The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00078

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
Israel, Egypt Accept In- Place Ceasefire Agreement
By Special Report
Secretary of State Henry Kis-
singer's 9-hour trip to Moscow
last weekend, purportedly at the
urgent request of the Soviet
Union's Communist Party Chief
Leonid Brezhnev, hit pay dirt
Sunday night when both the
United States and the Soviet
Union asked the UN Security
Council for an in-place ceasefire
in the Israel-Arab war.
Israel and Egypt promptly ac-
cepted the ceasefire, but several
Arab nations, including Iraq had
not accepted when the announce-
ment was made that fighting
would come to an end 12 hours
after the Security Council ap-
proved the joint U.S-Soviet move.
EVEN AS the UN was making
plans for a halt to the bloody war
along the current battle lines,
Israeli units were advancing along
a broad front into Egypt after ex-
tending two bridgeheads from the
Suez Canal and inarching on
Cairo.
In addition to the in-place
ceasefire, the Security Council
called for immediate steps to put
into effect the provisions of Res-
olution 242 of the Council adopt-
ed on Nov. 22, 1967.
That resolution called upon Is-
rael to withdraw from all terri-
tories occupied following Israel's
lightening victory in the Six-
Day War of 1967.
In addition to halting the bat-
tle in place 12 hours after adop-
tion of the latest resolution Sun-
day night, the UN move also
called upon all parties concerned,
specifically meaning Israel, to
implement Resolution 242. which
Israel has repeatedly said is un-
acceptable to her.
THE UN move also said that
concurrently with the ceasefire,
negotiations should start between
Israel and the Arabs aimed at
permanent peace in the .Middle
East.
Early Sunday night, the White
House, beleaguered by the con-
stitutional crisis precipitated by
President Nixon's firing of Spe-
cial Counsel Archibald Cox in the
Watergate investigation, and Dep-
uty Attorney General William
Ruckelshaus. as well as the resig-
nation of Attorney General Elliot
Richardson, nevertheless, an-
nounced that the administration
had agreed with Moscow on "an
immediate meeting with the Se-
C'ontinued on Page 2
wJewislh Flondliiai m
and SIIOI Alt OF .HI A I I K HOLLYWOOD
Volume 3 Number 24
Hollywood, Florida Friday, October 26. 1973
Price 20 cents
IN RESPONSE TO EMERGENCY
$1 Million-Plus Pours In From Area Residents
Where They Were
When Firing Ended
By Special Report
Hours before the VJi ceasefire
went into effect in the .Middle
[Ea^;. Israeli officers on >h" Sinai
fro t said that their tanks had
r'broadened their gateway in!o
".! were now within 40
Cairo.
Gen. l";i Narkis, is a briefing
with_ newsmen miles from the
...:. ed I at Israel
had destroyed 70 Egyptian tanks
and captured more anti-aircraft
ri- ile batteries.
THERE ARE reported to in-
. 6 ..min-
ed Soviet-produced weapon that
has knocked out a reported one-
f urth of the Israel Air Force
and whicb neither the United
States nor I rael has ever seen at
close range.
Object of t he Israeli strike
across the Suez at two major
points south of Bitter Lakes was
to spread north and south along
the we t bai k of th-> canal, then
to fan out westward to Cairo and
eastwaia to in< canal with the
purpose of entrapping a huge
foice of Egyptian forces and
Continued
P:ge IS.
Seen ut a high-rise organizational meeting were (front)
Sydney Holtzman and Jules Gordon; (back row) Abe Hal-
f> pern and Jerome Gevirman.
iiigii-Rise Response "Beyond
Our Expectations' Colin
'The high-rise rentals and con-
dominiums of east Hallandale
and Hollywood have each held
mass rallies and the outpouring
of people and monies received
were weil beyond our expecta-
tions.'" said Lewis Cohn. cochair-
man of the High-Rise Division
if the 1974 campaign.
"However." he added, "the
amount of money needed to ful-
fill Israel's needs has since been
upgraded mar;-' times. Now it
will be w -' iry to ""rtact the
same people again and again, and
we know we shall not find them
ng."
Mr. Cohn is coordinating the
massive fund-raising drive di-
rected towards residents of multi-
storied apart ment houses. His co-!
chairman, with the same duties
in the western areas of Holly-
wood and Hallandale. is Nathan
Pritcher of the Hillcrest com-
plex.
Working with Mr. Cohn as area
chairmen are Sydney Holtzman.
Mrs. Carolyn Davis, Maurie Mey-
ers, Abe Ilalpern, Jerome Gevir-
man, William Littman, Nat
Greenberg, Meyer Kaplan and
Jules B. Gordon.
More than one million dollars
was raised in Hollywood and its
environs during the first five days
of the Day of Atonement War,
according to Dr. Norman Atkin,
president of the Jewish Welfare
Federation.
The money, ranging from nick-
els to a S100.000 gift from a Gold-
en Beach resident, is being proc-
essed in the Federation office
where staff has been working 14
and 15 hours a day.
All Israel Emergency Fund
monies go directly to Israel and
are transferred within 24 hours
by wire. But. because of the
pre ent tremendous needs of that
FORTIFIED POSITIONS
How Israel
Maneuvers
Small Force
By SAIL MANN
J'-uish Chronicle Feature Syndicate
Israel has been securing the
defense of territories four times
her original size with a standing
army of scarcely more than 40,-
000 men. This is about the meas-
ure of her full-time, battle-ready
Army,
There are probably something
between 60.000 and 90.000 troops
undergoing conscript training at
any given moment, but their de-
gree of p -eparedness for battle
is variable.
Her front-line technique has
been to man a series of fortified
positions with regular infantr>
units, stiffened by conscripts in
training and specialized reserv-
ists.
SHE HAS chosen to hold her
heaviest materiel tanks and
artillery some way behind the
main lines and to bring it into
play as needed and depending on
the degree of mobilization neces-
sary.
The Suez Canal frontthe so-
called Barlev Line now occupied
by Egypt named after the Chief
of Staff during the 1970 war of
attritionis a series of bunkers,
with above-ground spotting posi-
tions and underground bunkers
providing accommodation and
housing supplies.
These positions are stretched
Continued on Page 11
country. American Jews are be-
ing a=ked to make their 1974
campaign commitments now in
greater amounts than ever be-
fore in Jewish history. That de-
cision was reached at a meeting
of the heads of all Jewish agen-
cies Oct. 14 in New York.
Israel Finance Minister Pin-
chas Sa] ir, speaking to the lead-
ership of Hollywood on Oct. 15.
explained that the war is costing
Israel ten million dollars an
hour.
'Each Israeli will now be taxed
an additional 7 per cent on his
Income (he i< now paying 45 per
He is also being u'ged to
make personal loans to the gov-
payable In 15 years and
at no interest. The Israeli gov-
ern has already received
fi m .!; own people nearly one
hundred million doilars," Sapir
said.
Leon Dulcin, executive direc-
tor of the Jewish Agency, told
the same e.r'Hip that "the needs
tod'..' ire such that 1.2 billion
dollars is needed in free money,
750 million from America alone."
The sixteen men and women
attending the meetings with the
Israelis contributed a total of
S73.000 in 1973. Their gifts to
tor i!':-i total s:s;50.000, an
inc i ise o 400 i> r cent.
It will bo necessary for every.
ContlMed on Page 6
Text Of Abba Eban's Message To
The American Jewish Community
"My friends ii th Jewish community amiss America, the
v.ar aims car: by the thousands ol I
the hundreds of aircraft of Egyp! an Syria ar' not different
from the aims which inspired them in 1948 or the aims which
they nearly bn I > fruition in !9t>7; they wanted nothing
less than the annihilation of Israel's independence and Israel's
sovereignty.
"Once again as in '.948 and as in 1967 they are b
thwarted Rnd they are being thwarted in that aim. But as in
1948 and as wd perhaps in even m^re intense degree
we have paid a heavj price :n blood for our self-defense.
Now this a is sacrifice that can neither be evoiatod nor fir
which there is an) compensation, \\'o cannot ask you to do any
thing about hundreds of young graves that have been added
to the mournful but heroic role of Israel's self defense: this is
a g?ory that will never pa's. Al! we can do is turn aide from
the anguish of bereavement and make such reparation as we
can of that injury to our securitv. our economy and our society
as have been accomplished by this illicit and brutal invasion.
"Here the whole Jewish people has th" power to answer
Arab threats with Jewish solidarity. This tragic and solemn ho.ir
calls for a new affirmation of Jewish indignation and of Jewish
fraternity. Everybody in Israel whose eyes can r-vich out across
the smoke and the debris of wr is asking himself this ones'
Will the Jewish people rally to us as in the past, will they age :
display those qualities of universal ition with Israel's
victories and in Israel's predicant) I
"The spiritual bond between Israel and lews across the
world has come in the past few days to memorable ev-iression.
but will that expression al,o be concrete and tangible, will it
be so vast as to have tangible effects. will you show such his-
toric imagination as to leap right out of the categories and di-
mensions of the systems with which you were familiar a few
days ago in order to rise to the sublime but perilous heights of
our opportunity today?
"I'm certain that perhaps for the third time in recorded
history the Jews of the Vnited States have an opportunity of
making t'e.at history more generous, more indulgent and more
prcmi-ir.g to Israel than without you it could ever have been.
This then i> Israel'* answer and ;>onse be?


Page 2
+JeIS* fUrldllar "< +*" of Hollywood
Friday. October 26, r:-M Fric
UJA General Chairman Calls
For 8750 Million In Cash
NEW YOKKIn announcing an
tll-OUt eroegen*ya>all tor >csi
Paul Zuckerman. United Jewish
Appeal general chairman, called
for "the total mobilization of the
American Jewish community to
collect S750 million in cash.
"This is not a new. or separate
campaign effort." Mr. Zuckerman
examined. "The Israel Emergency
Fund was initiated by the Amer-
ican Jewish community in 1967 tc
met humanitarian needs of new
JWV Ladies Hold
'Academy Awards'
President Rose Hecht presided
over a general meeting and mini-
luncheon of the Victor Freedman
Po No. 6'3 Ladies Auxiliary.
JWV, Oct. 3. during which p:o
g.am chairman and past p-csident
Maivina Freeman presented an
oriL'.nal program spoofing the "Os-
car" presentations.
Honored were nine past nation-
al presidents including Mrs. Free-
rran. Elsie Gould, Rose Hecht.
Sadye Hecht, Rose Perry-. Rose
Schorr. Anne Schwartz. Royce
Slut ky and Esther Zweibach. Each
ot tne honorees was presented
with an inscribed statuette.
' ife membership pins and cards
were also presented to Sarah Las-
Cv... a..u -> .:-na Freeman.
The auxiliary has contributed
Jap robes to the VA Hospital, bibs
and toys for the childrer who are
patients at the South Florida State
Hospital, and materials to the Can-
, immigrants in a wider effort than
Kptewiou slyjikun de#t akt m
"And now, as the people ot Is
rael face yet another crisis, we
must dramatically express otir con
cern by meeting in full our hu
manitarian responsibilities to the
people of Israel.
"Cash is urgently needed to in
sure the continuation of UJA pro-
grams in aid of new immigrants.
In the midst of war. Soviet Jewish
immigration to Israel is reaching
an all-time hign ... 510 newcom-
ers arrived from Russia this morn
ing at Lod Airport, and some 150
more are expected to arrive to-
: morrow, with another 400 enroute.
1.500 Soviet Jews have came tc
Israel," Mr. Zuckerman said.
"As the people of Israel mut
lurn all their efforts towards do-
, fense. the American Jewish com-
munity must respond in full to the
, resettlement and absorption needs
f all new immigrants.
"Our hearts are heavy. The
burden of this war is enormous,
ind will tax every resource of
[hat small country. Winning a war
is an expensive ordeal. The hu
manitarian programs we stippo:t
must continue during this crucial
oeriod. Ca.-h is vital, and we must
fill that need.
"Our most urgent priority is
now to provide a massive and daily
transmittal of cash through im-
mediate payment of all pledges.
In this way, we can best encour-
age the people of Israel with a
firm demonstration of Jewish
>nity."
Human Needs Israel, Egypt Accen
Continue In
Midst Of War I n-rkice Ceasefire
MARLO RENTAL APARTMENTS
Hollywood Hills
Furnished and Unfurnished
3500 Polk Street
Dade 625-4545-Broward 969-3030
30 Different Buildings
Scores of immigrants" horn the
Soviet Union arrived Oct. 10 at
Tel Aviv's Lod Airport, among ;
hem a large group from Georgia.
Many more were reported en
route.
Initial processing of arrivirg
immigrants is continuing to pro-
ceed effectively, in a calm atmos-
phere. Many volunteers, including
wounded and disabled Israeli vet-
:rans of previous wars who can-
lot serve in the army, are assiit-
ng Jewish Agency staff in every
possible way, woiking in all as-
>ects of absorption and settlement
of new immiyiants.
Young people in youth aliyah
programs -nc.uding new immi-
grants, are assuring continuity ol
humanitarian programs. Students
ire taking over responsibilities of
teachers called to active service
Immigrant housing in Migdal
Ha'em<>k, a development town in
he hills of Nazareth, has been
oartially destroyed in shelling.
Those families dislocated were im-
mediately provided with alternate
housing by the Jewish Agency.
Th? Migdal Ha'cmek situation
'lighlights the increased strain on
ilieady critically short housing for
newcomers, a problem further ag-
gravated by great increase in im-
migration. Nevertheless, new im-
migrant families are being housed
immediately despite war condi-
tions.
The Windsor Absorption (enter
which opened on Sept. 25, is al
ready filled to near capacity with
immigrants from Eastern Europe,
some of whom arrived after th<
outbreak of hostilities.
Continued from Page 1
curity Council" for the purpose
of calling a halt to the Israel-
Arab struggle.
Presidential press secretary
Ronald Ziegler said that U.S. am-
bassador to the United Nations
John A Scali had been directed
by President Nixon to join the
Soviet Union envoy. Jacob Malik,
in requesting a Security Council
session.
Apparently, the announcement
\\;is as a consequence of grounl
broken in the talks bet.veen
Brezhnev and Dr. Kissinger then
wr
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amid 25 acres of tropical gardens ...
Exotic pool, beach pavilion and pier,
Water sports and bullfights.
Tasteful rooms with plush carpets,
air conditioning, private bath and phone... Most rooms with
private balcony. Finest dining in Acapulco...
Tropical cocktails in the Cayuco Room.
EIFUERTE FLAMENCO NIGHT CLUB with doncing and SHOWS.
. All this at popular prices.
See your travel agent today. Or, write direct
tor rates and colorful brochures.
ACAPULCO
MEXICO
%$w&8t

Mortimer May Is
Zionists' Speaker
At its first general meeting o(
the season, the Broward Zionist
District will hear Mortimer May
oast president of the ZOA, report
on the annual convention held re
.entiy in Houston. Tex., and or
he current situation in Israel.
Al Shulman, ZOA national mem
lership vice president, will als<
be present. He will make the oi
icial presentation of the Nationa
Membership Award which the lo-
-al group has won by greatly ir,
leasing its roster of new mem
bers.
The r^urical entTtainment will
be by Cantor Yehudah Heilbraum
of 'temple Sinai and associates.
The meeting will take place
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in Haber Karp
Hall of Temple Sinai.
7&2E.
o,
THE
TRAVELERS
0
,?rcy3
^xAisel Insurance
KJ Ansel Wittenstein
All Forms of Insurance
Including
Homeowners Automobile Jewelry
FIREMAN'S
FUND
AMERICAN
2430 Hollywood Boulevard Bollywood
9239518 9453527
in a second session of two fej
hour meetings in Mo.-c.w >,.']
day.
THE WHITE House announc,
ment dec'.ared that. "The DJ
and the U.S.S.R. have agreed i
a resolution which will be siU
mittod i"intly to the council thj
evening."
The war began Oct. 6, and f?J
Council first met Oct. 8 tg d|
bate the Mideast cri-i-
The special Soviet position'
that only "with minor cor*
tions" Israel must return to Ibj
pre-1967 borders.
.
II
wou
on
plea
Fed
8811
5IL
Rath Dayan Book
To Be Reviewed
"And Perhaps the Story of
Ruth Dayan" will be reviewed by
Malvina Freeman on two succes-
sive days.
The new book by Mrs. Dayan
and Helga Dudman will be dis-
cussed first at the regular meet
ing of the Hollywood Section of
the National Council of Jewish
Women Monday, Nov. 5, at 12:30
a.m. at Temple Sinai. Mrs. Edna
Jacobs, program chairman, has ar-
ranged the event.
The following evening at 8 p.m.
the Temple Sinai Sisterhood wifi
also hear Mrs. Freeman's review.,
| in Haber Karp i.ail. followed by ,
a presentation on Tay-Sachs dis-
ease by Mrs. Edwin Gordon, past I
president. Mrs. Joel Rottman,
! president, will preside.
DRAPERIES
Visit our Showroom I Workshop
| WINDOW SHADES-BEDSPREADS
FOR FREE SHOP AT HOME SERVICE
CALL 921-2991
2420' 3 Hollywood Blvd. Hollywood


1
Friday, October 26, 1973
JpH-/s/> ftorirffrun and Shefar of Hollywood
Federation Seeking News Of
Soviet Jews From Travelers
Page 3
If yoa are going to Russia and
would like to bring back reports
on the Jewish community there,
please contact the Jewish Welfare
Federation, 1909 Harrison St. (921-
8810) before your departure. Fed-
eration can also
arrange gifts for
you to take, in-
cluding yarmul-
kas, prayer-
books, tallisim
for Soviet Jews,
reports there is
a renaissance of
| the study of Hebrew in the Soviet
1 Union. The Hebrew language is a
f transcendent element of Jewish
identity and is a necessary skill
for a would-be immigrant to Israel
In Moscow, there are over sixty
Ulpanim serving about 500 stu-
dents. The study movement in
other cities is much smaller but
growing.
Obviously, since Hebrew books
of any sort are not published in
the USSR, such items must be sup-
plied by Jews in the West and Is-
rael, and most important in their
struggle with Soviet authorities,
they need official recognition of
their status as teachers in the form
of certification.
A $3.50 donation pays for a
book, postage, and registered air-
mail return receipt. The donors
name and address are inscribed in
the book. The South Florida Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry should be
contacted for this project (P o
Box 1056. North Miami 33161)
Encyclopaedia Judaica's
1st Year Book Published
Keter Publishing House, Jeru-
lem, which last year published
the monumental 16-volume Ency-
clopaedia Judaica, announces the
publication of the first Year Book
Tor distribution in the United
* tates Dec. 1.
_ Edited by Louis I. Rabinowitz,
and with a foreword by the pub-
: lisher, Yitzhak Risehin, the sup-
; plemerttary volume covers the
|;>vents of 1972. It updates exist-
in : material in the Encyclopaedia
/\Judaica and contains special full-
'A**ngth feature articles by distin-
^IfiPJished Israeli and American con-
Sfcbutors, including Arthur Hertz-
I ben> in "The American Jew" and
" Ha:m Hillel Ben-Sasson in a com-
i prehensive study based on original
ources,. "Lithuania The Struc-
: ture and Trends of its Culture."
A young. American, Sidra Ezrahi
\ contributed a study of holocaust
: literature written, or available in
Sisterhood of Temple Sole!
Plans Square Dance Oct. 27
jkf;
A professional caller and pro
isiona] square dancers will be
hand when Temple Solel Sister-
Aood's square dance gets undor-
%av Saluiday. at 8 p.m. at the
fni'shts of Columbus Hall. Neo-
phyV~ -are especially invited as
no prior knowledge of the pioneer
ar1 form is necessary. There will
bo an open bar. snd a late snack
Will lifc served.
Chairing the event will be Mrs.
Robert Haglor. aided by her com-
mittee composed of Mrs. Arnold
SedeE" Mrs. Sheldon Brown. Mrs.
Barr Hunt.'-. Mrs. Alex Kobb.
(Air--. tailley Ziniur;. Mrs. Howard
I. iSgh, Mr~. D.v.id Harris and
rs. Milton Rubin.
CIRCLE
DRIVING SCHOOL
2021 Tyler St. -921-6966
Specializing in
Elderly & Nervous People
Licensed by the
State of Florida
i
LUNCHEONS
DINNERS
11 X A V. l'.OO PM.
Sj'urdav* & SundJvl
1.00 P W. 00 P.M.
ZAK S OUT
HONG KONG
VILLAGE
Chine** Rri'*wr/if
fM N. Fd Hwv Dante
PH0N6 f-7'7
translation, in English, German
and French; and an outstanding
authority on the history of the
second temple. Prof. Menahem
Stern, wrote of the Zealots and
the revelations recently uncovered
about their battle with the Roman
Empire and the fall of Masada.
Especially fitting on the 25th
anniversary of the State of Israel
is a comprehensive study of David
Ben-Gurion's Political Philosophy
by Avraham Avihai; and special
reference to Israel's ideological and
spiritual aspects offered by Walter
Eytan, the distinguished Israeli
diplomat in an article on the State
of Israel.
Photo journalist Nachum Tim
Gidal contributed, in text and 50
pages of photographs, a special
feature entitled "Israel 25 Years
in Pictures."
Temple Sinai
Adult Series
Beginning
Learning to Read Hebrew, Con-
versational Yiddish, and Making
Prayer Meaningful are among the
courses to be offered to area
adults at Temple Sinai, 1201 John-
son St.. beginning next week.
In addition to the Monday night
courses, which will run through
Dec. 17, Tuesday mornings will be
devoted to Women's Institutes
through May 21.
These latter courses will in-
clude Learning to Read Hebrew,
Improving Hebrew Reading. The
Bible, The Jewish Family, and
The Great Jewish Books Series.
Four Forum Nights are planned
dealing with important current
issues of vital concern to Jewish
people all over the world. Dates
will be announced later.
There will also be an intensive
course in Ulpan Hebrew offered
twice weekly, two hours per ses-
sion, for a period of ten weeks on
Monday and Wednesday evenings
or two weekday mornings. Read-
ing knowledge of Hebrew is a
prerequisite, with a minimum of
ten students needed to form a
group.
There is no charge to members
of Temple Sinai for the twenty
Monday night adult series or the
Women's Institutes. Fees are
charged for Ulpan Hebrew. Con-
tact the temple for registration.
Men's Club Fishing Trip
Temple Beth Shalom's Men's
Club is sponsoring a fishing trip
Sunday which will leave from the
Surf Rider docks at 5900 N. Ocean
Dr., Hollywood, at 8:30 a.m. The
tab includes breakfast, tackle and
bait; fishermen will return at
12:30 p.m.
DENNIS PRAGER
in his fourth and final symposium
THE JEW TODAY & TOMORROW
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Sunday, November 4-8 p.m.
Presented by the Committee on Jewish Life
Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood
Marine Painst & Supplies
HARDWARE PAINT. INC
HOU5EWARE3 ft GIFTS
HONE DECOR ACCESSORIES
Bath / Closet Accesseriet
fttarfetf WiHtfews Reem Dividers
Wiifew SJiefes Artificial flowers
Drtttry Rids Feline
VallDUar Plaits
Key & Lock Worfc Patio Furniture
Store Hours 7:30 A.M. 6:00 P.M. Cloted Sundays
1M EAST REACH BOULEVARD
HALLAROALE, FLORIDA SINS
_____ PHORE927-I8W

Lefkowitz Joins
Federation Staff
Dr. Norman Atkin, president of the Jewish Welfare Federa-
11 fGrteater Hollywood, has announced that effective imme-
diately Rubin Lefkowitz will be working with the 1974 UJA/JWF
high-rise campaign, with particular emphasis on the beach areas.
Mr. Lefkowitz, formerly executive director of Jewish Federa-
tions and Community Centers in the New York and New J-rspy
areas, is a graduate cf the New York School of Social Work with
a master's degree. He has been a field-work teacher for Fo-d-
ham, Columbia and Rutgers universities.
Although Mr. Lefkowitz came to Florida to retire, the exi-
gencies of the current Middle East crisis precipitated his return
to the fund-raising field on a part-time basis. He will be wo-k-
mg closely with Lewis Cohn, cochairman of the High-Rise Divi-
sion of the campaign.
To inaugurate the 1974
UJA-JFW CAMPAIGN
Greater Hollywood Benefactors
and their spouses
will be invited to a kick-off dinner
Sunday, January 20,1974
WATCH FOR DETAILS
arnett
anK
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
Ci-i'o-n Vadi
DRAPERIES
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Page 4
-Jmisti ncridfor "< '' of Hollywood
Friday, October 26, 1973
frJewist Meridian
OFFICE and PI.AXT 120 N'.E. 6th Si., Miami, Fla. 33132 Phone 373-4S05
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 373-4605
P.O. Box 2973. Miami. Florida 33101
FRED K. SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SEI.MA M. THOMPSON
Editor and Publisher Bxfr uiiv. Ddltor Assistant to FuliliMier .
JOAN MEYERS, News Coordinator
Ths Jewish Floridlsn Doe Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertiaed In Its Columns
Published BI-\Veekly by the Jewish Floridlan
Becond-CIass Postage Paid at Miami. Fla.
Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood Shofar Editorial
ADVISORY COMMITTEE Dr BbeldOD Willens. Chairman; Ross Becker-
man, Ben Suiter. Marion Kevins. Dr. Norman Atkln. Robert N. Kerbel
The Jewish Floridian hat absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndi-
cate, worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association. American As-
sociation of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association
SIIISCKIPTION RATES: (Ixxnl Area) One Year 14.00. Out of Town Upon
Request.
Volume 3
Friday, October 26, 1973
Number 24
30 TISHRI 5734
French Must Bear Burden
It is against their national mystique to feel guilty about
anything, but now the French must share their portion of
the responsibility for the Middle East war no less than the
Soviets themselves.
Since the Six-Day War in 1967, the French have sat
around the tragedy of the unresolved Israel-Arab confron-
tation like birds of prey waiting for their carrion to ripen.
Their purpose? To reclaim the French prestige in the
Middle East they lost there in colonial war after colonial
war until Charles de Gaulle put an end to the French ag-
ony by finally pulling his countrymen out of Algeria.
When the Six-Day War struck, the French acted by
pouncing on Israel, their "diplomacy" designed to guaran-
tee them the uninterrupted flow of Arab oil and renewed
Arab friendship.
To set a seal upon that friendship, they put an em-
bargo on arms to Israel, whose air force until then was
almost entirely French supplied and, in fact, began selling
arms to the Arabs.
Some of these arms were shot out of the skies by
Israel early this week the very Mirages the French once
sold to Israel and which, the French are now insisting, they
sent to Libya on the guarantee that the planes would
never be used for purposes of combat.
What nonsense! The Mirage is c combat plane. So
much for French diplomacy.
Now for French expediency that makes them the birds
of prey to which we refer here. The French newspaper,
"L'Aurore," has announced that French tanks left Mar-
seilles Monday on their way to Saudi-Arabia. Also for
non-combat purposes?
As we say, increasingly, it is clear, the French are as
guilty as the Soviets in precipitating the latest Middle East
catastrophe.
Outpouring Of Funds
To those observers of the American scene who have
for years been predicting the decline if not the demise of
American Jewry, the manner in which Greater Miami and
other communities across the nation have responded to
Israel's critical hour of need should say something.
Not all the statistics on intermarriage, divorce, the
growing use of alcohol among adults and drugs among
the young, the languishing in synagogue affiliation and
religious identification have had any significant effect on
the outpouring of cash and genuine sentiment from the so-
called alienated American Jew to Israel.
This is not to say that the observers do not have a
genuine point, and that their fears about our future as
Jews are groundless. But it does offer a ray of sunshine in
an otherwise dim picture the observers paint of us.
For all their alleged alienation, American Jews re-
gard the attack on Israel as an attack on them. And they
are giving of their best wishes and their means in un-
precedented amounts.
Speaking of which, have you given? Cash is what is
needed, and now.
More Moderate Approach
Prime Minister Golda Meir said Tuesday there would
be no talk of a ceasefire arrangement until an effective
prisoner of war exchange had been set up that would as-
sure the return of all Israeli fighting men.
This has led to speculation that the Prime Minister
would be willing to agree to a "symmetrical cease-fire,"
meaning that Israel would trade her apparent losses to
Egypt in Sinai for her gains in Syria,
If this is what Mrs. Meir has in mind, then there is a
terrible but silent struggle going on between her and
Israel Defense Minister Moshe Dayan, who this week said
"absolutely not" to any talk of cease-fire "until the Arabs
are crushed."
Now that Israel has had to accept U.S. war materiel
to make up for her maior losses, the possibility is heavily
weighted in favor of Mrs. Meir's more moderate approach,
art chushed."
Israel Must End It-Not U.S.
THE ISRAELIS have not been
able to stage another six-day
Blitz.
But they must end the war
auickly. or the danger Is that
Henry Kissinger will end it for
them and on his own terms.
For obvious reasons, that would
spell a greater tragedy than the
war itself.
U.S. foreign policy prior to the
Yom Kippur attack was motivated
mmmm mtmmmm wmmmmmmm
Mindlin
iiininiinmiiiuHaWRUt
<
by two concerns: detente with
Russia and Middle East oil.
Despite the obvious strain be-1
ing placed on detente, the So
viets are way ahead of the game
in their new "friendly" feelings
for us. Just ask the housewife
how much detente is costing her!
in terms of the weekly budget.
THE SOVIETS may make a lot
of noise as they resupply their
Arab clients and we begin re
supplying Israel, but they are
not likely to throw away such an
advantage so easily.
The issue, then, reduces itself
to oil. The danger is not a U.S.-
Soviet confrontation. Nor is it
that the Arabs may win a mili
tary victory.
The danger is that we will lose
patience with Israel's fight for j
survival as the threat to our oil
needs mounts. And that is when
Kissinger may act behind a
screen of the same kind of sane
timoniousness he brought to his
"peace" arrangement in South
east Asia.
ON ITS face, the Arab demand
for a massive increase in the price
of crude oil has great merit. We
may not like to think about it. ]
but the truth is that we have I
been living on borrowed time for
yean.
For years, we have been ex |
ploiting the Arabs brutally, even
senselessly, on the ground that,
their potentates are so rich they i
wouldn't know what to do with j
added profits anyway.
Besides, it was argued, the prof-
its would only go for more regal
Cadillacs, more frivolous activity
on the {French Riviera, more
elaborate harems and very
little of it where it is needed
for good works among the Arab
oppressed and poor.
It's easy to moralize when it
costs you nothing.
But now, the Arabs are clev-
erly linking their demands for
greater profits to the war with I
Israel.
It is Israeli "expansionism," i
the Arabs are saying, that is to
blame for figures like the 66 per
cent increase per barrel of oil
they threw at negotiating repre-
sentatives of western oil compa-
nies meeting with them in Vienna j
last week.
INSTEAD OF frankly admit-
ting that they want a more equit-
able arrangement, the Arabs are
in effect linking the increase to
our failure to force Israel out of
the territories occupied in the
1967 war.
The implication is that if the
U.S. had refused to knuckle un-
der to "Zionist pressures," we
would not be faced with the cur-
rent energy crisis.
Never mind the deception in
that sort of argument, or even
the violence it does to an other-
wise unassailable Arab position
on refusing to be exploited by
western enterprise, unassailable
when it isn't confusing economics
with war diplomacy.
The real issue is that Ameri-
__ Continued on Page 12
to ?
t
Max Lerner
Sees It
The republic will survive Spiro Agnew's sudden resignation,
as it survived the corruptions which he has now in effect owned
up to. but it has been a sleazy chapter in the history of Amer-
ican public morals; You don't hit a man when he is down and
now out.
But if America is ever to master its tawdry venalities, it
Will not be by bowing our heads in public unction, as most of
the politicians are doing, and saying how saddening it is, an.!
what a fine fellow and friend Ted Agnew was.
IN HUMAN terms it is sad. as every fall from high place
i< sad. What makes it especially sad is that Agnew seemed part
of the American dream a boy of immigrant stock, making his
way up the greasy pole- of success without being part of the
Insider's Club, until the Nixon lightning struck him in 1968.
But in civic terms, which affect the body politic, it is nof
just saddening but exasperating and desolating.
It leaves so many unanswered whys: Why he did it in the
first place, why he continued to receive payments (according to
the Justice Department summary) even while he was Vice Presi-
dent, why he put on the public display of outraged virtue
(damned lies) when the charges broke, why he went through the
charade of attacking the men ir the Justice Department for do-
ing their public duty, why he braved it out and promised he
wouldn't resign even if indicted.
The answer to most of these questions, one gathers, is the
moldy chestnut of the so-called tough political professional
that what counts is not what you do but what you get away with.
BY THIS reasoning it isn't venality which is wrong, but
getting caught and clipped for it. You deny, you maneuver, you
shift from defensive to offensive, you appeal to the public, you
try to get Congress to bail you out and when everything fails,
you make the best possible deal and resign.
It is anything but inspiring. The young people whom Agnew
lectured about morality and patriotism must be pretty dazed
today and contemptuously bitter. So must the newspapermen
at the press conferences at which he displayed his dazzling pyro-
technics of defense and attack.
So must the audiences of the party faithful who cheered the
bravado of his last public speeches before the pathos of his final
appearance in the Baltimore courtroom.
One may well say that Agnew did no differently from the
ordinary run of politician, businessman, petty union official, or
the cheating husband or wife. "Be your age," I hear some of my
readers say: "This is how life is." Again I make the distinction
between private moral shortcuts and essential civic honesty and
openness.
WITHOUT TRUST and decency neither the public nor pri-
vate sector can keep from falling apart, but the public sector
is on display and more vulnerable. Morality must begin in the
individual life, but it won't stand much chance there unless it
is upheld in its public tests. The Agnew case was such a test,
as Watergate has been.
Some things have worked out in the Agnew business. The
press didn't get scared off and continued its scrutiny. The Jus-
tice Department stuck to its guns, and in this case as com-
pared with Watergate came through well.
The House of Representatives' leaders refused to panic. The
grand jury and court process have worked. Finally, here we are
with the 25th Amendment at hand for its first test in the vice
presidential succession.
BUT THE test had better be made not with petty politic.-',
perspectives but in the large spirit, generously, with the foil
knowledge that it will serve as precedent. By which I mean the
Vice Presidency is nothing to play politics with.
At every political convention we do the Vice Presidency an
indignity by leaving the choice of candidate until the last min-
ute, and picking him by deal and guess. The Eagleton episode
was a dramatic example.
But the choice of Agnew in 1968 and again in 1972 was. if
anything, worse The focus was on getting someone with whom
the South and the conservatives could feel safe. In 1963. the
Nixon managers may have been too hurried to probe Agnew's
Maryland record. But that was scarcely a good reason in 1972,
after four years.
Right now, the Democratic leaders in Congress are worried
because the name Mr. Nixon sends up to them as Agnew's suc-
cessor may become a formidable man to beat in 1976. This Is
good politics, but narrow.
THE THING to remember is that a Vice President is not
only a potential presidential candidate, but more immediately he
is the man who may succeed to the hot seat.
Don't play party politics, but pick the man who could best
succeed you: That is my plea to President Nixon. And my plea
to. Congress? Don't reject a good man simply because, he migKc
be hard to beat in 1976.
It is better to have as a potential President someone hard
to beat than someone whose hand will falter at the helm in a
future as stormy as the present is.
I


^
Friday, October 26, 1973
****##? Ihrkn.ntr and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 5
'


1373
THE FAST THAT
.
L.A.
CHICAGO
HOLLYWOOD
TEL AVIV
IN THIS HOUR OF CRISIS
IS THERE ANYTHING
I CAN DO TO HELP
THE PEOPLE OF ISRAEL?
YES.

You can reach out and demonstrate your solidarity
with the people of Israel.
You can encourage the people of Israel with your
dramatic response.
You can show unity with the people of Israel.
You can play an historic role in this hour of crisis.
HOW?
By bringing your check....bringing your cash dollars to the
JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION
1909 Harrison, Hollywood
921-8810
for the Israel Emergency Fund*
IMMEDIATELY!



Page 6
* Jtnist Fkridlur nd Shofar of Hollywood
Friday. October 26, 19731
$1 Million-Plus Pours In From Area Residents
1
Continued from Page 1
cne to increase his giving in the
same ratio if we are to fulfill our
1974 commitment," said cam-
paign chairman Melvin H. Baer.
The campaign cabinet, rallying
tt Mr. Baer's call, began man-
ning a telephone bank set up in
Federation headquarters only oneV
week before the crisis. The
multiple instruments, originally
intended for use in December
which is when the UJA/JWF
campaign would normally get
underway, were pressed into sen-
ice two months early as the 1974
fund raising effort came to life.
Parlor meetings were set up by-
Mrs. Marsha Tobin, chairman of
the Women's Division campaign,
and amor-j those hostessing the
BUT GOLD AS CAREFUL-EVEN RESERVED
No Doubt of Victory--Meir
By DAVID LANDAU
JTA Jerusalem Correspondent
TEL AVIV(JTA 1Premier
Golda Meir assured hundreds of
foreign and local newsmen that
Israel had no doubt of final vic-
tory in ihe war. Asked whether
Israel would consider a cease-
fire with Egyptian troops on the
Israeli side oi the canal, the Pre-
mier twice refused to dismiss
that possibility saying only that
the Israeli government would im-
mediately discuss any cease-fire
proposal when and if any such
was made. But there was no sign
of any such proposal from the
Arabs at this time.
Mrs. Meir was scathing in her
criticism of the Soviets who, she
said, were aiding the Arabs not
because they liked them, but out
of their own "callous interests,"
Asked about the United States
arms supplies to Israel she quot-
ed Secretary of State Henry Kis-
singer who had spoken of an "on-
going relationship" in that con-
nection. "So it's ongoing," she-
said.
LOOKING DETERMINED and
fielding questions with ease
though with telltale rings under
her eyesMrs. Meir sent her
best wishes to the troops, saying
every one of them was the son
not only of hi< family but of
every one of us. "All our love
and ai! our heart goes out to
you and we hope to see you back
home soon."
The Premier said .-he would
not prophesj how long the war
in the south will la-tbut it
11 no; be only a few days,
She said in th" noith the Golan
Heights was clear of s- rians, and
in the south fighting was con
tinuing and would probably do
so for a few days to come. Mrs.
Mtir said that she could not find
sufficient words to prai-.' Is-
rael's fighters, and shi
happy that the civilian popula-
tion was matching the front in
indomitable spirit and sacrifice.
sne said Egypt and Syria had
been helped by Algeria, Tunisia,
Iraq and now Jordan which had
sent tanks and men"not too
many"to the Syrian front. She
called the Soviet ongoing airlift
to the Arabs massive.
The Russians had taught them
for six years not how to defend
themselves they knew Israel
did not intend to attackbut
how to attack Israel, Mrs. Meir
charged.
But Israel's position now was
much better than a week ago.
after some "very, very bitter
hours." Saturday morning it had
fought and beaten an Iraqi tank
division destroying the greater
part of the Iraqi force. And Israel
was "progressing though this
does not mean that the way is
open before us."
MRS. MEIR refused to discuss
''operational plans" when asked
if Israel intended to capture
Damascus. She said Russia had
sent more than 120 supply planes
to Iraq. Syria and Egypt in the
past few days.
If Jordanian tanks got in Is-
rael's way in Syria, they would
be knocked out, she declared, and
0/ course Israel was guarding it-
self in case of direct Jordanian
intervention across the river.
Meanwhile, the biidges would re-
main open as far as Israel was
concerned.
The Premier dw'ar<>d ?*>? Mi*
war ought to drive home to those
friends of Israel abroad who had
counselled otherwise the impor-
tance of defensible borders. How
much more terribly would Israel
have suffered if she had agreed
to go back to the pre-1967 lines?
Mrs. Meir asked.
QUESTIONED WHETHER she
regretted not making a preemp-
tive strike, Mrs. Meir replied,
"ves and no. Yes because had Is-
rael struck first it would now be
xn a better position and quite a
few lives would have been sav-
ed." And no because "at least we
don't have the argument with the
world about who started ... we
took the decision with our eyes
open."
Independent observers were
quick to pick out of Premier
Meir's hour-long press confer-
ence her pointed refusal to rule
out the possibility of Israel agree-
ing to a cease-fire at present posi-
tions. Asked repeatedly if Israel
couid contemplate a cease-fire
with Egyptians on this side of
the canal, she repeatedly replied
that Israel would lose no time in
seriously considering any cease
fire proposal if and when one
came.
She noted though that none
seemed forthcoming from the
Arabs at the moment. Nowhere
in the Premier's words was there
an echo of Israel's insistence
earlier in the week on with-
drawal to Oct. 6 lines.
money-raising get-togethers were
Mrs. Robert Baer, Mrs. James
Fox Miller. Mrs. Robert Langel,
Mrs. Norman Becker, Mrs. Mel-
vin Baer, Mrs. Morton Levin,
Mrs. Morton diamond, Mrs. Alan
Gordon, Mrs. Reubin Schneider,
Mrs. Richard Passon. Mrs. Jerry
Niederman, Mrs. Fred Ehren-
stein. Mrs. Ben Rosenberg and
Mrs. Theo Feinberg.
Area chairmen coordinating the
meetings and acting as speakers
in some instances were Mrs. Alan
Roaman. Mrs. Paul Kraemer. Mrs.
Jack Miller. Mrs. Robert Baer,
Mrs. Stanley Greenspun, Mrs.
Calvin Linda, Mrs. Henry Weiss,
Mrs. Rhona Miller, Mrs. Ben Ros-
enberg and Mrs. Martin Fleisher.
In addition to the parlor meet-
ings, many women were contact-
ing neighbors and friends on a
one-to-one or door-to-door basis.
Meetings at the Federation of-
fices were running far into the
night as plans were made for
even more fund-raising events.
With phones ringing incessantly,
one resident who volunteered to
act as receptionist found herself
hired as a permanent staff mem-
ber.
The outpouring of offers of
help was tremendous and. accord-
ing to Dr Atkin. "most gratify-
ing. Unfortunately. Federation's
space limitation precluded cur
being able to avail ourselves of
the public's generosity."
Volunteers were, however able
to obtain signatures on lists 0f
residents who were willing i0 psy
for telegrams to the president
to members of Congress, and to
Secretary of State Kissinger
Each message, costing no more
than two dollars, was biHed to
the donor and urged U.S. aid to
Israel. The wires were sponsored
by the Community Relations Com.
mittee ol JWF. m
Many offers of blood were re-
ceived at Federation: at the pres-
ent time lists of potential donors
are being compiled and it is anti-
cipated that at some point in the
future a blood bank account will
be set up at Memorial Hospital
to stockpile credits that can be
transferred to reciprocal accounts
in New York City blood banks.
For the moment, however, blood
is not considered critical.
The same holds true for d-ugs
according to Hadassah headquar-
ters in New York. Federation v as
informed that Israel is dealing!)
directly with large pharmaceuti-
cal houses in the eastern United
States and that local donations
presented too many problems in
terms of :e-packaging and ship-
ment.
V
EVERY
JEW
SHOULD
READ
THIS.
We are mortal.
We cannot live forever.
Try as we might to post-
pone the thought of our
mortality, we cannot postpone
its happening.
We put out of our minds
what we do not like to contem-
plate. This is only human.
But our humanness can
turn to selfishness if we fail to
consider those we leave behind.
Because if we leave them
the responsibilities and
decisions we should have made
in life, we add another burden
to those already burdened
with grief.
It is our responsibility
while we are living to take care
of the details that will make
our passing easier for those
who love us.
The choosing of a burial .
site is such a detail. A detail
that is neither complicated nor
expensive. A burial plot can be
pui chased for as little as 5200.
While an how or so spent .it
Lakeside Memoi ial Pai k is all
it takes to resolve the matter.
Once resolved it l^ix be
forgotten.
I Ins simple a< t (.111 save
those you love the agony of
hying to guess youi wishes.
lakeside Memorial Paik
is a place ol si 1 ikingly serene
beauty. It offei s you the
assurance tii.it those nearest
yon will wish to return of ten to
this tranquil garden.
The beautiful arbors, wide
boulevaids. interlaced concrete
paths fronting on every bin ial
site, and eight acre reflecting
lake contribute to Lakeside's
unique beauty among memorial
paiks lot the Jewish.
taking caie ol the
decision for youi resting site
can be an act of great consider-
ation to those dear to you.
And opportune to yourself in
a time of rising costs and prices.
Call us at (305) 592 0690
or pay a quiet visit to Lakeside
Memorial Park. N.W. 25th Street
at 103rd Avenue.
This decision could bring
a certain peace to your life.
J
*i
*


Friday, October 26, 1973
fj *.t*"-f.,,rsrti?*r and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 7
NATIONAL HAIRDRESSERS CREATE FOUR
CHARACTER-FILLED STYLES
The cut is a natural transition
each with a character-filled name, j
have been created for this fall and
winter's hair fashion patrons from ;
coajt to coast, by the National
Hairdressers and Cosmetologists
Association (NHCA).
The Association's exclusive Of-
ficial Hair Fashion Committee, in-
cludes more than 20 of the na-
'..'joj leading hairdressers and
styling instructors.
The nation's 60,000 hairdresser I
members of NHCA increased their
knowledge on how to cut and style '
(the four new fall-winter hair fash-
ions at classes held throughout the
[National Convention last summer ;
in Washington.
The names of the four new hair i
fashionsThe Amp, The Scatnn. |
The Vamp and The Campreveal
the character of the four new
Etyles thai are designed to com-
blement four different areas of
this fall and winter's clothing fash-
has sufficient density. The short
The Amp cut will keep the fash-
ionable woman vibrating u hen she
^witches on to this fall and win-
ter's big skirts, long sweaters and
knits.
This power-filled style is de-
veloped by a special shoit cut on
Ihe front and top. For easy up-
keep of the short top section, and
the longer sides and back, a pro-
fessional permanent wave is a
must.
for the iong-naired Miss, Mrs. or
Ms., who is not yet turned on to
shorter hair.
THE SCAMP
The Scampa snort cut that
can be worn wavy, close to the
head or straightis designed to
bring out feminine, mischievous-
D6M in the woman who scampers
around in fall and winters new i
ihi:t dresses and straight legged
pants. The fall and winter em
phasis on plaids, accented in red.,
and greens, will add further tc I
the Scamp look.
THE VAMP
Flirty evening dresses, both |
short and long, will give this hair j
style a total vampy appearance
this fall and winter. Fur-trimmed ',
jackets will also make great
'vamping" material.
The lady with natural curls can |
take fun advantage 01 tnis cut
when her hair receives proper con-
ditioning. The lady with straight
hair may achieve this temptress
look with a professional wave and
a special professional technique
of hair curling, providing her haii [
length of the back, and the mod
erately long sides, give the 1
"Vamp" a variety of hair styling
possibilities.
THE CAMP
New fall winter sweaters and
he "high water" pants look will
be enhanced by the Camp cut. The
new hair fashion will create a total
"camp' style, especially when
worn with the funky, new twin-
sweater sets and sis-boom-bah
fanny sweaters."
The secret to this sporty, care-
1 free cut is a good professional per-
manent wave. Individualized per-
manent waving.

NHCA's Official Hair Fashion
Committee styles director, Bernard
be jatdin of Lewiston. Maine. de-
Scribes the hair fashions as "four
Individual styles for four different
f< male personalities that have dif-
ferent life styles."
"Hair mould b.' styled to fit
tie Individual and her personality.
1 ir hair should be you," Des-
j; aid.
Following are descriptions of
tho four new hairstyles designed
for this fall and winter:
THE AMP
V
QnbiAnjcdloJud
983-9949
fOMtHY NfVY YORK STVHSTS
WIG STYLING
MANICURE 8. PEDICURE
coAtnrrf biauiv service
7613 MIWD BLVD.. PMBK PMS.

ATTACHE BEAUTY SALON
2711 S. Ocean Dr. Phone: 922-1416
CHARLES PHYSIOGNOMICAL
Ladies Hair Cutting Beauty Salon
2658 Hollywood Blvd. -- Phone: 927-2760
CIRCLE BEAUTY SALON
1837 N. Young Circle Phone 921-9777
DOWNING TOUCH COIFFURES
7991 Johnson St., Pembroke Pines 961-3413
DEES BEAUTY SALON
7967Miramar Pkwy., Phone: 961-2965
DJPLCMAT MALL BtWTY SALON
Located ir the Diplomat Mall
1799 E. Hallandale Peach Blvd. 925-3853
DRIFTWOOD BEAUTY SALON
"Driftwood Acres"
Experts in High Styling
1865 N. 66th Ave. -- Phone 983-6233
EVELON'S GARAGE BEAUTY SALON
6792 Miramar Pkwy., Miramar 966-1946
FELICE BEAUTY SALON
6520 Pembroke Rd., Miramar 989-1156
MIRRA-MART BEAUTY SALON
6320 Miramar Pkwy.,, Miramar -- 983-9555
PANDORA'S STY1ING ROOM
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Page 8
-Jewist noridfor "<* Shof.r of Hollywood
Friday, October 26, 1973
Mr. Hornstein (second from left) is seen
with campaign cabinet members Nathan
Pritcher, (left) Lewis Cohn, Alan Roaman
and Herbert Katz.
Approximately 2,000 area Jews turned out for the first in
what has become an ongoing series of fund-raising ral-
lies for cash gifts to Israel held in the convention center
of the Diplomat Hotel Oct. 9. Here Moses Hornstein, donor
of a $75,000 gift, is interviewed by Ron Gross of radio sta-
tion WFTL and Ron LaBrecque of the Miami Herald.
invitations etc.
Pompano Beach, Florida
Call Ken Tarnove 972-4417-^20-9731
JOSEPH M. HOPEN, M.D.
AND
SIDNEY PAVILACK, M.D.-
TAKE PRIDE IN ANNOUNCING THE ASSOCIATION Of
ALAN S. LANE, M.D.
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
OPHTHALMOLOGY
AT
3419 JOHNSON STREET
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33021
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x .heC^oli.ecf
eciLioii
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981-5173
CANDLES'ARTWORK-CUSTOM FRAMING
INVITATIONS FOR ALL OCCASIONS
WEDDINGS
BARMITZVAH
CONFIRMATION
PERSONALIZED STATIONERY
Hillel's New
Property
Dedicated
I'illcl Community Day School,
21288 Biscayne Blvd.. has pur ,
luised two and one-half acres of!
and lor a school site with the .
building to be in completed Au- i
JUSt, 11174.
A special ceremony to dedicate
:his new property was held Oct. 1
j 14 at the site. NE 215th St. and '
1 24th Ave., North Miami Beach. '
: Rabbinical and synagogue leaders. ,
; Federation executives, and local '
I and government officials parti-
:ipated in the ceremony.
Sen. Sherman Winn. a Hillel
parent and member of its board
of governors, introduced the dig-
nitaries which included Mayor
[ James Reardon of North Miami
Beach, and Mayor Jack Spiegel of |
Hallandale.
Hillel has had two temporary
1 facilities. The first, 1725 Monroe
St., Hollywood, saw the inception
1 of the Hillel Community Day
I School. In September 1970, Hillel
opened with 92 students and
grades kindergarten through sixth.
Another year at this location saw
the addition of a nursery and sev-
enth grade.
With the guidance of its first
president, Dr. Joel B. Dennis, Hil-
lel branched out to serve the
Orthodox, Conservative, and Re-
form Communities of North Dade
and South Broward. It moved to
North Dade in September 1972.
where it is now in its second year.
A motel located at 21288 Bis-
cayne Blvd. was completely reno-
vated into modern air-condition-
ed classrooms. A trailer now
houses offices for the rabbi, execu-
tive director, and secretaries. A
kitchen and dining room were in-
stalled to serve hot, kosher
lunches daily.
New playground equipment was
erected, a library and art room
1 formed, and swimming lessons
I given to the nursery through
I eighth grades in a renovated pool
which meets all safety regula-
tions.
The new Hillel building, which
will be completed for the start of
its fifth year, will serve as the
Gateway to Jewish Education" in
North Dade and South Brow aid
Counties. Hillel has a fleet of six
buses bringing its 140 children
from as far as Tamarac, Planta-
tion and Ft. Lauderdale.
Participating in the dedication
were Michael Scheck, Hillel's new
president, Dr. Dennis and Marshall
Baltach, executive director, who
announced that a building fund
campaign will begin shortly with
1 Dr. Dennis serving as building
fund chairman and Irving Cirul-
nick as campaign whip.
Chairman of the site and de-
j velopment committee is Leonard
Schreiber; Phillip Pearlman is the
architect for the new building.
Melvin H. Baer, (left) 1974 campaign chairman, and Fed-
eration president Dr. Norman Atkin were happy about the
evening's gifts which totaled mere than half a millloj
lars. Added to the previous day's collection at Em
Hills Country Club, it made the 43-hour total almost one
million dcllors.
Mark and David Levitats, young sons of Dr. and Mrs.
Meron Levitats, spent the evening parading around the
convention center with their signs.
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Friday, October 26. 1973
*'Jew?'*F*rirffor nd Shofar of Hollywood
Pago 9
Scholarships Awarded To
Nine Students Of Ballet
Nine young people from South
Broward and North Dade have
ben awarded scholarships for the
1973-74 school teim at Hollywood's
Browaid County civic Bal.et.
One-year full scholarships went
to Joanne Nortmann (3rd yean:
Frine Quijano (2nd year); Angela
Ash (iiih yer ); Julie Allison (3rd
yea,!: Leslie Cornfe.d (1st yea:):
and Chris Green (1st year).
Partial scholarships were re-
ceived by Teresa Coopman. Lise
. and Darin Schonzeit. The
scholarships are awarded on merit
to students who have shown par-
ticular aptitude and are interested
in making ballet a career.
Several former Broward Ballet
scholarship recipients have gone
on to professional companies. Pa-
tricia Vrancik has Icon a dancer
a! : ie Radio City Music Hall Bal
lei since '-969 and Rene Ceballos
i; rently with the Tom Finnan
Internationa] Company: Florence
i r and Laurie Melton are cur-
rents in .New York City where
they are studying at American
Ballet Theate with Madame Ma-
iia Suoboda.
The study program is made pos-
sible by contributions and fund-
aising event sponorcd by the
broward County Civic Bad;>t Aux-
liary.
This year's Mardi-Gras Ball will
be held Nov. 16 at the Viking Res-
taurant and premises to be the
ro;t festive ti date. Added fea-
tures will be a dance contest and
na k competition (to be judged
by Mrs. David Keatingi. P. be:
will be awarded to thu ladies
wearing the mo t beautiful and
mo.t original masks.
The Bali begins with a co-ktail
-arty at 7 p.m. and the t aditionai
irand Promenade, led by Miss
'harlot'.' [ngalls, honorary chair-
man.
Dinner will b followed by en
tertainmenl and dancin:. Tickets
nay be obtained from members of
the Ballet Auxiliary.
Dr. Maurice Yermish (left), recent immigrant dentist from
Philadelphia at the Hebrew University-Hadassah Dental
School in Jerusalem, discovered that Dr. Simon Barenstein,
new "oleh" from Moscow, is a cousin. The younger man,
who with six other Russians will work under Dr. Yermish at
the Hadassah staff dental clinic, recognized "Yermish" as
his maternal grandmother's name.
k
Hospitslization Siekne.i Accident Lit. Annuities
B.H.BERNARDJNC.
"Insurance Specialist"
1926 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33020
Barry Holeve, President Phone 925-3251
PLANS AVAILABLE TO PERSONS WITH 5ERI&US
HEALTH PROBLEMS
Ballet scholarship winners included, from
left, (seated) Lisse Geier, Darin SchonzeiL
Joanne Nortmann, Frme Quijano; (stand-
ing) Teresa Coopman, Chris Green, Leslie
Cornfeld and Julie Allison.

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DRESSES 2. ALL B'JROINE'S STORES


Page 10
-Jenislffrridlnr nd Shorar of Hollywood
Friday, October 26, 197J
Waldheim Urges Warring Sides *** **
Help Restore Peace to Mideast
Tag Davs October 26, 27, 28
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
Secretary General Kurt Wald-
heim. breaking his silence on the
Middle East war. urged all par-
ties concerned to end the blood-
shed and move toward a perma-
nent peace settlement.
He said the UN stood ready to
help them in that endeavor. In a
written statement released here,
the Secretary General said he
had "no illusions about how dif-
ficult it is for countries in con-
flict to turn from war to peace"
and stressed that he had "no wish
to deflect any government from
what it believed to be its legiti-
mate sovereign aims."
HE SAID that he had "no de-
tailed solution to suggestion."
However, Waldheim .vent on,
"after more than five days of
heavy fighting which has already
caused app tiling human losses, I
ft el obliged to speak out as Sec-
retary General."
He sad he had not spoken out
thus far because he did not want
to interfere in any way with ef-
forts of the Security Council. He
said he hoped Security Council
members and other member
states "will redouble their efforts
to seek an end to the fighting."
Waldheim observed that "none
of the parties is prepared to con-
cede its objectives, either mili-
tary or political. They would ap-
pear, therefore, to be embarked
on a war of attrition with the
gravest consequences not only
for the region itself but for the
world community as a whole."
In his meeting with Secretary
General Kurt Waldheim. Israeli
Foreign Minister Abba Eban fur
nished the Secretary General
with "further proofs of the pre-
meditated Arab attack on Israel"
on Yom Kippur, according to an
Israeli spokesman.
ALSO DISCUSSED in the meet-,
ing was the "hysterical atmos
phere" that prevailed in the Se-
curity Council meeting when the
Security Council members were
sending condolences to non-exist-
big Soviet victims in Damascus,
anil Egypt was inciting the Se
Ciirity Council members with
non-existing Israeli air raids on
Cairo.
ADL Counteraction
Material to Fight
Arab Propaganda
Counteraction material related
to Arab propaganda and informa-
tion sheets i elated to the Middle
East crisis for speakers and opin-
ion molders are now available
from the Florida Regional Office
of the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith.
As part of its coordinated work
with other Jewish agencies, ADL's
national office specialists have
prepared up-to-date fact sheets on
such topics as:
"The Record of Arab Aggres
sion Against Israel:"
"Arab ExtremismA Delib-
erate Program of Hate Nourishes
Aggression Against Israel."
Arthur Toitelbaum. regional di
rector, said the League also has
ivailable a newly-prepared report
locumenting the history of tiie
\tab states' attempts to use the
United Nations as an effective
weapon in their efforts to destroy
Israel.
Teitoibaum said the League's
research and fact-finding staffs
will continue to produce issue
oriented factual materials on other
aspects of the Middle East situa-
tion. He said these materials will
be distributed through Jewish Fed-
' eratior.s and the ADL's resources
, ,n Florida and throughout the na-
: ion.
Sheffield
CONYALARIUM &
THERAPY CENTER
24 HOUR REGISTERED NURSING CARE
MODERN CENTRALLY LOCATED
SPACIOUS 4% ACRE GROUNDS
STAY FOR ANY LENGTH OF TIME
REGISTERED THERAPY PERSONNEL
IN PATIENT OUT PATIENT
COMPLETE REHABILITATION PROGRAMS
PHONE 563-5711
JEAN SADOW. Administrator
Sfef
2675 NORTH ANDREWS AVE.
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLA.
It was recalled that Israeli Am-
bassador Yosef Tekoah, who ad
dressed the Security Council
meeting said: "My delegation will
join in the expression of sympa-1
thy by members of the Security >
Council for all victims of the re- \
newed warfaie, men, women and
children, irrespective whether.
they are Egyptian, Syrian, Israeli
or citizens of other states."
Mayor James E. Reardon of the j
City of North Miami Beach has pro-1
claimed' Oct. 26, 27 and 28 as the
Robyn Tubin Chapter City of Hope .
tag days which will be manned by
women and men with shaker cans ,
1
Mrs. Matty Goldstein is chair-
man and Mrs. Becky Abrams is co
chairman. Mrs. Allan Wagner is
president of the chapter. Fund.
received in this drive contribute
to research for cures of cancer, leu
kemia, diabetes, heart disease and
glaucoma.
Dade and Broward City of Hope
Chapters meet the following days:
Star Chapter, Franz Katz, presi
dent, meets the second Thursday i
of each month at noon, at the |
Washington Federal. 1133 Nor-1
mandy Dr.
Robyn Tubin Chapter. Genevieve
Wagner, president, meets the'
fourth Thursday of each month at!
noon, in the Washington Federal
633 NE 167th St.
South Broward Chapter. Ruth
Portnoy. president, meets the sec-
ond Thursday of each month at
noon, in the Galahad South Bldg..
1301 S. Ocean Dr.. Hollywood.
Century 21, Evelyn Seiden, pres-
ident, meets every third Tuesday,.,
each month at noon, at First Fed-
eral, NE 183rd St.. Biscayne Blvd.
Hallandale Chapter. Pearl Monte-
Leon, president, meets the second
Wednesday of each month at noon,
at the Home federal, Hallandale
Beach Blvd.. Hallandale.
Phyllis Dropkin Chapter, Rhoda
Ehrlich, president, holds meetings
every second Tuesday each month,
in the Hemisphere Bldg., 1985 S.
Ocean Dr.. Haliandale.
Irving If. Rosenbaum Chapter
(Young Couples Chapter) Terry
Cohen, president, holds its meet-
ings every' second Friday of each
month at 8 p.m. in the First Fed-
eral. NE 183rd St. and Biscayne
Blvd.
Teddy Grant Men's Chapter,
Ralph Marder, president, has meet-
ings every' second Wednesday at
1 p.m. at Washington Federal, 633
NE 167th St.
Miami Beach Chapter, Bess
Plasky. president, holds its meet-
ings every third Wednesday each
month at noon, in the Washington
Federal, 1133 Normandy Dr.
SHIRUY COIE
Shirley Cole
To Entertain
Shirley Col' will rnto'-tqir, -v,-,
members of Temple Beth El Sis-
terhood at their regular luncheon
and meeting Tuesday. Nov. 13. at
11:30 a.m. in the Tobin Auditorium
of the temple. 1351 S. 14th Ave..
in Hollywood.
Mrs. Cole, a resident of Hallan-
dale for the past two years and a
member ol the Sisterhood, is a
professional whose one woman
how was a featured program on
the Jewish Lecture Bureau series
for a number of years.
A native of Wilkes Barre. Pa.,
-he is a graduate of Temple Uni-
versity in Philadelphia, and has
had extensive drama and theater ;
oxpei ience.
Reservations for the luncheon
may be made wih Anna Wolfe or
Belle Green.
A dinner and dance is planned
by the Sisterhood Saturday at 7:30
i .m. Mrs. Milton Jacobs invites '
ill temple members to make re- ]
nervations immediately, as facil-
(ties are limited.
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jy, October 26, 1973
'+JpnHt>ffr* frl0r>r ind Shofar of Hollywood
Page-11
How Israel Maneuvers Compact Forces
Continued from Page 1
lit along the whole length of
3the waterway, hut .sometimes with
^Considerable distances between
them. Behind them run patrol
roads which enable the quick
movement o:' tanks and artinery
to the front from assembly points
out of reach of Egyptian guns.
f
9
&*
%1 BOB KlKBEl, fxecolivc Director,
itwish W/(ore f ederofion of Greater Molhrwootf
October 6, 1973, is a day that will go down in the history of the ,
^wish people as the beginning of the Day of Atonement War. As we ]
know by now Israel had information about the attack in advance !
could have, as it did in 1967, initiated the actual fighting. How >
x, because of the pressure the Israelis felt would be brought to i
hear, they thought it in their best interests not to fire the first shot
and. because of this, untold lives were probably lost. A defensive war
.li very different from an offensive war; the element of surprise is
lost and so Jews are dying and we are now long past a six-day war.
The dimensions of the cost of this war will be beyond the scope
ti any of us In the first 10 days, more lives were lost in Israel than
the equivalent of all casualties the Americans had in the Vietnam
War in terms of population ratios. This small country cannot afford
aoch losses because, who dies? The young, vital people who had a
. Ial role to play in the future of Israel are the first segment to be
decimated.
We sit in total frustration because of our inability physically to
:,fcelp the people of this nation, despite the outnouring of funds that
fa taking place in our country. The Jews of South Broward are raising
Ignore money than ever before for this war emergency, and yet. at the
aeme time, there are thousands of Jews here who have not contributed
one dime to aid the Israeli people in this time of great need.
It is only natural that at times I feel angry and frustrated. I have
4o ask myself How do we reach people? In what way can we help
BiPm to understand the magnitude of problems and the greatness of
Mfconcern? How can we help them appreciate that their future is tied-in
Bp dramatically with the future of Israel? How do we bring about Jew
is!i consciousness'' Why is it some people just cannot be reached?
There are times when I think maybe if they received a "hate"
e'ler or their child was called "a dirty Jew." perhaps this would
^ffox-t them. Perhaps it takes something very personal to make you
act. I really should not dwell on these negatives, but we are all very
ed, and frankly, we know that we are just beginning.
I do have to talk about the hundreds and hundreds of people
ho have volunteered their services to the Federation: about the
people on the bench and the other high-rises who have gone out on
feeir own and raised money for this emergency: about the many poo
ph who have given Up their pleasures and yes. part of their bank
-accounts, to put themselves al the disposal of the community. One of
our most active members has been in this office nearly every day
since Oct 6 sp indinc all day with us. One dav he was not here and
I called his office. His receptionist remarked: "Whom are you asking
Ifor? I do not know whether he works here any longer."
I am seeing some non-Jewish people who have been bringing con
ributions into the office and teen-agers and young women v. ho are
lading as messengers and runners making thousands of phone call-
[for us. Our campaign leadership I now know better than I know
{members of my own family because they are constantly at my side
f willing to help in any way they can. To all of these a "Thank You" if
f not enough and my appreciation can never be adequately expressed.
From everything I can see at this time, this war emergency and
the contributions made are just the beginning. We are going to have
to come back to you again, again and again for more and more funds
and there will be a time when we are going to have to give money
not only from our capital and from our income but we may have tc
borrow the money necessary for the survival of Israel and when
I say Israel will survive I really mean every' Jew.
The best way to express the contributions and the kind of
anoney we are looking for is something that one of our biggest con-
tributors said publicly just a few weeks ago: "I expect no apprecia
tion or thanks for what I have done because I can afford it. Thanks
and appreciation should go to the people whose contributions are so
much greater than what they can really afford."
We have a job to do let every Jew stand up and be counted!

The front-line positions are
lightly armed, and no Israel com-
mander has ever claimed that
under ma*sive frontal attack
they could be held indefinitely.
Their purpose is to wain of at-
tack and undeitake such holding
action as they can until heavy
reinfo: cements are brought up
from the rear.
THE REAR, in the case of
Sinai, is a vast dump of tanks,
mobile guns and other artillery
pieces and support airfields. The
weapons held there are always
in battle readiness. The problem,
other than in a situation of total
mobilization, is to match men
drawn from the cities and set-
tlements in Israel proper with
the weapons awaiting them be-
hind the front.
Here, the role of the Air Force
is vital. Its task is not only to hit
enemy concentrator on the oth-
er side of the line, but also to
stem any advance until the main
battle force can be brought into
action.
In fighting such as has been
taking place along the Suez
Canal this week, close air sup-
port wi.l have been difficult be-
cause of the virtually hand-to-
hand nature of the battles.
The Golan Heights front has
been similarly organized, with
the added difficulty that, al-
though Israel's positions for the
most part look out over a vast
Syrian plain where reinforce-
ments would easily be spotted,
there a:e areas of terrain, es-
pecially in the northern section
of the front, where there is con-
siderable natuial cover enabling
an enemy to gather his assault
forces with some chance of escap-
ing detection.
The f. ont-line Israeli positions
on the Golan Heights are also
well strung out and. other than
in times of crisis, lightly held.
.L,ut ne, e artillery and tank sup-
po.t is kept clojtr at hand and
there is not the logistic problem
o: moving manpower across hun-
dreds of miles of desert.
THE DANGER has always
been that, given the fixed nature
of the Israeli positions and the
gaps between them, they could
be turned by Syrian units able to
The new settlements establish-
make a breakthrough,
ed on the Goran Heights are, for
the most part, engaged in farm-
ing and other non-military pur-
suits and are far from being
heavily armed encampments, i
Their defense is dependent on |
units brought up from the rear.
Again, the Air Force is the
primary weapon both for stem-
ming any early jdvance and
keeping Syrian suppiy lines and
depots under fire.
The River Jordan front is prob- '
sible. Not only are her forward !
sible.Not only are her forwaia
positions in constant sight of
each other, they also have total
vision of the plain which stretch-
es from just south of the Sea of
Galilee to the Dead Sea.
Israel's armor also occupies
strategic positions on the heights
commanding the river and valley, i
THE SITUATION is more fluid
along Israel's southern frontier
with Jordan, which stretches
through the Arava and Negev to
Elath. This, apart from a few Is-
raeli settlements close to the
national front-line, is desert
wasteland. Israel's main defense!
here are mobile.
Cne problem on the Jordan
front whicii is not repeated else-
where is the safeguarding of the
Israeli rear, populated by some
600 000 Arabs who have bee:
under Is.aeli occupation since
1967.
In normal circumstances of
this week, concentrations of Is-
raeli reserves for possible action
on the Jordan front and an in-
crease in the holding force will
have been allowed for.
THE LEBANESE front has
been mainly constructed to with-
stand tenorist attacks. It is fenc-
ed off for its entire length, some
pa; is of which mn through ter-
rain similar to that of the Scot-
tish highlands.
The tence runs together with
patrol roads which enable the
the Israelis quickly to bring up
armor and other reinforcements
and are bacKiii "jy settlements
which have a long history of
holding off attacks from the
other side of the line.
Hadassah Raises
Dollars For Israel
At its Oct. 9 meeting, the Sha-
lom Group of Hollywood Hadas-
sah resolved to make a special ef-
fort on behalf of Israel and many
members made contributions to
the Hadassah Emergency Fund for
purchases of medical supplies and
additions to the blood bank.
At the same meeting 15 mem-
bers were added to the roster
which now represents one of the
fastest growing groups in Florida.
There was a candlelighting cere
mony, one candle for each of the
25 years of the existence of the
State of Israel, led by women from
the Hillcrest Group, during which
the achievements of Israel were
recounted year by year.
The meeting ended with prayers
I for a quick ending to the war.
Ben Fried, (left) president; Abe Rosenblatt,
lay reader; Rabbi Mark Loeb, and Jerry
Seligman, vice president, are shown at The
Temple in the Pines' first service held at
the Holiday Inn in Hollywood on Rosh Ha-
shanah. Now a bona fide, tax-exempt, char-
itable organization, having received its
state charter from attorneys Steven Shutter
and Les Berger earlier this month, the
newly organized temple is looking for a
place to hold Friday evening services and
invites suggestions.
DATSUN
SAVES
AT
scon MOTORS
PEMBROKE ROAD & 441
PHONE 987-2500 or 625-2586
G
A
S
U
P
SAVE
AUTO TECHNICAL ASSOCIATES
Formerly SOUTHEAST AUTO MARINE
Now located: 2041 Hayes St. at 21st Ave.
Excellence in Automotive Service
Specialists in Gas Mileage
More horsepower-emission control
Complete Dynamometer Tune-up
929-1243


page 12
+jistFkridfiar "d shof" of Hollywood
-
Friday, October 26. 1973 3
Morale Among Troops High
By GREEK r AY CASHMAN
JERUSALEM (AJPA) Mo-
rale among Israeli troops is high.
I had the privilege of being one
cf the first civilians to talk to
some of the valiant young sol-
dier- who are writing another
chapter in the history of Israel.
Together with Dutch Journalist
Eva Ke'lerman and British Jour-
nalist Alan Smith, I drove t) the
batt'.e zones, We turned back to
Jerusalem some 12 kilometers
from the Suez Canal.
We visited army camps, army
refueling -i ition and a m i r
area o! ni- irati ins. All along the
vast stretch i desert land, still
screened with the relics of 1067,
we saw men on their way t > war.
SOME HAD already seen ac-
tion. TTiey were Weary-eyed and
unshaven, their uniforms stain I
and askew. When we asked how
the fighting was progressing, the
weary faces stretched into smiles.
There was no need for words.
swer was always the same. "Fine,
I feel fine."
"How do you feel?" we asked
one soldier after another. The an-
Nonc seemed Jo. hgv^ any
thought for his personal safety,
but each was concerned about
his family. Eva and I were be-
sieged with requests to call a
wife, a mother, a girl friend, with
messages of love and reassur-
ances from Avi, Shlomo, Zion,
Uri, David.
Between us. we collected more
than 60 messages and letters.
WE RETURNED to Jerusalem
close to midnight and headed
straight for the office of the
army spokesman in the Govern-
ment Press Offices. Within min-
utes, the staff dropped every-
to each take some of the
n; mes to call the families con-
d. In just over half an hour,
ail messages had been conveyed.
Some of them were touching.
A boy due to have been married
the day before, but sent to the,
front instead, told his sweetheart
that the wedding would take
place as soon as he returned
home.
LEO MINMN
Israel Must End
War-Not U.S.
Continued from Pace 4-
cans are beginning to buy the
deception.
FIRST THERE was the Stand-
ard Oil of California letter to its
stockholders asking them to "con-
sider" a more pro-Arab U.S. pos-
ture in the Middle Fast
This was followed by similar
letters to its stckholders from
Texaco, a monolithic partner in
the great Arabian-American Oil
combine.
And the other day. crammed
in among the columns of war
war news was a UPI dispatch re-
porting Transportation Secretary
Claude S. Brinegan's warning to
the nation that "if the Arab-Is-
rael war i prolonged, fuel ra-
tioning in the United States will
result."
The key here, he said, is Saudi-
Arabia, whose King Faisal has
threatened not to increase Saudi
oil production next year at the
same time that we are looking to
him for marked increases.
AS OF this writing. Brinegan's
statement was more prophecy
than warning. The administration
has already announced fuel oil
rationing beginning in November;
while the meaning of King Fais-
al's message to President Nixon
last wek seems clear enough,
even if it has not been reported.
He has since joined the Arab
war. '
And so. it is all Israel's fault,
and ours for refusing to punish
Israeli "aggression." It has noth-
ing to do with the good old cap-
italist princiDle of supply and
demand at which the Arabs were
bound, finally, to grow more
adept: Pay our price, and we'll
sell: don't pay, and you can't buy.
What we're meant to do is to
read the message this wav: You'll
be suffering gas and oil short-
ages next winter because you re-
fused to punish the Israelis.
Or even because, as Sen. Ful-
bright had the incredible audac-
ity to put it on national television
the day after Syria and Egypt
launched their Yom Kippur war,
Israel controls the Congress of
the United States."
Even in Europe, this deception
appears to be gaining ground.
THE SWISS daily, "Bund." is
a reliable newspaper with a sense
of solid editorial acumen.
Still, it published a report sev-
eral weeks before the war broke
out, citing the usual "informed
sources" that President Nixon
and the Shah of Iran were hold
ing secret talks to decide what to
do in the event Faisal and the
other Arab oil-producers reduced
or even cut off oil supplies to the
west.
According to the "Bund," Nix-
on and the Shah had decided on
military intervention already map ';
ped out by high-ranking Amer- i
ican and British officials.
Parachutists, including U.S., Is-
raeli and Iranian troops, would
take over the oil fields. Further-
more. Nixon was already com-
mitted to phoning Communist
Party Chief Leonid Brezhnev on
the "hot line" between Washing-
ton and Moscow, advising him to
keep hands off.
THE "BUND" cited the French
weekly, "Nouvelle Observateur,"
which corroborated its report.
In fact. "Nouvelle Observateur"
went a step further: Nixon had
discussed the parachute take-over
with Brezhnev during Brezhnev's
summer visit to the U.S.
And. as "Nouvelle Observateur"
understood it. Brezhnev acknowl-
edged the legitimacy of Ameri-
can interests in the Persian Gulf
The prestigious French week-
ly's corroboration of the "Bund"
story is remarkable only for its
Gallic flavor, so reminiscent as
it is of the 1958 war when the
French were humiliated by
American intervention at Suez.
Clearly. "Nouvelle Observateur"
was licking its imaginative chops
at the prospect in 1973 of Amer-
ican humiliation by French inter
vention (of course, entire moral-
istic) over the oil fields of Arabia.
BUT IF we can understand
the French report, what about the
Swiss report? The Swiss are not
subject to hysterical outbursts
of dramatic intensity. They do
not, like the French, suffer the
false pains of national gigantism.
The answer lies in the fact that
the Europeans look forward to
oil shortages with even greater
anxiety than the Americans, and
it is bad enough here.
If so solid a paper as the
"Bund" could be sucked in
after all, it was Iran's latest
friendly gesture toward the Arabs
that permitted Iraq to enter the
war, an act hardly calculated to
permit joint U.S.-Iranian-Israeli
drops over Arab oil fields it is
a significant measure of the oil
pressures we are beginning to
feel. All of us Americans and
Europeans, the hysterical and the
dispassionate.
And that is why Israel must
end it quickly. A victory that
takes too long will be no victory
but a loss.
wars in v" -h Israel fought for
h'-r survival. Though all are opti-
mistic of an ultimate victory,
none will venture to pin down
an actual time.
Army spokesmen have refrain-
ed from talking about Israeli cas-
ualties, and only last Sunday, a
week after the war began, ac-
knowledged the death of 650
men on all fronts and in the air.
We heard from their comrades
Another man. Whose wife was
giving birth, sent wishes for an
easy labor. Another sent his re-
gards to his girl friend and add-
ed shyly, "Tell her I love her,
and that I knocked out two
tanks."
The alacrity with which phones
were answered all over the coun-
try at so late an hour spoke vol-
umes for the feelings of those
with their menfolk in the forces.
It was the fourth day of the war,
hut from the charged emotions
which emanated from telephones,
one would have thought that the
war had been |0in : on for a year
at least. "Where did you sec him?
When did you see him? was a
nationwide echo.
We saw him. in Sinai, grimy
with three sleepless nights be-
hind him, but doing his duty for
his country.
WE SAW him sitting astride a
tank. Mending equipment, driv-
ing a busload of soldiers, buying
a steak sandwich in an army can-
teen, manning a radio, refueling
a truck or just waiting for orders.
He always waved at us as we
passed. Sometimes he asked for
cigarettes. Once he gave us gas
when our car ran out.
He joked with us and called,
"Are you out on a picnic?"
We saw him amid swells oi hearted and festive day for area
tank dust. We saw him guarding teenagers turned into a solemn
a base. We saw him safe and demonstration of unity for the be-
well on his return from the line leagured Israelis as the Jewish
of fire, and confident and fear- Federation's Youth Council mem-
less on his way back. | bers and their guests gathered on
As we drove past them and ine Robert Herman ranch in Davie
countless convoys of trucks and oct. 14.
tanks, we saw helicopters and, Even the weather was bleak as
Mirages in the air. flying low on I tne young people heard Youth
the horizon. The war was less I Council president Scott Snyder
frightening at close range than 5Pcak of the unparalleled finan-
in its distorted magnification over cjai needs of Israel as the fight-
radio and television. jns |D the Middle East continues.
OURS WAS the only civilian Contributions totalling S2.200
vehicle on the road for scores I were collected, .including S1.000
of miles, all the way back to i from the savings account of Mi-
Beers'heba. We kept on passing
more and more men.
No one can predict how long
this war will go on. Military
spokesmen have been unanimous
in differentiating between this
war and the preceding three
in Sinai that there had been some
serious casualties.
"How do you Set thefe?" I
asked one of the soldiers to whom
we spoke. "Why do you want to
go?" he countered.
"To see the boys who've, come
back from the front," I replied.
"Don't go. There are other things
for you to see in Sinai," was his
gentle rejoinder.
Saveial busloads cf youngsters departed from the Sheri
dan Street Medical Center for the Berman Ranch where
appicxlmately 250 teen-egsrs congregated for a youth
rally despite a rainy afternoon.

Simchas Torah Youth Rally
Spirit Tempered By Crisis
What was to have been a light- pay for wires to the president the
Secretary of State, and members
chad Roaman who had earned the
money h'niseif.
The teenagers were given "tele-
gram bank' sheets sponsored by
Federation's Community Relations
Committee on which they will ob-
tain names of residents willing to
of Congress. They were also given
pledge cards and asked to' solicit
.heir peers for gifts.
Some 300 letters and cards from
the teenagers were' mailed'fa' So-
viet Jews who are being harassed
as the result of applying for exit
permits from Russia.
Susi Tanur was chairman, of the
event, aided and abetted by pro-
gram vice president Paul Kerbel.
Committee members were Linda
Meyers, Lisa Bennett, Pebbje May,
Nina Sift and Steve. We,iialein..
Classes Monday At Beth El
Beginners' and -Conversational
Hebrew classes will be held at
Temple Beth El Monday at 9:15
a.m., followed by Dr. Samuel Z.
Jaffe's "'Living Bible" series in
the chapel at 10:30 a.m. The Book
of Isaiah will be under discussion.

Thefirst
9 Riverside Chapel
inBroward County
is now open
inHcdlywood.

-.
5801 Hollywood Boulevard
Telephone 920-1010


RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL. INC. FUNERAL DIRECTORS
Other Riverside Chapels in the
Miami-MiamiBeachFt. LauderdaleHollvwoodareas

: -
i
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16480 N.E. 19th Avenue. North Miami Beach 947-tM2
19th Street & Alton Road, Miami Beach JE 1-1151 Wflii
1250 Normandy Drive, Miami Beach JE 1-1151
Douglas Road at S.W. 17th Street, Miami JE 1-1151
Riverside also serves the New York Metropolitan area with Chaffers in
Manhattan, The Bronx. Brooklyn, Far Rockaway and Ml. Vernon.
Murray N. Rubin F.D.


jday. October 26, 1973
-Jmlsil fifirMfor < Shofar of Hollywood
Page 13
AUTHORITIES TAKE PRECAUTIONS AGAINST TERRORISM IN MANY CITIES
Groimdswell of World Support Against Arab Attacli
ly Jewish Telegraphic Agency
A groundswel! of support for
.Israel's defense against the at-
Uack by Egyptians and Syrian
armed forces on Vom Kippur was
expressed by Jewish and non-
| Jewish leaders throughout the
voi'ld. The theme running
through all the messages and
[statements was that the two Arab
[countries had crossed the cease-
Ire lines in an unprovoked and
[premeditated assault on the Jew-
fish state.
At the same time, huge rallies
[continued in various major cities
(where waves upon waves of dem-
[ onstrators expressed their solidar-
ity with Israel.
IN MANY cities, too, police
authorities took extra precautions
to guard Israeli and Jewish and
Arab installations against attacks.
Throughout the United States
there were reports of unprece-
dented responses as donations
poured in to meet the call for
$100 million in cash in the next
few days. Switchboards were jam-
med in the offices of the United
Jewish Appeal and Israel Bond
Organization almost around the
clock.
A UJA spokesman said dona-
tions were pouring into the na-
tional office at a greater rate
than expected. He termed the re-
I sponse unprecedented. A bond9
spokesman termed the response
| "fantastic."
Meanwhile, a warning against
giving to unauthorized fund-rais-
ing efforts for Israel being con-
ducted on the streets of New
York was issued by the National
Committee on Control and Au-
thorization of Campaigns of the
Jewish Agency for Israel by its
cochairmen, Mrs. Charlotte Jacob-
son and Jack Weiler.
"Our committee." they said, "is
receiving information at its head-
quarters at 515 Park Avenue of
such unauthorized campaigns. We
want to warn the Jewish public
that street collections by individ-
uals and by the organizations
have not been authorized or sanc-
tioned by our committee or any
authorized body. We urge those
who seek to aid Israel by immedi-
ate cash gifts to channel them
through the United Jewish Ap
peal."
THROUGHOUT THIS country
and abroad Jews and non-Jews
continued to express solidarity
with the Jewish state. The Jew-
ish communities of Denmark and
Sweden have rallied massively in
support of Israel. Thousands of
Danish and Swedish Kroners have
been flowing into special funds
established throughout the two
countries.
Many Danish citizens and sol-
diers have been coming to the
Israeli Embassy offering to
serve as volunteers. Israeli citi-
zens have been trying to get back
home to join the fighting. In
Brussels, a delegation of 45 rep
resentatives of the Belgian Jew-
ish community and the rabbini-
cal corps went to the Israeli Em-
bassy to "express its identifica-
tion with Israel" and its "uncon-
ditional support"
More than 500 Belgian Jews
have volunteered for the Israeli
army, joined by some nonJews.
Blood transfusion centers have
been opened in Brussels and Ant-
werp. In Amsterdam the three
Dutch trade union organizations
expressed their solidarity with Is-
rael as they welcomed the Euro-
pean representative of the His-
tadrut.
More than 2.000 persons at-
tended a solidarity meeting with
I ,rael at the Jewish Cultural Cen
t;r which was addressed by Par-
liamentary, Labor Party and Ro-
man Catholic spokesmen. In
Paris, strong French police con-
centrations have been massed in
the Belleville area of the city to
prevent possible ArahJewish
fighting. Police have also in-
creased their guards at Jewish
and IsraeJj installations in. the
French capital.
THE ISRAELI consulate in
Paris reported that hundreds of
volunteers have been streaming
in asking to enlist in the Israeli
army and hundreds of others
have phoned offering financial
contributions to Israel's armed
forces. In Bonn, security meas-
ures have been tightened up still
further at the Israeli Embassy
and other Israeli installations in
West Germany.
In New York the Anti-Defama-
tion League of B'nai B'rith called
upon the U.S. and the interna-
tional community "to support Is-
rael's efforts at repulsing the
treacherous aggression and re-
storing peace in the area."
The American Zionist Federa-
tion termed the attack against
Israel "a new low in Arab treach-
ery." The Labor Zionist Alliance
declared that "the free world
must insist on upholding the
basic principle or negotiation be-
tween the parties."
In Boston, more than 7.000 per-
sons, including many college
youth from surrounding aivas
held a demonstration sponsored
by the Crisis Committee of the
Jewish Community Council of
Metropolitan Boston which was
addressed by representatives of
the Jewish, Catholic and Protes-
tant communities.
IN THIS country and Canada
an estimated one million Jews
participated in emergency meet-
ings in 1,000 synagogues to ex-
press their solidarity with Israel
and to pledge maximum support
of the Israel Bond campaign. In
London, Dr. Nahum Goldmann,
president of the World Jewish
Congress, sent a message to Pre-
mier Golda Meir stating: "On be-
half of the entire World Jewish
Congress, I convey to you and to
the people of Israel assurances
of fullest solidarity in your just
and valiant fight against an at-
tack by enemy forces."
The chief rabbi of the British
Commonwealth, Dr. Immanuel
Jacobovits, has instructed rabbis
and ministers of synagogues to
arrange for the recital of spe-
cial psalms after every service
during the present time of crisis.
In Chicago, some 5,000 persons
attended a noon rally at the
Civic Center Plaza sponsored by
the public affairs committee of
the Jewish United Fund of Met-
ropolitan Chicago.
In response to an urgent call
for aid to Israel, more than 600
New York business, civic and
Jewish religious and communal
leaders purchased a record-break-
ing sum of more than $20 million
in State of Israel Bonds at a din-
ner in the Plaza Hotel.
-
FORMER CONGRESSMAN Her-
bert Tenzer, general chairman of
the United Jewish Appeal of
Greater New York, declared that
"never in the history of this hu-
manitarian organization have so
many New York Jews volunteered
to work for UJA nor has the
organization ever received so
many individual gifts in such a
short period of time."
Referring to the response to
the UJA's Israel Emergency-
Fund campaign which began
when the war broke out, Tenzer
said more than 7,500 people have
come to the UJA headquarters
to make personal contributions
ranging from a child's 25-cent
piece to an industrialist's check
for $25,000. So far 200 fund-rais
ing rallies and meetings have
been held and more than 250 are
scheduled to be held within the
next few days.
In Paris, over 20.000 "persons
rallied on behalf of Israel at a
meeting organized by the Paris
Committee for the Support of Is-
rael. Daniel Mayer, president of
the Human Rights League, at-
tacked French Foreign Minister I
Michel Johert who had earlier
said one could not call aggressors
those states which try to recover
territory which belongs to them. |
"Such a statement is not diplo-1
macy but dishonor," Mayer said.
IN BRUSSELS, 15 Belgian Jew-1
ish students were injured at the'
University of Brussels when j
fights broke out between them'
and Arab students. The fighting J
took place when the Jewish stu-
dents organized, for the third
consecutive day, a meeting at j
the "Cite Universitaire" to ex-
press their solidarity with Israel. |
Some 150 Jewish students were
attacked by the Arabs, who were |
joined by non-students and who
were armed with chairs, sticks,
bottles and clubs. The injured
students wore taken to the hos-
pital.
In Johannesburg. 2.000 jam
packed the Zionist Center in sol- j
idarity with Israel and to protest
the Austrian surrender to Arab
terrorist aggression.
In New York Christian leaders
meeting at the American Jewish
Committee's national headquar-
ters deplored the attack by Egypt
and Syria and termed the attack
"not only a threat to Israel but to
world peace."
In Detroit, every organization
and synagogue has held fund-
raising campaigns. There were
rallies at Wayne State University
and the University of Michigan.
At the latter there were over
1,000 students who raised $7,000.
A partial faat day was called by
the Council of Orthodox Rabbis.
IN PHILADELPHIA where
some 20,000 persons attended a
rally at Kennedy Plaza, Mayor
Frank Rizzo said he would ask
the City Council to buy $1 mil-
lion in Israel Bonds. He was fol-
lowed by City Council President
George Schwartz, who said he
would try to speed the resolution
through the council.
In Maryland, some 6.000 per
sons spilled out into the street
as part of an overflowing crowd
attending a rally at Ohr Kodesh
Congregation in Chevy Chase or
ganized by the Jewish Commu-
nity Council of Greater Washing
ton.
In Dayton. Ohio, the response
of the Jewish community in the
first nine hours of the appeal to
raise cash brought in $750,000
with Jews and non-Jews donating
There were also donations of
blood and plasma.
At Kent State University in
Ohio some 300 students held a
solidarity rally. At Case Western
Reserve University in Ohio 350
students rallied.
Palmer's
Miami Monument Company
3279 S.W. 8th Street, Miami
444-0921 444-0922
Closed On The Sabbath
Personalized Memorials Custom
Crafted In Our Own Workshop.
Where They Were
When Firing Ended
Continued on Page 1
wcarons in her toehold along the
east bank.
In Cairo, Egyptian sources said
Israel was sustaining heavy losses
and that its defense units were
knocking down large number of
Israeli jets over Suez.
BUT NEWSMEN in the area
noted that most of the furious
lighting was being done in Egypt
proper by invading Israeli forces
which the Egyptians earlier in
the week characterized as a "task
force" that it had surrounded and
warned to surrender or oe annhi-
lated.
That task force, by week's end.
was reputed to be in excess o.
12.000 Israeli troops with untold
numbers of tanks and other mo-
bile equipment in support.
Egypt insisted it had destroyed
85 of the tanks and 56 halftracks.
Israel Deiense Minister Moshe
Dayan, in commenting on the Is-
raeli plunge into Egypt, noted
that "Until yesterday (Saturday),
the air force was crossing the
canal with great danger.
"BUT SINCE we destroyed
their missile bases in the central
sector, the planes are flying much
more safely."
On the northern front in Syria,
action was relatively quiet, al-
though at ceasefire time, the Sy-
rians were still shelling advance
Israeli positions.
In response to the news that Is-
rael had knocked out all of Sy-
ria's oil installations during the
first two weeks of the war, Syria
announced Sunday that one of its
fighter planes had bombed an oil
refinery near Haifa. Israel denied
the report.
Israeli units have dug in at
Sassa. some 20 miles from Damas-
cus, and trained huge cannons at
the Syrian capital city which they
ray they can .-.hell from that van-
tage point.
AND SO, as the UN-imposed
ceasefire took effect, Israel was
some 20 miles into Syrian terri-
tory and some 40 miles from
Cairo deep in Egyptian territory.
From Cairo came charges that
L'.S. fighter pilots were flying
Phantoms for Israel directly to
El-A.ish, an Israel occupied
Egyptian town on the Mediter-
ranean coa:>t.
In Syria, the Israelis said their
toll of Syrian armor had reach-
ed 1.000 tanks and 190 planes.
Alfred Golden To Speak At
Temple Sinai Men's Meeting
The Men's Club of Temple Sinai
rill hold its regular meeting in
he Louis Zinn Chapel Tuesday,
Nov. 6, at 8 p.m., it was been an-
nounced.
Alfred Golden, guest speaker,
will discuss "Current Topics of the
Day," according to Sam Albert,
"hah man of the Social Affairs
Committee. Mr. Golden, who served
in the U.S. Army as a clinical
psychologist, has been affiliated
vith B'nai B'rith. the Anti-Defama-
aon League and Hillel at various
national and district levels.
Miramar Man \
Joins Hadassoh
Jesse Berk has become an as-
.' sociate life member of the Hen-
j rietta Szold Group of Hadassah in
: Miramar. Also accepted for mem-
' bcrship were his wife Ann. Mrs.
. Harry Cawn, Mrs. Ben Lobow,
1 Mrs. Sam Labow. Mrs. Sam Le-
' Bow and Mrs. John Staracin. Mr.
and Mrs. Charles Fine hosted the
recent meeting.
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
J?ew
Memorial Chapel
"JEWISH tUNUM D/RECfORS"
LOCAL AND OUT OF ST AT*
ARRANGfMENTS
947-2790
13MS W. OlXII HWV- N.M.
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD, HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
temple Betk &
WlemotiaC
gardens
The only all-jew ish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call:
923 8255 or write:___________m*r%**\
"Temple beth el #;^V
1351 S. 14th AVE.- HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above.
NAME: ___
ADDRESS:
_ PHONE:


Page 14
>JenisHnhrHii=r nd Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, October 26, 1973
Question Box
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
(), 1973 Jewish TaMarraphlc Agency
Why does Orthodox Jewish
practice forbid the use of an
organ in the synagogue?
A variety of reasons are given
for this prohibition. Some contend
that playing a musical instrument
was prohibited in a synagogue, es-
pecially during services, because
ever since the destruction of the
temple a spirit of mourning pre-
vails in accordance with the state-
ment in the Psalms (137:4) "How
shall we sing the song of the Lord
in a strange land?"
Others claim that the organ it-
self is considered an imitation of
the practice of another faith and
that Judaism should project its
own image. There arc others who
claim that the service to God must
be one that is directly issued from
man without being channeled
through some impersonal mechan-
ical device such as an organ.
Why does Jewish tradition In-
sist on the mezuzah parchment
being letter perfect ia its hand-
written content?
The actual commandment in the
Bible, from which the law requir-
ing a mezuzah on the doorpost i<
derived, expressly states that the
obligation is to "write" the hol>
words on the doorpost. This pindi
cates that" every Jew is "required
to be involved in writing the text.
This is accomplished by buying one
which means paying for the writ
ing of the parchment to be af
fixed to the doorpost.
Since the obligation involves
writing, the writing is of utmost
concern. Any mistake would make
the "writing" incomplete and
thus, the obligation of having the
mezuzah on the doorpost would
not be fulfilled.
The mezuzah, thus, resembles
the covenant between the Almighty
and the Jew which must be clearly
understood and manifested so that
there be no error or misunder
-tanding between man and God.
Beth Shalom To
Begin Classes
Rabbi Morton Malavsky and
Mordecai Opher, director of educa-
tion, have announced that con-
firmation classes at Temple Beth
Shalom will begin Thursday, Nov.
7, at 7 p.m.
The Confirmation Program at
Temple Beth Shalom consists of
a two-year course open to all 14-
anl 15 year old boys and girls who
have had their Bar or Bat Mitz-
vahs.
Weekly sessions of informal in-
struction in the areas of Jewish
Life will be conducted, providing
a forum for lively discussion and
exchange of ideas.
Registrations for the confirma-
tion classes are now being ac-
cepted. Further information may
be obtained at the school office.
If you can spend some time,
;even a few hours, with someone
fwho needs ;\ hand, not a handout,
call your local Voluntary Action
Center. Or write to "Volunteer,"
Washington. D.C. 20013.
flic National Center tor VJr
Voluntary Action. ?
Wt*fl conlrlfcutf* Ht pwWtc 1
y****f/ >-A v^ CANDLELIGHTING TIME
30 TISHRI 6:24
9
' Medical Supplies
Being Airlifted
Daily to Israel
Mrs. Arthur Feinberg is volun-
tary' chairman of a drive to obtain
contributions of drugs and medical
upplies from South Broward and
Dade County physicians to be air-
ifted to Israel, in response to an
.ppeal for non-governmental help
n replenishing the medications
ind equipment expended in that
ountry's war effort.
Mrs. Milton Meyers, wife of a
lollywood urologist, is coordinat-
.ng the Hollywood campaign,
vhich is under the chairmanship
f Dr. Eli Hirschman. 4430 Pine
Tree Dr., Miami Beach. Supplies
ire screened and packed at a Mi
imi gathering point and air-lifted
o Israel, usually within 24 hours.
A number of nhysicians' wives
have volunteered to pick up and de-
iver the donated iiems. Three
:ave offered the use of their homes
is drop-off locations, including Dr.
uid Mrs. Philip Gould, 930 Jeffer-
on St.: Dr. and Mrs. Louis Ben
vett, 4014 Lincoln St., and Dr.
ind Mrs. Stanley Margulies. 4350
\'. Player St., Emerald Hills.
Fred Lippman's Hillwood Chem-
-ts, 46th Avenue and Hollywood
3oulevard, is serving as a station
nc druggists and suppliers of the
area.
Panel Discussion
Set at Beth El
The Cultural Program of Temple
Beth El. hosted by the Brother-
hood, will present a discussion on
"Shou'd a Rabbi Officiate at an
| Intermarriage:' in the Tobin Aud-
itorium. 1351 S. 14th Ave.. Tues-
day at 8 p.m.
The panel win consist of Rabbi
Michael Eisenstat, Temple Judea,
Miami; Rabbi B >n Rosayn, Boca
Raton Hebrew Congregation, and
i Dr. Sam Feldman. Miami psychol-
| ogist.
Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffe. spiritual
r of Temple Beth Fl will
rate the discussion. There will
I be a question and answer period,
and refreshments will be served,
m is open to the pub-
'": ; 40 to the Youth Ac-
tivities Fund.
Religious
Services
. HAUANDAU .
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
(Conservntivr). 416 NE 8th Ave
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz, Canto*
Jacob Danziaer.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE !
18801 NE 22n.: Ave. Refurm. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingtley. Cantor Irving
Shulkea. 37
NORTH BROWARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON. !
QREGATICN. .Reform) 3501 Uni. I
vertity Dr.. Coral Springs. Rabbi
Max Weitz.
HOLLYWOOD
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1351 fc
14th Ave., Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffe.
BETH SHALOM (Temple) Conterva-
tlve. 4*01 Arthur M Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (Conservative).
310 SW 62nd Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi
Salomon Benerroche.
TEMPLE SOLEl (Liberal). 5001
Thomas St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Rob-
ert Fraiin.
TEMPLE SINAI (Conservati /). 1201
Johnson St. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun.
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Conservative)
6920 SW 35th St. Rabbi Avrom
Drazin.
i IRsWi -: :;' ''i'
i.....,.,.ii i:.-..mi' -,..111.1.1......;";..'i'" : m. :i '! ;:.u
Bar Mitzvah
MICHAEL SCHTJLTZ
^ Michael, son of Mrs. Elaine
Schultz and Morton Schultz, be-
came Bar Mitzvah Saturday, Oct.
13. at Temple Beth Shalom.
ft ft ft
HARVEY HARRIS
Harvey, son of Mrs. G. Hum-
"hries. celebrated his Bar Mitzvah
S'irday, Oct. 14. at Temple Beth
Shalom.
ft ft ft
ALAN SIFF
Alan Jay. son of Mr. and Mrs.
Wallace Siff. will be Bar Mitzvah
Saturday, Nov. 3. at Temple Sinai.
MICHAEL MYERS
Michael Ross, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Roy Myers, was called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah Saturday.
Oct. 20, at Temple Beth Shalom.
ft ft ft
BOBBIN DAVIS
Robbin, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Murray Davis, celebrated her
Bat Mitzvah Friday, Oct. 19. at
Temple Beth Ahm.
ft ft ft
STEVEN BAER
Steven Craig, the son of Mr.
t and Mrs. Sheldon Baer. will be-
i come a Bar Mltrvah St"i*day, Oct.
27, at Temple Beth Shalom.
ft ft ft
BRETT KUBUN
Brett Lawrence, -on of Mr. and
Mrs. Alvin Kublin. will be called
to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah Sat-
urday. Oct. 27. at Temple Beth El.
Community Calendar
PLEASE NOTE: Many of the events in the following schedule
have been cancelled or postponed. Please confirm with each
group whether the meeting or affair will be held:
FRIDAY. OCTOBER 26
Friday through Sunday Temple Israel cruise aboard the
Flavia
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27
Solel Sisterhood square dance 8 p.m. temple
Beth El Sisterhood dinner and square dance 7:30 p.m.
temple
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28
H'Atid group of Hadassah "Cabaret Night" 9 p.m.
Diplomat Hotel Tack Room
Temple Israel Youth Commission regular meeting 7
p.m. temple
MONDAY, OCTOBER 29
Jewish Youth Council executive committee meeting
7:30 Temple Beth Shalom
Beth El Sisterhood board meeting 8 p.m. temple
TUESDAY. OCTOBER 30
B'nai B'rith Women. Hallandale Chapter 1379 trip to San
Carlos Inn, Fort Myers Oct. 30 through Nov. 2
Broward Zionist District regular meeting 7:30 p.m.
Temple Sinai
Beth El Brotherhood program on "Intermarriage" 8
p.m. temple
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1
Beth El Brotherhood golf outing 830 am. Holly-
wood Lakes Country Club, 172nd Avenue and Holly-
wood Boulevard
Temple Israel Sisterhood regular meeting 8 p.m.
temple
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2
Beach group of Hadassah board meeting 10:30 a.m.
home of Mrs. Harry Bagdan
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3
Miramar Post 177, JWV "Las Vegas Night" 8 p.m.
Temple Israel
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4
Fourth lecture by Dennis Prager "The Jew Today and
Tomorrow" 8 p.m. Temple Beth Shalom
MONDAY. NOVEMBER 5
National Council of Jewish Women regular meeting and
book review 12:30 p.m. Temple Sinai
Beth El Brotherhood board meeting 8 p.m. temple
Beth Shalom Sisterhood general meeting and book fair
8 p.m. temple
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6
Beth El Sisterhood board meeting -- 9:30 a.m. temple
Hollywood Chapter of Hadassah board meeting 10 a.m.
Home Federal, Hollywood
Temple Sinai Sisterhood general meeting and book review
8 p.m. temple
Temple Sinai general meeting 8 p.m. temple
Twin County Council of B'nai B'rith Women regular meet-
ing 7:45 p.m. First Federal. North Miami Beach
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8
B'nai B'rith Women, Hallandale Chapter 1379 board meet-
ing 12:30 p.m. home of Mrs. Joe Rossman
H'Atid group of Hadassah general meeting 8 pm
Perry Middle School
Henrietta Szold group of Hadassah board meeting
12:30 p.m. Miramar Recreation Center
Miramar Chapter, Pioneer Women regular meeting
noon Miramar Recreation Center
rE
i'
.. i .
-
viirtfc.
ED-LEES
CLOTHING RACK
At the front entrance in the Hollywood Mall
100^ Polyester Double Knit
Mens Suits all one price $49.90
Sport Coats $34.90
Slacks $12.90
Complete stock of Bapy,(* & Jeans
\ \ t '
/
* *\ s
C> S\ /iV %'
Fox's
*
I
7//.m\\\n
SAVE
50/c
o
ON FIRST ORDER OF
SELTZER
Keg. $2.50 $ 9 C
Call Tpdayf N0W I
(LIMIT 1 CASE)
739-4540
2923 N.W. 17th TERRACE FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA.
U-BET
SYRUPS
Regular
&Diet
HAMMER
BEVERAGES
All
Flavors
A


fe

<
Stephen Bolivia's Jews
Are Well But
Losing Numbers
Friday, October 26, 1973
*Jewist fkriafiar and Shofar of Hollywood tags 15
La Paz, Bolivia
THE HALLWAYS of the Cir-
" culo Israeli'a in La Paz, Bo-
livia are mostly dark and silent
now. The small clubrooms in the
spacious four-story building are
usually empty, except for a few
hours during the week when a
handful of youngsters or adults
gather for a game of ping pong
or bridge.
The Jewish Center in Bolivia's
capital city, located just two
blocks from the bustling Prado,
today serves as more of a re-
minder of what used to be. rather
than what is, the state of affairs
of Jews in this rugged Latin
American nation.
"Perhaps, at most, there are
200 or 300 famili-s in the whole
country now,'' estimated Chaskiel
Silber, the part time director of
the Circulo Israelita. "Since the
1950s, thousand; of Jews have
left for the U.S., Israel, Brazil or
Argentina.''
THE RISE and fall of Bolivia's
Jewish population is an intrigu-
ing story with the most exciting
chapters during the 1930s, when
the Hitler era cast a dark shadow
across Eastern Europe. Jews
looking -for escape routes and
new homes found that for some
money and a pioneer's spirit
. Bolivia would welcome them.
The" landlocked Andean republic,
best known for its tin mines and
high altitude, at least could pro-
vide an access to other countries
in the Western Hemisphere once
the war was over.
By the early '50s. there were
close to 10,000 Jews in La Paz,
with a few thousand more in Co-
chabamba. Oruro. Sucre, and Po-
tosi. Jewish traditions and orga-
nized activities flourished the
Cl was erected in 1955 and
the new immigrants had become
leading businessmen in the larger
cities. But that is only a memory
now.
'There :- certainly no future
here for uur children," lamented
the sma'l. dark-haired Silber. As
he spoke, a few middle-aged
adults fled in the Circulo Is-
raelita's tidy dining room for a
late suopcr, followed by cards or
television.
"This building is only open
Wednesday and Sundny nights,"
he added. "There just aren't peo-
ple around to use it any more."
SILBER HIMSELF came to La
Paz in 1952 after paying the Bo-
livian consul in Germany $800
and being issued falsified papers.
The textile dealer smils contin-
uously and talks about moving to
Israel "in a year or two."
Thre is a rabbi in t^e countrv.
65-year-old Chaskiel Levin, also
living in La Paz. He leads the
Saturday morning services in the
CI's small shul, chanting Sabbath
prayers for the 20 or so regular
worshippers. Cochabamba, Boliv-
ia's second largest city, also has
a synagogue serving the families
who remain in that pleasant tour-
ist area.
In La Paz, some young students
still attend a school established
by the Jewish community several
years ago. "But now," Silber re-
vealed, "it has mostly a non-Jew-
ish enrollment."
PART OF that friendliness
could be due to a cordial rela-
tionship that has developed be-
tween the Bolivian government
and Israel. Agricultural missions
from the Jewish state have work-
ed closelv with Indian farmers
on the wind-swept altiplano and
in the lush tropics, contributing
the kind of assistance an under-
developed country" can aporeci-
ate, without strings attached.
"Bolivian newspapers are al-
ways carrying stories about Is-
rael," Goldman said. "And the
few Jews left her" have a spe-
cial sentimental attachment to
aheir homeland."
<_5cymoio* ^T). asL^icbi
IK7JJ
Lustig Novel a Many-Faceted Gem
READERS OF this column know that novels are
rarely reviewed with great enthusiasm. I
believe, however, that decades from now people
will be reading and discussing "A Prayer for
Katerina Horovitzova," by Arnost Lustig (Harper
Si Row, $5.95, 165 pp.).
The book was translated from the Czech by
Jeanne N'emcova. It first appeared in 1964 and
won the Clement Gottwald Prize in 1967. It has
been translated into Croatian, Bulgarian. German,
Hebrew and Japanese. The author was born in
Prague in 1926.
In 1942. he and his parents were sent to
Theresionstadt and then to Auschwitz where his
father died in the gas chambers. He and his
mother were then sent to Buchenwald. After the
war. they returned to Prague.
THE AUTHOR left Prague in 1968 after the
Soviet occupation of Czechoslovakia, and he now
resides with his wife and two children in Wash-
ington. D.C. He teaches at the American Univer-
sity. Many non-Jews still doubt that six-million
Jews died under the hands of Hitler's missions.
Others raise queries about how good German
Christians could have resorted to the now docu-
mented barbarities in the concentration, better
extermination, camps. For those who seek com-
prehension of the psyche, mental processes and
attitudes of the Nazis, "A Prayer for Katerina"
witl supply valuable insights.
EVEN THE role and activities of Rabbi
Dajem are narrated with a paucity of words.
How he was spared because of his beautiful
voice, and why he and the tailor were permitted
to survive are told unemotionally rather than
with the invoking of the despairing grief so
often considered a necessary part of talcs about
the camps.
The beautiful young Jewish girl, who is
joined to the 20 men by a freakish but plansible
accident despite having been designated for the
ovens, shares the center of attention with Her-
man Cohen, the spokesman for the other 19,
and. with the German officers in charge of the
operation of exchauge.
Lustig rejects Balzac's epigram that if evil
is massive enough it cannot be punished be-
cause a great evil exceeds the framework of the
criminal law. Lustig hopes that his book repre-
sents his attempt to punish. We believe that he
has succeeded. The book is a many-faceted gem.
Haifa's Coming into Mainstream
Haifa
A UNIQUE personality is scheduled to become
^^ the next mayor of Haifa. The candidacy of
Yosef Almogi is hailed with remarkable enthusi-
asm in every part of the city. A labor leader of
the old school, he is nevertheless popular among
the city's industrialists whom he once fought.
Though with little formal schooling, he has won
the respect of the city's academicians and schol-
ars. Recognized as the leader of the port work-
ers, he is still the darling of Carmel cafe society.
Everywhere in this city is the feeling that the
oid which has existed since the death of Abba
Khoushy is about to be filled by a strong and like-
able personality. There is no opposition to speak
of. and he will probably break all records for
public support.
THERE ARE few in Israel po'itics who, like
Almogi. have no foes, no antagonists only
friends and admirers. Once the butt of jokes for
his lnck of culture, he is now universally re-
spected for his lack of pretensions. I have known
him for years and can affirm that he is no stuffe!
-h'rt. His friendly spirit, his cordial smile, are
warm and spontaneous. He is fluent in speech,
and his command of English is excellent.
Yosef Almogi has had a remarkable career,
which in no small measure has helped to shape
the character of the man. Born in Poland, he
came to Israel in 1930 at the age ot 20. He lived
in a kibbutz for a while, became a labor orga-
nizer, and with the outbreak of the war volun-
teered to serve with the British army fighting
the Nazis in North Africa and Greece.
UPON HIS return to Israel he again became
a labor organizer. It was he who smashed the
seamen's strike in the early '50s, because he saw
in it a threat to the Histadrut. And it was he
who led the textile workers of Ata out on one of
the country's longest and bitterest strikes. He be-
came secretary of the Haifa Labor Council, and
secretary of Mapai. But when David Ben-Gurion
and Moshe Dayan formed the breakaway Rafi
Party. Almogi followed them in an unexpected
display of independence.
Under Abba Khoushy. Haifa was a separate
city-state, isolated and detached from the main-
stream of national politics. It is exported that
under Alnwei it will exert a new influence in
national affairs, and itself blossom and grow as
a thriving metropolis. And Almogi himself.
though no lonser in the Cabinet, will undoubtedly
become one of the most influential personalities
in the country.
i
Jack Lemmon Walter Matthan Tie
B
Hollywood
ILLY WILDER once more will pair Jack Lem-
mon and Walter Matthau, the team responsi-
ble for the ali-time hit, "The Fortune Cookie."
in his forthcoming feature, "The Front Page," a
remake of the famed Ben Hecht-Charles Mac-
Arthur play of the 1920s which was filmed twice
before in 1981 with Adnlph Menjou and Lee
Tracy, and 10 years later with Rosalind Russell
and Cary Grant. Walter Monash is the producer
of the latest version which Wilder is writing in
collaboration with his long-time colleague Iz
Diamond.

"SHLOCK." is a comedy-thriller dealing with
prehistoric monsters coming back into today's
world, written-produced-directed and enacted by
John Landis for Hollywood producer-distributor
Jack H. Harris.
Made for approximately S160.000, it won the
first prize "Golden Asteroid." at the Trieste In-
ternational Science Fiction Film Festival. The
picture was praised for its high technical achieve-
ments.

FRITZ LANG won the special Gold Medal at
Trieste for the poet'c concept and social aware-
ness he brought to the screen in the still silent
epic pictures "Metropolis" (1925) and "Woman
in the Moon" (1928). Both were written, pro-
duced and directed by Lang for UFA in Berlin.
Lang's "Metropolis." recently shown in Los An-
geles at the County Museum, was screened in
Trieste's retrospective series this year.
U.S. Wont Sell
Out Israel For
Barrel of Oil
'stmtMmtwmmMmummMmmmwmmMakiivmw^.mvMm
,..:.:.'.-:. I. "-" ,.-...
Some wno follow the vagaries
attending the Middle East shifts
of fortunes are upset by the glee
with which the Federation of
Arab Petroleum Workers hailed
Standard Oil of California's re-
cent propaganda letter calling
for a shift towards the sheik-
doms in U.S. Middle East policy.
Others arc exasperated by the
Standard letter itself and not
too convince.! by the west coast
company's belated effort to give
assurance that it really didn't
mean to heave a brick at Israel.
Lifting eyes to wider hori-
zons, the sympathetic television
reaction King Faisal of Saudi
Arabia draws from otherwise
pretty well-informed Americans
in his new assaults against Zion-
ism provides more cause for
worry. Faisals move towards a
new alignment with President
Anwar Sadat of Egypt carries
a thousand times the clout of
Libya's Colonel Muammar el-
Qaddafi's flirtations with Cairo.
QADDAFI OFFERS primar-
ily bombast and boastfulness
and a hungry desire to take
Nasser's place in the affections
of the Egyptians, but Faisal, as
oil rich as a modern despot can
be. brings to the bargaining
table not only barrels and bar-
rels of lubricant but also the
po'intial for delivery of Phan-
toms and other military .hard-
ware to Sadat.
In all of those considerations.
Americans who desire to trans-
late their anxiety into some-
thing constructive can take com-
fort from the following:
1. The Unit-d States is not
apt to change its traditional and
firmly established policy of
working to maintain a balance
of deterrent force in the Middle
East and to stand back of an
ongoing assurance not to let
Israel be ground to pices by oil
bargains, Arab mergers, oil
cornnanv propaganda, the dedi
cated opposition of Moscow, or
anv combination of these and
other factors.
Jrhn A. Sca'i. representing
th* U.S. at the UN, has point-
edly in recent days refreshed
the memory of the forgetful by
slating without equivocation
that U.S. policy towards Israel
remains today what it has been
through the vears of Israel's
emergence and progress.
2. THE MOST authoriative
figure serious students of the
oil problem can find today is
that of 10 per cent of U.S. oil
and gas imports actually coming
from the Middle East. The oil
wealth of Canada and Venezuela
is by no means exhausted. And
there is every reason to believe
that the United States will find
oil available in shale deposits,
in oceanic beds, in Alaska, or
in other regions now under con-
stant probe
3. Those foes of Israel who
have tried to picture the "En-
ergy Crisis" as a spreading
plague, with its roots in the
oil politics of the Middle East,
are gradually going through an
unravelling process. That there
is an enercy shortage is as ob-
vious as the hottest day of sum-
mr. But that Israel's head-
aches over Arab intransigence
have churned up an "energy
crisis." vo'ldwide and ominous.
is ridiculous.
The American Israel Public
Affairs Committee has con-
vinced many that it is not a
crisis the oil hungry world faces,
but one more solvable problem.
Says that body:


Page 16
* Jewish TtcrtjHair
and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, October 26. 1973
LIKE NEW
USED CARS
'73 CADILLAC
*M fM ilaeae. y lo
td *.e* Omt ...
1 iie>
;$7395
IKE NEW
USED CARS
OVER 50 BRAND NEW 1973
CHRYSLERS & PLYMOUTHS MUST GO
'70 PONTIAC
Le Mint convertible. VI,
taiofo' < tcanimisiion,
an conditioning Hue.
5>
'73 GREMLIN
tde*', VI, vtomofic
'rocHOMSlrOO), fcloty fir a.
'73 PONTIAC
Grand fru, immaculate
condition, lull power, lac- jk
ry en conditioning, very ;V
U mikofo, one owner. ?
1995
2595
5195
1973 CHRYSLER
NEW YORKER
door. vinyl dr meuld.pg .myl intone* factory ear. *wremotic hO*lIwUH, pewe* .teeiing.
po-' diw b'c.. flectiic window., tpaad control, doe* ioc.t. many, mony aitiot.
Stock BSOOt
WAS $7322.30
now $5879
'70 CADILLAC
flcttwood 4 door '. j
power, oir condit'C J
mg. Gold
'73 CADILLAC
Coupe DeVille. 2 door,
Yellow, lull power, oir
conditioned.
$
3595
6495
ra,ht A doolar prop
1973 PLYMOUTH FURY
4 deer, factory air, power itoaf.no. pewar due brofaal whilawaMt, many othr tahai.
t< WAS $4902.60
now $3910
Pi-t l.*.gKi t dealer prp
'70 CHRYSLER
Nt-pert 4 dooi
power, at' lenditic -
1995
'73 COUGAR
1 door hardtop, Vt
ouiomatic Iramitiis-
non, full power. Rod.
3695
1973 VALIANTS
TO CHOOil FROM
4 doort, 4 cylinder, tinted g an. putomaM liantrtiittien.
'69 COUGAR
2 door hardtop, V8
automatic transmit-
sion, air conditioning,
Red.
$
1895
NOW
$2619
rXwi fr.gM 4 daoUr prep.
'70 CADILLAC
Coupe DeVille. 2 door
'73 FORD LTD
> deer Herder, lull
ewer, eir ceHdttioned,
uerte. led.
$
3795
1973 CHRYSLER IMPERIAL LeBARON
. pewar ttoaring power die b*Otai,
arae iod.a. lilt whool. tpaad control,
$6728
hordtop, full power, C t% M f\ F
oir (ondttioning "* C ^^L \M ^^
Whir*. \J T / /
4 dee* hordiop f pewar window*, pewer teott. pewar deer teckt. ticrae radio, tilt wheel, tpaad control,
tneny aXret.
WAS $0508.40 NOW
rivi f*a>ght 4 daolar prap.
'71 FORD
Mustong 2 door
hardtop, automatic
transmission, air con-
ditioning, While.
$
2695
& Harbor Chrysler Plymouth
US. 441 iust south of Sheridan St.
HOLLYWOOD 962-6400
Service Hevrs Mon.-Fri. 7:30 AM-5 PM
Sales Hours Mon.-Fri 9 AM-6 PM
?i


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