The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00091

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
.
mJemsti FlonW&n
and SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Volume 4 Number 9
Hollywood, Florida Friday, April 26, 1974
Price 25 cants
a,:,i:,.':.i ;.,." ii..,:,i..t.iiu.iMUMMUMiMiuii;ii.M'!...... 11 ni..i,;.ii......1:1111111.1111111, BMMMi 111:1 m;i;.i; 11 iti mm* t
Fairways' Paley
Receives Award
George Paley of Fairways
South hi-rise, associate area
chairman for Fairways North and
GCORGE PALBY
South and Meadowbrook for the
1974 Jewish Welfare Federation
Campaign, was honored for out-
standing and dedicated service in
the rebuilding of Jewish lives in
Israel and throughout the world.
Paley received the Community
Service Award from the United
Jewish Appeal at a rally held
Tuesday at Temple Beth El, Hol-
lywood.
"A Message of Life," the poig-
nant Israeli movie filmed after
the Yom Kippur War, was shown.
For many years, Paley has
been active on behalf of Israel.
He is a member of Hallandale
B'nai B'rith and chairman of the
Hillcl Committee.
A member of the steering com-
mittee of the South Broward his-
tadrut Foundation and an active
member of Hallandale Jewish
Center Men's Club, he is also
president of North East Hallan-
dale Community Council.
Abraham B. Halpem, area
chairman, and David Lurie, area
cochairman, participated in the
planning of the event.
The Sponsoring Committee in-
cluded Mr. and Mrs. Sam Bern-
stein, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore
Blitz, Mr. and Mrs. Al Bloom,
Mrs. Estelle Elman, Mr. and Mrs.
Emanuel Gerson, Arone Gold-
berg, Mrs. Paula Jacobs, Mrs.
Dolores Lourcey, Mr. and Mrs.
Nathan Mardell, Mr. and Mrs. Al
Nagelberg, Mr. and Mrs. Sam
Palley, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence D.
Popper, Mr. and Mrs. Al Prober,
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Schulman,
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Weinstein and
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Wolff.
Dr. K., Dinitz Air
Syria 9s Proposals
For Withdrawal
WASHINGTON (JTA) Secretary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer met for 90 minutes with Israeli Ambassador Simcha Dinitz
at the State Department over the weekend, and then left for New
York to attend a special session of the United Nations General
Assembly on international economic and energy problems and to
hold a round of meetings with diplomats of several nations on the
Middle East, State Department sources indicated.
After the meeting, Dinitz told
newsmen that he thought there
was room for negotiations with
Syria.
HE ADDED, however, "Just
because it (the Syrian proposal)
is not exactly the same as before,
it does not solve the problem.'"
He said that Israel was deter-
mined not to give up any part of
the Golan Heights and the mat-
ter had not even been raised by
Secretary Kissinger.
Dinitz described his talk with
the Secretary as "long and con-
structive." He said his govern-
ment expected Kissinger to re-
turn to the Middle East toward
the end of the month to resume
his "shuttle diplomacy" between
the Israeli and Arab capitals.
Asked if he thought the re-
newed fighting on the Golan
Heights would hurt prospects for
negotiations, Dinitz replied. "We
hope not."
HE ADDED, "We have not
initiated the fighting in the north
and as far as we are concerned
we are willing to stop it at any
time."
He said he was not "pessi-
mistic" before his talk with Kis-
Labor Opposes New Elections;
Tries to Form Government
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Labor Party may have set itself an
impossible task when its Executive and Knesset faction voted 31-13
to try to form a new government without new elections, some of the
party's top leaders have indicated.
Finance Minister Pinhas Sapir
said bluntly that it could not be
done, mainly because the Nation-
al Religious Party will not join
a new coalition unless its de-
mands are met.
SAPHt WAS among the minor-
ity of Labor Party Executive and
Knesset faction leaders who
voted for new elections. Another
was Deputy Premier Yigal Allon.
He told reporters that new
elections might have been avoid-
ed if the Labor Party had re-
opened the election lists to admit
new candidates right after the
Yom Kippur War.
But the mistake was made, and
new elections are inevitable, Al-
lon said. Defense Minister Moshe
Dayan did not participate in the
party vote. But he told a meet-
ing of former Rafi members that
he would not support any candi-
date for the Premiership who dis-
agreed with his views on domes-
tic or foreign policy.
HE SAID several potential can-
didates were in that category but
mentioned no names. Rafi is in-
sisting on either a national coali-
tion government embracing Li-
kud opposition or new elections
at the earliest possible date. The
Labor Party is working against
a firm deadline set by President
Ephraim Katzir who gave it no
more than 10 to 14 days to come
up with a new leader and start
the Cabinet-building process.
Katzir has also made it clear
that he will not tolerate a drawn
out process such as was the case
from January to March.
Sapir has already declared cat-
egorically that he is not a candi-
date tor Prime Minister.
TWO OTHER MK'S Labor Min-
ister Yitzhak Rabin and Informa-
tion Minister Shimon Peres, are
declared candidates.
Earlier. Foreign Minister Abba
Eban ruled himself out of consid-
eration, but this week he said
that he may join the derby after
all.
In a subsequent vote of 283-
170. the Knesset moved a second
time a?ain-t new elections after
several party leaders warned that
Labor might lose its ruling edge
if elections were held.
Kiryat Shemona Buries the Dead;
Assails Nation for Non- Defense
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
singer "and I am not more
optimistic now."
While no substantive informa-
tion was released on the Kis-
singer-Dinitz meeting, State De-
partment sources told the JTA
that Kissinger had "briefed"
Dinitz on the Syrian disengage-
ment proposals which he received
from the head of the Syrian ne-
gotiating team, Brig. Gen. Hikmat
al-Shihabi at State Department
meetings over the weekend.
On Friday, Kissinger presented
Shihabi with Israel's disengage-
ment proposals which he received
from Israeli Defense Minister
Moshe Dayan two weeks ago.
These included a detailed map.
Shihabi gave his own map and
proposals to Kissinger ever the
weekend.
KISSINGER'S departure for
New York was delayed by his
talk with Dinitz. The Secretary
has scheduled meetings at the
UN with Soviet Foreign Minister
Ismail Fahmy.
He was to also meet with the
top representatives of Saudi
Arabia and Yugoslavia.
KIRYAT SHEMONA (JTA) Hayim Na
long time ago. "Even the devil has not yet create
But these words lost their meaning Friday mo
the funeral of 18 men, women and children who w
by three Arab terrorists who crossed the border
the Lebanese border.
FOR FOUR hours the killers conducted a car
nades during which time they _,,, ....
also wounded 15 persons. The Thev fel1 on Kiddush Hashem, on
murderers were subsequently safeguarding the name of the 1
killed by Israeli fire.
On Friday morning the town
of Kiryat Shemona was empty as
all its 15,000 inhabitants, many
of them Sephardim and Russian
immigrants, gathered at the en-
trance of the town to form the
long funeral procession that in-
cluded delegations from the en-
tire country.
The army chaplainship. headed
by Chief Army Chaplain Gen.
Mordechai Firon. headed the
procession reciting part of the
Psalms. At the entrance of Kiryat
Shemona a state ceremony was
held. The two chief rabbis were
there, tears in their eyes. They
could hardly console others.
POLICE MINISTER Shlomo
Hillel was there too. He spoke on
behalf of the government.
"We are digging today many
graves, for sons and daughters,
for brothers and sisters who fell
at hands of beastly marauders.
Leadership Meetings
Postponed For Symposia
Both the Women's Leadership
Institute and Young Leaders
Council postponed their April
meetings in order that members
could attend the first in the
threejpart series. Educative Sym-
posia II, which featured Phil
Baum.
All members of the Hollywood
Jewish community are urged to
take advantage of this Commit-
tee on Jewish Life-sponsored
series by attending the May 9
lecture by Marshall Sklare at
Temple Sinai and Max Dimont's
at Temple Beth El May 23.
hman Bialik, the outstanding Hebrew poet, wrote a
d the revenge for the blood of young children."
rning as thousands of people cried for revenge at
ere slaughtered last Thursday in Kiryat Shemona
from Lebanon into this Upper Galilee town near
nage with machineguns, bazookas and hand gre-
raeli ipeople and the land of Is-
rael.
Marshall Sklare Speaker At
2nd Symposia Lecture May 9
Mrs. Ellie Katz, chairman of
the Committee on Jewish Life,
reports that tickets for part two
of a three-part lecture series.
Educative Symposia II, are avail-
able at the Federation office.
Sponsored by the Jewish Wel-
fare Federation of Greater Holly-
wood and The Jewish Commu-
nity Centers of South Florida, the
series will present Dr. Marshall
Sklare Thursday, May 9, at 8:0C
p.m. at Temple Sinai. Prof.
Sklare, whose subject will be "In-
termarriage and the Jewish Fu-
ture," is a social scientist who
specializes in the study of racial
ethnic and religious groups, with
particular emphasis on the sociol-
ogy of the American Jew. He
serves as Professor of American
Jewish Studies at Brandeis Uni-
versity.
Dr. Sklare has taught at Ye-
shiva University and the Hebrew
University, and for over a decade
he was the director of the Divi
sion of Scientific Research of the
American Jewish Committee.
The author of "America's
Jews," he is also the senior auth-
or of "Jewish Identity on the
Suburban Frontier: A Study of
Group Survival in the Open So-
ciety," the editor of 'The Jews:
Social Patterns of an American
Group," and the author of "Con-
servative Judaism: An American
Religious Movement."
Dr. Sklare took his master's
degree at the University of Chi-
MAffSHAU SKUUtt
cago and received his doctorate
from Columbia University.
Thursday, May 23, at Temple
Beth El, the concluding speaker
for the series will be the provoc-
ative spokesman of Jewish his-
tory. Max Dimont.
Dimont, author of "Jews, God
and History," has selected as his
subject: "The Indestructible Jews
Will The Real Jewish History
Step Forward Please."
Tickets will also be on sale at
the door.


Page 2
+Je*iS* fhridgan <** Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, April 26,
Sam Stang (left) presents the Slate of Israel Bonds Scioll of
Honor to Jack en 1 Harriot Solot at the Galahad South
"Mja\t In Israel" he'd Apr. 1 on behalf of the Israel Bond
Organization. The Solots were honored for their continued
t..^.io ui support oi isiaei's economic development. Stang
served as chairman of the highly successful Galahad South
Israel Ecnds evrnt; Sydney Holtzman was cochairman.
Florida Contingent Attends
BBW International Conclave
A large contingent of Fiondlana
attended the B'nai B'rith Wom-
en ) International Triennial Con-
vention held in D:-.l as, Tex.,
March 24 to 23 as d
T .c Ambassad ir of the State of
Israel, His Excellency Sis
Dimtz. keynot d '.he final lunch-
--" of tw cntwntiota, and Helen
Smith of Austin. Tex., was elected
tn- new international president.
Attending from North .Miami
Beach were: Mm. Harriet Hor-
witl, president BBW Distri I
Five: Mrs. Alma Hofstadter, vice
president BBW District Five;
Mrs. Adele Beckcrmari. BBW Dis-
trict Five Florida FiMd D'recton
Mrs. N'orma Jay. BBW District
Five Executive Committee; Mrs.
Cir^'e Romer, viee president
BBW Twin Countv Council: Mrs.
Sandra Rosen, president Beth Tov
Chapter; Mrs. Ann Englander.
president Amity Chapter; Mrs.
Hermione Spahn. president Dc-di-
cation Chapter; Mrs. Ida Fried-
land, president Century 21 Chap-
ter; .w j. Phoebe Gould, presi-
i! nt-elect, Century 21 Chapter;
Mrs. Jean Stempa and Mrs. Rose
Roban, Amity Chapter.
Also MSs Elise Factor, presi-
dent Twin County Council. Hia-
lean; Mrs. Dorothea Modes, presi-
dent Miami Council; Mrs. Edith
Ba -:nan. District Five Executive
Committee; Mrs. Renee Braun,
Shalcm Chapter, South Dadc;
Mrs. Lillian Sands, president Mi-
ami Beach Council: Mrs. Blanche
Breitbart. president-elect Bien-
venida Chapter, Miami Beach;
Mrs. Rose Bernstein, president
Hallandale Chapter; and Ms. Mol-
lye Ginberg, District Five Execu-
tive Committee. Hallandale.
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United Way
i Officers
Oriented
New officers and hoard mem-
bers of the United Way of Brow-
aid County were oriented at a
recent meeting.
Officers for this year include
G. K. I.ivin :ston. Jr.. Division
Manager of Southern Bell Telc-
phone Co., president: Robert J.
Kelly, president of Sunrise Amer-
ican National Bank treasurer; at
torney Michael E. Zeaiy. secre-
tary, and Harold E. Walker, a
partner in Frn^t and Ernst, cam-
paign chairman for the 1975
drive.
Members added to the organi-
sation this year are Andrew De-
Graf fcnrci.it. Yvonne Henry,
Sandra S. Castec!. Claude G.
Davis, Esther Gordon. Robert H.
Larsen. Robert Ross and Donald
J. Welkner.
The board of directors includes
Joseph C. Amaturo. Arthur A.
Frimct. Donald L. Heffner. Wil-
liam J. Holland. Dr. Sanford E.
Jameson. Al J. Novak. Sr.. Ed-
ward J. Stack. John T. Wulff.
Elizabeth Athana>kos. Edie
Greene. Earl R. Johnson, Virgi-
nia S. Young and Benjamin K.
Synttners, budget committee
chairman.
----------------------------------------
New Colimm
To Be Called
-/\&l rVOe
We are happy to announce a'
new column starting this issue
cailedASK ABE.
Readers are
welcome to
send in ques-
tions relating
to Jewish his-
tory.
Try and
stump Abe .
who is none
other than ac-
tive Federa-
tion worker,
Abraham B
Halpern, Edi
Abe Halpern tor Emeritus
of the Jewish Journal of Raritan
Valley.
Mr. Halpern appears to be a
walking encyclopedia of Jewish
facts.
Send your questions to:
"ASK ABE-
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
& SHOFAR
1909 Harrison Street
Hollywood. Florida 33020
Question: What is inscribed on
the outside of the Liberty Bel!
and what is the significance?
Answer: "Proclaim Libertv
throughout the land, unto all the
inhabitants thereof." (Leviticus
25:10)
This massage in Leviticu<
speaks about the jubilee (the '0th
year) when liberty has to be pro-
claimed throughout the land. Our
founding fathers, who were stu
dents of the Old Testament,
could find no better quotation to
express the thought that the
colonies should not be sub-
servient to King George than the
passage in the Torch about free-
dom.
The Israelites proclaimed the
new idea which was unheard of
until that time that no man
can be a slave to another man
forever.
ajb.h.
United Way of Broward County officers for the coming year
include (left to right) Rob;-rl J. Kelly, Michael E. Zealy, G.K.
Livingston, Jr. and Harold E. Walker.
JWV Post Elects Officers
Victor 13. Frecdman Post 613.
Jewish War YYterans, has elected
and installed a new slate of of-
ficers. They include .Mike Bog-
danoff, commander; Raymond
Weiss, senior vice commander:
Edwin Strauss, first junior vice
commander: Meyer Riceman, -ec-
ond junior vice commander; her-
man Zweibach, judge advocate-
Dr. Meyer Kaplan, adjutant
ncy Gingold, quaiterni.i-.cr. and
Monty Sadock, chaplain.
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Friday. April 26, 1974
+Jewish ncridk*& and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 3
Young Couples Are Young Leaders
By RITA GOODMAN
Four Hollywood couples will
undoubtedly gather, for years to
come, to hash and rehash a trip
they took together in the "Spring
of 74."
The Robert Baers, Stanley Mar-
gulies, Morton Diamonds and
James Fox Millers, a quartet of
young leaders in the Hollywood
Jewish community, joined 29 oth-
er couples on a National Yourig
Leaders Mission which covered
18 Israeli cities in 14 days.
It was a "first time" for the
Diamonds.
Morton, a physician, says, "My
lasting impressions are, first, the
intensity and determination of
people to survive as a nation and,
second, the application of time
and energy to social problems de-
spite tremendous external hostil-
ity."
Louise Diamond says of her

ROBERT BACK
gether and agreed, ''An aware-
ness of the area really turned us
on. It was like 2,000 years ago
and today."
Now, after their third trip,
Karen noted, "It was a sad trip
to see the country heartbroken.
They will not be beaten, but the
MORTON DIAMOND
initial visit, "I have always had a
mental picture of Israel and it
was what I oxDected."
She adds, "I thoueht the most
important thing I felt was their
ultimate aim to provide a Jewish
state as a homeland for all Jews
in the world no matter the
cost in sorrow or financial hard-
ship."
The Baers, who were returning
to Israel for their third visit in
eight years, found the people
"much more serious. Peace has a
more important meaning to
them," they agreed.
Baer, a member of the Young
Leadership Cabinet, was a co-
leader on this trip.
Both he and his wife noticed
that Israelis felt a closer rela-
tionship with American Jewry
than on any of their previous
trips. They were asked, "How can
we get American people to move
here?"
"They feel Americans would be
a great asset to them." Bob Baer
said, "because of their education
and familiarity with a free demo-
cratic system.'
Karen Margulies had been to
Israel as a single girl.
After her marriage to Dr. Stan-
ley Margulies, they returned to-
LOUISE DIAMOND
AVIV A BAER
morale was down."
Dr. Margulies added, "They
have lost a generation of fine
young people. Yet, they under-
stand they have a date with des-
tiny and they are doing every-
thing within their power to make
sure they keep that date." He
went on, "What they want from
the world and American Jewish
communities is the necessary
help, beyond their resources, to
allow them to do what they must
do"
There is one day of that trip
indelibly etched into the mind of
Dr. Diamond. He explained, "In
terms of poignancy, most menv
orable was the monument erected
in the Sinai Desert at an Israeli
military installation by rabbinical
students whose job it was to
identify the dead.
"This monument was erected
by welding destroyed personal
military equipment including ma-
chine guns, rifles, bayonets, hel-
mets and ammunition cartridges.
STANLEY MARGULIES
KAREN MARGULIES
Le Cafe de Paris
in DANIA
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Temple In Pines
Art Auction Set
Temple in the Pines vice presi-,
dent Lea Berger has announced
an art sale and auction to be held
Suud.ya May 5, at the Hollybrook
Tennis and Country Club, Pem-
broke Pines.
The art. supplied by the De-
Ci'ique Art Gallery, will be dis-;
played from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. for
i opk holding -Patrons of the
Arts" tickets. Tickets entitle the
bearer to preview and purchase
items prior to the auction. Re-
freshments will be served.
At 7 P-m. the exhibit reopens
for the auction. There is an ad-
mission fee for the evening
event: however those holding pa-
trons tickets will be admitted
free.
Anyone wishing to purchase
tickets may call Mrs. Lynn
Berer or Mrs. Ric Garfinkle.
WE DON'T ADVERTISE
LOW PRICES
WE GIVE THEM!
H0UYW00DF
1200N.KDERAIHWY.
I 921-6800 HOLLYWOOD 947-3411
"It was black, six feet hij>h
and, as yet, incomplete. To me,
its structure reflected the agony
and wastefulness of war."
He remembers the inscription
at the base vividly, "Shoot and
burn. Shoot and burn."
Like her friend Karen, Aviva
Baer especially feels ties to the
past. To remind them, they both
collect antiquities for their
homes.
All of these young Hollywood
couples agreed to the need for
world Jewry to pay their snare
of being a Jew stated by the
Baers.
The Margulies declared, "We
are very committed to Federation
and we were more than ready to
return again." He added, "They
RITA GOODMAN
want our presence not just our
presents."
If Louise and Morton Diamond
heed their hearts, the presence
will include their children the
next time. Louise said. "I want
to go again when the children are
old enough to accompany us, to
see it and be made to realize
they too have an important role
to play in the future of Israel."
. And that is the heritage
young leaders are made from."
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of Hollywood
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Page 4
JtoMRBF*m*l Friday, April 26, 1974
fJewtsti fTcridian Sax be's Preemptive Strike
i %Uit \H "I Mil 411 II IIUI I 1 "oiiii r^s jj
OlflCE and PLANT 120 N.E. 6th St., Miami, F\m. 33132 Phone 373 460f
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 373-4605
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Executive Editor Assistant to Publisher

FRED K. SHOCHET
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Of TheMirctarHairf* Advbrtlted InlfeT Cottfnrta
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The Jewiah Floridlan haa abaorbed the Jewiah Unity and the Jewiah Weekly.
Member of the Jewiah Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arte Feature Syndi-
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soclation of Engliah-Jewiah Newapapere, and the Florida Preee Aaaociation.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Tear 4.P0. Out of Town Upon
Reouest.
Volume 4
Friday, April 12, 1974
Number 8
20 MIS.AN 5734
An Outrageous Remark
Attorney General Wlliam B. Saxbe's outrageous re-
marks that "Jewish intellectuals" during the McCarthy
era were "very enamored of the Communist Party" casts
doubts on his capability to head such a sensitive post as
the Department of Justice.
In fact, it shows him to be a miserably educated man
filled with the poisons of bigoted stereotypes.
President Nixon, already besieged by incompetents
around him, does not need another tawdry politician in
his inner circle.
The Justice Department's initial explanation that the
comment "just came out" has helped the situation very
little, and in fact, it may even have made it worse. What
it suggests is that Saxbe was right, but that he should not
have said it.
In effect, Saxbe has revived the worst excesses of the
McCarthy era at a time when the President, himself an
ardent Communist-hunter in those days, can ill-afford such
cheap trickery.
No apology by Saxbe can erase the filth he has
heaped upon the nation.
Let Saxbe and his ilk not forget that the only people
in the world actively fighting the scourge of communism
today are the Jews in Israel and everywhere else.
The rest, and that includes the industrialists of this
nation who surround the administration, are playing foot-
sie with them because they find it profitable.
Tribute to Dr. Lehrman
South Florida will join with members of Temple'
Emanu-El this week in paying tribute to Dr. Irving Lehrman
as he marks his 30th anniversary as rabbi of the Miami
Beach synagogue.
Dr. Lehrman, over the years, has achieved top posi-
tions of importance in an astonishingly broad array of or-
ganizations dedicated to civic, philanthropic, religious,
cultural and interfaith organizations.
His seemingly endless sources of inspiration and
energy have brought him to levels of accomplishment
attained by only few men.
The results of this dedication have been felt on every
level of the Jewish and general communities in South Flor-
ida, nationally and abroad.
The causes he has espoused are myriad, and the
loftiness of their excellence is symbolized by his service
as president of the Synagogue Council of America he
was the first Floridian ever elected to that post which
resulted in his being designated as the Council's first
honorary president in its 50-year history.

His Contributions are Many
Not only in religious affairs, but in his activities in the
cause of Israel, Dr. Lehrman achieved similarly high dis-
tinction when he was elected to serve two years as na-
tional chairman of the Rabbinic Cabinet of the United
Jewish Appeal.
In the general community, he rose to the highest
levels of accomplishment when the National Conference
of Christians and Jews conferred upon him its highest na-
tional and state honors.
At the same time. Dr. Lehrman has resourcefully ap-
plied himself to the growth of Temple Emanu-FJ, which
under his spiritual leadership has become one of the na-
tion's major Conservative congregations.
The community gathering to pay him honor will be
wishing him many more years of dedicated achievement.
rpHE SAXBE affair will most
Ukely be swept under the rug
by the Nixon administration
aiong with all,his other lesser"
troubles.
But if nothing else, it is sig-
nificant because it emphasizes
the amazing consistency of the
quality of the men surrounding
the President, whom he has per-
sonally chosen to help run the
nation.
WITH FEW exceptions, they
are industrialists of one sort or
another without the slightest
mark that a good course in col-
lege humanities might have en-
graved upon them.
Saxbe's comment about Com-
munism and Jews is worse than
bigoted. It represents the kind
of ignorance that is inexcusable
in a U.S. Attorney General.
One after the other, the Pres-
ident's choices betray him, and
repeatedly bring to light his own
singular superficiality for hav-
ing failed to detect the arrogant
selfishness and malevolence be-
neath the glitter of their posh
surfaces.
THE FACT is that a President
with at least a minimal under-
standing of men would not so
consistently choose so many
duds.
But the Saxbe affair is in
many ways more important than
the President's other sti ike-outs
because, more than the others,
it illumines the administration
view of Communism as it was
not meant to be illuminated.
This is particularly painful be-
cause President Nixon is himself
synonymous with our so-called
struggle against Communism
since his earliest days in Con-
gress and coinciding with the
emergence of the Cold War right
after World War II.
WHEN THE U.S. was the un-
mistakable leading world power,
when it suited us to try to iso-
late Communism not only polit-
ically and militarily, but also in-
dustrially and economically, our
major ideological purpose was
to be anti-Communist.
Now that the U.S. is not the
unmistakable leading world pow-
er, if only because it is almost
impossible today to measure
what that means, now that we
are troubled by an unfavorable
balance of trade, by a devalued
currency and by extraordinarily-
powerful competition for mar-
kets abroad, it no longer suits
us to isolate Communism either
politically or militarily.
FOR THE Soviet Union, still
the major international purveyor
of Marxist mendacities, is al=o
(and still) the major industrial-
ly and economically have-not na-
tion, but with a breathtakingly
powerful supply of the money
that is needed to become a have.
And so. say we, to hell with
ideology. Where there is a buck
to be made, how can ideology
matter? There is nothing incon-
sistent in this policy.
It is true that we have changed
from a country of Communist-
hunters to a haloed harem of
Communist camp-followers in
the name of detente.
BUT WHAT is behind this has
not changed, and that is the
American industrialist's search
to exploit every available eco-
nomic horizon in the cause of
profit in this case, a piece
of the Soviet action.
That is why President Nixon's
career spans the poles of our na-
tional about face on Commu-
nism why he has helped to
shape the about-face.
Surrounded by industrialists
from the beginning, he will be
their handmaiden till the end.
WITH OUR currency still
battered, our balance of trade
still askew, our competitors still
outmaneuvering us for markets,
why not pitch woo in the cor-
ridors of the Kremlin? After all,
everyone else is Japar, West
I aBjejafjajajajjaaejuexifffr:'
'
.
Mi mil in
i
i
Germany, France, Italy, even a
diminished Britain.
Most of them, the fat cat
beneficiaries of our largesse af-
ter the second great war. have
been directly responsible for all
our troubles. They are trying to
bury us, and so why *iot beat
them at their own game?
"BUT WRELY if w6u4d be un-
seemly, responding in moral out-
rage to such ideological philan-
dering, to charge the Nixon men
with what Nixon charged his own
victims, say, 25 years ago.
It would be wicked, as he him-
self was wicked, mendacious as
he himself was mendacious, sell-
serving as he himself was self-
serving, to call them Communist
The Saxbe comment about
Continued oi. Page 13
>*A
:
'As,
Max Lerner
Sees H
.....-i.t

CARACAS Most Venezuelan politics affects only Vene-
zuela, but its oil politics affects the world. While the Arab oil
decisions hold the center of the world stage, and rightly, the
coming decisions by the newly-installed President Carlos Andres
Perez will form an important part of the world's energy future.
First, a few primary facts. Venezuela fifth in oil pro-
duction, third in oil exports was an oil exporter before the
big Arab oil strikes were made, and was one of the founding
members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries
(OPEC).
THE ARABS were influenced by their idea of common eco-
nomic action. But the Arabs beat them to the recent price hikes,
and Venezuela followed hard on their heels.
The oil tax reference price here, on which the 60% govern-
ment tax is collected, has increased from a little more than S3
a barrel to $14. The oil company officials are wry about it. but
the ordinary Venezuelan is likely to draw a moral of his own: If
the companies and consumers can stand such stiff prices and
taxes now, then for some years the Venezuelans must have been
exploited.
THIS MOOD sets the climate of opinion here on oil politics.
The company officials have to face the fact that the old days
of company domination, which began with the dictator-President,
Juan Vicente Gomez, are over.
In the coming negotiations to decide the new economic and
power setup on oil, it is the government that will be domi-
nant and will call the tune.
In the tyranny of words, each side has a bugbear word that
frightens it. On one side it is the multinational corporation; on
the other it is nationalization.
But to an observer committed to neither side, the chances
are that the final solution will have to combine elements from
the reality behind both terms.
THE OIL companies, over the years, have trained a corps
of Venezuelan technicians. At a pinch they could take over the
production task. But I have found few observers here who
would gamble on their doing it well.
For a time they will still need technology, especially the
continuing technical advances which come from American uni-
versities. They will also need managerial skills.
THIS VIEW, however, which the company officials gamble
on in their calculations, has in one important respect been over-
taken by history. The world demand for crude oil is so great
that a producing nation has a completely seller's market, and
can bypass the refinery and marketing problems that it once
had to face if it wanted to nationalize its oil resources.
There are other issues that the negotiators will have to
reckon with. One is the question of ownership stakes. If the
decision is for total nationalization, there could still be a con-
tract with the companies to continue in a management role.
BUT SOME observers feel that the job will be done better
if the companies retain a minority partnership stake, set by the
government, than if they are simply hired and eventually fired.
There is the related question of bureaucracy. The Accion
Democratica to which the new government officials belong, is
a nardneaded centrist party, which doesn't make a cult of so-
cialism as such.
They know that big units, whether in the private or govern-
menta sectors, are not efficient. They may well decide not on
a single unit to rim everything but on a number of units which
will cover oil and natural gas.
THE WHOLE debate within the government and party is
also likely to turn inward toward the private sector in other
industries where there are interlocking directorships that need
to be broken up with more rigorous controls.
There will be, of course, a rivalry between the political
parties on the oil nationalization issue. The party now out of
power, Copei, will try to retrieve its public image by pushing
hard for early nationalization. There is a wing of the government
party that will want to beat them to it.
President Perez had some sharp comments on the multi-
national companies in his inaugural speech, and I suspect he
meant them and that they deserve them.
BUT I should be surprised if he were to allow the issue of
a final setup for oil, and for the relations of government and
management, to be decided in a savage, open battle between the
parties in the congress.
Oil is too flammable a commodity to be handed over to the
firebrands.
The fact that President Perez commands impressive popular
support gives lum the political strength to make his decision
with coolness, standing up to pressures from whatever direction
they come.


Friday. April 26, 1974
*Jmistfhrid far, and Shote of Hollywood
Page 5
->
"
/
Lester Maddox is No Museum Piece Today
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON
Los Angeles Times Syndicate
ATLANTA .Innocents out-
side Georgia may have been go-
ing along blissfully these past
three years assuming Lester
Maddox is now a museum piece
or rocking on a front porch
some place like a veteran of
Chickamauga, fondling his ax
handle and reminiscing about all
the black heads he threatened to
knock with it if they ventured
into his fried chicken palace.
Georgians have not shared that
bliss. They know the segrega-
tionist ex-governor has been
right here all the time, alternate-
ly entertaining them by riding
his bicycle backward and infuri-
ating them by some clumsy po-
litical sleight-of-hand that is ob-
vious to everybody but himself
in office, as lieutenant gover-
nor and priming now to go for
governor one more time.
PEOPLE WHO want the best
for Georgia and usually know
what they are talking about say
that this year he will not make it.
Admittedly, there is a percent-
age of wishful thinking in it for
them. But a the early outlines
of the Georgia gubernatorial pri-
mary take shape, you can see
reasons to hope they are right.
Georgia and the issues have
changed in these years, and the
voters' lengthening acquaintance
with Maddox has bred more and
more of what familiarity is said
to breed. A group of solid, mod-
erate (by Georgia standards)
Democrats already is lined up to
contest with him.
Mandolin Orchestra Will
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Temple Beth El Brotherhood
will present The Hollywood Sym-
phonic Mandolin Orchestra un-
der the direction of Anthony
Rizzuto, Sunday at 8:00 p.m. in
the temple.
For this performance, the
group has donated their services
and the Brotherhood has under-
written all other expenses. The
entire proceeds will be donated
to the Israel Emergency Fund.
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JIMMY CARTER, the incum-
bent, cannot run for another
term, and probably could not win
if he did. His "new south" image'
has been favorably noticed out-
side the state, but inside he cre-
ated political hostility by a
wholesale reorganization of state
government.
Still, his moderation has been
influential; and while none of
the imminent candidates will
publicly align with him, none
will be drastically to his right.
None except Maddox, that is.
Carter's erstwhile appointee to
the U.S. Senate, David Gambrell.
is running at arm's length from
his benefactor. He was beaten
by Sam Nunn in his try for a full
Senate term in 1972 largely be-
cause of his Carter association.
STATE REP. George Busbee,
an Albany, Ga., lawyer, is an ex-
pert legislator known at the capi-
tol as "a workhorse, not a show-
horse," and may have more thor-
ough knowledge of the state
budget and other vital issues
than any of the competition.
State Sen. Bobby Rowan is a
country-style farmer from Enig-
ma. Ga., a lively campaigner who
makes a big thing of having his
campaign fund records freely
available at the Enigma branch
of the Bank of Alapaha. Rowan
has won state-wide recognition
for his work in mental health
and other nonpolitical cam-
paigns. He enjoys calling Mad-
dox "the Pontius Pilate of Geor-
gia politics."
ANY OF THESE could run
strong enough to go into a run-
off with Maddox, but five months
ahead of the primary the most
potent may be another Carter ap-
pointee, the former state trans-
portation director, Bert Lance.
In the Carter administration.
Lance cleaned up the infamous
patronage system in the highway
department, which was either a
highly popular or unpopular
achievement, depending on who
is rating it.
Lance is a wealthy banker
from Calhoun, Ga., who uses a
private plane to get about the
state.
BUT HE has the look and man-
ner of a county sheriff burly,
bluff and crew-cut.
In 1966 Maddox became gov-
ernor after a disputed election in
which he got a boost from At-
lanta riots that stirred racial
fears. In 1970, he barely avoided
a runoff for lieutenant governor
against weak opposition.
The only live racial issue he
can play on now is busing but
unless a black candidate comes
in, which is likely, all his oppo-
sition will be firmly against it,
too. In earlier state-wide elec-
tions, the assumption usually has
been that any racist candidate
would carry the state outside At-
lanta, but this time Lance will
draw strongly in the northern
mountain counties, and Rowan
from the farmers in the south-
east.
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IN HIS TIME in office, the one
thing voters resent most about
Maddox is how he foxily allowed
the senate to slip through a leg-
islative pay raise last year. Now
his friends at the capitol are try-
ing to bury that offense in an
uneventful, noncontroversial 1974
session, but it still hurts him
deeply.
All the objective evidence,
then, is that Maddox may be still
around, but Georgia has moved
on past him. The only catch is
my subjective memoiy that
eisht years ago this summer, ev-
erybody I knew thought the very
idea of Lester Maddox becoming
governor was hilarious.
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Phone: 772-6550


Page 6
*Jelst>norknt*tl d Shofar cA Hollywood
Friday, April 26, 1974
Ida Needs Encouragement
-
By FRAN NEVINS
In our modern world of prog-
ress and technology, scientists
and engineers are highly funded
and encouraged to become ab-
sorbed in their work. But when
you are a member of the Soviet
society. Jewish, and even begin
to think about emigration to Is-
rael. At urging often turns to
repression.
For example. Professor Venia-
min Fain was expelled irom the
Scientific Council of the Institute
of So id Substances of the USSR
Academy of Sciences iin the Moj-
cow academic suburb of Cherni-
golovka). The official reason for
the expulsion was his "suspected"'
desire to emigrate to Israel. The
decision, passed while he was ab-
sent with illness, was based upon
no evidence of application for
visas.
A mathematics professor in
Kishinev, Isa-k Gokhbtrg, a cor-
responding member of the Mol-
davian Academy of Sciences, was
removed from his position as de-
partment head. He had submitted
his application for emigration.
In addition to their jobs, sci-
entists are now losing the hanor
they deseive for their contribu-
tions. Sources within the USSR
report that it is forbidden to
make any reference to David
Azbel's works. Azbel. 63, is a
chemical engineer and Jewish ac-
tivist. This includes any mention
of "Azbel's Effect," a phenome-
non that for the past fifteen
years has been written of all
over the world.
Three articles by Dov (Dmitri)
Ramm were deleted at the gal-
ley stage from a collection of
scientific works of the Scientific
Research Construction Institute
for Measuring Instruments. The
deletion was ordered by the In-
stitute Director.
Azbel. veteran of sixteen years
in prison during the Stalin era,
was the leader of a hunger strike
which took place in Moscow a few
months ao. It was publicized in
the West. The reaction by USSR
officials included:
Harassment on the street by
KGB.
Phones of nearly 35 Moscow
activists were disconnected.
Mail delivery became highly
selective and sporadic.
Phone calls from abroad
were disconnected after the
first sentence.
In an open letter to the U.S.
Senate the activists disputed So-
viet claims that Jewish emigra-
tion is proceeding unimpeded,
and urged our support. "By cut-
ting us off from the outside
world.'' they said, "the KGB is
trying to minimize the value of
our hunger stiike."
One striker, Ida Nedel, a cou-
rageous activist and former econ-
omist, especially needs our en-
couragement. For the past three
years she has given aid, signed
petitions, and demonstrated on
behalf of all Jewish families,
seeking freedom. She has also
suffered. Before she joined the
hunger stiike. Ida sent a letter
to the West from which I have
taken excerpts:
"The little scrap of paper
which is given the title of exit
visa costs 900 rubles of Soviet
currency but no one has so far
estimated the price that one has
to pay in human suffering for
the privilege of being able to ob-
tain this tiny scrap of paper. It if
difficult to describe all the hard-
ships and humiliations I have
had to endure during these years
as a consequence of the simple
expression of my will .
"I was thrown into prison aft-
er I appealed to the Presidium of
the Supreme Soviet. Moreover, I
have been made to starve and I
have been abused by officialdom
in numerous other ways. I have
been beaten hunted like a wild
animal, chased by the hounds.
Many times I've been arrested
while walking quietly in the
street and thrown into dirty un-
derground cellars which are
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from the West do make an im-
pact and do give reassurance to
our Jewish brethren. Why not
and a night cable of support
($3.00). A 9-10 word sample:
"We send our support for your
right to emigrate." or "We sup-
port you in your fight for
exodus." Be sure to ask Western
Union for confirmation of deliv-
ery. Ida's address is
USSR; RSFSR
Moscow
ul. Yunikh Lenintsev No. 79
Korp. 6 kv. 28
Nudol. Ida
It is also recommended that
yon write to yur congressmen as
well as Soviet officials making
them aware of Ida's position ar.d
urging her release.
Husbands Invited
To Final Meeting
Of Sisterhood
Marilyn Hoffman, president ,>f
Beth Shalom Sisterhood, an-
nounces it will conclude its cur-
rent year Monday, May 6, at 8
p.m. at the temple.
Program vice president Rmh
Kerbel has planned a program
which is particularly poignav at
this time of Golda Meir's retire-
ment at age 75.
The award-winning film pro-
duced by BBC, "Golda." honor-
ing Mrs. Meir, will be presented.
Members' husbands are invited
to join this concluding event
where Israeli refreshments will
be served.
(AJe \*son
f^eop/e V^>y cir
26th IVQYS&rU
DAMA BANK
255 EAST DANtA BEACH BOULEVARD
DANIA 33004


Friday. April 26, 1974
*"**/** nmrldRan and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 7
-tMMMHHiuuiu mm.......>:. iiimiin u:,.;.:. ;r: i: m-rnmriv
&4s $ *See <9t
By BOB KtRBU, Executive Oireelor,
/wish Welfare federation of Creater Hollvweo*
i
warn mmmmmfftmum
The heat of the 1374 campaign is over. There remain immaie
pledges and followups that are continuing. Office procedures such as
(i. ction of records and generally putting the house in order for the
nex'. steps, also remain. The allocation process is presently being
planned, thoughts are being given to an expiession of our appreciation
to campaign workers and leadership concerning next year's operation
is already being discussed.
Yes, this is a time for planning.
It is also a time to reflect upon what has been accomplished, what
should be further accomplished, and also a time for dreaming.
Since October, time has moved so quickly that there has not been
any period when one could reflect and contemplate. Even now, there"s
no time for that, and yet, it must be done. How best can this com-
munity be solidified? What are the means and methods to be employed
enabling all to work together for a common good? What programs and
plans have we put off what changes should be made in our present
manner of doing things?
Hopes and dreams by themselves are fantasy unless they become
our goals in which concrete plans are implemented which move them
into the realm of reality. Fighting windmills is both time consuming
and non-productive. The development of objectives and working toward
them needs to be done and will be done if we, as a community, work
together both openly and honestly. There will always be differences
of opinion for that is life and to be expected; however let the goal
for those in leadership be mutual and let the striving be together.
Some subjects now being contemplated and developed such as a
Chaplaincy Service, a restructuring of leadership development pro-
grams, a study of our Jewish education needs, and an evaluation of
our new Jewish Community Centers Program, will provide great im-
port for this community.
We. all of us, have an obligation to work not only for ourselves
but for those who come after us, in making this a community which
will provide for the needs of our Jewish people.
As I see it there is only one direction to go: forward.
We all must have our dreams. But we must also move with reality.
Then, perhaps our hopes and aspirations will one day be attained.
Young Singles
Plan Socials
The Young Professionals and
Profes;ionali II Singles Clubs,
serving D.ide and Broward coun-
ties single adults in their twen
tie-, thirties and'forties, are co-
onsoring several upcoming so-
cial functions.
Sunday at 8 p.m. there will be
a dance party in the Peacock
Room of the Coconut Grove Play-
house.
Saturday, May 4, at 6:30 p.m.
a bowling party will be held at
Bird Bowl, South Miami. Games
will be complimentary for the
clubs: however reservations must
be made in advance with the
group.
"Rape Prevention," a self de-
fense seminar demonstrating
karate, will take place Sunday,
May 5, at 8 p.m. in the Wash-
ington Federal at North Miami
Beach.
There is an admission charge
for both members and guests; a
social will follow the seminar.
Hollywood Women In NYC
Shirley A. Tragash, Miami
Beach, president of the Depart-
ment of Florida, Jewish War Vet-
erans Ladies Auxiliary, past na-
tional presidents Billie Kern of
Miami Beach, Malvina V. Free-
man of Hollywood, Marcia Kos-
low and Rose Schorr, Hallandale.
and past Department president
Zelda Weinstein of Pompano
Beach, are attending the National
Executive Committee meeting of
the National Jewish War Vet-
erans Ladies Auxiliary in New
York City this weekend.
Temple Beth Shalom dedicated its new sanctuary recsntly
with a Torah procession from the existing assembly hall.
The honor of carrying the Torah was given to past and
present officers of the temple. Affixing mezzuzah to the new
building are Rabbi Morton Malavsky, (left) Jack Shapiro,
president, and Edward Kaplan, corresponding secretary
and building fund chairman.
Henry Levy 'second from right) former direc'or of European
operations for United H1AS Ssrvice, spo'.:e "ecently at a
TWF '74 Campaign brunch held at the Holiday Inn for the
Aguarius hi rite. At left are Paul Wiener and Julius Freilich,
Aguarius cochairmen. Lewis C. Cohn, Aguarius chairman
and ccchairman of the Hi-Rise division is at right.


Page 8
*-Je*lstrhridfr*n and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, April 26, 1974
A unique experience is planned for a local Bar Mitzvah to
take place at the Western Wall in Jerusalem. Dr. Morton
Malavsky, of Temple Beth Shalom, will officiate at the Bar
Mitzvah of Michael Feinstein, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ellis Fein-
stein, when the family joins the Rabbi on his June 16 tour
to Israel.
Special Seminar
For Young Leaders
The Hollywood Young Leaders
Council and Women's Leadership
Institute will join with the Miami
and Fort Lauderdale groups for
a special seminar on Israel Sat-
urday. May 4, from 1:30 p.m. to
6 p.m. at the Doral Country Club,
Miami.
Dr. Allan Pollack, a distin-
guished authority on the Middle
East and Soviet Russia, will lead
the seminar.
He will be joined by Dr. Al-
bert Vorspan, director of the
Commission on Social Action of
the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations and Benjamin A hi
leah, Deputy Consul General of
Israel in New York.
Women's Leadership Institute
and Young Leaders Council mem-
bers are urged to reserve now
as reservations are limited.
Seders For Hospitalized
Thanks to the concern and lar-
gesse of area residents Mr. and
Mrs. Ansel Wittenstein, Jewish
patients in four area hospitals,
Memorial, Community of South
Broward, Golden Isles and Doc
tor's were served Seders on
Passover.
Five menus were served to pa-
tients on variously restricted
diets. The catered Seders were j
the gift of the Wittensteins who j
are making this an annual event.
THE STAFF OF
ANOTHER DIMENSION
INVITES YOU TO EXPERIENCE
THE LATEST IN HAIR DESIGN
ANOTHER DIlVfENSION
5890 S.W. 40th AVE., FT. LAUDERDALE
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT 962-0770
(100 ft. North of Stirling Road and North 58th Avo., Hollywood
JULIE
MAINA
ORCHESTRAS
WITH YEARS OF EXKRIENCf PIAV-
ING FOR THE GREATEST OF THE
PROFESSIONAL!
JUUl 110NY IENNIII
NOW PLAYING F0R_
I PRIVATE PARTIES WEDDINGS!
I BARMITZVAHS 'I1C I
5719 HOLLYWOOD BLVD., HOLLY I WOOD, FIA.
Phone: 89-MM 983-8663

vw Vrongratulate J he JL^eaders f^eople \Jj iversar
if


EQUITY CONSTRUCTION CO
2181 N. 56th TERRACE
HOLLYWOOD 33021
-* i
<


Friday. April 26. 1974
-Jewlstriorkttar and Shofar of Hollywood


Page 9
fturdines
Uflorida

. where ancient empires and civilizations
rose and flourished, and left
their indelible stamp on the history of mankind.
where the Patriachs laid the foundations
of the Jewish faith
where King David built his beautiful
city, Jerusalem, sacred to Jew, Christian,
and Moslem alike. .
where, in our time, a nation was reborn.
May 14th, 1948, fulfilling the biblical prophecy.
shalom


Page 10
VJenisfi ncriaTiar? and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, April 26, 1974

Congressman Bill Gunter (D-Fla.), recently participated in
the new building dedication ceremonies for Congregation
Ohev Shalom in Orlando, giving the dedicatory speech
Congressman Gunter (right) joined with Rabbi Rudolph Ad-
ler, (left) spiritual leader of Congregation Ohev Shalom;
Julius Haberman, congregation president; Rabbi Sol Lan-
dau, Congregation Beth David in Miami, and other Orlando
rabbis in the dedication ceremonies for the new home of
Congregation Ohev Shalom.
difrlM*- -a:^___
(EsxtenJ .Hest lUidi
to the
tes
*^tate of s^fsrctel
On 3ts 26tlt J3irtU*#
CARPET LUXURY CENTER
2114 S.W. 60th Terrace
Hollywood 33023
GALE DISTRIBUTORS INC.
5628 S.W. 25th Street
West Hollywood 33023
<,xteJ J$est HJJisltes
to tlie
*^tate of On 3ts 26tk girtUay

Teen
Scene
By PAIL KERBEL
Ice-skating in Florida in April? ,
it's unheard of except at
Miami's Polar Palace wheie the
JewLh Community Center spon-
cored an Ice Skating and Pizza
Night Tuesday, April 16.
Sixty-fix Hollywood area teen-
agers attacked the rink for two
hours; some skating, some slid-
ing, some never managing to get
off the ground and some who
COUldnt even walk on skates!
What a bunch of amateurs a
real disaster but a fantastic disas-
ter because everybody had a real-
ly great time!
After we left the Polar Palace,
we all went to Myer's Pizza
House where we ate all the pi/.za
that we could pack into our stom-
achs and drank enough Coca-
Cola to supply Patton's army.
All in all, this was, by far, the
best program that the Jewish
youth of Hollywood have experi-
enced in a long time.
Thanks to Mark Fried and Alex
Buehwold for watching over us
"Holiday-On-Ice-Dropouts."
i3 -fr
Camp Ocala will be the host.
once again afler so many years of
hosting, to the 23rd Annual Re-
gional Convention of United Syn-
agogue Youth, on Friday, April
26 to Sunday. April 28. The
theme of the convention is "Is-
rael Our Never Ending Love
Affair."
From arrival to departure, this
convention will be filled with
Ruach," the backbone of USY.
which consists of meaningful
dance, singing, prayer and a
unique closeness which is the se-
cret formula of USY and one
which no other organization can
duplicate.
Regional Convention and Lead-
ership Training Institute (LTI)
which is held in August are the
highlights of USY.
Approximately thirty teenagers
of Temples Beth Shalom and Si-
nai will assemble with 200 other
USY'ers from all over the South-
east U.S. for this most exciting
and important convention.
ft ft &
Yom Ha-atzmaut. Israeli Inde-
pendence Day, will be celebrated
on Thursday, April 25. Let us all
remember the importance of this
day not only to us but to Jews all
over the world.
Am Israel Chai .
THE PEOPLE OF ISRAEL
LIVE!!!
Seniors To Take
Disney Tour
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida, a beneficiary of
Jewish Welfare Federation, will
sponsor a trip to Disneyworld
for the senior citizens of the
South Broward area as part of
the celebration of Florida Senior
Citizen Week.
The group will depart Wednes-
day, May 8, at 9 a.m. and return
Thursday, May 9, at 6 pm.
Bug pickup will be from Tem-
ple Israel (Mtramar), American
Heritage School and Temple Beth
El.
The cost of the trip will in-
clude round trip transportation,
first class motel accommodations
and two days of touring Disney-
world. Food is not included in
the fee.
Since registration is limited,;
reservations must be made by,
Friday.
Far complete information,
phone the JCC office, 900-2080 or
920-2108.
NOW To Conclude Season
National Council of Jewish
Women, Hollywood section, will
conclude its current season at
12:30 p.m. Monday at Temple Si-
nai. Florence Rose, director of
the Hallandale Civic Center, will
direct and narrate the program,
"Hands of Dedication."
Mandell, Simmons Report Stratford Towers Response
asm ..land.Mi, cna.inian oi tut
JWF 74 Campaign tor Stratford
Towers, and Pe ry Simmons, co-
ciiairii.an, repo. t they are pxceed-
ing.y pleas.d with the response
by re.idents of their bi.iiding.
Sydney IKltzman. a co-vice
.,aii oi in.' 11'ji.y.vood Hi-
lt, Division, said. "Pledges wen
ubn .1 and we feel
Stratford Tov.e s. under the able
leadership of both Mandell and
s...... o,! was .-i miuelj respon-
se in tfleir t .i iniiAent to the
people oi toot I"
4711 West Hallandale Beach Boulevard
Hollywood 33023
3501 West Sunrise Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, 33311
ics
to t/ie
*^tatc of Jjsr-.icl
On Jts 26th $irtfiJ*u
to tlte
<3*a*e of Jjsrctel
On 3u 26t JfaUy
JACKS GEM SHOP
414 South Dixie Highway
Hallandale 33009


Friday, April 26, 1974
Jenisti ffrrratty, and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 11
Adolph Berger Chairman Of
Israel Bonds Builders Dinner
Adolph J. Berger, president of
Pasadena Homes, Inc., Pembroke
Pines, has been selected as chair-
ADOIPH J. BtRGlR
man of the r.-rst South Florida
Builders and Allied Trades Israel
Pinner of State, Robert L.
Siegel, general campaign chair-
man of the Greater Miami Israel
Bond Organization, has an-
nounced.
In his first official act as chair-
man of the Build-r* dinner. Bn*B-
cr announced that a breakfast
meeting will be held at Dupont
Plata Hotel next Wednesday to
set plans for the forthcoming
event. s
The dinne.. t3 bo held Mav 23
at the Eden Roc Hotel, is the
first major effort by the local
Uiael Bonds organization to se-
cure the support of South Flor-
ida's building communitv in
strengthening Israel's economic
growth and development.
Berger, former board member
of the Beth Torah Congregation
North Miami Beach, has served
as president of Pasadena Homes
since its inception in 1959 \
member of the board of directors
of the Builders Association o!
South Florida. Berger is a direc-
tor of the Sterling National Bank
of Davie.
An active participant in the
Creator Miami Israel Bonds cam-
paign and the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation. Berger has visited
Israel on three occasions, most
recently in February as a partic-
ipant in a United Jewish Appeal
leadership mission.
Area vice chairmen for th?-
BuMden and Allied Trade* din-
ner "ill include Jacob L. Fried-
man, Adrian R. Kaufman and
Richard D. Levy (Broward); Har-
ry Carman. Murray M. Friedman.
Herbert Lolchuk, Saul Morgan
and Donald J. Riff (North
Pade>: and Irving Epstein. Mor-
ton R F"I',nian and Hank Green,
(South Dade).
Beffe Eden
Highlight of Agranat
Commission Report
JERUSALEM (JTA) Fol-
lowing are highlights of the
Agranat Committee's partial re-
port:
The report said that the intel-
ligence network was "blinded'
and tnus failed to give the de-
fense forces adequate advance
notice of the pending attack.
THIS NOT only caused a delay-
in calling up reserve forces to
the front but delayed the de-
ployment of forces positioned
near the borders to meet an
enemy advance.
The basic reasons given for the
intelligence failure was "a blind
belief in the preconception that
the Egyptians would not go to
war until they were able to stage
deep air strikes into Israel, par-
ticularly against Israel's major
military airfields in order to
neutralize Israel's Air Forcea
relatv-d belief that Syria would
not go to war without Egypt.
THE REPORT f;>und that On
Eliahu Zeira had made a firm
undertaking to provide the army
with adequate warning should
war become a certainty when he
had no basis to make such a
promise. The Army Intelligence
Research Department possessed
a vast amount of deterrent in-
formation which had been sup-
plied both by army field intel-
ligence and other bodies, but be-
cause of their refusal to budge
from preconceived ideas, the Of-
fice of Chief of IntellJgence an-1
the head of research did not ap-
praise their information correct
ly. the report charged.
The intelligence chiefs claimed
that the noted Syrian military
build-up was of a defensive na- \
ture and that the massing of
Egyptian forces i of the Suez Canal was nothing
more than annual maneuvers, the
Agranat Committee said.
THE REPORT provided minute
details of events during the hours
immediately preceding the Egyp
tian-Srrian attack.
It said that it was not until
4:30 a,m.. on the day of the at-
tack, that army intelligence final-
ly concluded that war was im-
minent, but even then it errone-
ously believed the attack would
not be launched until 6 p.m.
The report stated that while
army intelligence mistakes were
not the .inly ones that led to
Israel's defense forces being
caught off guard, "first and fore-
most there was an unjustifiable
delay in the deployment of the
reserve-
The report continued. "We an
convinced beyond doubt that th.
Chief of Staff should have re-
quested a call up of reserves in
the week preceding the outbreak
of hostilities to maintain a real-
istic balance between enemy
forces and Israeli forces along
the borders.
"AT THE very bast, the Chief
of Stiff should have ordered a
call up on the morning of Oct.
5 even if enemy intentions were
not entirely clear"
Hollywood Federal
Opens 8th Office
Hollywood Federal Savings and
Lo.-.n Association ribbon cutting
ceremonies, performed by Mayor
John Lomero,
City of Sun-
rise, were held
Monday for its
new Sunrise of
ficc, followed
by an open
house celebra-
tion April 29
through Mav
10.
During the
open house pe
riod. there will
be free gift
for all visitors to the new Sun-
rise office.
Key personnel at tne Sunrisr
office. Hollywood Federal's eight!
i.i Broward County, include Beti
Eden. Marilyn Jones, Betty Ad-
derly. Sharon McGee and Linda
Ann Robinson.
Mrs. Eden, assistant vice Dresi
.lent-manaeer. is past president
of the Hollywood Chapter of th'
Pilot Club. Mrs. Jones, assistant
secretary-assistant manager, is ?
member of th? American Savings
and Loan Institute.
Mrs. Adderly. head teller. i
active with the Spectrum Hous-
drug program. Sharon McGee will
serve as Teller and Linda Robin-
son as savings counselor.
Son To Install
Mrs. Alex Packer
Harvey S. Swickle, well knowr
Miami Beach attorney, will in-
stall the new officers of the Hen-
rietta Szold Group of Hadassah o:
Miramax at the installatior
luncheon to be held at the Ree.
Restaurant. Ft. Laudtrdale, May
9, at 11:30 a.m.
In addition to inducting hi-
mother. Mrs. Alex Packer, as
president, he will administer the
oath of office to Mrs. Adele
Foland. fund raising vice presi-
dent. Mrs. Charles Fine, member
ship vice president. Mrs. Charles
Cohen, program vice president
Mrs. Jack Rosen, treasurer: Mrs
Murray Kranzer, recording secre-
tary; Mrs, Sidney Wien, corre
sponding secretary and Mrs
Charles Schantz, financial secre
tary.
Robeit Kerbel, executive di-
rector of the Jewish Federatior
of Greater Hollywood, will ad
dress the group.
Music and entertainment wll"
be provided by I.ila Savitt.

Extend Jjest Wishes
to tltc
^tate of Israel
On Sis 26tlt girtUay
DREAM KITCHENS INC
5731 S.W. 23rd Street
W. Hollywood 33023
Beth Shalom Sisterhood Calls Party 'Successful
Mrs. Marilyn Hoffman, presi-
dent of Temple Beth Shalom Sis-
terhood, and Mrs. Marie Portnoy,
fund raising vice president, an-
nounce that a successful brunch
and card party was held in the
Grand Ballroom of the temple
this week.
Committee for the event in-
cluded Mrs. Ethel Reichkind, Mrs.
Joan Neiman, Mrs. Nina Opfccr,
Mrs. Rena Stern, Mrs. Doris
Buchhantz, Mrs. Belle Weinman
and Mrs. Pauline Zuckman.
PCOPLC VOU
can still
BCUC vc in
HOLLYWOOD FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
A HALLANDALE OFFICE: 2401 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd. JM
ARGO UNIFORM CO.
1000 South Dixie Highway
Hallandale 33009
Cl^xtcnd to tlie
*^tate of ^Israel
On 3ts 26d J3irtU<,y
RINKER
MATERIALS CORP.
3080 Sheridan Street
Hollywood 33021
Extend Jjest Wishes
to tlte
*^tate of <-7srael
On 3ts 26tn $irtU>f


Page 12
vJenisliFhridian Friday, April 26. 1974
Profile
HOT MIUTARY
Sugar Plummed Visions
'* Hoosick Falls,-New York is no
stone's throw from Russia but
Jacob, David Lurie's late father,
was 18 when he made that trip
and the eighteen-year-old Rus-
sian boy with visions of sugar
plummed years ahead of him, was
not to be detoured until he found
upstate New York soil both firm-
ly under his sole and in his soul.
Like so many other Jews of
his era, he became a peddler.
David's father peddled for two
years and yes, they became su-
gar plummer years for two rea-
sons: First, his friend from Bur-
lington, Vt, had a sister named
Ida Ella.
. and second, by age 20, he
was ready to open his first de-
partment store.
Ida Ella became his wife and
together they produced their
beautiful vision of a family six
sons.
The one department store not
only kept pace but took even
greater giant steps by becoming
18 department stores.
It was natural then that David
Lurie would study business and
retailing at New York University
and go on to work in one of his
father's stores.
However, one by one, the
stores were sold for Jacob, by
then, had a new vision.
This time he would retire and
take Ida Ella to a place then
called Palestine.
David, in the meanwhile,
through mutual friends, met
Frances, a lady from New Haven
who was to become his bride.
. and she was also to become
the mother of their two daugh-
ters, Margot and Linda.
They moved to Williamsport,
Fa., where a brother operated
one of the remaining stores while
Momma and Poppa moved to
Jfadar Ha Carmel, then on to
Jerusalem.
When a family has six sons,
visions can become interesting.
They splinter.
One splinter, a brother named
Ted, was attending Cornell Uni-
versity with cne eye on the text-
book and the other on that place
where his parents had moved.
When he graduated in 1932, he
too splintered off to Palestine
with the vision of starting a
newspaper.
He decided to call it the Jeru-
salem Post. His father was the
first stockholder.
Today, Ted R. Lurie remains in
Israel having worked and lived
the transition of his early Pales-
tinian journalism vision through
the establishment of Israel as a
country and its ensuing wars to
remain a country.
He has fought hard with words.
Stringing words together to form
a necklace of communication
taut enough for people to grab
on to in their pull for survival.
Although David and Frances
were to be hit between the dollar
signs with a thing called THE
DEPRESSION, they too had the
inherent family strength for sur-
vival.
Changing locales, they moved
to Utica, N.Y., where they were
to open what was to become a
very successful dress shop.
They were also to become firm
blocks in the building of their
Utica Jewish community.
Today, sitting in the lovely liv-
ing room of the Lurie Hallandale
hi-rise which overlooks a mar-
velous chunk of Florida water
and scenery, David reminisces of
those early days.
"My first trip there was in 1933
When I went to visit my parents.
Jed had only been in Palestine
two months."
There's a silence while his
memory recaptures a moment
and it is only broken by the
rustling of Frances reading the
newspaper over on the sofa.
Naturally, the rustle is from
pages of the Jerusalem Post
which is airmailed each week.
DAVID LUKIt
David Lurie continued, "At
that time, Ted and I went on
horseback into the area between
Acre and the Tiberias Valley of
Jezreel (the Emek). Our stir-
rups dragged in the mud. From
kibbutz to kibbutz, it was one sea
of mud."
He smiles as he adds, "Today
it is very fertile land."
When asked why he never
joined his framily in Israel, Lurie
answers, "I felt a distinct need
for friends of Israel living in the
diaspora to be here working for
Israel. Israel couldn't possibly
absorb all world Jewry. They
needed the help of American
Jewry."
. and so, David Lurie re-
mained in Utica from 1937 to
1970, doing just that giving
help in his way.
He became active in the Amer-
ican-Israel Public Affairs Com-
mittee, a legislative lobby for Is-
rael in Washington, president of
ZOA and active in Bonds For Is-
rael from its inception. Later, he
became chairman.
His fervor gained such inten-
sity that each Fall he would gath-
er up a speaker from Israel and
travel the circuit of small sur-
rounding communities where
Jews numbered maybe 20 fami-
lies with one shul in each place.
In a one week swing, they were
able to muster up an additional
$100,000 from those communities.
In 1947 and 1948, Lurie work-
ed underground as well as above-
ground. Each week a Haganah
messenger would arrive to ex-
plain the latest needs.
Lurie would raise the funds In
reply.
Although retiring to Hallandale
in 1970, Lurie's feelings for Is-
rael were not to be placed in
mothballs with his active business
life.
Rather, he is still active In
things like the Israel Bonds Na-
tional Conference where he de-
votes time to phoning people all
over the country for their ad-
vance commitments.
His activity with UJA has not
ceased, for this year he perform-
ed untiringly as vice chairman
of the Golden Isles/Diplomat
Parkway Hi-rise Divisions in the
1974 Campaign.
David Lurie has long been ac-
tive in the American Friends of
Weitzman Institute.
He remembers that evening
when he and Frances were driv-
ing down Park Avenue in New
York toward the Waldorf Astoria
to attend the first Weitzman din-
er and in the distance, they saw
the Israeli flag flying next to the
American flag.
"The first president of Israel
is having dinner there," he said
to Frances.
"We both cried."
A sugar-plummed vision.
R. G.
Dayan Says Lebanon
Raid Was Political Act
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel's commando raid into south-
ern Lebanon Friday was described by Defense Minister Moshe
Dayan as a "political, not a military action."
He said the purpose was not revenge for the massacre of
18 men, women and children in Kiryat Shemona Thursday but
to warn the Lebanese authorities that it is their responsibility
to keep the border regions clear of terrorists.
THE ISRAELI force, encountering no opposition, raided six
Lebanese villages, demolished buildings after clearing out their
inhabitants and took ten prisoners, including a gendarme, for
questioning as possible terrorist collaborators.
An Israeli spokesman said no shots were fired during the
entire operation and no one was hurt.
(Lebanese authorities claimed that a mother and daughter
were found dead in the rubble of a demolished building. Sunday,
Lebanon called for a meeting of the United Nations Security
Council to deal with the raid. UN Secretary General Kurt Wald-
heim, who denounced the Kiryat Shemona massacre Thursday,
said that he "consistently condemned such acts of violence" as
the Israeli raid into Lebanon.)
ACTING CHIEF of Staff Gen. Yitzhak Hofi said that the
Israeli commandos struck at the villages of Duheira, Yarin,
Kitarun. Blieda, Muhabeib and Taibeh.
He said that in all but the last-named only one to four
buildings were demolished. In Taibeh, where the Kiryat She-
mona terrorists were believed to have received shelter before
infiltrating across the Israeli border, an entire block of ten
buildings was blown up.
The Taibeh water pumping station was also destroyed.
THE LEBANESE authorities, apparently anticipating the
raid, withdrew their soldiers from the region. Dayan said at a
press conference that the Lebanese authorities must understand
that normal life will be impossible in the border region as long
as terrorists continue to find shelter there.
"Israel will not assume the policing tasks of Lebanon,"
Dayan sard.
"Israel will not go looking for the headquarters of Jibril's
gang. This is the function of the Lebanese government and ap-
parently they know well where Jibril's people are."
He was referring to Ahmed Jibril, leader of the terrorist
unit Popular Front-General Command that carried out
the Kiryat Shemona massacre.
SPECIAL MOTHERS DAY SERVICE
-/
On Sunday, May 12,1974-1:00 PM
Directed by Rabbi Milton Schlinsky,
Temple Adath Yeshurin, officiating.
Free bus service from North Miami Beach
and Miami Beach. Limited space available.
For reservation and details call Mr. Stuart Elkir
at 592-0690, prior to Friday, May 3.
Buses will leave at 11:30 AM from
163rd Street Shopping Center in'
North Miami Beach and from Lincoln Road
and Alton Road on Miami Beach.
lakeside. .
Mem^nal
N.W. 25th St. at 103rd Avenue
V


April 26. 1974
JfWisti Fhrrcfiatr? and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 13
!0 MINDLIN
Saxbe's Preemptive Strike
itinued from Page 4-,
lunism and Jews was de-
to forestall that unlikely
Ibility.
kprobable? Well, wasn't Wa-
tte designed to forestall a
Jocratic victory when any
ll observer knew in his heart
the Democrats didn't have
ance? The preemptive strike
laracteristic of the Nixon
JD SO the silent but very
argument goes something
this: It is not the industrial-
who are commies, pinkos,
rlibs (that wretched agnew-
sm). That would be a con-
(iction in terms, wouldn't it?
it is the intellectuals. In
[high falutin but rather low-
fe circles of the Saxbe types.
jlleetual" has always been
[less than subtle synonym for
After all, there is no getting
away from the fact that at-one
time in American history, nota-
bly during the depression years
of the 1930's, some Jews, as
some non-Jews, in their feverish
search for social and economic
justice, identified themselves
with the Communist dream.
That is what Saxbe was talk-
ing about when he spewed his
anti-Semitic poison.
WHY DOES Saxbe excuse to-
day's Jews from the same thing?
Saxbe understands that as
soon as the Jew of the 1930's
saw and was revolted by Com-
munism in practice in the mid-
1940s, he repudiated it as the
most important moral impera-
tive in his life.
Saxbe understands that then-
is no more ardent and effective
enemy of world Communism to-
day than the Jew whether he
lives in Israel and fights its
minions on tne front lines,' or
whether he lives in America and
supports his oppressed brethren
in the Soviet Union.
Saxbe understands all of this
well.
IT IS just that the merchant-
princes in the new Potomac Pal-
ace are not motivated by these
moral imperatives in the slight-
est. They never have been.
Saxb- doesn't want anybody
pointing a finger at the inner
circle of administration indus-
trialists, bankers, agriculture
moguls and power monopolists
while the inner circle is, quite
frankly, on the take a pur-
pose as crude and misbegotten
as the Communist's of the '3G"s
was desperately idealistic and
doomed to disappointment.
Saxbe's comment was the su-
preme preemptive strike.
Irael Welcomes UNEF Extension
fNITED NATIONS Israeli
lassador Yosef Tekoah said
that Israel welcomes the
^nsion of the mandate for the
- member United Nations
ergency Force (UNEF) for
ther six months but stressed
Israel would oppose allow-
any Communist bloc coun-
to inspect its position.
le Soviet Union had insisted
UNEF units which now oc-
a buffer zone between
Iptian forces on the east bank
(the Suez Canal and Israeli
bes deployed in the Sinai be
fmitted to inspect both Egyp-
and Israeli zones.
[Tie 15-member Security Coun-
has extended the life of
>EF until Oct. 24 by a vote of
D, with Iraq and the People's
public of China not partici-
Jing in the vote.
ft it ft
South African Elections
Johannesburg in view
|some items that have appear-
in the press trying to per-
kde or disaffect Jewish voters
connection with the coming
uth African general election,
|vid Mann, chairman. South
rican Jewish Board of Depu-
Is, has declared that "The
pntry is now in the throes of
election campaign. It should
be necessary to reiterate that
jfs, like all other citizens, par-
Ipate in this election as South
Vicans, and not as members of
particular community or reli
us denomination.
here are no 'Jewish Issues*
[this election and it is wrong
any newspaper, political
rty, or candidate to suggest
contrary. I make an appeal
all concerned neither to env-
oy such tactics nor to be influ-
Iced by them."
'S Women Close
rear With Party
I The Women's Division of the
nerican Technion Society,
.uth Broward chapter, was to
_oTd its closing luncheon and
laid party Thursday noon in the
fount Alba Room of Holiday Inn,
follywood, with Miriam Sirkin,
'egional president, addressing the
iroup on the subject "Emergen-
Ruth Teich and Ann Garbel-
nick are cochairing for the event.
Marion Rubin and Ethel Klau-
were reservations cochair-
rien and Eleanor Goldberg was
pn charge of decorations and
prizes. --
campaign to raise funds for an
"Alumni Chair'' Endowment in
Practical Rabbinics.
ft ft ft
Critical of Kissinger
BOSTON United States
policy in the Middle East is
based on an illusory detente with
the Soviet Union, an important
policy evaluation committee of
Boston's Jewish community
charged in the first of a series
of Mideast study papers prepar-
ed for the Joint Mideast Policy
Committee of the Combined Jew-
ish Philanthropies of Greater
Boston and the Jewish Commu-
nity Council of Metropolitan
Boston.
The group charged that U.S.
political investment in detente
requires a quick resolution of
the Arab-Israel conflict to avoid
further Soviet-American con-
frontation.
"All other policy considera-
tions, including the matter of
Israel's security and the pursuit
of a true and lasting peace in
valued to protect the investment
the Middle East have been de-
in detente," the policy paper
claims.
Openly critical of Secretary of
State Henry A. Kissinger's diplo-
matic moves, the policy paper
accused Kissinger of making an
understanding with President
Sadat of Egypt to secure an Is-
raeli withdrawal from occupied
territory without direct substan-
tive negotiations between the
belligerents, without true peace
or recognition by the Arab states
of Israel's sovereign rights.
ft ft ft ,
Hope to Battle Inequities
LOS ANGELES The two
women studying for the Reform
rabbinate at the California School
of the Hebrew Union College
have expressed the hope that, as
rabbis, they will be able to bat-
tle "subtle symbolic and ritual
inequities" against women in
Judaism.
Laura Geller, 23, and Rosalind
Gold, 24, say they do not regard
themselves as pioneers.
Sally Preisand was ordained in
1972 as the first Reform rabbi
in the United States and perhaps
in Jewish history.
Ms. Geller decided to enter the
rabbinate during her senior year
at Brown University, where she
majored in the history of Jewish
thought, a program which she
said forced her to examine the
history of her own tradition.
ft ft ft
Make Further Changes
NEW YORK Noting that
the Christian Holy Week was for
centuries ",\ Deriod when Chris-
tians celebrated the passion and
resurrection of their Lord by at-
tacking, persecuting and some-
times murdering Jews,'' a prom-
inent Catholic author has called
upon Christian Churches to make
further changes in their liturgies
and educational materials, both
to remove remaining vestiges of
anti-Semitic attitudes, and to
teach respect for Judaism "as a
legitimate living religion."
Mrs. Claire Huchet Bishop, a
French Catholic writer and
American correspondent for L'-
Amitie Judeo-Chretienne (the
French Jewish-Christian Fellow-
ship), urged these actions in a
new book published by Paulist
Press, "How Catholics Look at
Jews."
The volume is based on studies
sponsored by the American Jew
ish Committee's Leonard and |
Rose A. Sperry International
Center "for the Resolutljoli of
Group Conflict
ft ft ft
Torahs for Soldiers
NEW YORK A nation-wide
Center for the Resolution of
United States Synagogues and
Temples to tecure donations oi
Torah Scrolls and Torah orna
ments for presentation to syna
gogues and military installations
in Israel.
These presentations will be
made in tribute to the Israeli
prisoners of war and missing in
action during the recent Yom
Kippur War.
The campaign is being coordi-
nated by the American Action
Committee for the Release of
Israeli POW's at the request of
the Israeli League of Families of
War Prisoners and Missing.
Palmer9s
Miami Monument Company
3279 S.W. 8th Street, Miami
4444)921 4444)922
Closed On The Sabbath
Personolued Memorials Custom
Crafted la Our Own Workshop.
Philip Olonder, chairman for the JWF 74 Campaign, North
Hollywood Beach Area Division, discusses the activity
generated by Nat Singer and Dr. William Feder in their
building, Oxford Towers, where the two act as cochairmen.
Sinai Sisterhood Installation
To Be Held May 7
Temple Sinai Sisterhood's final
general meeting of the year will
be held Tuesday, May 7, at 8
p.m. in the temple's sanctuary.
Following a short business
mepiing, a Women's League in-
stallation script will be presented.
Mrs. Jack Wolfstein, Florida
Branch president of Women's
League, will be the installing of-
ficer.
Officers to be installed are:
Mrs. Melvin Waldorf, president;
Mrs. Albert Freeman, CEAC vice
president; Mrs. Hy Kamcron, Fel-
lowship vice president; Mrs.
James Wachman, ways and means
vice president; Mrs. Charles Pier
son, treasurer; Mrs. Jacob Mogilo-
witz, recording secretary; Mrs.
Barry Miner, financial secretary:
and Mrs. Sarah Soboloff, corre-
sponding secretary.
Board mombers to be installed
are Mrs. Samuel Albert, Mrs.
Sidney Burd, Mrs. Herman Cohen,
Mrs. Abraham Edelstein, Mrs.
Michael Einhorn, Mrs. Mary Feld-
man. Mrs. Louis Garbr-r, Mrs.
Martin Geilman, Mrs. Hyman
Goodstein. Mrs. Diane Gordon,
Mrs. Harold Genon, Mrs. Phillip
Hausfeld. Mrs. Morris Horowitz,
Mrs. Mervin Hornreich, Mrs.
Rubin Jacob*. Mrs. Mort Kush-
ner, Mrs. Adolph Lebovic, Mrs.
Bret Lusskin, Mrs. Philip Mauner,
Mrs. Hyman Merkow, Mrs. Samuel
Miller. Mrs. Louis Phillips, Mrs.
Isadore Ringler, Mrs. Elsie
Schleiffer, Mrs. Samuel Sisholce
and Mrs. Ruth Tunkel.
Honorary members are Mrs.
Yehuda Heilbraun, Mrs. Elliot
Herring, Mrs. Harry Kanlan. Mrs.
Oscar Oschmerler and Mrs. David
Shapiro.
Refreshments will be served.
All members and their friends
arc invited.
JZeuill
Jflemonal Cnape)
jeWI%H fUNIRAl DIRECTOdS"
LOCAL AND OUT Of ITATI
ARRANGEMENT*
947-2790
1338S W. DIXIE HWV.. N.M.
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
7mp& 3etkl
WemotloC
Cjazdens
The only all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call: '-*'.**1"jfl
920-8225 or write: i*~. ~.'.;A
""templebethel "" n^
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORID
Please send me literature on the above.
NAME: __-----------------------------------------------------
ADDRESS:
Pric Increase Effective Jan. 1st, 1974
PHONE


Page 14
+JmHtl fhrkHan and Sholar of Hollywood
Friday. April 26, 1974
c
cwitnuvtii
2f
K^alevudi
ar
KHURSDAY, APRIL 25
JCC Senior Citizen Trip to Birch State Park 10:00 a.m.
to 5:00 p.m.
American Technion Society, South Broward Chapter
Luncheon and Card Party noon Holiday Inn,
Hollywood.
B'nai B'rith Women, Hallandale Chapter Installation
Luncheon 12:30 p.m.
JWV, Victor B. Freedman Post 613 General Meeting
8:00 p.m. Home Federal Building, Hallandale.
FRIDAY, APRIL 26
BBYO Council Convention Camp Ocala Thru April 28.
AJC Abraham Heschel Chapter Family Living Shabbat
Weekend 6:00 p.m. 13341 Stirling Rd., Ft. Lauder-
dale (thru April 27.)
SATURDAY, APRIL 27
Temple Israel Israeli Program 9:00 p.m. Temple Israel
SUNDAY, APRIL 28
Pioneer Women, Miramar Chapter Flea Market 10:00
a.m. to 6.00 p.m. Miramar Recreation Center.
Temple Sinai Men's Club Installation Brunch 11:30 a.m.
Haber Karp Hall.
Young Professionals and Professionals II Singles Club
Dance Party 8:00 p.m. Peacock Room, Coconut
Grove Playhouse.
Temple Beth El Brotherhood "Salute To Israel" 8:00 p.m.
Temple Beth El.
. MONDAY, APRIL 29
NCJW General Meeting 12:30 p.m. Temple Sinai.
TUESDAY, APRIL 30
Temple Beth Shalom Senior Friendship Club General
Meeting noon Temple Beth Shalom.
Temple Sinai Sisterhood Board Meeting 8:00 p.m.
Haber Karp Hall.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 1
Victor B. Freedman JWV Ladies Auxiliary General Meet-
ing noon Home Federal Bldg., Hallandale.
SATURDAY, MAY 4
Young Leaders Council and Women's Leadership Institute
Special Seminar 1:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m. Doral Coun-
try Club Miami.
Young Professionals and Professionals II Singles Bowling
Party 6:30 p.m. Bird Bowl, So. Miami.
SUNDAY, MAY 5
Beth Shalom Men's Club Breakfast Meeting 10:00 a.m.
Temple Beth Shalom.
Temple Israel Sisterhood Donor Luncheon 12:30 p.m.
Seville Uotel, Miami Beach.
Jewish Federation Singles Beach Party 2:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m. Hollywood.
Temple In The Pines Art Auction 2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. and
7:00 p.m. Hoilybrook Tennis & Country Ciub.
Young Professionals & Professionals II Singles Self De-
fense Seminar 8:00 p.m. Washington Bank Bldg.
North Miami Beach.
MONDAY, MAY 6
Temple Beth El Brotherhood Board Meeting 8:00 p.m.
Temple Beth El.
Temple Beth Shalom Sisterhood Final Meeting 8:00 p.m.
Temple Beth Shalom.
TUESDAY, MAY 7
Temple Beth Shalom Senior Friendship Club General
Meeting noon Temple Beth Shalom.
Hadassah, Henrietta Szold Group, HoUywood Board Meet-
ing 12:30 p.m. lion.e of Mrs. Claire Brown.
Temple Israel's Men's Club Dinner 7:30 p.m. Temple
Israel.
Temple Sinai Sisterhood Installation Meeting 8:00 p.m.
Haber Karp Hall.
Temple Sinai Men's Club General Meeting 8:00 p.m.
Temple Sinai.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 8
JCC Senior Citizen Trip to Dfcmeyworld 9:00 a.m.
THURSDAY, MAY 9
Hadassah. Henrietta Szold Group of Miramar Installation
Luncheon 11:80 a.m. The Reef, Ft. Lauderdale.
Pioneer Women, Miram.v Regular Meeting and
Election of Officers noon Miramar Recreation
Center.
B'nai B'rith Women, Hallandale Chapter Board Meeting
12:30 p.m.
Committee on Jewish Life/JCC "Educative Symposia II"
Lecture Series featuring Marshall Sklare 8:00 p.m.
Temple Sinai.
JWV Victor B. Freedman Post 613 General Meeting 8:00
p.m. Home Federal Bldg., Hallandale.
Religious
Services
HA1UNDAU
HALLANfALE JEWISH CENTEff
(Conservative). 416 NE 8th Ave.
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz, Canto*
Jaoob Danzioer.
NORTH Ml/Ml BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE
1R801 NE 22n<; Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingtley. Cantor Irving
Shulkea. 37
NORTH BROWARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATICN. (R**-rm) S501 Uni.
versity Dr., Cora, opringa. Rabbi
Max Weita.
HOUYWOOD
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
(Orthodox). 3891 Sterling Rd.. 00-
poiite Hollywood Hide High School.
President Dr. Frank Stem.
Saturday. 9 a.m
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1M1 t
14th Ave., Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffa.
BETH SHALOM (Tempre) Conserva-
tlva. 44)01 Arthur '_ Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (Conservative).
310 SW 62nd Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi
Salomon Benerroche.
TEMPLE SOLEl (Liberal). 5001
Thomas St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Rob-
ert Frazin.
TEMPLE SINAI (Conservat:). 1201
Johnson St. Rabbi David Shapiro,
Cantor Ye;:tida Heilferaun.
MIRAMA3
TEMPLE .-*RAEL (Conservative)
6920 SW SSth St. RaDDi Avrom
Orazln.
PEMBROKE P'NES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES (Conserve,
tive) Pines Middle School. 200 No.
Douglas Rd.. Pembroke Pines.
Rabbi Aaron Shapero.
I
Vvv>A^VVvVVVVVVVvVVVV>
I
MM*>VvWvWvVWvV
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
4i IYAR 7:28
f
Bar Mitzvah
BARBARA GORUN
Barbara, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Herbeit Gorlin, will be Bat
Mitzvah Friday, May 3, at Temple
Beth Shalom.
ft ft ft
JEFFREY COOPER
Jeffrey, son of Dr. and Mrs.
Morton Cooper, will be Bar Mitz-
vah. Saturday, May 4, at Temple
Beth Shalom.
ft ft ft
GILBERT GROSSMAN
Gilbert, son of Mrs. Edith
Grossman, will be Bar Mitzvah
Satiuday, May 4, at Temple Beth
Shalom.
ft ft ft
CHARLES REACH
Chai les, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Tnomas Reach, will be Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday, May 4, at Temple
Beth El.
. -
rf-
m tm ~ tin 1111 m !
JEFFREY PITTELL
Jeffrey, son of Dr. and Mrs.
Robert Pittell, will be Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday. May 4 at Temple
S.nai.
ft ft ft
DWAYNE ROSE
Dwayne, son of Mrs. Maxine
Ro.-e. will be Bar Mitzvah Satur-
day, May 4, at the Rose home for
Temple Soiel.
ft ft
LEAH SIMONSOM
Leah, daughter of Dr. aril Mrs.
Louis Simonson, will be Bat Mitz-
vah. Friday, May 10, at Temple
Sinai.
it .-
CiI.VRI.FS LITTMW
Cbarl vilen, so-i o: Mr. and
Howard Littman, will be
Bar M ...::. Saturday, May 11.
at Hillcrest t'.uirtry Club for
te Solel.
-^ .>.
MITCHELL KRASNE
SOU of Dr. and Mrs.
Alvin Krasne, will be Bar Mitz-
vah Satin day, .May 11, at Ten.ple
Beth El.
Two Socials For Singles
Jewish Federation Singles have
phnnerl a beach party in Holly-
wood for Sunday, May 5, from 2
p.m. to 7 p.m. On Saturday, May
18, a houseparty will be held in
Hollywood. For information and
reservations, phone Federation
offices, 920-2089 or 764 8899.
Broward Teens To Tour
Israel June 19-July 16
The Teen Tour for 1974 encompassing all of Broward County
promises to be the greatest ever. The educational component of
the tour will be strengthened. Learning from the past two years,
changes and innovations have been made to make this year's
tour more meaningful.
The itinerary has been developed and coordinated by the
Broward Board of Rabbis, Rabbi Arthur Abrams, president; Dr.
Morton Malavsky, Teen Tour chairman All plans have been for-
mulated in consultation and in cooperation with Jewish Welfare
Federations of North and South Broward. Dr. Robert Pittell.
chairman Teen Tour JWF.
To be eligible, a teen must be a high school student and
recommended by his respective rabbi or youth leader.
He will be interviewed by the tour co-leaders Mrs. Shirley
Cohen and Mordecai Opher.
Mrs. Cohen has been involved with youth in the Hollywood
community for the past 9 years most successfully. She led the
first Teen Tour to Israel from Hollywood in 1972. Her rapport
with teenagers is highly regarded and her leadership for this
tour has been endorsed by the rabbis and Federation.
Mr. Opher has been acclaimed as an educator of the highest
calibre. He is Israeli born and although quite iew to our com-
munity, it is felt that he will be a most valuable person in leading
this year'* Teen Tour.
The tour co-leaders will interview every teenager together
with his parents For an appointment please call 966-2200.
APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP
TOUR RESERVATION
I apply for membership in Broward Teen Tour Broward
County, Florida and enclose a deposit of $150 to hold my reser-
vation, plus $25 non-refundable registration and processing fee.
Balance due by May 15, 1974.
Name in full
Home address
Telephone ..
City ............
School Now
State............................... Zip.
Attending and Grade ...
Temple and/or
Youth Group Affiliation
THE FACTORY
"Its worth finding"
LAMPS REPAIRED REFINISHED
Free pickup on 2 or more items
500 N. Ansin Blvd. Hallandale
1 Bit. East of 1-95 Torn loft at Ramada Inn
and follow our signs to
"THE FACTORY'
SAVE MONEY Phone 920-2002
BROWARD PSYCHIATRIC g'rOUP '
MILTON M. GRADITOR M D. JEROME F BERGhEIM M D
P GORDON IEVER M 0 ROBERTO BRANOFORTE M.O
ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE ASSOCIATION OF
TOM WALTON, MSW
PSYCHIATRIC SOCIAL WORKER
FOR THE PRACTICE OF INDIVIDUAL FAMILY
MARITAL AND GROUP THERAPY
EMERALD HILLS MEDICAL SQUARE
4400 SHERIDAN STREET
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33021
HOURS BY HOLLYWOOD 961 -4730
APPOINTMENT MIAMI 624-3597
* MORNINGSTAR'S JEWELERS *
PROTECT YOUR JEWELS'!!
Have Them Appraised by State Licensed Diamond Appraiser
WHILE YOU WAIT
119 N. 20 Ave. 923.2372 Hollywood
WE PAY CASH FOR
DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY
REGARDLESS OF CONDITION
r, f
MEYER 4
AIR CONDITIONING
"Ask Your Neighbor About Meyer"
Since 1952
CUT YOUR ELECTRIC BILL
Have your system tuned up by a professional
I'J
-fi


r, April 26, 1974
+,Je*%istifk:-ridFiar7 and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 15
JWF Eenefactors Luncheon

licng me riOi.yv. cod communiiy's women
^Rders who attend :d the recent "Benefcc-
Ks Luncheon" hested by Mrs. Sue Millar,
;hcirman of the JWF '74 Women's Divi-
in campaion at her heme were Anita
Weiss end Annette Milloff (left) Campaign
chairman Marcia Tobin, Karen Margulies
and Frances Briefer, honorary campaign ad-
visor for life (right).
Cv sa,
JL



tf\t *
L *&


- /
sn&fr-c'ors L-ncheon guests also included, from left to right,
ftp) Loui3e Diamond, Marion Levitats, Sue Miller and Phyl-
Kraemer, who served as chairman of the event; (center)
pcrothy Fine, Either Lowenthal and Brenda Greenman; (bot-
^m) Ida Kline, Leila Shapiro and Joyce Roaman, Women's
ivision president.

Where Your Money Goes...
Leadership Development
There are two groups in the community sponsored by the
[Jewish community whose purposes arc to educate and develop
[young men and women to make them more knowledgeable Jews
land more conce: ned community citizens.
The Young Leaders Council of the Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion is geared to young men b.-tween the ages of 25 and 40. Many
[of these young men have become leaders within their own
congregation and in other community groups.
Women's Leadership Institute is tor young women. The pro-
grams include preparation for the Sabbath, a demonstration
Passover Seder, book discussions basically helping young women
to understand their role and future in Judaism as well as the
community.
"We
to tftc
^5tatc of ^jsi'acl
On St, 26d i>tLL>,
MILLER-SACCENTI
MARINE INC.
5914 S.W. 25th Street
West Hollowood 33023
i/(/o C- f^eople v^y 26th vcrsar
y
JUNGLE QUEEN
BAHIA MAR YACHT BASIN
ROUTE A1A
FORT LAUDERDALE 33316


Prrrra M
I
M
Tl
Wt
TH
Page 16 *.?~iistifkriaffor and Shoiar of Hollywood Friday, April 26, 1974
TODAY is the 26th anniversary
of the birth of Israel.
TO DAY is Israel Independence Day,
the time to express
the hope, the joy and the unity
which Jews feel for one another
and the people of Israel.
TODAY is the day to help sustain
the humanitarian efforts
which enhance life
and uplift freedom.
TODAY is a day of Jewish solidarity,
a national day to collect cash
which is so urgently needed
for social programs
for immigrants
and the people of Israel.
TODAY is the day to keep your promise
and pay your pledge.
ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION
1909 Harrison, Hollywood
921-8810


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