The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00077

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Hollywood responding to Israel Emergency; Series of Meetings Brings J
Unprecedented Funds, According to Melvin Baer Federation Chairman, I
'

^Jewish fliariidii'ai in
and SIMM Alt OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
rolume 3 Number 23
* *
Hollywood, Honda Friday, October 12, 1973
Price 20 cents
V
-*'
tf
y
\
Eban Says U.S. Barred Preemptive Strike
By Special Report
Israel's Foreign Minister
ta Eban appeared on ABC-
PV's "Issues and Answers" Sun-
jay and charged that the Egypt-
Syria attack on Israel on Yom
iippur was "an act of infamy."
Eban's charge came moments
ter Egyptian Foreign Minister
tohammed el-Zayyat declared
the same program that the
vo Arab nations would not agree
a cease-fire until they recap-
red all of the occupied terri-
ories or until they were given
up by Israel.
EBAN SAID that the attack
yas designed to catch the Is-
aelis unaware and to obtain a
military advantage that the Arabs
.11 nevertheless not be able to
aintain.
Promising ultimate victory, al
though at admittedly high Is
rae'.i cost, Eban noted that Israel
would only agree to a cease-fire
when the 1970 cease-fire lines
had been restored, that is, when
Israel had succeeded in repulsing
the Syrian incursion onto the
Golan Heights in the north and
the Egyptian attack across the
Suez Canal to the south.
El-Zayyat and Eban appeared
in separate half-hour segments.
Eban labeled as "a lie" el Zay-
yat's charge that the two-pronged
attack was in response to pro-
vocative Israeli attacks the day
before, although el-Zayyat's main
reference was to the mid-Septem-
ber battle between Syrian and Is-
raeli planes, when Israel knocked
11 Syrian MIG's out of the sky.
EBAN SAID that despite the
ON DAY OF YOM KIPPUR
Yom Kippur holiday observance,
Israelis had not been caught flat-
footed. On the contrary, he said,
Israel had been warning "our
friends" for sometime that an
attack was imminent.
In response to questions about
U.S. Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger's meetings with Eban
at the United Nations, Eban said
that "our friends" had in effect
warned that 'preemptive strikes'
were out," meaning that although
Israel expected the Arab attack,
she would have to sustain the
first blow as the price for con-
tinued support of her position.
Eban said that Israel agreed,
although it was proving to be a
high price in Israeli lives to pay
In Eban's view, discussion
either before the Security Coun-
cil or the General Assembly
gypt, Syria War Against Israel
As Dayan Vows Victory
seemed futile because of the pre-
ponderence of Arab representa-
tives or Arab friends in both
bodies, including the Soviet
Union.
EARLIER, el-Zayyat had said
that Egypt would welcome action
from the United Nations, but
that the UN had done nothing
since the August. 1970 cease-fire
to force Israel to acquiesce to the
November, 1970 resolution de-
manding Israel's withdrawal of
its forces from the occupied ter-
i iiories as a starting point for ne-
gotiation of a permanent peace.
As the two 'li llama!'; were
Continued on Page 11
By Special Report
Determined to undercut Israel's
growing word-of-mouth assurances
that the 1970 cease-fire lines are
negotiable if the Arabs are ready
for genuine peace talks, Egypt
nd Syria crossed into Israeli
territory Saturday to launch a
war against the Jewish state on
two fronts.
' The cross-over occurred at 2
' pjn., during the afternoon of
the Day of Atonement, as Jews
in Israel and throughout the
.world were celebrating Yom
Kippur.
THE EGYPTIANS promptly es-
tablished bridges across the Suez
Canal, and the Syrians took up
positions on the Israeli-held Golan
Heiahts in the north, with early
reports from Damascus declaring
that Mt. Hermon had fallen be-
fore the attack of Syria's forces.
Prime Minister Golda Meir
promptly appeared on national
television and declared that: "We
are fighting for our very survi-
val." Simultaneously, she dis-
missed as nonsense a Cairo com-
munique that Egypt had seized
part of Israeli territory on the
western bank of the canal.
"We are battling and throwing
back the attack," Mrs. Meir said,
adding that "the enemy has been
caused serious losses."
LABELING THE Egyptian-Syr-
ian attack "an act of lunacy," she
assured Israelis that, "We have
no doubt about our victory."
In announcing the attack, even
as most Israelis were still in syn-
agogue, Kol Israel said that Syria
had massed some 2,000 tanks near
the Golan Heights. Egypt had
massed 3,000 tanks, 1.000 artil-
Israel on Attack
In Mideast War;
Smashes Invaders
By Tuesday, the third day into the war, Israel launched its counter-
offensive against Syrian and Egyptian forces by sending armor and
warplanes into action on two fronts.
By Special Report .
congressmen to join me in insist-
Late Monday night, it was al- j ing that the U.S. government im-
ready apparent that Israel had es-, mediately release to Israel all air-
tablished air supremacy over the I have been contracted for but not
skies of the Middle East although' yet delivered."
Cairo. Damascus and Beirut radios
lery pieces and 250,000 troops
a.ong the Suez Canal.
Military' analyst Chaim Herzog
said the attack seemed designed
to seize Israeli-occupied territory
and to hold it until a Security
Council move would call for a
cease-fire. In effect, this would
cancel out the bargaining posi
tion Israelis were letting it known
they have been willing to adopt
in a permanent peace arrange-
ment.
With little or nothing left to
trade, Egypt and Syria hoped that
a strike on Yom Kippur that
caught the Israelis "unaware"
could effectively force Israel back
to her pre-1967 borders.
In another broadcast hours
after the war began, Israel De-
fense Minister Moshe Dayan de-
Continued on Page 8
claimed that the Arabs had shot
down 109 Israeli aircraft.
The Israeli counter-offensive
was in response to the Egyptian
crossing of the Suez Canal on Yom
Kippur and Syria's attack against
the Israel-occupied Golan Heights.
AT AN early press-time neces-
sitated by the Sukkot holiday, U.S.
Rep. William B. Lehman told The
Hollywood Jewish Floridian and
Shofar that "In the face of the
current outbreak of war in the
Middle East, I will urge my fellow
Lehman, who represents the 13th
Congressional District in Dade and
Broward Counties, said that "I
want to express my outrage over
this unprovoked attack by Egypt
and Syria compounded by the
launching of their aggression on
Yom KiDDur.
"The U.S. government must act
to release the weapons the State
of Israel has contracted for to
balance off the enormous quanti-
ties of MIG fighters and Soviet
Continued on Page 11
Beth El President To Serve
As High-Rise Cocliairman
. Nathan Pritrher. cochairman of
the 1974 IMA JWA campaign
ind chairman of the High-Rise
Division, has announced the ap-
pointment of Lewis Conn as his
cochairman.
Mr. Colin, who is president of
Temple Beth El and a member
Of the Board of Trustees of the
Jewish Welfare Federation, has
long been active in the commu-
nity He holds memberships on
the boards of the Broward Chap-
ter of the American Jewish Com-
mittee, the Hollywood Jewish
Community Relations Committee,
asd the Herzl Lodge of B'nai
B'rith. During last year's fund-
raising drive he was involved in
residential solicitation.
Mr. Cohn's specific frame of
reference will be those high-rises
east of Federal Highway, includ-
ing the beach area. Golden Isles
and Diplomat Parkway.
As his vice chairmen Mr. Cohn
has appointed area leaders as fol-
lows:
Hollywood Beach Carolyn
Davis and Sydney Holtzman; Hal-
landale Beach EastOtto Stieber
and William Littman; Hallandale
Beach WestMeyer Kaplan and
Jerome Gevirman; and Golden
IslesAbe Halpern and Maurie
Meyers.
Mr. Cohn is still seeking a vice
chairman for the Diplomat Park-
way division.
UWfS CONN
Exclusive AJPA
Report On War
The follow inft telegram is from a direct telephone call made from c'.i.. r
Cashman exclusive Israel correspondent for the American Jewish Press
Association in Israel. Th.....ill was made al 5:18 p.m. Jerusalem time Mon
Jay. it is an exclusive AJPA dispatch.
JERUSALEM(AJPA)Oct. 8 More bombs were dropped
by the Israeli Air Force in one hour this morning than were dropped
by the Israeli Air Force throughout the whole of the Six-Day War.
At 8:10 this morning, Israeli planes raided five major Syrian airfields
inflicting heavy losses and damage on the enemy. The Egyptian Air
Force activated this morning large numbers of aircraft to bomb Is-
raeli targets throughout Sinai. A military spokesman announced that
approximately 16 planes were downed by Israeli aircraft and anti-
aircraft fire from Israeli forces. The Israelis also wiped nut the .Io-
nian Egyptian commando unit.
The largest massive defense battle ever fought by the Israel de-
fense forces took place all day yesterday along the Suez Canal and on
the southern front. Bands of Egyptians torn away from their units are
now astray in Sinai. Four hundred Egyptian tanks which had crossed
the Suez have been trapped in the Egyptian bridgehead across the
canal. The Israelis have also wiped out 400 Syrian tanks.
At the outbreak of the war Saturday afternoon, the total of Egyp-
tian and Syrian forces was believed to exceed the combined might of
the Arab armies during the Six-Day War by approximately 30 per cent.
Israeli forces expect to be outnumbered by six to one. The dispro-
portionate ratio in numbers has not had any deterrent effect on
Continued on Page 11


Page 2
-Jenist fhrHlan Shof,r of Hollywood
Friday, October 12, 1973
Temple Sinai Sisterhood leaders took part in a two-day
Conference on Jewish Family Survival held by the Wom-
en's League for Conservative Judaism at the Eden Roc
Hctel recently. Pictured here are (from left) Mrs. Jake Mo-
gilowit7;, Mrs. Albert Freeman, Mrs. Joel Rottman, Mrs.
Henry Rappaport, national president of the 800-member
Sislerhocd organization, Mrs. Edwin Gordon, Mrs. Bret Lus-
skin, Mrs. Milton Geilman, and Mrs. Charles Piarson.
Women's League Holds 2-Day
Conference In Miami Beach
The role of the women volim-
t< i In Am rican and Jewish life
v.a- examined at the closing tes-
}>ion of the recent national board
meeting of the Women's League
for Conservative Judaism held in
M.jmi Beach.
"I would say that a Jewish wom-
an can be completely fulfilled
only if she gives something of her
time and herself to improve th'-
world in which she lives," de-
clared internationally-known nu-
clear scientist Dr. Betty Maske-
witz. a national vice president of
the 800-mcmber Sisterhood or^an-
The director of the radiation
shielding information center of
the Oak Ridge National Labora-
tory in Tennessee, Dr. Maskewitz
discredited the prevalent notion
that today's working woman no
]nn"er has time for volunteer ac-
tivities.
"There is time in one's life to do
bothto work as a volunteer and
as a professional," she said. "It is
one of the functions of Judaism
to try to influence people for the
better, to try to improve the qual-
ity of life around you so that it
becomes better for everyone."
Rabbi Seymour Friedman, direc-
tor of the Southeast Region.
United Synagogue of America,
addressed the conference discus-
sion which focused on stren.
ing Jewish family life.
"Jewish women must begin to
reci eate the home as a miniature
sanctuary t.i counteract the frag-
1 of lifi i mi :;:a to
day," said Rabbi I"i > "The
h conci pi of family lifi
be nan I will contlnu to bi
' '! : ."atii n
of Judai in."
Pail In tfa ; inel dii
1 Iman were
Mrs, Henry Rappaport of Scars-
j aie, N.Y.. national president of
'he League-: .Mrs. M. Milton Per y
1 'f Philadelphia, Pa., a national
rice president: and Mrs. Stuart
: Wagner of North Miami Beach.
president of the B'nai Raphael
1 Sisterhood.
Over 100 women synagogue lead-
I gracomprising the national and
i regional leadership of the conser-
vative Sisterhood organization, met
' for the two-day session. Mrs. Ru-
dolph Astor, West Roxbury, Mass.,
.oordinator of Training Services
for Women's League, was chair-
nan of the National Planning
Committee for the conference.
The host branch committee was
rhaired by Mrs. Arthur Brown and
Mrs. Jack Wolfstein of Miami
8each. Serving with them were
Mrs. Herbeit Cohen of Miami
each and Mrs. Morton Levin of
tiollywood, registration cochair-
men.
Local Chapter Of
B.B. Women Plans
TVo Fund Raisers
"With the dedication of the new
Wilfg oi *iir- ij'nai Birth Women's
Children's Home in the Judeftft
Hill, near Jerusalem taking place
this month, it seems appropriate
or B'nai B'rith Women and all of
heir friends to support its fund-
raising affairs and projects to con-
tinue its outstanding contributions
in serving humanity throughout
the world," reports Mrs. David
LeVine. a past pre-ident and trus-
tee of both the Hollywood Chap-
ter and the Broward-Noith Duiie
Council of BBW.
Since 1943 BBW has made re-
hab Italian of emotionally dis-
turbed children in Israel (origin-
ally as a result of the Holocau l)
its particular concern. For this
purpose the BBW Children's Homo
was established.
in 11)73 BBW established the
Group House for residential psy-
chotherapy fur graduates of the
Children's Home who are not yet
ready to enter the mainstream of
Israeli life.
Hollywood Chapter invites the
pub.ic to attend two of its fund-
rai iing affairs during the next few
week-;. A "Fall Luncheon and
Fa.-hien Show" will be heid at the
Reef Restaurant in Ft. Laucicr-
dale at noon Thursday, Oct. 25.
Cochairing the event are Mrs. Sol
Cohen and Mrs. David Drubin.
Following the luncheon, guests are
invited to remain and play cards.
On Sunday evening, Nov. 4, the
chapter will sponsor an 8 p.m.
theatre party" at the Hollywood
Playhouse for a presentation of
A Funny Thine Happened on the
Way to the Forum." Reservations
may be made through Mrs. David
LeVine or any member of the
chapter.
Gentlemen are welcome at all
chapter events.
Beth f.f Brotherhood To Open Season With Dinner
The 1973-74 Beth El Brother- Entertainment will be presented |
hood season will open Tuesday iy Bill Bernardi.
with an Installation dinner at 6:30 All u-mnle members an! their
p.m. in the Tobin Auditorium. Mr. guests are invited. Ret
Lewis Colm. pre>idot of {he tem-i jro necessary mid miy b- made
pie. will he rht> installing offi'-er. nroueh the temple office.
. .,'.. -.

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The Jewish Calendar
5734.
1973
F"t Dov o* Succolh Thurs. Thurs. Frl. Ort Ocl Ocl ii
Feost of Conclusion -
Sirrehoth Toroh 19
Rosh HcwJesh Heshvon Sot. Mon. Ocl NOV. 11
ejosh HoOtsh Kiilev 26
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Friday, October 12. 1973
+J(**1stl ncrldian nd Shofar of Hollywood
Page 3
Succoth Is Holiday Of
V
\
Harvest And
By RABBI SAMUEL JAFFE
Temple Beth El
At sundown on Wednesday,
Jews everywhere began the cele-
bration of Succoth, the "Feast of
Tabernacles" or "Booths," a holi-
day of harvest and thanksgiving,
and the most joyous of all the
Jewish observances.
Succoth is observed by Reform
Jews for eight days and for nine
by Orthodox and Conservative
Jews. The holiday was called the
Harvest Festival because, accord-
ing to the Biblical book of Deu-
teronomy, it was celebrated at the
conclusion of the autumnal har-
vest. The book of Exodus also
describes it as the "Festival of
Ingathering" of the fruits of the
earth.
The theme of the holiday is
immediately recognizable by non-
Jewish Americans, for the Amer-
ican Thanksgiving holiday was
deliberately patterned upon Suc-
coth by the Scripture-minded Pil-
grims. It shares with Thanksgiv-
ing the predominant ideas of
autumnal harvesting and joyous
gratitude to God for his bounty.
Many ancient symbols, evoca-
tive of the Biblical past of the
Jewish people during which their
culture was both agricultural and
nomadic survive unchanged in this
holiday.
In keeping with the Biblical
injunction, Jews build "succoth,"
or booths, outside their homes or
synagogues; these are made of
three wooden walls, and the roof
is covered with green boughs and
decorated inside with the fruits
of the harvest season. Meals are
eaten in the "succoth" during this
holiday, and prayers and songs of
gratitude and joy are recited in
them.
The building of "succoth" is also
associated historically with the
liberation from Egypt and the long
wandering of the Jewish people
before they reached the Promised
Land of Palestine. It is also
thought to symbolize the fragility
and transitory quality of life and
to serve as a reminder to Jews
that material things, like the "suc-
coth" have little permanence.
Reminiscent of both harvest and
the desert, two other ancient sym-
bols are an integral part of the
Succoth observance. They are the
"etrog," or citron, and the "lulav,"
a palm branch.
The prevailing spirit of this hol-
iday is joyousness and rejoicing,
in keeping with biblical command-
ment which enjoins the "Thou
shalt be altogether joyful," and
Original Drama Will Be
Presented To Beach Group
A dramatic skit entitled "Moth-
*%rs of Jews," written and di-
rected bv program vice president
Mrs. Henry Schwartz, will be
presented at the 1 p.m. meeting of
the Beach Group of Harta.sah
Wednesday at Galahad South. The
meeting will presided over by
Mrs. William Schulman, president.
Participating in the drama will
be Mrs. Phyllis Davles, Mrs. Rob-
ert Davis. Mrs. William Rabin,
Mrs. Mildred Ockner, Mrs. Sidney
Dulberg, Mrs. Dave Fisher, Mrs.
Irving Goldwasser, Mrs. George
Weitzman and Mrs. Charles Sie-
gel.
Thanksgiving
the description of Succoth is, in
Jewish tradition, "the season of
our rejoicing."
From the Union Prayerbook,
used in Reform Jewish services
comes this passage from the Suc-
coth service which typifies the re-
ligious attitude toward the holiday:
"O God and Father, all that we
are we owe to Thee: all that we
have is Thy gift. On this, our feast
of joy and thanksgiving, we rec-
ognize how much there is for
which we should be grateful. The
radiant beauty of nature, the vivi-
fying sunshine, the refreshing rain,
the care with which Thy loving-
kindness provides for our every
need, all awaken within us feel-
ings of deep gratitude toward
Thee. Thy providence is ever
watchful. Thy protecting arm is
stretched out over all Thy crea-
tures. Thou openest Thy hand and
satisfiest every living thing with
favor. Thou hast blessed the work
of our hands and established it
for us. When our foot stumbled,
1 Thou didst uphold us: in the night
of adversity, Thou didst revive our
drooping spirits ."
On Succoth the Book of Eccle-
siastes is also read in the syna-
gogue.
Hollywood Women
To Attend UJA's
Regional Retreat
"To share experiences, informa-
tion, and to make plans for the
1974 campaign" are the goals of
the second Florida State "Region-
al Retreat" to convene Tuesday in
Palm Beach under the auspices of
the National Women's Division of
the United Jewish Appeal.
With the Palm Beach Jewish
Federation acting as host, the two-
day meeting will center around
"total involvement" and will be
held at the Holiday Inn in Century
Village.
Dr. Allan Pollack, professor of
Russian history at Yeshiva Uni-
versity and one of the world's
authorities on the problems of
Jews in the Soviet Union, will be
joined by Howard Stone, UJA pro-
fessional of New York in charge
of Young Leaders Cabinet and
Leadership Development, as schol-
ars-in-residencc.
Local Women's Division dele-
gates will include Mrs. Marsha
Tobin, 1974 chairman of the UJA/
JWF fund-raising drive; and the
Mesdames Louise Diamond, Elaine
Pittell, Joyce Roaman, Sue Miller,
Rona Miller, Anita Weiss and
Sandra Miller.
Sinchat Torah Oct. 21
On the ninth and final day of Succoth, the year's reading of
the Pentateuch is completed. This day is known as Simchat
Torah, a full-fledged holiday and a most l.appy one, for it cele-
brates the end of the year's reading and the beginning of the
new.
In many cities preparations are well underway for unity
observances with Soviet Jews in conjunction with this festival.
Our own local observance will take place this Sunday with a
youth rallly.
Originally begun as an American Jewish simultaneous dem-
onstration of solidarity with the thousands of courageous young
Soviet Jews who gathered in front of the synagogue in Moscow
and other cities, these annual programs have come to be one
of the most sifnificant forums for mass community interpreta-
tion of the cause of Soviet Jews.
Last year for the first time the Simchat Torah gatherings
in Moscow were totally dispersed. It is important, therefore,
that American unity be made even stronger than in past years.
American Jews must continue and intensify pressure on
Congress as well as letter writing campaigns to individual So-
viets. The Russians must be made to know that WE SHALL
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Area Youth To Celebrate
Simchat Torah At Rally
The Berman ranch in-Davie will
again be the setting for an area
get-together organized by the
Youth Council of the Jewish Fed-
eration.
The rally, to take place Sun-
day from 1 to 5 p.m., will feature
the traditional football game be-
tween the Young Leaders Council
and the teenagers of Federation
with the cash prize for the winner
going to the cause of Soviet Jew-
ry. Each member of both groups
will contribute a set amount to-
wards that prize.
There will also be swimming,
and participants are asked to bring
bathing suits and towels.
Teams of 12 will be arranged at
the ranch for sports competitions.
They can be all boys, all girls, or
mixed.
Dennis Prager, who is slated to
conduct the third in his series of
educative forums that evening at
Temple Beth El, will also be
present.
Bus transportation will be pro-
vided, leaving from the Medical
Center at 46th and Sheridan at
12:30 p.m. There will be a small
donation from each participant.
The festivities will be headed
by program chairman Susi Tanur
and program vice president Paul
Kerbel. Committee members are
Linda Meyers, Lisa Bennett, Deb-
bie May, Nina Siff and Steve Wein-
stein.
To inaugurate the 1974
UJA-JFW CAMPAIGN
Greater Hollywood Benefactors
and their spouses
will be invited to a kick-off dinner
Sunday, January 20,1974
WATCH FOR DETAILS
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
arnett
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NITELY
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Page 4
+Jewish fkx-Mtan nd Shotsr of Hollywood
Friday, October 12, 1973
^Jewish'Meridian \ Anti-Semites at Senate Hearing
1 ._j T v"? ion U c- eiv cr Miami Flo Tnt*> Phnri* 373-4d05 ^"^'
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E. 6th St., Miami, Fla. 3313? Phone 373-4G05
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 373-4605
P.O. Box 2973. Miami. Florida 33101
FRED K. SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SELMA M. THOMPSON
I Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Assistant to Publisher
JOAN MEYERS, News Coordinator
f The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kaehruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published Bl-Weekly by the Jewish Floridian
Beyond-Class Postage Paid at Miami. Fla.
Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood Shofar Editorial
ADVISORY ri'MMITTEE Dr. Sheldon Wlllens. Chairman; Ross Becker-
man. Ben Salter. Marlon Nevlns. Dr. Norman Atkin, Robert N. Kerhel
The Jewish Floridian hat absorbed tht Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndi-
cats. Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American As-
sociation of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year $4.00. Out of Town Upon
Reouept.
Volume 3
Friday, October 12, 1973
Number 23
16 TISKRI 5734
Kreisky Makes a Choice
The bitterly galling aspect of the whole sordid Aus-
trian mess is that Chancellor Bruno Kreisky is himself a
Jew. His knuckling under to Arab terrorism, his withdrawal
of Vienna as the way-station for oppressed Jews from
the Soviet Union to Israel is the kind of betrayal that no
one else but a Jew would visit on his brother in the same
way.
Kreisky should know better. Months ago. we reported
in these columns the anti-Semitism with which he has had
to deal from elements of his own party, some of whom
are former SS officers.
In the heyday of the Nazis, the Austrians weren't so
much conquered and invaded as they welcomed the "en-
emy" and almost immediately they became more viciously
oppressive, more Jew-hating than the Nazis themselves
had been in the past.
And why not? A psychotic corporal named Adolf
Hitler came from Austria.
As Austria's first Jew to become chancellor, Kreisky
was at least some kind of vindication of that nation's great
cultural and intellectual past. It is not that with his elec-
tion anti-Semiti3m died in Austria, only that it was a meas-
ure of Austria's willingness to opt for a new kind of choice,
a choice other than its choice when Austrians welcomed
the Nazis that Kreisky's political success was meaningful.
But in giving up to the Arabs, the Jew Kreisky has
destroyed the meaning of that choice let alone the hopes
of so many Jews fleeing Soviet oppression who must now
wait for a new way-station somewhere else in Europe be-
fore they can resume their flight for Israel in numbers.
The Mature of the Universe
We know this is a sensitive question, but it is worth
examining the statement by Israel's Ashkenazic Chief
Rabbi Shlomo Goren that the decision by the American
Conservative movement to count women for the minyan
"can not even be considered."
Rabbi Gcren wants us to know that the exclusion of
women from the minyan "is not discrimination." It is,
he declares, "halachic law based on the nature of the
universe."
In the wake of such high-sounding rhetoric, it seems
that we are at least entitled to understand just what Rabbi
Goren means by "the nature of the universe."
Does this mean that "the universe" has ordained that
women not be permitted to be counted for the minyan?
If that is what the Rabbi means, then it seems that the
universe, which generalljypnplies far more cosmic con-
siderations, is really reaching down into some rather tri-
fling problems.
Past Not Easily Forgotten
The nomination of Andrei D. Sakharov as a candidate
for the Human Rights Prize of the United Nations is, we
think, a bit hasty.
After all. Dr. Sakharov's major contribution to man-
kind's best interests was his theoretical work leading to
the Soviet Union's first hydrogen bomb.
That's not very much to crow about.
On the other hand, Sakharov's open support of Alex-
ander Solzhenytsin's long-held position that Russia is
brutally oppressive and must give this up if it really wants
to become a member of the family of nations does deserve
praise.
If that is what those who nominated Sakharov want
to say, then it is a worthy statement. But the Human Rights
Prize well, the past is not so easily forgotten.
AMONG THE organizations ap- I
pearing before the Senate
hearings to argue against confir-
mation of Dr. Henry Kissinger
as secretary of state was the Lib-
erty Lobby.
The organization is headed by
Washington lobbyist Curtis Dall,
and much was made of his anti-
Semitic testimony, but the press
seemed strangely silent about
the man and his background.
Dall is a former Franklin
Roosevelt son-in-law. Once mar-
ried to Anna Roosevelt, the cou-
ple gave the President and Elea-1
nor their first and most favorite
grandchildren, Sistie and Buzzie.
But Dall was not content to
bask in the spotlight of the
Rooseveltian fame and power, or
in the patrician glory of its
Dutchess County (New York)
splendor.
INSTEAD, HE gravitated to-
ward the Liberty Lobby, which
had been founded by Willis Carto,
chief ideologist and tactician be-
hind the now seemingly defunct
Nazi movement in America.
It was Carto who once declared
that "Hitler's defeat was the de-
feat of Europe and America. How
could we have been so blind? he
asked, and promptly answered
his own question:
"The blame must be laid
at the door of the international
Jews."
A major project of the Liberty
Lobby has been to encourage the
sales of "Imperium," the "Mein j
Kampf" of Nazism in the United \
States.
WHATEVER IT was that at- \
traded Dall to the Liberty Lobby,
he lost no time in trumpeting its !
philosophy.
When, in the summer of 1963,
President Kennedy was pressing
for a revised trade policy, with
particular emphasis on a new
approach to tariffs, Dall ap-
peared before hearings of the
Senate Finance Committee to
voice his opposition.
Speaking for the Liberty Lobby.
Dall warned the committee that
Kennedy's trade policies were I
not really Kennedy's, but those
of his "political bosses and men-
tors.''
These, he identified as "the
political Zionist planners for ab-
solute rule via one-world gov-
ernment."
Explained Dall: "This is the
basic group that created and fi-
nanced what is called Commu-
nism, which bores upward on
Christian society from the bot-
tom."
Before the committee could
catch its breath, Dall added:
'The political Zionist planners
for absolute rule via one-world |
government have gained the
power to influence, while remain-'
ing themselves in the shade, and I
thanks to the press, they have
got the gold in their hands I
notwithstanding that they have
had to gather it out of oceans
of blood and tears.
WHATEVER THE Liberty
Lobby said about the Kissinger
confirmation, it couldn't have
been any less lurid than that.
A sad sidelight of this testi-
mony is that it was being given j
at the same, time that Florida '
Sen. Edward Gurney was sitting
as a member of the Senate com-
mittee hearings into the Water-
gate scandal.
Willis Carto founded not only
the Liberty Lobby, but the United
Congressional Appeal, as well, if
possible an even more Nazi-ori-
ented organization than the Lib-
erty Lobby itself, whose purpose
Carto declared was to "capture"
political power in America.
During the 1968 congressional
and gubernatorial campaigns, the
United Congressional Appeal is
reported to have contributed up-
ward of $90,000 to conservative
candidates across the country,
perhaps a pittance by today's
standards when we are blithely
being told about the $60 million-
plus garnered by the Nixon cam-
paign last year, but a hefty sum
nevertheless.
MANY OF the recipients of
United Congressional Appeal giftj
expressed shock when they dis-
covered the nature of the organ.
ization and its tie with the no-
torious Liberty Lobby.
But Sen. Gurney, who received!
a $2,500 check signed by Carlo
himself, stuck to his guns.
Despite all evidence to the
contrary. Gurney observed. "I
find them (the United Congres-
sional Appeal and the Liberty
Continued on Page 9-
NEW YORK It was Eric Hoffer, the longshoreman phi-
losopher of San Francisco, who caught the American spirit on
the wing and pointed out that every successful idea in America
ends up as a corporation, a foundation or a racket. One can judge
the success of the Women's Lib idea from the fact that it led to
the publicity-saturated encounter of Bobby Riggs and Billie Jean
King at the Houston Astrodome, which was a publicity racket if
there ever was one.
For without the Women's Lib symbol to fuel the flame of
popular obsession with the encounter, it would have been only
a contest between a woman at the noonday height of her tennis
powers and a man in the twilight of his.
INSTEAD IT was one of those happenings that the histori-
cal researcher, decades from now, will dig up again as a peg on
which to hang his narrative of America in the 1970s. The sport
and feature writers have caught the zanier circus aspects of the
affair as well as the technical skills of the match itself. I come
on this, with litte tennis knowledge. Hence I add only a footnote
on what it shows about community in America, and the kind of
global village we have become.
We keep lamenting the loss of community, not only in Amer-
ica but in the world as a whole, and the fact of loss is true
enough. What we seek in community is the sense in our ev-
eryday life of common interests, concerns, stakes, a common
grammar and vocabulary of the things that people think about
and do together.
A village or small town used to be a community. So was a
neighborhood. But with supermarkets, superhighways, mobile
jobs, fast cars, transient homes and the wandering young, we
have lost a good deal of it.
IT WASNT just the circus and public-relations stuff that
had America and much of the rest of the world clustered
around the TV screens while a bespectacled young woman and
a somewhat absurd middle-age man each tried to get a tennis
ball where the other couldn't return it. The ballyhoo helped, and
the media again played their role as accelerator and multiplier
of excitement.
Just as much, it was the hunger for something in common.
It had to be something sufficiently charged with emotion to ani-
mate us into crossing the dividing lines between people and
reaching out to strangers as well as friends. The Women's Lib
theme furnished that animating force. When I looked at the
Astrodome crowd on the screen, and around me at the huddled
roomful of people watching the screen, I smelled the sweet smell
of community.
THE WATERGATE hearings, of course, tied people to-
gether in a community of fascination, and with a far greater
depth of meaning. For a few weeks they wiped out the isolation
of individual atoms which is the blight of our time. We cant
begin to compare the two shows on the level of what we used
to call "social significance" during the New Deal days. Or can
we?
The thing to note is that the Watergate show, exactly be-
cause it was political, divided as well as united. There were mil-
lions who resisted and resented the hearings, even while they
were attracted to them.
The Billie-Bobby show was not political, yet what made it
far more lhan a sports event was the idea that it represented
some kind of battle of the sexes, and that the stakes were not
the $100,000 check nor the commercial spinoffs in the millions,
but what the image and self-image of women will be.
A LOT of this was synthetic, yes, but there was a core that
was real enough. I should have identified with Bobby Riggs, as
he dragged his panting, middle-age carcass across the court. It
was Hemingway's Old Man, battling the indestructible element
of the sea.
Yet instead I found myself rooting for Billie Jean King,
because every stroke of her racket was a blow for women's iden-
tity, and until they have achieved a more confident ease in liv-
ing with themselves, there will be no ease in the way we live
with women or they with us.
HENCE I felt a stir of victory in myself, when I should
have been keening over the humiliation of the bedraggled, clown-
ing champion of middle-age masculinity.
A tennis contest, charged with electric energy from one
J)l the great movements of our time, had taken us all out of our-
"selves for a brief moment, and linked us with others. Which is
-what community means.


Friday, October 12, 1973
i .Unlsti Ik ricffrtr and Shofif of Hollywood
Page 5
"Life Begins At Sixty* Says RSVP
' Wl a! are vou doing to
Ai.d t'lir.rrro'.v'.' a-ks the Brow-
ard County Itctircd Senior Volun-
iMViuPrOgvam, a- s*>vke--e.S;-iuy .
for senior citizens which now has
273 area volunteers m rving in day-
care centers, libraries, schools, I
woik hops for b:ind adults and [
the Division of Family Services.
Area residents <*>0 and over are
urged to make use of the skills
Men's Club Holds
1st Meeting Of
The New Season
The Men's Club of Temple Sinai
of Hollywood held its first meeting
of the new season last month in
the temple's so. hi hall. It was an
open meeting, with the wives of
members as well as non-members
present.
The newly elected president.
Charles Pierson, welcomed the
audience and introduced Rabbi
David Shapiro of Temple Sinai,
'who delivered the invocation, then
made an appeal to all nonmem-
ber to join the temple and Men's
Club. .!
Aae Saperstein explained that
membership in the temple includes
membership in the Men's Club for
the first year, but one can join
the Men's Club without joining
the temple.
Joseph Binder acted as emcee
entertainer. Miss Patricia Gayle, an
for the evening and introduced the
international singer anil accordion-
ist of stage and TV. She sang songs
of many lands, spiced with some
humorous anecdotes and stories.
^Sjk Refreshments were served and a
*Af*T>'af'uc was Presented to the out-
going president, Louis Garber, in
appreciation of his services last
year.
Joseph Binder and his program
committee are planning a program
for the year 1973-74 including en-
tentainment, luncheons. New Year
party, etc.
Officers for tiie year 1973-74 in-
clude Charles Pierson, president;
Samuel Albert, first vice president;
Abraham Edelstein, second vice
president; Isaac Schonfeld, record-
ing secretary; Abraham Saper-
stein. financial secretary, and Syd-
ney Burkholz, treasurer.
ind expeilonee they have gained
over the years by visiting, play-
. tutoring, stotf telling,
.ii'h-. cooking, planting and
{ard 'iring, carpentry, sewing and
mending, telephone calls, small
appliance repairs oi needlework.
ige and luncheon allowances
are provided, as well as accident
insurance.
Funded federally through AC-
TION' and locaily through the
Service Agency for Senior Citizens
of the United Way, RSVP be
ieves that 'the secret to longevity
is activity."
Volunteers seive as friendly
Visitors with the Visiting Nurse
Association; act as teacher aides
in the Broward Child Care pro-
grams and as "listeners" with the
Division of Youth Services; assist
in the Sheltered Workshop for
the retarded 16 years and older;
serve as tutors for young people
in drug rehabilitation centers:
and participate in patient pro-
grams at Florida State Hospital.
RSVP's main office is at 1300
S. Andrews Ave., Ft. Lauderdale
(522-3761); their local representa-
tive is Walter Kane, 6408 Mayo
St., Hollywood (983-2912). Inter-
views may be arranged by calling
either number.
Viclcr Freedman Post 613, Jewish War Vet-
eians, one cf the largest in Florida, will
celebrate its 25ih anniversary Saturday
with a 7:30 p.m. dinner in the Hemispheres
Ocean Pavilion. The committee planning
the event, which willl feature Mayor Wein-
kle of Hallandale and Mayor David Keating
of Hollywood as honored guests, included,
from left to right, (seated) Mike Bcgandoff,
S'd Gingold, Herman Zweibach, post com-
mander, and Hy Spiegel; (standing) Peter
Bluesten, Herman Muransky and ccchair-
men Bill Schoenield and Jack Barman.

f
*
Season's Greetings
EXECUTIVE
CLEANERS
Mr. & Mrs. Norman Silverman
3810 S. Ocean Dr.
Hollywood
Telephone 927-3604
CIRCLE
DRIVING SCHOOL
2021 TVlor St. -921 -6966
Specializing in
Elderly ft Nervous People
Licensed by the
State of Florida
Season's Greetinqs
Thrifty Rent-A-Car
3000 Hallandale Be*ch Blvd.
927-1761
Season's Greetinqs
Divers Unlimited
Professional Co-ed
Scuba Classes
4305 Hollywood Blvd.
981-0156
EVERY
JEW
SHOULD
READ
THIS.
We are mortal.
We cannot live forever.
Try as we might to post-
pone the thought of our
mortality, we cannot postpone
its happening.
We put out of our minds
what we do not like to contem-
plate. This is only human.
But our humanness can
turn to selfishness if we fail to
consider those we leave behind.
Because if we leave them
the responsibilities and
decisions we should have made
in life, we add another burden
to those already burdened
with grief.
It is our responsibility
while we are living to take care
of the details that will make
our passing easier for those
who love us.
The choosing of a burial.
site is such a derail. A detail
that is neither complicated nor
expensive. A burial plot can be
purchased for as little as $200.
While an hour or so spent at
Lakeside Memorial Park is all
it takes to i esolve the matter.
Once resolved it can be
forgotten.
I his simple act can save
those you love the agony of
tiying lo guess your wishes.
Lakeside Memor i.il Park
is a place ol stiikingly serene
beauty. It offers you the
assurance that those nearest
you will wish to retui n often to
this tranquil garden.
The beautiful arbors, wide
boulevards, interlaced concrete
paths fronting on every burial
site, and eight acre reflecting
lake contribute to Lakeside's
unique beauty among memorial
paiksfoi tJu-Jewish.
hiking caieolittic
decision for your resting site
can be an ant of gieat consider-
ation to those dear to you.
And opportuneto yourself in
a time of rising costs aiid prices.
Call us at (305) 59e-0690
or pay a quiet visiL to Lakeside
Memoi iaLParJ*. N.W. 25th Street
at 103rd Avenue,
This decision couldbring
a certain peace-to your life.


Page 6
-Jenisl norkfirtr md Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, October 12, 1973
There was standing-rocm only as teen-agers filled the hall
ct Temple Beth Sha'cm to hear Dennis Prager discuss the
plight of Soviet Jewry. The meeting took place under the
auspices of ihe Ccmmitlee en Jewish Life of the Jewish Wel-
fare Federciion. At a second get-together with the young
rccple he discussed "Why Bother Being Jewish?"
Waller? of 3Ugfjrs
LIGHTING SHOWPLACE OF THE SOUTH
MEMBER Of ., ..
Residential
Commercial
MASTER CHARGE
J-ityntlnq \jlxtuze.
czjiiociation
of WLoiidu
'LET THERE BE LIGHT'
RETAIL
927-4241
WHOLESALE
2331 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
Season's Greetings from ...
PETS N THINGS
The ComiAetePet Shop
IN DOWNTOWN HOLLYWOOD
2020 Hollywood Blvd.
Phone: 925-9005


*
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Sheffield
CONYALARIUM &
THERAPY CENTER
24 HOUR REGISTERED NURSING CARE
MODERN CENTRALLY LOCATED
SPACIOUS 4% ACRE GROUNDS
STAY FOR ANY LENGTH OF TIME
REGISTERED THERAPY PERSONNEL
IN PATIENT OUT PATIENT
COMPLETE REHABILITATION PROGRAMS
PHONE 563-5711
JEAN SADOW. Administrator
2675 NORTH ANDREWS AVE.
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLA.
'Succah-ton' Will
Be Hosted Bv USY
Of Temple Sinai
The USY of Temple Sinai will
host a "Succah-Ton" (Succah Live-
1 In) for the community's teenagers,
i 8th through 12:'n grades, Friday
. evening, commencing at 6:30 p.m.
The Succah-ton was conceived
\ by Marty Listowsky, director of
; youth activities at the temple. In
' keeping with Mr. Listowsky's
| philosophy that young people learn
I best through experiential activities,
the Succah-ton will include pray-
ers, holiday foods, rap sessions,
singing and dancing, learning
seminars and sleeping in Temple
Sinai's traditional Succah, much
in the way Jewish ancestors did
after fleeing Egypt centuries ago.
On Shaboat morning a special
sunrise service is planned for those
j who are awake. Following serv-
j ices, cholent (a brown potato dish
I which is prepared a day ahead of
time and left warming to provide ;
i hot Shabbat meal when cooking
is not allowec') and other dellcacii .-
| will be served in the Succah.
The afternoon hours will be
in nt in meaningful social and
learning programs. A beautiful
Havdalah service will conclude the
rent.
For further information regard-
ing the Succah-tcn, contact Mr.
Listowsky oi the temple offi
Both USY members and non-mem-
bers may participate.
'Outreach' Groups
To Review Aetion
The various subcommittee? func-
tioning under the overall Jewish
: Community Center Program IV-
! velopnient Committee of the JCC's
of South Florida will meet -Mon-
day, Oct. 22, at Federation head-
I quarters. Actions taken by each '
group at individual sessions dur-
! ing the month that has ensued I
since the inception of "Operation
i Outreach" will be reviewed.
"Outreach" is the name given to
new programs being initiated in
the Greater Hollywood area as
the first step towards the com-
munity center concept in South
Broward.
The subcommittees and their I
chairmen are: Teens, Darryl Drick- ;
man and Steve Weinstein; College \
| Youth, Mrs. Joseph Hopen. Miss
i Leah Weinstock and Bruce Gross-
\ man; Adults, Mrs. Philip Wein-
stein; Temple Presidents and Sen-
ior Adults, Lewis Conn. The Chil-
dren's subcommittee chairmanship
is temporarily vacant.
Steps for implementation of
programs devised by these sub-
committees will be taken at the
Oct. 22 meeting.
Israel Salute Sponsors Scored By
CRC Cultural Committee Chairman
At its recent Executive Steer-
ing Committee meeting, the Com-
munity Relations Committee of
the Jewish Federation heard a re-
port from Cultural Subcommittee
chairman Mrs. Allen Gordon in
which she suggested a closer liai-
son between her group and the
Israel Ministry of Tourism in the |
future.
Citing the recent "Salute to Is-
rael" program in which entertain-
ers were changed at the last i
moment and without any advance
notice, Mrs. Gordon questioned
the "cultural" content of the pro-
gram provided by the sponsors \
Eastern and El Al Airlines, the
Israeli Tourist Ministry, and Tours
International.
Mrs. Gordon suggested that lo-
cal events be tailored "to the
many-faceted interests of our com-
munity." and cited as examples
evenings <>f Yiddish theatre, Is-
raeli ioik programs, and forums
with "vivid and exciting .-pi ak-
crs."
Mr*. Gordon also apologized for
i thai many residents had
o he turned away from Temple
Beth L'l because of fire t
i:on;.
In other business, chairman I. A.
Durbin informed the Steering
Committee of literature being dis-
tributed at Penney's by the Union
Gospel Press and asked that the
ADL be contacted.
Dr. Stanley Kessel reported that
a Lutheran church women's group
had requested a speaker to brief
them on Jewish holidays, and
added that Dr. Samuel Jaffe.
spiritual leader of Temple Beth
El. had volunteered to take the
assignment.
by Mrs. Edward Light
's American ORT was
That group has been
e the convening organ-
the Women's Plea for
ry to be held on Dec.
omen's groups in the
be contacted for as-
A report
of Women
presented,
asked to b
ization for
Soviet Jew
10. All w.
area will
sistjnec.
Members attending the meet
Included Mr. Durbin, Ira I
Harry Cohen, \xw\, Conn, M -.
Molly Ginberg, Dr. Ma] Golden,
Mrs, Allen Gordon, Carl.? Feld-
man, Mrs. Ruth Feurstein, R
' klii Edna J
Dr. Kesst I, Dr. Rubin Klein, J
Dr. Walter Zand
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_fi


Friday, October 12. 1973
*l Page 7
- -
'V
*
'

JWF Campaign Leader Appointed
To S. Broward Israel Bonds Post
Sam Rothberg, national chair-
man of the Israel Bond Organiza-
tion, has appointed William Litt-
congregation in Hollywood, he is
presently vice president of the
Hemispheres B'nai B'rith Lodge
in Hallandale.
Littman was chairman of last
year's Hemispheres Israel Bonds
and Jewish Federation campaigns.
A former dental supplies execu-
tive in New York City, he served
as chairman (Dental Division^ of
the Israel Bonds and UJA cam-
paigns in New York City.
The newly-created South Brow-
ard Board of Governors was
formed in response to the expand-
ing Jewish population in South
Florida, particularly in the Holly-
wood-Hallandale area. A meeting
of the Boa>d of Governors wi.l be
held later tliix month.
Barry College Graduate Student
Doing Field Work At Federation
CANDACE RECHTSCHflFHR
Candace (Mrs. Michael) Rechts-
chaffer, a student at Barry Col- ,
!ege who will receive her Master's '
degree in social work in May 1974,
has been placed with the Jewish
Welfare Federation of Greater
Hollywood on a full salary stipend
by the Division of Family Serv-
ices, Ft. Lauderdale.
Mrs. Rcchtschaffer's field work
iait year was with the Spectrum
Jrug Rehabilitation Program, a'
residential treatment center for j
lard-core d:ug addicts. She lias
chosen to study social work ad-
nini t'ation rather than casework
for the la-t segment of her gradu-
ate studies.
A graduate of Minmi-Dnde C">m-
------:... n n,i rwida A'hn-
tic University, Mrs. Rechtschaffer
has been a teacher at the religious
school of Ft. Lauderdale's Temple
Emanu-El for the past four years.
She has also served as a coun-
selor for summer programs of the
Miami YM-YWHA.
She will spend three days a
week at the Federation and attend
classes the other two.
WlLliAM UUMA J
: H illandale as chairman of
the South Broward County
of Governors of Israel Bonds
The appointment was announced
i1 week by Wilton M. Parson,
< itive dir < tor of t!:e South
Florida]
.n is an active pr.rt:
as well as vice
chairman of the Hallandale E i t
ir of the JWFZUJA cam
paign to further the economic de-
al :! of the Stale of Israel.
A member of the Temple Beth El
Teen [
I Scene I
By STEVE WEINSTEIN
A very successful brunch for
youth group presidents was held
at Temple Beth El last month. Its
purpose was to acquaint the presi-
dents with the Youth Council, and
it was a "first" for the Council.
You should be hearing all about
it at your next organizational meet-
ing.
tfr tr ft
Also last month. Dennis Prager
the well known Jewish speaker
spoke to us about the plight of
Soviet Jews. The meeting took
place at Temple Beth Shalom, and
his speech immediately set off a
movement to help those suppressed
people.
Elsewhere in the Jewish Flor-
idian and Shofar you will see a
story about next Sunday's fall Get-
Together. You will also have re-
ceived information about it by
mail. We hope you will all make
it out to the ranch-----
fr fc -Cr'
If you would like to join the
Youth Council, contact Jodi Sto-
love personally or through the
Federation. And if you are inter-
ested in serving on a phone or
other committee, please speak to
Kathy Newman or to me.
Cr ft ft
If your group or organization
has any news it would like to pub-
licize, send it to me at least three
weeks prior to the event. All news
should be mailed care of the Jew-
ish Welfare Federation, 1909 Har-
rison St.. Hollywood 33020. The
new phone number is 921-8810.
(L
Season's Greetings
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Paqe 8
*,kn/<#> nrrMi.tr and shofr of Hollywood
Friday, October 12, 1973

JWV Warns of Oil Company
Interest in Foreign Affairs
Broward County's Retired Senior Volunteer Program
(RSVP) includes some 273 residents 60 year* of age and
over. The seniors are able to help many of the area's un-
derprivileged and at the same time help themselves by
remaining active.
By Special Report
WASHINGTON "The oil in-
dustry has now made its third
move within just a few months in
what must be considered a care-
fully contrived campaign to rear-
range current United States for-
eign policy in the Middle East."
said Ainslee R. Ferdie, national
commander of the Jewish War
Veteians of the U.S.A.
The JWV National Comman-
kr'.s statement was directed at a
.peech by the chairman of the
board of Texaco calling upon the
American public to "pause and
examine" the nation's Middle East
policy. Ferdie went on to charge
the oil companies of being the
tool of Arab oil blackmail and
if placing business interests above
the national interest."
"NO BUSINESS interest can be
bisger than the national interest
and what is good for the oil in-
Justry is not necessarily good for
!he American people or for Amer-
ican foreign policy," Ferdie said.
Texaco, the nation's eighth larg-
est industrial corporation, became
the third international petroleum
major in recent months to call for
a "more even-handed policy" with
regard to Arab-Israel confronta-
Hail
Standard Oil of California and
Mobil Oil are the other two major
companies who made statements
of late concerning United States
foreign policy in the Middle East.
They are partners, with Texaco,
of Saudi Arabia in Aramco, the
major Arab world oil producer.
Recently Socal in a second let-
ter to It* stockholders and cm-
ployea atl mpted to change the
impact of an earlier communica-
tion which shocked many Amer-
icans and resulted in a call for
boycott of its products by the
JWV.
MOBIL WAS the first to public-
ly broach this controversial topic
:n a large newspaper advertise-
ment eat lier this year calling for
change in American Middle East
policy.
the Jewish War Veterans, the
Temple In The Fines H
By LYNN BERGER
As the Shofar sounded and ush-
ered in the new year, there was
a feeling that something very spe-
cial had indeed happened. For the
more than one hundied congre-
gants who prayed under the lead-
ership of Rabbi Mark Loeb. it was
more than just another New Year.
ll was the beginning of a new
templea temple that was con-
ceived less than five weeks ago.
yet had a magnificent Rosh
11 ash,in a seivice.
Praise for Rabbi Loeb was end-
oldest active veterans organization
in the nation, "considers this
banding together of major oil
producers to change our foreign
policy in the Middle East as
mi;, icai to further peaceful de-
velopment between Isiacl and its
neighbors." Ferdie said.
"Any attempt to connect present
gasoline shortages with Arab
political blackmail demands is
economically false, politically mis-
leading and moiaily wrong. We
consider this clearly inconsistent
with the national interest of the
United States."
olds First Service
i less. Many people commented that
never before had they sat spell-
bound through the entire service.
Although they prayed in a coun-
i Iry club converted to a chapel,
| the spirit of the holy day was in
no way lost. The beautiful ark for
he Tor.th and lectern which stood
proudly before the congregation
! weie constructed and draped by
[ Joe Roth, Jerry Seligman. Phil
: Rosen, Lee Seligman, Lynn Berg-
er, Marcy Seligman and Rena
Selieman.
Egypt, Syria War Against Israel
As Dayan Vows Victory
Continued from Page 1-
clared tliat "Syria and Egypt
started the war again and it
is an all-out war."
PREDICTING VICTORY with
in a matter of days, Dayan never-
theless said that the first 48
hours wore critical.
The bunkers along the Suez
Canal and the defense outposts
on the Golan Heights had to hold
while Israel mobilized her re-
serve army units.
Frankly admitting that Egypt
had put up a number of bridges
across the Suez and that Syria
had captured several forward po-
sitions on Golan, Dayan never-
theless told a televised press con-
ference that "when the war is
over, they (the Arabs) will be
on our side of the lines" mean
ing that they will be destroyed.
Since the Yom Kippur attack,
Cairo radio has claimed all sorts
of victories and destruction of
Israeli plane*, tanks and othar
equipment.
Dayan, would only admit that
"we lost a few positions and had;
a few casualties. When our armor
and forces are mobilized, then we
can start the real war."
WITH RSPECT to casualties.
Dayan as of Monday, when Israel
launched its counter-ofensive,
merely admitted that they were
"reasonable," adding that "Arab
claims of our losses are exagge-
rated. Our losses can be counted
in the dozens, not the hundreds."
launched its counter-offensive
The Air Force, which quickly
established supremacy of the Mid-
dle Eostern skies, Dayan noted,
"lias suffered very little. Our
armor has net lost any signifi-
cant power.
'The enemy lost much more
in every respect on both the Syr-
ian and the Egyptian fronts."
SEASON'S GREETINGS
PERRY'S
OF COURSE
LADIES WEAR
1918 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
Prof. Allen Politick
Chairman Of
UJA's Young
Leadership Cabinet
NEW YORKThe Young Lead-
ership Cabinet of the United Jew-
ish Appeal has installed its new
officers for 1973-74, with Prof. Al-
len Pollack of New York as chair-
man.
At its 1973 annual retreat last
month in Houston, Tex., the new
officers participated in the first
YLC Executive Committee meet-
ing of the new campaign year.
In assuming his new office, Prof.
Pollack expressed his appraisal of
the Cabinet in its role as the
"representative voice of the first
Continued on Page It
STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP
MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION
(Act of Auqust 12. 1970. Section 3688)
(Title 3. United States Code)
Date of filing. Octoher 1. 1973 title
I of publication. The> Jewish Florldlan
and Shofar of Clreater Hollywood: fre-
quency of ishu... every other week;
location of known office of publication
120 N'.E. 6th St.. Miami. Florida 33132
location of headouarter* of general
busiuess offices of the publishers. 120
I N.F.. 6th St.. Miami. Florida 13138
Publisher Fred K. Shochet. 120 N.E
6th St.. Miami. Florida 33132; editor
bred. K. Shochet. UO N.E. 6th St..
Miami, Florida 33182: managing editor
Fred K. Shochet. 120 N'.E.6th St
Miami Florida 38182.
Owner: Fred K. Shochet. 120 NJE
6th St.. Miami. Florida 331*2.
Known bondholder*, mortgagee^ and
other security holders owning or hold-
In*. 1 percent or more of total amount
or bonds. mortgages or other secur-
ities: None.
Extent and Mature of Circulation.
Average No. conies each issue dur-
ing preceding 12 months.
Total No. copies printed n> 9.169
Slnsle issue nearest to filing date
Paid Clrculatio*.....
Sales through dealers and carriers
street vendors ami counter sales
Single issue nearest "to filing dace
........................................................... no
Marl Subscriptions 8.933
Single issue nearest filing date 9.879
Total Paid" Circulation 9.023
Single issue nearest to filing date 9.98
Free Distribution (including samples)
by mall carrier or other means 109
Single Issue nearest filing date 84
Copies Distributed to news agents.
but not sold ....... None
Total Distribution 9.132
Single issue nearest to filing date
............ ........ 10.073
Office uae. left-over unaccounted
spoiled after printing 27
Single issue nearest to filing date 27
Total 9.159
Single issue nearest to filing date
10.100
I certify that the statements made
by me above are correct and complete.
FRED K. SHOCHET. Publisher
Thefirst
# Riverside Chapel
in Broward County
is now open
inHollywood.
5801 Hollywood Boulevard
Telephoi*920-1OK)
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL, INC. FUNERAL DIRECTORS
Other Riverside Chtoeh in the
Miuni-Uiami Betch-Ft. LtuOerdtle-Hollyweod vt
16480 N.E. 19th Avenue, North Miami Beach 947-Mtt
19th Street & Alton Road, Miami Beach JE 11151
1250 rtormandy Drive, Miami Beach JE M\51
Douglas Road at S.W. 17th Street, MiamrflK 1-llSl
HvhtUn, The Bron,. Brooklyn, far rJocsiSiy 5rf3? vTnolT**'"
Murray N. Rubin F.O.
-.


Friday, October 12. 1973
*Jenist fhriafi^Jn and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 9

LEO .MI.WI.N
Anti-Semites Testify
At Senate Hearing
Continued from Pace 4-
Lobby) to be conservative Amer-
icans who have long been devoted
to freedom and the preservation
of our constitution."
There is no doubt that the
worst of us become the best of
us through the catalyst of poli-
tics that incompetents become
our leaders because too often
they are incapable of becoming
anything else.
That is the horror of modern
American politics, a horror which
exists by the sin of our failure
to demand competence from can-
didates once we elect them to
office.
Otherwise, devotees of Willis
Carto and the Liberty Lobby
would not now be sitting on a
Senate committee whose business
it is to investigate corruption
and arrogant defiance of the
American democratic process in
the very halls of the White House
itself, a contradiction in terms
that would be funny it is weren't
so tragic.
STILL, THE Gurncy episode
is, as I have suggested, a sad
sidelight of the Kissinger con-
firmation hearines. The central
issue is Kissinger's appointment
as secretary of state at a time
when the administration's pri-
mary foreign policy goals are in-
extricably tied to global consid-
erations with coincidental major
Jewish implications:
The Israel-Arab impasse in
the Middle East;
The Mills-Vanik bill and
Jackson amendment to place se-
vere restrictions on the Most-Fav-
ored-Nation status President Nix-
on wants for the Soviet Union;
Jewish emigration from the
Soviet Union, directly related to
MFN status for the Soviets, and
now enlarged by the revolt of
the Russian dissidents, particu-
larly physicist Andrei Sakharov
and novelist Alexander Solzhen-
ytsin. who are turning the Jewish
struggle for free emigration into
a struggle for the right of any
Russian to emigrate from Soviet
oppression;
Arab oil. recently tagged by
Assistant Secretary of State for
Middle Eastern Affairs Joseph
Sisco as a fundamental element
in our Middle East foreign pol-
icy.
THE MOST hideous thing about
the Nixon administration is its
monumental failures at home. The
President is not drawn to domes-
tic issues. He finds them annoy-
ing, unglamorous, irrelevant to
the image of himself as a man
of destiny.
In this sense, he is the danger-
ous fulfillment of President Eis-
enhower's farewell warning to the
nation about a takeover by the
industrial military complex into
whose hands Nixon has traded
away the keys to our kingdom
while he devotes himself to what
he regards as his "cosmic pur-
pose."
Did Eisenhower see something
in his Vice President that gave
him causa for foreboding about
the nation's future in Nixon
hands?
Whatever the answer here,
President Nixon is intent on bal-
ancing his calamitous domestic
failures with successes in the
area of his "cosmic purpose"for-
eign policy coups that will "can-
cel" the failures and enshrine
him in history as a peace-maker
and figure of detente.
During his first four years in
office, the President acted in
Southeast Asia and Moscow. In
his last four years, he hopes to
whip the Middle East into the
frosting atop his China-Russia
pie.
THE KISSINGER appointment
is designed to bring the Presi-
dent's dream into reality. Dr. Kis-
singer was the central figure in
Southeast Asia, China and the
Soviet Union. Whv not the Mid-
dle East?
The answer is that the Middle
East does not lend itself to Un-
kind of solution Dr. Kissinger
came up with in the Far East.
On the contrary', the likelihood
that he may fail is very strong
indeed.
The Middle East, with our oil
interests there, is a much thornier
problem than Southeast Asia
ever was, where our interests
were largely tactical and only
generally ideological.
More important, China and
Russia are ready for controlled
capitalist exploitation of their
economies, which they regard as
technological pump-priming.
By contrast, the Arab nations
are feudal societies for whom
technological development is still
an irrelevancy. Their absolutist
leaders are oil-centered, and they
are tired of having us pump their
wealth dry for a pittance.
To them, detente would mean
a continuation of this kind of
exploitation. And they figure they
can exploit their oil wells on their
own without paying us for
the privilege.
THAT IS when the nation will
need a whip to whip the whipper
for having failed to whip the
Middle East into the frosting
atop the Nixon pie.
It may be jaundiced of me to
suggest that the President chose
Kissinger precisely for such an
eventuality.
But when the time to blame
conies round, it will be mighty
handy to have a Jew at the ad-
ministration's side.
Because then, the philosophy
of the Willis Cartos and the
Curtis Dalls will really make
sense: what can you expect from
the "political Zionist planners?"
Surely, as Dall once reminded us.
they planned it (the failure) that
way.
And af Carto once put it, "The
blame must be laid at the
door of the international Jews."
The pity of it is that Kissinger
seems so willing to be used.
NOW To Hear Montante
At the first discussion group
meeting of the Hollywood Section
of National Council of Jewish
Women Monday at 1 p.m. in the
Hallandale Home Federal Bldg.
the speaker will be Philip J. Mon-
tante, Jr., Assistant State Attor-
ney it) charge of Consumer Frauds
and Environmental Affairs. A
question and answer period will
follow. Mrs. Judith Rappaport is
chairman.
Jewish Education
To Be Considered
At 2 Gatherings
Abe Gittelson, associate execu-
tive director f the Central Agen-
cy for Jewish Education of Miami,
#11] be the speaker and discussion
leader as the Young Leaders
Council of the Jewish Federation
metts at the home of Errol Rosen
Tuesday.
The topic of the 8 p.m. get-
logether will be "What's Happen-
ing in Our Community," with par-
licular emphasis on Jewish Educa-
tion and Jewish concepts in South
Browaid County.
On Oct. 25, Rabbi Dov Bidnic'k.
director of the Hillel Community
Day School, and Zvi Berger, execu-
tive director of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education, will mod-
orate a meeting of the Women's
Leadership Institute at the home
of Mrs. Gary Dubin.
The panel discussion will re-
volve around "The Jewish Day
SchoolIts Positives and Nega-
tives." Answers will be sought to
JUCh questions as "Does the Jew-
ish day school segregate our chil-
dren?" and "Does it create con-
flicts between what the children
learn in school and what is prac-
ticed at home?"
The ladies' meeting, which will
also commence at 8 p.m., is being
chaired by Mrs. James Jacobson
and coordinated by Mrs. Robert
Langel.
New 'Singles'
Group Planning
First Outing
Area residents between the ages
of 25 and 50 who are not married
are invited to join "The Singles
of Broward County," a group be-
ing formed under the aegis of the
"Operation Outreach" of the Jew-
ish Community Centers of South
Florida and with the sponsorship
of the Jewish Federation of Ft.
Laudcrdale.
The group's first social gather-
ing will take the form of an out-
door dinner at the Emerald Hills
home of one of the members Sun-
day evening, Oct. 21. Those inter-
ested in attending should call
either the Hollywood Federation
or the Laudcrdale Federation; a
member will contact the caller
with further information.
"The Singles" plans other social
events in the future, as well a>
cultural and educational get-to-
gethers. Its programming will be
determined by the membership.
Residents of Dade County are
equally welcome.
ORT Plans Rummage Sale
Members of the Hollywood Hills
Chapter of Women's American
ORT will sponsor a rummage sale
Thursday, Oct. 18, from 9-6, and
Friday, Oct. 19, from 9-4, at the
Winn-Dixie Supermarket on Rt
441 at Taft Street. A wide variety
of merchandise such as clothing,
toys, household goods, and elec-
'rical appliances will be offered.
"Chutzpah" is a very Yiddish word. Basically, it describes an ac-
tion taken which is beyond the rational comprehension of what other
people think should happen. "Chutzpah" takes guts and, really, inge-
nuity because it is very easy for people to do that which is expected.
It takes much more thought and development to do the unexpected.
I'm sure everyone is aware by now that finally, after 75 years of
talk, the tunnel under the English Channel which will connect Eng-
land with France is about to become a reality.
It seems that the bi-national commission which will have charge
of the excavation, after advertising for bids from contractors, received
three. The first, at a figure of three billion eight hundred million
dollars, was a French firm. The second, from an English company,
was a few million dollars less. But the third encased in a rumpled
brown envelope was a bombshell! The firm of Goldstein & Gold-
berg offered to undertake the stupendous project for S10.000.
Needless to say, the commission hurried to the offices of these
philanthropic gentlemen. They climbed the back stairs of a Soho loft
building, where they found Mr. Goldstein seated at a battered, vintage
1890, desk.
How,' they asked, "does the firm of Goldstein & Goldberg pro-
pose to achieve the completion of a tunnel under the sea at such a
ridiculously low figure?"
"Simple," says Mr. Goldstein. "I take a shovel and start digging
on the English side. My partner takes a shovel and starts digging on
the French side. When we meet in the middle viola!a tunnel."
"Yes," replied the commissioners, "but what if you miss each
other?"
"Why that's even better. Then you'll have TWO tunnels!"
Now THAT's chutzpah! And if you think for a minute that Jews
could have survived without it, you are dwelling in a state of unreality.
Today, more than ever, Jews of the world and Jews of Israel stand
alone. If we don't stand up for our rights, who will? And if it takes
chutzpah to brazen it out, we should not be reluctant to use it.
Just last week the government of Austria stated it planned to
close the reception center for Jews in Vienna. Why? Because it was
threatened by some Arab terrorists. It's hard to analyze the Austrian
government's actions without getting emotional, but I think it true
that Jews are just tolerated, and if any excuse can be found to dismiss
"the Jewish problem," it will be done.
Jews must fight for survival. We are a minority throughout the
world. The only area which is ours is that little stretch of land called
Israel and it is little. Just look at its size on a map of the world.
There have always been forces that wished to destroy us either physic-
ally, politically, religiously or through assimilation, and always a part
of us has survived. That in itself takes "Chutzpah."
We cannot be apologetic for what we ar do what is best for us as long as what is best for us does not cause
unnecessary hurt to others.
As I see it, the future will only be secure if we continue to have
the strength to endure the pressures placed upon us.
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NAME: ,-------------------------------------------------------------
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Page 10
+JeMrkrMian d Shof" of Hollywood
Friday, October 12. 1973
Question Box
Why is it that on this holiday
and on the following day of
Prof. Allen Pollack
Chairman Of
UJA's Young
Leadership Cabinet
Continued from Page 8-
wholly affirmative American Jew-
ish generation ... a generation
forging a commitment to Jewish
values with no scars from the trag-
edies and persecutions of the
Holocaust era ... a generation
that know only the fact of a living
Israel, and has no memory of the
pain that marked its birth.
"What will the future of the
American Jewish community be
when it is no longer sustained by
this reservoir of memory?" he
asked. "Our future is linked ulti-
mately and inevitably with the fu-
ture of the people of Israel. That
relationship shall continue to be j
our dominant inspiration and mo-
tivation."
Allen Pollack. Professor of Rus-
sian History at Yeshiva Univer-
sity of New York, has long held
major positions with many Jewish
communal organizations. He is
presently a member of the Execu-
tive of the World Zionist Organi-
zation, the board of governors of
the Jewish Agency, and the board
of directors of the United Israel
Appea!.
Prof. Pollack also serves on the
Executive Committee of the Na-
munity Relations Advisory Coun-
tional Conference of Soviet Jewry,
and the International Affairs Com-
mittee of the National Jewish Corn-
ell.
Simchas Torah a celebration
with the Holy Torah takes place?
-The Torah scroll represents the
covenant between God and Israel.
It is strictly a spiritual symbol.
Dancing and marching with the
scroll indicates how happy the Jew
is just to be in the presence of the
Creator without any other ulterior
motive.
Bar Mitzvah
HOWARD KHANI
Howard, son of Dr. and Mrs.
i'ied Khani, will be Bar Mitzvah
Saturday, Oct. 20. at Temple Beth
El.
tt ii it
BRETT KLBLIN
Brett, son of Mr. and Mrs. Al-
vin Kublin, will celebrate his Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, Oct. 27, at Tem-
ple Beth El.
# -ft
MINDY BARDASCH
Mindy Ann. daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Gerald Bardasch, was Bat
Mitzvah Friday, Sept. 7, at Temple
Beth Shalom.
H -ti &
PAUL GOLDEN
Paul Jay, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Sherwin Golden, became Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday, Sept. 8, at Temple
Bf' ^halum.
-it & -Cr
ROBERT SHERMAN
Robert Scott Sherman, son of
Mr. and Mrs.Hal Jacobs, was Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, Sept. 8, at Tem-
ple Beth Shalom.
4
LUNCHEONS
DINNERS
11:10 A.M. 11:00 P.M.
S*lorayi Sundays
1:00 PM. 11:00 P.M.
TAKE OUT
HONG KONG
VILLAGE
CWn Retuuranf
Ml N Fl Mwy Oania
PHONE WO-707?
& &
i3
STEVEN E1SENBERG
Steven Eric, son ot Mr. and Mrs.
N'orman Eisenberg, celebrated his
Bar Mitzvah Saturday, Sept. 29,
at Temple Beth Shalom.
&
ir
STEVEN AINBINDER
Steven Nathan, son of Mrs. San-
dra Ainbinder and Mr. Samuel
Ainbinder, was Bar Mitzvah Sat-
in day. Sept. 22, at Temple Beth
Shalom.
& t: *
LEONARD TONKIN
Leonard Marc, son of Dr. and
Mrs. Donald Tonkin, became a
Bar Mitzvah Saturday, Sept. 22,
at Temple Beth Shalom.
SEASON'S GREETINGS
A Home Health Service By
Qualified Aides
Trained by our R.N.s
4 to 8 hour shift
24-hour Live-Ins
VISITING REGISTERED NURSES
VISITING HOMEMAKER SERVICE
OF BROWARD COUNTY, INC.
Established 1959
5245582 925-8643
1101 E. Broward Blvd. 2121 Hollywood Blvd
Fort Lauderdale Hollywood
ED-LEE'S
CLOTHING RACK
At the front entrance in the Hollywood Mai?
100% Polyester Double Knit
Metis Suits all one price $49.90
Sport Coats $34.90
Slacks $12.90
Complete stock of Bagpy's & Jeans
VMV^^^<^VS*^^x***^i >**'''/ ^""B
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
16 TISHRI 6:36
?
n-'i "-''. i.il-ii ii::i
Community Calendar
Religious
Services
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTEK
(Conurvktivr). 416 NE 8th Ave
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz, Cantoi
Jacob Danziger.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADC
i8801 NE 22m: Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingtley. Cantor Irving
Shulkea. 37
NORTH BROWARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATICN. (Reform) 3501 Uni.
vertity Dr.. Coral Spring,!. Rabbi
Max Weitz.
HOLLYWOOD
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1S51 i '
14th Ave., Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffe.
BETH SHALOM (Temple) Conserva-
tive. 401 Arthur tf. Rabbi Morton
Malavaky. Cantor Irving Gold.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (Conservative).
310 SW 62nd Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi
Salomon Benerroche.
TEMPLE SOLEl (Liberal). 5001
Thomaa St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Rob-
ert Frazin.
TEMPLE SINAI (Conaervati/e). 1201
MhnMil St. Rabbi David Shapiro,
Cantor Yel.uda Heilbraun.
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Conservative)
6920 SW 35th St. Rabbi Avrom
Drazin.
Rabbi Schenk To
Address Beth El
Breakfast Sunday
The first of the breakfast ses-
sions hosted by Temple Beth El's
Brotherhood will begin at 9:30
a.m., Sunday in the Tobin Audito-
rium of Temple Beth El, accord-
ing to Alfred Golden, chairman of
the cultural program, which is
open to the public.
Guest speaker for the occasion
will be Dr. Emanuel Schenk, rab-
biemehitus of Beth Sholom Peo-
ples Temple, Brooklyn, N.Y. He
will speak on "Israel and Amer-
ican Jewry: Issues That Unite and
Divide."
Rabbi Schenk. who was ordained
at the Hebrew Union College-Jew-
i-h Institute of Religion in 1939
and received his Honorary Doctor
if Divinity degree in 1964, is a
former U.S. Army Chaplain and
lias served as president of Brook-
yn Board of Rabbis and Associa-
tion of Reform Rabbis in New
York City. He has been a member
of the executive board of Central
Conference of American Rabbis
and the New York Board of Rab-
bis.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13
Derby dance Temple Israel 9 p.m.
25th anniversary dinner-dance Victor Freedman JWV
Post 613 7:30 p.m. Hemispheres Ocean Pavilion
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14
Youth Council get-tocther Berman Ranch, Davie bus
leaves Medical Center at 46th & Sheridan at 12:30 p.m.
Temple Israel youth brunch 1 p.m. temple
"Judaism, Communism & Christianity A Jewish Perspec-
tive" lecture by Dennis Prager 8 p.m. Temple
Beth El
MONDAY, OCTOBER 15
B'nai B'rith Women. Hollywood Chapter 725 general meet-
ing 8 p.m. Home Federal, Hollywood
National Council of Jewish Women discussion meeting
1 p.m. Home Federal, Hallandale
Lecture by Dennis Prager for teen-agers 7 p.m. Tem-
ple Sinai
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16
Jewish Family Service board meeting 8 p.m. tem-
ple Beth Shalom
Beth El Brotherhood installation dinner 6:30 p.m.
temple
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18
American Women's ORT rummage sale 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Winn Dixie Store 441 and Taft
American Israeli Lighthouse, Hallandale Chapter regu-
lar meeting 12:30 p.m. Home Federal, Hallandale
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19
American Women's ORT rummage sale 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Winn Dixie Store 441. and Taft
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21
Singles of Broward County outdoor dinner 7 p.m.
Emerald Hills home of member (call Federation for
details)
MONDAY, OCTOBER 22
National Council of Jewish Women board meeting 10
am. Home Federal, Hallandale
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23
Hadassah, Hollywood Chapter book review 1 pjn.
Home Federal, Hollywood
Temple Sinai board meeting 8 p.m. Haber Karp Hall
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24
Brandeis University National Women's Committee, south-
eastern region convention through October 25
Howard Johnson's, Hollywood Beach
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25
Hadassah, Henrietta Szold Group luncheon and card
party 11 a.m. Sweden House, Plantation
B'nai B'rith Women, Hallandale Chapter 1379 ragular
meeting 12:30 p.m. Home Federal, Hallandale
American "Jewish Congress regular meeting 8 p.m.
Temple Beth Shalom
'' I'l.....:' "1, '
. I-- ,!:

New Year Marked At State Hospital
Following what has become an
annual custom for B'nai B'rith
Women, Jewish patients at South
Florida State Hospital were enter-
tained at a Rosh Hashanah party
on Sept. 24.
Rabbi David Shapiro, spiritual
leader of Temple Sinai, officiated
at the service which was followed
by the serving of traditional food.
Martin Smith, violinist and
pianist, and Lila Savitt, vocalist
and accordionist, offered songs of
Israel; many of the patients joined
in.
Hostesses for the evening were
Erna Palumbo, Marion Franklin,
Audrey Cohen, Eve Zoccola, Ester
Siegel and Lillian Kaplan, Holly-
wood Chapter, and Syd Kimelhor,
Ida Kostoff, Marion Schwartz and
Laura Jacobson. Sky Lake Chap-
ter. Also participating as sponsors,
but not present, were the Aviva
and Amity Chapters.
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'.VSSftfte*::
Friday, October 12, 1973
* fc V#i nrrSHIi^r "<* Shear of Hollywood
Parre 11
*
*
|5'
1
74 Campaign Leaders To Be Feted At Nov. 14 Dinner
More than 100 invitations have
I been sent to top community lead-
\ ers to attend a dinner at tne ilill-
Fcrest CoUntry Club on Nov. 14, bigi r conn
Me ' 1974 UJA/JWF campaign, an-
Bounced at a meeting of his
| cabinet recently.
Mr. Baer, together with his co-
[chahmen, Nathan Pritcher, Lewis
t Cohn and Alan Rpaman, will host
i the event. They hope to finalize
ithe entire team of associate chair-
imcn lor the Jan. 20 Benefactors'
LDinner, chaired by Robert Baer,
to be held at Temple Beth Sha-
lom.
"An outstanding speaker will
address the Nov. 14 gathering.'
said Mr. Baer. "We must put to-
. (ether our leadership network
now so that the campaign ma-
chinery will be tunning lull-tilt
when the drive begins in Jan-
Uaiy," he added. ,
Each year.presents new and
" nents to be roej
rough total com-
munity involvement that those
commitments can be honored. I
am in hopes that each one who
was invited will respond affirma-
tively."
Among those present at the
strategy conclave were Arnold,i
C. Goidstein, Lewis Cohn, Ro&rt
Baer, Alan Roaman, Nathan
Pritcher, Jules B. Gordon, I. A.
Durbin, Moses Hornstein, Syd-
ney Holtzman. Abe Halpern. Je-
rome Gevirman, Herbert Kat/
and James Fox M'ller.
Israel on Attack
In Mideast War;
Smashes Invaders
400 Attend Second
Prager Symposium
Focusing on the problem of
assimilation, Dennis Prager asked
his Miramar audience "where
have all the young Jews gone?-'
in the second of his four sym-
posia held at Temple Israel on
Sept. 3n
Some 400 persons of all ages
heard the young professor state
that "Jewish kids' formal Jewish
education is at the elementary
school level, so it is no wonder
that they cannot equate Judaism
with what they learn later."
He also questioned whether
the only purpose for Israel's
existence was to be a geo-political

Among those who attended the
lecture by Dennis Prcger were
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Kaplan,
members of the Committee on
Jswish Life.
entity, or whether there was "a
larger moral reason.
"When Jews are asked for a
definition of Judaism." he went
on "the reply is usually 'defend-
ers of justice.' But other groups
feel thai too. Judaism is a reli-
gious belief as well as a 'people':
belief, and the two cannot be
separated."
The Sunday night lecture was
followed the next evening by a j
small seminar at Temple Beth El
attended by approximately 70 in- |
vited guests, where Mr. Piager's
topic was "How Jewish Is Is-
rael?"
"The founders of Israel," he
explained, "were secularists
Marxist, labor-oriented, non-reli-
gious. But if the only purpose of
the founding of the state was the
provision of a refuge, the United
States could have seived the
same purpose.
"Biblicahy, however, Zion
means Israel; but the Israelis
have been too bur:- surviving to
give much thought to the reli-
gious aspects of Zionism. Religion
in Israel today is an Orthodox
political faction imposing its di-
mensions on the many spectra
of Judaic religious persuasion."
"Judaism. Communism and
ChristianityA Jewish Perspoc-
tice" is the title of the third
lecture in the public series at
Temple Beth El with Mis. Nor-
man Atkin Monday at 7 p.m.. Mr. Prager
will meet again with teenagers
at Temple Sinai. His topic will
be "Why Bother Being Jewish?"
The second of four forums featuring Dennis Prager (second
fa-cm left) as the speaker was held in Temple L=rael of
Miramar. Marvin Lee, (left) was chairman for the evening;
Mrs. Herbert Katz is chairman of the series; Rabbi Avrom
Drazin is the temple's spiritual leader.______________________
Continued from Page 1-
ianks which have been supplied by
Russia to its allies, Egypt and
Syria."
THE ISRAELI counter-offensive
:nme as the Unifad States wa:
seeking tn bring the new Midril
craft and other weapons whi*
Fast war before the United Na
lions.
President Nixon, who spent the
'veekend at Kev Risoayne. nut off
a nr^onsed trip to Grand Cay ir
the Bahamas in order to he on to"
-f the latest war reports. The Pros
ident had been alerted about the
war at R30 a.m.. Saturday, bv a
ihone call from hi= new secretarv
of state, Dr. Henry Kissinger.
Gerald L. Warren, deputy Whit"
House press secretary, said Nixon
was "deeply concerned" about the
sudden outbreak.
At the same time, Dr. Kissinger j
called for emergency meetings o'
U.S. militarv, diplomatic and intel
ligeno" advisors in Washington
where he issued an appeal to Israe'
and the Arabs to "make every ef
fort" to end the war.
BUT ISRAEL'S response was be
ng mapoed out in its counterof
'ensive I-raeli planes hit five Syr
ian air bases and Eayntian tarc"'^
also reporting "heavy losses" in
fiicted on Syria.
By Tuesday. Israel said it had
knocked out nine of the 11 bridge
Vads F:W threw across the Suez
' Canal, as well as most of Syria's
i Soviet SAM-3 missile launchers on
the Golan Heights.
Israel denied Egvptian claims
reporting 100 Israeli ulanes shot
| down, as well as deeper incursion?
into the Sinai Desert.
Winter Mini-Tour
Of Israel Planned
Th<- Broward Board of Rabbis
\i p-aking arrangements to spon-
sor l "mini-tour" of Israel for <>':
;cg, .!_.,, \ oi pie during the
winter hiatus the second week in
Oeceml). r.
Six days of sightseeing by car
rather than by bus are beinr; plan
ned for the nine day tour, with
each night to be spent in local
hotels.
Som" of the local congregations
are planning to offer partial scho1-
ar.hips to their members; anyone
j interested in joining the tour
I should contact his rabbi for de-
I 'ails and/or financial assistance.
Melvin Baer, (seated, right) is shown with his cochairmen
(cJcckwise) Alan Roaman, Lewis Cohn and Nathan Pritcher.
The group will host the Nov. 14 dinner lor top community
leaders at the Hillcrest Country Club.
Exclusive AJPA
Report On War
Continued from Page 1
Israeli fighting supremecy in the air, on the land an on the sea, how-
ever. '
Israeli fighting supremacy in the air, on the land and on the sea, how-
proving herself a formidable "David" against a seeming "Goliath."
This is borne out by the fact that Israel has not yet mobilized all her
troops. The first reservists were called out Saturday afternoon; many
were in synagogues and received special dispensation from rabbis.
Israelis abroad began to flock back home as news of the war was
transmitted across international airways. Many of them were bended
call up papers as they landed in Lod. The airport was closed to traffic
d-iring the first two days of the war. But special fiig'its were allowed
to operate.
A large air'ift of several hundred Russian Jewish immigrants came
from th- tr.aii-it point in Vienna to Israel. The Jewish Agency receiv-
ing staff was depleted due to mobilization and the new immigrants
were greeted by many of their former countrynvn who decided to
ia!." over the job of the Jewish Agency represeutaton who bad been
caUed to th<- front. Hospitals throughout the country were besieged by
\el-'r.'ecrs. Many of th.m gave blood. Some were politely sent away
but thus have been absorbed into the emergency system.
TVere vas a Ifttl" anx^ty on the Hrb'ew University campus on
ML Scoiius where 1.000 overseas k'ds were reassured by university
dmiiii tratora and given facilities to telepbuK- their families. Many
'f f e Vds volunteered far oine'geii"v senices. and v.-re a-coptcd.
<:i:- bn evacuated fr*in settlements i-t the Golan Heights
were Ibis afternoon given permission hv the Emergency Northern
to return I Ihelr homes. There has been no panic on the
.->: ,-i ," .- ie' norntatfon. B'aekont orders I r ben scrupulously
.brrrved Hmuthonl the country, and headlights or rrs htve been
.,.,:.... i ia i windews hive b*n tared aa"lwl scattering In th- un-
iv evenl tMt the enemy wi'l be drowning bombs In urban areas.
Streets .are almost deserted even in the evening with Israelis
sta> ing c'ose to rad'o and television.
Reports from army sources have been optimistic dspite conflict-
ing reports from Arab n-ws broad"ats. The Oral I-raeli casualties
hive been brought bar'r from the front. The number was not very
high. Israeli commentators broadcasting from the front lines over a
hail of gunfire, have reported heavy Egyptian and Svrian casualties.
At four Monday afternoon, it was announced that the back of the
Svrian advance had been broken.
Eban Says U.S. Barred Preemptive Strike
Continued from Page 1
speaking, neither nation had yet
requested a Security Council
meeting, and news was pourin?
in reporting the successful use of
the Israeli-produced Gabriel sea-
to-sea missiles for the first time
in combat, which sank five Syrian
naval craft.
Israel was a'.so claiming the
shooting down of 10 Egvptian hel-
icopters ferrying troops acros3
the cann' together with 30 troopr
in each of the helicopters.
ALONG THE Suez Canal. Is-
raeli offieers admitted that Egypt
had built many bridges acros-
the 200-foot-wide canal and
poured tanks into tbn Sinai.
But by mid-day Sunday after-
noon, they were also claiming
many planes and tanks in addi-
tion to the helicopters.
While Arab sources in Beirut,
Damascus and Cairo continued to
make unprecedented claims of
great destruction against Israeli
planes, weapons and men. Unit id
Nations truce observers announc-
ed that it was Egypt and Syria
that had started the war.
El Zayyat, confronted by news
men on "Issues and Answer-''
insi-ted that it was Israel that
provoked the war. although he
confessed that Egypt and Syria
made the first moves as a counter
offensive against the alleged Is
rae'i -orovocations.
EBAN PARAPHRASED Prime
Minister Golda Melr, who hour;
after the attack said on television
that "The rulers of Syria and
Eaypt have planned this breach
of the ceasefire for some time
now.
"They cho=e the Day of Atone
ment Yen Kiootir for thir
premeditated attack when manv
ef our pecrle are praying or fast
ing. and nwy net be capable of
defending themselves."
'
H-DOtATlON DH0NE
KUmfK CHANGED
With th renovation of
^-derat'on'^ Harrison Street
haadauartsrs now complete,
the pxoanded offices re-
quired addit'o-iil telephones
:o accommodate the increased
campaign staff. The new
number is 921-8810.
r: I. lit I .'': (',


Vjmlstl fhcridiair nd Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, October 12, 1973
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