The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00069

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJewisti Florid fan
and SIIOI 115 OF OH I ATI It HOLLYWOOB
Volume 3 Number 15
Hollywood, Florida Friday, June 8, 1973
Price 20 C3iita
1974 UJA-JWF Campaign Leaders Chosen
Dr. Norman Atkin, president
of the Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion of Greater Hollywood, has
announced the appointment of
Melvin Baer. chairman, and
Alan Roaman and Nathan Pritch-
er, cochairmen, of the 1974
JWF/UJA campaign.
Mr. Baer, Apartments Division
chairman in the current fund-
raising drive, and cochairman of
the same group in 1972. is a
former resident of South Bend,
Ind., where he was also active
m many community affairs.
As a resident and businessman
in this area, he has said that he
feels a responsibility to the com-
munity in which he lives, and
that his involvement with JWF
and its causes stems from his
beliefs in the needs of Israel
as well as the needs of the many
other agencies which derive
their support in part from Fed-
eration.
Mr. Roaman, this year's Em-
erald Hills chairman, is a New
Yorker who has long been active
in the work of the United Jew-
ish Appeal and the Federation
of Jewish Philanthropies. He
was chairman of the University
Gardens Division of the UJA
in Great Neck, and also served
in the Textiles Division in New
York City.
Nathan Pritcher, who chaired
the 1973 Hillcrest campaign
along with Alvin Hess, came to
Hollywood from Shaker Heights,
Ohio, two and a half years ago.
Melvin Baer
Nathan Pritcher
Marsha Tobin
I 'I1' '"; ; i I'M'!'......:-M
;ii" i,', ,:. 7ir i :i, m:i;i I'm : i: :
LIBYAN, SYRIAN AMBASSADORS IN MADRID
_^.^_-__
Peron Favors Contact
He was an executive of the
Society of Plastic Industries
there and active in local com-
munity affairs.
Mr. Pritcher will head the
1974 Apartments Division, while
Mr. Roaman will lead the cam-
paign in the city division (which
encompasses the trades, the pro-
fessions, the Pacesetters, or-
ganizations and temples.)
Dr. Atkin has aiso announced
the appointments of Herbert
Katz, 1973 campaign chairman,
and Robert Baer, this year's
chairman of Operation Upgrade,
to assist him as associate chair-
man of the Pacesetters (those
individuals who pledge $1,000 or
more).
The 1973 campaign, mean-
while, was increased by $12,000
as the result of a final Phone-A-
Thon manned by Melvin Baer,
Joyce Roaman. Alan Roaman,
Joseph Schwartz, Errol Rosen,
Meron Levitats, Joel Schneider,
Barry Holeve and Mark Fried.
And the present figures for
the Women's Division, chaired
by Mrs. Marsha Tobin, have been
announced: $108,000 compared
to $103,000 last year.
Even as the 1973 campaign
draws to a close, work on the
1974 fund-raising drive has com-
menced with organizational
meetings set for the end of
June.
With Arab Oil Sources; ^1 on |J # Jews to Fight
Rise in Repressive Trends
Anti Semites in Rally
By NISSIM ELNECAVE
There is near-unanimous opin-
ion in Argentina that the new
President, Dr. Hector Campora,
64, will not embark on any major
policy without first obtaining the
approval of Gen. Juan Peron, the
"father" of Peronism.
Gen. Peron, 77, President of
i
Argentina between 1946 and
1955, returned in November after
living in exile in Madrid for 17
years. He later went back to
Madrid, where he was visited by
President Campora soon after his
election in March.
There is little doubt here
Continued on Page It
5,000 S. Broward Residents
Attend Tribute To Israel
NEW YORK (JTA) Jews who have "disengaged from the liberal struggle, who have turned to
the right and have wedded themselves to Nixon's America," thus casting their lot with "the most threaten-
ing option confronting America," are bringing danger to t hemselves as Jews and to their country. warne4
Rabbi David Polish, president of the Central Conference of American Rabbis. This statement was made
by Rabbi Polish when he spoke at a series of regional meet ings of the CCAR, prior to recent development*
of Watergate.
trends in America, but must stand
firm against such incursions on
U.S. liberty. "We sltall not weather
any coming storm by trying to sit
it out." he added. "If we do not try,
it will overwhelm us."
On a rain-free and starlit eve-
ning, Young Circle was filled to
overflowing as five thousand
South Broward residents paid
homage to Israel on its 25th
anniversary May 20.
Among the tribute-payers
were Dr. Norman Atkin, pres-
ident of the Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration: I. A. Durbin, chairman
of the Hollywood Israel-25 Com-
mittee; Dr. Sam Meline, program
chairman for the evenings
event; Mayor David Keating,
who accepted the Torch of Free-
dom from Youth Council pres-
ident Scott Snyder: and Phil
Cohen. Regional Director of
B'nai B'rith and chairman of the
U. S. Maccabiah Team. The in-
vocation was by Rabbi David
Shapiro of Temple Sinai.
The air rang with Israeli
music provided by Chai Epstein
and the Hal Rader Orchestra as
the throng kept time with the
spirited offerings.
Posters made by children from
pre-school to junior high ages
were judged by Mrs. Joy Rubin,
Dr. Meline. and Mr. Durbin. The
contest was organized by Mrs.
Shirley Cohen, educational di-
rector of Temple Beth Shalom,
and represented the work of
three area temples.
First-place winners were pre-
sented with trophies; runners-up
received gift certificates to the
Joy Rubin Art School.
Preschool winners were Tom
Kierman, Kenneth Jacobs and
Brian Gotkin of Beth Shalom.
In the age 6-8 category, Claire
Sultan and Laura Meyers (Sinai),
Susan Kaplan (Beth Shalom)
were judged the best.
Linda Diamond, Amy Bar-
dasch, Kenny and Robyn Beck
(Beth Shalom) were the win-
ners in the 9-10 year-old age
group.
In the 11-13 year-old group,
Sara I.usskin. Hindi Klein and
Eric Rosenblatt (Sinai) received
the prizes.
Honorable mentions went to
Alan Rosenfeld and David
Termine (Solel).
Dr. Melinc's committee for
the occasion included Mrs.
Cohen and Rabbi Morton Malav-
sky of Temple Beth Shalom;
Ira Catz, first vice president of
the Florida State Association of
B'nai B'rith Lodges; Melvin
Baer, chairman of the Apart-
ments Division of the 1973
UJA/JWF campaign; and Irene
Devon o^ the Recreation Depart-
ment.
Aiding the committee were
Patrick Heneghen and Jane
Rose, also of the Recreation
Department.
In his message, the head of this
country's reformed rabbinate urged
Jews not to asquiesce in this
country's corruption "as it sickens,
weakens and languishes amid its
power and wealth, and while
it "struggles for its soul." Con-
cerned Jews, he declared, must
not abandon the struggle against
eroding values and repressive
Rabbi Polish charged that the
many Jews who "assumed a
super-patriotic pose before the
election were not nearly as in-
terested as they professed to be
in Israel or even in the economy,
but betrayed instead a profound
distrust in our society and its
capacity for change." On the
other hand, those who were ac-
cused unjustly "of anything from
Continued on rape II-
Photo shows Young Circle Bandshell and
part of huge crowd which fihed every avail-
able seat for Israel's 25th anniversary cele-
bration May 20.


Page 2
vJenisti FhorMian shofr of Hollywood
Friday, June 8 1973
Federation Office
To Be Enlarged
A combination of t he ever-
' increasing campaign records and
, the creation of new community-
tions the Jews believe, are part of senicc committecs has made it
an official attempt to prove the mandatorv that ,he Jewish Welfare
MOSCOW (AP) The Kremlin, existence of an illegal under- j Fcderation seek larger working
is reconsideringat Washington's ground Zionist organization with space Accordingly, it will take
over a suite of offices next door
Kremlin Seen Letting
1,000 Activists .Go
JDC To Give ORT $2,950,000
For 1973 Overseas Programs
Reprinted from May 22 issue of
The Jerusalem Post
request the cases of some 1,000 cells in several cities.
prominentt Jews denied permis-
sion to emigrate to Israel. Mos-
cow's decision could smooth the
Other incidents, they said, in- ;, |t ffice at ,he esenl loca.
dueled the arrest of astrophysicist lg09 Harrison st
\evgeny Levich who was sent to
way for implementation of the j a military unit on the Soviet- ; Ross Beckerman, chairman, has
1972 Soviet-American trade ract. Mongolian border, the police ac- ; set Sept. 4 through Sept. 25 as the
This was revealed Sunday by tion against a group of Jews who i dates for the meeting of the Allo-
Soviet sources in a position to tried to celebrate the 25th anniver- ( cations Committee, at which time
know, who said Presidential ad- | sary of Israel with a picnic, outside funds will be apportioned among
viser Henry Kissinger submitted a the Soviet capital and the lare the many agencies supported by
list of Jewish names to Leonid number of refusals being handed
Brezhnev during their private talks out to Jews applying to go to
here two weeks ago on the Soviet Israel.
leader's visit to the U. S. June The sources estimated some
18-26. eight to ten families in Moscow
According to the informants. a,one were beinS denied emigra-
Kissinger was told the White ; tion permission daily.
the Jewish Welfare Federation.
Dr. Joel Schneider has accepted
co chairmanship of the group.
The quarterly board meeting of
the Council of Jewish Federations
and Welfare Funds, which will
(Edlor's Note: The name of take place in Chicago June 14
before Brezhnev leaves *" ** whose story ap- through June 17 will be attended
peared in the May 11th issue of by Tne Hollywood Federation s
the Shofar. is on the list carried presiicnt Norman Atkin and ex
House would receive the Kremlin
response
for America.
The list, the sources said, names
tne mot active and best known
Jews detained here. Their release,
the informants added, would be
designed to dispel U. S. Congres-
sional opposition to granting Russia
trade concessions required under
the bilateral commerce agreement.
The sources' information could
not be officially confirmed. (Com-
menting on the reported move.
Jewish activist leaders here said a
Kremlin decision to free the 1.0C0
Jews, mot of whom have univer-
sity education, would be the big-
gest step to solving the Jewish
problem in the Soviet Union since
the authorities began letting large
numbers emigrate in 1971. Cur-
rently an estimated 2.500 Jews
emigrate to Israel monthly.
Meanwhile, the Jewish sources
reported, there had been no
change in Soviet policies toward
Jews since the Kremlin suspended
an education tax on emigrants last
March.
The informants said seven re-
tired Jewish army officers were
under criminal investigation by the
secret policeKGBfor allegedly
being members of a Zionist organ-
ization "that carried out propa-
ganda in favour of emigrating to
Israel, spread Zionist literature
and was involved in other anti-
Soviet activity."
Entitled "Case 97," the author-
ities' investigation is expected to
result in the trial of the Minsk
Jews and further trials in other
Soviet cities where dozens of Jews
are being interrogated, the sources
said.
The investigation and interroga-1
by Mr. Kissinger.)
high
At the Hebrew Union College
; Jewish Institute of Religion ord-1
incrtion exercises Sunday in I
New York City, Dr. Samuel Z. j
Jaffe spiritual leader of Temple
Beth El, Hollywood, was
awarded the honorary degree
erf doctor of divinity, according '.
to an announcement made by | ""* including rabbis of the six
,,,,,,, I local temples, have been asked by
Dr. Alfred Gottschalk, president Mr. Katz to serVe on the com-
of HUC-JIR. mi,tee.
ecutive director Robert Kerbel.
Abe Durbin has been appointed
new chairman of the Jewish Com-
munity Relations Council Steering
Committee. The JCRC annual
meeting will take place Monday
at 8 p.m. in Temple Sinai.
Social Planning
Group Is Formed
The newly formed Social Plan-
ning and Coordination Committee
will hold its first meeting at the
home of the chairman, Herbert
Katz. Tuesday at 8 p.m.
Within (he purview of the com-
mittee will be the study, plan-
ning, coordination and implemen-
tation of both new and on-going
programs for the South Broward
community.
Areas of concern will include:
Development of a South
Florida Jewish Community
Center
Jewish education
Cultural programming
Services to youth
Career guidance for
school students
Services to the aged
Thirty-six members of the com-
The Joint Distribution Commit
tee will provide $2,950,000 during
1973 toward tne overseas voca-
tional training programs of ORT,
the Organization for Rehabilitation
through Training. Samuel L. Haber
executive vice ciiairman of the
JDC, has announced.
The 1973 allocation, an increase
of $100,000 over last year, will
help finance technical education,
youth welfare, and economic re-
hab, litation services of ORT in
Israel, Europe, North Africa, Iran
and India, Mr. Haber said.
Some 65,000 persons in 20 coun-
tries are expected to receive train-
ing during the year. ORT services
in Israel, with schools in some 50
cities and towns, will receive the
largest portion of the grant. The
JDC allocation also includes pro-
vision for substantial funds to be
used by ORT in France for job
skills, education and other train
ing programs for North African
refugees.
JDC, the major American wel-
fare agency aiding distressed Jews
abroad, receives its funds from the
campaign? of the United Jewish
Appeal. ORT is the principal agen-
cy affording vocational education
to Jews overseas.
The JDC allocation was confirmed
in an agreement concluded by Ed-
ward Ginsberg. JDC chairman;
Samuel L. Haber, JDC executive
vice chairman; Dr. William Haber,
president of the American ORT
Federation, and Max A. Braude,
ORT director-general.
This latest agreement is the 27th
consecutive annual understanding
between the JDC and ORT. JDC
has made over $46,250,000 avail-
able to ORT in the past 26 years
to assist the vocational training of
over 600,000 persons.
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DR MICHAEL TUNICK. DDS
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Friday. June 8, 1973
-
Vjen'isti fhridiiam "nd Shofar of Hollywood
Page 3
Young Leaders Counci
Elects Dr. Schneider
Preparing for the 1973-74 sea- The cabinet also includes Dr.
son, the Young Leaders Council Meron Levitats, vice president for
of the Jewish Welfare Federation | program; Mark Fried, vice presi-
dent for youth; Barry Holeve, vice
president for membership; Dr.
Alex Buchwald, social vice pres-
ident; William Frank, treasurer,
and Dr. Stanley Margulies, sec-
retary. The immediate past pres-
ident is Dr. Samuel Meline.
Advisory Committee members
are Carlos Feldman, Dr. Victor
Glazer, David Goodman, James
Jacobson, Errol Rosen and Joseph
Schwartz.
Discussions have begun on
Beth El Installing
New Administration
The installation of new officers
and the board of trustees of
Temple Beth El will take place
during Sabbath Services this week-
end.
Lewis Cohn will be reinstalled
as president; vice presidents will
be Judge Morton Abram, Jack
Alexander and Robert Baer; James
Fox, secretary; Theodore Lifset,
treasurer; Samuel Schwartzman,
financial secretary.
The board of trustees will in-
clude Judge Morton Abram, Jack
Alexander, Melvin Baer, Robert
Baer, Dr. Louis Bennett, Dr. Rob-
ert Bland, Lewis Cohn, Mrs. Henry
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DR. JOEL SCHNEIDER
has chosen its new administration, of Jewish Federations and Welfare
broadening the base of the organi- Cohn. Mrs. Harold Firestone, Dr.
zation, which is presently com- Abraham Fischler, Alfred Golden,
posed predominantly of members Jlllcs Cordon. Irving Green, Albert
of the medical, legal and dental Haber, Dr. Stanley Harris, Sanford
professions. Rabbis of all local Heims, Dr. Asher Hollander. Stuart
temples will be asked to suggest Kallman, Dr. Stanley Kessel and
names of outstanding members of Myer Kirsner.
their congregations for member-, Also Dr Rubin K,ein H
sh-p in the Council. Kones Dr. Ah.in Krasne, Theodore
The group is proposing more Lifset. David Megar, James Fox
participatory programs such as the Miller, Paul Nestel, Allan Orlove,
recent highly successful Kallah Mrs, Harry Orringer, Irving Price,
weekend. Young Leaders will also Herman Scholl, Samuel Schwartz-
be encouraged to attend General man, Pettie Weinberg, Dr. Philip
Assembly sessions of the Council Weinstein, Jr., Charles Wolfe and
headed by Dr. Joel Schneider.
Temple Beth Ahm
Installs Officers
The 1973-74 administration of
Hollywood's Temple Beth Ahm
were recently installed, including
Murray Wetcher, president; Phillip
Schwartz and Morris Wasser, vice
presidents; Mrs. Irving Naigus,
treasurer; Mrs." William Sonn, cor-
responding secretary; Mrs. Phillip
Schwartz, recording secretary.
Board members are Jack Meyer,
William Sonn, Sam Abbaloulia,
Dominick Galletta and Joseph
Srebnik. Sergeant-at-arms is Ar-
thur Baron.
Sisterhood officers for the com-
ing year are Mrs. Phillip Schwartz,
president; Mrs. Irving Naigus, vice
president: Mrs. Marshall Berland, j
corresponding secretary, and Mrs. |
Dominick Galletta, treasurer.
The Men's Club will be led bv
Irving Shapiro, president; Philip I
Labbush and Andrew Schwartz
vice presidents;Jack Kushner, re- f
cording secretary; and Arthur |
Baron, treasurer.
Funds, one of which will take
place this fall in New Orleans.
Dr. Marcus Zbar.
In addition, there are three
Discussion groups are in the j automatic official members of the
making as well, to consider such | board: Mrs. Milton Jacobs, pres-
topics as the differences in various I ident of the sisterhood; Milton
Jewish philosophies. An invitation TK --~tJ- u o_.u-
... u _j j r, k Jacobs, president of the Brother-
will also be extended to a Luba-i, ,
vitcher Rebbe to conduct a Has-;hood- and Jack Levy. immediate
sidic "program of joy." I past president.
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REFINISHING STRIPPING ANTIQUING
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The most beautiful
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RIVERSIDE
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Tel: 920-1010
To arrange a funeral anywhere in the United States,
call the nearest Riverside Chapel
Murray N. Rubin, F.D.


Page 4
-Jmis* fkrkH^r nd Sfcofar of Hollywood
Friday, June 8. 1973
^JemstllMiJiari I MATTER OF FACT
OFFICE and PLANT 120 NJL 6th Street Telephone 373-4605
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 373-4605
P.O. Box :9T3. Miami. Florida 33101
FRKP K BHOCHET S1.7AXXE SHOGHS1 SEU1A M. THOIOC
Eotof and l-ut.ish.-r Executive Editor Assistant to Publisher ,
JOAN MEYERS. News Coordinator
The Jewish Flondian Dost Not Guarantee The Kaihrvth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published Bi-Weekly by the Jewish Flondian
Becond-C!a..' Pnsiaee Paid at Miami. Pla.
far* Federation of Greater Hollvwood Shofar Editorial
ADVI.Sf.RY COMMITTEE Dr Sr.idcn Wlllens. Chairman: Roes Berk*r-
man. Ben Salter. Marion Xevins. Dr. Norman Atkin. Robert K. Kerbel
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member o' the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndi-
cate, worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association. American As-
sociation of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
R'PTION RATES: (1-ocal Area) One Tear 12 00. Out of Town Upon
Volume 3
Friday, June 8, 1973
Number 15
8 SIVAN 5733
Energy Situation Needs Study
While doubts continue to be expressed that there is
really an oil crisis, the reality of domestic and Arab prop-
aganda cannot be ignored as part of the gloomy picture
presented in recent weeks.
The statement by a State Department official that the
United States would have to curtail its oil consumption in
the event of a new Middle East war, the threats by the oil-
rich Arab nations to bring this country into line with their
anti-Israel policies by cutting off the precious supplies,
may be viewed as only empty ones designed to black-
mail the administration. There is more than a suspicion
that our own oil companies are contributing their own pub-
licity fuel in the interests of higher profits and more con-
cessions in the tax field.
What seems to be needed is a serious, independent
study of the energy situation in the United States. The
American people must be given more facts than have
come to light- Gasoline rationing, the closing of service
stations because of lack of supplies and the daily head-
lines carry a greater threat to continued support of Israel
than statements from Arab leaders and State Department
spokesmen.
Another Cycle Completed
Another cycle in the religious life of the Jew will be
completed next week with the observance of Shavuoth, the
third of the traditional agricultural festivals which began
with Succoth last fall. For local synagogues it marks the
end of the "season" which will be resumed with the High
Holy Days and the new year of 5734.
The later addition of a spiritual dimension has given
the holiday a larger and more modern significance and,
in a sense, a far greater one than its origin. The emphasis
today is on the giving of the Torch on Mt. Sinai and the
acceptance of the Jews of a moral code which has been
then guide and their sustenance through the ages.
While originally a Reform replacement for Bar Mitz-
vah, the ceremony of confirmation has become an integral
part of the E.'iavuoth observance for most synagogues
Just as Moses received the Torah on Mt. Sinai and passed
it on to succeeding generations of Jews, boys and gir!
completing their formal religious studies today accept it
for their generation as a time of commitment to study in
the tradition of the Jewish people as well as a renewed
search for Jewish identity.
Educators' Work Bearing Fruit
Those who despair of Jewish education in the United
States should be made aware of the fact that three Amer-
K-an students were the top winners in the international
Bible contest recently concluded in Israel.
While this may only prove that they received excel-
lent training m learning a special subject, there is enouqh
evidence that at the different degrees of education rang-
ing from the Sunday School to the all-day yeshiva -
young Jews are being produced who know who and
what they are and have a commitment to the Jewish faith
and peoplehood which would appear to be even more in-
tense than that of their parents, if not their grandparents.
As the school year comes to a close, it is well for the
community to take inventory of its assets as well as
liabilities. Many critics will find, on closer study, that those
assets are greater than current thought would have you
believe. The intensive work by such new bodies as Fed-
eration s Commission on Education and its Central Agency
for Jewish Education are beginning to bear fruit, from all
the evidence at hand. The continued cooperation of Fed-
eration leadership can make the turnaround from despair
a reality sooner than many had hoped.
WASHINGTON. DC. By
general agreement of his col-
leagues. Herman Talmadge of
Georgia is one of the ablest.
most national-minded men now
in the Senate. He is also an in-
fluential member of the main
committee investigating the
Watergate horror. Hence, some
remarks of his are now highly
pertinent.
"You can't tell how long this
thing is going to go on. any more
than you can tell how long it
will take to unroll a ball of
string." Sen Talmadge has said
about the Watergate investiga-
tion. "But one thing any dam-
fool can tell. It will be bad for
the countryin fact it can be
really dangerous for the coun-
try to go on much longer
without knowing the truth about
the President."
Sen. Talmadge has therefore
approached the chairman of the
Watergate investigating commit-
tee. Sen. Sam J. Ervin of North
Carolina, with a tentative pro-
posal that makes tremendous
good sense. The proposal is to
take immediate steps to get to
the bottom of President Nixon's
real degree of involvement in
the Watergate horror, while leav-
ing the roles of the President's
subordinates for later inquiry.
THIS WOl I.I) be relatively
simple to do. On the basis of
all the evidence to date, there
are only five men who can now
testify to the President's per-
sonal knowledge and complicity,
or clear him from all material
charges of knowledge and com-
plicity as the case may be.
These five are former Atty. Gen.
John Mitchell; the Republican
bagman. Maurice Stans, and the
three key White House staff
members, H. R. Haldeman. John
Ehrlichman and Charles Colson.
Daily we hear what the Presi-
dent was thought to have wanted
but always at second hand.
Former CIA Director Richard
Helms has testified that the once
all-powerful Haldeman told him
it was "the President's wish"
to use the CIA to block part of
the early investigation of Water-
gate. John J. Caulfield has tes-
tified that he "felt the Presi-
dent probably knew about it,"
when he offered executive clem-
ency to the people who made
the Watergate break-in.
No one so far has testified,
however, that "the President
told me" or "the President re-
quested" or "the President or-
dered." The chances are im-
mensely high, too. that no one
can so testify at least without
committing perjury except for
Mitchell, Stans, Haldeman, Ehr-
lichman and Colson.
What Sen. Talmadge therefore
has in mind is calling these five
men out of order, without fur-
ther delay, and without prejudice
to subsequent orderly investiga-
tion of their own actions. They
would be on the stand under
oath.
THIS TIME around, they
would be asked solely about the
President's role. In fact, they
would only need to be shown
the seven denials in the Presi-
dent's Watergate statement of
Tuesday (May 22). They could
then be asked bluntly:
"Are these statements by the
President true or false, to the
best of your knowledge and be-
lief?" If a single one of the five
said there was untruth in any
of the President's denials, that
would be the proper signal for
serious consideration of im-
peachment.
On the other hand, if all five
of these men supported the
truth of the presidential denials,
that would be the effective end
of the poisonous talk about the
President's own knowledge and
complicity in the worst of what
has been going on.
The darkest, ugliest aspect of
the Watergate horror would then
be over barring some enor-
mous surprise from one of the
obscure bottom-dwelling slogs
who seem to have infested the
White House until recently.
As Sen. Talmadge remarked,
moreover, it is desperately dan-
gerous to go on as we are going,
with the President's guilt or
innocence always in doubt.
THE SHADOW of Watergate
by JOSEPH ALSOf
is known to have hung heavily
on the Vietnam negotiations in
Paris. The threat to the value
of the dollar, the threat of gal-
loping inflation, the threat that
the energy crisis will get out of
control all these are also de-
Continued from Page 8-
t
T
t '
' As ..
Max Lerner
Sees It
NEW YORK Richard Nixon is fighting for his political
life, harder than he has ever fought before. But will it avail him?
This is his time of troubles. He has been betrayed by friends.
He is beset by enemies, within his own party as well as among
the Democrats. He is beleaguered by the media: Never has so
intense a scrutiny been focused on every operation of an adminis-
tration, secret or public, as on this one. And he meets a continued
skepticism among the majority of those who have either felt
friendly or neutral about him in the past.
This at any rate is the image he would like to project. In
the midst of the Senate inquiry he has made a second major
effort to explain what happened. It helps, especially in recog-
nizing the coverup. and there are passages of contrition in it
which murt have been hard for Mr. Nixon's pride to utter. But
it still doesn't ring wholly true. It is hard to believe that every-
thing he did was done for reasons of national security, in order to
keep crucial political intelligence from being revealed. It is also
hard to believe that a tough, driving politician like Richard
Nixon didn't know about either the input or outgo of his cam-
paign finances.
When Mr. Nixon revealed so little in his first TV speech,
'here were desert stretches crying to be irrigated by further in-
formation His second statement adds considerable detail. But
now the trouble for Mr. Nixon is that every new revelation will
be matched against his statement, to see whether it confirms or
contradicts it. Which means a continuing crisis of credibiiitv.
ft tr ft
IS THIS FINALLY Mr. Nixon's last stand, or will there be
still another? I feel there is bound to be another, since new
contradictions and disbeliefs are bound to pile up and wil! need
to be dispelled. The danger is, of course, that this might zo on
indefinitely, ,n a chain-reaction sequence, until it finally forces
Mr. Nixon out of the presidency. Something like it forced Lyn-
don Johnson out of the political arena, compelling him to take
himself out of the running for another term.
Mr Nixon is, of course, aware of the Lyndon Johnson paral-
lel, as of the Andrew Johnson impeachment parallel. The two
historical Johnson cases plague his mind.
To prevent the ghost of Andrew Johnson from taunting
h.m. he has first to lay the ghost of Lyndon Johnson. He did it
once before, when an antiwar campaign in the media and on
the campuses was mounted against him. His answer was a
counteroffensive-the historic "Silent Majority" speech, one of
the effective presidential TV talks in recent history, shrewdly
gauged to the audience and to the moment. It caught the tide of
anti-anti-Nixon sentiment just as it crested, and it changed the
climate for Mr. Nixon's war and peace efforts for much of the
rest of his term.
One might guess that Mr. Nixon will do something like this
again, not in context of the war but of Watergate. He may again
wait for the right psychological moment, when people start to
feel that he is the underdog and a shabbily treated one Flag
decaLi are Parting to appear on car bumpers with a simple
' President Nixon" next to them. The movement may grow very
much as it did at the time of the "Silent Majoritv" speech
Right now the press is riding high, but there is an antilib-
eral potential in the attitudes toward the press which wil! crop
up if more people decide that the press is crowding the Presi-
dent too hard.
There is a gagsle of commentators, of various stripes, hint-
ing darkly of the counteroffensive to come, and saving (with
various shades of agreement or derision) that it will be linked
tn the climate engendered early in the 70s by intense anti-Nixon
movements on the left.
ft of rN0 TrE V^HOLE ,hCre is far ,ess talk of impeachment than
in, ant1nN PUt '! *"<"<"'" 'ho present way of express-
resignafLT ,T S l resign Part of '* *-* <>' this
t would lu SC Wh are abUt "* **. is that
neln nP th" CUntry apart Henc President's re-
tZZttJET" he has no inlention to resin-and that he
nTn, I Z.l fVern- iS 3 Way 0f urin8 foreign govern-
ments and the business community here. It also hints that those
liTi, JureSign Wi" haVe to mount an ^ense campaign
against him which will, in fact, split the country.
whatIvere-,iS 1Utle dUbt that a strong peachinent movement,
.i~ 'tS,lfUCCAess or failur. would leave its scars on the
country as the Andrew Johnson impeachment trial left scars
on the Reconstruction period. Richard Nixon now confesses to
grave misjudgments. One of the problems about punishing him
for them is to find a form of punishment that will not also
make the nation a victim.


Friday. June 8. 1973
+Jattall fhrkfiftt) nd Shofar of Hollywood
Page 5
T~ *
_..,.-,,,..........---------nnnniiiiiinnniiiniiiiiiiimniii
........i iii.i.i.
*4. 3 See 3t
By BOB KWBtl, Executive Director,
Jewish Weliare federation of Greater Holly wood
School will soon be out vacations arc being planned and the
hot days of summer are beginning. Our children are getting ready for
camp and our pediatricians are busy filling out medical forms and giv-
ing the necessary inoculations. The "snow birds" arc gone and now the
town belongs to "the local people." The campaign of the Jewish Wel-
fare Federation is nearly complete; it is in its "clean-up" process.
We are now approaching that time of year when (I was told be-
fore I accepted my position) things would be slower and there would
be time to relax. Those days are no more. With the growth of the
Jewish community of this area and with the involvement of more and
more people and a great diversity of organizations, there is no "slack
season."
Just within the past two weeks a new American Jewish Congress
chapter was formed and a new Anti-Defamation League advisory com-
mittee was born. Program committees of all organizations are now
planning their 1973-74 activities, and our community calendar is reach-
ing the bursting point. The pressures in terms of new services for the
entire Jewish community are not only continuing unabated but increas-
ing significantly. We have already appointed our 1974 campaign chair-
man and are planning for the fall and winter.
There are no seasons anymore as we finish one project or one
lerm we immediately evaluate that and move on to the next project,
each time hoping that what follows will be more inspirational, more
succesful than what preceded it.
Some people are complaining that they are being "meetinged to
death." Of course, these are the involved people who are called upon
again and again because of their commitment, their knowledge and
their ability.
It seems that one of the goals that we should attempt to strive for
in the coming year is the involvement of more people in meaningful
activities Broadening the base of leadership and involvement can do
much to insure a healthy, viable Jewish community.
I know it is very difficult for those in leadership roles to be called
upon for more and more meetings. Very often one member of a fam-
ily is involved and not the other, and there are numerous complaints
about the over-involvement of the spouse. I appreciate and sympa-
thize with the marnage partner; yet, at the same time, in order to pro-
vide the programs which will insure the future of Jewish life in
America, the involved have a job to do.
So 1 ask each spouse please to understand and forgive, and to
encourage the husband or wife to continue the work. I can. of course,
suggest that the spouse get involved as well in self defense. One of
the thing's we are now thinking of having is more activities for couples
and families.
And so as the doldrums of summer approach do not be lulled
Into a feeling of inactivity and security. There is much to do although
the pressures and emphasis may be different than "in season."
As 1 see it involvement is what it is all about.
Community-Wide Effort Launched
In Behalf Of Soviet Prisoner
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ART GALLERY
"The death of 100 is a tragedy; .
the death of 1,000.000 is a statis-
tic,'- declared Adolph Eichmann in
a statement' surprising in its per-
ception.
Mr. Eiciirnann .was. of course, a
statistician to whom a single death ,
V-as not noteworthy enough to ,
merit inclusion in his "bon mot.''
But if n was easier for him to
relate to multi-murder, for the j
average person such numbers be-
come academic. Most of us must
relate on a one-to-one basis. For
this reason many Americans have
chosen to encourage and give sup-
port to a single Russian Prisoner
of Conscience.
Now, for the first time, a com-,
mittee has been formed to provide
an opportunity for many people
to bring pressure to bear in behalf
of one Soviet Jew who is im-
prisoned in the Potma labor camp.
The Committee to Save Silva
Zalmanson, which came into being
in February of this year, is made
up of about 50 women mainly
from the South Miami area. It
calls itself a "grass-roots group"
and is independent of any political,
religious or similar organization.
Its aim is the release of Mrs. Zal-
manson "based solely upon the
realization of the unjust circum-
stances surrounding her extreme
punishment."
The committee is focusing on
Silva Zalmanson because she is
the last remaining female Prisoner
* Conscience and because, since
her arrest, she has undergone in-
tense physical and mental suffer-
ing and is now desperately ill with
tuberculosis.
"The 10-year sentence given her
in the now infamous Leningrad
Trial of 1970 is surely a death
sentence unless Silva is released
. ." the group declares.
The Committee to Save Silva
Zalmanson is circulating petitions
in the hope of enlisting community-
wide support for its campaign.
Following is the text of that peti-
tion which readers are urged to
collect signatures for; petitions
should be sent to Myrna Bricker,
7301 S\V 134th Terr.. Miami 33156.
THE NEW Ulirary that was
dedU'utPil at the I'nlversjty of
the Negev in Bcersheha recently
is the first in the country to be
Wired fr computor connections
and closed-circuit television. It
will have the latest audio-visual
facilities a.s well.
WE, THE UNDERSIGNED, PROTEST THE CONTINUING IMPRISONMENT OF
SILVA ZALMANSON, THE YOUNG RUS&IAN ENGINEER WHO IS SERVING A TEN
YEAR SENTENCE IN THE POTfA PRISON CAM?.
1) She was denied the right to leave the USSR and to Migrate to Israel,
a right guaranteed her as a Soviet citizen under the UniversM Declaration
of Human Rights.
2) She nas unjustly accused ar.d convicted of treason in the Leningrad Trial
of 1970. The ten year sentence given her at that tine was severe to the
extreme.
3) Kc consider unconscionable the brutal conditions which she is forced to
endure in the prison ca-.p. Inadequate food, lack of proper medical at-
tention, enforced isolation and hard labor despite her potentially fatal
illness are neasuresof unwarranted cruelty.
4) We call upon Americans of every religious, ethnic, and political back-
ground, American diplomats, and world political and spiritual leaders to
do all that is within their power to persuade the Soviet government to fee
Silva Zalmanson free.
5) Ke implore the Soviet government, In the name of justice and human decency,
to listen to the opinions and pleas which have been expressed to then re-
peatedly by men of conscience throughout the civiliied world; let Silva
go free.
NAME
Annitnss
GONE TO THE GROVES
WE'LL SEE ALL OF YOU AGAIN NOV. 1ST -
WHEN THE NEW CROP COMES OUT
HOPE YOU ALL HAVE A GOOD HEALTHY SUMMER.
WE WANT TO THANK YOU FOR YOUR PATRONAGE.
Al & Angie Kaufman
ANGIE'S GROVES
1809 Wiley St., Hollywood
PHONE: 927-5447
YOU CANNOT BUY
A NEW OR USED FORD
FOR LESS ... ANYWHERE
6vrd
THAN AT
fiord
HOLLYWOOD FORD Inc.
120a-N. FEDERAt HWY.
HOLLYWOOD
922-6721 947-3411
i .
fr


Page 6
>Jenist Heritor *>* W"**" <* Honywood
Friday, June 8. 1973
Profile
90 Minutes With
Distilled History
Temple Solel
Pays Tribute
To Teachers
'Operation Joshua' to Begin
4th Year Of Summer Tours
His words flow in unhesitating
liquidity; there are no **uhs'' or
"you know what I mean's" or
ALVIN HESS
"right?s" as his intensity mounts
and his total recall brings forth
^Sates from antiquity to this
decade. His name is Alvin Hess
and he ;s a wa::.:ng compendium I
on The History of the Jewish
People.
Twas not always thus. The Hess .
years at CCNY and NYU were
what he terms "universalist" and |
he confesses to no religious or
ethnic identification at that time.
But in the days immediately
preceding World War II, an en-
counter with a girl named Gloria
De Duke, a girl who kept asking
him what was going to happen to
European Jews if there were no
place for them to go, awakened an
empathy that has grown to an
obsessive commitment.
Today Alvin Hess is a man
Steeped in Jewish tradition, in
Jewish geopolitics, Jewish folk-
lore, Jewish literature. His erudi-
tion is awesome. The facts and
figures come in such a torrent
that assimilation is difficult.
He quotes Brandeis, Ben-Gurion.
Moses Hess (hero No. 1), Jabot in
sky (hero No. 2), Ben Hecht,
Spinoza, Stephen Wise. He de-
clares that "every Jewish home
Should subscribe to 'Commentary',
io 'Israel', to the 'National Jewish
Monthly' if it wants to raise its
children "vith Jewish knowledge.''
He believes that "the (religious)
education of our kids should be
from 15 to 22, not from 5 to 12."
He says, "You cannot be a Jew
without being committed to some
form of Jewry and to some temple.
"Have you ever heard of a
United Atheist Appeal?" he asks.
He goes on: "Contributions (to
campaigns) are meaningless with-
out commitment to Jewry. Gefilte
fish on Friday night is not
Judaism."
On Zionism he quotes Brandeis:
"To become a better American
one must be a better Jew: to be a
better Jew one must be a Zionist."
Then he adds that "there is a great
schim in Zionism between Ben
Gurion's Laborites and the cul-
tural clique of Ahnd Ha'am
(hero No. 3). Basically, however,
there is no difference between a
Jew and a Zionist."
Characterizing himself as a
"militant Zionist but a pacifist in
most other respects," Alvin Hess
vattributes his zea: to ne question-
ing girl who became his wife. He
calls Gloria "the most compas-
sionate, the most un-envious, un-
jealous woman who ever lived. She
i* totally incapable of feeling
malice towards anyone or any-
thing."
This gentle lady had her im-
passioned moments, however. She
was executive secretary in the re-
visionist NZOA, and met at least
six times with David Ben-Gurion.
Her influence on Alvin was in-
calculable. He was later to form
three chapters of the Palestine
Resistance Committee and to incur
the wrath of various factions of
Judaic political enterprise from
whom he earned such epithets as
"Fascist" and "black-shirt."
These words seem paradoxical;
Alvin Hess frequently invokes a
favorite word which describes his
concern for and empathy with the
suffgerings of his fellow human,
that word is "peoplehoodness" and
It breaks through the arbitrary
barriers set up by those who would
constrict "humanity" to one faith
or one ethic.
If one had to place Alvin in a
spectrum from liberal to conserva-
tive, he would be at the former
end. Not a "status quo" man. he
wants to see outmoded dogma
relevated eo a closet of tradition
with the door opened only for
glimpses of history.
As a board member of liberal-
reform Temple Solel, he was in-
-trumental in the formation of a
College Youth Group that meets
fc.- dialogues whenever there are
enough young people in town at
he same time, usually about four
time a year.
He terms these get-togethers
"blazing." The kids say they are
not the ones to be reached it's
their parents. They accuse the
older generation of hypocrisy, of
being 'check-book Jews.' They
question the rabbi's motivations,
they question our motivations, and
in general they shake up all those
nice, comfortable philosophies we
all thought we could grow old
with." He hopes to have one more
meeting before fall which will
center on pre-marital relation-
ships.
The Hesses are grandparents of
five, one of whom is the "only
blue-eyed, blond-headed Chinese
in the country."
Alvin "retired" in 1967, a con-
dition that, according to Gloria,
lasted all of three months. "Well,"
he says, "you can play just so
much golf, so much bridge, and
then you start asking yourself why
you're wasting all this time."
The JWF-UJA campaign pre-
sented the challenge he needed.
Between Alvin Hess and his co-
chairman Nathan Pritcher, the
Hillcrest complex over which they
presided increased its contribution
from $20,000 to $115,000 in two
years, which is pretty big potatoes
in any man's language.
And concurrently he went back
into the building business (his
former New York company sup-
plied most of the kitchen, bath and
laundry equipment for an area
bounded by the Hudseon, 96th St.,
the East River and 50th St.).
Now the phone rings from 7:30
in the morning till midnight, and
i when a suggestion was made to
take the phone off the hook, it was
| greeted with merry peals of
I laughter from Gloria Hess. She
; knows that a ringing telephone is
a joyous sound to her husband.
These two blythe spirits are giv-
: ing our community an infusion of
! adrenalin, and they are proving
that grand parenthood is not synon-
: ymous with atrophy. All they need
! is a 48-hour day to hurdle the
barriers of complacency life keeps
1 setting up.
In a creative Sabbath worship
service" held Friday evening" at
Sheridan Hills Elementary School,
Temple Solel paid tribute to its
religious school teachers. Instead '
of using the traditional Prayer
Book, the unique "Teacher's Shab-
bat" utilized original poetry and
prayers written by the teachers
themselves. The theme for the
service was "The Keepers of the I
City the Teachers."
Those creating the service were !
Mrs. Susan Shanker, kindergarten
teacher; Mrs. Lynn Berger, music
and dance specialist; Mrs. Bunny
Goldstein, who writes for the
BtNOHh Players: and Mrs. Rhona
Sandman, religious school princi-
pal. Mrs. Sandman also delivered
the sermonette.
The Junior Youth Group of
Temple Solel held its installation
dinner this week at the Sweden
House. Rabbi Robert Frazin in-
stalled the new officers for 1973-
74. including Ginger Emas, pres-
ident; Scott Hunter, vice pres-
ident: Karen Cutler, secretary, and
Warren Dranit, treasurer.
Advisers for the present admin- |
istration have been Mrs. Arnold
Cohen, Mrs. Richard Finer, Mrs.
Richard Kupperman, Mrs. Alvin
Wheeler, Mrs. Howard Sandman,
and Rabbi and Mrs. Robert Frazin. |
Thirteen young people will be
confirmed Friday night in a special
Shavuoth Service combining the
celebrations of First Fruits and
the Giving of the Torah on Mt.
Sinai.
Terming the program "multi-
media" in nature. Rabbi Frazin
explained that it was creatively
written by the class and will in-
clude a slide presentation by Lisa
Madoff and guitar accompaniment
by Meryl Katlin. The themes will
be "Harvest" and "Parents' Re-
lisious Responsibility to Their
Children."
Eric Bauman will read the Ten
Commandments from the Torah.
Nina Polak will read in Hebrew
from the prayer book, and Harry
Rose will read the Torah service
in Hebrew.
The Confirmands are Eric Bau-
man, Jeff Bauman, Harry Rose.
Roy Roden, Paul Eichner, Lisa
Madoff, Kip Hunter, Lisa Malacoff,
Meryl Katlin, Sue Meinstein, Lorv '
Levey, Nina Polak and Paula
Mottsman.
Beth Shalom Diplomas Go
To 24 Young Students
With Rabbi Morton Malavsky.
, officiating, 24 young people were
i graduated from Temple Beth
Shalom's Hebrew School Friday
evening. Gifts from the Sister-
hood were presented, and diplomas
were given by temple president
, Jack Shapiro and school board
chairman Dr. Fred Blumenthal.
Diploma recipients included Jill
Baer, Joshua Herman. Philip Ber-
man, Wendy Cohen, Steven Eisen-
] berg, Judith Feiler, Jody Feingold.
; Laura Fleet. Jane Frey, Cynthia
! Frimmer, Gregg Glaser, Steven
Gold. Paul Golden. Russell Kaplan.
1 Libby Robert, Sharon Landsberg,
Anna Maisel, liana Moidel, Josh
Ovett, Marcia Rindner, Jackie
Rosean, Sari Ross, Leslie Snyder
' and Leonard Tonkin.
"Operation Joshua", a unique
summer program in Israel run by
and for college students, will
begin its fourth year on July 15,
according to Irving Bernstein,
United Jewish Appeal executive
vice chairman.
The program is designed as an
inexpensive and yet informative
way in which a student not travel-
ing with an organized tour can
get to know Israel in depth.
A special project of the United
Jewish Appeal's University Pro-
grams, the Operation Joshua tours
take college students to kibbutzim
along the Beit Shean Valley, to im-
migrant absorption centers, devel-
opment towns, and other areas
indicative of Israeli life today.
Outlining the basis for the
Operation Joshua program, Mr.
Bernstein called the tours "a
logical outgrowth of our Univer-
sity Programs' constant process of
education, organization and action.
Our main goal is to enable Jewish
students to gain a basic knowledge
of the conditions in Israel and of
world Jewry, with the long-range
objective of helping to develop
future leaders for the American
Jewish community."
Participants will meet nnd speak
with Israelis from all walks of life
kibbutzniks, government offi-
cials and newly-arrived immi-
grants. One-day trips are run every
Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday
from July 15 to Aug. 23, and
originate from both Tel Aviv and
Jerusalem. For just a little more
than three dollars, a student can
join a day's tour, which includes
transportation, guides .and lunch.
Operation Joshua is open to any
j American college student. The
i typical itinerary will also enable
: students to do some sightseeing
j along the way, in places such as
Jericho, Haifa, Jerusalem and the
< Jordan Valley.
Once a student has arrived-, in
Israel, he can obtain' more infor-
| mation or register by visiting
either of the following Operation
Joshua desk locations, which will
open on July 8: JerusalemYouth
i Hostel, 1 Keren Hayesod St. Tel
| Aviv Egged Tours, 59 Ben
Yehuda St., corner Mendele St.
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-L


Friday. June 8, 1973
> lewist ncridfiaw end ShofIf of Hollywood
Pago 7
Signs & Portents
-v
' ;-?
I am fortunate in having come across my desk the publica-
tions of many Jewish organizations and the bulletins of all area
temples. In two recent editions of the temple periodicals there
appeared letters from the respective rabbis which are too evoca-
tive to remain unshared by other than their congregations.
Rabbi Robert Frazin of Temple SoleL, in an essay to his
congregants, speaks of the atrocities of the holocaust and the
callousness of nations worldwide. He ends his composition as
follows:
"My friends, three years ago the Central Conference of
American Rabbis met in convention in Jerusalem, and during
that convention we visited the Yad Vashem, the memorial to
the six million martyrs and heroes of our people. I recall this
night ascending the mount of remembrance, walking through
the garden of the righteous where trees are planted in memory of
our loved ones. And I recall entering a darkened room, the me-
morial shrine, and on the floor of that room were inscribed
names of the camps, Auschwitz, Dachau, Buchenwald, Bergen-
Belsen and others.
"And in the center of the floor there glowed an eternal
flame. And I listened.
"I listened as one of my colleagues spoke words of sorrow
and words of hope. I listened as a cantor chanted the El Malay
Rachamin. And then each of us. liberal-reform rabbis from all
over the world, recited the Kaddish. And the tears we shed served
as a tender tribute to our beloved dead.
'But they are net dead who live in hearts they leave behind.
"And they will, they will. For we shall never forget.
Amen."
And in an apparently jocular vein, but conveying neverthe-
less a message of depth, Rabbi Ralph Kingsley of North Dade's
Temple Sinai tells his congregants on the eve of Mother's Day:
". I've got to make a confession to you. I could live very
well and happily without it. I feel the same way about Father's
Day ... I am tired of all the year-round occasions which pres-
sure me to run out to buy cards and gifts on demand, so to speak.
" 'What shall I get you for Mother's Day dar?' or 'What
would you like for Father's Day?' Isn't it silly? If you have to
ask. there's something wrong. And if you have to search around
for something that he or she doesn't have, and end up buying
something that he or she doesn't really need, just SO you've
fulfilled your obligation, well, there's something wrong with
that too. In fact, it smacks almost of the immoral conspicuous
consumption and all that.
"Now those of you in retail and those of you in greeting
card sales (my father included), please forgive me. I know you
rely heavily on these special occasions ... I write these words
knowing fuH well that they will make no dent in your business
anyway, since all of us are far too regimented and disciplined
by the American system to turn away from the pattern that has
been set for us. But every now and then I have a need to give
vent to pet peeves (I also can't stand Halloween).
"Above all, I suppose my Jewish self reminds me that those
'spechrt days' are all so superfluous for those of us who take
Judaism seriously. We have a mother's/father's (and children's)
day every week. Perhaps you've heard of it. It's called Shabbat.
It's really great. Filled with love and family feelings. But
dont let it get around. Somebody will figure it's a good time
for presents and cards."
*>
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Officers and Directors Of
Temple Israel Installed
Miramar's Temple Israel re?
cently installed its slate of ad-
ministrators, including Arnold!
Feiner, president; Harry Rosen,
Gail Shankman. Max Shevin, Shir- I
ley Kravitz, Libby Hachenburg and
Harold Kravitz, vice presidents;
Shirley Weissman, recording sec*
retary; Harold Chick, financial sec-
retary; Jerry Fine, treasurer and
Sidney Wein, corresponding secre-
tary.
The Board of Directors is com-
prised of Lou Gorod, Al Po.rtner,
Austin Tupler, Norman Mendelson
and Perry Segal.
Aliyah Center's Director
To Address Young Leaders
More than 50 members of the
Jewish Welfare Federation's
Young Leaders Council have been
invited to the home of Dr. Louis
Kuriand Wednesday at 8 p.m. to
hear Israel Shapiro, Regional
Director of the Miami Israel
Aliyah Center.
Mr. Shapiro's topic will be "So
You Want to Move to Israel ."
and he will discuss such facets of
immigration as what professions
and individuals are needed in the
25-year-old democracy.
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Enroll Now for June Classes
Class size limited to 8No
Exceptions. Enrollment no
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Classes start June 4
ORT Holds 2nd Annual
Planning Conference
Women's American ORT (Organ-
ization for Rehabilitation Through
Training) will hold its second
annual Planning Conference, Tues-
day, June 12, at 9 a.m. in Temple
Beth El, 1351 S. 14th Ave., Holly-
wood.
Mrs. David B. Zugman will be
chairman of the day. The theme
of the planning conference will be
"Around the World with ORT."
Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe. a member
of the National Rabbinical Cabinet
of Women's American ORT, will
give the invocation.
Jerald Trash, guidance coun-
selor at Sheridan Vocational Cen-
ter, will be guest speaker. His
subject will be "How Women's
American ORT Can Help the
Vocational Schools in the Com-
munity." Mrs. Edward Light, pres-
ident of Broward Region, and
Murray Yavneh will also speak.
There will be opening plenary,
work shop, luncheon and closing
plenary sessions.
Chapter chairmen are Mrs.
Jerome Rubenstein, Hallandale;
Mrs. Lou Olesker, Hallandale
Beach: Mrs. Andrew Hersbin, Hill-
crest Hills; Mrs. Albert Lipsitz,
Hollywood; Mrs. Robert Zaresky,
Hollywood Beach; Mrs. Norton
Sinert, Hollywood Hills; Mrs. Rose
Hilton, Mealowbrook Towers;
Naomi Mayor, Miramar; Mrs. Ron-
ald Weintraub, Pine Hill; Mrs.
Bernard Friedman, Sheridan
Heights; Mrs. James Kosak, South
Ocean; Diana Edelstein, Estates;
Linda Goldin, Plantation; Mrs.
Lillian Grishman, Coral Ridge, and
Mrs. William Mofsky, Lauderdale.
i
Hallandale ORT Chapter
Installs 1973-74 Slate
With Mrs. Lee Bersofsky acting
as chairman of the day, the Hallan-
dale Chapter of Women's Amer-
ican ORT slate for 1973-74 was
installed by Mrs. Edward Goldstein
of the Broward ORT Region.
Officers are president, Mrs. Rhea
Levine: vice presidents, Mrs. Irene
Apfe!, Mrs. Anne Hyman, Mrs.
Dora Nathan, Mrs. Mae Wiener
and Mrs. Jennie Melnick; trea-
surer, Mrs. Ann Shafer; financial
secretary, Mrs. Fannie Nims; cor-
responding secretary, Mrs. Rae
Camina; recording secretary. Mrs.
Evelyn Picower; and parliamen-
tarian. Mrs. Laura Rubenstein.
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.Page 8
* legist fterldian "* *hof of Hollywood
Friday. June 8. 1973
?KfSSS- S(W feyPaul Kerbel
Dj ndODI Jllupll U Another school year is coming wood had a very large contingent
The men and women who per- t0 a ci0Se, and many youth groups, of people participating in Greater
rm<>d the voluntary tasks of are win.Hns up their activities with Miami's Israel 25 parade Sunday,
formed
ijood will and sick committees and the election of next year's officers.
JUDGE MORTON ABBA*
RABBI A. JAMC5 KUD1N
Judge Abram To Receive
AJCommittee's 1973 Award
Judge Morton L. Abram, distin I
guished civic and community lead-
er, has been selected to receive
the 1973 American Jewish Com-,
mittee Human Relations Award
gation" at Itazuke Air Base. His
travels included visits to the Jew-
ish personnel of the Atomic Bomb
Casualty Commissions at Hiroshi-
lain in the United States Air
lor his contribution to better in- ma and Nagasaki and at air bases
tergroup relations and understand- in South Korea.
Rabbi Kiiiiiii was national co-
ordinator of the American Jewish
Emergency Effort for Biafran Re
Tne award will be given at the
annual meeting of the Broward
County chapter of the American
Jewish Committee Sunday evening,
June 10, at the Holiday Inn, 4000
S. Ocean Dr., Hollywood.
Rabbi A. James Rudin, assistant
director of the Interreligious Af-
fairs Department of the American
Jewish Committee, will be key-
note speaker at the dinner.
Judge Abram, elected in 1972,
; -timed his duties as a full-time
County Court judge of Broward
County Jan. 1, 1973. Previously,
he had engaged in the practice of
law with his eldest son, Stanford,
and had served as senior judge of
the Municipal Court of Pembroke
Pines.
Judge Abram moved to Holly-
wood in 1957 with his wife. Gladys,
a-xl their three children. A native
oi Chicago, he was admitted to the
DHnois Bar in 1937. Educated in
the Chicago public schools, he
completed his undergraduate work
a'. Roosevelt University and re-
' ceived his juris doctor degree from
DePaul University Law School.
Judge Abram became active in
- Temple Beth El, Hollywood when | at home and abroad since 1906.
he moved to Florida. Elected sec-
retary' within six months of his ar-
rival, he thereafter served as vice
president, executive vice president
and for four years was president of
the congregation. Recentiy he was
elected executive vice president of
' temple.
A charter member of the Brow-
;.:l County chapter of the Amer
ican Jewish Committee, he
special secretarial services were
honored by Temple Sinai's spir-
iUial. leader from the pulpit re-
cently.
Among those singled out by
Rabbi David Shapiro were Mrs.
Samuel Albert, Mr. and Mrs.
Samuel Bernstein, Mr. and Mrs
Joseph Binder, Mr. and Mrs. Sid-
ney Burd. Sol Cooper. Dr. and Mrs.
Ronald Ehrlich. Mrs. Anna Dehls.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Frankel. Mr.
ind Mrs. Louis Garber. Herman
Goldsmith, Mr. and Mrs. Isadore
Gorberg. Mr. and Mrs. Daniel
Gribetz and Jack Harari.
Also Julius Harris. Mr. and Mrs.
Morris Horowitz. Mr. and Mrs.
Daniel Janowsky. Mrs. Martha
Katz, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin
Lazarus. Mrs. Lena Lightman, Mrs.
Max Oberman, Mr. and Mrs. Leo
Oppenheimer, Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Pierson, Mr. and Mrs.
Stephen Platt. David Podvesker,
'ack Price. Jack Rogers, Jacob
Scarr, Mrs. Goldie Schumacher,
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Sisholce. Mrs.
Burton Strauss and Mrs. Melvin t
Waldorf.
The rabbi will honor the follow-1
ing high school graduates at Fri-'
day evening's services: Fay Ades. j
Joan Vegotsky, Sari Kim Goorland,;
Terry Fixel. Richard Fradin. Fran
lief. He was secretary-treasurer : Carson, Jacob Delumi. Shan-i Gold-
of the executive board of the
Kansas City Council of Religion
and Race, and served on the board
of trustees of the Montabauer Club.
a Catholic men's residence.
man, Carrie Handel, Sidney Heil-
braun, Laura Katz, Frank Kellert,
Robert Leben. Scott Lobel. Gary
Newman, Denise Pollak, Don
Favus, Rhonda Richman. Lee Ann
Rogers, Caryn Schorr. Vicki
A member of the Jewish Chap-
lains' Association. National Asso- Seltzer. Jackie Sultan, Robin Sul-
ciation for the Advancement of I tan, Robert Warren, David Wiener
and Ruth Yadow.
nation for the Advancement of
Colored People and the National
Urban League, the rabbi partici-
pated in a voter registration drive
in Hattiesbure. Miss, in 1964.
Mrs. Dorothy Fine. Mrs. Louise
Forman, and Mrs. Leah Weinstein,
who comprise the planning com-
mittee are very much in the fore-
front in making this an exciting
evening to do honor to Judge
Abram and the Broward County
chapter of the American Jewish
Committee.
The Broward County chapter
of the AJCommittee was organized
in June, 1967. It is an integral part
of the National American Jewish
Committee, a pioneer human rela-
tions organization which has been
combating bigotry and protecting
civil and religious lights of Jews
Seminary Student
Is Guest Speaker
At Temple Sinai
Albert Slomovitz. a native of
Dade County who was confirmed
at Beth Torah Congregation, was
has' euest sPeaker at the Sabbath eve
also been active in B'nai B'rith, the ~ T'00 at TemP|e Sinai of North
Jewish Federation of Greater Hoi- Dadc recently.
l! .<>od, the Hollywood Civitan j ,,. .. .
Club, sad his Hattak lodge. I J JFI:mov"'? hM *"* com'
T. ... ^ i I'Icted his second year of the Joint
The guest speaker. Rabb. Rud.n | Program at the Jewish Theo|0gical
rk> with religious leaders of Seminary in New York City While
a .denominations to secure greater I receiving rabbinic training at
understanding of Jews and Judaism j.T.s.. he is engaged in secular
to promote goad human rela- studics at Columbia University.
is among people of all races
and creeds, comes with a wide Mr. Slomovitz's presence at
breadth of experience. He served Temple Sinai marks a trend to-
a two ywf tour of duty as chap- wards increasing cooperation on
in :>(. United States Air all levels between the Reform and
e", during which he was sta- Conservative movements, both of
->< Kyushu, with his "home congre- in modern terms.
sop
Continued From Page 4-A
manding immediate and bold ac-
tion.
No President in Richard M.
Nixon's present position can be
expected to take this kind of
action with much hope of suc-
cess. But if the air is cleared
in the manner desired by Sen
Talmadge. the President will
again be free to act as the coun-
try's interests require.
He will not be free, of course,
of the ghastly responsibility for
surrounding himself with the
men who gave orders in his
name false orders, if the
President has told the truth in
his latest statement.
Yet having a President who is
again free to act is an immense
Objective in itself, at least in
present circumstances. Getting
the worst over quickly, one way
or another, will not of course ap-
peal to partisan Democrats or
ambitious investigators or others
who want the agony to be de-
lightfully prolonged.
But as Sen. Talmadge has
drily said: "The country matters,
too."
TH f
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AMERICAN
IMkMKi CO-tr, -i::
Here are a few of them:
Temple Beth Shalom Senior
USY: Lori Mirrer, president; Paul
Kerbel, Cheryl Samet and Helene
Isaacs, vice presidents; Sherce Sei-
ner, recording secretary: Linda
Paul co reaponCRng secretary:
Hedy Shapiro, treasurer, and Deb-
bie Margolis, historian.
Young Judea: Sue Freed, presi-
dent; Harvey Mendelshon, vice
nresident; Steve Powell, treasurer;
Penni Jano;. secretary, and Bonnie
Gold, program chairman.
Temple Sinai Senior USY:
Debbie Fixel, president; Susan
Tanur, Susan Miner and Joe Vegot-
sky, vice presidents; Lauren Lux-
emberg, secretary, and Steven
Scharf, officer-at-large.
Beth Shalom Junior USY:
Steve Blumenthal, president; Steve
Kerbel and Steve Eisenberg, vice
presidents, and Cathy Hoffman,
secretary.
a & a
The Jewish community of Hollv-
May 20. It was a beautiful parade
and seemed to be enjoyed by par.
ticipants and spectators alike.
Tint same-evening, the Holly
wood Israel 25 committee held a
program at Young Circle. There
were people of all ages present.
We broke the all time record of
attendance at Young Circle: over
5.000 pers3ns! The Jewish Youth
Council was very happy with the
teen-age turnout at this program.
Everyone had a good time.
it ft &
The Jewish Youth Council held
its last general meeting of the
year May 23 The slate of officers
was passed unanimously and next
year's programs were discussed
The group will take a summer
hiatus and will reconvene around
the end of August.
I want to wish all of you who are
taking early vacations good luck
on your exams and a happy sum-
mer.
Shalom!!!
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Bob Asquith 945-1401


Fata*. June 8. 1973
+Je*i$t> flcridian Shofar of Hollywood
Pago 9

t
X
Committee On Jewish Life
Has Adult, Teen Division
.
*i
?,
In back iow are (from left to right) Lee Sslig-
i^Bi- Young Judea, Temple Israel; Rick Ap-
Temple Sinai, B'nai Israel AZA;
Snyder, Temple Beth Shalom; Steve
stein Temple Beth El and St. Andrews
High School, Bcca Raton; Paul Kerbel, Tem-
ple Beth Shalom. Steve Scharf, Jodi Stolove
and Steve Brody of Temple Sinai, and Kathy
Newman of Temple Beth El are sealed in
front row.
[Educational Director Appointed
ly Temple Beth Shalom's Board
Temple Both Shalom's school Mr. Opher comes to Beth
board chairman. Dr. Fred Blumen- | Shalom from Detroit, Mich., where
thai, nd Dr. Morton Malavsky. | he has served as superintendent
' of experimental education in the
elementary and secondary grades
for the past two years.
Mr. Opher is a graduate of
Hebrew College and Boston Uni-
versity, Boston, Mass. His thesis
for his Master's degree was writ-
ten on ready skills and their in-
fluence on the pre-schooler.
Mr. Opher served as professor
of Languages at Hebrew College
for four years, and is presently
assistant professor at Oakland Uni-
versity in Rochester. Mich. His
expertise is in the field of audio
lingual and audio visual, and he
has been training teachers in the
Michigan area for the past two
years in the most modern and
innovative approaches to educa-
tion.
Mr. and Mrs. Opher and their
2 children will take up residence
in Hollywood n?xt month.
At Beth Shalom. Mr. Opher will
be directing the religious school,
I Sunday school, and newly formed
rabbi, announce the engagementday school. He wiU be consultant
V Mordecai L. Opher as Director for the pre-school. as **"
?-, BSation effective next Sep. adult education and special teen
ternher. _________________|classes-___________----------------------
Canadian Arabs Urge Ouster
Of Foreign Minister Sharp
*JS
I*
MONTREAL (WNS) At (
the close of a two-day conference ;
hero, the Federation of Canadian ,
Arab Societies, representing 10
Arao organizations in Canada, de-
mand^ the removal from office
*f Foreign Affairs Minister Mit-
ycheB Sharp on grounds that he
-cannot be impartial in the vital,
Israeli Arab conflict because he,
yields to prcwure from the size-
able vote in his constituency."
Sh; rp is a member of Parliament
from Toronto. Both Arabs and,
Canadian supporters of the Arab,
cauae addressed the conference.
There are 80.000 Arabs in
Canada, but only 1000 belong
to the Federation. There are an
estimated 300,000 Jews in Can
ada The conference adopted res-
olutions urging the Canadian gov-
ernment to make representations
Israel regarding the Israeli
practice of terrorizing and starv-
ing the Palestinian people," and
to 'safeguard the lives of 16.000
falestiniam in Israeli prisons."
| Michael Chartrand. National
Tirade Union president, denounced
Itrael as a "bad copy of American
Imperialism." He claimed that the
Jowi-li community of some 127.000
hr*}uebec enjoyed more privileges
than any other minority in the
country, adding, "We do not want
them to pollute any more the at-
V*
mosphere of the country.'"
He said Canadians were tired of
being called anti-Semitic every
time they criticize Israel._________
Local Couple Attends 25th
Anniversary Celebration
Mr. and Mrs. Alex Packer of
Miramar were among the Amer-
icans who celebrated Israel's 25th
anniversary in that country, it was
the last stop on a three week tour
that included Greece. Spain and
Italy.
Mrs. Packer is the newly in-
stalled journal vice president of
the Hollywood Chapter of Hadas-
sah and is fund raising vice pres-
ident of the Henrietta Szold
Group of Miramar.
Beth Ahm Graduates
To Receive Awards
Scholarship, attendance and (
conduct awards will be the high-
lights as Temple Beth Ahm grad-
: nates its 1973 Hebrew School
students.
Receiving the awards and diplo-
mas will be Robin Davis. Heidi
Davis. Russell Swift, Scott Spindel.
Barbara Galletta. Wendy Kirsch-
ner, Linda Kirschner, Ronald
' Heim, Roland Heim. Ellen Schain-
! berg, Jeffrey Daitch, Diane Davis,
' Robert Corcell and Bruce Brodsky.
Youth Council
Plans for 74
Following election ol its new
roster ol officers (Scott Snyder.
president; Paul Kerbel, Jodi Sto-
love, Steve Weinstein and Lee
Seligman. vice presidents; and
Kathy Newman, executive secre-
tary), the Jewish Federation's |
Youth Council discussed projects
for the coming year.
With past president Steve Brody
acting as advisor to the grour
proposals included a repetition of
the annual get-together for Jewish
youth of the entire community
with special emphasis on parental
participation, and another Bike-A-
Thon for Soviet Jewry, again with
adult participation.
Also suggested were a youth
service under the direction of the
Broward Board of Rabbis: an ex-
panded program of meetings with
I Israeli youth; a second Awards
Dinner; a UJA Phone-A rhon dur-
ing the 1974 fund-raising cam-,
paign; and ongoing service proj-'
j ects such as visits to homes for
the aged, tree-planting in Holly-
I wood, and a beach clean-up pro-
gram.
The Youth Council will also
continue the sale of Prisoner of
Conscience medallions, a project
through which it raised over
$1,000 during 1972-73.
The need for the Council to
maintain a calendar for the entire
i youth community in order to avoid
conflicts and to coordinate activ-
! ities was seen as a major respon-
sibility of the group.
"To reinforce existing temple
programs and to supplement com
miinity programs" are the two
objectives of a newly formed Cum
mittce on Jewish life, an arm of
he Jewish Welfare Federation
oresided over *by Mrs. Herbert
Katz.
At its initial meeting Mrs. Katz
appointed her committee member?
including Mrs. Norman Atkin, Mrs
Pred Ehrcnstein, Dr. Victor Glazer.
Marvin Lee and Mrs, Alan Roarnan.
The committee has two divisions,
inc to deal with programs on the
adult level, the other on the teee-
age level.
The adult contingent at this first
meeting discussed innovative pro-
grams including discussion groups
on a regular basis commencing
this fall, and intensive weekly
programs on such subjects as
American Jewish history, Jewish
ethical values, and the Jewish role
in society, all to begin in the spring
of 1974.
One week later Mrs. Katz was
hostess to the teenage group.
Present were Scott Snyder, Bretta
Weissman, Lee Seligman, Steve
Horowitz and Tom Katz, and ad-
visers Dr. Sam Meline and Dr.
Joel Schneider.
The committee discussed the
young people's interest in a social-
athletic milieu rather than a
strictly educational frame of ref-
erence. It was the concensus, how-
ever, that the community should
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provide funos for the small num-
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The committee also expressed
i the need for a "programmed"
! coffee house or meeting center.
a place where activities such 3
| rap sessions, book reviews and
Israeli musical programs are
planned in advance.
In conclusion the committee
| stressed the fact that teenagers
are more concerned with finding
themselves than in any other facet
of life and that all programs foe
this age group must be geared
towards identity-seeking.
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Page 10
+Jewist> fhrk/iari "< Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, Juno 8. 1973
Peron Courts Major Arab Oil Producers
Continued from Page 1-
that Gen. Peron has assigned
to himself the main responsi-
bilities for Argentina's future
economic policy. Observers be-
lieve that the Argentine econ-
omy will be oriented towards
greater trade with the Common
Market and that hostility to-
wards so-called American im-
perialism will be intensified.
But the main point of the new
economic set-up, as these ob-
servers see it, is Gen. Peron's
active contacts with the Arab
countries. As soon as the results
of the Argentine Presidential
election were known, the Libyan
and Syrian Ambassadors in Spain
visited Gen. Peron in his luxu-
rious Madrid home.
Then, on April 6. he met the
Saudi Arabian, Kuwaiti, Leba-
nese, Lobyan, Syrian, Algerian,
Tunisian and Iraqi Ambassadors
to Spain.
The representative or the Arab
League in Spain was also present
at the meeting.
The weli-iniormea Argentine
daily newspaper, La Opinion, has
reported that Gen. Peron aims at
increasing Argentina's oil output
which is approaching some 90
per cent of her consumption,
with a view to an association with
the Arab-dominated Organisation
of Oil Exporting Countries.
Gen. Peron is also reported to
be seeking large investments
from rich Arab countries to ex-
pand Argentina's industry and oil
output.
Such developments in the Ar-
gentine economy, linking it with
Arab interests, would seriously
worry Argentina's 475,000 to
500,000 Jews.
On the fringe of the tradi-
tional Peronista Party are het-
erogeneous groups ranging
from the extreme Trotskyist
and Maoist Left to the neo-
Nazi Right, all of which are
rabidly anti-Semitic.
Already, observers are appre-
hensive of the pressure these
fringe groups will bring to bear
on the main party, which is not
anti-semitically inspired. These
observers have little doubt about
the outcome of the factor if Arab
What the Arab League and a
number of Arab Embassies have
not been able to achieve in ten
years of campaigning in Argen-
tina, could be accomplished
easily if large-scale economic in-
terests were to be put at stake.
Dr. Sion Cohen Imach, the
president of Daia, the represen-
tative Jewish organization in
Argentina, complained of anti-
Semitic outbursts by some Peron-
ista quarters when he met Gen.
Peron secretly in Madrid last
November
Gen. Peron replied that this
view of some Peronista sup-
porters could not commit the
whole movement. However, he
declined to issue a public state-
ment on these lines.
Gen. Peron was also asked
for his own opinion in the
matter as the "father" of
Prronism. To this he replied
that an official declaration
would appear soon in the party
organ, Las Bases, published in
Buenos Aires.
Alter a lapse of several
months, no such statement has
appeared and the general feeling
here is that none will now be
issued in the light of Gen. Peron's
growing interest in the Arab
world, which could be a pivot in
Argentine economic planning.
Later Gen. Peron, was invited
by the Arab ambassadors, includ-
ing the Egyptian envoy, to visit
their respective countries "in
order to underline the friendship
of the Arab world with Argen-
tina.''
Gen. Peron accepted the invita-
tion and said that he would tour
some of the countries soon.
: i -I ;i'r' i
II 'CUIIi. I I'll.
mmmmmmmm
c
itu K^^alcndar
Question Box
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Why is it customary to sing
special table songs at the Sab-
bath table called "Zemiroth?"
word "Zan," which means to feed.
The number of letters (227) that
make up this Psalm is the numer-
ical equivalent of the arithmetic
value of the letters that make up
Some (e.g., Ya'avetz) derive this the Hebrew word "B'Rachah,"
custom from the verse in the I which means blessing.
Psalms (Psalm 92) which reads j Reciting the Psalm is thus asso-
"A Psalm, a song for the Sabbath | ciated with the Almighty's suste-
Day." This would technically dem- nance for the world and also with
onstrate that somehow the Sab-
bath and song are phenomena
which have something in common
and that Sabbath is a day of song.
(Sefer Chasidim, also).
Others derive the idea from
the fact that Job cursed his day by
saying that there would be no
songs on that day. This would in- eause this third meal is consumed
dicate that a day which is regarded on Saturday afternoon the after-
as blessed should have songs (Sefer
Chasidim).
Since the Bible, in the Book of
Genesis, indicates that the Al-
mighty blessed the seventh day,
these commentaries assert that its
noon on which Moses died. Moses
was regarded as the "shepherd"
of his people and remembering his
death makes Jews feel sad at the
loss of this great shepherd.
The Psalm stresses a message
blessings should be demonstrated : ,f consolation when it emphasizes
economic interests is added.
Bar Mitzvah
with song. Some (Rabbenu Eph-
raim) claim that the finishing
touch which the Almighty put on
Adam was the power to express
himself in speech and song.
Some rabbis note the fact that
the words "Hashevi-i" (the sev-
enth) and "Shevach B'peh (praise
with the mouth) have the same
numerical equivalent in Hebrew
letters. This tells them that the
seventh day (i.e., the Sabbath) is
a day on which to praise the Lord
with one's mouth.
Perhaps the gist of this idea can
be understood when we note that
WAYNE LIBMAN
The Shofar inadvertently omit-
ted the name of Wayne, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell Libman. who tne songs are chanted at the table,
cel'hrated his Bar Mitzvah Mon- Tne Sabbath table is supposed to
day, May 28, at Temple Beth Sha- stand out in comparison with the
lorn. taUe set during the rest of the
ft ft ft
LAWRENCE GREENSPAN
pie Sinai.
ft ft ft
SANDRA PERLMAN
that "The Lord is my Shepherd,"
and thus Israel has really not been
left without a shepherd.
Why is it a tradition in many
synagogues to have the third
meal of the Sabbath on Saturday
in the synagogue together with
all the other worshippers, in-
stead of in the privacy of one's
home?
There is a practical and a
theoretical reason for this custom.
Practically speaking, it was rather
inconvenient to have everyone
assemble for the afternoon Min-
chah service, then disperse and
go home, then reassemble for the
evening service of Ma'ariv. Thus,
the third meal which takes place
in the afternoon, between the
prayers of Mincha and Ma'ariv is
consumed in the synagogue.
On the theoretical side, there
are those who claim that it is
especially meritorious to eat the
third meal in a public quotum I
', (i.e. a Minyan). One of the reasons
given for this is that the third |
meal represents the eschatalogical
dimension of the Sabbath pointing
to the Utopian period when all
all of Jewish holy literature. SV^iriSP'S 5 ?*. '"I?
While scholars can easily engage ?f J* 2 l! 'S e."ten
in deep conversations MgriSlEHl^JLSWffE:
,. ;_, ii ,u i Another reason given is that the
week.
Physically, the best foods are
Lawrence, son of Mr. and Mrs. placed on the table for the Sab-
Joseph Greenspan, will be Bar bath. Spiritually, the atmosphere
Mitzvah Saturday, June 9, at Tern-; at the table is comparatively more
relaxed and spiritual. This latter
factor is demonstrated by intellec-
tual discussions which take place
Sandra, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.. at the Sabbath table as well as by
Fred Perlman, will celebrate her j songs whose words quote phrases
Bat Mitzvah Friday, June 8, at from the Bible, the Talmud and
Temple Beth El.
ft ft ft
MEG KAPLAN
Meg, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Joel Kaplan, will be Bat Mitzvah
Friday, June 15, at Temple Israel ing to do this. Hence, a way was
provided to quote works of intense
of Miramar.
ft ft ft
STEVEN GOLD
Steven, son of Cantor and Mrs.
scholarship without being frus-
trated at having to understand
their deep meaning. This was ac-
Irving Gold, will celebrate his Bar complished by putting these words
meal is eaten is close to the exit |
of the Sabbath. When the Sabbath
departs, the "N'shamah Y'Serah"
(the transcendental dimension) of
man which is especially acquired
on the Sabbath, also departs. This
;. V "'" wrcunic his oar i-uiupiuueu uy putting tnese woras Pipmon. ;< hp "aHHitinnal ..l"
Mitzvah Saturday, June 9, at Tern-, into song which anyone can chant. h^h L.l. -- -- u""L 5L
pie Beth Shalom.
ft ft ft
SAMUEL NEMES
without too much trouble in com-
prehending them.
In this way ail alike can indulge
Samuel, son of Mr. and Mrs. in quoting the words of scripture
David Nemes, will be Bar Mitzvah and the words of the wise the
Saturday, June 9, at Temple Beth
Shalom.
ft ft ft
PHILIP SERLIN
Philip, son of Mrs. Renee Serlin,
will celebrate his Bar Mitzvah Sat-
urday, June 9, at Temple Israel of
Miramar.
ft ft ft
' ALAN GORDON
Alan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ber-
nard Gordon, will be Bar Mitzvah
Saturday, June 16, at Temple Is-
rael of Miramar.
scholar in his discussion the
layman in his song.
which leaves man on the exit of
the Sabbath.
The famous Israel Ba'al Shem
Tov remarked that when a soul
departs, a quorum of ten (i.e. a
Minyan) is assembled. According
to some, this is to assert that
Wh Is the Stwe8nty,hird Psalm ^ J^f^ "S .*
chanted at the third meal of the JL!2?5,E' *S P3rt f the
Sabbath (i.e., at the meal on
Saturday afternoon)?
Generally speaking, the twenty-
third Psalm is recited by the pious
in conjunction with every meal.
Some claim that this is because the
community at large.
Thus, when the "additional soul"
departs at the end of the Sabbath
the last meal of the Sabbath is
consumed in a public assembly to
show that while individually we
. are losing this extra-dimension of
number of words in this Psalm I transcendentalism, it will remain
(i.e. 57) is numerically equivalent i with us as part of the collective
to the arithmetic value of the let-1 experience of the Jewish com
ten which make up the Hebrew raunity.
cinvnuni
SUNDAY, JUNE 10
JWF Youth Council awards dinner 7 p.m. Temple Beth
Shalom
American Jewish Committee6:30 p.m.Holiday Inn,
Hollywood Beach........
TUESDAY, JUNE 12
Beth El Sisterhood general meeting 11:30 a.m.
temple
Women's American ORT second annual planning con-
ference 9 a.m. Temple Beth El
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13
National Women's Committee for Brandeis University
general meeting 10 a.m. Galahad South
Temple Israel 12:30 p.m. luncheon and card party
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20
Departure date for Broward County Jewish Teen Tour to
Israel.


Religious Services
His blessing. The contents of the
Psalm bear this out when it
speaks of the confidence man has
in his Creator because of His sup-
port and blessing for mankind.
There are some who say that
this Psalm is especially fitting for
the third meal of the Sabbath be-
HAUANDALE
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(Conservative). 416 NE 8th Ave.
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz, Cantor
Jacob Danziger.
----^
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADF
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingaley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. 37
NORTH BROWARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. Westinghouse Home
Center Auditorium, Coral Spnrgs.
Rabbi Max Weitz.
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TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1S51 S.
14th Ave., Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffa.
BETH SHALOM (Temple) Conserva-
tive. 401 Arthur St. Rabbi Morton
Malaviky, Cantor Irving Gold.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (Conservative),
3'0 SW 62nd Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi
Salomon Benerroch.
--------
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal) 5001.
Thomas St., Hollywood. Rabbi Rob>
ert Frazin.
TEMPLE SINAI (Conservative) 1201
Johnson St. Rabbi Oavid Shapiro,
Cantor Yehuda Hailbraun
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Conservative)
6920 S.W. 35th St., Rabbi Avrom
Drazin, "antor Abraham Koster.
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Bie 8, 1973
*.teiVtftl fler fdfigun *rid Shofar of Hollywood
Page II
lall on U.S. Jews to Fight Repression
.
mied from Page 1-
feelings to radicalism
ng America."
jlish noted that "we are
ig not only ideological I
but psychological trau-1
that Jewish certainties:
convictions "have been I
irhile the well-hidden an- \
ttMefl, dogmas and bigotries of ,
me Jews have erupted to the sur- j
See. We are no longer ashamed
to be bigoted,'' he charged, and,
asked:
i
"Are these the Jews whose i
IrotheM ceme out of Auschwitz? :
Are that the Jews whose fathers
11 sick rolling cigars in dark'
'les-hj-the wall for $15 a week? '
re these the Jews who belabored
insensitive world for ignoring >
damned six million Jews?
iiat has. happened to the moral
nsciaaiaBess of the U.S. Jews?
lit gone with the general moral.
tisciousness? If so, then it was
rail thing Has it proved too i
great a luxury for us to be em-
battled over Jewish issues, and in '
U.S. moving towards a dictator-
- lip as W76 approaches?" If so,.
' len Jewish liberalism was "nnt
: i cessarily deeply rooted in Jewish
chics," he said.
SabW" Poli-h said he did not
. -re*; .with those who say that
'ewa hawt not turned to the right
I it have st^od still while every-
Jne efrehas gone to the left. He
'.led this "fatuous" in the face
Jews helping to "elect riht-
uigers" as city mayors. "Many
lews," he went on, "have been
/miking on taking their places in
.he privileged sanctuary of right-
wing America." He deplored the
faet that these people do not lis-
tea to the warnings of others.
He asked whether Jews are
"traayjinore sensitive ethically
itxm sfc^ir n*'"hbors." a JmiIi
isaa teaches, "or are merely adap-
tive ttf changing social trends."
noted that sum- say the
lews tave betrayed their heri-
hsive realistically come to terms
with H." One claims that "we
ttivw
ts- .<
have wedded ourselves to Sa-
tan," while others say "that we
are at last veering ..towards a
correct, traditional position."
"Tough-minded Jewish non- lib-
erals claim that the exclusive con-
cern of Judaism is the Jewish
people," Rabbi Polish noted. They
;ay that times are too stormy to
permit other considerations; that
he Jewish ethic is "not encum-
bered by the malaise of an alien
world," and, lastly, that "liberal
ism is harmful to the Jews." As
"or whether liberalism is good or
harmful, Rabbi Polish asked
whether the antiwar and civil
rights position of many Jews was
^ood or bad for Jews, and con-
cluded that they were good. Jew-
ish concerns over crime, over en-
croachment into the teaching pro-
'ersion and deteriorating neigh-
borhoods do not help," Rabbi Pol-
sh said. What he said disturbs
urn is that there is no "reasoned
trategy of defense of Jewish in-
'crests but the emergence of an
rrational and violent counter at-
tack, the emergence of Jewish
\rchie Bunkers in the various com
munities."
"The suggestion has been put
"orward that we disengage our-
elves from our society." Rabbi
Polish said. "Even if it were pos-
itble or desirable, disengagement
is a spurious issue." He noted that
omc Jews have "disengaged"
heimelves, but that these "disen
laged" Jews "demand their cut
jf government monies for day
OUT Chapter Installs Slate
New officers installed by the
lollywood Hills Chapter of
Women's American ORT include
Mrs. Norton Sinert, president.
Mrs. Julian Jacobson. Mrs. D.
5'oster, Mrs. Ralph Rose, Mrs. E.
Welt and Mrs. Morris Sovcn, vice
presidents; Mrs. Philip Unger.
treasurer; Mrs. S. Gelber. secre-
tary: Mrs. Mel Adelman, recording
;ecrctary; Mrs. Eugene White,
corresponding secretary, and Mrs.
Carl Gross, parliamentarian.
schools; ''disengaged' "Jew's rage
auainst busing; 'disengaged' Jews
fight against quotas, as they shotfttt;
disengaged' Jews wage battles'
against scattersitc housing."
Jews who have cast off "the un
comfortable restraints of liberal-
ism and we must now recognize
that for them it was liberalism
more expedient than convictional
do so out of their feeling that
the new American scene is good
[ for Jews, that it is in our interest
to support the prevailing system.
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Israel," Rabbi Polish continued.
He said that those Jews who
their concern for Israel with
their own economic interest dur-
ing the election campaign "were
not lying." They saw both issues
as closely interlinked, "a right-
turning for Israel, protected by
a rightwing America."
These people were as concerned
for the welfare of Jews as their
Jewish opponents, he conceded.
But so were the "rabbis who knew
that it is good for us and good for' and would not tell their people
the truth about the extermination
plans of the Nazis."
Rabbi Polish went on to ex-
amine the thesis that Nixon's Amer-
ica is good for the Jews. "We are
more^Brosperaus than .ftver.ibefore
in Jewish history," he said, and
"we have felt more secure than
ever." are the arguments given.
However, "American prosperity is
being acquired at the expense of
an accelerating social and political
dislocation which is resulting in-
creasingly in a widening gap be-
tween the powerful and rich on
the one hand, and the weak and
the poor on the other," he de-
clared.
JACK L. MORRIS, D.P.M. and SHELDON WILLENS, D.P.M.
announce the association
of
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Page 12
*Jwist>ncrSdi&f1 Shofar of Hollywoed
Friday, lune 8
!: HHMM m
s.
eumottr
y
JZU
>man
Prosperous Jewish lawyer as Southerner
THE COVENANT, by Paige
Mitchell (Atheneum, $7.95)
is not unusual in general plot I
line and setting. A prosperous '
Jewish lawyer in a Mississippi
town had always thought of him-
self as a son of the South. His |
grandfather and father provid
ed the psychological and socio-
logical climate and tradition toward that end.
This identification far outweighed that of his
Americanism or Judaism, but the degree of his
loyalty to both these aspects of his life was
tested. On the one hand, civil liberties influences
placed him in the position of having to defend a
man unjustly accused of homosexuality because
of his liberal attitude toward Negroes in the
town.
On the other hand, Ku Klux Klaa activities
included bombing the rabbi's home and the tem-
ple. This forces him into a painful reevaluation
of his identity and his association with his non-
Jewish law partner.
This is a readable and well-written book, but
one wishes that the story had a more original
theme.
It is acknowledged that first novels are
autobiographical. THE LINE OF DAVID, by Ken
Hurwitz (W. W. Norton, $6.95), is not the auth-
or's first book, but it has all the hall-marks of
the collegiate attempt to be blase and to shock
the reader in this case by understatement. We
wonder if the book would have been published
if the protagonist had not been a Jew, the fe-
male interest an Israeli, and part of the scene
set in Israel.
' 11' .....!
Joseph j^olahoff
A Tumultuous Welcome for Viet POW's
JLVtt MAJOR Floyd H. Kush-
ner, one of the four POWs
officially identified as Jewish
who returned to the United
States from Vietnam, came home
to a community reception at the
Danville, Va., airport.
"I'm trying hard not to cry,"
he told the crowd. "The words
come hard but the tears come
easy."
An assistant to Congressman
Dan Daniel, who represents the
Danville area, read this excerpt
to us over the telephone from
?he Danville Register's account
of the reception. She explained
she had been "Spanky's" baby-
sitter and then asked not to be
identified further.
The Register, founded in 1847,
bannered the reception "Kush-
ner Given Tumultuous Wel-
come." It said "several thousand"
were at the airport. He received
many gifts, including a car from
the city and a scrapbook about
him from the Chamber of Com-
merce. The mayor and former
mayor made speeches. Rabbi Nor-
man Auerbach, of Temple Beth
Sholem, where Maj. Kushner had
been Bar Mitzvah, pronounced the
invocation.
Maj. Kushner arrived in Dan-
ville from Valley Forge Hospital
in Pennsylvania with his wife,
Valerie, nationally famous in her
own right as an antiwar activist
who seconded Sen. George Mc-
Govern's nomination for the pres-
idency at the Democratic conven-
tion last June, and their son and
daughter.
Danville, a textile and tobacco
marketing center of 48,000, is
noted for being the site of the
last meeting of Jefferson Davis'
Cabinet after the Confederacy
had lost Richmond. It now has
60 Jewish families and Orthodox
and Reform congregations. The
major's grandfather, Rabbi David
Kushner. was the Orthodox rabbi
there for many years before his
death in 1964.

,, .
Rabbi Kushner's Orthodoxy re-
mains strong in the major's
father, Dr. Robert Kushner, a
dentist, who was a captain in the
Army Air Force in World War
II. When asked whether anything
special would take place at "the
temple," Dr. Kushner replied: "I
don't go to a temple. When I go,
I go to a shul."
Maj. Kushner was the only
American captured prior to 1968
who survived the prison camp in
Quangrom, South Vietnam. "The
only one. All the rest are dead,"
he told a news conference before
he came home.
Ten of the 27 Americans held
in his camp in the Central High-
lands died in the arms of this
32-year-old medical doctor who
was trained for aviation services
and was shot down Nov. 10, 1967,
while aboard a helicopter and
held captive for 65 months. Those
Americans perished, he said, be-
cause the Vietcong denied them
food and medicine.
. ii'ovni .! i; !" !". '"!i ch;;'I:n iij
iK-obert *^/a
tcr
Did Gen. Dayan Make AH on Angry?
?
UfHII.F Deputy Premier Yigal Allon was busy
outlining his Allon Plan for the first time
publicly last month, reporters accompanying him
on a one-day press tour through the Jordan Val-
ley were trying to figure out the most intriguing
question: Why now? One theory went that the
election was coming up in six months, and Allon
simply wanted to remind his colleagues of his
thoughts on the burning political question of the
day, the fate of the territories.
Another theory had it that Allon was an-
gered by Defense Minister Moshe Dayan's appeal
for Jewish settlement anywhere in the territories,
an appeal that is at variance with the Deputy
Premier's view that major Arab population cen-
ters should be returned to Jordan, with the im-
plication that Jews would not settle in those
centers after a peace settlement

Chief of Staff David Elazar, talking to the
Foreign Press Association at a Tel Aviv lunch-
eon, replied in the affirmative as to whether the
Israel defense forces felt it was subject to
"moral limits* iosra" in carrying oat suck sets aa
the Beirut raid. Elazar, speaking slowly and de-
liberately, noted that the Israeli raiders could
have done much more damage during the attack,
but felt that civilian buildings near the terrorist
headquarters might have been damaged.

Learning Hebrew has become one of the fa-
vorite pastime of Gaza Strip schoolchildren. So
much so, that a teacher crisis of sorts has de-
veloped there. Last year, 3,000 youngsters were
learning Hebrew, while this year, the figure has
more than tripled to 10,000. But, the Israeli
teaching colleges and other schools are not turn-
ing out enough qualified teachers who want to
teach in the Gaza Strip.
*
During the press tour of settlements in the
Jordan Valley, one fellow kept popping up, say-
ing little, but nonetheless present at all stops.
He was Haim Topol, the Israeli movie actor,
famed for his role as Tevya the milkman in
"Fiddler on the Roof." A friend of Yigal Allon,
who led the tour, Topol was dressed in an army
jacket and open shirt, looking very much like
any other ordinary military man. But he was
recognised at one atop by some excited young,
store who asked for autographs and- to take bis
picture.
SBm

< win
Winds of Change Appear to Blow
Through Ancient Church Doctrine
1AKIS Every year on Easter eve, 'the
good people" of Narbonne in Southern
"ranee gather to see the Jews crucify Christ.
In a ritual which has not changed since
he darkest days of the Middle Ages, the pro.
ession wends through the city's tortuous
treets, with Roman soldiers escorting Jesus
vith a crown of thorns on his head and heavy
wooaen cross on his shoulder, the Roman governor wearing a
white flowing toga, and dozens of scornful and sneering "Jews"
calling for the Christian messiah's death.
Practically all European countries have known this yearlv
ritual play. The one at Oberammergau in Barvaria still draws
tens of thousands of tourists and visitors, while at Sevillia in
Spain the masses watch Christ's disciples point an accusing and
threatening finger at the Jews as Jesus expires on the cross.
For hundreds of years, the Catholic church has burned
flogged, or simply persecuted the Jews, who every "Good Fri-
day" and right up to 1965, were accused of "deicide" and termed
"perfidious."
During the last week in April the French Catholic bishops
suddenly called an end to this. In a document which goes much
further than anything attempted before, they termed anti-Semi-
tism a "sin," described Judaism as "a guiding light" and recog-
nized that the Jews "have the right and the means to a political
existence among nations of the world."
The Catholic church's misgivings of its treatment of the
Jews is nothing new. Back in 1272, Pope Gregorius X issued an
encyclical forbidding Christians from "hitting Jews with sticks
or stones during their holidays or opening graves in which their
dead are buried.'"
The real change came under the reign of John XXIII who
during the Catholic conclave of 1964-65, Vatican II, created i
special committee of Catholic bishops and cardinals to formulate
a new Catholic policy towards the Jews. German Cardinal Augus-
tinus Bea was given the responsibility of drawing up a new Cath-
olic "fundamental attitude" towards the Jews. The new dogma,
officially approved by the hundreds of cardinals and bishops who
attended the conclave, said that "entire humanity" and not only
the Jews were responsible for Christ's death.
r^ebert *^eqal
Pancho Villa Activity Recalled;
What Would the UN Do Today?
*?*
THERE once
was a gov-
ernment which
sent 6.0 00
troops 300 miles
into a bordering
nation to track
down a terror-
ist.. The year was 1916. The ag-
gressive government dispatching
the troops was the United States
under the schoolmaster. Presi-
dent Woodrow Wilson, and the
terrorist was Pancho Villa.
That episode ended up in the
forums of Hollywood. A contem-
porary pursuit of terrorists in a
bordering nation by authorized
government fighters has ended
up in the Security Council of the
United Nations. The terrorists
sought were free-wheeling strate-
gists for international murder
The bordering nation was Leba-
non, and the pursuers were train-
ed Israelis.
The United States was never
really scolded by public opinion
for its chase after Pancho Villa.
But Israel's antagonists in the
present matter including the
Arab states, the USSR, France
and England have made a mo-
mentous thing of Israel's defen-
sive lunge into Beirut in an ef-
fort to wither terrorist leader-
ship where it flourishes. A bold
writer for the Washington Post,
prior to the UN Security Coun-
cil's unevenhanded piiim
ment on the raid, had trenchantly
observed: "One suspect* Lebanon
is privately pleased to have W\
raelis dispose of the menace that
the Lebanese lack the mean- to
dispose of themselves."
However, neither the Security
Council's myopic treatment ofj
Israel nor the reported transfer
of top Arab terrorist leadership
te Syria will solve the funda-l
mental festerings in the Middle i
East.
Were an impartial board ?'
settlement to be set up and Si
off to try to deal with the Pal-j
estiiiian terrorists, that body
would he hard pressed to knovf]
with whrm it should deal. Per-
haps in the end, the leadi
will be provided by Col. Muaffl-
mar el-Qua of Libya, who has been fever
ishly active on behalf of the ter-
rorists with time left over to see
to it that Egypt (constantly
threatening to repeat its lilt!" mo-,
bilization against Israel) is
plied with Mirage jets sent to
Libya by France.
Meanwhile, back in the UN.]
the Arab protagonists have wor
whatever victory they wish to,
read into the Security Council's i
condemnation of Israel. And for,
that they can thaak Austral'"
Austria, Britain, France, IndV j
Indonesia, Kenya, Panama, Pert!
the Sudan and Yugoslavia. Wir
their added applause to *
USSR, whose Yakov Malik wts
so livid over the tinkering
the resolution that he took
walk.


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