The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00074

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
1
WJemsti Floridiai in
and SHOFA1I OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Volume 3 Number 19
Hollywood Florida Friday. August 17, 1973
Price 20 cents
Envoy Stays-But Oslo Presses Murder Case
f
COPENHAGEN (JTA) The Norwegian Cabi-
net, meeting in special session in Oslo to examine the
"Boushicki Affair," decided against the expulsion of
Israeli Embassy official Yigal Eyal from Norway.
At the close of the meeting, Norwegian Foreign
Minister Dagfin Vaarvik declared that Norway bad no
formal proof" of the complicity of Israeli officials,
Le Monde has quoted the Palestinian news agency
pese a certain link between them and this affair."
IT HAD been reported that Eyal would be ex-
pelled after two Israeli suspects were arrested at his
home following the murder of 30-year-old Mohammed
Boushicki Eyal had reportedly been declared persona
nen grata by Norwegian authorities and his expulsion
was considered imminent. According t the French
paper, Le Monde, the Norwegian government decided
not to expel Eyal "in order to attenuate the political
implications of the affair."
- "I
..-,. '-" -'-<'--
although he said "some indications permit us to sup-
"Wafa," which congratulated Norway for its "noble
attitude" and denounced the "shameful attitude of
French police and authorities when faced with Zionist
terrorism.'*
The Palestinian agency was referring to the mur-
ders of pro-Palestinian militants in Paris, Mahmoud el
Hamshari and Mohammed Boudia, and whose murder-
CvaUnned on Page 9

'Blood and Whiskey Were
Everywhere:.. Then Quiet9
TEL AVIV (JTA) Communications Minister Shimon Peres
said Wednesday that the leniency shown by some countries to Arab
terrorists led to Sunday's attack in the Athens airport in which three
persons were killed and 55 injured. He said every country must make
an energetic effort to "behead this dangerous snake of terrorism."
Meanwhile in Athens, the two
the lounge's marble bar for two
hours while they tried to get a
plane to take them to the Middle
East.
SHIMON PERES
leniency at fault
in
Arabs who threw hand grenades
and opened fire with pistols in the
crowded airport transit lounge
have refused to answer questions,
according to authorities. Earlier it
was reported that they claimed to
be members of the Black Septem-
ber terrorist organization and said
that "we have done what we came
forour mission is accomplished."
POLICE ARE also questioning
two Arabic-speaking young women
who were taken from the airport
kicking and screaming.
The two men surrendered after
crouching with 35 hostages behind
Territories
No Subject
For Debate
Mo. Pen Prisoners
Seek Kahane Pardon
BY SPECIAL AUTHORITY
800 Soviet
Jews Will
Come Here
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Eight-hundred Soviet Jews in Rome
who have been there several
months after leaving the USSR
with exit permits may have a
chance to come to the United
States without the customary de-
lay.
Attorney General Elliot L. Rich-
ardson said here that he would
use a special authority under U.S.
immigration laws to permit the
Jews to come to the U.S.
THE EXERCISE of the Attorney j
General's parole authority is ex- j
pected to shorten the waiting pe-
riod from several months to sev-
eral days. Richardson said most of
the 800 Jews have no immigration
visas to the U.S. and that they
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Jewish Defense League (JT>L) said
here Aug. 1 that seven Jewish and
33 non-Jewish inmates of the Mis
souri State Penitentiary had signed
petitions appealing to Jews "to
exert whatever influence possible
to win the freedom of Rabbi Meir
Kahane," now awaiting trial in
Israel on conspiracy charges.
David Fisch, JDL executive di-
rector, said that the prisoners, re-
acting "to the harassment of a
man whose words have brought
many of them a new outlook on
life since their incarceration, ex-
pressed grief over Rabbi Kahane's
unjust treatment in Israel."
FISCH TOLD the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that one of the
Jewish inmates received reading
material which included some of
the writings of the JDL leader and
Continued on Page 5
Witnesses said passengers were
prepared to board two flights to
Tel Aviv and New York when one
of the Arabs, about to have his
baggage checked for the New
York flight, threw his hand gre-
nade to the ground. Both men be-
gan firing pistols. Originally re-
ports said both TWA planes were
bound for Tel Aviv.
First reports of the incident
here resulted in placing Lod Air-
port under a state of emergency.
It was feared that the Athens at-
tack might have been a diversion
for another attack elsewhere or
that the Arabs were planning to
hijack a plane bound for Tel Aviv.
POLICE IN Athens speculated
that the two Arabs may have plan-
ned to attack an El Al plane which
left 10 minutes before the shoot-
ing began. The Israeli flight still
was listed on the information board,
and this may have confused the
Arabs, according to police.
The emergency at Lod was re-
laxed after passengers arrived from
Athens. One of them, Dr. Gerald
Stern, a 41-year-old Brooklyn den-
tist, said there were four persons
waiting to go on the Tel Aviv-
bound plane and many for the
U.S. flight when he suddenly
heard shots and explosions.
"I suddenly fell to the floor and
wished it would open," he said. "I
saw people falling, blood covering
them. Blood and whiskey were ev-
erywhere, and then there was
quiet."
STERN SAID when he boarded
the plane he found that the
passengers did not know "that a
Continued on Page 8
JERUSALEM (JTA) Pre-
mier Golda Meir declared July 31
in an apparent response to De-
fense Minister Moshe Dayan's com-
plaint that Israeli activity in the
administered areas has been inade-
quate, that "everyone in the Labor
Party agrees that more should be
done" and that there were no dif-
ferences of opinion on the issue
in her party.
She made the statement in an
interview broadcast on the army
broadcasting station. The statement
also was published in morning
newspapers. Dayan had threatened,
in a speech recently that he might
leave the Labor Party in the Oc-
tober elections if a clear program
for action in the territories was
not adopted for the coming four
years. Asserting that the govern-
ment had already done "a great
deal" in the territories, Mrs. Meir
Continued on Page 5
ANWAR SADAT
doesn't fear vet*
ENHANCED REVERENCE FOR CONSTITUTION
Avoid Orgy of Reform,
Senate Quizzer Warns
By SEN. HOWARD H. BAKER
Los Angeles Times Syndicate
In recent months and weeks I
have come to have an enhanced
reverence for the Constitution of
the United States and for those
inspired men who crafted it near-
ly two centuries ago. The vitality
of our institutions, the strength
of our ideals and the understand-
ing of flawed human nature that
emerged from the Philadelphia
convention are truly remarkable
testaments to the origins of our
republic.
It is true that, from time to
time in our history, we have found
ourselves confronted with a rela-
tively radical shift in our way of
doing a particular public busi-
ness. Several of the more import-
ant amendments to the Constitu-
tion have marked such change.
IT IS my belief that we ase
at that point again, this time with
respect to reform of the federal
Continued on Page 8
Standard Oil Urges Support of Arabs
By Special Report
LOS ANGELES Standard Oil
of California has asked its stock-
have run into a waiting time of j holders and employees to support
several months because of paper-
work in processing their requests
to come to the United States.
Carl Glide, president, and Gay-
Continued on Page 8
U.S. should support the Arab po-
sition because Middle East oil re-
serves are vital to "the future wel-
fare of the Western world."
Miller's message, dated July 26,
"the aspirations of the Arab peo- fa ^.^ mailed to standard-s 40,-
ple" and 'their efforts toward ^ employees and 262,000 stock-
peace in the Middle East. Stand- t^der,, The Standard Oil letter
ard Oil Chairman Otto N. Miller marks the first time a major oil
said in a special letter that the company has taken such a strong
and public stand on the Arab side
of the Middle East issue.
EXECUTIVES OF the interna-
tional oil companies which have
large petroleum reserves in Arab
states traditionally have preferred
to work behind the scenes in urg-
ing U.S. government support for
the Arab governments. The letter
suggested that all citizens urge the
U.S. government to work for peace
in the Middle East.
The letter, which recommended
that the U.S. "work more closely
with the Arab governments to
build up and enhance our rela-
tions with the Arab people," did
not mention Israel by name.
MILLER'S LETTER did not dis-
continued on Pace 8-


Page 2
+Jewis* Fk>riJiar "* Shofar of Hollywood
1'iiday, August 17, 1973
UJA Announces Formation
Of Operation Israel 74
Calling them "deeply moving
lissions ol commitment, love and
. onc-ern." the United Jewish Ap-
c;;! has announced the formation
. f Operations Israel. 1974.
Iiividing the missions into scv-
ral dilfercnt categories, the UJA
.,- designed each to give first-
hand and in-depth information lo
those community leaders who are
eligible for the study-trips.
Commencing with an Oct. 22
Women's Division Leadership mis-
sion, eaeh are 10-day trips with
h i xception of one seven day trip
. n Dee. 9 and wiil explore places
d meet people must tourists
i ei let
Participants will speak with new
imers arriving from the Soviet
n; with Israelis in border
utzim and immigrant develop-
town.-: with high ranking
overnment officials and re pre-
cntatives of the Jewish Agency.
There will be visits to Massada,
" .id Vashem and the Western
id the o'd city of Jerujj
... Ashdod. Kfar Kuppin and
lal HaEmek.
For the women, an in-depth
stud) of a single development
town, tracing it- growth, its prob-
lems, its population, its future, its
educational resources and needs
and its social services is planned.
Informal meetings with Cabinet
ministers and members of the
Knesset, and Shubbat visits with
Israeli families are also on the
agenda.
The schedule of missions is as
follows:
Women's Division Leadership
Oct. 22 Nov. 5
Couples Nov 11-Nov. 21
Couples Nov. 25-Dcc. 5
MenDec. 9-Dec. 16
University Campaign Chairmen-
Dec. 20-Dec. SO
CouplesJan. 6 Jan. 16
Women.Ian. 20-Jan. 30
Couples- ft b. 3-Feb. 13
CouplesFeb. 17-Feb. 27
The total cost per person is be-
i ven $693 and S975 from New
York, depending on which mission
is chosen. A $250 deposit is re-
quired for each reservation, which
can be made through the Jewish
Welfare Federation, 1909 Harrison
St., Hollywood (927-0536).
Eligibility for Operation Israel
i> based on a minimum contrib-
ution of $750 to ihe JWF UJA
campaign
'Operation Outreach' First Step
Towards Community Center Goal
Under the auspices of the Social
Planning Committee of the Jew-
ish Welfare Federation, a Jewish
Community Center -Program' De-'
velopment Committee is being or-
ganized with a view towards
aunching "Operation Outreach"
in September.
The Outreach operation is en-
visaged as the first step in the at-
tainment of the long-range goal of
Center programming in the Holly
woid area.
The function of the new commit-
tee will be:
to identify the needs of the
Hollywood Jewish community rela-
tive to leisure time
to identify programs and serv-
ices to meet those needs
to identity the areas of serv
i e by age and grouping
to develop the necessary struc-
ture for in-depth programming
to act as an advisory group to
t le professional staff on program
development and evaluation
to promote the services and
rograms within the community
to tie-in the programs de-
veloped with the concept of the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida and other .services
developed by the JCCs.
Arthur Frinnt and Dr. David
Classman are ooohairing the Pro
-ram Development Committee
Chairmen of sub-committees are
Darrt Drickman and Steve Wcin
-tern. Teens: Mrs Shirley Cohen,
Mrs Lister Named By Beth El to Head Religious School
Hollywood's Temple Beth El
las announced the appointment of
Mrs. Rebecca Lister as principal
I its religious school.
Mrs. Lister has been in the field
' ri'iorm education for 15 years.
aving served as principal for a
,umber of major congregations
including Temple Emanuel. Ken-
injton. Mel.. Temple Israel. New
Hochelle, N.Y., and Temple Beth
SI, Chappaqua, NY
Mrs. Lister was recently awarded
;he Fellow in Religious Education
certificate by the Commission on
Jewish Education.
The author of many religious
shoo! textbooks under the aegi-.
,if the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, she was Education-
il lon.-ultant for the Jewish Edu-
cation Committee of New York
lo the New York Federation of
Reform Synagogues.
Specializing in early childhood
and parent education, and special
classes for the handicapped. Mrs.
Lister is a faculty member ol the
Hebrew Union College 'Jewish In-
stitute of Religion in Education
and Hebrew.
How to
make money
Rabbi Shapiro Returning
Rabbi David Shapiro, spiritual
leader of Hollywood's Temple
Sinai, will once again officiate at
.egular services commencing Aug.
31 following a summer holiday.
Itahbi and Mrs. Shapiro toured
California and Canada, and trav-
i led to Alaska by boat
without
working
for it.
Make your money go to work
Bring il in to the Banks to Go With
First National Bank of Hollywood.
First National Bank ol Hallandale and
Second National Bank ol West Hollywood.
Start an easy, systematic savings plan.
Then watch your money grow
even laster than you can save it
The First National Banks pay liberal
interest And compound it every
quarter You gel interest on
your interest
Better start now Every day you
wait you're losing money
PLANNING
ON MOVING TO
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All Forms of Insurance
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Homeowners Automobile Jewelry
2430 Hollywood Boulevard Hollywood
______ 9239518 9453527
FIRtMAN"?
FUND
AMERICA X
livAkci i:ni.ii,
j
Children: Lewis Cohh. fc&lfjA.
Presidents); Mrs. JosrJph Hopiri ai f
\Iiss Kdthj Grossman, S
Adults and College Youth:' dr.J
Mrs. Philip Weinstcin. Aduits.
DRAPERIES ^j
by jUicfiaeC
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CALL 921-2991
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Kindergarten: waiting list
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For information and literature, call 966-3200.
Morton Molovsiiy.
Jack Shapiro.
Mordetoi I. Ophci.
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Dr. Frad Blumenthol.
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ALLAN F. SCHEINBLUM, M.D.
AND
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TAKE PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING THE ASSOCIATION Of
RONALD B. WEBER, M.D.
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
Neurology anil Nciiroopiithalniology
4107 HOUYWOCD BOIHFVARD
HOUYWOCD, FLORID*
PHONE 9620314
DIPLOMATES IN NEUROLOGY
AMERICAN BOARD OF PSYCHIATRY
AND NEUROLOGY


iay, August 17, 1973
*"Jenist> fk>rirfi*r or"* Shofer of Hollyweofl
Page 3
EVEN THE TREES WERE JEWISH
Teens Wanted To Take
Israel Home With Them
When 26 American kids aged
through 17 stepped off an El
I plane at Lod, they shared a
leness of haying "come home at
fcst." according to Rabbi Avrom
azin, spiritual feaaer of Mira-
ir's Temple Israel and pragmatic
ider of the 1973 Teen Tour of
^,#\Jhey were very moved," he
ft
A*Le
|wi.
plained, "because the guards
ish, the officials who stamped
Heir passports were Jewish, the
ftople sweeping up were Jewish,
nd all around them they heard
ly the language of the Jew. It
eemed as If even the dogs were
Biking in Jewish, and for the
ifrst time in these young peoples'
Ires they were surrounded by a
ptality of Jewishness."
! The Israeli trip and its final
lays in Italy were coordinated by
he Jewish Welfare Federation of
J#llywood in conjunction with the
Jioward Board of Rabbis, with Dr.
^^J.Jon Malavsky acting as Teen
JJjr chairman for the board and
" Robert Pittell as overall chair-
nan.
The group, which departed June
0. was led by Rabbi and Mrs.
)razin and Mitchell Korder, a
eacher from New York City.
The three adults and their en-
ourage headed for Moshav, Habo-
lin, a settlement of English-speak-
ig families dating back in 1948.
lere the Americans challenged
he locals to a game of basketball
nd got themselves drubbed, but
ame back to win over an Atlanta
een tour that caught up with them.
^ flasket ball, according to Rabbi
\>zin, is very big in Israel; the
ourts are equipped with lights
that the game can be played
round the clock.
Also at the Moshav the kids
icked potatoes and learned that
stoop labor" is every bit as bad
s it's cracked- up to be. Outside
the hand-harvesting, however,
hey found that most things in
srael are mechanized. Even ir-
igation is by tinieclock.
The potato pulling adventure
recipitated some observations
tarn the teenagers that Americans
re not in very good shape. Young
KV'igh they were, the kids were
to take more than three
ours of the strenuous exercise.
Americans are spoiled," corn-
tented Ike Fisher. "We're used
driving everywhere we go, and
list the absence of napkins in
)me of the places we ate upset
few of the group. I don't think
host Americans could take the
ard life in Israel."
The tour spent one night at Kfar
iladi on the Syrian border; the
Rowing day 4hey looked down
their resting place from the
olan Heights' and realized how
lnerable the settlement was,
ich explained the presence of
climb the cliff and witness a
spectacular sunrise. The rest of
that day included an inspection oi
a Ciusader castle some eight or
nine hundred years old and of a
400 year old Byzantine palace
where the Americans lunched.
Each of the treks during the
first days was designed to build
up to the joyous moment of view-
ing The Wail. As the final prelude,
the tour held its own service, con-
ducted by Rabbis Drazin and Ma-
lavsky, the latter having met up
with the Federation group, at Yad
Vashem.
"The kids broke down." said
Rabbi Drazin; "they were so upset
they couldn't eat lunch, so I felt
the time had come to take them
into Jerusalem. And when we
reached The Wall that Friday eve-
ning, it was as if we were attend-
ing 50 different synagogues at
nee. No one could be downcast
amidst such obvious happiness."
Jerusalem was, according to
Barry Snyder, "like walking around
,n history. And it was strange to
>e classified as Americans, rather
han as Jews. But most of all I felt
at home, which I would never feel
n any other country in the
World."
Rick Apseloff considered his
-isit with a recently arrived Rus-
sian to be"the high point of his
trip. Although neither spoke the
jther's language, each had the use
>f a few Yiddish words and, with
the help of gestures and sign
.anguage, was able to communicate.
Of the three boys interviewed,
Ike is the only one who has com-
mitted himself to Israeli emigra-
tion. Barry feels the adjustment
to life there would be very dif-
ficult, while Rick plans to finish
college Stateside, then decide. But
each of the trio agreed that he
had been "a Jew among Jews" and
expressed regret that the stay had
not been a longer one.
'They wanted to take Israel
home with them," was the way
Kabbi Drazin described it, speak-
ing of all 26 kids. "They were all
very serious and asked questions
constantly. They wanted to know
the meaning of Israel and the
meaning of their own Jewish iden-
tities. And I think, for most of
them, an answer was found."
State Hospital Receives Gifts
Fishing rods, children's books.,
baking and cooking utensils, and
a set of dishes were presented to
the children's wing of South Flor-
ida State Hospital by the Auxiliary :
of the Robert Franzblau Post of
From JVYV Auxiliary
the Jewish War Veterans.
Attending the presentation were
Mrs. Philip Moskovitz, president;
Mrs. Sam Franzblau, senior vice
president; and Mrs. Mack Cohen,
treasurer.
ROGERS AND WEINSTEIN. P. A.
624 SOUTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY
HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
ALEXANDER S. ROGERS. M. D.
AND
PHILIP WEINSTEIN. Jr.. M. D.
INTERNAL MEDICINE AND CARDIOLOGY
ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE ASSOCIATION OF
Edward Stanley Klotz. M. D.
DIPLOMAT! AMERICAN BOARD OF INTERNAL MEDICINE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF INTERNAL MEDICINE
AND PULMONARY DISEASE
HOLLYWOOD 927-3222
MIAMI 945-5234
arnett
lanK
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
In the ancient city of Advert. Wendy Rubin takes her ease
in a stone vat At left is Ilene Konas outside King David's
tomb.
ARTS FURNITURE CLINIC
Specializing in all wood furniture repairs
REFINISHING STRIPPING ANTIQUING
Nothing too small but large quality of workmanship
Call for any information
920-7122
Reasonable Professional
430 Dixie Highway, Hollywood
*"r uaDle
Resting on the step3 of the temple at Masada are (top step)
Gary Margolis, Keith Hoffman and Barry Snyder; (center).
Mark Rosen, Sherri White and Lauren Luxemberg; bottom,
(half hidden) Ike Fisher, Ilene Kones, Jerry Anton, Lynn
Miller, Tina Propper, and Nina Polak. __________^^
Cul'o-n Vidl
DRAPERIES
nd
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805 N. FEDERAL HWY.
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Phone: 9230564
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Page 4
+Jewisti Fhridliar) Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, August 17, 1973
fcJemsfi ncriJidm \Rabbi Wandered Far Afield
OFFICE anJ PLANT 120 N.E. 6th Street Telephone 375-4605
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 373-4605
P.O. Box 2973. Miami. Florida 33101
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Reoueat
Volume 3
Friday, August 17, 1973
Number 19
19 AB 5733
Counter-Terror Is No Answer
The terrorist attack in Athens airport is tragic on its
own terms. The innocent slaughter of men and women can
not be condoned whether it happens in Greece at the
hands of Arabs or in Norway, where an apparent innocent
Moroccan was mistaken for a member of the Black Sep-
tember movement and shot down by three Jews.
That a secret war is now going on between Israel and
the terrorists is clear from the address of Premier Golda
Meir before the Religious Zionist of America convention in
Tel Aviv last week.
In effect, Mrs. Meir confessed that the war had long
since spilled over the borders of Israel, which in her own
words is now fighting "practically all over the world."
Years ago, before the state, Jews mourned the lack
of a Jewish nation to stand up and fight for their right.
New, that Jewish nation is in existence, and what
Jews prayed for is a reality. But the reality raises several
questions.
The first is that in today's world there is sufficient
ground to arque the legality of Israel's fighting her cause in
the name of Jews everywhere, who are no longer stateless
and living in the pale as they once were.
The second is that there may be those Jews who do not
want Israel to speak, let alone to fight, for them.
But the most important consideration here is that
counler-terrcr is no answer to terror. Each feeds on the
other, with the prospect for peace in the Middle East grow-
ing ever dimmer.

Changing the Balance Of Power
None of this suggests any lessening of pride in or fierce
identification with the State of Israel. To the contrary, it is
merely a reflection of our concern for the future.
As Abba Eban has repeatedly pointed out, the prin-
ciples, the spirit, the personality of the Jewish republic
must he in the peaceful pursuit of human justice and hu-
man progress, not in the unhappy realization that Israel's
war has spilled over her borders and that she is now
fighting globally.
The blame, of course, is not entirely Israel's. The ter-
orist attack in the Athens airport demonstrates that.
What 6"-6T,s clear is that Arab strategists are now
mined to change the Middle East balance of power
Ly impressing primarily on the United Stales that the
American alliance with Israel has a high price tag on it
not only in terms of cU but also in terms cf the compro-
mised .safety of Americans traveling abroad.
Slijl. it would be easier to bear this escalation in terror
if Israel's vigilance were somehow less militant, if Israel's
preparedness did not carry the chin of Mussolini on its
face. Premier Meir's address did not help matters.
Welcome To JWV's Delegates
We are gratified that the 78th annual national con-
vention ol the Jewish War Veterans of the U.S.A chose
Hollywood for the site of its gathering last weekend.
JWV's efforts on behalr of Jews everywhere takes the
organization from the corridors of Congress to the White
House.
Among JWV's principal concerns as it convenes here
are the abolition of the visa tax on Jews wishing to emi-
grate to Israel from the Soviet Union, the upgrading of
hospital facilities for servicemen, the preservation of Israel
as a bastion of democracy, the strengthening of NATO, and
the improvement of housing for the elderly.
We are also gratified that Ainslee R. Ferdie of Coral
Gables was elected national commander of Jewish War
Veterans during its convention deliberations here.
Long active in the affairs of veterans' organizations,
Ferdie will bring distinction both to JWV and to South
Florida in that post.
In a column here last week. I r
argued that our feelings for
President Nixon's pro-Israel poli-
cies shouldn't blind us to the less
than sympathetic portrait of the I
President emerging out of Sesti- I
mony being given to the Ervin I
committee in the Watergate heal-
ings.
For one thing, we're not really
sure about the motives behind
these presidential policies, how jj
long they'll last, what new dircc- '
tion they may suddenly take, or
even whether they aren't s cov-
er-up for something entirely op-
posite to their public intent.
But primarily, what we are
learning from the Watergate in-
vestigation is so revolting that
the admininrarJaa's immorality
ought not to be something we
are willing to swallow as the
price for a continuation of these
policies, even if we could be sure
that they are pro-Israel out of the
President's absolute conviction,
not out of some secret Machiavel-
lian design.
fr ft
NOW COMES Rabbi Barach
Korff as head of a Rehoboth.
Mass., citizens' committee who
takes an ad in the New York
Times of Sunday. July 29. charg-
ing that the Watergate hearings
are being conducted in a "vigil-
ante atmosphere."
Furthermore, declares Rabbi
Korff. members of the Ervin com-
mittee are "hanging judges" out
to get President Nixon.
After all. the rabbi observes,
'one and only one witness
John Dean has implicated the
President in Watergate .
(through) a supposition based on
an interpretation of a single re-
mark made to him last September
by the President.
Rabbi Korff's credentials as a
Mindlin
C ; : 7
political analyst are somewhat
restricted, They are based on his
work in the rescue of Jews from
Nari Germany in ihe 1940s.
I have long maintained that it
would be a good idea if rabbis
and other men of the cloth gave
up their presumptuous pretense
as book ?nd drama critics and
keen observers of the political
scene that it would be a good
idea if they stuck to their re-
ligious last instead.
RABBI KORFF'S ad in the
New York Times is a perfect ex-
am pie of what happens when he
and his colleagues refuse the ad-
vice, when they insist on profes-
sional moonlighting in alien
fields.
We can not of course be sure
that his motive is to protect the
President as a friend of Israel.
But the effect is the same.
He attacks the committee when
it is the administration that i
to be attacked. It isn't the "ham
tag judges" who perpetrated the
vicious Watergate crimes.
And if you want to see a \
ante in living lurid color, there is
no better example of one than
John Ehrlichman. whose testi-
mony before the committee raised
the sound of jackboots in my
ear goose-stepping in the arena
of the Berlin Sports Palace ti
the metronomic beat of "Sie <
Heil "
Particularly when he wound u?
his testimony, when he took off
his glasses to appear at his most
sincere, when he turned his eyes
to the TV cameras and the youth
of the nation, when he gave u,
his little Boy Scout speech -,
morality in the high halls of g<
ernment at that moment 11
Ehrlichman's act. this really little
man showed us what a vigilant?
on Capitol Hill could be.
'.. ff
AND SO, Rabbi Korff moves 11
defend the President from tha
nation, when it is the nation that
needs to be defended from th;
President.
It is the nation that cringt
from a new Nero who fiddles a
Washington burns who strut
across the stage of international
ism and strange foreign policy,
including his pro-Israel p
when what needs attend:'
are the sky-rocketing food pric
dangerous inflation, a declining
dollar, scandal after BCJ
reaching into the President's ow:
hou*e, the feeling among citi
that they are in a runaway ceac
with no one at the wheel.
Needed is not a free'
with a multitude of offices Broun
the country, an emperor dealir,-
with world luminaries and cot
poration moguls, who find
mestic affairs toe boring an
glamorous for his distinguish^
attention, and who tells an
lasinglj re,'less nation to e;>:
fi.-h as his Washington buti
ai srily declines to supply hii
filet mignon by the IS
order.
ded is a leader who rev-
4
*
Continued on Page 10
V
Donors to Nixon Campaign
Find Themselves Favorless
By JOSEPH ALSOP
WASHINGTON At this mo
ment. a large number of rich
Americans are biting their nails
in disappointed fury. They prob-
ably number close to two dozen.
Because of the Watergate horror,
they will not get the ambassador
ships they bought and paid for in
the 1972 campaign.
The Republican ambassadorial
auction this year, mainly con
ducted by former Secretary of
Commerce Maurice Stans, un-
doubtedly topped all former rec
ords in this sordid but customary
department of American politics.
The new ambassador to Luxein-
bourg, Mrs. Ruth Lewis Farkas,
gave more than S200.000 which
is a devil of a lot of money for a
small post.
PRE-ELECTION bids often had
to be raised after the President's
reelection. Part of Mrs. Farkas'
S200.000 plus represented raises
on her original bid. This was a
new feature; and so was the way
several of the bidders were per-
mitted to specify the ambassa-
dorships they hoped to buy. One
of them wanted Kenya, for in-
stance, because he is a big game
enthusiast.
Mrs. Farkas was lucky because
her name went early to the Sen-
ate. She got what she paid for
after a good deal of senatorial
grumbling and rumbling. Her fel-
low bidders in the auction have
been overtaken by events, how-
ever. After the drastic shake-up
of the President's staff, meetings
were held at the White House in-
cluding Secretary of State Wil-
liam Rogers and the chairman
of the Republican National Com
mittee. George Bush.
THE MEETINGS produced the
unanimous decision that deliver-
ies could no longer be made to
the successful bidders in the am-
bassadorial auction. All the more
shockingly generous contribu-
tors are out. Presumably, the am-
bassadorships thus left open will
mainly go, instead, to the senior
i
... it may be hoped that one
good result of the Watergate hor-
ror will be a serious effort to deal
with the whole ugly problem of
campaign contributions and cam-
paign financing.
*v >
AfSOp
professionals of the F.
Service.
This is a result that has its
comic side. To the disappoint
of the successful bidders, for ex-
ample, one must add the i
pointment of the chairman of the
Foreign Relations Comm tt<
Sen. J. William Fulbright. II
been looking forward to .
a delightful i ibli he
many a Republican monej Ive
writhing on the witness stand.
Yet Sen. Fulbright's well-known
plans to use the griddle am
cattle prod have served a highly
useful purpose, nonetheless. The
threat of Fulbright, plus the post-
Watergate climate, positively
forced abandonment of th
Bystem of dealing with American
embassies abroad as though they
were expensive merchandise.
TIUS IS a change long overdue;
and it should be made permanent.
It.is nonsense, on the one hand,
to deprive the President of the
right to make political appoint-
ments to embassies. Under the
rules. David K. E. Bruce in Pe-
king is a political appointee, al-
though not for reasons of finance.
But on the other hand, there
would be much advantage in a
statutory prohibition of any nom-
ination to an embassy going to a
large political contributor.
By the same token, it may be
hoped that one good result of
the Watergate horror will be a
serious effort to deal with the
whole ugly problem of campaign
contribul I < im : !
"
to be ii
I and i r
wing of .\:\
I
NOTHING OX the tec
sfi raw -
>t
S ri bert ftimj I
ii hi .;-. n "^
ew In the midSe of
p2gn
Nothing on the righBas
more ruthless, eSer, I i;
the proposition vainlysanadi
i Gee l i);W>o.) ii
the Council fori* U<
World. The psopositiol was, i i
Co n "over to our
on Vietnam and we wilnhelp >oi
or stick to your opinions an!
find about $40,000 somew! I
else."
This Council for it Liv
World, it should be ridded
one of the Capitol's &rc 1 ii .
ous and powerful lobbies: a id
power largely depends on
knack of delivering BOney i
ed candidates.
IN FACT, the probl&i of cam-
i financing onlySegini
presidential elections. It ends
the Senate and House of Repr-
sentatives. A substantial majorii
of members of both Senate and
House are politically Kortgage I
because of "their dependence on
campaign money from Kisiness ot
from labor or from such outfit*
as the Council for :.z Liv lb
World.
? 4>-


Friday, August 17. 1973
- lewlttlFforldH&tl Shofar of Hollywood
Page
*
Salute To Israel Demand
Territories Not
tSZZi Se|li ^T'8 Subject to Debate
Representatives of all Jewish or-
ganization's in Greater Hollywood
will act as Utsts and hostesses at
the annual Salute to Israel pro-
train to be held Tuesday, Sept. 4,
at Temple Beth El.
T..s evening even which com-
mences at B o'clock, is ring spon-
sored by the Israel Government
Totiris' Office, El Al Israel Mr-
lines, Foreign Tours International,
and Eastern A;, lines.
The local sponsor !.< the Com
munity Relatior ; Committt-c of the
.liuish Welfare 1 t.eiaiion, which
committee is composed of all Jew-
ish men's and women's organiza
lions, all area synagogues Slid the
Broward Board of Rabbis.
Keynoting the program will be
Zkdan Atashi. Consul of Israel in
New York City for (he past year.
Mr. Atashi, the ODiy Druze in
the foreign service of Israel, is
lrom Osifiya. He was formerly in
charge of Arabic television for the
northern area of the Haifa District,
at the same time holding a teach
ing position in the Political Sci-
ence Department of Haifa Univer-
sity.
Acting as master of ceremonies
for the event will be Jacob Gorcn,
director of the southern region lor
the Israel Government Tourist Of-
fice. A native Israeli, he has lived
in Atlanta for the past four years
Entertainment will be provided
by The HaAmrani brothers, widc-
Ij acclaimed Yemenite singers whe
have had hit recordings in Israel
and Europe.
Many local dignitaries, as well
as stars from the entertainment
world who will be appearing it,
the urea, have signified their In-
tention of joining the Salute to
Israel.
There will be no admission
charge and no solicitation of iimds.
'hairmen of the committee plan-
ning the event are Mrs. Allen Gor-
don, vi'-c chairman of Cultural Af-
fairs for the CRC: Mrs. Edward
L,ight. and Mrs. Alan Jacobs. Com
.nittec members are Mrs. Joel Rott
! nan. Mrs. Milton Jacobs. Mrs.
| Abraham Sailer. Mrs. Marsha
I Tobin. Mrs. Alan linaman. Mrs.
' Jake Mogilowitz, Mrs. Norman
Atkin and Mrs. Edward Hoffman.
__^__ _________________
JWV Post Celebrating
Its 25th Anniversary
A 'Silver Anniversary"' dinner
: dance will be hosted by the Vic-
tor Freedman Posi of the Jewish
: War Veterans Saturday, Oct. 13,
at the Hemispheres Ocean Pavil-
l lion in Hallamlale.
Reservations may be made by
calling William Schoenfeld. Hy
Spigel. Herman Muransky. Mike
Bngdanoff or Sidney Gingold. The
cocktail hour will begin at 6:30.
Freedom
Continued from Page 1-
became "'very enthusiastic" about
Habbi Kahane.
When he was indicted in Israel,
the inmate became very disturbed.
Fisch said, and asked the JDL of-
nee whai ne could do. Fisch said
it was suggested to the inmate that
he prepare and circulate a petition,
which the prisoner did to both
Jewish and non-Jewish inmates,
and then sent it to the JDL office
here.
THE PETITION, signed by eight
Jews, including a rehabilitation
counselor, which the petition noted
was "provided us hy Hillel Foun-
dation," declared that reading
Rabbi Kahane's words "has given
us hope, as we sit here in prison
and hope for a new life."
The petition also said that for
Habbi Kahane "to be harassed" in
Israel and "treated as a criminal
s not oniy a shame to Israel but
to the Jewish people."
RADIOLOGY CONSULTANTS
And't" S Cop.. M 0
led M Avello'ne. M D
Rubin Klein. M E>.
Alenonder I Kermsh. M D.
Joel A Schne.dei.MD.
Joseph V. Cuirncmo. M -
Donald M. Monde!--'.'". M D.
Kcnne'h J Monson. M D
Robert Pomconti. M D
Albert M. lojuc. MO.
TAKE PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING
THE ASSOCIATION OF
VLADIMIR GRNJA, M.D.
In Diagnose Radiology & Nuclear Medicine
AND
WARREN SEWALL, M.D.
In Radiation Therapy
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Continued from Page 1-
said she saw "no room for an argu
ment over policy in the territories
-iicU's to this debate entrenched be-
hind barricades."
She added that "nobody suggests
there could be a revolution over-
night on this issue."
MRS. MEIR described the posi-
tion of F.gyptian President Anwar
Sadat as weakening, and asserted
that if he thought he could bene-
fit from a "military adventure,'
he would have attacked Israel some
time ago.
She said Sadat did not fear a
United States veto in the UN Sc
eurity Council but he realized that
if Egypt started hostilities, it would
suffer a major defeat.
She praised the U.S. for having
been "consistent" In its policy i
casting one of its rare veto--
against a resolution offered at Hi
end of a special debate in the St
eurity Council on the Middle Eas'
which criticized Israel for its cor
tinned occupation of the Aral) tei
ritories. She said those countriei
which voted for tho resolution hai
shown their "isolation from con
mon sense."
REFERRING to the recent inc
dent involving a clash between
Georgian Jews and Ashdod por
j officials, Mrs. Meir said the inc
dent was resolved when an am.
cable settlement was reached. Som
40 Georgian Jews hired, according
to port officials, on a temporal-
basis, were discharged, leading t.
a physical clash between Georgian
lews and police. The governmen
finally agreed to find other Jobs
for the unemnloved Georgian Jen -
Wildfire
in the south.
There's no
future in it.
Nearly hall ol a" loresi 'ires n
the South are set on purpose
By woods arsonists kids out lor
a thrill or grown men carrying out
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II you'd like to help
prevent arson ..
report it!
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'tgr
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Time To Go Home
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The Pledge
Champagne Spy
While Six Million Died
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Pcge 6
vJcnist FkridH&rt nd Shotar of Hollywood
Friday, August 17, 1973
Profile
Figures Don't Lie...
Once upon a time there was a
quiet little man who toiled as an
accountant for a large firm. Each
day he would arrive at his desk,
his shirt cuffs neatly turned back
twice, his celluloid eyeshade held
in place by rubber bands, and his
first action after sitting down
would be to open the middle draw-
er, gaze at its contents, close the
drawer and commence his work.
After 45 years of this exact
routine, our man finally retired.
The other office staff was elated
because now they would be able
to find out what the accountant
had looked at in his drawer each
morning.
They gathered around the desk
and, with great expectations,
pulled the drawer open. There lay
a piece of paper with these words:
"Debit leftcredit right."
According to Morton Levin, sen-
ior partner in the CPA firm of
Sadoff, Rothchild, Levin & Myers,
the caricatured little man has be-
come a stereotype of all account-
ants in the eyes of the public.
But "numbers for the sake of
numbers are boring to account-
ants," he says. "Of course, there
are some who close numbers
around them like a security
blanket. But numbers to the per-
son who can interpret them cor-
rectly tell many stories. They can
tell of personal motivation, of
greed, they can point to irrespon-
sibility or careful planningnum-
bers represent the blood, sweat
and tears of the people who have
created them."
Mort Levin is not the middle-
drawer-opening kind of account-
ant. He is an articulate, well-
informed man of multiple interests
that encompass religion, politics,
community action, children, sports
and just about anything else you
can name. His BBA degree from
the University of Miami was not
handed to him on the proverbial
silver platter. It represents an
average of 4 hours sleep a night
as he alternated working days and
attending class in the evening with
the reverse.
The firm in which he is now a
senior partner was his first ac-
counting employer, having hired
him when he had only six credits
in the field.
Wife Marcy held him together
during those dog days, he says.
"She made huge contributions to
the joint effort, both financially
and by prodding me when I needed
prodding, by being sympathetic to
my tiredness, and by her unfail-
ing faith that I would make it. I
had been an engineering major,
but one day 1 woke up and said
to myself 'that's no work for a nice
Jewish boy.' So I had to start all
over again and that takes a lot of
understanding."
Now the Levins have Michael,
Mark and Matthew, aged 15, 13
and 8, respectively, and the whole
clan makes it together in tennis
and swimming, temple activities
and Jewish community projects.
Mike is president of B'nai Israel-
A.Z.A.; Mark is immediate past
president of the Moshe Weinberg
A.Z.A.
Marcy, current vice president of
the Florida branch of the National
Women's League of United Syna-
gogues of America, is a past presi-
dent of the Beth Shalom Sister-
hood. Not to be outdone, Dad is
a vice president of Temple Beth
Shalom and a past president of its
Men's Club. He is chairman of
the Jewish Federation's Personnel
Committee, and has been on the
board of Camp Ka-dee-mah since
MOKTON and UAKCt UVIN
its inception. This year he was
elected president of that group.
He was also a member of Federa-
tion's Young Leaders seven years
ago.
"One cannot sit on the sidelines
of life and take, take, take," Mr.
Levin states emphatically. "Tzeda-
kah means caring about your fel-
low man and helping him in the
same way others helped you. That's
why the whole family is so in-
volved. It's our obligation."
Morton Levin describes himself
as "politically liberal, but fiscally
conservative." He likes the run-
ning and sweating of tennis but
Joes not play to win. Similarly, he
ciever wins much at his weekly
poker games because he is too con-
servative to bet heavily. It is this
jame non competitiveness that
keeps him out of politics, plus his
conviction that the expediencies
of political races make for rule-
bending.
"Accounting is the most ethical
profession in the world," he says.
"I would feel very uncomfortable
in a situation where it's every man
for himself."
Right now the major interest in
Morton Levin's life is to get a
Jewish Community Center going.
"Hollywood needs it badly," he
explains; "it would enhance the
life of the total community and
help to pull together those Jews
who are not temple or organiza-
tion-affiliated. After Israel I think
it should be the number one
priority on everybody's list."
Mort's father, who is not an ac-
countant, has a favorite saying:
"Figures don't lie, but liars fi-
gure." These words, buried in his
subconscious, may well have been
the impulsion that brought Mort
Levin's career to its successful
pinnacle. But he is a community-
activist first and an accountant
second, and he hopes that with
success will come more time for
the involvement so necessary to
his fulfillment.
THE FIRST Svislotzky Prize
for parliamentary writing has
been awarded to two veteran
Israeli journalists. Yona Cohen
of "Hatzofe" won half of the
II. 2,500 prize for his new book,
"The Knesset: Debates and
Smiles." And Matti Golan or
"Haaretz" won the other half
for a series of articles be wrote
for the newspaper.
>CJW Receives
Judicial Honor
The National Council of Jewish
Women has received an Achieve
ment Award for "service to the
children of America" from the Na-
tional Council of Juvenile Court
Judges.
In accepting the award from
NCJCJ presidrnt Judge Lindsay G.
Arthur. Mrs. Eleanor Marvin, the
national president of NCJW, ex-
pressed the hope that through the
cooperation of concerned individ-
uals and agencies, significant and
ong overdue changes can be
brought about in the juvenile jus-
tice system.
In recognition of NCJW's full-
icale investigation into the legal
injustices inflicted on the trou-
bled and troublesome children of
America, the award is dedicated to
"the group making the most out-
standing contribution in com-
municating the needs of youth and
the Juvenile Courts to the public."
Representing the Hollywood Sec-
tion of NCJW in this effort are
Mrs. Milton Forman, Mrs. Charles
Dubin, Mrs. Charles Levine, Mrs.
Wm. Weiser, Mrs. Leon Sternberg-
Si and Mrs. Leo Lane, who with
ather NCJW volunteers across the
ountry are probing and publicizing
the operation of the legal system
n their own communities.
NCJW program priorities, de-
veloped after nearly two years of
itudy, include reforming juvenile
rodes to protect children's rights,
establishing group homes, and
forming coalitions with other civic
groups to take action on providing
justice for children.
SOME 4,000 additional teen
agers get free education in the
10th grade of high school next
year, the Knesset Economic Com-
mittee was told. EUeter Shmu
eli, deputy director general ol
the Education Ministry, said the
loth graders would come from
localities where large numbers
of immigrants are being absorb-
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Aerobatics were performed by many planes, including
these six Fouga Magister trainers, seen trailing plumes of
blue end white smoke.
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M


Friday, August 17, 1973
Jenisfi fhrijiar ,nd Snof*r of Hollywood
Page 7
THE HALPERN JOURNEY
Israel-----1973: 25th Anniversary
4:
. *
By BLANCHE & ABE HALPERN
(Fourth of a Series)
At 7:30 Monday morning. May
7, we were at the King David an-
nex where many buses were de-
parting with tourists for the grand-
stands. Only these official buses
and those coming from other parts
of Israel just for the parade were
allowed to enter the Old City and
park near the parade grounds.
There were approximately 60.0CC
seats in the stands with about
55,000 allocated to tourists. Tickets
were issued to those tourists who
arrived in Israel after April 1,
1973, upon the presentation of
their passports. Many tourists were
disappointed because there were
not enough tickets to go around.
With our tickets we received in-
(.tractions. We had to be in our
stats by 9 a.m. and to bring a
head-covering and sun-glasses. Nc
parcels, even food and beverages,
were allowed in the grandstands.
The carrying of firearms was ab-
mUitaly prohibited. Refreshments
i
v!
I!

l>
were available at the stands.
We were seated a few minutes
be.fore.nine. All the streets of the
parade rputa, including the street
opposite t the grandstands, were
lined with people. Across from our
section of the grandstand were
many who found a spot on tree
branches, walls, hilltops and roofs.
A large group of monks watched
the parade from the roof of a
church.
For half an hour the loud speak
ers played military marches. At
8:40 the President's Guard of Hon
oi, the Israel Defense Forces Band,
and the Commander of the Central
Region took up their positions.
All the dignitaries arrived in
three cars preceded by motorcycle
escorts accompanied by the rolling
of drums and great cheering from
the- crowd. They included former
Prime Minister David Ben Gurion;
the Prime Minister, Mrs. Golda
Meir; the Defense Minister, Moshe
Dayan; Gen. David Elazar, the
CJueioL Staff; and His Excellency,
President Zalman Shazar.
AERIAL FLY-PAST
Promptly at 10 a.m. the parade
started with the playing of Hatik-
vah Jy the Israel Defense Forces
Band. Then immediately the aerial
"fly-|iBst" of Air Force formations
took place. There were many gasps
ci astonishment and admiration at
.the intricate and perfect forma-
tions
French made Mirage fighters
flew'in the formation of a Magen
David (Shield of David). Another
gToup of planes formed the He-
brew fetters Chav Hey (Hebrew
fox 25K One plane wrote the let-
ters Chav Hey with smoke. Other
formations looked like flocks oi
birds. One design in the form of
a plane was.- so perfect that it
look8 as if a-single gigantic jet
were in The air.
For about 20 minutes we watched
flights of Phantom fighter-bomb-
.ers, French Super Mysteres, Sikor-
sky CH-53 jet helicopters, and Bell-
.205 helicopters. There were many
^others. Some of these formations
flew past more than once. A group
of Israel; Ait Force flying instruc-
tors demonstrated their aerobatic
"skill.
It was announced that Aluf Mor-
dechai Hod, the chief of the Israeli
Air Force, would lead a squadron
Of Phantoms. Six jets trailing blue
and white smoke signed off the
serial "fly-past." The entire per-
formance was breathtaking.
MOTORIZED EQUIPMENT
Then motorized columns began
1o pass. These included a forma-
tion of ceremonial columns, mil-
itary police, standard bearers and
Nahal Outpost Units. (Nahal is the
r name for border settlement com-
. bining a kibbutz and an army out-
post.)
T'jie artillery columns were
greeted with a tremendous cheer
>vhen it was announced that the
Israeli improved 240 mm. Katyu-
sha rocket launchers. Russian
weaponry, was a gift from the Rus- .
sians via the Egyptians.
There were also howitzers
mounted on Sherman tanks and
160 mms, Israels heaviest mortar,
made entirely in Israel and fully
mobile. There were others. The
Hawk anti-aircraft missiles con-
cluded the motorized part of the
parade.
ARMY CAN BE BEAUTIFUL
The last portion of the parade
comprised the Infantry columns.
When a contingent of the Women's
Corps marched past there was ap-
plause and cheers with remarks
such as "Who said an army can't
be beautiful"
The greatest applause and loud-
est cheers greeted the Druze
soldiers, a representative con-
tingent of Israel's minority units.
They share the burden of safe
guarding Israel's borders together
with their fellow Jewish Israelis.
There were detachments of of-
ficer cadets, air Force and Navy
cadets, and contingents of para
troopers who could be distinguish-
ed by their purple berets. The
standard bearers, Military Police,
pre-army Gadna Youth Corps, mil-
itary bands and drum corps all
marched in perfect unison. The
parade concluded with the Mounted
Police detachment.
The entire spectacle was mag-
nificent to behold. The setting in
the Old City of Jerusalem, all
those present, the participants
marching by, the music and the
colorful flags waving in the breeze,
underscored the magnitude of the
historic moment unfolding before
our eyes. It was one of the most
exciting and emotional experi-
ences we ever had the "zchut," the
privilege, to witness.
We walked back to our hotel.
When we arrived the last con-
tingents of the parade were pass-
ing by.
That night we recorded on tape
our impressions of the day. Fol-
lowing is a brief summary.
MEMORIES
One memory after another kept
crowding into our minds. For 2,000
years since the destruction of the
Temple in 70 of the common era.
the Jewish people have been har
rassed, persecuted, burned at the
stake. We recalled the holocaust,
so recent, when six million of our
brethren were exterminated and
burned in the crematoria of the
concentration camps. Where was
the civilized world?
We remembered the Warsaw
Ghetto uprising where a handful
of old men and women, children,
ind a few young leaders staged an
uprising with their bare hands
against the might of the Nazi
Wehrmacht.
This was a tremendous show of
courage. They knew that they
would get no help. They knew
that they would die. But they de-
cided to die fighting, and not as
Hitler ordered, to die suffering.
Abe recalled the pogrom in his
'shtetl" in the Ukraine when he
was nine years old. The hooligans
freely killed men. women and chil-
dren only because they were Jews
without anyone offering any help.
It was a traumatic experience that
has left its mark to this very day.
As we watched the aerial "fly-
past," the various military equip-
ment passing by, the tanks, artil-
lery, missiles, and the boys and
irls marching, we felt that here
was a clear message to the Arabs
and to the entire world.
NEW GENERATION OF JEWS
With a feeling of pride we saw
i new generation of Jews who were
saying, "Don't push us around. Not
determination and the capability
of defending ourselves.
"So please don't start a war. We
don't want any of your ooys to be
killed and we don't want any of
our boys to be killed. We have
enough resources now to defeat
any attempt of the Arab world to
destroy Israel and to push us into
the sea."
During the next week or so we
had many discussions with Israelis
including young Sabras who were
either serving in the Defense
forces at tne time or who had al-
ready completed their terms of
service.
We saw a letter to the editor of
the Jerusalem Post
additional boost to the economy
brought about by the influx of
lOWiftSi hut also to Ihc lifting of j
morale of the Israelis and of the
Jews of the entire world. About |
300000 people saw the poratfe i
from the stands and the streets. I
A million or more in Israel saw |
it on television.
MESSAGE TO ARABS
Finally, the most important re-
sult of the parade was a psycho-
logical message to the Arab lead-
ers and to the millions of Arabs
who undoubtedly also watched the
parade on television.
Arabs arc convinced that Israel
cannot be beaten on the battle-
field will they give up their
dreams of victory in battle. Per-
haps thn they will sit down at
the conference table.
We hope that the 25th Anniver-
sary parade, this great show of
strength, will be the beginning of
willingness by the Arab nations
to join Israel in its quest for peace.
Thus the parade, without a single
shot and without any loss of life,
will bring the greatest victory for
Israel, the Middle East and all
mankind.
about the cost of the parade. The
writer suggested that perhaps the
money should have been put to
better use.
We also read about the request
of the United Nations that the
parade be cancelled. The unanim-
ous opinion of all those to whom
we spoke and the consensus with
which we agree wholeheartedly is
very simple.
It was absolutely mandatory that
Israel not show weakness by call-
ing off the parade at the request
of the United Nations. The mone-
tary expense was infinitesmal com-
pared to the positive results that
ensued, not only in terms of the
The fact remains that the se-
complaining ( curjty 0f the nation on all borders
and the deterrent effect of the Is-
raeli Defense Forces were so great
that there was not one single act
of sabotage anywhere. There was
no loss of life. This is an achieve-
ment of great importance.
No one knows what would have
happened if Israel had called ofl
the parade. Even if the parade suc-
ceeded in saving only one life, the
expense was more than worth it.
Moreover, this was another
demonstration toward the goal of
peace to which Israel and the Jew-
ish people everywhere aspire. We
are certain that only when the

LUNCHEONS
DINNERS
II 3C A W. HOC P V
Saturdj.i & Sundays
1:00 P.M. ii.oo P.M.
- T*Kt OUT
HONG KONG
VILLAGE
Chinese UgltlMTOHf
NO N Fed. Mwy., Owtio
PHONE M0-W7
. They were followed by the arm- only are we not going to allow you
cred columns of Israeli up-dated
and improved versions of Cen-
turion tanks, Patton M-48s and im-
proved T-54 tanks captured in the
-. Six-Day War.
V The Engineer Corps included
formations of Patton M-60 bull-
doifens and Bridge-layer tanks.
to push us around, but we are
capable of preventing you from
doing it.
"We don't want to have to use
this equipment. And please note
that this is just a portion of what
we have. But if anyone starts
something against us we have the
>4MJ9
our denim shop opens...
AND CORDUROY GETS THE BLUES
There are so many denim-looks.
we're devoting an entire shop to
the blues. Here, from our
European-inspired collection, is a
creative corduroy version. Soft.
city-tailored by the Market of
Canada. Washed-out blue
mini-wale cotton. Blazers. $29
Piped-yoke pants. $23 Nylon
check long sleeve shirt by
Huk-A-Poo. S-M-L.$13
CtNIM SHOP. Alt BUfiDINl'S SlOHrS.


Paoe 8
* If-W / Fiiday, August 17, 1973
Avoid Reform Orgy, Ervin Quizzer Warns
Continued from Page 1
oral process. 11 is a challenge
Out involves the most elemental
principles of our pulil.v. It i, tin
kind of soul-searching challenge
to which Americans respond best.
One of the mo.it vulnerable ol
our constitutional practiceh is
that whereby the national legisla-
ture monitors its own conduct and
sets its own rules and regula-
tions.
\\ c are for.d of the axiom til it
no executive ageney should he
bath promoter und regulator of a
given public activity. And yet,
within the bounds of the Con-
stitution, that is essentially what
we in the Congress do.
We set our own rates of com-
pensation, contrive our own pre-
requisites, determine the qualifi-
eations of out members, write
our own rule, of procedure and.
clearly most important of all. ve
establish the methods when by
The need for such reform was not
all elected federal officials are
chosen by the people.
THIS IS the very root ol dem-
ocracy. For however often wt
may lose sight of it. Hie one
inescapable fact of any true de-
mocracy is that the people arc the
ultimate sovereign.
The apparent fact of the mat
ter is that the people of this
country hold current electoral
practices in low esteem. Fifteen
years ago a public opinion survey
showed that lully 80 percent ol
the American people felt that i!".1
government could and should be
trusted.
Now only one out of every two
citizens places much stock in 'he
integrity A public officials and
their ability to govern with com-
petence and decency.
MANY MEMBERS of the Sen-
ate, if not a majority, believe
Ihat electoral reforms of the most
fundamental nature are in order.
Sen. Howard H. Baker, Jr. (R-Tenn.) is vice chair-
man of the Senate committee inquiring into the
Watergate affair. In this column, Sen. Baker ar-
gues that "We must avoid ... an 'orgy of re-
form' and the temptation to get by with as little
reform as necessary to assuage public demand."
created by the so-called Water
gate affair: the seeming events
of the 1972 presidential election
have only dramatized and height-
ened our perception of some of
the reforms that must be made.
But we must seek to avoid two
extremes in our search for mean-
ingful change: We must avoid
Oolh what some have called an
"orgy of reform" and the tempta-
tion io get by with as little re-
form necessary to assuage public
demand.
Either course would be the soul
Chevron
8
Standard Oil Company of California
225 ;. St.-eei. San Francisco. California S4104
0. N Viller
Cm.not Hit Sei'd
July 26, 1973
To ou: Stockholders:
All of us are well aware that the United States is not producing enough oil and gas to meet the
overall demands which exist today tor these energy resources. We are becoming increasingly
dependent on foreign oil imports.
Hero in the United States we must increase our exploration efforts to find new oil fields, and
do all tiuit we can to develop all sources of energy. However, even with our strongest efforts in these
directions, it is clear we must iook to increased imports of foreign oil in sizable quantities.
Since 1960. the Nation's volume of petroleum imports has increased more than three-fold, and
now amounts to more than 35 < of our domestic requirements. The foreign oil we will need could
rise to 45-507* by the end of the I970's.
A key question certainly is. "From where is all this oil to come?" Obviously we must look to
e world. Jjut primarily to thej^ific oil fields of the AutaAirsian Gulf area which
<>*%,.
LETTER ADDRESSED TO OUR STOCKHOLDERS'
of irresponsibilitv.
THE FAITH of the public and
laith in ourselves cannot be
restored overnight. Nor can it be
enhanced by piecemeal attempts
at cosmetic alteration. It is rather
the type of faith that will be
restored only if we can convince
the American people that we
have undertaken the sort of
political soul-searching required
under the circumstances and ihat
we have made a concerted and
careful effort to enact meaning-
nil electoral reform.
The sorts of reform that seem
to me deserving of the most care-
ful and serious consideration and
enactment during the next few
months are a strict and enforce-
able limitation on individual
campaign contributions and over-
all expenditures for any one can-
didate and a ban on all cash con-
tributions without exception.
Other changes should include
simple, full and forthright report-
ing of all campaign contributions
in time for the voters to assess
the meaning of such reports: a
single designated repository for
all campaign contributions; reg-
ulations to limit or prohibit the
last-minute "blitz" just prior to
Election Day. and an independent
elections commission with the re-
sources and the high-mindedness
necessary to fairly and fully ad-
minister the law.
WE MUST also, in mv jud"-
ment. follow through with lan-
guishing proposals for the elimi-
nation or serious reform of the
electoral college, that vestigial
remnant of 18th-century com-
promise that has no place in a
modern America: we must short-
en the length of federal cam
paigns.
We should lend some sem-
blance of uniformity to our presi-
dential primary system bv adopt-
ing a system of regional primaries
and establishing a system of elect-
ing delegates to the national con-
vention.

Standard Urges Arab Support
Continued from Page 1- with the Gulf area, which has be-1 represent the onlv major source to
close his company's strong depend- "i"'"1' lmpo1'tant ,as a ^sie supply which the United States can look
ence on the Mi< Idle East as a source fn a t rope and for any substantial increase in its
of supply. Sau li Arabia and Iran pa"; '" ,. W,I" b,e a" important crude oil imports to meet our
together provided, lil per cent of u the United States in the | needs.
Standard's worldwide production !*T ^cad<: California Standard
of crude oil ir 1972 e ,he flrst ol1 discovery on I Xl ls highly important at this
The letter ic -, i,i, i Bahrain Island in the Gulf in 1932. t,me that the United States should
StJckhoWers' dl!dlcSied lo ol"- A year later it concluded an his- wrk more closely with the Arab
" l01"'c agreement with King Abd al-1 governments to build up and en-
i- a qS ar dWa'c that the Aziz to explore and develop the nance our relations with the Arab
Lnited States is net producing Eastern segment of Saudi Arabia People. We as Americans have a
enough oil and gas to meet the which contains nearly one-fourth lon8 history of friendship and co- bloody attack was iust overall demands which exist today of the world's known oil reserve*, operation with Arabs. It goes back in the nearbv terminal''
for these energy resources. We are DURINr, THFW ^ more than 100 years, long before '
becoming inerasingly dependent "L RlNt,K THESE. and more the first oil
on forign oil imports. ; ears- we have maintained a eon- Volves cultural
Another step that I would lik<>
very much to sec taken, although
it is not technically electoiai re-
form, is a structural improvement
in communications between
the legislative and executive
branches, not in a way to dimin-
ish the constitutional separation
of powers but to diminish mis-
trust and suspicion.
One symbolic gesture that
might prove to be of considerable
help in this regard would be the
provision of office space in the
Capitol for the President and his
senior administrative officials.
IT IS said in books of etiquette
that an invitation to the White
House is tantamount to a com-
mand: perhaps an invitation to
the Capitol for consultation
should be equally irresistible.
Some of these elements o1' elec-
toral reform arc necessary, in my
judgment, if we arc to arrest the
erosion of public trust in our gov-
ernment. These proposed reforms,
however, require the most eare-
ful deliberation and cruni'.y be-
fore enactment.
The Federal Election Campaign
Reform Act amendments, despite
every good intention on the part
of their sponsors do not. I be-
lieve, reflect the kind of thorough
consideration necessary for the
magnitude o^ reform we seek to
undertake.
Moreover, these amendments
make little effort to anticipate or
accommodate the recommenda-
tions authorized and mandated by
the Senate in Senate Resolution
60.
THIS IS not to say that the
Select Committee on Presidential
Campaign Activities is a reposi-
tory of political wisdom. But I
suspect that the report o; the
committee will be as careful,
responsible and thorough as the
members of the committee can
make it. When the committee's
report is filed next February, it
is likely that many of its recom-
mendations will either overlap or
conflict with the amendments ap-
proved late last month.
For these reasons, I voted
neither jor nor against final pas-
sage ol tne measure, but rather
signified my presence in the Sen-
ate chamber at the time of the
vote in the interest of prompting
consideration of more compre-
hensive electoral reform.
'Blood and Whiskey
Everywhere' in Athens
Continued From Page 1 i The
third person killed
Mas an
all that we can to develop all r A- rflnforClng bonds of u 5" es,ablisl
sources of energy However even f,,',cnd:sn,p betwe our two peo- must be enhanced. Then
with our strongest efforts in these P S lhat wcre forged dci,(lcs be" und.erstand>ng on our p;...
directions, it is clear we must S *** asp,ra,,on f ,he Arab People, and
H am,uts- in much of the Arab world that East.
more than h e ola and -- & t0 feel *hat ***" do not "s wh "tttoana of the United
amounts to more thin" w h'd '" pr0per regard ,he national s*tes to urge our Government to
of our domesreqSrementt K J"^'. f the Ara statcs- ** 2* 7^ "g*" f Pce
foreign oil we need could rise "g hlstorv.f important contribu- d *?"* We ">ust aeknowl-
to 45-W wrcentbv the enH ,f ,h tl0"S t0 clvi"on. their efforts ^ge the legitimate interests of all
lo tooxj percent d.v the end of the t r.h;n.,n ..* _,_. .... T the nHin ... r,r k. r*;,ui_ ~_ .
operations, and in- | Tw0 Americans killed in the at then i "" WisPort. identified
relationships which tack were positivelv identified as! \rhj t0 pollco as 7pehod
ication and religion, I M'S- Jeannie Salandi. 23 of Hieh p?i ,!"'.. 21' of ^'e^ine. and
nmcrcial trading. 'and Park. X J., and Elbert Ker- Hl,ssam. 21. of Cairo.
ie. much good *"', 5 a *'***' MJ' p,umbing Palestinian guerrilla or^niza-
lllshed which cont'-.ictor. Kersen's wife. Kate 1,ons in Bdrut denied any connec-
here must be and Mrs. Salandi's husband iVn U."h ,he aUafk and blamed
^Sp^ 2* Wi'liam- =2 ;""ng '*- nded: jJSaSPk'_ f *| PaleSt'nia"
800 Soviet Jews DucT
To Arrive from Rome
Continued from Page 1-
nor I, Jacobson, executive vice
to J-i <^n n/,r^. w .u-----. ... uons l0 civilization, their efforts cuc ",e 'eeinmate ....
1970's P bV 'hC Cnd f th ,0 arhi^e political stability and to "> peop,es of the Middle East and
develop sound and modern eco- ne,p them ,0 achieve security and u ?'i n Lnitl'd Hi"-"-> Service
lie future. ,h '! R",'h;,rd,ion's action as in
the finpst haatMA.U.-t ...
vuv.a t, ww~
A key question certainly is. nmiC stn,ctures- a depe"dable economic
"From where is all this oil to All of this is occurrine at a !],;
come?" Obviously, we must look time when the Arab tates-be need i ? thl""7""
to all parts of the world, but pri- cause of their va:t reserves of our m. t9M \ f"'^' i$ in
manly to the prolific oil fields of .rude oil are becomin "incrcas UniT Vntefrest to encourage a
the Arab/Persian Gulf area which ingiy important to the future we *S ""T"1' C0Urse
forn,. hM w a Jong ^ocialion; WMm Euro Sjap.^ Thy | "' """'"' ^,Poin.s.
r '' O. N. Miller
future Most do not have U.S.
visas. They gathered in Rome after
leaving the Soviet Union.
eonomic future. lh8'.Hr Ri''ha'-dsons action as in THEY \VH i
...rnn,, cour.e "We h.ve b,e cornc ,. to nS"^* J**",!
the welfare of these refugees who QfTLffl hund,;e(l^ "f thousands
have been under the aegis of our '<'' ^ ,JrWlsh AM*al dollars,
agency in Rome. Many have been n T tn Amenca^ Joint
waiting here for months unab'e to 'st,'lb,,,,on Committee in care and
- work and uncertain about their; Sd^""88 StS> hiVe
Ck

- /- .


1
fc.
Friday, A-gust 17, 1973
V'JenisHni'biriidliaiin ""d Shofar of Hollywood
Page 9
Envoy Stays--But Oslo Presses Case
Continued from Page 1
ers have no', yet been found. Le
Monde also quoted the weekly
magazine. "Africasia," which de-
clared that the lives of nine Arab
personalities are currently threat-
ened by 'Zionist terrorists.'"
ACCORDING TO "Africasia"
French police have warned the
nine of possible assassination at-
tempts ar.d offered to protect them.
The nine- include Dr. Adel Amer,
director of the Paris Bureau of
the Arab League; the new Paris
representative of the Palestine
Liberation Organization. Mahmoud
Saleh; the PLO representative in
Geneva, Daoud Barakat: Arab jour-
nalists m Paris, and leaders of the
Paris Union of Palestinian Stu-
dents.
When Oslo earlier declared Am-
bassador E> il persona non grata,
it charge! six suspects apprehend-
ed in co".i'"ction with the Bous-
hicki murder.
THE SIX. described by authori-
ties as Israeli agents, were earlier
charged &'ith murder. Svein
Hoevde. Lllic-hammer's police chief
said that the new charge carries a
maximum sentence of two years
in prison The earlier charge of
murder, or participation or com-
plicity in carrying out a murder,
carries a possible life sentence.
Two of the six suspects are Is-
raelis who were apprehended last
ome of Eyal. The Is
raeli diplomat is the embassy's se
purity He is claiming that
since he covered by diplomatic
immuoit) lis home is too.
Hoevde ia*d that the new charge
was baa the fact that the sus
pects ha I ecretly and illegally
gathered M tried to gather infor
mat ion In favor of a foreign power
while aware that these ac
tivities detrimental to the
interests f Norway and jeopar
dized the >s. health, freedom and
property of individual residents."
OBSERVERS IN Oslo quoted by
Norwegian newspapers are report-
ing tha: the new charge seems to
indicate the government believes
that the Israeli government was
aware of the Boushicki murder.
(Israeli Foreign Ministry officials
in Jerusalem said July 27 they
knew nothing about the identity
of the suspects or the shooting.)
The Norwegian press, without
quoting any sources, noted Aug. 2
that the six suspects were arrested
as a result of the cooperation be-
tween police and one of the sus-
pects, a Swedish woman. The un-
named woman reportedly told po-
lice that 11 other persons were an Arab the suspects believed was
involved in one way or another in 1 the contact man in Norway of the
the killing. Ulack September movement.
According to the Olso newspaper.
Aftcnposten. police have issued
warrants for the arrest of the 11.
The warrants were issued through
Interpol. In Paris, an Interpol
spokesman refused to confirm or
deny this report when questioned
by the Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
The newspaper also reported
that several days before Boushicki
was shot he had been contacted by
ACCORDING to Norway's Public
Prosecutor Haakon VViker, the sus-1
pects assumed that the contact had
gotten in touch with Boushicki to
plan an attack against the Israeli
Embassy in Olso and decided to
kill the Moroccan. One Norwe-
gian newspaper reported that the
Black September agent contacte .1
Boushicki by mistake and that.
consequently, his murderers, too.
Miami Leads Nation In Per Capita
Sales of Israel Bonds, Parson Says
Greater Miami continues to lead
the nation in sales of Israel Bonds
to the Jewish community on a per-
capita basis. Milton M. Parson, di-
rector of the r.ond Organization in
South Florida, has announced.
The latest figures from the Na-
tional Office of Israel Bonds in
New York City also reveal that
Miami is one of the leading cities
in total dollar sales to the Jewish
community, "approaching or even
surpassing cities such as Chicago
With three times Miami's Jewish
population." Parson declared. The
figures cover the January-July pe-
riod. /
Congratulating the many com-
munities of Dade and Broward
counties on their record support
it the Bond program. Parson cited
he personal appearances of Prime
Minister Golds Meir and Foreign
Minister Abba Eban at Bond func-
tions this spring as having helped
;o generate the excitement that
Blackman Elected President
Of Florida Fashion Council
Edward BlacKinan. president of
I Vagabond Sportswear. Inc.. wa-
spurred the unprecedented sales of unanimously elected president of
both Bonds and Capital for Israel >
stock.
"Although the 25th anniversary
year is a time tor rejoicing and
celebration.'- Parson said, "the ;
Jews of Greater Miami have not .
forgotten that the struggle to keep
Israel free and secure is a con-
tinuing one, and that the need of
Israel for development funds is
constantly increasing in relation to
(he rising flow of immigrants to
her shores."
Parson cited in particular the
response of Broward Jews to Is-
rael's needs and the phenomenal
growth of Bond sales there. "While
wc know we can count on Dade'..
Jewish community, we have been
extremely gratified by results in
Broward County as its growing
Jewish population joins neighbor-
ing Dade to make the two-county
res a vanguard in providing funds
for Israel." he said.
elected
the Florida Fashion Council for a
second term at their recent annual
meeting. The Florida Fashion
Council represents the apparel
manufacturers in Florida, in de-
veloping this area as the leading
fashion center in the nation.
Other officers elected were
Runny Jacobson of Bunny's Cm
uals, first vice president; Gerald
Breslaw of Timely Fashions, sec-
ond vice president, and Harry Nis-
sel of Harmony Fashions, secre-
tary-treasurer.
Hillel Day School
Acquires Reading
Audio-Visual Aids
Hillel Community Day School of
North Dade and South Broward
announces the purchase of a com-
plete audiovisual system for use
by nursery through 8th grade stu-
dents.
An EDL "Listen and Think"
series will be used in the lan-
:uage arts program, while a
Teehomatic-500 projector with film
trips and work guides in reading
comprehension will be utilized in
reading problems.
In the Hebrew department, the
B'yad Halashon series for the de
eelopment and teaching of spoken
Hebrew will also be in use for the
upcoming ..
The kindergarten and nursery
! : liie SWRL read-
in-: program by Ginn and Co., as
well as the R ader's Digest "Giant
Leat -ii- A Ddules" as aids
in the accelerati d reading and de-
.i i.
The public is Invited to inspect
;h te new educ tional systems.
Tin- school ihoul I be called for
.. appointment,
JWVA. Delegates Attend Conclave
Mrs. Rose Hccht, president of quet and the Women of the Year
the Victor Freedman Ladies Aux- \ Luncheon.
Palmer's
Miami Mcmimeirt Company
3279 S.W. 8th Street, Miami
444-0921 444-0922
Closed On The Sabbath
Personalised Memorials Custom
Crafted In Our Own Workshop.
JZeuill
Jflemorial (chapel
"JEW-H fJNlRAl DIRECTORS"
LOCAL t\0 OUT OF STATS
AB^ANGtMfNTS
947-2790
DIXIE HWV N M.
diary No. 613. Jewish War Vet-
erans, led its delegation attending
the National Convention of JWV
Ladies Auxiliaries hold at the
Diplomat Hotel Aug. 5-12.
Other delegates were Barbara
Sherry. Anne Schwartz. Anne Bas-
kjn, Royce Slutsky, Martha Katz.
iara Landson, Sylvia Gingold, Sa-
lic Hecht. Rose Siegel and Ida'.
Messer.
Highlights of the convocation
were the National President's Ban-
JEFFER
I I \KK.\L HOMES, INC.
DIRECTORS
I'Ain jetfer
Mcilwin Jetfer Alvm Jeffer
I HOLLIS. LI 188-11 HILLSIDE AVE
BROOKLYN 1?83 CONEY ISLAND AVE
212/776-8100
MIAM FLA 13385 W DIXIE MWY.
Hi-P"' onted by Sonny Levitt
305/947-1185
Chaoels available in all
mmunitiosin New York and
th'cughout the Miami area
National president Florence
Vuckcr presented cana fencing to
several day care centers, schools,
houses of worship, the Cerebral
Palsy Association, and to the Mic-
cosukce and Seminole Indian
Tribes on behalf of the Auxiliaries
prior to the national conclave.
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD, HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
Temple 3etA 1
Wemeefal
Cjazdens
The only alljcwish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beauti
scaped, perpetual care, icjbuiubly priced.
For information call: 'i'"i"'*f^
923 8256 or write: _______KZf-yif-
" TEMPLE BETH EL I"/ '--3
1351 S. 14th AVE. -HOLLYWOOD, Ft ORIDA .-3020
Please send me literature on the above.
NAME: _.....--------------------------------------------------------------
ADDRESS:
_ PHONE:
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
ASK YOUR
RABBI ABOUT US
JOHNSON-FOSTER
FUNERAL HOME, INC.
1650 HARRISON ST. HOLLYWOOD, FLA. PHONE: 922-7511
Paul J. Houlihan,
L.F.D.
The first
Riverside Chapel
in Broward County
is now open
in Hollywood*
5801 Hollywood Boulevard
Telephone 920-1010
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL. INC. FUNERAL DIRECTOPS
Other Riverside Chapels in the
Miami-Miami Beach Ft. Lauderdale Hollywood areas
16480 N.E. 19th Avenue, North Miami Beach 947-8692
19th Street 4 Alton Road, Miami Beach JE 1-1151
1250 Normandy Drive, Miami Beach JE 1-1151
Douglas Road at S.W. 17th Street, Miami-JE 1-1151
Riverside also serves the New York Metropolitan area with Chapels in
Manhattan, The Bronx, Brooklyn, Far Rockaway and Mt Vernon.
Murray N. Rubin F.0.


Page 10
-Jewlst ncridlian *hof" Hollywood
Friday, August 17, 1973
l
DON'T FORGET: Federation's
community education forihhs on
Sept. 16 and 30. Oct. 14 and Nov.
4. Watch for places, topics and
times in the next issue of The Jew-
ish Floridian.
Charles Kaplan Awarded Ph.l) In
Sociology At U. Of California
One of Camp Ka-dee-Mah's first
ounselors, Charles Kaplan, the
on of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Kap-
an. has been awarded a Ph.D. in
ociology by the University of
lalifornia at Los Angeles. Mrs.
.illian Kaplan, Dr. Kaplan's moth-
r. is on the staff of Jewish Fam-
y Service in Hollywood.
Dr. Kaplan is a graduate of Tu-
ine University where he majored
i political science. His master's
egree in sociology was granted
y UCLA, after which he became
n instructor in the Urban Life
nstitute at the University of San
rancisco and at San Francisco
tate College.
Published articles include "The
sychodynamics of Rebellion," in
urnan Mosaic; "Dialectical Foun-
-.tions of Scientific Inquiry," in
le Kansas Journal of Sociology:
'id a forthcoming book, "Science
id Its Mirror Image," published
ty Harper and Row.
CHAKI.IS KAPLAN
tiissian Exodus Seen 1)e<*liniii
According to the Union of Coun-
Is for Soviet Jews in Washington,
C. June and July saw fewer than
If the monthly average of So-
iet Jews for the same period last
ar leaving Russia for Israel.
The Council estimates that from
i average of 2,500 Soviets in 1972,
ic current figures have dropped
i between 1,000 and 1.250 per
ionth.
primarily from Georgia and other
remote areas, with large cities
such as Moscow and Leningrad
yielding almost none, according to
the group.
So-called "refusables." accord
ing to a Council spokesman, those
who have been formally turned
down, consist mainly of intellec-
tuals and activists. Other thousands
of Jews who have applied have not
The current emigration stems : officially been refused.

Community Calendar
SATURDAY, AUGUST 18
Temple Solel Sisterhood bowling party 8 p.m.
Brunswick Imperial Lanes, Dania
MONDAY. AUGUST 20
B'nai B'rith Women, Hollywood Chapter 725 general meet-
ing 8 p.m. Home Federal, Hollywood
Beth El Sisterhood petite luncheon and card party (pro-
ceeds to "Service for the Blind") 11:30 a.m. temple
THURSDAY, AUGUST 23
B'nai B'rith Women. Hollywood Chapter 725 luncheon
and card party noon La Mer Restaurant, Hallandale
TUESDAY, AUGUST 28
Temple Sinai board meeting 8 p.m. Haber-Karp Hall
MM '.litllllt.lim.l
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
19 AB 7:35
?
Religious
Services
NAllANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
(Conservative). 416 NE 8th Ave
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz. Canto*
Jacob Danziaer.
NORTH MI/.Mi BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE
.8801 NE 22m: Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingaley. Cantor Irving
Sholkes. 37
NORTH BR0WARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. (Reform) 3501 Uni.
vertity Dr.. Coral Springs. Rabbi
Max Weitz
HOLLYWOOD
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1351 S.
14th Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi Samgel
Jaffe.
BETH SHALOM (Temple) Conserva-
tive. 46D1 Arthur Rabbi Morton
Mmavsky. Cantor Irving Gold.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (Conservative).
310 SW 62nd Ave., Hollywood. Rabbi
Salomon Benerroche.
TEMPLE SOLEl (Liberal). 5001
Thomas St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Rob-
ert Frazin.
TEMPLE SINAI ( Const rv,il. /e) 1201
Johnson St. Rabbi David Shapiro,
Cantor Ye urt.i Heilbraun.
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Conservative)
6920 SW 35th St. Rabbi Avrom
Drazin.
Bar Mitzvah
MICHAEL BAER
Michael, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Irving Baer. celebrated his Bar
Mitzvah at Temple Israel of Mira
mar Saturday, Aug. 4.
tJ i3 &
STEVEN CRAMER
Stephen Ivan, son of Mr. and '
Mrs. Jack Cramer, celebrated his
Bar Mitzvah at Temple Israel of
Vliramar Saturday, Aug. 11.
BBW Luncheon
Will Benefit 4
Local Hospitals
A "summer luncheon and games
party" will be sponsored by Holly-
wood Chapter 725 of B'nai B'rith
Women Thursday noon, Aug. 23,
it La Mer Restaurant in Hallan-
dale. Proceeds will g0 to the four
South Florida hospital programs
of the organizations.
Reservations may t* made with
ways and means chairman Mrs.
David LeVine, or with the cochair-
men, Mrs. Sadie Udell and Mrs.
Harry Zimmer. Mrs. Raymond
Stomel is chapter president.
The organization is making
plans for a theatre party in the
fall to attend "A Funny Thing
Happened on the Way to the
Forum" at the Hollywood Play-
house, as well as a weekend cruise
to Nassau in November.
All events are open to the pub-
lic.
Officers of the newly formed Abraham Heschel Chapter of
the American Jewish Congress are seen at their recent in-
stallation in Hollywood. From left are Carlos Feldman,
president; Sandi Khani, secretary; Sue Schwartz, treasurer-
Andrea Feldman. cochairman of membership, and Alfred
Schreiber, vice president. Debbie Glasskin, (not shown) is
j also a membership cochairman.
Sisterhood Event
To Aid Sightless
With Mrs. Melvin Freedman.
I Mrs. Bernard Price, Mrs. Alfred
! Mazzarino and Mrs. Milton Jacobs
Id charge of planning the event, j
a luncheon and card party will be
held Monday, noon at Temple Beth
El in Hollywood.
Proceeds will go to the "Service
to Ihe Blind." a project of the
temple's Sisterhood that is headed
by Mrs. Caryl Feldman.
The service is manned by wom-
en who work as Braille writers,
recorders and binders to produce !
books and talking records for the i
ightless. During .he past school
rear, materials for 42 sightless
students of Nova were transcribed
and bound.
In addition, the service tran-
scribes books for the Libran (if
Congress and for the Jewish Brail-:
le Institute. Mrs. Milton Forman
heads the bindery and Mrs. Nel-
iOH Kramer is in charge of the \
talking books. Mrs Martin SL-hrei-
ber is proof reader.
Tickets are available through
the temple office. Husbands and
other guests are invited. I
LEO M1NDLIN
Rabbi Wandered
From His Field
Continued from Page 4
this pattern, who gives up wallow
ing in his monarchic splendor and
turns his attention homeward and
to the people who elected him.
That is what Rabbi Korff should
be telling us in his own terms,
not that we are the sinners but
the sinned-against.
C? & &
INSTEAD, he goes from bad
the committee as "hanging
judges." its spirit imbued with a
"vigilante atmosphere") to worse.
For Rabbi Korff, only Sen.
Gurney and Sen. Baker are wor-
thy members of the Ervin com-
mittee. Only Sen. Gurney "has
been a friend of the White House
throughout the hearings."
And only Sen. Baker "ap-
proaches the position of objectiv-
ity claimed by his colleagues."
But Sen. Gurney is the Shirley
Temple of the investigating com-
mittee, an unctuous man whose
simplicity is his greatest affec-
tion, whose sole contribution was
his comment last week that the
investigation is hurting the na-
tion.
No wonder Rabbi Korff has I
singled him out for praise both |
are political dyslexics. Both fail'
to distinguish between the victim
and his tormentor.
As for Sen. Baker, he writhes
increasingly on the cross of his |
Republican loyalty, ceaselessly
seeking out motivation for the
Watergate horror as an alterna-
tive to confronting the fact of
the horror.
ft ft
THE HORROR itself exists and
is hard enough to contemplate; I
motive of the Nazi mentality be-'
hind it is at least at this time al-
most beside the point.
Reckoned in Sinclair Lewis | All Sarr*H Occasions enmmenem
terms, we must be willing to face n the preceding evening at Sunset
up to the truth that it nearly
DID happen here that a bunch
of upstart chutzpah'niks nearly
DID run away with the country
before we sit down to analyze
how they planned to pull it off.
One would have thought that
Rabbi Korff, of all people, with
his own personal struggle against
the Hitlerians 30 years ago,
should understand this.
Instead, he falls into the Hitler
trap. He joins the 1933 throng
that called for the blood of Mar-
inus van der Lubbe as the man
who burned the Reichstag down,
when it was the Nazis themselves
who burned the Reichstag down
and raced to power on the Char-
lottenburger Chaussee. blamin*
the Communists all the way.
In 1972, that is what Watergate
and the Nixon mentalities behind
Watergate were all about a rac-
ing to power, blaming the Com-
munists all the way (the national
security bunko).
And Rabbi Korff doesn't see it.
That's worse than dyslexic. That's
blind.

The Jewish Calendar
5733 1973
Rosh Hodesh Elul | wed. Aug. i
5734. 1973
Rosh Hoshonoh
,FOt of 1-eooHo
Vom HW
First Doy of Succolh
Feost of Conclusion
Simchath Toroti_______
Rosn Modes* Heihvon
Rosh Hodesh Klslov
First Doy Honykah
Rosh Hodesh Ttvts
Thurs.
Sot.
Sept. n
Sot.
Thurs.
Thurs.
FrL
Oct.-Q
Oct. II
Oct.
sotr
Oct. !
6ci..if
Nov. M
Thurs.
vied.
doc
Dec. 24
1904 OCEAN ORIVE, HALLANDALE
8 Open To The Public Daily Dinner Specials
WEDNISDAT FISH FRY
All Tew Cm Eat
French Fris, Cole Slaw
$
2.19
!
THURSDAY
Lamb Chops Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad, Rolls, Butter
& Vegetable
3.99
FRIDAY
Traditional Sabbath Dinner
5 DIFFERENT CHOICES WITH COMPLIMENTARY WINE
4.95
SATURDAY IAR.R.Q. Beef Ribs & Chicken
All You Can Eat
$3.29
SUNDAY "DOWN ON THE FARM
^^^i^cKen^ner
$3.29
I
EL3^JrMT *"?'- u u1
T ... -1. e,,ry sund Kim s-t a.m "
I
\*th
t


Iday, August 17, 1973
vJenist FhiridlHann nd Shofar of Hollywood
Page 11
By BOB KIRBtl, executive Director,
Jewish WelSore Federation of Creofer Hellvwoorf
For the last three or four years a number of people throushout the
rtry huu' beon questioning the decision making apparatus of the
ration.-. In 1969 it was the college community at the Boston Gen-'
Assembly of the Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds
were questioning the priorities of Federation allocations. The com
nis were that only the bi1.; contributors, and -very few of those,
e the decisions that affected the agencies and organizations of the
ri-h community. During the last few weeks I have been involved in
ries or seminars dealing with decision-making within the Jewish
munity. Using these seminars and my 15 years of practical experi-
i. 1 should like to share some feelings and attitudes with you.
The Kehillah movement in Eastern Europe was not as idealistic as :
st people have heard. A duke, a czar or a tax collector did not very
|en impose taxes on individual Jews but rather imposed a tax on ;
complete Jewish community. The deci-ion as to who should pay a '
. and how much became the responsibility of the wealthiest and
Ast influential Jews in the community ami they, in turn, levied a
A V assessment on each individual family. In n ligious matters it was
of in,', the- rabbi w ho was contacted and consulted, and usually the
i rabi' nic decisions on religious matters became law of the community,
i When emigration began in America Western European Jews who
had received Hvii civil independence saw themselves as individuals.
Cen.i.n individuals banned together for a common causeto help
r-A-.tho less fortunate. But again, it was primarily the affluent helping
I the i or Development of the Federation movement in the 1870s
; ati'M : the purpose of coordinating fund-raising activities, again bj
one ,..ass helping the other.
Therefore we see briefly in history that the decision-making has
I been in the bands of a few until very recent times. It has been said
th;<: '.hose who contribute should make the decisions in allocating the
Contributions. At the same time wo are told that those who are recipi-
ent- .'1 the allocations or services are in a better position to know what
sei" 's are needed than are the large contributors.
What is happening today with American Jewry0 Just taking the
Greater IbiUvv'Hid area as an example, we presently have between
( 15 and 20 ac'ive committees within the Federation alone. These com-
mittees study recommend, plan and implement various aspects of pro-
Srams for the community. They report to the executive committee
hich. white perhaps not representative of the total community, does
' fcpre-ent many and various a-ects of the community. Our alloca-
tion process is such thai over 200 peoole were invited to serve on the
Various sub-committees. The only criterion for their involvement is that
0i''v have made a contribution to the campaign commensurate with
aSici" abilities and that they have shown interest in the develoument o!
th" Jewi>h eoirmi'initv of Greater Hollywood Less than half of the
( peoph who eere invited agreed to serve. It seems to me. therefore
t that they do give up some of their light to protest about how funds arc
' allocated.
1 And this brings me to the final point. To my knowledge anyone
Who has shown interest in helping the future development of this com
, amnity has been asked to participate in the community. This does not
i Becessarih make for a truly democratic situation, but really, what is
' democracy when there arc elections in the genera! community and less
*^than 50 per cent of those eligible vote? Is this a true democracy
r Jth Id'in at times and wrong ones at other times, most often individuals
mak decisions based upon the best available knowledge and Informs
tion they have, hoping that the decisions at that time are right. The
mature community and mature individuals are those who can recognize
when they have made an error or when it is time to change something
In a few weeks we will be -tailing our allocation of funds raised
ins our 1!>73 campaign. Those who are involved. I feel, will make
the best recommendations possible. The community must understand
that perfection is npt something man has a right to expect.
Miami Joins Nation's Protest
Against Standard's Politics
SEE RELATED. STORY PAGE 1-___I
Greater Miami joined communities across the nation this week in protesting the circulation of a
letter by the Standard Oil Company of California to its stockholders urging that they support the
Arab cause in the Middle East.
Telephones l The Jewish Floridian rang repeatedly demanding that action be taken to demon-
strate American displeasure at Standard Oil's crude interference in the policy-making processes of
the government.
invitations etc.
Pompano Beach, Florida
i Call Ken Tarnove 972-4417 -900-9731
I JACK BERMAN INSURANCE
I AGENCY- INC.
HOMEOWNERS Bl SIN ESS
MAJOR MEDICAL AITOMOBILE
UOSl'lTAUZATION SENIOR DRIVERS
LIFE SR-22 FILINGS
2640 Hollywood Blvd. Phone 23 7471
Hollywood, Florida Miami 947-5902
In Washington. I. L. Kenen
chairman of the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee, joined
Aaron David Rosenbaum. director
of research for th.' Public Affairs
Committee, charging that, "There
should be a vigorous reaction te
the brazen and outrageous attempt
by the Standard Oil Company of
California (SOCAI.) to mobilize a
lobby for pro-Arab policy.'*
KEREN AND Rosenbaum note I
that. "Sine the Arabs refused any
peace negotiations with Israel and
insist on Israel's total withdrawal
the SOCAI, letter is tantamount to
a demand for a reversal of U.S
policy which now strives for a nc
gotiated settlement and which ha-
consistently rejected Soviet-Arab
demands that we impose a settle
ment. as we did in 1957.
"Thus. SOCAL like its fellow '
Dartner in the Arabian American
Oil Company (ARAMCO). Mobil
has become an open champion of
Saudi Arabia, advocating that vv
surrender to the threats that Saudi
Arabia and other Arab states will
curtail our crude oil supply if we
do not change our policy to suit
\rab aspirations."
The spokesmen for the Amer-
ican Israel Public Affairs Commit
tee noted that the committee ha
' never urged boycotts. "We have
fought against the Arab boycott
against Israel and its friends, and
we do not urge a campaign of boy
: cott against Standard of California
"But.'' they noted, "it is import
ant that letters of protest shoul'1
go to SOCAI. not only from stock
holders and employees but als*
from taxpayers and consumer'
against an unprecedented lobby
ing effort by an American coroora
i tion. to say nothing of th" diver
-ion of company assets and rcve
nues."
IN NEW York, the Conference :
if Presidents of Major Anifricai- ,
'ewish Organizations charged th<
Standard Oil letter was "a crud'
"ornorate intervention in Americar ,
foreign policy."
Jacob Stein, chairman of th'
conference, said that thf ltt"
vas "a bald surrender to the oi'
-ressores being anolieri again1"* j
?he United States by Arab coun j
'ries.
"Peace in the Middle East is sr |
ensitive and suhiect to such con
inued and delicate negotiation'
"thai this ernss interference by ;
multinational corporation will se<
'nek the cause of peace" in th'
irea.
In Cal'fornla. Sen John V. Tun
ney fDom.l declared thai the lei
ter is counter-productive to peace
-I AM distressed and dismaver"
it this letti r," he -aid. "Americar
nolicy in the Middle East has loir
ecognized the legitimate asoira
tions of the Arab peoole and i'-
"articular the needs of the Pale-
'inians to gain a permanent sta
tus. Our policies have been de
oi'd to persuading both sides te
make small but concrete steps te
promote peace.
"But our policies have also rec
>znized that the military security
i )f Israel is a fundamental require
ment for the continued existence
>f the Israeli state, and for th"
maintenance of -i stable balance
of power in the Middle East "
Tunney argued that "Even more
misleading in this letter is the
unstated suggestion that American
policy in the Middle East must be
ihanged in order to help solve our
mergj crisis. Our energy prob-
lems are based on complex and
numerous different factors; Mid-
dle Eastern oil is only one part of
the total picture. We can not solve
our fuel crisis by selling out Israel.
IN LOS Ange'ci, activists
Wednesday splashed paint on
standard Oil of California's head-
quarters and ordered a boycott
against the firm.
They also started a campaign
to make a bonfire out of Standard
Oil credit cards.
Joining Senators Tunney and
Man Cranston in their angry re-
j sponse was California Secretary
of State Edmund G. Brown Jr.
The activists, carrying signs
with quotes from the statements
of these leaders, also moved their
"campaign" against Standard
buildings in San Francisco where
they sprayed Standard headquar-
: ters there with plastic bags of
paint.
A Star of David was painted
onto the Los Angeles facility.
The Jewish War Veteran- of the
i U.S.A.. meeting in Hollywood, Fla.,
' for it- 78th annual national con-
vention, took note of the letter
I this week.
Nati( nal Commander Norman
: I). Tilles declared that. We can't
i let large corporations become lob-
byists and influence the country's
foreign policy."
pines
% Stand Tall
^4 in Florida's
^^> Future!
HRIFTY
RENT-A-CAR
10% discount on weekly rentals with this ad.
In Hollywood & Hallandale
NEIGHBORHOOD & AIRPORT SERVICES
Weekdays 927-1761 3000 Hellandale Beach Blvd.
Evenings I Weekends 525-4355
MORTON A. DIAMOND, M.D., P.A.
TAKES PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING THE ASSOCIATION OF
JAY S. KERZNER, M.D.
DIPLOMATS OF THE AMERICAN BOARD OF INTERNAL MEDICINE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
CARDIOLOGY
2740 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD
HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
PHONE 920-2740
Sheffield
CONVALARIUM &
THERAPY CENTER
24 HOUR REGISTERED NURSING CARE
MODERN CENTRALLY LOCATED
SPACIOUS 4V> ACRE GROUNDS
STAY FOR ANY LENGTH OF TIME
REGISTERED THERAPY PERSONNEL
IN PATIENTOUT PATIENT
COMPLETE REHABILITATION PROGRAMS
PHONE 563-5711
JEAN SAD0W. Administrator
2675 NORTH ANDREWS AVE.
FORT LAUDERDALE. FLA.


Page 12
*;/ nrricHMI "<* Shof* oFHollywoed
Friday, August 17, 1973
PUTIN
IT ALL T<
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JM'S BACK-TO-SCHOOL
FASHION FINDS...
Mom, get them ready in the
smartest gear you can find!
JM puts together great looks for
guys and gals in kid-proof fabrics
that never need ironing I For the
guys: Levi's classic blue cotton
denim jeans outfit. Jacket, 8-16,
8.68. Flare Jeans, 8-14, 7.00
For the gals: Suntogs""
coordinates of Trevira polyester.
Blue side-zip cycle jacket,
5 7-14,14.00. Blue pullover
shrink, 4-6X, 6.00; 7-14, 7.00. /
White shirt, 4-6X, 7.00; 7-14, 8.00.
Blue cuffed pant. 4-6X, 10.00;
7-14, 12.00
Boys' Wear, Young World,
at all jm stores
THE STORE WITM THE FLORIDA FLAIR
miami. dadeland 163rd street. Hollywood fort lauderdale pomoano west palm beach oWando merritt I
merritt island
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