The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00084

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
<0Uemst] IFIondliia in
ami SIMM Alt OF t.ltl VI III HOLLYWOOD
Volume 4 Number 2
Hollywood Florida -- Friday, January 18, 1974
Price i.o c 211:3
Norman Atkin Reelected President Of JWF
Dr. Norman Atkin was reelected j
president of the Jewish Welfare
Federation of Greater Hollywood
at its annual meeting held Jan. 6.
at the Hillcrest Country Club.!
Other officers elected were Her-
bert D. Katz, president elect; Rob- j
ert M. Baer. first vice president: ;
Melvin H. Baer, I. A. Durbin, Sam-!
uel M. Meline, D.M.D and Abra ;
ham J. Salter. vice presidents; Alan :
Roaman, treasurer; Nathan Prit '
cher, assistant treasurer; Lewis E.;
Cohn, secretary, and Sheldon Wil-
lens D.P.M., assistant secretary.
Dr. Atlcin, presenting his annual
report to a standing-room-only au-
dience stated that in the 30 years
of Federation's existence, the an- ]
nual amount yielded by fund-rais ,
ing has grown from $9,000 to al
most $2 million.
Pointing out that the Greater
Hollywood area is among the 50
largest Jewish communities in
America, he related the growth of
South Broward County in terms
not only of the Jewish population
but of the ever-increasing services
that have evolved to care for it.
Recapitulating the events of
1973, Dr. Atkin spoke of the "close
cooperation and guidance of area
rabbis," and of the "involvement
cf our lay leadership and volun-
teers, not only in the campaign
but in every facet of our commu-
nity work."
Citing the work of Herbert Katz,
1973 Campaign chairman; Marsha
Tobin, Women's Division Campaign
chairman, and Melvin Baer who,
as 1974 Campaign chairman, felt |
the onus of the overnight emer-1
gency brought on by the Yom Kip-'
pur War, Dr. Atkin called the re-}
suits "inspirational." And he
praised both the Women's Lead
ership Institute and the Young |
Leaders Council for their ongoing
educative programs.
Speaking of the newly created
Jewish Community Center concept, 1
Dr. Atkin described it as "an ex-;
citing one, a first for this commu-
nity.
"Although it is too soon to make
a real evaluation." he added, "some
of the first efforts are becoming
visible. Already programs havs
started for senior citizens, and com-
mittees have been meeting to de-
velop programs for all age cat-
egories.
In summation, the newly re-
elected Federation president called
1973 a "year of cooperation, of
mutual respect, and of assistance
in all areas of our community.
Federation Sets
1973 Allocations
(TOSS BKKERMAN
The 1973 Allocations Committee
of the Jewish Welfare Federation
f Greater Hollywood met in both
September and October of 1973 to
tuily and recommend allocations
for the various agencies and or-
ganizations of Greater Hollywood,
ihe United States, Israel and other
countries. Seven committee meet- j
ings took place and numerous sub-
Committee meetings. Nearly 100
different individuals were involved.!
Ross Beckerman, chairman,
stated that the involvement and
concern of the member? of the
Allocation Sub-Committees was:
"extremely gratifying."
Recognizing the prime needs of
the people of Israel, more funds |
were allocated to the U.J.A. and to
Israel than ever before. Approxi-
mately 75 per cent of all funds
raised were earmarked for Israel
and overseas needs of the Jewish
communities, he said.
Mr. Beckerman also stated, "Thf'
monies raised since the beginning
of the Yom Kippur War of Oct. 6. |
1973 are not, in any way, included
in these figures.
"Our collections in this commu-
nity have been excellent with in
finitesimal losses due tc deaths
and relocations," he added.
The Allocation Committee Re
port from the 1973 campaign will
be found on Page 2 of this issue.
TAKES OVER VACATED SAXBE SEAT
Ohio's Sen. Metzenbaum
Cleveland Jewish News
Howard Metzenbaum, the 56-
year-old Cleveland attorney and
civic leader who was named by
Gov. John Gilligan to take over
the Senate seat vacated by Wil-
liam Saxbe, the new United States
attorney general, will become the
first Jewish senator in Ohio's 170-
year history.
Metzenbaum, who only a few
weeks ago announced his candi-
dacy for Saxbe's post when the
, term expires in January, 1975, is
1 only the second Jew in Ohio's
[history to attain a high position
[in the state.
HIS APPOINTMENT to the un-
j expired term will become effec
[tive with Saxbe's resignation next
[ month.
"I have always felt that the
[American political system is a
SiM. MtTZiHBJMM
long-time Democrat
great one, and this appointment,
in view of my Jewish heritage,
only confirms that fact," he de-
clared.
Contrary to All Theory,
{Elections Affect Geneva
By EDWIN EYTAN
JT.V European Bureau Chief
GENEVA The Israeli elec-
tions loom over the Geneva con-
ference. The political talks at
ministerial or even ambassadorial
[level have been adjourned until
he second half of January and
^he military negotiators discuss
according to their own communi-
ques, "principles" more than con-
crete disengagement means.
All the delegations still present
In Geneva, mainly middle eehelon
officials, realize that nothing seri-
ous can happen and no break-
through can be achieved until a
new government is formed.
IT IS a strange sight to see
the offices of the Egyptian dele-
gation strewn with Israeli foreign
language publications as officials
and newsmen follow the latest
Israeli electoral developments.
On most desks at the Egyptian
delegation one can see copies of
French and English-Israeli dailies.
Continued on Page 6
According to authorative
sources at the American Jewish
Archives at Cincinnati's Hebrew
Union College, the only other
person of Jewish faith to hold a
top post in the state was Gilbert
Bettman. Sr., Ohio attorney gen-
eral for two terms, 1929-33.
AN ACTIVE Democrat for
many years, Metzenbaum will be
come the 11th Jewish senator in
American history', according to
the curator of the B'nai B'rith
museum in Washington. He will
be the third Jewish senator now
serving.
Robert Shosteck, curator of the
B'nai B'rith museum, said his list
includes only those identified as
Jews. It does not include such
persons as Sen. Barry Goldwater,
who had a Jewish father and non-
Jewish mother and considers him-
self an Episcopalian; nor does it
include the late Sen. Ernest H.
Gruening, of Alaska, who served
in the senate from 1958 to 1968
but did not profess Judaism.
The list also does not include
Sen. Neuberger's wife, H. Mau-
rine, who served in the senate
following the death of her hus-
band. Mrs. Neuberger is not Jew-
ish.
METZENBAUM BEGAN his
long career in public service at
the age. of 25, after graduation
from Ohio State University and
its law school.
He served two terms as a mem-
ber of the Ohio House of Repre-
sentatives and two terms in the
Ohio Senate, and in each session.
newspaper correspondents cover-
ing the legislature selected Metz-
enbaum as one of its "outstand-
Continued on Page
Lewis Cohn (left), chairman of the Jewish Federation Hi-Rise
Division, receives an Israel Emergency Fund check from
Louis Jason., representing residents of the Parker Plaza
Social Club.
WEST BANK FEDERATION CONSIDERED
What Concessions May
Israel Make for Peace?
By HYAM MACCOBY
London Chronicle Syndicate
How can Israel satisfy the le-
gitimate national aspirations of
the Palestinians without incur-
ring unacceptable risks to her
' ''" '''ii i- .mi-...... 11 .. 1: 11.: "', "1
CREATIVE SPECIALISTS
NEEDED FOR CENTERS
Creative specialists are
needed to work with elemen-
tary school children in after-
school hobby clubs now be-
ing formed by the Jewish
Community Centers of South
Florida.
People knowledgeable in
creative art, drama, guitar,
science, nature, model build-
ing, chess, handicraft, pup-
petry, tennis and folk danc-
ing are invited to phone
Myrna Amsel, director, Holly-
wood-North County Exten-
sion Service.
own security?
This is the most important and
central question of the Arab-Is-
raeli peace negotiations. All the
difficulties and problems in com-
ing to an accommodation with the
Egyptians and the Syrians are as
nothing compared to this; for in
the Palestinian question Israel's
moral viability is at stake.
IT IS in the way she solves
this question that Israel will show
her right to exist as a center of
social justice and humanity.
Other nations may be abls to
survive only if she continues to
believe in herself as the repre-
sentative and fountain of Jewish
ideals.
One solution suggests the mo3t
promising wav of combining jus-
tice with security the solution
of Federation. If a Palestinian-
Arab state were set up (in the
West Bank and Gaza) linked to
Israel by a federal constitution.
Continued on Page 13


Page 2
Imist nrricfiir> "<* Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, January 18,197^
Summary of Allocations for 1973
JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION
of Greater Hollywood
r\!TED JWItt APPFAI. .....................................
[SRAI ':,. V^pyfX V FUND ......................
LOCAL irs
B'nai B'risb IliKo! Foundations
University of Miami.................................................
University of Florid* ..........................................
Flnrid' State University ................ .'.................
B'nal B'rith Womm of Hollwood ................................
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization .................................
Central Agency for Jen-h Education ............
Ping:.-1-; Gardens Jewi-h Borne for the Aged ........
Financial A-si'tance Transient Fund ........................
Hebrew Aeadrmv of Greater Miami ...........................
Hillel Community D\v School...............................
Jewi*h Children's Service Atlanta ..........................
Jewi h FarrMv Service of Brcwarrt Countv ..............
Tewi h Service South Florida State Hospital ............
Social Work Student Scho'ar=hip ..........................
South FIorHa .TewHi Community Centers ...................
Teen Tjur to I.iael ....................................................
NATIONAL AGENCIES
American Association of JewUh Education ................
American Jewivh Committee
Appeal for Human Relations ...............................
American Jewish Congr -> ..........................
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith ....................
B'nai B'rirh National Yoath ......................
Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds .....
Dropcjc I'niveisity .................................................
IqrHtHt* for J?-vi-h T.if,- ................................................
Jewish Labor Committee ..................... ...........................
Jevi-h War Veterans USA..........................................
Joint Cu'turnl Aureal .........................
National Jewi h Community Relation
Advisory Council ............................... .................
National Jewish Welfare Board ................................
Xorth American Jewiah Itudanti Appeal ..........
Synagogue Council ol America .......................................
ST2M24 93
524,93000-
LOOT 00
500 00
600.00
3000.00
4 000.00
15,741 "0
3O0 00
4500.0"'
5.300 00
600 00
25,900.00
500 00
500.00
20 000.00
10.000.00
1,000.00
5.400 00
900.00
5.400.00
550.00
5.76500
500 00
2 5-0 00
350.00
600 CO
1.C00.0C
lTIS.O"
2.10').00
250 00
150.0J
ttTJlER nvF.Mam.AJi AGENCIES ......... 400.00 ....... 660.04'

Nationd Jewish Community Relations .......... 500.00
$975,485.00
Joan Meyers P-R, Volunteer Director
Leonard Weinstein. administra-
tor of Community Hospital of South
Browr.rd. announces the appoint
ment of airs, aoan Meyers to the
dual post of director of Public Re-
lations and director of Volunteer
Services.
Mrs. Meyers, former news coord
inator of the Jewish Floridian and
Shofar, succeeded Mrs. .Marion N'ev
ins in April of 1973.
She is in the process of organiz
ing a hospital volunteer corps with
Feb. 1 as the target date for com
mencement of operation.
Area residents are invited to
contact Mrs. Meyers at the hospital
if they are interested in volunteer
work at the Hallandale health
facility.
The first
Riverside Chapel
in Broward County
is now open
inHoUywood.
5801 Hollywood Boulevard
Telephone 920-1010
RIVERSIDE
MEMOR L CHAPEL. INC fONEIA. D.RIZ'ORS
u-tri, vim sex-ft nawwlm W0 .-*-/>
164fl0 N I9r-,pnu Nort* Mj~ 9?K--474tM
19t1S!-M!t At;nRjj3 Vi8m:" JE 1 11S1 .
1250 Normjndy 0. *k*m, ittz- Jf 1111
Dojf:sMd!SW I7MSMM V i- JE 1 lilt
- Me ie:n : ** ran .... ,.-, tin
- :&% ut~*t:rtr rr*$-jr>M. B< x-*in.
Murray N. Rubin, F.D.
Third Annual
Teen Tour
Scheduled
The Brcward Board of Rabbis
the Jewi h Welfare Federation o*
Greater Hollywood, and the Jewish
federation of North Broward. have
announced the third annual Brow
ard County Jewish Teen Tour tc
Israel June 19 tj July 16.
Dr. Robc-t Pittell. chairman o(
the Teen Tour Committee, said.
The entire four weeks will b
trip include a week at Moshav Ha
bonim, a cooperative farming com
munity; one full week ir, Jerusa
lem: archaeological exploration,
and touring."
Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Teen!
Tour chairman of the Broward
Board of Rabbis, said there will
b; an extensive educational pro-
gram plus visits with Israeli fami-
lies.
The projected cost of the tour i-
$1,100. A number of the area tern
les will be providing scholarships
to their teens.
The Federations of North Brow-
ard and Greater Hollywood will
rovide funds for the Educational
D'reetor and Study Component. Ad-
iitionally. both Federations will
have scholarship funds available
for teenagers who cannot afford
,'ie entire cost and interviews with
hoe scholarship applicants and
heir parents will be confidential.
All interested parties are urged
l 1 ih Welfare Federation of
Greater Hollywood or the Jewish
Federation of North Broward.
Listers Attend
X.A.T.E. Conclave
Mrs Rebecca Lister, director of
education at Temple Beth F! and j
Louis Lister, ed I
ucational con I
ultant, have re j
turned from th< i
19th annual con I
ference of tlu
National Asso '
ciation of Tern ',
pie Educators ir
San Diego. Calif
Mrs. Lister
was elected;
NATE, seer,? j
tary and Mr
Lister, immed: i
ate past president, was succeeded I
by Philip Chapman, of Phoenix
Ariz.
The National Association of Tern |
pie Educators is the professiona '
organization representing Reform
ducators in the United States and j
Canada.
All-Florida UJA Mission
Depa.ts For Israel Feb. 3
Some 400 Florida residents, rep I
resenting the leadership of Jewish ;
communities throughout the state ;
will participate in a special week
long United Jewish Aopeal Mission
to Israel beginning Feb. 3. Herbert
D. Katz, chairman of the UJA'
Southeast Cabinet Region an
nouneed.
'"This mission is direct evidence
of the strong bond that exists be
tween Floridian Jews and the pea
pie of Israel.'- Mr. Katz. Hollywood
JWF president-elect, explained.
"We are going to Israel during thL
critical time to demonstrate our
solidarity with the people of Is-
rael and our total commitment tc
them."
toaH lister
Fifth Skabbaton-Xofesh Encampment *1
For Temple Sinai Religions School |
Mrs. Miriam P. Schmeibr. edu- sored a/ionvmoiislv
cational director of Tempi? Sinsi Each* sfciclem* frFned ..nda
IKllvwood announces Shabbaton- by points awarded for stu
\,v." h encampmenl a: YMJA ice to the community syoagogm
Camp. Lake Placid. Florida. Friday and Israel, and by attending reJJ.
norning througn I altar- pious services,
noon.
ine fifth encampment the r?'.i Dr. Schechterman Beth El't
2ious School has had in two year; M
its purpose is to give students the Sunday Breakfast Speaker
ipionunity to experience a bme The Temple Beth E! Culta]
i in a nature setting. This j Program presented Dr Bernard
year, the weekend has been ex- Schechterman. Universih of M--
tended to ;:v days beeause 01 anii professor of politics a
Br ward County schools" time off. |jc affairs, at a Breakfast hostel'
Camter* '.; .in'u> student: by the Brotherhood Sunday. Pm,
(rom class Aleph thru 12:h grade ceeds from the breakfast went h
plus adult members and friends oi the Temole Youth Activ ties Fund
ihe synagogue. Everyone partiei- Professor Schechterman, uhon
r-ating is committed to periods of subject was "Why Are S : study and prayer. jsh Irtellectuals Alienated'" re-
Rabbi and Mrs. David Shapiro will reived his Ph.D. from Indiana Uni-
accompany the students and spend versity and specializes ir. interns-
the Sabbath with them. Mrs. Al tional relations. American foreign
bert Apseloff is chairman of th.> policy and hoth Soviet and Middle
vent rrade possible by a ;ift spon- East affairs.
: Le Cafe de Paris
: in DAN.A
I Mtrtti from The JAI-ALAI Point*
OPEM
7 DAYS A \IELK
LUNCH DINNER
11:30 A.M.-2 00 P.M. 5:30-10:30 P.M.
LZ
Special Dinners
From S4.9S
For Reservations S27 9724 or 921-96M
400 E. DANIA BEACH BLVD.
( hef'l.uri
CHEF MCK THE GREEK
m giving ODDS
That everyone tr/io visits
The Attache' Motel's
GOURMET BUFFET
Leaves a WINNER
HoUfwoodSy-TheSea (A-1-A)
(Just north of the Diplomat) 923-4631
staff t
builder
TEMPORARY PfRSONNEl
Medical Services
----------2R
Comes ToajpTJ
Hollywoodi-^
RN'S, LPN'S. Aides
ond Orderlies
All Shifts
Select your own hours
Office Personnel
Clerks, Typist, Secy's,
Machines operators,
Key punch, All forms
of Industrial help
Located at 1747 Van Buren St. Room 710
Hollywood Bread Bldg. at Young Circle
r 921-8103
lomc ,n ond soy hello ond join us for coffee
-;T
TH
TRAVELERS
u
sel Insurance Agency^
Ansel Wittensfein R
All Forms of Insurance
Including
Homeowners Automobile Jewelry
2430 Hollywood Boulevard Hollywood
9239518 9453527
FIREMAN'S
FUND
AMERICAN
ItOVMHtt cour* wti


Friday, January 18, 1974
+Jm'isilfk>rlrM9r and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 3
RUSSIAN JEWRY
Silent No More
By FRAN NEVINS
Fourteen-year-old Marina Tiem
kin yearns to be reunited with her
father, Dr. Alexander Tiemkin,
who at last, lives in Israel. Since
April, 1972, when Alexander ap-
plied for permission to emigrate,
the family has been psychologically
tormented.
Marina, the strong-minded youn?
Jewess daughter, considers Israe*.
her homeland. Her mother, Mar-
kovna Raiskaya, a child psychia-
trist, at first agreed reluctantly
to emigrate but, a month later, be-
gan divorce proceedings in an ef-
fort to convince Marina to stay in
Moscow with her.
Despite her mother's wishes,
Marina was granted permission to
leave with her father on Oct. 19.
1972. When they arrived to pick
up their visas, there was only
one for Alexander.
In November, the Soviet police
snatched Marina and her father
from the street for questioning.
They were released, but shortly
afterwards a hearing was held to
determine Marina's custody.
The court wished to restrict
Tiemkin's participation in his
daughter's upbringing because he
was "a bad influence." An appeal
was made and lost.
The Judge declared that Alex-
ander's Zionist activities and ef
forts to emigrate to Israel proved
he was "an anti-social influence."
The decision was based on three
pieces of "evidence": Marina ate
matzoh on Passover, she refused
to wear her Pioneer tie to school
and she considered herself an Is
raeli citizen.
Marina was then kidnapped. On
a cold February day Moscow po-
lice forced her from her home.
She was dragged off screaming
No one knew where she'd been
I taken
Over a month later, Marina
tsneaked a phone call to her father
asking why he hadn't answered
[her seven letters. He told her he'd
[never recehed them.
Marina had been flown to a Pio-
Ineer j ith mp. on the Blac -
i of "re-educati n,
he told h'.:n. In the camp she
are I forget her '
I I to .CO to 1
ly Jew in tl
she stagevi
trikas.
God forbid. Wh
towards Jews they have here," she
declared.
Shortjy after Marina spoke to
her father, he was forced by the
Soviet police to leave for Israe!
without her. Once out of the coun-
try, she was allowed to return to
Moscow where she must remain
with her mother. She is not per-
mitted to visit her grandmother
or Zionist friends.
The long efforts to reeducate
Marina are futile. She has written:
"I want to live in my Homeland.
to speak Hebrew, to study our his-
tory. I would go to Israel alone
even if my parents would not
want to go. 1 am a Jewess and 1
cannot live without Israel. Please
help me!"
Send your letters appealing for
Marina to: USSR. RSFSR, Moscow.
The Kremlin, CPSU Secretary Gen-
eral Leonid Brezhnev and Presi-
dent Nixon.
If you care to contact Marina's
father, Dr. Alexander Tiemkin, his
address is: 36 Brodetzky Street;
Ramat Aviv, Israel. "If the Soviet*
will not let her go," he wrote to
friends in the U.S., "it will be new
proof that they take Jewish chil-
dren away from their parents even
as during the Spanish Inquisition."
No Pepsi, Please
Pepsi Cola's new slogan, "Join
the Pepsi people feeJing free" has
U.S. V-P To Address ADL
created quite a stir among in-
volved Jewish communities. The
slopan, they feel, is insensitive and
inappropriate, for Pepsi will be
sold in Russia where thousands
of families who have requested
freedom to emigrate are being de-;
nied.
The Pepsico Corporation signed
a trade agreemem in 1972 with
the Soviet Union to manufacture
and sell Pepsi-Co!a in the USSR. \
Although two-thirds of the House
and three-quarters of the Senate
have co-sponsored legislation ask-
ing the Kremlin to free pecple be-
fore there is free trade, Pepsico
has remained siient.
In response to this, telegrams
and letters have been flocking to
Pepsico board chairman, Donald
Kendall, a close friend of President
Nixon and chairmar, of the Emerg-
ency Committee for American
Trade. Kendall has known Soviet
leaders since 1959 and is in a
unique position for urging the
Kremlin to give elementary rights
to Soviet Jews.
Write Mr. Donald Kendall, chair-
man of the board, Pepisco, Pur-
chase, N.Y. :0577. Let him know
of your concern for Marina and
the other captive Soviet Jews.
The announcement of the vice
president's appearance was made
by Seymour Graubard, national
rhairman of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, who said
that this will be Mr. Ford's first
visit to Palm Beach since his in-
auguration.
The event, in keeping with a
tradition of several years stand-
ing, will launch a nationwide ef-
fort to raise the sums needed to
carry out the human relations pro-
grams and services of the ADL.
cne of the country's oldest and
most influential voluntary agen-
cies, which is in the forefront of
the struggle against reJigious and
racial bigotry and for the strength-
ening of democratic institutions
and individual liberties.
The "Inaugural Luncheon" will
be the highlight of a weekend
meeting of the ADL's National
j Executive Committee which will
j review events and programs of the
pat year and determine future
policy.
j Vice president Gerald R. Ford
| will deliver a major address at the
national "Inaugural Luncheon" of
J the Anti-Defamation League Ap-
peal at the Flagler Museum in
, Paim Beach Saturday, Jan. 26. at
noon.
nett
anK.
First 74 Meeting
Of JWF Committee
The first 1974 JWF executive
committee meeting was held Thurs-
day in the Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion offices.
Items discussed were the 1974
Campaign, preliminary personnel
committee reports, budget reports,
general committee reports, and pre-
liminary b '-laws
Dr. Normal! A'1" aewJ?1 reelect-
en presided.
B'nai B'rith Art Auction
auction sponsored
by the B'nai B'ri'.h of Port L.
e antiques
Irj h announ<
d lie Sat
W p.m. in the Gait
- 4250 li Oc in Dr., For;
i : idei dale.
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200


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945-8348 947-2565
DAOE
Mnmtiart National Horn* fashion Iaqua
Dr. Michael V. Mansdorf
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF HIS OFFICE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF CHIROPRACTIC
t
A. C. D. BUILDING
2500 EAST HALLANDALE BEACH BOULEVARD
HALLANDALE. FLORIDA 330O9
Phone: (305) 927-0088
Office Hours:
BY APPOINTMENT
All-Day Trip For I
Seniors Planned
The Jewish Community Centers
of South Florida, a beneficiary of
JWF, announce an all day program
for South Broward area senior cili
zens, Wednesday from 10 a.m. to
6 p.m.
The trip to the Cinema Theatre.
Miami Beach, will include lunch
at Hoffman's Cafeteria.
Bus pick up will be from Tempi-'
Israel, Miramar: American Heri-
tage School, Hollywood, and Tern
pie Btth El, Hollywood.
For details phono the Jewish
Community Center office.
Beth Shalorr Men's Club
Musical Revufl Jnn. 27
s
ho Musical B
be
-. Jan
37, at 8 p.m.. per-
formed by Op<
: Curtis Ri
1 i Jol
Warren Bi
The two hour show will be di
vided between opera selections and
Broadway musical numbers.
OF
MAIIANDAII,
INC.
Cul'o-n Mdt.
DRAPERIES
and
BED SPREADS
INTERIOR DICORATINQ
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805 N. FEDERAL HWY.
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Fcqe 4
+Jmisti nrridiar nd SM" Mo"ywood
Friday. January 18, 1974
wJewishFiendian
nJ hhk ui uii iiih Mill VMS
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.K. 6th St.. Miami, FU. 33131 Phone 373-4S0I
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE ...... Telephone 373-460.'
P.O. Box 2973. Miami. Florida 33101
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ahf *&^&'&&k Executive Editor Assistant to publisher
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The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Ksshruth
Of The Merchandise Advertlaed In lt Columns
Published Bi-Weekly by the Jewish Floridian
Becond-Class Postage Paid at Miami. Fla.
Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood Shofar Editorial
ADVISORY COMMITTEE Dr. Sheldon Willens. Chairman: Ross Becker-
man. Ben Saiter. Marion Nevins. Dr. Norman Atkin. Robert N. Kerbel
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndi-
cate, worldwide Newa Service. National Editorial Association. American As-
sociation of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Tear $4.00. Out of Town Upon
Reout.
Volume 4
Friday, January 18, 1974
Number 2
24 TEVETH 5734
Let's Not Rest on Our Laurels
The Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood
has, since Oct. 6, 1973, raised nearly S1.9 million almost
twice as much as ever raised before. It would be very easy
to be proud of this achievement if not for the fact that few
have sacrificed anything and probably no one has changed
his life-style.
Israel's economic situation is critical. The people have
been fully mobilized for over three months and probably
will have to be mobilized for many more. Since the Army,
except for 30,000 soldiers, is made up of civilians, it means
that the work force of Israel cannot construct housing or
produce goods and services needed for the people.
Israel's entire internal budget is now used for defense
purposes.
We, as Jews of this community, must give much more
than ever bsfore. Those who contribute to the Israel
Emergency Fund in their northern communities, must now
give again. We ere not speaking of token gifts. What is
asked of us and you is a generous response when you are
called upon to do so. You should not have to be asked.
Consider your gift to the Jewish Welfare Federation as
your Jewish tax. Without your sacrifice, the people of Israel
will be unable to know the security of having a home. The
Jews of the world must give them that security.
Exemptions for Nazis
Responsible Americans should ask some hard ques-
tions of their congressmen on how the neo-Nazi National
Youth Alliance received a federal income tax exemption
from the Internal Revenue Service.
The group is headed by former Nazi William F. Pierce,
a one-time friend of the late George Lincoln Rockwell.
Pierce is the man who once promised there would be "a
Jew hanging from every lamppost in the country" once he
and his henchmen took over.
The IRS is now promising a review of the NYA's ex-
emption at the request of New York Democrat Hugh L
Carey, but Carey is wondering how the exemption was
granted m the first place, as well as how NYA managed
to squeeze a reduced mailing rate out of the postal service.
This is an incredible achievement in view of the organ-
ization's sponsorship of anti-Semitic and anti-Black litera-
ture which it disseminates through the mail, as well as the
fact that it publishes a magazine inciting violence, bigotry
and even political assassination.
Significant Statistics
We are not quite sure what ought to be made of the
American Jewish Yearbook's statistical analysis of the
world's Jewish population that there are 14,370,000 Jews
living across the face of the planet Earth and how they are
disposed demographically.
Or of that number, according to the Yearbook, that
there are 6.115,000 living in the United States.
But we do know what to make of another set of statis-
tics just compiled by the Council of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds pertaining to American Jewry.
Fully 53 percent of the Jewish homes in the United
States have no synagogue affiliation, says the CJFWF
study.
Furthermore, while 58 percent of the U.S. population
is native-born, the Council warns us that the community in
general appears to have stopped growing, with its average
age on the increase.
Whatever the reasons whether the shift in Jewish
population toward the free professions, the affluence re-
sulting in the fact that 75 percent of Jewish men and women
between the ages of 25 to 29 have had a four-year univer-
sity education the statistics as a whole are worrisome.
Jewish survival demands Jewish identification. And
the CJFWF figures give us little reason to be optimistic on
ihat score.
Solzhenitsyn: Truth in Blood
________ isinnimi V.'F. f'W tml 1, ,.!.
TN A phony era of phony de- I
tente, Alexander Solzhenitsyn's |
newly-published "Gulag Arcbipel- I
ago" is a srrwath -of freak aft-. >
Some will argue that there is |
an inconsistency in my position I
that I have been cynical in the J
past about the awarding of I
a Nobel Prize to Solzhenitsyn for I
his "One Day in the Life of Ivan I
Denisovich."
BUT MY objection there was
the same as my objection to the
ft ? 4
I
. I IIIH ITT" |
Mindlin

, -i.iii. i inn* ti.
Nobel Committee's choice of the
Chilean poet, Pablo de Neruda,
for a prize in literature.
And to the choice of Jean Paul
Sartre and Boris Pasternak be-
fore them as well as for the
FAILURE to choose Ezra Pound
for a Nobel.
In each instance, it was poli-
tics that guided the committee in
its deci-inn, not literature:
Solzhenitsyn, for his revi-
sionist Communism;
Neruda, for his call for
Marxist revolution in Chile (he
died right after the fall of Al
lende, not of a broken heart as
the Communists would have us
believe, but of cancer);
Pasternak, al;o for his re-
visionist Communism, but with a
sentimental backward glance at
the failures of White Russia, and
the nagging belief in retrospect
that Red Russia mi(;ht have been
more humane if only the Whites
were less egocentric;
Sartre, because it was clear
that, like Le Due Tho, he would
reject the prize and so make
much of western "imperialism,"
"colonialism" and "racism" to
the delight of the Nobel people,
who are always looking for a rea-
son to advance the cause of en
lishtenment Peking-style.
THE FACT is that of these
writers, only Pound, whom the
Nobelitcs rebuffed because of hi
frank fascism and franker anti
Semitism, and Sartre, who could
care less about such things, de
served the prize.
Forget Sartre's distinction a-
one of the world's major philoso
phers.
Pound is undoubtedly the most
important poet h* the 20th cen
tury, and he went down the drain
because only the Russians can
make hay of anti-Semitism these
days and get away with it. For
anyone else, it is still a liability
What then of Solzhenitsyn""
Why is "Gulag" important while
his Nobel for "Denisovich" was
an embarrassment?
His talent is as a historiograph
er of the obscenity of the Soviet
regime. "Denisovich" contribute?
to the historicity of Soviet oppres-
sion, but it is not a profound worl
of creative literature deserving a
presumably distinguished literary
prize.
It is a book with a message
that weakens the message and
comprises its own creativity.
IT IS, in fact, a variety of what
in America we once called the
New Journalism, an important
variety because it challenged the
Stalinists, but beyond that not a
literarily worthy one.
But "Gulag Archipelago" is the
fulfillment of the promise of
"Denisovich."
It is in the best and most ad
vanced tradition of the New Jour-
nalism, outranking Mailer or Hal
berstam at their most inspired
It is written not only with the
sweat of intellect, but with the
blood of conviction, too.
IN THIS sense, we are not in
a twilight world of "art," where
Solzhenitsyn's attack on Soviet
oppression Denisovich-style may
be considered "symbolic" and'
therefore as appropriate, say, to
the criminality of the Nixon ad
ministration as to the excesses of
Stalinism.
In "Archipelago." we know pre-
cisely what he is talking about.
Solzhenitsyn's intent and our
purpose in reading him can hence
not be interpreted for us by the
Kremlin Good Guys as revision-
ist or heterodox or any other non-
sensical thing.
WE CAN not be cajoled :-. ;he
Krerr.lin Good Guys into di
lag him as mentalln sick or as a
toJ f the..imperiJsts intent on
destroying detente or a publicity,
seeking scoundrel determined to
defame the Holy Soviet Empire
and who needs to be institution-
alized.
Solzhenitsyn reminds us that
"Kremlin Good Guys" is a con-
tradiction in terms, a linguistic
imvoSBtfaUity leading to a I _;(ai
brick wall. His history reinforces
Continued on Page 13
".." ..."iiiiiii
Max Lcrner
Sees It
NEW YORK It would be hard anywhere to find an r
like him. embodying his combination of intelligence, cou
strategic sense, moral authority.
With the Paris publication of his anatomy of the s
police and penal system, "The Gulak Archipelago," the most
ing of his books, he emerges as a man alone, holding a powerfj;
government at bay
YET NOT quite alone. He has mi'lions, tens of millions ith
him. not yet in his own country but around the world. Gandhi c..,o
kept an empire at bay a half century ago. But where Gandhi was
able world opinion outside to redress the balance in his own country,
The response to his whole darirts, anguished life show a
gbbal consciousness in the making, which will hel? him mightily.
His timing is shrewd. Smuggled out of Russia, chapter by
chapter, his book was released just a? the Soviet officials wi re
moving to change their laws so as to make such outside publica-
tion, without prior clearance, a crime.
It came also when the Soviet need for the detente with the
Wet w-.- still great, and when the American mood about the
Soviets had grown darker. Most important, it came when the
Ameiicans themselves were examining, after Watergate,
meaning of a free and humanist society.
SOLZHENITSYN MIGHT just manage to get away yil I
After the grand, solemn statements and promises in-Hs del
agreement with the United States. Russia's Mideast role has
made Americans take a hard second look at the detente. If the
Soviet officials were now to move harshly against Sabhenitsyn,
the cup of American misgivings and anger would spill over
There is no question of interfering with Russia's int
affairs. But neither is there any need to tread softly, and -
only in whispers, and try" to ease the internal troubles thi
litbu > must face because of its police state.
In his new book, Solzhenitsyn cites with scorn the naive
blndness of Franklin Roosevelt and Winston Churchill in turning
over to the Stalin executioners the masses of anti-Stalinist sol-
diers and partisans who were sent directly to prison and death.
This Is no time for a similar naivete about Brezhnev'-,
ocratic yearnings and his tenderness of heart.
IN ONE sense, the Soviet police state created Solzhenn >n
He was a bright young mathematician and artillery officer, an
unquestioning Communist although skeptical of Stalin when
he was thrust into the prison system. That system became a
school where he met other prisoners, learned about the democracy
he had been shut away from, came to question Communism itself,
which was so deeply interwoven with police repression.
The Russians are a strange, remarkable peopleearthly,
mystical, passionate about whatever they do. Their ideas of jus-
tice and equality come not so much from the democratic as from
the Christian tradition. Solzhenitsyn's forerunners Tolstoy,
Dostoevski, Pasternak were imbued, each in his own way. wifll
this religious sense of good and evil
SOLZHENITSYN'S YEARS of his own prison experience have
made h.m an embattled carrier of values very deep in Russia's
past, as well as in the democracy of the West.
He cries out now with anguish, looking back at the spectacle
of m.l.ions of Russians waiting in their houses for the knock
lln nr' ?K,ng fU0 dCath 0r t0 a death-in life like so many
IT,' ," Same insi*ht that ,he J^ish victims of Hitler
ghett000If?heRlaS.Whe.,, thev st00d ad ^ught in the Wars*
been f' !, T^ *Ua" had resist'd' he W*. >M h"
been 00 co My for Stalin to go through with it. Solzhenitn is
Zn. t S 7? Way' fi*htin-king it too costly for the re-
Sime to crack down on him.
rem-,rtW,hf0,rmifb,e an "*"* is! One thinks of his own
remark, that, when a country has a great writer, it has. in effect,
another government. Sitting in our safe homes, there is no single
cTrlt^T \ v,"01 3Sk himself whe,her he wu,d have ,he
courage to lay his life thus on the line.
it mSrV0!!!* S,3te U b0Und'in time- to'be buried in the rutal
of r. in" sv eXperience 'Is victims share and the infection
o thai ,paS,v C0mmunicate- Solzhenitsyn is the historic carrier
Se world u '".I"' T Cra- Ut the Soviet leaders know that
me world is watching him and them.
ful as to? r, P,rwOUd- The ^ <* t*e idea can be as power-
of tne Id*. 1 thC U'timate triumPh y well be the power
the ,dea, when intelligence, passion and compasaion inform it-
M


Friday, January 18, 1974
-Jm*M fkrirflnr "* Shofar of Hollywood
Page 5
AT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MEETING
-
Energy Crisis Distorted And
Exploited, Says Abe Durbin
By RITA GOODMAN
Being new to the Hollywood com
munity, I'd never heard I. A. Dur-
bin, JWF Community Relations
Committee chairman, prior to his
appearance at a recent Chamber
of Commerce meeting, speak to
an audience.
I'd heard he was a profilic and
much in demand speaker but lis-
tening is something else.
Durbin is an interesting looking
man whose face suggests his busi-
ness success didn't fail into his
lap but was earned.
His charm as a speaker lies in
the fact that he doesn't talk down
to people but rather, it's a more
"us folks together" kind of projec-
tion.
Although he was one with his
audience of top level business
executives, the thought occurred to
me that Durbin could probably
make a full house at the Hardhat
Convention relate to him also.
There is no doubt of Durbin's
commitment to Israel's survival for
even when he's speaking as a
Chamber member, he lets a "WE"
slip into his message when discus-
sing the small country.
The casual, slow-speaking man
is not so casual when he decides
to word-punch: "The Arab nations
are using Israel as a smoke-screen
Michael Cook (left), Florida Power and Light Co. treasurer,
end I. A. Durbin (second from left), JWF Community Rela-
tions Committee chairman, were guest speakers at the regu-
lar Greater Hollywood Chamber of Commerce meeting
which took place at the Emerald Hills Country Club. Elmer
Weigle, Chamber president, convened the meeting; Russ
Demarais (right) was moderator.

VAUGHN & WRIGHT iZ
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PLENTY OF PARKING
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World Renowned Actor
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IN CONCERT
Monday, January 28
8 p.m.
Stacy Chapel and Auditorium
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Tickers: $5.50
A!! Seats Reserved
For information **> rs*-va'ons contact the Pitw Crest Pub'-e
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to mask a purely economic effort
to exploit a seller's market in
world oil," he said just a few mo-
ments after a previous speaker had
predicted gasoline selling for $1
a gallon by next summer.
Durbin, a businessman himself,
admitted, "selling less and making
more is a good business practice
but not when it affects the lives
of hundreds of millions of people
__"The energy crisis is being dis-
torted and exploited," he told the
Chamber members, and then, like
a gentleman-with-socko, he con-
tinued, "it is being used to revive
anti-Semitism."
He added, "True or not, every
industry is using the crisis for
some excuse."
Durbin selects his thoughts care-
fully. One of these thoughts: "If
Israel had disappeared off the face
of the earth before this war start-
ed, we would still have an energy
crisis."
However, I. A. (Abe) Durbin,
former Canadian and longtime
Floridian, has no intention of let-
ting Israel disappear off the face
of the earth.
He's going to encourage people
to write to the President of the
United States, the Secretary of
State, Senators, Congressmen and
inyone else who represents a peo-
ples' voice.
. and in case of a stationery
hortage, Mr. Durbin will probably
nvent tape recorder equipped hom-
ing pigeons.
Like Israel, his message goes on.
T-Y Park Cookoiit
For Singles Set
The Jewish Federation Singh?
of Broward will hold a cookout
lunch at T-Y Park, Sunday. Jan. 27.
it 1 p.m.
Bicycle and boat rentals wi'.l be
available and children are wel-
come.
The outing is open to a1! Jewish
singles, age 25-50, residing in Brow-
ard and Dado counties.
Reservations may be made by
rhoning either of the Federation
office;.
Joey Russell Special Guest
At Hillcrest Bonds Dinner
Joey Russell,,beloved American
Jewish entertainer, will be the spe-
cial guest at the Hillcrest Country
Club Israel Dinner of State Sunday,
Jan. 27, Leo Balkin, dinner chair-
man, has announced.
Russell has starred in numerous
night clubs and hotels throughout
the country, and has appeared in
stage shows with many leading
show business personalities. A pop-
ular master of ceremonies, he also
is an accomplished vocalist and
presents a combined repertoire of
wit and music.
Honorees at the annual Hillcrest
Israel Bonds dinner-dance will be
Mr. and Mrs. Manny Lax. They will
receive the State of Israel Masada
Award for their selfless efforts on
behalf of Israel. Music for dancing
will be provided by the highly cele-
brated Stu Granger Society Orches
tra.
Preparations for the gala dinner-
dance are nearing completion. A
| "prep party" hosted by Mr. Balkin
and his wife Ethel was held in the
Arnold Palmer Room at Hillcrest
Country Club Tuesday evening. Sol
Entin and Harry Schwartz are serv-
ing as co-chairmen of the event.
JOtY KOSStlL
Israel Tour Set March 11-26
Rabbi and Mrs. Arthur J. Ab-
rams of Temple Emanu-El, Fort
Lauderdale, will lead a group tour
of Israel March 11-26 combining
sightseeing activities with the Cen-
tral Conference of American Rab-
bis Conference in Israel.
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Page 6
*Jf*i*t> Fk>rirfifor "* Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, January 18, 19"4

Election Casts Huge Shadow Over Geneva
Continued from Page 1
as well as cuttings from the wire
services, reporting Israeli elec-
torirr promises, ""pltdges, and re-
turns.
Egyptian newsmen talk fluently,
somewhat like their Israeli count-
erparts, about the chances of the
Likud and the number of seats
the "Maarakh" Alignment might
lose. Some of them question Is-
raeli colleagues about the influ-
ence of the "Tel Aviv Gush." the
weight of Deputy Premier Yigal
Allon within Mapai inner circles
and Menaehem Bei?in's chances
to join a national coalition gov-
ernment.
Even Russians seem to follow,
though with a certain naivete
Israeli internal politics. They
seem strangely misinformed about
Israel's political system, and So-
viet newsmen here persistently
ask about the chances for a "left
bloc" victory which would bring
to power Rakah (the pro-Moscow
Israeli Communist Party) and
other small left-wing groups such
as Moked and the Matzpen group.
MOST SOVIET newsmen and
officials at the Geneva Confer-
ence seem to hold their knowl-
edge about Israel's political life
from a couple of Soviet official
publications dealing with the
Middle East. To many observers
it seems as if the Russians are
the victims of their own propa-
ganda.
Even the Americans follow the
coalition news, but seem to base
their knowledge on professional
reports. The American delegation
receives a daily analysis of elec
toral developments from its Tel
Aviv Embassy and from the State
Department in Washington. Many
of the American officials also
nave a first-hand knowledge of
Israel and the Middle East, hav
What do doctors
recommend
for patients in pain?
There are many medications a
fhysician or dentist can prescribe
or pain. Rut there's one pain re-
liever physicians and dentists dis-
pense again and again: Anacin.
Each vear, doctors give out over
60,000.000 Anacin tablets for
everything from toothache and
headache pain to the minor pains
of arthritis. And millions take
Anacin without stomach upset.
When you're in pain, take the
tablet a doctor might give you in
liis own office. Take Anacin.
Wildfire
in the south.
There's no
future in it.
Nearly half of ail fores! fires .n
Ihe Soulh are set on purpose
By woods arsonists kids out for
a thrill or grown men carrying out
a grudge with matches
If you'd like to help
prevent arson ..
report it!
**"""," ,-iriv
'.Buiealo' r1.)
Help Prevent Forest Fir in th South
tdverl
cotn
th PvOK |
ing served or visited the area at
one point or other of their careerl
Obvidasly the* Israelis ha
double interest in the elections:
first, as participants in their coun-
try's life and future: and second-
ly, realizing as delegates that all
talks and discussions in Geneva
can only deal with generalities
and "principles" until the forma-
tion of the new government and
the promulgation of its broad po-
litical lines.
THE EGYPTIAN'S seem well
aware of this handicap and last
Friday agreed to hold the next
meeting of the military delega-
tions in the afternoon of Jan. 2
when the electoral results would
be in. Shortly before leaving Ge-
neva, Egyptian Foreign Minister
Ismail Fahmi met for over two
hours with the deputy head of
the Soviet delegation. Ambassa-
dor Vladimir Vinogradov.
According to Egyptian sources
here, the Soviet diplomat advised
the Egyptians to show "pa-
licence and "realism" until
after the coalition formation
and not press for a decision
on the disengagement issue until
then. He reportedly told Fahmi
that it would be useless for the
Egyptians to press for a solution
as nothing can be done before.
At the same time, he promised
a clean-cut Soviet intervention
should the issue not be solved by
the middle of January. He did not
specify whether the Soviet inter-
vention would be direct or would
work through Washington.
EGYPTIAN CIRCLES here say I
that they will be stepping up
their pressure. Though the talks I
deal officially with military mat-
ters "disengagement and the sep-
aration of forces" along the Suez
Canal, the Egyptians plan to turn
this issue into a political one. The
Egyptian thesis is that it is part
of Resolution 338 which, in turn,
has been voted by the Security
Council within the framework of
Resolution 242.
For the Egyptians, disengage-
ment is synonymous with with-
drawal.
Israeli officials who were in
Geneva with Foreign Minister
Abba Eban at the time of the
plenary conference, indicated at
the time that Israel will probably
ask as a first step for the follow-
ing concessions:
The demilitarization of the
Sinai or at least of the territories
from which Israel will withdraw,
as well as a limitation of Egyp-
tian troops on the Eastern Bank
of the Suez Canal.
The reopening of the Suez
Canal to the international ship-
ping with clearance work to start
at the earliest:
Repopulation of the aban-
doned EavDtian "ghost" cities
these last two points would pre-
vent, or at least complicate, new
Egyptian attacks across the Canal
entailing major human and fi-
along the canal, such as Suez nancial risks. Meanwhile Israeli
and Port Said. aRd Egyptian officers meet at the
The Isra,elj seejn,,.tftBJhir,.k that Paiais des Nations.
Metzenbaum, Ohio's
First Jewish Senator,
Active Democrat
Continued From Page 1-
ing members." Metzenba'im lost
to Robert Taft Jr. in a senate bid
in 1970.
Over the years he ha sbeen a
successful legislator, attorney, po-
litical advisor, businessman and
civic leader. He serves as a direc-
tor or trustee of more than a doz-
en organizations on the local and
national level, including the Jew-
ish Community Federation Fair-
mount Temple, Mt. Sinai Hospital
and The Cleveland Jewish News.
HE HAS been a national vice
president of the American Jew-
ish Congress, a member of the
National Citizens Committee for
Community Relations, a member
of the National Council of the
Joint Distribution Committee and
a member or tfts ^resident's
Council of Brandeis University.
Born in Cleveland on June 4
1917. to Ohio-bom parents,'
Charles and Anna Metzenbaum!
Metzenbaum has been a lifelong
Clevelander and attended Pat-
rick Henry Junror High School
and Glenville High School.
A sports enthusiast and tennis
buff, Metzenbaum is a board
member and stockholder in the
Cleveland Indians, Cavaliers and
Crusaders.
HE IS the founder of his law
firm, Metzenbaum, Gaines, Fin-
ley and Stern, and is chairman of
the board of ComCorp, Inc.
His close-knit family includes
his wife, Shirley, and four daugh-
ters, Susan, Shelly, Amy and Bar-
bara (Mrs. James Bonner).
THIS AD
COULD
SAVEYOU
SOOO
WHENYOU
If you are one of the thousands
of Jews who came to Florida
to live but still own a cemetery
plot up north, your death could
prove very costly to your
survivors.
Consider the cost of ship-
ping the casket and remains
back. Consider the long
distance phone calls. Consider
that one or more family
members will fly back tor the,
funeral. The cost of accom-
modations while they are
there.
Your inexpensive burial
plot could become very
expensive.
There is a much more
sensible alternative.
' You could buy, outright, a
plot at Lakeside Memorial
Park for a mere $250.00.
This is what you will get
for that $250.00:
1. A beautifully serene
memorial garden setting with
an eight acre reflecting lake.
Most northern cemeteries
are old and depressingly
unnattractive.
2. Perpetual care at no
extra cost. Practically all
northern cemeteries charge
an annual fee for care. In a
few years, the cost of this care
could exceed the price of a new
plot at Lakeside.
3. A place your family,
friends and relatives can visit.
Lakeside Memorial Park is a
short bus ride from anywhere
in the Miami area.
See Lakeside Memorial
Park for yourself. It's the kind
of decision you should not
put off. We're located at
N.W.25AthSt.atl03rdAve.,
Miami. Phone 305-592-0690.
w
Lakeside. .
Mpmgnal


Friday. January 18. 1974
+J, t*i**~F*crkHfr> and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 7
Momma Talks To Strangers
By 'RITA GOODMAN
1
.
"
The year before our Silver Wed-
ding Anniversary, my husband and
I decided that along with the ster-
ling gravy boat and well-and-trcc
platter, time had also tarnished our
marriage.
So, we gave each other the pre-
cious gift of a new start in life by
obtaining a divorce.
Loving each of us as individual
people, our two children approved
with understanding.
They also started worrying.
Not about their father who had
piloted a plane through a war.
They knew he could cope.
They worried about the woman. I
already in her forties, whose great j
pot of chicken soup with matzo
balls was hardly background for
singular survival.
Although they'd left "the nest"
to feather their own futures, they
wrote letters which appeared to
have one mutual concern: "Your
friendliness with strangers."
When growing up. they'd never
questioned the "strays" who ap
peared with regularity at our din-
ner table.
Now. their alarm became visions
of Mother befriending The-Mo^t
Wanted-Rapist on the F.B.I, list
and saying. "You look like you
need some stuffed cabbage."
It was then I decided to take
"my fir;t vacation ALONE."
My friends. Sam and Louise, hai
invited me to Toronto many time
and, since I'd never been to Canada
the trio finally jelled into reality.
The pleasure of being with them
was not "the millionaire bachelor"
they dug out of mothballs and
dotted off for escort duty.
The pleasure was watching their
loving devoting to each other. Sam ;
and Louise each had had other
Jives with separate families and
had met midstream in the river
of years.
It gave me hope that: "Perhaps
it could happen to me too!* '
I also wanted to see Quebec
so, despite their abundant hospi-
tality, I reserved a club-car chair
on one of Canada's finest trains
which would enable me to see the
country rather than fly over it.
The woman sitting next to me
was a prim type in her high-neck
dress with well-below-the-knee
hem.
When we later dined together
as a friendly gesture, I ordered
wine.
As a friendlier gesture, she or
dered more.
As we sped through the Cana-
dian landscape, the two ladies in
their forties didn't see much more
than wine glasses being emptied
with rapidity.
It was then the prim lady con-
fided, "I have a boyfriend eighteen
years younger than me."
I was enchanted.
. and probably based upon
my willingness to listen without
judging, she further insisted I
come stay at her brother's house.
Since I believe "the only way tc
see a country is through its peo
pie." I accepted. The wine had un-
doubtedly hyped my belief.
However, as we neared a suburb
station, the conductor rushed her
the message: "Your brother is
waiting at this station."
She grabbed her traveling case
ran down the aisle and called back
over her shoulder, "It was nice
meeting you."
Ten minutes later I arrived
alone in a strange city.
Common sense called for me to
say to a taxi driver, "Take me to
your best hotel."
"It's a holiday there's not a
room in town."
I opted for a hotel which he
seid "might have a room for one
night "
Of course it had a room for one
night. It also had a room for one
hour! 1 lay in bed timing the ar-
rivals and departures.
That is, when I wasn't listening
to the gToup of visiting lumber-
jacks playing some form of Ca-
nadian Karate by throwing each
other against the wall!
The next day I stopped in a
quaint French restaurant for a
croissant, coffee and directions to
a good hotel.
Young People
Will "Turn On9
In Program
Florida Chapter of Hir.eni will
r an appearance here of
\cb'o:tzen Esther Jungreis in a
program of singing and dancing
called "HineniA Return to God."
AT JWF's ANNUAL MEETING
RITA GOODMAN
The charming owner gasped
when he heard of my abode. "Mad-
ame, he said, "The Widow will
have room for you. She takes se-
lected guests in her home."
B?ing a Selected Guest of The
Widow had its good points. For
one, it was across the street from
the restaurant where the owner
was to introduce me to a life of
French Canadian Flambe' At-
tention.
For each meal, I created a new
image.
Once I was Laureen Racall. The
next time Anne Bancroft.
It was the nigU I was playing
Simone Signoret that he suggested
we walk together further into town
for a brandy.
I thought it odd those strange
looking men jumping out of bathes
and whispering furtive French mes
.ages into his ear.
However. I shrugged it off since
I don't understand French.
His sixth brandy revealed him
to be an "underground member"
who believed "Jews cause all the
trouble."
Having READ about revolution-
aries but never having sipped
brandy with one before, for the
first time in my life. I thought M
in my bttt interest not to say my
usual, "I'm a Jew."
Instead, I chose to go to the
Ladies' Room.
Little did he know I meant the
one in The Widow's house!
Before you could spell S-C-A-R-
E-D, I was packed and baking an
appearance at the railroad station.
The children wrote: "How was
your first vacation alone?"
Afraid of their admonitions, the
Jewish Simone Signoret replied,
"Uneventful."
The program is scheduled foi
Miami Beach Auditorium on Feb.
18 at 7 p.m.
To plan for her appearance here,
there will be a meeting at Beth
Israel Congregation on Jan. 14 at
8 p.m., according to Morton Maisel
and Irwin Block, cochairmen.
Rebbitzcn Jungreis heads a
voung people's movement designed
to "turn them on" to God. During
ner recent performance at Madison
Square Garden, she captivated
10,000 spectators with what she
calh "Judaism in Action."
Campers Picnic, Reunion
At Greynolds Park Jan. 27
Old campers, new campers, pros-
pective campers, parents, counsel-
ors and friends are invited to a
"Florida Get-Acquainted Picnic and
Reunion" sponsored by Camp
Wohelo and Camp Comet, the
brother-and-aister camps owned
and operate! by Morgan I. Levy
Shirley L. Shor and Isabelle L
Rosenberg In Wayncsboro. Pa.
The picnic will take place at the
rock shelter near the north en
trance to Greynolds Park Sunday
Jan. 27, from 1 to 4 p.m. Interested
persons are invited to bring fris-
bees, ballgl.ives and cameras.
Many prominent members of Greater Hollywood's Jewish
community attended the Jewish Welfare Federation's recent
annual meeting at Hillcrest Country Club. Studying the re-
ports in the top photo are (from left) Jesse J. Martin, Robert
W. Gordon and Joseph Gabel. Below are Mr3. Milton For-
man Mr. Foiman, Barbara Miller and Melvin Baer.
f!S\

*Zav*
Shaare Zedek Hospital's
100th Anniversary
DINNER AND SHOW
presents
,* Jeffrey L. Mcnn, president ot
People and Pictures, Inc., re-
cently won four photographic
merit awards from the Profes-
sional Photographers Guild of
Florida. The winning prints are
on display at his studio offices
in Hollywood.
Talented Youth Invited To
Jain Temple Musical Group
A musical group has been formed
by the youth department of Beth
Shalom. Bud Brietbart; Howard
Neu and Mark Marks, directors of
the "Chosen Children," are inter-
ested in meeting Jewish youth of
the community, from 7th to 12th
grade, who enjoy singing or play
ing a musical instrument.
For further information, phone
Shirley Cohen. Temple Beth Sha-
lom youth coordinator.
1&0 ^I8L
Music By SID ENGEL AND ORCHESTRA
AT
EDEN ROC HOTEL
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
SATURDAY EVENING, JANUARY 19, 1974
ADVANCE RESERVATIONS:
605 LINCOLN ROAD, MIAMI beach Dr. and Mrs. Milton B. Myers,
PHONE (305) 531-8329 Chairmen, Hollywood


Page 8
-Jewisfi tkridHnuT mt Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, January 18, 1974
Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood
Annual Awards For 1973 Presented
JOEL A. SCHNEIDER, M.D.
HY and BELLE SCHLAFER
YOUNG LEADERS AWARD
. presented in recognition of servica,
interest and devotion to the betterment
oi our community by Mr. Hy Schkrfer
(right).
MARK FRIED
AWARD OF MERIT
. ior devotion and leadership on be-
hali of the Jewish community presented
by Dr. Samuel Meline (left).
SCOn SNYDER
YOUTH COUNCIL AWARD
. for outstanding leadership cs pres-
ident of the Jewish Youth Council 1972-
1973, presented by Dr. Samuel Meline
(left).
HERBERT D. KATZ, PRESIDENT-ELECT
MAN Of THE YEAR AWARD
for inspiring and exemplary service
to the Jewish community
v ,MrKate haS Served on the Executive Committee of the Jew-
ish Welfare Federation, was 1973 Federation Campaign Chair-
man-Vice President and is past-president of the Young Leaders
Council. He presently serves on the National Campaign Cabinet
Of the Jewish Appeal where he previously worked on the Youna
Leaders Cabinet y
n .f?'iKat\i\the Southeate U-S. Regional Chairman for the
United Jewish Appeal and serves on the Board of Directors cf
Uie Joint Distribution Committee and American Association for
Jewish Education.
He is also active with the American Israel Public Aifcrirs
Committee and serves on Committees of the Council oi Jewish
Federations and Welfare Funds.
MELVIN H. BAER
PRESIDENT'S AWARD
presented in grateful appreciation
for distinguished leadership and service
to the Jewish community by Dr. Norman
Atkin (left).
. >


'^~C
,
*w
is/. w
MERITORIOUS SERVICE AWARD
... for effective, continuous leader-
ship to the J?wish community pressr.ied
by Dr. Norman Atkin (left).
STANLEY M. BECKERMAN
FOUNDER'S AWARD
... for being a founder and for 30
years of devcled service to the Jewish
community, presented by Ben Salter
(left).
SAMUEL M. MELINE D.M.D.
COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARD
-presented for outstanding service
tc the Jewish community of Greater
Hollywood by Dr. Norman Atkin (left). "; 1 *


?
Friday, January 18, 1974
VJenisfiFlcrkJiari nd Shofar of Hollywood
Pag *
ROBERT M. BAER
Quiz Box South Florida Israel Bonds
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD
... for his outstanding contribution
and service to the Jewish community
presented by Dr. Norman Atirin (lsfl).
GERALD SIEGEL
MERITORIOUS SERVICE AWARD
... for effective, continuous leadership
to the Jewish community, presented to
Mrs. Gerald Siegel for her husband by
Dr. Norman Atkin.
JOYCE ROAMAN
'
WOMAN OF THE YEAR AWARD
... for the development of an aciive
interested and effective Women's Di-
vision presented by Aviva Baer (right).
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
(c) 1!<74 Jewifch Telemmhli.- AKen<-y
What is Ma'aser?
Ma'aser is the tithe. The word
:utnes from the Hebrew word for
the number ten which indicates
:hat the tithe is usually 1/10 of
..-.e crop.
Actually, there were three kinds
A tithes. The first, that which was
given by an Israelite to a Levite.
rhe second, that which the Is-
raelite took oif from his produce
n the 1st, 2nd, 4th and 5th years
A every seven year cyclj to brinz
o Jerusalem and to consume there.
The third, for the under-privili-
.eged, stranger, orphan, widow,
.tc. which an Israelite took off
rom his crops in the 3rd and 6th
/ears of eve-, y seven year cycle.
Does Trrumah or Ma'aser have
any relevance today?
There are authorities who clain-
ha< the produce of the Holy Lane'
>f Israel is subject to some kind
f off?:ing representing these
hares.
These requirements may not be
he orieinal requirements of the
Torah, but they are Rabbinic re-
tirements (some authorities
maintain that they may be even
oday Torah requirements). There
ore, there are many authorities
n Israel who are veiy careful that
>'art of the produce is taken off
>efore the produce of the land is
onsumed.
These are not given to the
-iriests or Levites today. They are
simply set aside in minimal
amounts and either buried or
wrapped up and left to decay.
Accepts $60 Million Goal i
The South Florida Israel Bond;
Organization has accepted a goal of
$60 million in State of Israel Bond
sales, Milton M. Parson, executive
director, has revealed.
Parson noted that the worldwide j
Israel Bond Organization has em-
barked on a $1 billion campaign
to help stabilize Israel's economy
following the costliest war in its
history.
Highlighting the 1974 South Flor-
ida campaign is a special drive
now underway to produce $15 mil
lion in cash by the end of the first
quarter coinciding with the nation-
wide effort to cover the full
MttOUnt of Israel's $642 million De-
velopment Budget. Some $400 mil
'ion in Israel Bonds have been sold
nationally since the Yom Kippur
War began Oct. 6.
"Never before has the South
Florida community responded as it
has since the news of the outbreak
>f fighting in the Middle East. We
are in the most successful fam-
paign in our history, and we will
continue the present pace right up
until the summer months," Parson
said.
Funds from the sale of Israel
Bonds an- being utilized to offset
the economic dislocation caused by
the recent war by continuing indus-
trial and agricultural expansion,
financing new construction and de-
velopment projects, and creating
the jobs and housing necessary to
successfully absorb the tens of
thousands of new immigrants ar-
riving in th-' Jewish homeland.
Parson asks all Israel Bond pur-
chasers who have not yet received
certificates to please be patient.
Because of the unprecedented vol-
ume of purchases in recent months,
banking institutions which serve as
transfer agents have run out of
many of the certificates which aro
printed in Israel.
Tormenting Rectal Itch
Of Hemorrhoidal Tissues
Promptly Relieved
In many cases Preparation H
fives prompt, temporary relief
from such pain and itching
and actually helps shrink
welling of hemorrhoidal tis-
sues caused by inflammation.
Tests by doctors on hun-
dreds of patients showed this
to be true in many cases. In
fact, many doctors, them-
selves, use Preparation H* or
recommend it for their fam-
ilies. Preparation H ointmsni
or suppositories.
gurdines
wwwwv .*****~''~~**i%,*!*++++++'*****,
1
10V ear. *j i'JUt i* UST t -
Todd%n BONDED FRUIT SKIPPER
MOW SHIPPING FIOMDA'S HMff HiJlT
tASKlU t SIFTS
11*4 rCNCE 'Z~. I SON Corel Goblw L 448-5J1S
,w>l)y^MyW **************'
the printed
shirt life
N KLOPMAN'S
CAREFREE ULTRESSA*
It's one of the best shapes a
dress can be in. And ours is
a soft, long sleeve step-in of
Ultressa* Dacron* polyester.
Houndstooth check: green
or blue. 8-18. $21
DRESSES :. SECOND FLOOR.
MIAN* AND ALL BURDINE'S STORES


Page 10
h knist fhrirfnr wd Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, January 18, 1974



'"' '
I
By BOB KERBfl, Executive Director,
Jewish Wifforc federation of Creofer Hel^eetf



How many times have you said or heard it said ... "I have al
ready given." Every volunteer raising money for any Jewish organiza
tfon wili hear either that statement or "1 give up north," or "sure, 1
believe in these thing?, but the Federation gives money to X-Agency
which I do not like," or "I bought State of Israel Bonds."
These are a few of the excuses that we all hear and there are
others such as "I'm here on vacation." (Are we ever on vacation
from our responsibilities?)
The Jewish Welfare Federation is now in the second phase of it-:
1974 Campaign. This phase will be the solicitation of all those who
have not been solicited since the Oct. 6 Yom Kippur War, and also the
r-solicitation of those who have contributed.
As men on the front, we must continue to be as alert. The cost of
the war in human lives is beyond comprehension, but equally import-
ant is the cost of the war as it relates economically to the lives of the
Israeli people. Our job is to provide the humanitarian services: housing
for new immigrant;. replacement housing for those inadequately placed
in the pa=t. financing social services, home* for the aged, nursery
schools. kindereartens, hocr>ita!s and univer-ities. This is our responsi-
bility it belongs tn no one el;e.
Today I received the official figures of Soviet emigrants to Israel
in 1973. The population of Israel has been increased by 1.5 per cent
That's equivalent to over three million emigrant coming to the United
States in a one-year period. Since the United States has a maximum
limit of 129.000 in any one year, you can well imagine what this does
to the economy of a country. Find'ng jobs and housing for these peo-
ple and aidina their integration Into society is a monumental task for
the State of Israel.
When called upon to make a sift to the 1974 Campaign, please
don't think of the above mentioned excuses. Rather, say to yourself.
"What if I were that person who wanted to live in freedom in the State
of Israel'' What if I were dependent upon others to provide essential*
so that I m;ght live in dignity? What if I were living in a country sur-
rounded by forces who wanted its destruction?"
The answers to these questions should heltf you determine the
amount of your gift.
If we want Israel strong and secure and also want the development
of programs and services necessary- for a strong Jewish communitv in
this area. then, as I see it. we must do what must be done. The deci-
sion of a future for Jews is up to you.
MIRRORED WALLS AND CHUNGS
INSTALLATION MADE WITHIN THREE DAYS.
DOOR MIRRORS FRAMED MIRRORS
SHOWER & TUB ENCLOSURES
PLATE GLASS TABLE TOPS
CALL THIS WEEK FOR A FREE ESTIMATE.
ALL WORK GUARANTEED INSTALLATION
DONE BY EXPERIENCED, QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.
772-3980
Triangle Glass & Mirror,
817 N.W. 44th Street
Inc.
Sheila Says:
I have my hair styled by Stanley J
and I won't ever go anywhere else.
Why don't you?
Call for appointment, 566-1228.
HAIRSTYLES by STANLEY J
4001 N. Andrews Ave. p$ w#
mma i. HoaowiT?k,and p"rk :" *"
Burdine's Plans
Store Expansion
Thomas C". Wasmuth. chairman
of the board oi Burdine'a, has an-
j nouneed plans! for tiif expan.sij|n.
of the retail chain's Westland
store.
The 21.000-:quare foot enlarge-
i ment of the second floor will add
| major home furniture and carpet
I departments to the store and alse
| allow for the expansion of space
i and merchandise assortments in
the decorative home accessories
and textile divisions.
Geor~e Corrigan. general man-
ager of Burdine's Westland store, j
stated tiiat the enlargement will j
make Westland a complete depart
ment store.
Completion date for the expan-
sion is scheduled for late June
The store, located in the Westland
Shopping Center, is in the heart of
the rapidly growing West Hialerh
section of Greater .Miami.
Hollywood Chapter Of
Harlassah Meets Tuesday
Hollywood Chapter of Hadassah
iviH meet Tuesdav at 1 p.m. in th"
Home Federal Building. Hollywood.
Rabbi Robert Frazin of Temple
Solel will b? the guest speaker.
He will discuss: "The Hebrew
Prophets Now More Than Ever
Their Relevance to Contempor-
ary Life."
Dr. Joel Schneider, president of
the Jewish Welfare Fedaration's
Young Leadership Council, will
describe the Council's work at
Friday n;ght services in Temple
Sinai. Hollywood, Jan. 25. Coun
cil members will also partici
pate in the services.
Chiropractor Opens
Hallandale Office
r>r. Michael V. Mansdorf, of Mi
ami Lakes, and formerly of New
York City, announces the opening
. of his office for the practice o;
chiropractic at 2500 E. Hallandale
Beach Blvd., Hallandale.
Dr. Mansdorf's office features,
the most modern and up-to-date i
equipment to help him in the prac I
tice of chiropractic, which is the i
world's largest drugless healing
profession.
Dr. Mansdorf and his staff are I
able to treat patients of all ages.
His patients include individuals
having accidents at work and who
are covered by Workmen's Compen
sation; patients 65 or older who
have Medicare Health Insurance, a
federally funded program; and pa-
tients covered by all other forms
of health insurance.
DV. Mansdorf hai also initiated
a program for school children,
which consists of a spinal and pos-
tural check-up and recommenda-
tions for correction if necessary. I
"Update," the name of the Women's Division 74 Campaign,
was reenacted for the 18 persons who attended a pre-solici-
tction telephone demonstration by Louise Diamond (left)
and Karen Margulie3 (right). Andrey Meline, congratulated
the ladies on their convincing performances.
*l
i
The first Worker Training Session of JWF Women's Division,
headed by Mrs. Joyce Roaman, president, was hold recently
at the home of Helen Glassman. A viva Baer (left) conducted
the session. Marsha Tobin, Campaign chairman, opened
the meeting; Sue Miller Iright), Worker Training chairman,
presided.
MOVING TO METROPOLITAN WASHINGTON OR
BALTIMORE AREA? DO YOUR
APARTMENT HUNTING
The free Easy Way
(301)587-6614
OUICK, CONVENIbNT NO-COST SOLUTIUN
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ALAN BORENSTEIN, M.D.
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AMERXAN BOARD OF PSYCHIATRY ANO NECROLOGY
WISHES TO ANNOUNCE THE RELOCATION OF HIS OFFICE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF NEUROLOGY
. WITH SPECIAL INTEREST IN
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TO
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TELEPHONE OFFICE HOURS
739 84B4___________ BY APPOINTMENT

BROWARD: 925-3381
DADE: 944-4711
STOCKS
BONDS
OPTIONS
QUOTATIONS
MARK R. FRIED
RICHARD M. KNEE
CompUte Investment Services
3906 S. Ocean Dr., Hollywood, Fla. 33020
HERZFELO ft STERN
ESTABLISHED 1S80
MEMBERS
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE
ANO OTHE* LEADING EXCHANGES
H


January 18, 1974
Vjewistnoridiar) nd Shofar of Hollywood
raae 11
j Profile
Jules B. Gordon. The Head
alalmd of Galahad Three...
I
Act tall Jules B. (Julis) Gor
a big man physically and
pfcily.
^physique had a h?ai start
Hty his mother, Sonia. pre-
a more than bjuncin? 12
Hialf-pound son to her bus-
bar K);,vi(l.
fcenior Gordons, who owned
^katessen in Harlem, "were
ovable people and a warm
|" Julie Gordon sayj.
natural then, that good.
lules Gordon, who loves Her-
^ and "noshing," prescribes
\A:MI, not Alka Seltzer, as
rail cure for stomach dis-
ie tenants of Hollywood's
H Three had their way, he'd
ftring perpetual stomach dis-
H)r his phone never stops
ringing
dower since this past Sep-
H when his wife Beatrice
away, the president of the
d Three Men's Club, con-
| of 270 tenants, says, "They
fsee if I need anything."
it Gordon needs is a seeing-
in living color, for he is
lind.
's the reason why he doesn't
K car. "I never could tell
Bolor the traffic lights were,"
he lai>
s Jules Gordon, who was
ft New York City and whose
School Yearbook read, "G
for Gordon as jolly a boy,
ftver spread wholesale, his
ft-s of joy."
to the prophecy, he's been j
ing joy ever since,
aduate of New York Univer-
fthrre he majored in P-iblit
Bnlin H>f Gordon. Linka and Ross
which lay, although he's been
^m five years, still bear* his
^"Tlvy won't take it r.ff." he
ft, adding with a twinkle,
sav it's a !u-ky charm "
Over that span of year-, though.
Jtlles Gordon worked hard. He'
rare'.y took a vacation exce"t for
** weekend away with the boys" j
flse he v-.k a bachelor into his I
thirties.
He sfys. "I'm probably the only
person who'd never boen to Flor-
ida."
Gordjm did. however, love to go
do his cl cit" books, for then he
wast around people an! he's always
loved peoph'.
'Two alwiys been a kibitzer."
he says puffin:; on th cijur which
is never out of hi* mouth or reach
"and I'd go to their offices and
kibitz, eventually getting the books
redone too."
During those times, he inevit
ably became involved in nth->r
things, like helping organize "Fight
For Sight" because his client had
a friend who was going blind.
He is also a trustee of the Re-
form Mt. Neboh Congregation in
New York, honorary trustee of the
Grand Street Boys' Foundation
which maintains scholarshios for
needy students, and founder of
the "Jules and Beatrice Gordon
Scholarship Fund" at Brandeis
University.
Marrying Beatrice in his middle
thirties made a profound mark on
Gordon's life for his wife was not
only a talented artist, but was the
daughter of famed New York Judge
Jonah J. Goldstein, who defended
and achieved acquittal for Mar-
garet Sanger in her fight for Plan-
ned Parenthood. It was her mother,
arriet B. Lowenstein. a lawyer.
t settled an argument of Jewish
factiotv in New York by saying.
Mon't we call it 'UNITED
Tapp*"'?' "
to the late Judge Gold-
nfluence on Gordon sits
[but forever judging as a
In the center of the Gala-
ee penthouse wall
says, pointing his dear to
J
JULtS B. GORDON
the man, "He was interested in the
unfortunate."
They didn't have to be Jewish
for both the Judge and his son-in
law raised money for the Holy-
Name Society in New York's Bow-
ery where a Jew could have a cup
of coffee without having to say
Mass.
Jules Gordon "gave up doctors
after they told me I wa3 sick";
however, he dil retire from his
firm and move to Hollywood.
It only changed the locale of his
charitable nature.
He is a trustee on the board of
directors for Tem?le Beth El, a
board memb"r of th Hope School,
a board member of the North Dade
Children's Center, a board mem-
ber of Doug'as Hom for the Aged
<"where I'm going after the Gala-
had," he laughs. ... ). a recipient
of a Bond; for Israel Scroll and.
most of all, a board member of
Jewish Federation of Greater Hoi
a wood, where h-- ii 1974 Cam-
paign chairman cf Galahad Three.
An untiring U.\ worker, he has
been chairman for several years.
Of himself. Gordon says, "I'm
sorry I haven't been able to do
more. I'm not wealthy; I don't
know what I have." As he pokes
a cigar burn in his light blue
slacks which the maid has assured
him matches the shirt, he adds. "I
go overboard out of proportion to
my income."
Jules Gordon has recently gone
overboard for someone else. His
name is Brian (nam>>d for his late
wife, Beatrice) and, at this writing
Brian is one day old.
He's We son of Gordon's only
child, David, 27. and his wife.
Deborah, who reside in Sacramen-
to, Calif. where David is working
on his Ph.D. in location. They
il"o have a three-year-old daugh-
ter, Jennifer.
A graduate of Brandeis Univer-
sity with a Makers degree from
Harvard, David is now a Develop
rrent Consultant for the State of
California Health and Welfare
Agency.
"He's a nice youngster," Gordon
says of his son as he answers the
ohone and receives flight informa
tion from the travel agent who has
ticketed him to California for "the
bris."
Julie Gordon must hurry back
though because he's about to be
installed as the president of the
Galahad Three Men's Club for the
second consecutive year, elected
unanimously.
No wonder.
He walks you to the elevator
and a lady says. "Congratulations
Mr. Gordon. I hear you're a new
grandfather."
. and in the ebvator. another
lady says, "I hear his name is
Brian."
. and when she departs, he
touches the long hair belonging to
one of two remaining little girl
passengers and asks, "Are you
, sisters?"
"We're friends," they answer
giggling.
Jules Gordon has noticed them.
Like everyone else who passes
through his life.
In turn. Jules B. Gcrdon, color-
blind, cigar-smoking philanthro-
! pist. but mostly, good person, is'
noticed too!
Sisterhood To Conduct
Temple Sinai Services
Temole Sinai Sisterhood will con-
duct the Friday night services in
the main sanctuary at 8 p.m. Mem-
bers of the executive board will
participate and Mrs. Joel Rottman.
president, will deliver the sermon.
This Sisterhood Sabbath com
memorates the 56th anniversary of
the founding of Women's League
, for Conservative Judaism by the ,
, late Mathilde Schecter to foster j
the ideas of Con-ervat've Judaism.
Meeting briefly with Israel's President Ephraim Katzir (right)
in Jerusalem, last month was Harry Suasman of Ho'.lvwood
(left), a leading member oi the South. Broward Israel Bonds
Board of Governors and JWF of Greater Holty wood. S'ass-
man was recently honored at the Galahad Court "Night in.
Israel" for his effort3 in fortifying the economic foundations
cf the State oi Israel.
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Page 12
+Jelst fhrkUan "< ** of Hollywood
Friday. January 18. 1974
Religious Party Labor's Likely Coalition Partner

A relatively small drop for Lattor-a jrelatively minof in-ease^or
j(^l)t"Wenormusir mcre%^d*p#litiAl pfcwer for
By DAVID LANDAU
JTA Jerusalem Bureau ChS?f
Lapor,
Likud 4MMtie
the National Religious Party which neither dropped nor increased
but maintained its 12 Knesset seats. Such are the vagaries of Israel's
multi-party politics that this peculiar sounding assessment is in fact
the basic outcome of the national election.
In simple terms, the Labor
Alignment will probably be de-
pendent upon the NRP to an un-
precedented extent if it wishes
to form another government co-
alition without the inclusion of
Likud.
OR LOOKED at from an-
other angle Labor will prob
ably not be able to form a ma-
jority coalition relyfcig only on
the Independent Liberals, the
Arab pro-Labor affiliates, and
Shulamit Aloni's Civil Rights
List. Such a coalition would not
top SO seats or would only just
top 60, making it unsafe and un-
stable. With the NRP too, on the
other hand. Labor would have a
comfortable 70-plus and would
command a strong government
and be able to face the enhanced
Likud opposition.
A great deal, then, will hinge
upon the NRP's position in the
horse-trading which is now going
on with the aim of establishing
the new government. Labor itself
seems divided as to its evalua-
tion of NRP's likely pose. While
the Labor Party election cam-
paign manager Avraham Offer
spoke on TV of the likelihood of
new elections soon because, in
his view. Labor had not been
-1 FinJ,gfcftH Results,,
JERUSALEM (JTA)According to the final election
results, seats for the Eighth Knesset shape up as follows:
Labor Alignment ............................................................................
Likud ............................................................................................. 39
National Religious Party ............................................................. 10
Independent Liberal Party............................................................
Rakah Communists......................................................................
Afjuda-Poalei Aguda......................................................................
Labor-Affiliated Arab List ......................................................... 3
Civil Rights List (Shulamit Aloni)............................................. 3
Moked ........................................................................................" 1
Total 12J
well spurn all such compromise
and insist that the NRP as a
-whole remain firjn fto its pre-eleo-
\ionv4emandl.for ;a '
emergency cabinet"
Likud, too.
"national
to embracd
'VISION OF THE APOCALYPSE'
There's No Energy Crunch,
Oil Expert Says in Article
NEW YORK (JTA) The
oil crisis is an 'Arabian fantasy"
engineered by the oil companies
with the express purpose of in-
creasing their prices and profits,
according to Christopher T Rand
writing in the January edition of
Harper's Magazine.
Rand was described as a Mid-
dle East specialist who has
worked for Standard Oil of Cali-
fornia and Occidental Petroleum
and as a translator of Arabic and
Persian materials for the U.S. De-
partment of Commerce.
"FOR THE past few years, the
major oil companies have spent
considerable sums of money ad-
vertising a vision of the apoc-
alypse. The October war between
some Arabs and all Israelis
seemed to testify to the truth of
this vision.
"The embargoes placed on Arab
oil shipments to the United States
und the Netherlands, together
with unilateral price raises and
threats of reduced production,
provoked a further outpouring of
oil industry bulletins announcing
the approach of an energy crisis
akin to the millennial source of
Huns from the Asiatic steppes,"
Rand wrote.
"ALTHOUGH SUFFICIENT to
its melodramatic purpose, the
prevailing rhetoric fails to an-
swer a number of awkward ques-
tions, especially now that the Oc-
tober war has come and gone.
Few people point out that in the
past year the major oil compa-
nies have reported enormous prof-
its or that they have enjoyed a
policy of generous forebearance
on the part of the Nixon admin-
istration," the writer said.
"The war has created a few
problems with logistics of oil sup-
ply, but these have aggravated
the American public more than
they have inconvenienced Amer-
ican oil companies." Rand said.
"For the time being, the world"
supply of oil far exceeds the
world's demand, and so the cri
sis must be discerned in a net
work of theoretical lines converg
ing at imaginary points in tinv
future. The oil companies there
fore project a rate of increasing
demand for oil and then they pro
ject a ratn of declining supply."
A FACT that the oil compa
nies do not tell the public i
that "as a result of their effortf
the inventory of the world'.*
available fuel has been increasing
rather than diminishing ... the
inventory has become so exten
sive that it has become a luxury
or at best a waste of time for
most people to worry about it,"
R?id wrote.
"The oil companies obviously
worry about it, but their worries
have to do not so much with the
supply of oil as with the cost at
which they trade it. It is the dis-
parity between these two con-
cerns that gives rise to the con-!
venient misconception of the oil
crisis," according to Rand.
"The consumer should wonder
why the oil companies sell gaso-
line wholesale at 21 cents a gal-
lon when it costs them only 4j
cents a gallon to provide it."
given a strong enough mandate,
the party's Secretary-General,
Aharon Yadlin, sounded confident
that Labor would be able to con-
tinue in harness with the NRP,
the ILP and Shulamit Aloni.
Clearly, at any rate, Labor is
trying to reform the present co-
alition. Clearly, too, the bargain-
ing with NRP will be tougher
than ever because of the new
balance of power, and also be-
cause of NRP's declared hawkish
policies on the West Bank terri-
torial issue. The NRP is commit-
ted to the electorate not to join a
government whose policy is to re-
divide western Palestine in
other words to return some of
the West Bank to the Arabs. Re-
ligious and historical considera-
tions play the major part in this
NRP position.
CAN LABOR woo NRP to its
corner? That key question de-
pends on many factors. One of
them is the personality factor:
Who is to be the real Labor lead-
ership and who the NRP leader-
ship? The Religious Party is
much closer on the issues of
borders and defense to Defense
Minister Moshe Dayan and Pre-
mier Golda Meir than to the new-
ly-strong Labor doves led by Fi-
nance Minister Pinchas Sapir,
Deputy Premier Yigal Allon and
Foreign Minister Abba Eban.
Which Labor team will emerge
now as the real guiding force
within Labor and the real spokes-
man of its policies? This question
itself is intimately bound up with
the election results and with
Labor's reinforced dependency on
NRP.
If Labor had triumphed in the
polls, there is little doubt that it
would have shifted further to the
left and perhaps even forced
Dayan out. As it is, though. Labor
needs Dayan and his ex-Rafites in
order to keep above water. Hence
Dayan, because of Labor's drop
in the polls, would seem to have
emerged with his position inside
the party strengthened.
THIS IS particularly the case
when it is borne in mind that the
various Left-of-Labor fringe
group peace parties did not pump
up much of a showing. The doves
in Labor can hardly claim that
the elections demonstrated a sig-
nificant swing to the minimalist
policies of the doves inside and
outside the Labor party. Assum-
ing then th3t the Dayan-Gold'
camp in Labor is strengthened bj
the party's weakening, and tha'
this line will continue to guid
I>abor, will NRP allow itself t<
be wooed into a coalition unde
this leadership? Of course NRF
would ask and receive a heav\
price in terms of religious ar
rangements sabbath, education
and so on.
Usually, that is enouah, bu'
this time it may not be, tecaus'
NRP itself is by no means unitec'
and there are hawkish pressure
within that party which constantl'
push the leadership towards n
harder and harder line on the
territorial question. Dr. Yose.'
Burg and Michael Hanzani, th':
present NRP leaders, might well
wish to compromise with Labor
and reform the traditional coali
tion.
They might seek to accept La
bor's formulations regarding the
West Bank such as the Jordan
River as the "tecurity border,"
or a federation or confederation
scheme designed to include Jew
ish settlements in historic areas
and military security without nec-
essarily seeking political sover
eignty over thj whole West Bank
The NRP's internal "opposi
tion," Dr. Yitzhak Rafael's young
faction led by Zevulun Hammer
and Yehuda tsen-.vieir, might very
THE NRP's immediate post-
election statements, apart from
obvious satisfaction that the party
retained its strength, adopted a
hard line with Burg calling for a
national emergency coalition. Ex-
Rafi Minister Shimon Peres seems
to forecast the hectic days anl\
weeks ahead as he predicts "great
difficulties" for Labor in setting
up a coalition this time.
Mrs. Meir is bitterly opposed to
a national unity Cabinet which
she feels would be hopelessly
paralyzed and would inevitably
result in the conference failing
to achieve anything.
One further point: Yadlin
clearly ruled out the possibility
of bringing Moked or any other
far left groups into the coalition.
Moked will certainly have one
Knesset seat and perhaps two,,
and possibly some other leftist"
might attain the one percent mini-
mum, but Labor does not want to
rely on them.
Arabs Take
'Credit' For
Fire at Dan
TEL AVIV (JTA) As the
Dan Hotel returned to normal
life, police investigators went to" >
wcrk at the basement of the lux-
urious hotel of Tel Aviv where
a fire broke out at the "Tof-
any's" nightclub located there.
Within a short time police came
to conclusion that it was a break
in, and the fire was made to
cover up the forcing open of the
cash.
HOWEVER, more detailed in-
vestigation brought police to con-
clude that the money safe was
opened with key. and the signs
of forcing open were made to
cover up the fact that a key was
used.
Most of the hotel guests evac-
uated early hours Monday were
back in their rooms, and some
asked to be transferred to the
Accadia hotel which belongs to
the same hotel chain.
Israelis could only smile when
they heard the Arab terrorist
radio state the fire at the night-
club was a result of an act of
terror.
Wildfire in the south.
There's no
future in it.
1 tha puUx jood >/ %MF Help Prevent Forest Fires in the South

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January 18, 1974
* jlpw i k f, fkurkJIticmn "* Shofm of Hollywood
Page 13
M MINDLIN
kflzhenitsyn: The UltimateTruth iriBlood
sntinued from Page 4
understanding in us, even if
Soviet rewriters of history
Bid have us believe otherwise.
love all these days, we need
reminders. Detente has
Bd us into the kind of political
rdities that make the task
be rewriters simpler.
iPresident Nixon's drive on
pow and Peking for the pur-
of discovering new market-
es for the crypto-fascist indus-
|ists surrounding him is being.
example, presented to us as a
exercise in interfaith politi-
Bxperience.
M.ZHEMTSYNS NEW book
is us about the price we will
paying for that. It tells us we
Ltupid to think that detemo
Jrally "relaxation") is pos-
with the criminal Muscovite
ressors. As George Meany do-
Bed detente the other week:
Jng the Middle East war. th.>
sians were relaxing all over
I Sinai.
^nd isn't Meany after all right
it this fraudulent detente
iness?
lust consider Nobel-winner Lc
Tho's latest explanation of
loi's failure to tell us about
POWs still in North Vietnam
lanoi. he argues, can not do
until we live up to our end
\he bargain he hacked out of
hides with Nobel-winner
Borowitz To
lugurate Annual
ries of Lectures
|nday Jan. 27, at 8 p.m. guest
rer Dr. Eugene B. Borowitz.
Bssor of Jewish Thought
ew Union College-Jewish In
of Religion, will inaugurate
jwnual Charles Doppelt Mem-
| Lectures at Temple Beth El
S. 14th Ave., Hollywood. He
speak on "Four Views of Be
Jewish: Roth, Malamud, Bel-
[Wiesel."
Borowitz is the founder and
pr of Sh'ma, a Journal of Jew
esponsibility. He serves as
lent of the Jewish Book
fccil of America; as vice presi
I Religious Education Associa
jfrof America; and is the authoi
Re book "The Masks Jewf
;" plus a number of othei
Kand articles on Judaism and
Bl Life including "Toward A
jewish Theology," "A Jew-

View of -Sex Ethics."
recelv.
I Borowitz has been active in
Held of adult education. He
Red his bachelor's degree
Ohio State University and
dained by the Hebrew Union
e; and earned two doctor's
fees one from the Hebrew
H^ College, the other from
Hers College, Columbia Uni-
veiW-
The annual Charles Doppelt
rial Lecture series was es-
Hied as a living memorial to
Hived husband and father by
[Charles Doppelt and her
L 0" Bter and son-in-law, Shirley
Km Brenner. Its purpose is
King to Temple Beth El cut
Rng Jewish scholars, histori
KV writers, lor a cultural eve-
Kvhich is open to the com
ty These lectures will add an
rtant dimension to the tern
ogram and will enhance its
as a dynamic cultural cen-
bough there will be no ad-
charge, reservations will
to be made in advance,
will be available at the
office only.
Henry Kissinger in Paris until
we start giving North Vietnam
the funds we promised her to "re
build" the destruction we imperi-
alistically wreaked on her during
the war.
IMAGINE OUR tax monies go-
ing to North Vietnam at the same
time that North Vietnam sloshes
South Vietnam down the drain
as is happening at this very mo-
ment, despite the Nobel Prize to
Kissinger and Lc Due Tho, who
at least had the honesty to re-
fuse it. What did those 50,000-
odd Americans suffer and die for
in Southeast Asia?
In his "Gulag Archipelago."
Solzhenitsyn's description of the
infamous doctors' plot and Josef
Stalin's plans for the Jews of
the Soviet Union teaches as that
the Soviets are as warped and op-
pressive as Le Due Tho's view of
the possibility of peace between
us.
Because the UnPresident for his
own reasons is willing to play
footsie with Le Due Tho, we must
not permit ourselves to forget
that it simply isn't possible to
play footsie with Communism, in
Moscow or Hanoi, without some-
where along the line losing the
foot in question.
THAT'S WHAT Solzhenitsyn
has done for us, perhaps at the
cost of his life. He has warned
us to forget the intellectual word-
riggers. Whether in Moscow or
Hanoi, nothing is changed.
The danger is that in Vietnam,
we were committed to a no-win
policy in the name of a fraudu-
lent egalitariauism.
In the Middle East, we pres
sured Israel out of a "too far,
too fast" win in the Yom Kippur
war in order to preserve Arab
"honor."
And so "Gulag Archipelago"
may well be dismissed by the Un-
President and his circle as em-
barrassing to detente.
But we must not be embar
rassed.
Is Deal in Offing WithArabs?
Chief Rabbi Shlomo Goren
has met with the apostolic
delegate in Jerusalem, Mon-
signor Pio Lagghi, to enlist
his church's aid on two hu-
manitarian issues: Israeli
POW's in Syria and Israeli
dead still jn the battlefields
on Sinai within the control of
Egypt's Sacond and Third
Armies.
Continued from Page 1
it would be possible to do even
more: to give every Palestinian
Arab a sense of belonging to the
whole <0Palestine, and also (most
important of all) to solve the
vexed problem of Jerusalem.
The solution of Federation is
by no means new. It has been
put forward at intervals through-
out the period of the Arab-Is-
raeli conflict and has had the sup-
port of hard-headed realists such
as Shimon Peres.
THERE HAS never been a
better time for translating this
solution into practice than the
present. And even if for some
reason it proves impossible to
put this idea into practice, it
would be of inestimable value
for Israel, in the field of inter-
national relations, to put forward
this solution, thus showing her
goodwill towards the Palestinian
Arabs and her recognition of
their legitimate claims.
What does the Federation
mean? It means that within the
area of what used to be called
Palestine there would be two in-
dependent nations, one called
Israel and the other (comprising
the West Bank and Gaza, joined
by a narrow corridor) called
whatever the Palestinians want
to call it, but at any rate serving
them as a national homeland.
So far the plan is partition:
but this will not do, for Israel
would have no guarantee that the
new state was not being used as
a dagger against her. This guar
antee would be provided by the
federal link, which would mean
that Israel and the new state
would form one super-state, with
a common army and common se-
curity, against attack from out-
side Palestine.
PALESTINIAN AilABS wher-
ever the are, would be given the
choice of settling in the new
state, or (within certain obvious
limits) returning to former homes
in Israel, if they still exist. Most
would choose to settle in the new
state.
The two states, Israel and
Arab-Palestine, would have their
own parliaments, but there would
also be a federal parliament, to
which delegates would be sent on
a demographic basis. The con-
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The seat of the federal gov-
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which would thus be the capital
not of Israel or of Arab-Palestine
but of the whole of Palestine
just as Washington belongs to
no single state of the American
Federation but to all of them.
This would solve the question of
the status of Jerusalem, and there
would be no sense any longer in
the demand that Arab Jerusalem
should be handed back to Jordan.
WITHIN EACH of the two
states of the union, national cul-
ture could be developed to the
heart's content of the inhabitants.
Israel could be as Jewish as it
liked, and Arab-Palestine could
be as Arab as it liked. The mish-
mash of the so-called "bi-na-
tionnl state," with its implied
demand for Jews to become
Arabs, would be avoided.
At the same time, from a basis
of individual sense of identity
and culture, true friendship and
cooperation could develop be-
tween the two nations, neither of
which would be felt to be swal-
lowing up the other. Arab fears
of being Judaised, and Jewish
fears of being swamped by Arab
population-increase would be
laid to rest.
Though each citizen would feel
culturally attached mainly to his
own state, he would also feel him
self to be a citizen of the whole
super-state of Palestine. Those
Palestinian Arabs who are not
able to return to their former
homes (which in many cases no
longer exist) would still have re-
turned home just as a York-
shireman, returning from abroad
would still feel that he had come I
home even if circumstances com-
pelled him to settle i.i London or
Manchester.
THERE WOULD be nothing in
this plan which would prevent
the setting-up of demilitarized
zones between Israel and Egypt,
or between Israel and Syria. But
the settling of the Palestinian
problem would defuse the whole
Arab-Israeli conflict.
Egyptian and Syrian rulers
oaM have to give up the excuse
of going to the aid of the Pales-
tinian Arabs when looking for a
foreign adventure to take minds
off troubles at home.
The working-out of this coop-
erative project would be of in-
estimable benefit to Israel which,
by this means, would become for
the first time an integral element
in th Middle East, able to con-
tribute to its general develop- |
ment and share fully and posi-
tively in the solution of its prob- I
kms, as she has always wanted |
to dn
To list all the benefits would I
be impossible, but two may be |
mentioned: reduction in defense i
expenditure and independence of'
great power manipulation and in-
terference.
DESPITE WHAT has been said
and written about "biblical cxpan
sionism," there is plenty of prece-
dent in the Bible for Jewish ac-
ceptance of a Palestine inhabited
by more than one nation. The
Philistines, for example (from
whom Palestine takes its name),
lived on the coast (including Gaza)
throughout biblical times, and
were not reckoned among the na-
tions (the Canaanites) whom God
had commanded the Israelites to
drive out.
Moreover, the 12 tribes of Is-
rael formed one of the earliest
federations in the world, and they
were joined in their federation by
several Arab tribes such as the
Kcnites and the Calebites.
Centennial Bail Saturday
Dr. and Mrs. Milton B. Myers
have been named Hollywood chair-
men for the Centennial Ball of
Shaare Zedek Hospital of Jeru-
salem. The gala event will take
place Saturday at the Eden Roo
Hotel, Miami Beach and will fea-
ture Phil Foster. Eddie Shaffer
and Sid Engel's Orchestra. For in-
formation ci>n;act Dr. and Mrs. My-
ers or the Shaire Zedek office.
Palmer's
Miami Monument Company
3279 S.W. 8th Street, Miami
444-0921 444-0922
Closed On The Sabbath
Personalized Memorials Custom
Crafted In Our Own Workshop.
JZeuill
Jllemorial Cnapel
"JEWISH fUNlPAl DIRECTORS"
LOCAL AMD OUT OF STATI
ARRANGEMENTS
947-2790
133B5 W. Ollll HWY N.M.
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
lempie 3etk 6
WtemoziaC
gardens
The only all-jew ish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful sunoundings,beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual caie, reasonably priced.
For information call: ''"*S>1
923-8255_or write:___________________________.-f1 V-'V 0
" TEMPLE BETH EL ffi'&$*"
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above.
NAME: _-------------------------------------------
ADDRESS:
'Priot Increase Effective Jan. 1st, 1974
PHONE:
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
ASK YOUR
RABBI ABOUT US
3
JOHNSON-FOSTER
FUNERAL HOME, INC.
1650 HARRISON ST. HOLLYWOOD, FLA PHONE: 922-7511
Pant J. Houlihan,
L.F.D.


Page 14
+Jen 1st ilorfdfSar) "< Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, January 18, 1974
BBBBBBai
Community Calendar
SATURDAY, JANUARY 19
Temp:e Sole! "Las Vegas Night" 8 p.m. temple
Temple Israel 'Las Vegas Night" 9 p.m. Carriage Hills
MONDAY. JANUARY 21
Federation Women's "Division Board Meeting 9:30 a.m.
Home of Mrs Norman Atkin
NC.7W, Hollywood Section, Discussion Meeting 12:30 p.m.
Home Federal Hwd.
TUESDAY. JANUARY 22
N23XV Mental Health Forum All day Nova High School
Hassedah. Ho.lywood chapter, Board Meeting 10 a.m.
Home Federal. Hwd.
Hadassah. Hclywood chapter, Regular Meeting 1 p.m.
Home Federal. Hwd.
Tenvrie Sinai Sisterhood Board Meeting 8 p.m. tempi:
WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 23
Jewish Community Center of South Broward Senior Citizen
A)'. Day Program 10 a.m. Cinema Theatre
Beth Bbalem Men's Cub Meeting 8 p.m. Temple Beth
Shalom
THURSDAY, JANUARY 24
B'nui ;<'rith Women, Hallandale Chapter, Regular Meeting
12 30 p.m. Home Federal, Hallandale
SATURDAY, JANURAY 26
Had'i-sah, Hollywood chapter and Henrietta Szold Group
Square Dance 8:00 p.m. N. Perry Community Cen-
ter
SUNDAY, JANUARY 27
Pioneer Women. Miramar, Flea Market 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Miramar Recreation Center
Federation Singles of Broward Cookout/Lunch 1 p.m.-5
p.m. T-Y Park
Temple Sinai of North Dadr Fine Arts Series "The Joy
of Jews on Broadway" 8 p.m. temple
Temr-le Beth El Lecture Series Dr. Eugene B. Borowitz
p m. temple
Temple Beth Shalom Men's Club Show "Musical Revue of
Opera and Broadway" 8 p.m. temple
MONDAY, JANUARY 28
CRT, Kfi Chapter. Rummage Sale 9 a.m. all day
West Hollywood Civic Center
NC'JW, Hollywood. Board Meeting 10 a.m. Home Fed-
eral, Hollywood
TUESDAY, JANUARY 29
CRT, HH Chapter, Rummage Sale 9 a.m. all-day
We.-1 Hollywood Civic Center
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30
Fight Fer Sight Open Meeting & Card Party 12:3d p.m.
Temfie Beth El
pis Sinai Sisterhood Card Party 1 p.m. temple
ZOA Meeting 7:30 p.m. Temple Sinai
Rabbi David Shapiro will dis-
:' cuss "The Israel Situation Up-
to-Date" at the regular Broward
Zionist District meeting in Tem-
j pie Sinai, Hollywood, Wednes-
: j day, Jan. 30, at 8 p.rn., with
Sam J. Perry, president, presid-
ing. Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun ,
will present a musics! Drogram. .
CANDIELIGHTING TIMF
24 TEVETH 6:34
i^AMMMW^^MWWVW
...-.'.
;;'.; .
Pvino
V
Dr. Samuel Msline 'left?. Temple Beth Shalom membership
vice president, is seen with Rabbi Morton Maiavskv on the
occasion of the consecration of 104 new member-fsmilies.
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Volpert, (right) represent those con-
secreted. Mrs. Volpert pronounced the candlelight prayer.
Religious
Services
HAIUNDAIE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
(Connrvt,tivr). 416 NE 8th Ave
Rabbi Harry E. Schwart*. Canto*
Jacnt Danzmer.
NORTH Mir Ml BEACH
SINAI (Temole) of NORTH DADF
,8801 NE 22n.: Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Raloh p. Kinqtley, Cantor
Shulkea.
NORTH BROWARD
COPAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON.
GREGAT'CN. (Reform) ?S01 Uni.
ven-ty Dr.. Coral Springs. Rabbi
Max Weitr.
HOLLYWOOD
VOI '.'", l.RAE' cr HnLLvwono
rnMhooVvV ?ri Bterllna Rrt od-
p-v- Hallvwood H.ii. High School.
"'-f'>< D-. Trank Stein.
1 a m
TEMPLE BETH EL ,Rformi 1'S1
",'.u. Ave- Hollywood. Rabbi Samun



.. ,
fTvmoTCI Conrva.
*UJ}ur Rahb' Mor,on
BETH ahm "eonwJrvotlw.1
J IW Snd Av Hollywood. Rabbi
temple SOI El 'L b-.n *ni
St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Roh.
TE,Mt.C'-E ? *;AI 'Conerv*t:/e). 1201
.;''"'""'St. Rahbi D.vid Shapiro
Cantor Vet-.vifa H.n-.1un >"
MIRAMAR
nSW 35th St. R.bb" AvPor.,
Morse Elected To Head Central Bodv
NEW YORKEar] Morse of
New York City has been elected
as the new president of the Na-
tional Foundation lor Jewish Cul-
ture. He succeeds Rabbi Daniel
Jeremy Silver of Cleveland as the
heali of this central body, founded
by the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions and Welfare Funds to
strengthen American Jewish cul-
tural services.
Tfcis year the Foundation as the
administrative arm of the Joint
Cultural Appeal will seek $750,000
from local Jewish Welfare funds
to aid the activities of nine na-
tional organizations which special-
ize in Jewish cultural work: the
American Academy /or Jewish Re-
search, American Jewish Historical
Society, Leo Baeck Institute, Con-1
ference on Jewish Social Studies. |
Congress for Jewish Culture, His-!
tadruth Irith of America, Jewish
Publication Society of America,
National Foundation for Jewish
Culture and YlVO-Institute for
Jewish Research. Their total ex-
penditures in 1973 exceeded
$2,500,000.
Long active in Reform Judaism,
Mr. Morse is the immediate past
chairman of the Union of Amer-
ican Hebrew Congregations and a
member of the Board of Governors
of the Hebrew Union College-Jew-
ish Institute of Religion from
which he received the honorary
degree of Doctor of Humane Let-
ters in 1973.
A graduate of the University of
Wisconsin and Harvard Law
School, Mr. Morse has served as
special counsel for the FCC and
as executive president of the DCA
Food Industries.
Bar Mitzvah
BETH WILKOV
Beth, daughter of Mr. and Mrs
Lawrence Wilkov. will be Bat Mite
van Friday, Jan. 13, at Temple Beth
Shalom.
# *
LEE ZECHNER
Lee, son of Mr and ^^% Jop]
Zeichner. will be Bar Mitzvah Sat-
urday, Jan. 19, at Temple Beth
Shalom.
ft & &
ROBERT WEXLER
Robert, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben
Wexler, will be Bar Mitzvah Satur-
day, Jan. 19, at Temple Solel serv-
ices in Emerald Hills Country Club
#

MARCIA SONNENKLAR
Mareia, daughter of Mr. and Mrs
Herbert Sonnenklar, will become
Bat Mitzvah Friday, Jan. 25 at
Temple Beth Shalom.
# **
ERIC ROD EN
Eric, son of Mr. and Mr. Steve
Roden, will be Bar Mitzvah Satur-
day, Jan. 26. at Tmole Solel serv
ices in Sheridan Hills Elementary
School.
GOOD PROGRESS CAN BE MADE'
No Schedule, but Hope
Voiced for Withdrawal
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
JTA Washington Bureau Chief
Secretary of State Henry A.
Kissinger predicted that "good
progress" would be made in the
Israe:i-Egyptian disengagement
talks in Geneva though he would
not set a "time-table on the sep-
aration of forces."
Addressing reporters at a press
conference in San Clementc,
Caiif., where he has been meet-
ing with President Nixon on for-
eign pol'cy matters, particularly
the Midtil? East. Kissinger said.
"Unless there has been a basic
change of views, which I don't
beiicve, I believe good progress
can be made along the Suez."
KISSINGER SAD the resu'.ts
of Uhe elections in Israel "won't
have any affect on the current
ta'ks" on disengagement. He said
"The broad concensus is that the
talks will proceed even before a
new government is formed."
He added, however, that "what
the effect will be of the elections
on an ultimate settlement will de
pend on the composition of the
Cabinet and on negotiations now
going on between the (Israeli)
parties."
He said it was "premature to
offer an opinion."
Kissinger stated he had no time-
table for a separation of forces,
because a great deal depends on
the Arab states and Israel. "It
was always understood that after
the Israeli elections the talks i
might accelerate," he said, but
he wps "not predicting a solution I
in January."
KISSINGER, referring to his
meeting in Washington Jan. 4
with Israeli Defense Minister
Moshe Dayan. said that after the
disengagement talka resume in
Geneva next week "We will sec
how much pri great is possible
and how much can be done."
He responded sharply to a re-
pcrte: refei to Dl
asked if it was proper for
the U.S. "to bi .: d to Israe I
policy on
"V> our My
die
i .ill parties,'
that 1

i
Aral

' U.S. ol
and
see it in
ited he t ild the r. p
ASKED WHAT were the most
hopeful signs in the Middle East
Kissinger said: "There is a good
possibility for progress on the
separation of forces, and this
would create very positive con-
ditions for similar progress on
other fronts and it will be a
good bridge into the general *vij
peace talks that of course will
continue."
He noted that President Nixon
has said, "and it has been our
policy and our conviction, that
the chances for peace (in the
Middle East) are the best in 25
years. This does not mean that
negotiations won't be extremely
painful and extremely difficult"
Kissinger also responded sharp-
ly in reply to a reporter's ques-
tion on the U.S. policy jn tne
Middle East in view of the Arab
oil embargo. He said it was not
"appropriate" for the Arab states
to discriminate against the U.S. ""^H
which adhered to Resolution 242
and is the principal country ne-
gotiating for a peace settlement
in the Mideast.
HE SAID the U.S., however,
was not negotiating to get the
oil embargo lifted and would not
make its foreign policy depend-
ent on Arab oil.
"We have talked to Israel and
to the Arabs and we will not link
our talks to the embargo.'' he
stated. The energy problem is
endemic and would exist with
or without the oil embargo, Kis-
singer observed.
Postage Increase
Delayed To Mar. 2
Po-tage rate inereaces pre\
lv scheduled to go into effe:
Jan. 5, have been postponed
March 2.
The announcement mad;' r
f m "le office of P
' era! E. T. Klassen ii
on. D.C., was reifa i
Miami District (For! P
W (.-(' by E. H.
Manager Postmasl
ami.
of b
and ii" (
rate changes will be
March 2,"
tret "ii "PosU i
will remain u i I
that date."
Second class or con'
culation postage rates wl a-
puted on the current ba !il
2, added.
CIS-
I on
.
-t-
r
a
i'
:
UADINQ THE BUND
'*** ?^Sh i** i***


[Friday. January 18, 1974
+Jeist FhrXHam $*lof,r Hollywood
Page 15-
*^euntonr t^j- ^*-~ieb
man
Books on Jews, God, Jerusalem, Germany
rtli.itiN Hirrmelfarb's "Tfe Jews of Motfcrnliy"
t /Bajic |4>ek#.S*0tf% :!?)-pp.) fc4 cileiiin (
tides that, with tv on3, appeared in C
lentary. The theme connecting these essays is "
Ind of modernity so long and s i di-proportionat.-.y
k'.ored by Jew;."
The author is co-editor of the American Jewish
fear Book and a most per eptlve observer on the
Imerican scene. He notes that "'today a mo.iern
iw must make an effort greater than his predeces-
ar's 70 years ago who for his part had to make an
tfort greater than that of his predecessors 170
pars ago, to ignere the ever more obtrusive evi-
rence that his modernity tends to consequences only
cuivocally honorable."
Hinimelfarb's subjects cover the spectrum of
the internal and external problems confronting Jem.
[Stimulating, peripatetic and learned are three adjec-
| lives that describe the author and this book.
*
"FOUR PATHS to One God," by Gilb?rt S.
Rosenthal (Bloch Publishing Co., S8.95 322 pp), is
a Conservative rabbi's attempt to trace the develop-
ment historically, societa ly and ideologica'ly of Or-
thodoxy, Conservative-::-.. Reform and Reconstruc-
tioni?m in America
The author clarifies some misconceptions about
the varieties of theory and practice in the religious
iife of the modern AineiUan Jew. He also discusses
4
the thinking and philosophy of the leaders of each
, of ihc *" r1 'liflij"""-"

"THE TRIP to Jerusalem." by Jakov Lind
(Harper & Row, $5.00 64 pp.), is an emotionally
h a itiful account of a trip to the Holy City. The
brief account of how he discovered himself as a
Jew is tojd as an intimate and personal memoir.
He presently resides in London and Majorca.
He presents panoramic views of people and places
in Israel in such a manner that the reader feels
.....i.

Woman Cantor Get
Her Job Through Ad
JJILDA ABRAYAYA'S life as a cantor involve- a
number of unique elements. When she was engaged
fer her first cantoria! post she was reportedly the only
woman cantor in New York St.ite. She quite possibly
may be the only carfr-r ti h:ce obtained a cantoria!
pot tbroMsA I situation wanted advertisement in a
daily newspaper. !*
Canter Abravaya has served a Flushing Reform con
gregation. Temole Beth Sha'-ri. since 1071. Rabbi Her-
chti Levin said that the tradition of democratic pro-
cedures at Temple Beth Sh.',.:n is such that not only
HI HI'IIMInn
jimnri*i:i.i ii >i

(its rabbis but also cantors must be approved by a ma-
jority vote of the congregation.
ACCORDINGLY, th? congregation approved her
selection, a procedure Rabbi Levin called high'y an-
asual. Cantors are generally hired, not elected, he said.
Needing a cantor. Temple Beth Shalom had ap-
plied to the School of Sacred Music, the cantorial school
f the Jewish Institute of Religion, the New York
branch of the Reform rabbinical seminary. The best of
is available cantorial school graduates proved to be
unsatisfactory. At that point. Rabbi Levin's attention
called to the situation wanted ad placed by Ms.
jravaya.
Rabbi Levin said that h:s primary concern had
[been the candidate's knowledge of the liturgy, ability
[to work with choirs and ability to teach children in
^the synagogue's religious class is
HE SAID that he felt that whethr the candidate
[wan man or a woman, or had a cantorial degree, were
econdary matters. He said he interviewed her, she
vas auditioned, named the synagogue's first woman
sant;r and approved by the congregation.
Rabbi Levin said there hid been a little resistance
long the congregants to a woman as cantor, a resist-
he said that had diminished steadily since she
vas initially engaged on a three-month provisional
Igreement covering May, June and September. 1971.
She then received a two-year contract, startng in
isigust, 1971 and signed a new three-year agreement
kst August. She described the pay as comparable to
Eat of a male cantor at this point in her cantorial
tareer.
RABBI LEVIN said the arrangement had worked
but very well and that Cantor Abravaya was a dedi-
p{ I worker. He emphasized h r skill in developing an
iult choir and in working with it and with a youth
loir and a junior choir at the synagogue. He credited
with introducing a great deal of Jewish music to
le Sunday school clashes she teaches. He said that,
forking with crear.it Andrew Shindler, she had pro-
ceed many beautiful religious musical programs at the
K'jgue.
The Bold
Vanik Stand
1st in*. Mosul season marking the 25th anniversary
of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,
the USSR received dramatic and unwelcome
reminder that scores of our congressmen not only
believe in our freedoms but are willing to act upon
that belief in the crunch.
For no sooner had the United Nations commemo-
rated the significant observance than the House, by
a resounding vote of 319 to 80. approved an amend
mwt to the trade reform bill telling Moscow forth-
Ii.hrly that the rights of free men are far more im-
portant to Americans than are political maneuvering
... economic concessions.
B1 PASSING '.he am"ndmnt. put forward by
Congressman Charles A. Vanik of Ohio and strongly
Championed by Sen. Henry Jackson of Washington,
313 of our congressmen were making it clear that
trade credit guarantees to the USSR would be out
if President Nixon determined that Russia di
.1- citizens the right to emigrate or charged more
than a nominal fee for exit permits.
This bold stand was fashioned by thorough soul-
searching and persistent campaigning. In this in-
stance, one has every right tj use the clear term,
lobbying. For pressure exerted by the White House
and by powerful international trade interets in
the United States necessitated a relentless effort to
push through the Vanik amendment.
"YOU ARE in serious trouble in the Middle
East." champions of the Vanik bill were told. "You
are endangering detente. By bucking the President
on this Russian iss.ue, you are not only putting a
damper on this glorious new era of big money flow
into the United States from Russia through new com-
mercial agreements, but you are actually making it
tougher for Jews to get out of the Soviet Union."
These arguments were being advanced in high
places in some of the darkest days ever faced by
Jews everywhere. The appeals to pipe down, to sit
it out. to take a stroll came when the ceasefire in
the Middle East was a puny, flickering flame.,
IN THOSE troubled days. Congressman Vanik
spoke for millions who cherish human rights above
nearly all other blessings when he said: "These
(trade) credits are not rights, but gifts that can
be offered by the American people. The gift is an
internal affair of this country. This amendment is
in the American tradition. There is no security for
the United States in the oil and gas fields of Siberia."
author is not only revealing himself but
the reader is traveling with Lind.

IICRST VON Maltitz has made a contribut:on
to the history of modern Germany in his book. "The
itian of Hitler's Germany" (McGraw-Hill Book
Co., 112.99, 430 pp.). The German-born author and
V,>rk lawyer discusses the ideology, personality
of the progenitor of World War II The
it bia answer to the question. "How could it
tappet) that a people who contributed so significantly
to Western civilization suddenly succumbed to Hitler
and embarked ... on unpara'.l I 1 destructiveness?"
Von Maltitz refutes the theory htld by some
that National Socialism was a necessary or inevitable
outcome of German history. His chapter on anti-
Semitism, over one-fourth of the book, is a resume
of th's virus that affected and sti.l affects so many
German and other Christians. The bibliography is
solid and is slightly flawed by the absence of Jules
Isaac's monumental work and Friedrick Heer's
"God's First Love."
0W

WMi
I I'M
<^ii$mtel O/Vvc*
Kreisky'd
Rather Not be Jewish
POLITICAL pundits arc trying lo figure out why
Austria surrendered to two international gangsters
in the words of one speaker, "besmirched its
r-day reputation as a haven of temporary refuge"
by yielding to terrorists who were not even liked by
thi d ilk.
But perhaps the explanation of the dilemma may
require a psychiatrist.
FOR BRUNO Krcisky, the Austrian chancellor whs
said "no" to Golda Meir, is of Jewish parentage.
His "origins," to use a word favored by Henry Kis-
singer, were Jewish, but he "doesn't work at it." When
he became chancellor he was asked whether he ex-
pected ever to visit Israel. He replied "no." He's un-
comfortable when reminded of his origins.
Kraiiky reminds me of a type of Jewish celebrity
which flourished more often in the past than in recent
times.
THERE WERE a number of famous Jews whs
wou'd rather not have their Jewishness stressed.
Well, they're entitled. I suppose we can't expect
every Jew to savor his identity. In some cases, of
course, prominent Jews capitulate to the anti-Semitism
abotet them to the point where they would rather play
donva their religious background.
Sometimes famous Jews lean over backward to play
down their Jewishness.
ARTHUR GOLDBERG used to do it a bit when he
was the spokesman of the US in the United Nations-
He belonged to three synagogues and served on na-
tional boards oi Jewish institution*, but when he ap-
peared before the UN. he wanted to be the voice of
his nation, not his people.
It was hard to get biro to avow his Zionism.
In contrast, Christian senators, like Sen. Jackson,
don't hesitate for a moment to speak out forcefully
for the Jews.
Police Story on Screen
i
V
CltiNLY Lumet's latest picture, the Dino de
Laurentiis produc.m of 'Serpico," based on ttie
be-t idler by Peter Mao-, reveals the true story" of
New York City policeman Frank Serpico. an 11-year-
veteran on the force who fought a single-handed
campaign against corruption and bribery within the
department, though he was advised by his superiors
to lay lew in order to protect his own life.
The screenrlay by Waldo .-a t and Norman Wexler
pul'a no punches to expose the extent of thp con-
spiracy; and Lumet. director of such pictures as
"Twelve Angry Men. "The Pawnbroker" and the
British-made "The Offense" (in which Sean Connery
portrays a police detective involved in a child mo-
lesting case) once more manifests his hard-hitting
approach to the filmic medium.
SIDNEY LUMET, who has never made a picture
in Hcl.ywojd. photographed his current epic, with
Al Pacino as Serpico, and cameraman Arthur J.
OrniU at his side, on 104 actual locations in New
York City.
Cne of the sites was the Fifth Avenue apart-
MOt of playwright Sidney King-ley, loaned t:
Lumet to film a party sequence. Back in 1935, Kings
ley had hired the ll-year-o'.d Sidney (son of Yid-
dish playwright Baruch Lumet) to appear on Broad
way ia "Dead F-ud," and they've been friends ever
since.
..:;;..-: :::ir:
M Mil ...


**' Jenist FhrHiar end Shofai of Hollywood
Friday, January 18, 1974
SAVE$ 100
FAMOUS KENT
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quality.
COME SEE OUR
LOW LOW PRICE
DANIA FURNITURE SHOWROOM
1025 South Federal Highway (U.S. 1)
North of Shoridan on U.S. 1 ... Phone 927.0237
Open Daily 9:30 to 5:30 Mn*y and Friday Night Til 9#m.
Sunday Y to 6 p.m.
Wab//tit?as


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