSTALLED BY OUR OWN CAREFUL CRAFTSMEN
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
AIR CONDITIONING
ENTERPRISES. INC.
AUTHORIZED SALES & SERVICE FOR WESTINGHOUSE & G.E.
CALL FOR FREE SURVEY
Member Better Business Bureau
2200 S.W. 58th Avenue
-,.A
987-5255


.
Page 12
*Jmittl Fkridian id Shofar of Hollywood
Friday. May 10, 1974
Profit
She Must Have rA34-Hour Day
. Phyllis Roth apparently has 34
hours in each of her'TiormaT "24-
hour days.
Otherwise, how could she man-
age it ali?
"IT ALL" encompasses a myr-
iad of responsibilities to many,
ARTEFACT
IMPORTS
Exclusive Giftware
170 N. University Drive
Pembroke Pines
961-9646
for one young matron to handle,
now Mrs. Roth Is gaining a rep-
utation in the Hollywood Jewish
community for her work with
Soviet Jewry.
An inveterate letter writer,
Phyllis became active in the Rus-
sian plight because, "I had to be
at home with the new baby and
couldn't do anything that would
require my leaving the house."
So she writes to Congressmen,
the President, Russian officials,
Russian agencies and anyone else
she feels needs prodding.
She eor-esponds with four Rus-
sian families who have returned
answers and one of them recent-
ly reported arriving in Israel last
month. One such letter is re-
printed on this page.
"It's extremely rewarding. It
makes you feel like you're doing
something. Like you're doing a
worthwhile thing for someone
else," she says as she continues
to explain her involvement.
"One man I heard from has
been tortured with acid. He's
very ill now. I've written to peo-
ple who've been on hunger
strikes. Even if I don't get a re-
ply, I write because I want them
to know people do care."
Even young Mitchel has caught
the writing bug along with the
flu bug. He writes to a Russian
boy his age even though there
hasn't been a reply as yet.
Mrs. Roth's sister, a concert
pianist, now writes to a Russian
concert pianist.
Amidst the piles of National
Geographic magazines, array of
cats, toys and letters, you spot a
framed picture of Steve and
Phyllis Roth taken at their wed-
ding twelve years ago and you
wonder how the young attorney
takes to all this family activity.
"My husband thinks what I do
is worthwhile and Interesting.
Things seem to evolve like ev-
erything else 1 do.'
Evolve. Involve. Words from
an English teacher but not empty-
ones.
PHYLLIS ROTH
many people and not necessarily
just her own family.
When you arrive at the Roth
home, Phyllis suggests you keep
your distance because she's walk-
ing around with the flu and
doesn't have time to go to bed.
Nine-year-old Laurie, the Roth's
at home too, because he's feeling
as rotten as Mommy and yet, the
two take turns holding nine-
month-old Daniel, because Daniel
needs attention.
Nine-year-old Lai'rie, the Roth
foster daughter, is attending
school but she needs abundant at-
tention also, for as Phyllis says,
"Laurie is a child who needs love
and affection and the warmth of
a home."
WHEN ASKED if it won't
trouble her when Laurie might
return to her natural family, she
holds the thumbsucking baby in
her arms and replies, "There are
no guarantees in foster care. It
would be selfish to worry about
loving and her leaving."
She adda, "It's very rewarding
because Laurie now loves school
and is a real member of the fam-
ily. I yell at her like my own."
It doesn't appear that much
yelling takes place in the Roth
home because despite the phone
ringing, Daniel needing infant
care, the toys strewn in different
locations and everyone apparent-
ly enjoying poor health at the
same time, tranquility prevails.
Perhaps it's the aura establish-
ed by cats everywhere you look.
A Siamese lolls on the patio.
A street-version appears to be
president of the living room and
a large Persian/Calico vies with
Daniel for Mitchel's attention.
The nine-year-old-in-pajamas says
of the latter: "Grandma left him
here for a few days a year and
a half ago."
Phyllis and Steven Roth were
fourteen when they met. Both
g-aduates of the University of
Florida and both school teachers,
Steve has gone on to obtain a
Law degree and now practices
that profession while Phyllis is
on maternity leave from hers.
She teaches high school Eng-
lish and Speech.
AS IF ALL this wasn't enough
Letter From USSR
Mr. and Mrs. Steven M. Roth
Miramar. Florida 33023
Good morning dear Uncle and
Aunt
I did not receive a reply to my
previous letter and I therefore
decided to write you once again.
We were figuring to meet with
you this year for Passover in Is-
rael but to our sorrow after wait-
ing almost five months we found
out that our visa for emigration
was denied.
My father did not see his broth-
er since the Great War that is
almost 30 years ago. Thirty years
ago the Fascists killed very close
relatives. In our family there is
no one left. He would like to
very much be reunited and live
with his brother. However, it is
evidently not possible.
It is very difficult for me to
watch my wife's suffering whose
parents live in Israel. They are
very sick. Her father is an invalid
from the Great War and now he
very much needs our help and in
every letter that they send us
they keep asking that we should
come to Israel. These letters are
impossible to write without tears.
Please write us more often be-
cause the post office does not al-
ways deliver all the mail. Please
write us how your health is
how your children are in other
words, about everything. We are
always happy to receive your let-
ters.
Our life is without a change.
After giving my dissertation I be
gan in Medicine Institute as an
Assistant in Pathological Ana-
tomy and also as a doctor of
Pathology. My wife, after finish-
ing the Conservatory, is working
in a School of Music. Our son, in
the first class, brings us happi-
ness with his grades.
During this last period I am
studying English but to write a
letter in English I have not de-
cided yet. I am afraid that there
will be many errors, but you can
in order to make it easier for
you. write to me in English. I will
understand everything. If you
have a telephone please give me
the number. Perhaps we might
give you a call.
This is all about our not so
pleasant news. Once again I ask
you to please write us more
often. Our address:
U.S.S.R.
Ok. S.S.R.
700.000 TASHKENT No. 6
House No. 88
Apartment No. 62
U. L. Lemeshev
We send you our kisses.
Urie
Regards and best wishes from
Geni and Mishenka as well as
from my father and mother.
Dated April 10. 1?4 Tashkent
Translated by A.B.H.
Majority
Calls For
Impeachment
Continued from Page 1
ish concerns."
The UAHC president cited this
week's Harris Poll study showing
that a majority of the American
people believe in the statements
of John Dean over President
Nixon (52-287c).
In a religious breakdown of
the same poll, Jews agreed with
Dean 65-3Tc (32% unsure.)
Rabbi Schindler further noted
that if the UAHC assembly were
held today, rather than last No-
vember, "in the shadow of the
Yom Kippur War" the delegates
representing 715 Reform syna-
gogues would probably support
an unequivocal statement on im-
peachment rather than the reso-
lution wheh was adopted in Nov-
ember, 1973.
THE STATEMENT, "though
strong on Watergate and the con-
stitutional crisis, still avoided the
impeachment issue."
He said that reports from the
congregations and UAHC regions
support the general Jewish grass-
roots mood on impeachment.
Rabbi Schindler expressed
"deep concern" about the general
mood of pessimism which has
seized the Jewish community re-
garding its future.
"JEWS ARE less secure about
their own position both here and
in Israel. The Yom Kippur War
has shocked them into thinking
some unthinkable thoughts.
"They are disturbed about So-
viet Jews, frustrated by the com-
plex problems of the inner city
and the moral malaise in our
land. And they worry about the
future of the synagogue and the
fraying of Jewish life in Amer-
ica."
the UAHC president.' who
considers himself an 'inveterate
ontimi't' rejected these "voices
of gloom."
David Light (seat 3d) and his wife, Cyril, display the State of
Israel Anniversary Award they received for exemplary par-
ticipation in the development of the economy of the State
of Israel during its first quarter century. At right is Milton M.
Parson, executive director of the Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization.
JEO MINDLIN
Dayan as Seen at
Home and Abroad
Continued from Page 4
they know about Jewish family
matters, the better.
While Israelis expressed pleas-
ant surprise that Jews outside of
Israel "know these men as they
really are." which is to say, not
as public relations messiahs.
Two years ago. I went to Israel
to study the country's growing
military jet industry.
Already then. Gen. Dayan's
name was a private joke at best
and the object of public indigna-
tion at worst.
IN THE GRIP of his romance
with a 27-year-old Tel Aviv girl,
Eiisheva Chisiss, who held court
at the Salon Alfi near the lit-
erary cafes on Dizengoff St.,
Dayan would listen morosely as
she willingly characterized him
to any stranger as a "quarrel-
some" man, who "trusts no one,
and considers everyone 'a noth-
ing.' "
Newspapermen who on occa-
sion found it difficult if not im-
possible to interview Dayan be-
cause he was "too busy." could al-
ways rely on E.isheva's ready-
availability to taik about the Gen-
eral or else find the General,
himself, at Alfl's, depressed and
grumbling.
Seen in this light, it is not hard
to understand the anier of his
detractors with a press abroad
that made him an idol.
ONE NEWSPAPERMAN did
not make him an idol London
Daily Mirror cartoonist Keith
Waite, whose caricature of Dayan
presented him as a sort of Jew-
ish John Wayne but no longer
invincible, no longer astride the
Sinai deseit like a colossus, pis-
tols blazing at the hip.
Waite's caricature, copies of
which I found plastered all over
the back alleys of Jerusalem,
showed Dayan as Wayne gone to
seed miniaturized, balding be-
wildered by the fast-talking Eli -
sheva and a misty entourage of
other long-lo t nightclub loves.
IT IS THIS failure to under-
stand Dayan's image at home,
which Waite captured so faith
fully, that now leads the world's
politicos and their Bartletts to
befuddlement before the pros-
pect that Dayan will not survive
Israel's governmental crisis.
Rabin i; not likely to retain
Dayan as Minister of Defense or ;
of anything else.
And, in a general election, the
Agranat Commission hysteria
currently gripping the nation will
sweep him away with the same
fury that it forced the ouster of
Prime Minister Meir who, inci-
ilenta.ly. dislikes Gen. Dayan all
on her own. a moot consideration
these days but well worth know-
ing if the matter is to be under-
stood entirely.
What observers outside of Is-
rael have yet to discover is that
Rabin is a prince among Israel's
doves if it is Dayan's willing-
ness to bargain over the annexed'
territories that they are mourn-
ing even before he is gone from
the high halls of government.
IN FACT, those Israelis who
welcome his imminent departure
from power are just now coming
to grips with the sad paradox
that as a generous trader of the
territoiies. Rabin as Prime Min-
ister would be without .peer.
Thus far, the change in Israel's
government has been AWAY
from the meaning of the Agrar.?.t
"clean sweep" not toward it.
In contrast with Rabin, it is
Meir and Dayan who have been
the hawks. And so, if Kissinger"
was delighted with Dayan. he is
likely to find Rabin an absolute
pussy cat on the question of giv-
ing Arab lands back.
For that very reason, those Is-
raelis who forced the ouster of
Meir and who will welcome the
demise of Dayan do not find
Rabin welcome either. That is the
force that drives the demand for
new elections these days.
Only in America do they really
care about what happens to Day-
an. In Israel, if he is symbolic of
anything at all, it is of the Meir
Kitchen Cabinet and its alleged
"betrayal" r* the nation's trust. -


May 10, 1974
VJewistncridnar} -~* ***** f Hollywood
Page 13
V
r/
. I
**
y
W>*&3snL
m
$
$%:
BnBNM^4H-
ar mma

K

""mbSoBf^M
4
Paul Seaman (right), chairman of the Star Lakes Israel
Bonds Committee, presents the State of Israel Bonds Scroll
Honor to Philip A. Zelevanoky (left) at the Star Lakes 'Night
in Israel." Also nictured is Eddie Schaffer, guest entertainer
at the annual Star Lakes Israel Bonds event Mrs. Ediih
Kinsiler, president of the Ein Kerem group of Hadassch,
was also honored for outstanding leadership in speeding
Israel's economic development through the Israel Bonds
campaigns.
\:J
c*
I
;p photo shows Parker Plaza brunch
aes'.s. from left, (seatec-) Frsd Baer, Maurice
pearl an and Mrs. Stearman; (standing)
Ernard Ekstein, Morri Markman and Frank
Ginberg. Below, iJam Hociier, president,
povr3 coffee for Mr. and Mrs. Louis Jason
deft) and Mr. and Mrs. Rubin Jacobs.
rjEFFER
^^FUNERAL HOMES, IXC.
DIRECTORS:
Irwin Juffer
Medwin Jelfer Alvin Jeffnr
188-11 HILLSlDEAVE.HOlLIS.il.
1283 CONEYISIANOAVE.BKLYN.
212/776-8100
13385 W DIXIE HWY, Ml AMI
305/947-1185
Represented by Sonn/LenH. F D
625 S.OLIVE AVE .WPALM BEACH
305/833-4413
Represented by Philip nVwslon. F D.
Chapels available in all
communities in New York and
throughout the Miami
W Palm Be:ich a'ias
Rente
/n/i'S
Jilemorial Gnapel
"JvV/SH fUNfSAi DOCTORS"
LOCAL ANO OUT OF STATE
APrtANGeMINT"
947-2/9U
13385 W. DIXIE HWY N.M.

A
m ""sf^sjss
llomo Levy (second from leit), Israel's
^nsul General for the Soulheastem United
Ites, recently participated in the launch-
of the Prime Ministers Club, Greater
lami chapter, a new honor society formed
by the Israel Bond Organization under the
cegis of Prime Minister Golda Msir. With
him are Mrs. Nathan E. Greenbsrg, (left) of
Hallandale, Mr. Greenbi'rg, and Mrs. Milton
M. Parson.
abbinic Body Urges Amnesty
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
Temple &etk 1
Memorial
Cjazdent
The only all-Jewish cemoterv in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call: ovV"%'
920-8225 or write: tJT'"'.'V;i
TEMPLE BETH EL JSt&&i&
1351 S. Uth AVE.-HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above.
NAME:_______________________________________
ADDRESS:
__________________________ PHONE:
Price Increase Effective Jan. 1st, 1974
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
continued from Page 1<
ies of Conservative, Orthodox
Reform Judaism, and the
ervative and Reform lay sy-
gal organizations in the
ted States have urged the
|ption of amnesty as a national
cy "for those who on moral
unds refused to participate in
Vietnamese war."
he announcement of the res-
tion was made by Rabbi Irwin
Blank, Brookline, Mass., pres-
nt of the Synagogue Council
America.
POLICY statement de-
that amnesty is an estab-
ed historical tradition in the
erican experience.
Our support of amnesty does
relate to judgments of the
American involvement in Viet-
nam or of the actions of war re-
sisters. Rather, it expresses our
conviction that amnesty will heip
heal wounds in our society and
lead to reconciliation."
Positions in favor of amnesty
have also been taken previously
by the National Council of
Churches of Christ and the U.S.
Catholic Conference.
The Synagogue Council of
America is the coordinating agen-
cy for the national rabbinical and
lay syna'ogab organizations of
Conservative, Orthodox and Re-
form Judaism in the United
States. Its constituent agencies
are the Rabbinical Assembly, the
United Synagogue, the Rabbinical
Council of America, the Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congregations
of America, the Central Confer-
ence of American Rabbis, and
the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations.
THE COMPLETE text of the
resolution of the Synagogue
Council of America declares:
Palmer's
Miami Monument Compofiy
S-279 S.W. Stb Street, Miami
4444921 444-0922
Closed On The Sabbath
Personalized Memorial! Custom
Crofted hi Our Own Workshop.


Page 14
Vjewisfi noridTiann and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday. May 10. 19"74
' "1MMM........."
:'.' .-. :., !!.[....
c
itxj Kcalendar
omvnum
MONDAY, MAY 13
Temple Solel Sisterhocd Rummage Sale 8:30 a.m. Glen
Parkway,
i ORT, Miramar chapter Needlepoint Instruction 8:00
p.m. Hol.ywood Federal Bldg., Hollywood.
TUESDAY. MAY 14
Temple Solel Sisterhood Bazaar 9:00 a.m. 9:00 p.m.
Hohywood Mall.
Temple Beth Shalom Senior Friendship Club General Meet-
ing 12:00 Temple Beth Shalom.
JWV. Miramar Post 177 and Auxiliary Jewish Theatre
Evening 8:00 p.m. Temple Israel of Miramar.
Jewish Family Seivice Annual Meeting 8:00 p.m. Town
Hall Room, Home Federal Bldg., Hollywood.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 15
Temple Solel Sisterhood Bazaar 9:00 a.m. 9:00 p.m.
Hollywood Mall.
Temple Beth Shalom Men's Club General Meeting 8:00
p.m. Temple Beth Shalom.
THURSDAY, MAY 16
American Israeli Lighthouse, Hallandale chapter Regular
Meeting and Installation 12:30 p.m. First Federal
Savings Bldg. 183rd & Biscayne.
JWF Women's Leadership Meeting 8:00 p.m. Home of
Mrs. Louise Diamond.
SATURDAY, MAY 18
Jewish Federation Singles Houseparty 8:00 p.m. Holly-
wood.
Temple Israel Installation Dinner Dance 9:00 p.m. --
Temple Israel.
SUNDAY, MAY 19
Jewish Welfare Federation 1974 Campaign Leadership
Brunch 10:30 a.m. Hillcrest Country Club.
Temple Beth El Brotheihood Dinner Dance 6:30 p.m.
Temple Beth El.
Bonds for Israel 8.00 p.m. Emerald Hills Country Club
for Temple Solel.
MONDAY, MAY 20
B'nai B'rith Women, Hollywood chapter Regular Meeting
8:00 p.m. Home Federal Bldg., Hollywood.
TUESDAY, MAY 21
ORT District 6 Convention Broward Region Hosting
ALL DAY Diplomat Hotel.
Temple Solel Sisterhood Donor Installation Luncheon
11:30 a.m. Jacaranda Country Club.
Temple Beth Shalom Senior Friendship Club General
Meeting Noon Temple Beth Shalom.
JWF Women's Division Campaign Leadership Meeting
Zvi Kolitz. speaker 8:00 p.m. Holiday Inn. Route 84.
Hollywood.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 22
ORT DISTRICT 6 Convention Broward Region Hosting
ALL DAY Diplomat Hotel.
THURSDAY, MAY 23
ORT DISTRICT 6 Convention Broward Region Ho ting
ALL DAY Diplomat Hotel.
B'nai B'rith Worn it, rtaUandale Chapter Regular Meeting
12:30 p.m. Home Fedi raJ Bldg., Hallandale.
Jewlsl unity Center SYMPOSIA II Communi
Speaker: Max Din i nt 8:00 p.m. Temp B< Hi EL
JWV Viet r B, Freedman Po t 013 General Meetii
8:00 p.m. Home Federal Bldg., Hallandal
Religious
Services
HAUANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
(Contervktivr). 416 NE 8th Av
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz. Canto*
Jacor. Danzmar.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22r-: Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingdey, Cantor Irving
Shulkea. 37
NORTH BROWARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON.
GREGATICN. (Re''Tm) 3501 Uni-
varsity Dr.. Cora, Jprings. Rabbi
Max Wait*.
HOLLYWOOD
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
(Orthodox). 3891 Sterling Rd.. op-
posite Ho.lywood Hills High School.
President Dr. Frank Stain.
Snturdny. 9 am
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1M1 t
14th Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffa.
BETH SHALOM (Tenipre) Conserva-
tive. 4*01 Arthur fV. Rabbi Morton
Malavaky. Cantor Irving Gold.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (Conservative).
310 SW 62nd Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi
Salomon Benerrocha.
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal). 5001
Thomas St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Rob-
ert Frazin.
TEMPLE S'NAI (Coniervat./e) 1201
Johnaon St. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Cantor Ye::uda Hailbraun
Mawani
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Conservative)
6920 SW 35th St. Raooi Avrom
Orazin.
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES (Conaarva-
tive) Pines Middle School. 200 No.
Douglas Rd., Pembroke Pines.
Rabbi Aaron Shapero.
Bar Mitzvah
ANDREA NEWMAN
Andrea, daughl r of Mrs. Reva
man ani th late Arthur
Newman, will be Ba] Mil
Friday, May 17. at Temple Sinai
is
Rl SSELL SWIFT
Russell, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Kenneth Swift, will bo Bar Mitz-
vah Friday. May 17. at Temple
Beth Ahni.
GAIL MARGOLIS
Gail, daughter of Mr and Mrs.
Stanley Margolis, will be Bat
Mitzvah Friday, .May 17, at Tem-
ple Beth Shalom.
ft i-r -r
GARY 1-It OHM AN
Gary, son of Mr. and Mrs. Her-
bert Frohman, will be Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday. May 18. at Temple
Beth Shalom.
ft ft ft
STEVEN FINEHIRSH
Steven Craig Finehirsh. son of
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Ferguson,
will be Bar Mitzvah Saturday.
May 18, at Sheridan Hill- Fie-
mentary School for Temple Solel.
ft ft ft
JEFFREY COHEN
Jeffrey, son of Mr. and Mi-s.
Louis Cohen, will be Bar Mitzvah
Saturday, May 18. at Temple Beth
El.
ft ft ft
MURRAY SELEN
Murray, son of Mr. and Mrs.
i
Sinai.
HARRIETT BERKLEY
Har iett, daughter of Mrs.
Nancj Berkley, will be Bal Mitz-
r riday, Ma) 24. at Temple
ft
BONNIE TOPFER
Bonnie, daughter ol Mr. and
Morton Topfer, will be Bat
Friday, May 24. at Tern-
;!eth Shalom.
ft ft ft
MICHAEL I.1EBA
Michael, son of Mr. and Mrs.
William Lieba will be Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday. May 25. at Temple
. ..I Miramar.
ft ft ft
ROBERT GL'THMANN
Robert, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Edward Guthmann. will be Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, May 25, at
Tcmp.e Beth El.
ft ft ft
GARY ISAACS
Gary, son of Mr. and Mrs.
David Isaacj, will be Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday, May 25, at Temple
Beth Shalom.
ft ft ft
HARRY STERN
Harry, son of Mrs. Rena Stern,
will be Bar Mitzvah Saturday,
May 25, at Temple Beth Shalom.
******** *n*********l>***
CANDL" IGHTING TIMF
18 IYAH 7:36
?
a> mm m* ***mt***m**0i0***At
Teenage Hotline
Is Supported By
Contributions
"Teenage Hotiine," a crisis in-
tervention telephone service that
has been operating in this com-
munity for almost five years, was
designed to offer a friendly ear
to adolescents and others in
stress. Since its inception ap-
nately 20.000 cads have
been answered.
Vener al disease and pregnan-
cy are the most common prob-
li ms. Na coties, boy-girl relation-
> 1, parent-child re-
. pa and teenage alcohol-
i m are among the situations
I by 1 from
Noath Miami Beach to the Palm
line. Help is only
a phone call awav 966-1030 or
522-3141.
it Li a can i inteer
program. Proi telephone
operators aie interviewed and
ted by profi a ionala in the
agreed to
their time and special
e Mover any personal
in face
ition between caller and
operator.
Hotline was founded
by Chai Lodge B'nai B'rith and
is now supported by contribu-
tions from Individual and groups
and by fund-raising activities.
The cost of essentials such as
telephone, stationery, postage and
advertising runs approximately
S10 per day. Teenage Hotline
needs volunteer operators, 16
yean of age and over plus fi-
nancial support for the program.
To be an "Angel" for Teenage
Hotline for one or two days or
more send checks made pay-
able to Teenage Hotline to P.O.
Box 6430, Hollywood. Fla. 33021.
One "Angel"' who declined to
be identified, said "I'm happy to
contribute because you help teen-
agers help themselves." "Angels"
for the months of January and
February included Stanley Green-
spun, Mr. and Mrs. James Franc,
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Sonnen-
klar, Ben-Jon Gerber. Dr. George
Sussman, Lewis Cohn. Italian
American Civic League, Sam
Calig. Jules Gordon. Mr. and Mrs.
Jordan Snyder. Arnold Ferber,
Adams, Rosenthal and Cohen,
C.P.A.'s, Albert and Birdie Ein-
stein Foundation, Dr. V. M. Glaz-
er. Judge Angeline B. Weir and
Abe Manges.
Where Your Money Goes...
CAMP KA-DEEMAH
Now beginning its eighth year. Camp Ka-Dee-Mah has crys-
.talized its program, so that it now serves children 3 though 13
With a sma.l coumelor-intrainmg program at the upper age
group.
Total registration in 1973 was 512.
The program provided recreation and informal education
along with an opportunity for pleasant Jewish experiences and
relationships.
Under the direct supervision of George Kirn, a public school
guidance counselor, techniques allow the staff to provide an
exciting and wide-ranging variety of activities without losing
sight of the social, emotional and physical needs of the individual
child.
In 1973, a total of 36 children received assistance through
the camp's scholarship program.
Jews Voice Upset
With DeFunis Ruling
Continued from Page 1-
attacking these procedures will
not come with relative speed to
this court."
The American Jewish Con-
gress the Anti Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith and the
American Jewish Committee, had
intervened as friends of the court
in support of the student's posi-
tion that he had been the victim
of "reverse discrimination" in be-
ing rejected for admission when
a number of Black applicants
with lower test scores had been
admitted.
THE COMMISSION on Social
Action of Reform Judaism and
the National Council of Jewish
Women were the only Jewish or-
ganizations to support the uni-
versity's position.
Howard M. Squadron, chairman
of the AJCongress' Governing
Couni the AJCongress was
ply di-appointed" by the
cou t'a d c ining ro e on the sub-
I in the De Funis
laint.
II said the AJCongress sup-
i "affirmative action" to in-
e opportunities in education
and jobs for the disadvantaged
but "without imposition of a sys-
tem of racial preference or oth-
er discriminatory practice."
Seymour Graubard, ADL chair-
man, expressed regret that the
court had held it could not rule,
in the De Funis case "on the con-
stitutionality of the quota sys-
tem."
HE SAID the ADL remained
deeply concerned about "the
erosion of the merit system and
the substitution for it of the
practice of reverse discrimina-
tion."
Elmer Winter, president of the
Ames ican Jewish Committee, said
the court inaction made it "im-
perative" that groups in the case
"search for new ways to resolve
the critical issues raised" by the
suit.
He said the Committee's posi-
tion was that the primary goal
remained "the establishment of
affirmative actions and processes
that will provide disadvantaged
minorities a realistic opportunity
in education and employment
while avoiding the dai ;era ol
"reverse discrimination,"
DRIVING A $4
AS
and obtain Information about our
emission modification service and a
tfynomometer (vehicle aerformanee teat
equipment) tune-up end compliment ry gat mileage
computer. Increase tne gas mileage on v .ur car from 30'o to
100% plus smoother performance an greater engine
efficiency. Service meets emission stan irds and does not
effect the warranty on new cars. The fordable price Is
returned to you in gaa savings ... and H i all done legally.
AUTO TECHNICAL AS 0CIATES
2041 HAYES STREET. HOLLYW J>D, FLORIDA
PHONE 921-2211
OPEN EVENINGS AND SATURDAYS FOP
AND PICK-UP TRUCKS, BY APPOINT
oINESS VANS
NT ONLY.
Also Specialising In Front End /
rake Service. Major and Mini
Air Conditioning S*r>
nme.it and
rune-Us.
.
Featured on Channels 4-7-51
Art Merrill Show WI0I
i

SI > i
<
I 5 I
U 1
Jthe
13


iy, May 10, 1974
*'JenISil ffcrid'faun and Shofar of Hollywood
Pa^je IS
........'" > <:: .! r;:u i.i.i:i.i ;;,.:;.;;;. :, ,,..
li.ini-
t i .,! .Ml;: i i! 11 -
(as Wise
^e Most Popular
If Them All?
IS GOOD to see American
Jewry taking note of the cen-
lial of Rabbi Stephen Wise.
|jli\ Callup had polled the
}'.:'.. Who is the most pop-
rabbi?'' Whe would easily
I, won.
here would, of course, have
In some runners up. Abba
Tel Silver, of Cleveland, sur-
ged Wise in Hebrew learning
ha a devoted following.
CHICAGO, there was the
knlering voice of Sinai Tem-
Emil G. Hir.-ch. but the
|s of American Jews were
pietlzed by the Wise charis-
Wise would have gotten
jsands Of non-Jewish votes.
In Haynes Holmes thought
ke the greatest orator in the
lerican pulpit.
bnce Wise spoke in a Black
krch and the minister intro-
^ing him said, (or it sounded
he said). "Dr. Wise is con-
led to be one of the greatest
(tors in the country." Wise
to the minister, "I see you
Iw me."
[Vise didn't need any micro-
bes. He had a powerful voice
was as easy to take as a
^ng day. "If we live within a
he's throw of each other," he
lid say. "it is no reason why
should throw stones at each
|er."
FOUNDED the Free Syn-
bgue with branches in various
les. Yes, he would say, "Why
^uldn't we work in religion as
United Cipar Stores work
tobacco?" He opposed
kerica's entrance into Woild
\r I. but when the decision
taken, went to wo: k in a
pyard.
had that humor which
sricans regarded as their spe-
gift But didn't Hillel joke?
Is told of Hillel, that leaving
] class one day, he said to the
ients, "I have to go to per-
a mitzvah.'
|What mitzvah is that?" asked
ftuderts.
To take a bath." said Hillel.
Ickling.
|It is a sin."' Wise once told
congregation "to cirry mon-
on Shabbes. Emptj ycur pock-
[here."'
PISE VISITED Sigmund
id. and the father of psycho-
lysis asked. "Dr. Wise, whom
|rou rate as the four foremost
in the world?"
'ell." replied Wise, "I should
name you and Einstein and
Weizmann and Brandeis."
Jut what about yourself?"
tzed Freud.
pro, no. no," exclaimed Wise,
licu'ating strongly.
ft seems to me you protest
much," said Freud.
Pise, telling of the incident,
ed. "So I got a f:ee analysis
the father of the science."
jnsidering the list, the pres-
S-^neration seems orphaned.
we men today to match a
'like Einstein, Freud, Weiz-
\n, Brandeis and Wise?
erhaps we do not need them.
do not need the strong in-
Idual as the strength of the
Iple as a whole is greater. We
lot if a Hitler could arise so
lly today. Moshe Dayan's boys
|e inspired a little fear and
pert for muscular qualities
|ch the world respects more
Einstein's scientific achieve-
Wilson, who was very friendly
|wise, reassured him, "Don't
y. Dr. Wise, I have a big
tebasket," said Wilson.
What About May Day in Israel?
Haifa
_\IAY DAY" tlu' leUrt nolidav of thc interna-
tional labor movement, continues to be a
controversial date in Israel. It has no legal, na-
tional standing, bat much of the country comes
-o a ha.t on that day. There are no newspaper.,.
..loit schools are closed.
Government agencies, like the post office,
Jut up a brave front of being open, but piac-
UCallj the entire -taff is absent. The universities
ie "open," but neither students nor teachers
ippear. by tacil common consent
TOURISTS WHO are in Israel at this time
.>! year for the first time are invariably shocked
to tee the re.I flags flying over so many build
ugh i- are quick to point out
that the flag contains no ban me and sickle.
Sponsor ami chief advocate of May Daj a:
a labor holiday in Israel is the Histadrut. Each
tl Labor Federation issues its proclama-
tion to the workers of the country, calling upon
them to mark the clay appropriately, and con-
e.udina with the toast: "Long Live Israel So-
cialism: Long live the solidarity between the
workers of the world ."
AND EACH year, with plowing vehemence
there has been opposition to the celebration.
Ot late, the new immigrants from the Soviet
. ."ion have been most outspoken in their criti-
: m. "We know well enough what the red flag
gtanda for. We had enough of it> in Russia," they
say. "Here in Israel we need only one flag, the
b.ue and white."
There has been criticism, too, that at a time
When the economy is under great strain, it is a
ciime to lo^e several million man-hours of work
only a week after the national stoppage for In-
dependence Day.
If the Histadrut does indeed wish to give
the day significance, let it call for increase in
efficiency, doubling of productivity, unselfish
devotion to thc national interests. Let this be
the day on which labor seeks to outdo itself in
creative achievement.
INDEED, May Day ha; become, in effect,
the day of a general strike. The Histadrut state-
ments refer to it as the time to emphasize strug-
gle: the struggle to achieve socialism, the strug-
gle for a progressive Israel, the struggle of thi
worker, always the struggle, presumably against
the oppressors and the exploiters.
Little wonder that Labor Day, as marked in
Israel on May First, seems dedicated to the heat-
ing up of the class struggle between Jew and
Jew.
A few years ago Azariah Alon, himself a
socialist and kibbutz member, pointed out that
in its historic beginnings May Day had begun
as a protest against government, against society,
against long hours, against child labor, against
labor enslavement. Vast changes have taken
place.
May first is marked as Labor Day by all
those nations and peoples which proclaim them-
selves enemies of Israel. Are we to show sol-
.darity with them?
_ ... i
s.
cumour
\i
. JZU
mar.
Going from Ridiculous to Sublime
IF EVER a good idea went awry, and if ever an
author performed a disservice to his vast store
of knowledge, it took place in "From the Shadow
of Insight." The author is Joseph Wanefsky. and
the maladroitness is abetted by the publisher,
Philosophical Library.
The price of $6 for 149 pages of a miserably-
edited book is exorbitant. The lack of punctuation,
some typographical errors, the failure to use dif-
ferent type to distinguish between the English and
Hebrew which constantly run into each other, and
the lack of chapter and verse for quotations and
references make the work appear ridiculous.
WHILE WANEFSKY defeated himself in the
fo'egoina book, Joanne Bock in "Pop Wiener:
Naive Painter" (University of Massachusetts
Press, 138 pp., $20) has done justice to her sub-
ject and to herself. The publisher added luster to
the text and reproductions.
Isidore Wiener came from a Russian "shtetl"
and was imbued with a sense of Jewish folklore
and a reverence for the Jewish belief in God's
Covenant with His people. He had no formal train-
ing as an artist. The book is Ms. Bock's Master's
degree thesis.
SHE IS an authority on American culture,
particularly art. The reproductions in the book
are both in color and black and white. Personally,
I prefer Wiener to Chagall. The book reminds one
of the Chinese proverb, "One picture is better
than 10,000 words."
Judah Pilch in his "The Weak Against the
Strong" (Bloch Publishing Co., 114 pp., n.p.) suc-
ceeds in depicting a group of individuals who stand
out as giants in the Ukrainian "shtetl" from which
he came.
DR. PILCH is a noted Jewish educator. The
present book was originally written in Hebrew on
the 50th anniversary of the 1919 Russian pogroms
which swept away hundreds of Jewish communi-
ties in a paroxysm of plunder, rapine and slaughter.
The book recounts events in the lives of men
and women who died "al kiddush ha-Shem." Pilch
has brought the martyrs back to life in simple
words unblemished by emotion-stirring adi?ctives.
THE BOOK serves as an integral part of Jew-
ish history, u should be required reading since it
is of an era and a people that can easily pass into
i.inbo because of 'he greater magnitude of the
Holocaust.
....
^-Herbert JLuft
Milton Berle Started Big Time TV
Hollywood
WTILTON BERLE, a show business veteran of
more than half a century before the cameras
and footlights, at 66 has returned to screen
acting portraying the role of Mr. Meyer, Bernice
Buchalter's Orthodox father in Menahem Golan's
ciime picture, "Lepke," currently before the
cameras at the Culver City Studios, with Tony
Curtis portraying the title role.
Tagged "Mr. Television." he made his TV
debut to a closed circuit audience in Chicago of
129 persons. He became the first big name to
break into the new medium when he bowed on
NBC-Tv"s "Texaco Star Theater." June 8, 1948
to ride the pinnacle of popularity for eight con-
secutive years.
BERLE GENERALLY is credited with sell-
ing more television sets in those days than all
I 1/*./
the nation's appliance salesmen combined.
Yet Milton Berle has been a motion picture
actor since the age of five when young Milton
Berlinger made his debut before the cameras as
the baby screen star Marie Dressier clutched to
her heart in "Tillie's Punctured Romance."
He was the child tossed from the tiain by
Pearl White in "The Perils of Pauline," and the
kid who climbed on John Bunny s lap in "Bun-
ny's Little Brother."
LATER HE appeared in silent movies w>th
Douglas Fairbanks, Sr.. Milton Sil'.s, Mabel Nor-
niand and Marion Davies in all some 50-odd
films with nary a comedy line.
And now the role of Meyer, one of the few
decent men in "Lepke," story of Louis Buchalter
who ended his life of crime in the electric chair.
l\,obe
ft

mm.
Not a Case
Of Just One
Law Student
TY THE TIME advocates of
equality of opportunity fin-
ished discussion of the case of
Marco DeFunis. the Supreme
Court reached its judgment, and
young DeFunis. of a Sephardic
Jewish family, graduated from
thc law school that decided at
first not to admit him.
By now, the U.S. Supreme
Court has in fact ruled not to
give an opinion on the case he-
cause DeFunis' graduation would
render the opinion moot.
This is a profoundly signifi-
cant case: and thc facts merit
recording: A magna cum laude
and Phi Beta Kappa graduate of
the University of Washington in
Seattle. Marco DeFunis was not
admitted to that institution's
law school until court action
pushed him in.
NOW HE is clue to graduate
in a few weeks. One of 1.601 ap-
plicants for 1971 admission to
the school which accepted only
200 to find their way into 150
seats. Marco DeFunis was ac-
cepted in four other law schools,
out he stuck with his first choice.
Rejected by the University of
Washington admissions unit, he
won entrance through a local
court order. The Supreme Court
of Washington reversed that or-
der but was checkmated by Just-
ice William O. Douglas, who is-
sued an edict keeping the young
ma' in the law school.
7.,e university decided to fight
that ruling: and the case proved
of such importance in the Su-
preme Court that considerable
legal and academic brass listen-
ed to every word.
MARCO DeFUNIS seems cer-
tain to be hanging out his shin-
gle soon, but the excitement and
debate raised by this case are
symptomatic of deep concerns
anxieties over college quotas,
affirmative action and a still-un-
acknowledged failure on the part
of America to compensate for the
discriminatory practices of the
past without undermining the
gains of recent years.
Much of the agonizing over the
DeFunis case arises from the
fear that Blacks and Spanish-
speaking aspirants for places in
college courses will find new
roadblocks in their way.
ACTUALLY, the American
Council on Education released a
study recently indicating sad-
'j that the minority groups
percentages were shrinking in
colleges.
This study revealed that 7.8
percent of the 1.600.000 fresh-
men entering higher education
classrooms in 1937 were black as
compared with 8.7 percent in
1972.
A similar downward trend was
registered for American Indians,
Orientals and Spanish-surnamed
people. The financial crunch ex-
plains thi. shrinkage in part.
AT THE heart of the dilemma
is the question put by some who
are sympathetic with briefs pre-
sented by 60 law school deans:
Does the 14th Amendment for-
bid a discretionary admission
process whereby a State Univer-
sity Law School affirmatively
seeks qualified students from
racial minority groups when such
groups have long been victims
of racial discrimination and have
had only then membership in the
law school and the legal profes-
sion?
To put the is'ue thus is to re-
call the late President Lyndon
Johnson's reminder: "Until we
overcome unequal history, we
cannot overcome unequal oppor-
tunity."


Pcge 16
*jB*UHkl1dKtMi Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, May 10, 1974
NORTON
TIRE CO.
S rvCE
.

Improve your cars
ft*. : -
With
m
RADIAL TIRES!


Waranteed 40,000 miles
BETTER STEERING CONTROL
Michelin X Radials let you steer
with less effort. You'll find less
sway on curves and greater directional
stability on straightaways.
PROVEN GAS SAVINGS
Your car's tank won't hold more gas
when you drive on Michelin but you'll
surely get more mileage to the gallon
because Michelin X Radials roll easier.
ACCURATE BRAKING ACTION
Michelin's extra-large "footprint"
and steel-cord belt prevents the
braking force from distorting and
pinching the tread. Your car will
stop quicker, surer, safer.
EXTRA LONG MILEAGE
Watch the odometer move up to 40.000
miles and beyond on a sfngle set of
Michelin X Radials... We guarantee it.

MICHELIN X
THE STEEL-CORD BELTED RADIAL
Waranted 40.000 miles
Michelin's 40,000-mile
optional credit or refund
jnal purchase price and
CENTRAL MiAMi
5300 N.W. 27th Ave. 634-1556
CORAL GABLES
Bird & Douglas Road 446-8101
NORTH MIAMI
13360 N.W. 7th Ave. 681-8541
MIAMI SHORES
8801 Biscayne Blvd. 759-4446
N. MIAMI BEACH
1700 N.E. 163 St. 945-7454
MIAMI BEACH
1454 Alton Road 672-5353
HIALEAH/PALM SPRINGS MILE
1275 W. 49th St. 822-2500
tread life guarantee covers
based on consumer's orig-
proportion of mileage run.
CUTLER RIOGE
20390 S. Dixie Hwy. 233-5241
SOUTH DADE
9001 S. Dixie Hwy. 667-7575
HOMESTEAD
30100 E. Federal Hwy. 247-1622
W. HOLLYWOOD
497 S. State Rd. 7 987-0450
FT. LAUDERDALE
1830 W. Broward Blvd. 525-3136
FT. LAUDERDALE
1740 E. Sunrise Blvd. 525-7588
PLANTATION
381 N. State Road 7, 587-2186


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EFBZMM3ZV_JDTNEA INGEST_TIME 2013-05-24T21:25:02Z PACKAGE AA00014307_00092
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES