The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00068

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJmisti Florid/ii&n
e 3 Numbsr 14
and SHOFAIl OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood, Florida Friday, May 25, 1973
Price 20 cer.'.s
I
.
UJA-JWF Campaign Begins 73 Ciean-Up
rrth the current fund-raising
sign now in its final days,
ert Katz, this year's chair-
H announces that S1.150.U0O
h*S beer, pledged lo date, rep-
uting a 15 per cent increase
[the total 1972 campaign.
apartments division has
inted for $560,000 of that
figUT''. according > chairman
Melvin B.ier, and the women's
division has raised $101,715 as
announced bv chairman Marsha
Tofcjln.
There have already been 217
gifts of Si.000 a.:d ever, com-
.pared to 181 in 1972.
Pledges earmarked for the Is-
rael Emergency Fund amount
to fH2.000, which sum will con-
tribute towards the enormous ex-
pense of aiding in the immigra-
tion and reorientation of Soviet
refugees, as well as to help fund
ongoing local Israeli programs
for youth, the aged, housing,
etc.
Members of the Youth Coun-
cil, who manned telephones out
of the offices of Herzfeld and
Stern, raised $8,200 in three eve-
nings' work.
The young people, all mem-
bers of Tzedakah B'nai B'rith
Girls, Temple Israel or Temple
Beth Shalom, included Kenny
Edwards, Steve Blumenthal.
Bonnie Gold, Lee Seligman,
Scott Snyder, Steve Powell,
Penni Janos. Steve Rubel, Steph-
anie Brown, Diane Krasne, Laura
Block, Richie Goldstein, Sue
Freed. Harvey Mendelson, Steve
UFS Broadens Scope
Of Governing Board
WHh
the addition of nine new
meabers ranging from college
student to senior citizen, the
Jewish Family Service of Brow-
ard County by unanimous vote
increased both the size and the
diversity of the board at its
annual meeting May 14.
Be nominating committee,
red by James Fox Miller and
.sting of Mrs. Richard Leben,
Edward Nacht. Mrs. Aaron
Sebrctcr ami Mrs. Kichard Tem-
lak. proposed new members in-
cJading Cathy Grossman, a 22
year-old student of journalism
|.Northwestern Univeristy and
a resident of Fort Lauderdale,
and Cathy's grandfather. Charles
Dubin. a 17.year resident of the
South Broward area and founder
of Palm View Real Estate.
Clher new members are Mrs.
Herbert Hc-iden, Mrs. Joan Mey-
ers, Mrs. Coleman Rosenficld,
Henry Scrfer, Mrs. Marsha
Tobin, Mrs. Samuel Winn and
Col. R. J. Lewis.
Held over were Robert Baer.
Mrs. George Barron. Emanuel
Borenstein, Mrs. Harriet Dietz,
Mrs. Richard Finder, Sam Fink-
elstein. Rabbi Robert Frazin,
Mark Fried, Fred Greene, Stan-
ley Greenspun, Mrs. Richard
Leben, Mrs. Edward Lichtman.
James Miller. Mrs. Joel Miller,
Dr. Edward Nacht, Mrs. Aaron
Schecter, Dr. Marvin Shustcr,
Mrs. Richard Temlak, Dr. Shel-
don Willens, and Dr. Paul
Winick.
Officers elected at the same
meeting were Dr. Sheldon Wil-
lens, president; James Fox
Miller, vice president; Emanuel
Borenstein, treasurer, and Mrs
Richard Temlak, secretary.
The decision to enlarge board
membership to encompass both
ends of the age spectrum was
made as the result of the es-
calating numbers of young and
old people seeking the assistance
of Jewish Family Service, ac-
Continued on Page 11-
Cathy Grossman and her grandfather. Charles Dubin.
Horowitz. Debbie Gusky, Barry
Greenfield and Cliff Weiss.
Youth advisors on the project
were Mark Fried, Dr. Howard
Israel, Dr. Sam Meline and Dr.
Alex Buchwald.
Broward
ADL Forms
Committee
Dr. Stanley Kessel of Holly-
wood has been named first chair-
man of an ADL Broward Area
Committee, according to Jack
Kassewitz of the Florida region-
al office.
The committee was formed
following recommendations by
the local parent body that the
structure of the regional board
be expanded for the purpose of
increasing the level of service
and programming throughout the
state.
Serving on the committee with
Dr. Kessel will be Dr. Norman
Atkin, Dr. Alex Kobb, Dr. Alex
Buchwald. Barry Holeve, Dr.
David Glassman and Dr. Robert
Pittell. all of Hollywood; and
Michael Weinberg of Fort Laud-
erdale.
The first case taken on by
the BAC concerned a "Christian
Community'' housing advertise-
ment which appeared in the
Hollywood Sun-Tattler.
Edward Wentworth, Jr.. editor
of the Tattler, in expressing his
regret and concern, stated that
"the ad was taken by a new
employee and slipped by the
supervisor. We have a strong
policy against taking ads of this
nature and I'm confident that
it won't happen again."
ADL has filed a charge of dis-
crimination with the federal gov-
ernment against the advertiser.
The Broward Area Committee
will operate as a standing com-
mittee of the regional board
with the expectation that it will
result in both improved and ex-
panded ADL service in Broward
County.
16 USY Delegates
Attend Convention
Beth Shalom's United Synagogue
Youth delegates recently returned
from a regional convention week-
end at Camp Ocala, Umatilla.
Among those who attended were
Robin Bardasch, Steve Blumenthal.
Glenn Dubin, Bruce Freedman.
Debbie Friedman. Keith Hoffman,
Helene Isaacs, Paul Kerbel, Debbie
Margolis, Gary Margolis. Lori Mir-
ror. Linda Paull, Bonnie Rosen,
Sheree Seiner, Gaylc Swissman
and Walter Zoller.
The Kadima group of the pre-
USY'ers held their final meeting
of the season May 3. Included was
a barbeque and outing.
Summer encampment for this
group will be held at Camp Blue
Star, Hendersonville, N.C., Aug.
20-28. For additional information,
call Mrs. Shirley Cohen at Temple
Beth Shalom.
Steve. Powell mans the phone; Isaac Fisher, Scott Snyder
and Leslie*Tfiorn contribute telephone numbers and pledge
card information.
STATl DFPMTMENT Official VOWS:
U.S. Gas Needs
Won H Deter
Search for Peace
WASHINGTON (JTA) America's quest and need for petrol-
eum will not alter its search for a peaceful Middle East settlement,
three highly placed U.S. government officials told Jewish leaders
meeting here for the annual policy conference of the American-Israel
Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC).
The officials also deprecated the '----------------------
oommonly used description of the
oil situation as a "crisis." Assist-
ane Secretary of State Joseph J.
Sisco, speaking of the "desire to
develop further" the relations be
tween oil ducing countries, observed:
not believe the U.S. is experienc-
ing an energy crisis. The country,
he said, is facing a series of prob-
lems, but these can be reasonably
settled. The oil situation he added,
can become a crisis only if the
U.S. docs not take action to use
its resources of oil natural gas
and particularly coal which would
supply it with enough fuel for 1.000
years at the country's present con-
sumption of energy.
"In this connection, there has
been much speculation of late as
to whether the so-called energy
crisis is going to lead to changes
in our Middle East policy. In mv
view, this is the wrong way to
pose the question. The question JWV Auxiliary Announces
is whether our policy of seeking
to promote a peaceful settlement
is going to succeed, so that there
will be uo temptation for some to
seek to politicize the energv prob-
lem.
In a visit to the Mace Depart-
ment, many of the more than 300
AIPAC delegates were told by a
Middle East specialist that the
U.S. would not be panicked into a
change of policy for peace based
on Israel's security. This official,
who asked for anonymity, pointed
out that most of the Arab threats
to cut off oil supplies to the U.S.
come from countries that do not
have oil resources. The oil pro-
ducers, he said, have suitable re-
lationships with the United States.
Another official, a specialist on
world energy supplies who also
asked not to be named publicly,
told AIPAC delegates that he did
Luncheon, Membership Party
Victcr B. Freedman Ladies Aux-
iliary 613. Jewish War Veterans of
the U.S.A. will meet at the Hallan-
dale Horns Federal Bink. 2100 E.
HalHmdale Beach Blvd. Thursday,
May 31. There will be a luncheon
to honer the women of the auxili-
ary who have worked hard all
year. The one accumulating the
most points will be honored as
"Queen for the Day."
On June 4. the auxiliary will
hold a paid-up membership party
with luncheon and dessert to fol-
low. All paid-up members are
urged to attend.
The state convention will be
held at the Playboy Plaza Hotel
June 8-10.


Page 2
+Jewist> rkridtiar Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, May 25, 1973
Awards Made By
Temple Beth El
Two special award assemblies
were held at Temple Beth El's re-
ligious school marking the con-
cluding session of the current
term.
Lisa, daughter of Dr. and lbs.
Michael Dcmet, received the
President's Award, initiated by
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Forman, for
outstanding achievement which en-
compasses scholarship, attendance Jaffa. Valerie Klein, i.t.--a iwckerma
Third Grade: BcholaaliC: Jeff Zbar.
Unda Slurman. Andy I'uMer. Wendy
Hochbenr.
Fourth Hr.i.l. All. mlan.-e. .lay sul-
tan. Randy Welnatetn, Kandv Hta-
chel Scholastic: Diaa Bobbins David
Slav. Gary Qalnton, Steven Oiaxer
S. i.. lar.-hlp: K.-viu K..mrr. Sally
Lewis, Rhoatfa I.inhi. Rebecca Krled-
ttan.
Fifth CJrade: Bcholaatlc: Michael
KcL-naiz. .Mk-hael Baer. illndy Daley.
Jeffrey Hu<1a. Kicky Job|i>ve. Sharon
Alkon-, Dana Hnohhent Jimmy De-
met. Jeffrey Oreenman. Mlehalc
D.
ue WeinMein. Lfaa P"'lis. Deborah '
Friedman
Flflh (irade: ScholnMir: Natalie
Haven, Sh.lly Herman. Beth Miller.
Scholarship: Gary Welder
sivih c;rad. : Attendance: Keith
Blank Siholastk-: Jeff Newman
Scholarship: Uea H.mwr. Una Covi
Jill BurnMiii..
Sixth Grade: Seliolaslir: Martin
Shapiro. Erie .Mifeh.l. David Simons.
Scholarship- Ann Temlak.
Seventh Grade: Attendance: Debra
B. "ml Grade: Attendance: J"di I Segal. Eric Jacobs, Scholastic: Jet-
s' mm -. Robert Uuinton. Scholastic: frey fornfeld. Many KgKimtz Leslie
I ... OohUn. Lorl Segal, Terl Stein. Friedman. Howard Khani. Mitchell
David Shafran Amy Marks. Uarnl Lerner. Frank Stride Robert Price.
Caster, Scholarship: Sharon BotiUck. Sandra Perlman Brenda Z.ok.
and character.
Other awards in.-lud.'.l: Kindergar-
ten: Attendance: Gary Gould; Scho-
I Melissa Sacks, Judith Hunz-
burc*-r. sllchael AbrSOL
First Grade: Seholastlc: Kenneth
Siri. k. Jennifer P..di>. Scholarship
Beotl Hlrsch.
s... ,i,.i Qradi Scholastic
Robbina. Leslie itaklander.
Olaai i". .Mairhea i Jppaaan
shlri: Cynthia Gurzbura-er.
Carolyn
Marjorie
Scholar-
Third Grade S.holasti.-: I vi.l Tim-
lak. Cliervl Rowars, Miriam Fri.d-
m.ui. Kmii.erlv, Beckerman Nancy
Morton. Scholarship: Phllin Welaa,
Leslie
WelM-
.luli-
Grad-
Rent-A-Car
$ LOW AS
5 A DAY
FREE MILEAGE
100 Mile Radius
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
520 S. Dixjf HWY.
920-4141
HOtlTrVOOO
4156S Miami
Seventh Grade: Scholastic:
Efro. James Kallman R.l.ert
.....ii. Grea Silver. Hindi Klein.
Kialuh tira.I. : Bcholaatlc:
U i Iss, Mark Slurnian. Sondra
us. Julie vVefnstatn, Karen it.-iii.il:-.
.. Greene. Mas Demet, Jo ner Ann Morton. Leslie c.rnield
ts.-hoiT-shi-.: Karen Kodenskv. I.etty
Wolf, it.-th Atkin.
Ninth Graile: Seliolastle: Lisa Ben-
ii.ii. JIU Newman, Helens Friedman,
lb ne K.ni.s. Debbie May. Wendy
Marks. Scholarship: I-aurle Nltsbenr,
Si.-\ --ii W'einstein.
Hebrew Department: Attendance:
Sally Lewis, Rebecca Friedman, Gary
Qulnton, Jay Sultan DnvM Simons
Scholastic: .loan Tanofaky, Jeff Coh-
en. Edward Hlrsch. Jeff Newman,
:f Cornfeld. Steven Glaser Scholar-
ihlp: Peter Llppman, Randy Ulachel,
Rand) Welnatetn, Lisa Beckerman,
Dean Adelman, Kevin Homer. Alan
Rosenfeld, Jamei KallnHhn, Eric MIs-
.liei. sii.-.im w.instein. Laurel vVyner,
rj Sbaolro.
Certificate of Service: Aide.- Shar-
on Kronlsh, Cathi Bcnoll, Peaxy Gar-
ron. Brooke Manning Amy l.ittnaii.
Paul Segal, Paul Greenberar, Warren
Bturman, Robert Qarron, David Ja-
.niia. I isa Newman, Laurie NitsberK,
lelie Kolles. Thomas Garron.
Companion Housekeeper
BETWEEN 50 and 65 YEARS
LIVE IN OR OUT KOSHER HOME FOR
ADULT JEWISH COUPLE
PLEASANT ENVIRONMENT OWN PRIVATE ROOM IF DESIRED
HOLLYWOOD AREA -
SEND ALL REPLIES TO:
P.O. BOX 2012
HOLLYWOOD, FLA. 33021
HfWE d GREAT
fiFFfiiR!
WEDDINGS
BANQUETS
SPECIAL PARTIES
ASSOCIATION. SOCIAL AND BUSINESS
LUNCHEONS (50-700)
GOURMET DINNERS PREPARED BY
MASTER CHEFS AT SENSIBLE PRICES
BRING YOUR OWN LIQUOR -
AND SAVE
FREE PARKING
Call
JACQUES
OSTADAL
Managing Director
Phone
731 3100
CamelotHall
N.W. 21st St. at 49th Ave.
Lauderhill, Fla.
Mrs. Genad Named
Woman of Valor'
Women for Hillsl have selected
Shirley Genad as their "Woman
>f Vaior" for 1973. In a surprise i
oresentation at the groins first
annual luncheon at the Deauville'
Hotel. Thursday, May 10, in the,
oresencc of her entire family. Mrs.
Ben Genad was named "Eshes!
Chayal."
The Eshes Chayal. an acrostic
poem. Proverb 31: 10-31 Is re-:~
cited in Friday night services, be
fore Dddtisb, and it means "a
good wife."
The verses of the poem begin
with the letters of the Hebrew
a'phabet in regular order. It de-1"
scribes the perfect housewife,
trusted by her husband, obeyed by
her servants, and admired by the
people. She is kind to the poor and
gentle to all. She is self-respecting
and dignified. Her husband and
children praise her as the source
of their happiness.
Shirley became active with the
Hillel Community Day School with-
in one week of her arrival in Mi-
ami in June, 1970. Her twin
daughters were immediately en-
rolled for the fall semester and
ire now in the fourth grade. Shir-
ley and Ren became members of i
he executive board within a year.'
-'hf has been involved in all arms '
of the school the PTA, the exec-
iti-r board. Women for Hille) and
;n I he groundwork for the new
Men's Cub.
.Mrs. Genad has been active in
'ladassah and a member for over
25 years here, and in her native
Far Rockaway where she was a
member of the Sisterhood of the
Shaaro Zed-k for 23 years.
2nd OPERATION ISRAEL9
MISSION BEING PLANNED
Due to the termendous success" of last year's Miami Op-
eration Israel Misiion. a similar trip is set for a Sept. 10 de-
parture, according to Myron Brodie, executive vice president of
the "MSmi Jewish Federation.
Visiting Vienna and Israel before returning to Miami Sept.
24. cost of the trip will be entirely lax deductible due to the
fact that it is a study mission.
Participation in the mission will constitute a minimum con-
tribution to the 1974 campaign of $1,250; the estimated cost of
the trip will be $1,400 per person.
For further information, call Shirley Coff at the Miami Jew.
ish Federation, (758-3321, ext. 205) or Bob Kerbel in Hollywood
(927-0536).

\
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
23 IYAR 7:44
5
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HIGHLANDS
NORTH CAROLINA
camp
hiqhUndeR
A residential camp for boys
and girls ages 7-1 5 in 5-4-9
week sessions, June 16-
Aug. 18. Located at 4200
feet in the heart of the Blue
Ridge Mountains,
Highlander offers a moun-
tain of fun with horseback
riding, hiking, nature crafts
and riflery. Water sports
include sailing, skiing and
canoeing.
Mr. Mario D. Pena, Pine Crest
School, 1501 N.E. 62nd St., Ft.
Lauderdale, Fla. 33308 Phone:
772-6550
Show some
interest in your
tdK refund.
**
Expecting a refund from Uncle Sam? Bravo! It's almost like found
money But don't let it slip through your fingers d
535S%^,^-awaTK^
.J^IZ^Z'T'' "^ """ "^ -* V me
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HOUYWOOO FEDERAL SAVIKGS
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JJSl.ly"?00 0*"'* WT HOUYW000 DAVIf -.. !,..
14MI,lerS|.t 140S feoeulHwy. .MM Wwli.itfon S' UOO Zfl,n IM mai uiLt*M0*u (MiMlOHILlt
^


Jenisti fkridtam nd Shofar of Hollywood
Paga 3
law Week' Speech Withdrawn By Bar
The Florida regional office of
the Anti-Defamation 'League of
B'nai B'rith succeeded in having
the Florida Bar, the governing
body for attorneys in the state,
withdraw from circulation a speech
on "The Illegality of thai Trial of
Jesus Christ." The Jewish Floridian
learned last week.
The speech, which was recom-
mended for delivery to church
audiences, was part of the promo-
tional kit for "Law Week", sent
l>y the Bar to its 64 Law Week
chairmen throughout Florida.
marked statewide May 1 to 8.
AI>L spokesmen said an exam-
ination of the speech, which is
based on the New Testament
Gospels account ot the trial and
crucifixion of Jttns, revealed its
rotential anti-Jewish impact and
its inappropriatciu'ss for distri-
bution by the Florida Bar.
Following contact with the AJDI*
Florida Bar officials memoed Law
Week chairmen. "Do not dis-
seminate or use this speech during '
Law Week."
S'
Mrs. Edward Kaplan shares an observation with Dr. and
Mrs. Joel Schneider.
Age No Barrier To Kallah
Weekend's 105 Participants
f
**t;
Despite a swimming pool without
water and the nocturnal chatter of
teen-aged girls in the group. 25
families proved that age was no
barrier to sharing an emotional
and festive retreat.
With Dr. Mervin Verbit of
Brooklyn College acting as scholar-
io-residence, the "togetherness"
weekend opened with a Friday eve-
ning service a D'Vora Torah
followed by a Saturday morning
service, a study of Jonah, and Is-
raeli singing and barefoot dancing
until 1 o'clock Sunday morning.
Three formal sessions were mod-
erated by Dr. Verbit with themes
Of the formation of the identity of
the Jewish people an historical
perspective; Jewish identity for the
individual, and implications for
Jewish identity by a community.
The two-day sojourn took place
earlier this month under the aus-
pices of the Young Leaders Coun-
cil of the Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion; its goal was the "broadening
of the base of Jewish life by an
enriching family experience."
Children from the age of three
were led in arts and crafts by
Temple Beth Shalom nursery
Jiool teachers Cheri Levinson anJ
ami Kalet. The youngsters also
[pated in many of the aduli
Ctivitles, including a discussion of
he story of Jonah and the Whale,
rhieh precipitated some interest-
ing questions from the young lis
tenors.
How does God talk to you?"
one of them asked. And. "Why did
Hie non-Jews want to save a Jew?"
sked another. A third queried,
"1I.>\\ do you know it was a whale'.'
The story hi.-", -avs 'a big fish.' "
At 2:30 Sunday morning, the last
d:i\ of the weekend, activity was
still evident i:i the first of three
r tola shared by the tcen-aged
Kirls. \ tough they had ample
hpace and beds, they chose to con-
prcgate In ons room with the re-
lull thai no ore was able to deep.
the exhausted group took
I of the !l;':t m Inn. the ho-
t staff began filling the pool.
"IVrfect timing," they all agreed.
But the consensus was one of
satisfaction; as one 12-year-old put
Rabbi Ephraim S. Kolatch of
Congregation Beth El, Long I
Beach L.I., N.Y., has been ap- j
pointed chairman cf the June
25*28 convention to be held by
the Rabbinical Council of Amer-
ica in Fallsburg, N.Y. Some 600
U.S. and Canadian spiritual
I leaders are expected to partici-
j pate in the conclave, which will
it: "There was no separation due ,, ,, ,, ,,
to age. Everyone was part of it and ; have lhe theme How the Jew"
even the older teen-agers didn't isn Family Survives in an Open
look down on the pre-teens. It
was neat!" I Society."
arnett
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I


Paige 4
+Jeni$ti fkrxftor and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, May 25, 1973
**Jewish Meridian
m,t .iu > uhauk mumm
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E. 6th Street
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE '
P.O. Box 297J. Miami. Florida
shoc
.Telephone 373-4605
' Telephone 373-4605
33101
HOCHCT
l'ublliKtr
SlTZANNK SHOCHET SELMA M. THOMPSON"
Kxwutlve Editor Assistant to PBMUjher
JOanSEEYEKS, New Coordinator
The Jewfih1^rflTciyn'boet*lWfT3forntt Ths Ksshruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published Bi-Weekly by the Jewish Floridian
Second-Class Pnstaee Pnld at Miami. Fla.
Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood Shofar Editorial
AT'VISOKY COMMITTEE Dr. Sheldon Willens. Chairman; Ross Becker-
man. Ben Sailer. Marion Nevins. Dr. Norman Atkln. Robert N. Kernel
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndi-
cate, worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association, American As-
sociation of .English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
MATTER OF FACT *"
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Reauest.
(I-ooal Area) One Year 11.00. Out of Town Upon
Volume 3
Friday, May 25, 1973
Number 14
23 IYAR 5733
A Major Step Toward Unity
The impending transfer of the headquarters of the
World Union for Progressive Judaism to Jerusalem marks
another major step for the international Reform Jewish
movement which has long since discarded its attitude to-
ward Zionism, for it is further evidence of the unity ol all
Jews in the upbuilding of Zion.
That same unity was expressed at the 73rd annual con-
vention of the Conservative movement's Rabbinical As-
sembly at the same time that keynote speakers empha-
sized that the welfare of Israel depends on viable Jewish
communities all over the world.
The head of the assembly could not resist enunciating
the hope that Conservative and Reform Jews, in the name
of that unity, would some day enjoy the same religious
freedom in Israel as is presently permitted the Moslems
and various Christian sects, a continuing problem that will
some day not too far distant require action.
Example Must Be Followed
The decision of the Metropolitan Museum of Art to go
ahead with plans for a major Israeli archaeological ex-
hibit at the end of the year is an important victory for good
sense. At one point the question was raised as to the pos-
sibility of Arab terrorists creating a problem and doubt
was expressed as to whether the famous museum would
carry through the project.
As both Mayor Teddy Kollek of Jerusalem and Mayor
John Lindsay of New York told the Metropolitan Museum
authorities, there would be no end to threats and intimida-
tion if the museum retreated from its original invitation. The
two political figures were well aware of the implications in
bowing to terror, for such fears spread to other events and
activities. The example of Israel in standing firmly against
the terrorists is one which must be followed by all nations
if we are ever to bring this condition to a close.
Jewish Authors Recognized
Outstanding works in the fields of Jewish history, the
holocaust, Jewish thought, fiction, Yiddish poetry and chil-
dren's books have been recognized with awards given by
the Jewish Book Council at its annual meeting.
This is a welcome custom for, too often, the many fine
endeavors of Jewish authors have been ignored in the
past and their books not brought to the attention of the
public. Among the men and women honored this year are
such distinguished authors as Elie Wiesel, Dr. Samuel
Sandmel, Arthur Zuckerman, Johanna Reiss, Robert Kot-
lowitz and Aaron Zeithn. In the field of Yiddish poetry,
the annual prize given this year to Meir Sticker is in
memory of Harry and Florence Kovner. who Were local
residents.
WASHINGTON, D.C. All
the weather gauges were set to
"fair" at any rate for public
consumption for Dr. Henry A.
Kissinger's Moscow vfcit. The
'".# >st&ctimJurisV a>f stal* of the
SoviPt Union, Lenoid Brezhnev,
has finally declared the "irrever-
sibility" of his policy of develop-
ing closer, more cooperative re-
lations with the United States
and the West.
But can one trust the weather
gauges? It is a problem now be-
ing heatedly argued on the high-
est levels of the U.S. govern-
ment. Recently, the problem was
vividly posed by the elevation of
the tough, brilliantly able Soviet
minister of defense, Marshal An-
drei Grechko, to full member-
ship in the ruling Soviet Polit-
buro.
THIS HAS produced a Soviet-
ological debate comparable to
the medieval theologians' dis-
putes about how many angels
could dance on a pinhead. This
is only natural, since Grechko's
new, purely political position has
made nonsense, once and for all,
of the common Soviet analysts'
belief that the Soviet armed
forces have "no political role."
Long ago, this belief became
highly dubious. First, Marshal
Grechko was able to rar.i through
his own appointment as defense
minister with the support of the
other Soviet military leaders, but
against the wishes of a majority
of the Soviet Politburo of that
period. Then it became apparent
that Grechko was the closest ally
of Leonid Brezhnev, and that
he was also able to sive Brezh-
nev most valuable support when-
ever the going got rough.
LET US suppose that Gen.
Curtis LeMay had been able to
force his own appointment
as secretary of defense. Let us
suppose, further. Secretary of
Defense LeMay further emerged
as the initial partner of the
President. Should we not then
say the U.S. armed forces had
enormous power in U.S. politics?
The question answers itself:
and it is therefore the wrong
question to ask. The real ques-
tion is whether the ideas of
Grechko and Brezhnev are a So-
viet version of the ideas attrib-
uted to Gen. LeMay. Or are
these men's true ideas those ex-
pressed by Brezhnev the other
day, very much for public con-
sumption?
HERE, THE right answer is
surely to be found in the wise,
unanimous warnings of the three
founders of serious Soviet analy-
sis in the U.S. government.
Charles E. Bohlen, George F.
Kennan and the late Llewellyn
Thompson.
All three used to say, over
and over again, that you could
never understand the Soviets un-
less you also understood that
Moscow invariably pursued two
simultaneous but different poli-
cies. These policies always
seemed totally contradictory to
the simple Western mind. Boh-
len, Kennan and Thompson
would add, yet both were valid
policies.
THAT IS plainly the position
today One policy is symbolized
by Dr. Kissinger in Moscow pre-
paring Leonid Brezhnev's visit
to this country. It was expressed
in the huge Soviet wheat pur-
chases in the United States a
matter of dire necessity. This
policy's ultimate aim is whole-
sale importation of the Western
technology by the Soviets
again a matter of dire necessity
on the civilian side of the Soviet
economy.
The contradictory Soviet pol-
icy is equally tangible and visi-
ble, however. It shows and
has shown for a long time in
the continuous, massive Soviet
military buildup along China's
northern frontier. It endangers
U.S. interests quite directly in
the Persian Gulf. Here the So-
viets are building a naval base
which will be like a knife to
Continued on l*ag 9-
. .....
As*,
1
Max tr
Sees It
LOS ANGELES, Calif. No wonder Broadway theater,
poor devil, is dying of playwright anemia. How could it possibly
compete with the gaudier, bloodier and more rambunctious po-
litical theater playing to full houses out of Washington and, in
consequence, in Los Angeles at the Daniel Ellsberg trial, which
has become "tainted" with Watergate.
Consider the cast of characters. The President's former dose
adviser and attorney general. His two White House chiefs of
staff Not since Hamlets Rosencrantz and Guildenstern has a
rair of twins with Teutonic names achieved such fame as hapless
satellites to a prince. His former White House counsel and per-
sonal counsel. A number of campaign staff, including former
secretary of commerce. A quintet of field operators, caught red-
handed and convicted. A still untotaled number of assorted mar-
ginals whose tribe is bound to increase as the hounds of justice
follow the spoor.
Add the witnesses called for testimony or depositions, includ-
ing one of the authentic originals of our time: the wife of the
former attorney general. Add the chief defendant in the Penta-
gon Papers trial, an.d his psychiatrist whose files were rifled.
And, of course, for whatever role he played, the President him-
self.
This is political theater, never doubt it, since it involves
characters, plots, subplots, coverup, discovery, unfolding, sus-
pense, tension. All the ingredients are there.
But what kind of political theater is it? Not Bertolt Brecht
or Peter Weiss, since it doesn't involve class struggle and the
proletariat. I wish some American playwright would take it on,
but who could do it? Philip Roth and Gore Vidal, who have done
some sorties into the Nixon follies, would make a caricature of
it, which would be a disaster since it is already close to a cari-
cature of itself.
Should it be played for realism or suspense, tragedy or
farce? Not realism, since it is surrealist. Not suspense, since we
will, in time, know pretty much what happened, but not the tru?
motives not a whodunit but a whydunit. It is too farcical to be
all tragedy, especially the antics of the "plumbers" and the FBI,
which come right out of the Keystone cops-and-robbers slap-
stick. And it is too tragic to be all caper and farce.
? BASICALLY IT BELONGS with the ironic political vision of
Albert Camus or Friedrich Durrenmatt, written with a sense of dis
tance from its action and characters, and with the kind of feel
Camus had for the absurd moral contradictions of power and his-
tory. If I were a playwright. I would set it not in America today
but in a distant country and place, with a counterpoint ef knaves
and fools, and with an almost tragic prince, at once betrayed and
himself tainted.
For whether there is blame or responsibility he must bear,
guilt or not, the central character is Richard Nixon. It is he who
gives the whole play its tragic quality. The action is not by him
but about him. There is little of the tragic, only the bathetic, in
the assorted characters who planned and plotted and tried to
cover up. The Greek tragedies involved a man in high place and
power, aiming at a grand goal but using means which set him
in conflict with the laws of the gods and the traditions of the
society, and brought him down. Of all who hold the stage, Richard
Nixon alone conies close to this definition.
? & TO SEE HOW MUCH of a fall there will be, we must await
the further unfoldings. But who can deny the tragic quality thus
far? The flawed, contradictory personality is there, and so is the
srand slam (as witness the summaries in the State of the Union
draft on foreign policy), but also the tawdry climate around him
which polluted the grand design.
The starkly inevitable ravages to the structure of presiden-
tial policy and power are also there. Item: the Japanese nonvisit,
Item: the "year of Europe" stillborn. Item: Mr. Nixon having to
meet Georges Pompidou neither in Paris nor Washington but in
Iceland, a fitting locus for an "ice age." Item: Mr. Nixon having
to woo Congress, blow compliments to the press, bespeak a coming
era of liberal and compassionate action in domestic policy which
seems alien to him.
Most people don't take all this as a big deal of tragic pro-
portions. The straw polls show them skeptical and even cynical
A big chunk of them feel that Mr. Nixon was involved at the
least with the coverup.
But they don't see the whole Watergate business as notably
novel. Phones have been tapped before, they say. The files of
doctors and psychiatrists have been rifled before, including John
Kennedy's medical dossier and Mr. Nixon's own. This administra-
tion is corrupt (they add) no more so than past ones.
There is an earthly quality to this which deflates moral pre-
tensions on whatever side. There is enough truth in it to make us
wary of a kind of high moralistic overkill that is setting in on
Watergate. But don't push the deflation too far. That "compas-
sion" Henry Kissinger invoked may or may not be in order, but
reserve some of it for our poor country and the plight of all of
us not just the sinners or angels but the ordinary earthly
creatures.


Friday. May 25, 1973
+ 3<>*ist fkrHiir nf Shof.r of Hollywood
Page 5
iiM>milIMII iiawm
I! 1:11.1'llll,

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>-^ r o m. eMflM WrMtar,
' iPMMPmMrt MMmIm # iriiftr MfrvMf -
Have you ever been to a racetrack and after the race was over
said to yourself"I put my money on the wrong horse?- I am sure
you have. I am sure, too, that many of us have thought that if we had
our lives to live over again we might have done some things differ-
ently. Then there arc those incidents where whole buildings seem to
collapse in the middle of the construction phase because the founda-
tions just were not strong enough to hold the entire structure. Well, I
am beginning to think that when it comes to Jewish living and Jewish
life in America, that possibly the priorities have changedand yet,
we are still doing business as usual.
For many generations the hierarchy of the Catholic church has
stated that if they have a child until the age of 12 this is insurance
that the product will be "a good Catholic." Recently the Catholic
church realized that this emphasis was not in fact germane to positive
results. They are now stating that a child who is educated in Catholic
high schools and collages has greater potential for the continuation of
Catholicism than the elementary school child who does not continue
m his Catholic education.
The emphasis on Jewish education has been from the ages of
t.even to 13, and the Bar Mits vah. in many cases, indicates to the par-
ents and to the child the graduation certificate.
Ao. analogy I would like to draw is that we send a child to religious
school for a maximum of six hours per week 40 weeks a year for
an average of five years roughly a total of 1,200 hours of religious
education for the average American Jewish child. A child goes to
public school approximately 1,000 hours per year. In public school he
is given courses in learning how to read, write, spell, in history, geog-
raphy, holidays, science and mathematics. Only the last two are not
taught, in religious schools. We learn a new language Hebrew
how to read and write it both in script and print: we learn transla-
tion, conversation, a 4.500 year history of the Jewish people, the
philosophies of our people, traditions etc., and yet, we think that this
can be done in a program which is probably the equivalent of the
second grade level in the public school system. Even if we stretch
our imaginations and state that religious school education is equiva-
lent to public elementary school, could we, as parents, feel that our
children are educated enough after elementary school?
A few weeks ago 25 families, totaling 105 individuals, ranging in
age from 18 months to 17 years for the children and averaging in
the 40s for adults spent a weekend together in Judaism sponsored
by the Young Leaders Council. Elsewhere in this paper the program is
described but what seemed most important was the wish for greater
knowledge about themselves and Judaism that most of the participants
had, and their expressed desire for more after the weekend ended.
Should the emphasis on Jewish education in its true sense, with
its various philosophies, be geared more toward our teen-age and
young adult groups? There has been a number of proposals to change
"he Bar Mitzvah age to 15 or 16. Possibly our zeal for teaching Judaism
has clouded the concept that there are certain things a child cannot
^,a trasp that an adult can, and that we should gear ourselves for teach-
ing adult concepts to adults.
I think pedagogues agree that language skills can easily be taught
1o the very young, but that philosophy and history should be geared
from the high school age and beyond. There is no question in my mind
that many of our temples are aware of this problem and are doing
something about it.
Programs such as Shabbatom and study weekends for our teen-
agers, Jewish camping experiences, trips to Israel and confirmation
classes are steps in the right direction. However, if we look at the
number of children involved in these programs compared with the
total number of children in the community, we see that as successful
as these programs may be, they are reaching only a few. If we search
for programs for young adults and couples we find some excellent
,_*-ones, but again, how many do they reach?
As I see it, the development of a future generation of committed
and knowledgeable Jews will take the effort of all of us and the edu-"
cation of our adolescents and young adults. We have put much of our
money on one race horse shouldn't there be a reevaluation of
priorities?
e1
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Page 6
+Jemsti HcrktkUl ", *">*' of Hollywood
Friday, May 25. \"\\
Temples To Confirm
Young Congregants
On the eve of Shavuoth the fol-
lowing 'tudents will be confirmed
at Temple Sinai:
David, son of Mr. and Mrs. Al-
bert Apseloff: Mark, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Kail Brotman; Robin,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David
Chaykin: Elliott, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Foster; Lynn, daugh-
ter of Mrs. Irma and Sheldon Hoff-
man; Leslie, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Mort Kushner; Lauren, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Lynn Luxenberg;
Susan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Barry Miner: Mark, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Bernard Reesr: Ben. son of
Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon Shaffer:
Nina, dnueht?r of Dr. and Mrs.
Wallace Siff; Jeffrey, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Jaul Smith: Jodi. daugh-
ter of Dr. and Mrs. Sender Stolove;
Harold, son of Mr. and Mrs. Melvin
Waldorf: Susan, daughter of Mrs.
Bottie and Joel Tanur.
Temple Beth Shalom's confirma-
tions will take place Sunday; San-
dra, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Harold Polis; Robin, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Gersld Bardasch:
Jaime, son of Mr. and Mrs. Manuel
Gavmizo; Gary, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Stanley Margolis; Paul, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kerbel;
Dcbra, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Jerome Friedman; Lexa, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Roseau.
and Nancy, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Jack Richman.
Friday, June 1. will he confir-
ii ion day at Temple Israel. Con-
firmands are Barry, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Morton Cohen: Steve, san
of Mr. and Mrs. Alan Horowitz;
Pcnni, daughter of Mrs. Estellt
Janos; Harvev, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Norman Mendelson; Steve,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Pow-
ell; Mona. daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Perry Segal; Lee, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Jerry Scligman; Wendy,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Myron
Shupler, and Liz, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Meyer Waldman.
Temple Beth El's confirmands
will be Stephen G. Blank, Robbie
Burnstine. Ross E. Dickstein, Mi-
chel S. Ecker. Susan B. Efros, Su-
san L. Eggnatz, Karen A. Fire-
stone, Janice M. Freedman. Joan
M. Freedman, Barbara A. Fried-
man. Robert A. Garron, Cathy L.
Gordon. Sharon J. Kronish, Steven
J. Levy, Amy S. Litman, Julie L.
Marks, Laura A. May, Harold L.
Mazzarino, Debra Roth, Myra L.
Schwartz. Patricia L. Shafran, Seth
M. Shapero, Warren M. Sturman.
Michele L. Weiss and Joanne
Wormser. Confirmation services
will be held June 5.
TRANSPORT Minister Shi-
mon Peres thinks th:it a federal
solution Is the most workable
approach- t>> the problems of
Jew and Arab !> the Middle
East, The federation would have
two-thirds JewB and one-third
Arabs, living; In complete equal-
ity hut with separate autonomy
for the Arabs over many areas
rooe-ininir their Internal affairs.
ISRAEL'S 850 architects have
broken away from the Engineers
and Archilrcts Association, and i
Termed their own union because :
they felt the association dis-
regarded their r.eeds. The new
group hell its foundation con-
vention March 6th
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Friday, May 25, 1973
*Jm>lsfl JftrrldffrUn nd Shofar of Hollywood
Page 7
InQkf |# The Jewish Aqehcy.with
*"^** Funds provided by uj A,
maintains a large and professionally
Staffed Social Services Oepartrnent
prd/iding/a" broad variety of personal
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new immigrants in isrqel.

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t.
Emanuel Berlatsky, who is re-
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I at a gala event Saturday night,
j in Philadelphia, Pa. A
veteran social worker, Mr. Ber-
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the National Jewish Welfare
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Holland America's s.s.Volendam and s.s.Veendam present:
8
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cruise
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2. You'll stroll a brand new multi-million
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cpacious. 90% face the sea.
o. Each ship is a full 22,000 tons, yet the

tflllAGAtCIA
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v S;
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c
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capacity is 550. hundreds fewer than ships
of comparable size.
6. You'll have the nicest crew in cruising
at your beck and call, and no gratuities
required.
7. Yet for all their qualities, the ships are
priced at less than you'd expect.
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America Such great meccas as Morocco,
Monte Carlo; ancient islands like Delos;
discovery ports ."ike Costa Blanca, La
Coruna.
out imto
WrEO-Ofj* tOllR

" CAOi
Western European August 10. s.s. Veendam from
New Yoik. 36 days. 20 ports including Madeira.
Casablanca. Gibraltar. Syracuse. Naples. Lisbon.
Le Havie. Torquay. From $1680 to $5680
ONT.OUCAD
Western Mediteiranoan August 31, s.s. Volendam
from New York. 35 days. 23 ports including Cadiz,
Malta. Genoa. Cannes. Monte Carlo. E jrcelona,
Casablanca. From $1610 to i5450
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Fall Mediterranean October 6. s.s. Volendam from
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Page 8
+Jew1st) IkirkMan nd Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, May 25, 1973
Day Schools Receive 25%
Of Education Allocation
Growing recognition of day
whDob as a key component in the
overall area of Jewish education is
reflected in a report issued by the
Council of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds (CJF). showing a
23 per cent increase in Federation
allocation* to dav schools during
the 1970-72 period.
The report further reveals that
day schools received more than a
quarter of total Federation allo
cations to Jewish education in 1971-
1972.
Based on data provided by the
American Association for Jewish
Education, the report covers 36
Federations almost half of the
Federations in the United States
and Canada which provide funds
to day schools and encompasses
large communities with Jewish
populations of more than 40.000,
larje intermediate communities
with 15,000 to 39,999 Jewish popu-
lations, and intermediate sized com-
munities with less than 15,000 Jew-
ish population.
For the 10 large cities covered
Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, De-
troit, Essex County, N.J., Los An-
geles, Miami, Philadelphia, St.
Louis and San Francisco Fed-
eration support of day schools in-
creased 22 per cent during the sur-
vey period, rising from Sl.lfl.000
i to $1,345,000.
The 10 largo intermediate com-
| munities Atlanta, Buffalo. Cin-
cinnati. Dallas. Hartford, Milwau-
kee, New Haven, Northern N.J.,
Providence and Rochester reg-
istered a 26 per cent increase,
from a total of $321,000 in alloca
tions to day schools in 1970 to
$403,000 in 1972.
A similar trend was evidenced
in the survey of 16 intermediate
cities: Bridgeport, Columbus. New
^-unswick. N.J.. Norfolk, Passaic
Phoenix, Portland, Richmond, San
Diego, Scranton, "Seattle, Spring-
field, Stamford, Toledo, Trenton
and Worcester. According to the
report. Federation allocations to
day schools for this group in-
creased C4 per cent, from $224,000
to $277,000.
In relation to the overall picture
of Jewish education, the CJF re-
port shows that during the 1971-72
span, day schools received some 26
oer cent of the total Federation al
location for Jewish education. The
largest percentage share by the 16
'intermediate size communities, av-
?raged 42 per cent and was fol-
lowed closely by t 41 per cent
average for the 10 large intermedi-
ate communities. The 10 largest
communities' allocations for day
chools accounted for 22" per cent
if their Jewish education funding.
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The repett 'fllilM*!
day school enrollment rose in each
jf the three community groups, for
an average increase of 8.7 per cent.
The largest increase was in the
large cities, up 11.4 per cent. (In
New York City, which accounts for
two-thirds of all Jewish students
attending day schools, enrollment
dropped 1.4 per cent during 1971-
72). Day school costs per pupil dur-
ing 1971-72, according to the CJF
survey, were lowest in the large
communities, averaging $971, and
highest in the intermediate sized
communities, averaging SI.213.
The average cost per pupil in the
large intermediate city group was
$1,051.
The CJF is the association of cen
tral community organizations
Federations, welfare funds, com-
munity Councils serving 800
Jewish communities in the United
States and Canada. It aids these
communities to mobilize maximum
support for the UJA and other
overseas agencies, as well as for
major national and local services
involving financing, planning and
operating health, welfare, cultural
educational, community relations,
and other programs benefitting all
residents.
We arc interested in PURCHASING
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Friday, May 25, 1973
* lewM fkrirftrtr *nd Shofar of Hollywood
Page 9
Mayor David Keating (right) presents a "Certificate for Com-
munity Service" to Walter Gray, phc'.ogiapher for the Holly-
wood Jewish Flcridian and Shofar. The award wa at a dinner meeting of the Kiwanis Club recently.
Temple Sole! Senior Youth Group Installation Held
Temple Solel Senior Youth vick is chairman of the group,
group recently held its installation Newly elected officers include
at a dinner meeting at Escom I Jeff Bauman, president; Lori Beck,
Country Club. Sisterhood board vice president; Sue Meinstein, sec-
member-at large Mrs. David No- retary; Steve Calef, treasurer:
Frankie Wildhorn, historian; Wen-
dy De Leon, program chairman;
Maidi Rosenblat, social chairman;
Mark Bernstein. fund-raising;
Wendy Berk, worship; Barbara
Gelfand, membership, and Lila
Greenberg, telephone.
*4L
\
op
Continued From Page 4-A
our vulnerable oil jugular run-
ning through the gulf.
THIS SAME policy has led to
a massrve Soviet effort to
achieve naval predominance in
he Indian Ocean, to control the
entrance' of the Persian Gulf.
The test list of Soviet actions
as every Tatt as factual, every bit
in undeniable and every bit
as important, too as the first
list of SoViet actions given above.
MfcROFUlXY, Dr. Kissinger
vis well a*are the- i>atential
meaning of the second list, even
if most of bis countrymen appear
so be under the permanent in-
fluence of heavy tranquiliiers.
One of Kissinger's aims in Mos-
cow is to discover which of the
two contradictory Soviet policies
to watch more carefully.
His Moscow visit will help Kis-
singer to form a judgment. Be-
ing Kissinger, he will probably
form an exceptionally shrewd
judgment.
THE REAL trouble today,
however, is that Kissinger and
the President he serves may be
unable to take the actions their
judgment may indicate are neces-
sary.
For neither diplomacy nor
money crediK neither smiles
nor hopes, will influence the
final Soviet choice between the
two contradictory policies.
The only final influence will
be the Soviet estimate of the
Tisk of the tougher policy, which
jan also be the more profitable
policy if risk-free. Yet we in the
United States are currently do-
ling all we can to make the risk
aeem less and less.
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Faae 10
+Je*isi> norldHan nd shof'r of Hollywood
Friday, May 25, 1973
Signs & Portents
On first reading, I. A. Docbin'l remarks at a recent Kmerald
* ili!ls Country <".',:! dinner might em shocking "I was asked
1. one man," he.said, "whether I.ihavs'ovor thought'nf trwrond
home iii case smytiiing ha pened in America as in Germany or
RUHia. My answer was that this is in the bark of my mind
constantly ."
On second thouqht, however, Mr. Durbin was sounding an
alarm which should be registering loud and clear in every Jew-
ish mind in the United States.
Item: "Arnold Strippel. a former SS non-commissioned of-
ficer and chief guard at Buchenwald concentration camp, has
been paid 150.000 marks compensation for 14 years' 'unjustified
imprisonment' on war crimes charges after World War II.
"Strippel was sentenced in Frankfurt in 1949 to hard labor
for life (allowing for release after 20 years) on charges of co-
responsibility for the murder of 21 Jewish prisoners in Buchen-
wald quarry in 1939.
'In 1969 he was freed by a local court, which confirmed
the submission of his counsel that the evidence of a former
witness was unreliable ." tas reported by JCNS in the Phila-
delphia Jewish Exponent).
Item: "The Montreal Urban Council has started use of the
Utter \J' on tax bills sent to Jewish taxpayers. The action fol-
lowed abolition la-t January of separate tax lists for Jews,
Catholics and Protestants.
'Montreal area Jews said the J on their lax forms reminded
them of the J which Nazis forced Jewiah victims to wear in
Europe'' tas repoitrd in the Haxrisburg Community Review).
Item: "The International Telephone and Telegraph (ITT)
corporation maintained close tie? with leaders of Nad Germany
from 1933 unl.l the end of the war in 1915. a cording to Anthony
Sampson, author of a forthcoming book. "Tlii- Sovereign state of
ITT." to be published by Stein and Day. His charge is based on a
study of U.S. government records in the national archives that
have been ignored until recently.
"The protagonist in Sampson's book is the late Sosthenes
Behn who founded ITT in 1920. Citing a news item that ap-
peared in the New York Times Aug. 4, 1933, he reports that
Adolf Hitler received a delegition of American businessmen
which included Behn and his representative to Germany, Henry
Mann "The meeting was the. beginning of a very' special rela-
tionship between the ITT and the Third Reich," Sampson notes.
"Behn obtained the names of 'reliable men acceptable to the
Nazis who could join the board of ITTs German companies,'
Sampson continues.
"Sampson also writes that after the United States entered
the war, the Swiss ITT factory 'continued to collaborate fully
with the Nazis at a time when its Swiss-owned rival, Halser,
refused to make equipment for Germans'
"Desipite its connections with the Nazi regime, ITT later
presented itself as a 'victim of World War II,' Sampson writes,
and in 1967 managed to get $27 million 'in compensation from
the American government for war damages to its factories in
Germany. This sum included $5 million for damages to its Focke-
Wulf plants on the basis that 'they were American properties
bombed by Allied bombers.' According to Sampson, the ITT
buried its history in a mountain of public relations.'" (as re-
ported by the JTA in The Southern Jewish Weekly).
What these seemingly unrelated and disparate stories have
in common is "climate." We are living in a world climate of. in
some cases, subtle apartheid in others, overt acts of official
forgiveness for the most ghastly acts of horror ever committed.
And we in the United States also live in a society that currently
gives corporate structure number one priority in the name of
free enterprise whirh. as we all know, ranks with motherhood
and blueberry pie in the American hierarchy.
This being the case, can repudiation of Israel (and thus in-
evitably all things Judaic) be far behind? Can a government
committed to the fostering of big business interests withstand
the pressure of those corporations to cement the tenuous ties
with Arab nations supplying approximately 62 per cent of the
world's oil? Those corporations have apparently never let little
things such as honor, loyalty, ideology or humanity stand in the
way of larger profits and bigger dividends for their stockholders.
As Nathan Barnett, executive director of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Delaware, puts it in Th? Jewish Voice: ". the oil
idngdoms are beginning to point ou> directly to the United
States that pro-Israel policies must change. As reported in 1he
New York Times, Saudi Arabia's minister of petroleum has told
Secretary of State William Rogers that his country would find
it difficult to increase oil productivity if the United States did
not help to bring a political settlement in the Middle East that
is satisfactory to the Arab states."
The Arabs' witting or unwitting allies will most certainly
be the American petroleum industry which is interested only in
obtaining crude oil for its refineries no questions asked.
Yes. Mr. Durbin, this nation may. indeed not be as hospit-
able as we have taken for granted. It i I not inconceivable that
the yellow armbands will have to be laundered and refurbished
It is not the voice of the turtle that is being heard throughout
the land.
tr & -ir
A note of farewell to Helen Rohloff, an ab?e reporter and
good friend of long standing who is leaving the Sun-Tattler for
an instructorship in journalism at the University of Florida. We
won't say "thirty," Helen, only "Godspeed."
9
-
The Aruba Caribbean's Cactus Nesdle
Snack Bar where Byam, the hctel's expsrt
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Friday. May 25, 1973
*J(i<>t fieriJinun nd Shofar of Hollywood
Page 11
JFS officers for 1973-74: James Fox Miller, vice president;
Dr. Sheldon Willens, president; Emanuel doien^i.ji. ueuj-
urer, and Mrs. Richard Temlak, secretary.
JFS Broadens Scope
Of Governing Board
i
Continued from Pagas l-
cordins to Shell,, n Willens. rros- j
ident.
"The requests for assistance i
to the aged," Miss E ther Lawon- j
thai, executive director of JFS
stated, "have doubled since 1972. ,
Most cases involve illness and
Ihe prohibitive costs of medi-
cal care for those people living
on a fixed and nnrginal incom?.
And there are increasing mari-
tal problems among the older
people who < l isolated from
or by their adult children.
"Among young people." she
continued, "our caseload has
b;en exactly reversed. Where
previously the largest percent-
age was bays, we now find that
the preponderance is gilte."
"Our totjI family caseload has
also increased due. no doubt, to
a severe breakdown of family
relationships in the past few
years."
A rccan'tulation of 1972 73
acccmpll hments of JFS includ-
ed a re\i-ion of the organiza-
tion's by laws, a revision of per-
sonnel practices, and a review
of programs, services, and the
unmet needs of the community.
/ V
TENNIS
BALLS
1S9 ANDUP
STRINGING $8.00 IMPERIAL NYLON
______________$18.01. V.S. GUT__________
| YEAR ROUND 1 PAY SERVlcF]
LADIES OUTFITS o
AS LOW AS lsfc*J*J
COLLECTION OF
LA CONFESS* DECASTIGUONE
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Malavsky Children
Receive Diplomas
Within weeks two daughters and
l son-in-taw of Temple Befh Sha-
em's Rabbi 3iid Mrs. Morton Ma-
avsky are being graduated from
M.S. colleges.
Last Sunday marked the gradua-
ion of Judith Malavsky from Bos-
on University with a bachelor's i
degree in English. Judy, a gradu-1
ate of the Hebrew Academy and
Soutfl Broward High School, also j
ttended the Hebrew College in |
ioston and is on the faculty of
)habei Shalom, Brookline. Mass.
"he was president of the Hebrew
\cadcmy and served as regional
ecretary of United Synagogue
forth.
In the fall Judith will enter the
icv.- England Conservatory of Mu-
ic where she will work towards
tor master's degree in music.
Sunday. June 3. Gladys Malavsky
\zulay will receive her master's
Icgree in education from the Uni-
ersity of Alibama in Birmingham,
"he was a student at the Univor.
ity of Miami, and received her
tachelov's degree from Alabama
-.- a mathematics major, she also
erves on the faculty of Temple
teth El. Birmingham.
Saturday. Yehuda A/.ulay.
ladya' hu-band. wi',' receive his
legree as doctor of Jurisprudence
\s a graduate of Stanford Law
School, Birmingham, Ala. A li-;
Tensed Hebrew instructor serving
m the faculty of Temple Beth El
n Birmingham, he will be taking
lie DOT exam in July and hopes tD
vactice in Florida.
Nursery School Director Named
By Temple Sinai of North Dade
Mrs. Henry Zadan. known for!
many years as "Miss Trudy." has
been named director of the Tcr.iple
Sinai of North Dade nursery
school.
Mrs. Zadan has a B.A. degree in
dtication from the University of
Pittsburgh, a certificate in Early
Childhood Education from Miami-
Dade Junior College, and holds
certification by the Central Agency
for Jewish Education.
A charter member of the Conn
<-il of Congregational Jewish Pre
School Teachers in South Florida,
. her background includes 12 years
as a nursery school teacher and di
| rector at the Flagler Granada
j Jewish Center, and five years as
I the founding director of Beth
, David's nursery school in Soutiv
| west Miami.
Temple Sinai's nursery school
will open its doors at the same
time as its new religious schoo1
building opens in the fall.
The nursery school, located on
the temrle grounds in a wooded
area wher? peacocks and squirrel;
roam freely, will be named "Gar,
YelaJ.m" a Garden for ChiJ.
dren.

.
HELP!
The Jewish Floridian and
Shofar is seeking two indi-
viduals to report on the go-
ings on of the beach com-
munity and the mainland
community. If you would
like to write a bi-monthly
column detailing the social
scene, please contact Bob
Kerbol of the Jewish Wel-
fare Federation.
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land America Cruises


Page 12
.
* legist fhr/dfiar and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, May 25. 1973
Ka-Dee-Mah's Ranks Swell
.

With the summer camp set for
a June 25 opening, director George
Kirn announces that only a few
openings in the 3- and 4-year-old
nre-school program remain.
Demand for the teen-age pro-
.ram was so great that the camp
dded a new section; that group,
lowever, has now been totally
subscribed.
For the first time since the
camp's inception, tee shirts with
the Ka-Dee-Mah imprint will be
soil They will be available at
th? parents' meeting which will
be held on the following schedule:
pre-schoolers, June 18; juniors
and seniors, June 19; teen camp-
ers, June 20. All meetings will take place at Temple Beth El at
8 p.m.
-I
TEEN SCENE by Paul Kerbel
The Youth Council is now getting ready to present its first
annual awards and installation dinner. It will be held at Temple
Beth Shalom, 4601 Arthur St., Sunday, June 10. at 7 pjn.
I am serving as chairman of the program along with my
cochairman, Steve Weinstein, who is responsible for the award
presentations. The people on our committee are Scott Snyder,
Steve Brodie and Kathy Newman; our advisors are Mark Fried
and Elaine Pittell.
There will be a nominal charge to defray the cost of dinner,
etc. Reservations must be made with Steve or me before May
31. Everyone is cordially invited.
The slate of officers of the Youth Council has changed
slightly since my last column; here is how it permanently stands:
Scott Snyder, president; Paul Kerbel, first vice president (pro-
gram); Jodi Stolove, second vice president (membership); Steve
Weinstein, third vice president (publicity); Lee Seligman,
fourth vice president (fund-raising) and Kathy Newman, execu-
tive secretary.
Our fund-raising committee, headed by Lee Seligman of
Young Judea, raised S8.000 in a phone-a-thon for the UJA/JWF
campaign two weeks ago.
Remember, if you have interesting news about your friends,
organizations or synagogues, please contact me through the
Jewish Welfare Federation.
Shalom!

MY AUNT TILLIES
BEAUTY PARLOR
"A YESTERDAY'S PLACE WITH TOMORROW'S IDEAS"
Formerly "Village Coiffures"
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
MR. ALAN AND MISS DIANA
Also Relocated: Miss Marcia
1295 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
(In Back of Dinty Moore's)
Phone 923-1094
Beth Shalom Rabbi
To Be Tour Host
Dr. Morton Malavsky, spiritual
leader of Temple Beth Shalom, will
be tour host for -a summer tour to
Europe and Israel.
The group traveling with the
rabbi will leave July 28 from Mi-
ami and will spend four days in
Switzerland. On July 3 they will
depart for Israel where they will
visit the major tourist attractions.
In addition, special meetings
have been arranged with officials
and prominent dignitaries. They
will also spend a night at Kibbutz
Kfar Giladi.
On July 11 they will leave for
Madrid. While in Spain they will
also visit Granada, Torremolinos,
Seville, Valdepenas, and will re-
turn to Miami July 19.
For further information, call
Temple Beth Shalom.
Girl Scout Troop
Hosts Family Night
Girl Scout Troop 66 held its
family night program thij week at
Temple Beth El. Included was a
flag ceremony, skits of various as-
pects of the year's activities, dem-
onstrations of dances, badge pres-
entations, and a rededication cere-
mony.
Jill Bumstine and Wendy Rog-
ler, sixth-graders who are leaving
the troop, received special gifts.
Troop officers are Sharon Al-
kow, scribe; Marjorie Levy, treas-
urer; Susan Weinstein, historian,
and Jill Burnstine, Allison Olivieri
and Wendy Rosier, patrol leaders.
Adult leaders of the troop are
Mrs. Harvey Alkow, Mrs. Kenneth
Stibbler, Mrs. Robert Pittell, and
Mrs. Philip Weinstein, Jr.
Hollywood Hills
Photography
4512 Hollywood Blvd.
983-1200
Closed Mondays
DON T LET >yoOR MAIL END
UP IN THE DEAD LETTER
OFFICE. MAKE SORE
YOUR ADDRESSES ARE
written CLEARLY AND
THAT THEY ARE COMPLETE
THt 7
TRAVELERS
u
Ansel Insurance Agency^|
Ansel Wittenstein *
All Forms of Insurance
Including
Homeowners Automobile Jewelry
2430 Hollywood Boulevard Hollywood
9239518 9453527
FIREMAN'S
FUND
AMERICAN
If.iVMxei cor w;
French, Saudis Meet in Paris
To Discuss Oil, Jet Fighters
PARIS (JTA) The Middle
East situation and oil supplies to
France and other Western Euro-
pean countries were discussed
this week by President Georges
Pompidou and King Faisal, of
Saudi Arabia, official circles dis-
closed here.
The Arabian monarch arrived at
Orly Airport aboard his personal
plane and was greeted by the
French President. He paid tribute
to Pompidou "and the French
nation for their attitude toward
their Arab friends and their help
in ridding the Arabs of oppres-
sion."
President Pompidou, who later
greeted the King at the Elysee
Palace, praised "the dignity and
moderation he exercised in his |
quest for a solution of the Middle
Kasl problem." Informed sources |
! said the two leaders would discuss
the sale by France of Mirage Jets,
helicopters and anti-aircraft mis-
siles to the oil-rich Arab kingdom.
The sources said Fiance hopes
to sell Saudi-Arabia 20 to 30
Mirage fighters and an undis-
closed number of helicopters and
ground-to-air missiles.
Saudi Arabia is beefing up its
armed forces as a result of tension '
with IranIt has recently pur-
chased 50 American Northrop F-5E
fighter bombers, 48 British Light-
nings and an undisclosed number
of Strikemasters.
France and Britain are currently
competing for additional arms
contracts from Saudi Arabia.
MOTOROLA
Quasar.
COLOR
Portable TV
ConsoleTV
SALES
AND
SERVICE
APPLIANCE ClTYl
OF MOLLYWOOO MALL INC
981-1300
*.
arnett
anK
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of Hollywood
n
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
FULL TIME SEAMSTRESS, SHIRTS, ALTERATIONS
REPAIR WORK ALL DONE ON PREMISES
One hour
"mmmiziiis:
TNI MOST IN DRY CLEANINO
ACROSS FROM BROWARD HIGH SCHOOL
1910N. FEDERALHWY. 923-1133 HOLLYWOOD, FLA.
Sheffield
CONVALARIUM &
THERAPY CENTER
24 HOUR REGISTERED NURSING CARE
MODERN CENTRALLY LOCATED
SPACIOUS 4% ACRE GROUNDS
STAY FOR ANY LENGTH OF TIME
REGISTERED THERAPY PERSONNEL
IN PATIENT OUT PATIENT
COMPLETE REHABILITATION PROGRAMS
PHONE 563-5711
JEAN SAD0W. Administrator
2675 NORTH ANDREWS AVE.
FORT LAUDERDALE. FLA.
A Quality Subsidiary Of American Medical Affiliates, Inc.
Heritage House, 2201 NE 170th Street, North Miami Beach
Bob Asqutth 945-1401
*-
I


Friday. May 25. 1973
-JewtsHhrkBai) nd Shof.r of Hollywood
Page 13
Profile
Turkish Delight
On Taylor Street
Towards the end of the 15th
entury, at a time when the Inqui-
ition had reached its apex (or

\
^\
k/7
CJF Reports On Aid To Jewish
Victims Of Hurricane Agnes
mi*Ai mtNSTtiN
nadir, if you will), western Euro-
pean Jews were forced once again
to search for sanctuary to escape
She oppression that had become as
iuch a part of their tradition as
ie menorah.
They had been offered a choice
f swift conversion to Christianity
or swift exodus from countries
ch as France, Belgium and Spain,
nd from that last-named country
'fled the ancestors of Meral Nassi.
The new land they chose was
^Turkey at a time when the Otto-
- man Empire was at the height of
its power and influence, and secure
j* enough to have an open-door policy
for all comers.
Meral's great grandfather be-
ame Grand Rabbi of Turkey, and
er family continued to flourish
ntil World War II brought such
"Sweeping changes in the official
^Turkish attitude towards Jews that
-even today she is reluctant to
speak of it.
But her other recollections of
i growing up in the exotic capital
of. Istanbul are happy ones. Sur-
rounded by an adoring family and
a contingent of obedient servants
whose job it was to anticipate
every whim and convert it into
- instant action, Meral had a story-
book life.
Although she went to Turkish
elementary schools, her secondary-
education was at the French high
school in Istanbul, followed by the
University of Grenoble (France)
where she majored in literature
and languages and "minored in
skiing." Vacations were spent
. skiing in Switzerland.
A year of graduate work at the
University of Jerusalem com-
pleted the polyglot process, as a
result of which Meral speaks six
languages: English, Turkish.
French, Greek, Hebrew and La
ino, a Spanish dialect.
Emerging from such a cocoon
ould have been a jet-set chrys-
lis. a superficial playgirl whose
fe revolved around the next party
md who was wearing what.
But the paradox that often
akes reality more interesting
lhan fiction is that Meral today
e American wife of Fred Ehren-
jtein, a Turk also turned Amer-
an who is a thoracic surgeon
a political liberal and community
tivist, an articulate champion of
ivil rights and a bitter enemy of
gotry and inequity, and a
oughtful, omnivorously read
Vman.
| In English that Vs idiomanic
Jnough to encompass puns and
fubtle nuances, Meral Ehrenstein
talks of one of her pre-conceived
^Weas a^ut the United States. She
and her husband were wed a week
before leaving Turkey ten years
-ago, and it was at about the time
of Little Rock, an incident which
had wide coverage abroad.
The Ehrensteins expected to
arrive in a country where black
and white were armed to the teeth
and taking pot shots at each other
on the hour. Today she under-
stands the covert forms racial
prejudice can take; "unfortu-
nately," she says, "you can't legis-
late against prejudice."
Among the things Meral had to
learn in the course of her Amer-
ican indoctrination was how to
cook, especially how to cook non-
Turkish style which is to say with-
out enormous quantities of starch
and sugar. Today she can assemble
a Western meal as if she were a
pioneer.
And, lest you think she is a
stereotype right out of the old
Esquire rotund, veiled and
draped in a diaphanous harem
garb this lady is a delicate 100
pounds topped by a graceful neck,
a lovely and sensitive face, and
blue-green eyes.
Most fetching of all is a grave
quality which lets you know that
she does not answer questions
lightly, that she gives a lot of
thought to what she says.
Today Meral Ehrenstein is in-
volved in Hollywood Jewish af-
fairs through her membership in
the women's division of the Jew-
ish Welfare Federation; she is al-
so active with the state division of
Youth Services and works with
teen-agers who are either in jail
or on probation.
"I really wanted to be a social
worker," she says, but motherhood
(of Gabriel, 9; Michael, 7, and Dor-
othy-Judith, 4 all born in Cleve-
land) intervened and Meral now
functions as surrogate parent to
the youngsters who have, tempor-
arily at least, become dis-affected.
She has great empathy with these
young people, as .?ie has with all
of the nelpless creatures she en-
counters.
Hollywood residents for the past
year, both Ehrensteins are still
seeking their Jewish identities in
an American context.
"Being a Jew in Turkey had well-
defined boundaries,'; Meral ex-
dains. "In the United States ev-
erything is so homogenous and
there are such varying plateaux of
Jewuh involvement. But before
we could begin that quest we had
the initial adjustment of just be-
ing American to make. Little
hings. such as everyone using
first names, were strange to us."
What was once strange to Meral
is now old hat. She is totally at
ease in her American setting and.
'xcept momentary lapses into
French or Turkish when she spells
>r counts, one would think the
onversation was with a Vassar
ilumna.
Meral Nassi Ehrenstein you've
:ome a long, long way. .
memorial Chapel
"JEWISH fUNtOAL DIRECTORS"
LOCAL AND OUT OF STATl
ARRANGEMENTS
947-2790"
I 133SS W. DIXIE HWV.. M.M.
The flooding caused by tropical
storm Agnes last summer "was
the greatest national disaster"In
the historj or me nation," Gen.
Richard H. Groves of the Army
Corps of Engineers testified last
month to the Senate Public Works
Subcommittee.
The corps' final report showed
that it brought more than $3 bil-
lion damage, 122 persons had been
killed, 5,000 homes destroyed. I
110,000 homes damaged, and 400,-1
000 people left homeless, Gen.
Groves reported. i
i
The Jewish communities most
severely stricken were Wilkes-
Barre, Harrisburg and Elmira.
The devestation in Wilkes-Barre
was particularly great. Thirteen
hundred of the 1,600 Jewish fami- !
lies were evacuated from their j
badly damaged or destroyed homes.:
Most of the 800 to 900 Jewish busi- j
nesses were damaged or destroyed, j
The Jewish Federations of Amer-1
ica responded quickly to this trag-1
edy by committing $2,250,305 to
provide critically needed assist- j
aace not available from govern-;
Bar Mitzvah
PHILIP SERLIN
iPhilip; son of Mrs. Renee Serttn,
will celebrate his Bar Mitzvah
Saturday. May 26, at Temple Israel
of Miramar.
it it -to
WENDY PRESS
Wendy, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Samuel Press, will celebrate
her Bat Mitzvah Friday, May 25,
at Temple Beth Shalom.
it 1t -A
TODD GORLIN
Todd Nelson, son of Mr. and
! Mrs. Herbert Gorlin, will become
| Bar Mitzvah Saturday, May 26, at
| Temple Beth Shalom.
JOSEPH HERMAN
Joseph, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Jack Berman. will celebrate his
Bar Mitzvah Saturday, June 2, at
Temple Beth Shalom.
it it 4
SALLY KATZ
Sally, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Herbert Katz, will become Bat
Mitzvah Friday, May 25, at Temple
Sinai.
it ft tr
ROBERT BERKELEY
Robert Ira, son of Mrs. Nancy
Berkeley and Leslie Berkeley, will
celebrate his Bar Mitzvah Satur-
day. May 26, at Temple Sinai.
it ir it
MAURICE MARHOLIN
Maurice David, son of Dr. and
Mrs. George Maiholin. will be Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, May 26, at
Temple Beth El.
* it a
SOL GLANTZ
Sol, son of Mrs. Saliy Glantz,
will celebrate his Bar Mitzvah
Saturday. June 2, at Temple Beth
El.
6 it T^
AMIE ROBERTS
Amie Lee. daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Roberts, will be Bat
Mitzvah Friday, June 1, at Temple
Sinai.
it it a
SAMUEL KRAEMER
Samuel, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Paul Kraemer, will celebrate his
Bar Mitzvah Saturday, June 2, at
Temple Sinai.
it ii it
LAURIE COHEN
Laurie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs
Martin Cohen, will be Bat Mitzvah
Friday, June 1, at Temple Sole:
services in Sheridan Hills Ele-
mentary School.
it it -fr
CRAIG ZIMBLER
Craig, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Howard Zimbler, will celebrate his
Bar Mitzvah Friday, May 25, at
Coral. Springs Hebrew Congrega
tiorr. -
ment or general resources. This'
fund was established for a two-'
year program of rehabilitation.
Of that amount, $1,314,677 has!
been paid as of May 1 to the Coun-1
cil of Jewish Federations and Wcl- j
fare Funds (CJF) which is admin-
istering this national assistance un-
der the guidance of a committee j
chaired by Judge Nochem S. Win^
DOt of Philadelphia. The CJF re-
ceives monthly reports on all j
phases of the flood relief and re-
habilitation services and their
costs, and transmits the assistance
periodically as required.
James Young of the CJF staff,
after his initial aid in setting up
and guiding the community recon-
struction while resident in Wilkes-
Barre for several weeks, is in con-
tinuing close contact with the com-
munity. The sum of S882.378 was
remitted by CJF for the first
months of the assistance program
through April 1973.
Cost of restoring Jewish in-
stitutions was estimated to total
$1,905,091. The amount of $460,000
was budgeted for CJF fund aid in
restoration of the Jewish institu-
tions the Jewish Community
Center, synagogues and school. Of
that amount.-$50,000 was allocated
fcr the' initial clean up of the
buildings from the massive mud
and other debris from the flood.
The $30,000/;has been spent for
that purposed
The balance of $410,000 was al-
located to pay. the interest and
principal on the first five years of
the 30-year loans expected from
the Small Business Administration,
(SBA) to.repair the buildings so
that they could again operate. With
the impoverishment of many of
the members, they require this as-
Palmer's
Mimmi MwUMRT Company
3279 S.W. 8th Street, Miami
444-0*21 4444922
Closed On The Soaaath
Personalized Memorials Custom
Crafted la Oar Own Workshop.
sistance in order to handle the re-
payment in the first years.
Actually, $512,090 has been ad-
vanced by the CJF fund to the in-
stitutions for the repair and res-
toration of their buildings to date.
The restoration of all but one of
the buildings is proceeding. (The
clean-up has been done in Temple
B'nai B'rith, but the restoration
work will be done in summer).
With delays in obtaining approv.
al of SBA loans and then the re-
ceipt of such funds, the CJF ad-
vanced the money for repairs to
enable institutions to undertake
and carry on the restoration.
As the SBA payments are re-
ceived by the institutions, they are
being remitted to the CJF, which
will then be utilized over the five-
year period for the interest and
amortization.
THE JEWISH AGENCY, In a
drive to improve the quality of
Schiiriiini it sends abroad, ia
conducting a two-week course
in Jerusalem for 25 Schlichim
front all parts of the world. The
basie theme that i brine incul-
cated into Schlichim Is that they
"must go out into the finld" as
Uzl Narkis*. the ajrnituy'it Immi-
gration director, put It at a
news conference the other day.
"We don't want them to sit at
their desks. They must get out
and meet the Jewish commu-
nity," he said.
JEFFER
FUNERAL HOMES, INC.
DIRECTORS:
Irwin Joffor
Modwin Jortor Alvin Jotter
HOLLIS. LI.: 188 11 HILLSIDE AVE.
BROOKLYN 1283 CONEY ISLAND AVE.
212/776-8100
MIAMI. FLA : 1335 W. DIXIE HWY.
Represented by: Sonny Levitt
$
305/947-1185
Chapels available in all
communities in New York and
throughout the Miami area.
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD, HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
Wletnotial
Cjazdei
MM
The only all-jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call:
923-8255 or write:
""TEMPLE BETH EL /58H8SH
1351 S. 14th AVE. -HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above.
NAME: _------------------------------------------------------------
ADDRESS:
__ PHONE:
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
ASK YOUR
RABBI ABOUT US
3
JOHNSON-FOSTER
FUNERAL HOME, IMC.
1650 HARRISON ST. HOLLYWOOD, FLA. PHONE: 922-7511
Paul J. Houlihan,
L.F.D.


Page 14
9-Jewistncridiar and Shofr of Hollywood
Friday, May 25, 1973
JEWISH
TRAVELOG
iu
&Jtuce3o$
A TWO ISLAND CARIBBEAN HONEYMOON!
jThe idea had long intrigued me. A kind of "mix-
'n match" journey. Our ultimate choice was Aruba
and St. Croix two quite delightful, yet different
spots.
ARUBA Our American Airlines flight down
;ook a little over four hours. We arrived around
mid-afternoon went through a very informal
customs line and from there into a waiting
cab. Our drive to our hotel, the Aruba Caribbean,
took us through desert-like terrain. Ah, but this
was desert with a "difference" namely long
stretches of undisturbed beach plainly visible on
either side of the winding road! Those almost-too-
good-to-be-true Aruba travel brochures, read so
carefully before the honeymoon, very quickly came
,o life before our eyes!
After a warm welcome at the Aruba Carib-
jean's front desk, we were ushered into our fourth
floor retreat. A beautiful room too with TWO
exposures. One overlooked the interior of this
five mile wide Dutch Island. (A small working
vrndmill, actually transported from Holland, dotted
the landscape.) The second offered a breathtaking
panorama of a very blue Caribbean. Below our
balcony lush green gardens wide stretches
of coastline ... and a picture postcard view of
the Aruba Caribbean's sprawling pool.
"This is quite a place!" I remember exclaim-
ing. However, I'm not sure, even now, if my bride
of 28"i hours actually heard the comment. All I
know it seemed like seconds later we were both
snued up" and dashing into that invigorating
Caribbean surf.
Before long, we met other honeymooncouples.
Then, after learning hometowns and exchanging
wedding day highlights, we all adjourned to the
Aruba Caribbean's poolside bar for an appropriate
toast. The great variety of tempting tropical drinks
there made the selection process anything but
easy! For example, there were pina coladas .
coconut coolers colorful rum concoctions
. and. of course, tho.se "be-tcha can't have just
one" house specials This first afternoon, however,
everyone opted for a delicious frozen banana
daiquiri "made by Byam." Byam, I must explain, is
the Aruba Caribbean's star bartender, and all I
can say is that his "outdoor laboratory" soon be-
came a favorite haunt for us all!
EVENINGS IN ARl'BA proved equally de-
lightful. First there was dinner In the elegant
I'apiamento Room, named for the Language of the
island (a colorful blend of Dutch, Spanish and
Portguese). Other nights we tried "Le Pelit Bis-
tro." a charming French-stylo restaurant located
in the lower lobby. Le Petit Bistro's rolling hois
d'oeuvre cait well seasoned French soups
. and Chef Lebrun's superb house specialties
were all outstanding. Incidentally, even dessert
here is an experience, thanks '" French Pastry
Chef Brute's expertise, l.e Petit Bistro defi-
nitely worth s visit!
As a matter of fact, no matter whore we
ate in the Aruba Caribbean, the cuisine proved con-
sistently ni erior. Hotel manager Stuart Waters
offered an explanation, u seems that all the Aruba
Caribbean's chefs are brought over from France
and put through an extensive "on the job" train-
ing program. All work side-by-aide with the hotel's
master chef. A most successful venture it has
been, loo!
sME OTHER SUGGESTIONS: The hotel's
casino is just a stone's throw from the Dutch tiled
lobby. Or you could try the Aruba Caribbean's de-
lightful "sea Jeeps"small gasoline-powered
boats that skim along ths water at just fast enough
speeds. Each seats a single person. We tried them
out ourselves on our last day there. Funny, when-
ever I think of them. I vividly recall my bride fran-
tically zooming past me in true bronco riding
fashion. "If only she would slow down." I kept
thinking! After calling to her several times
without result I finally steered close enough to
hear her shout. "How do you stop this thing?" Of
course, before I could muster an answer, she weut
darting off again!
Happily, however, my little rodeo queen even-
tually did manage to control her craft and in
plenty of time to make our American Airlines
flight to St. Croix later that day.
ARUBA FROM A JEWISH PERSPECTIVE
American Airlines' new pocket-size "Jew-
ish Tourist's Guide to the Caribbean" is a
dandy volume to take with you on your own
journey to these islands in the sun. We con-
sulted ours often. For example, through its
pages we learned that the \ery first Jew to
rent land from the Dutch West India Com-
pany in Aruba was Moses de Salomo Levy
Maduro, who arrived from Curacao with his
wife and six children in 1754.
Aruba\ present-day Jewish community
(which numbers about 200) dates from the
1920s. At that time, immigrants arrived from
places like Poland, Rumania and Czechoslo-
Later, many established businesses for them-
vakia most of whom worked as laborers,
selves.
The Beth Israel Ashkenazic Orthodox
temple, founded in 1962, is located on Nas-
saustraat near Pasteurstraat. Services are held
Fridays at 8 p.m. Interestingly, this striking
house of worship was designed by Morris
I.apidus, the same architect responsible for
the Aruba Caribbean Hotel.
-*. .*V Jr
ST. CROIX BY THE SEA Located directly
on the ocean, surrounded by no less tnan 22 acres
of lush tropical gardens, St. Croix by the Sea
struck us immediately as the ideal setting for a
romantic honeymoon. (Come to think of it, is
there any other kind?)
For example, ever hear of a room with a
ceiling-to floor swing for two? St. Croix by the
Sea has them in virtually every room. There's
even a swing in the front lobby (which, curiously,
always seemed "occupied' day and night')
Here's a hotel too where ALL rooms face the
ocean. (Nice to know when you're looking for
real value in a Caribbean resort.)
Here, also, people who really care nuke a big
difference. And that's jusl where St. Croix by the
Sea excels! Overseeing all is Herman Bredemeier.
the hotel's general manager. Then there is Johnnie
their always attentive maitrc d' in the atmospheric
Saint Sea Pavillion. where guests dine by candle
light overlooking the ocean.
By the way, St. Croix by the Sea's honeymoon
COectal al.su turns out to be quite a bargain. Jus*
think a 7-day, l-night package comes to only
S29t> per couple. This rate includes breakfast and
dinner daily, a welcome drink on arrival, a com-
plimentary bottle of rum in your room, a day'i
sailing to famous Buck Island (where my wife
and I first snorkeled!) and other money-sav-
ing features. Well worth exploring if you. or
someone you know, is planning a honeymoon.
THE JEWISH SIDE OF ST. CROIX
Once again our American Airlines "Jew-
ish Tourist's Guide to the Caribbean" proved
vabiable. For example, it's believed that Indi-
vidual Jewish settlors were on the scene here
as early as the late 17th century.
No formal Jewish community was estab-
lished on the island, however, until 1733.
when France ceded St. Croix to Denmark. By
1760. a small congregation formed at Christian-
xlt-u. and a synagogue followed six years later.
I N n reported that Moses Benjamin, a St.
Croix merchant, had kosher meat shipped to
him from New York!
Visitors today can visit the old Jewish
cemetery (epitaphs from 1799 to 1862) located
in the western suburb of Christiansted, adja-
cent to the Moravian Cemetery.
> *
Unfortunately, even a full week in St. Crois
is not enough. By the seventh day, you're just be
ginning to "settle in" and really enjoy. But even
honeymoons must end sometime. And so before
we knew it it was farewell to St. Croix and this
dream hotel. But certainlv not good-bye. Maybe
more like "shalom" (which, after all, also means
"hello.") Fact is, this is one place that's really
worth a second, or third, visit

unitxji
ar
SI NDAY, MAY 27
Broward Zionist district breakfast board meeting 9:30
nrgm Holiday Inn. Harrison St.
TUE8DAY, MAY 29
r mple Solel Sitti od board meeting 6:30 a.m.
homo of J51.'!Iun:'-r '
WEDNESDAY, MAY 30
' Temple Solel Sisterhood bowling luncheon and awards
day 11:30 an. Holiday Inn, Hallandale
SATIRUAY. JUNE 2
Temple Sinai 2C0 Club dinner-dance 8:30 p.m.
I labor Karp Hail
SUNDAY. JUNE 3
Temple Betel Religious School picnic 10 a.m. TY
Park
American Jewi h Committee din.ier 7 p.m. Pier 66
MONDAY. JUNE 4
Temple Sinai dinner for confirmation and pre confirma-
tion students 6 p.m. Lipinan Youth Center
TUESDAY, JUNE 5
Temple Beth El Sisterhood board meeting 9:30 a.m.
temple

HAUANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
(Conservative). 416 NE 8th Ave
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz, Cantor
Jacob Danziger.
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Conservative)
69:0 S.W. 35th St., Rabbi Avrom
Drazin. "antor Abraham Koster.
Priilav, Ma> 25, meat apeaker Jay
Berliner, ,i\vv; Memorial Das serv-
ice! S:iiunlay. afay'SS, "Contemporary
Torah." first in ii aeries Friday, June
' special i "ni'irmaii-in service; Satur-
day, June t. "Contemporary Torah,"
second i>r :i aerlee,
HOLLYWOOD
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1S51 S.
14th Ave., Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffa.
I'*rul;i\. Ma) -.">. Memorial Day **erv-
i.-e. "VVh.'it Should we ReniemlM-r and
What Should we try to PtonretT" It,-,
omiition will accorded IiIkIi school
graduates. Friday, June 1. "Ask the
liabl>i." an open question and answer
period on "Reform Judaism Where
are we Now?" ConeeeraUon of con-
flrmanda Tuesday' June ". Bhttvuoe
service, S p.m. Wednesday. June 6,
I Yi/.kor memorial arvlce ie:SQ a.m.
i BETH SHALOM (Temple) Conserva-
tive. 4601 Arthur St. Rabbi Morton
Malavtky, Cantor Irving Gold.
! TEMPLE BETH AHM (Conservative).
310 SW 62nd Ave., Hollywood. Rabbi
Salomon Benerroch.
Saturday. May St, "Prevention Rather
Mi.in Cure." Saturday, June ::. "Haav-
< niv Peace.*'
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal) 5O01
Thomas St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Rot>.
I ert Frazin.
------e------
j TEMPLE SINAI (Conservative) 1201
Johnson St. Rabbi David Shapiro,
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun
------e
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
! -.INAI (Temple) of NORTH DADF
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingslev. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. 37
NORTH BROWARD
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. Westinghouse Home
Center Auditorium, Coral Springs.
Rabbi Max Weitz.
Lo At its resular meeting last week,
Herzl Lodge of B'nai B'rith was
entertained by Tom Cohen in, "An
Hour with SholDrri Aleichem." Jack
Solot. vice president of Herzl
Lodge, also gave a brief talk on.
'The Five Minutes Which Shook
the Universe."
Mr. Cohen, one of B'nai B'rith's
foremost humorists, is president of
Hillcrest Lodge. He is also head ol
the ADL speakers bureau in New
York.
A past president of the Brook-
lyn Zionist region, of Shaari Israel
Temple in New York, and a former
Commissioner of Human Rights in
Lon^ Beach. L.I.. N.Y.. he is
presently vice president of the
Broward-Palm Beach Council of
B'nai B'rith Lodges.
MARLO RENTAL APARTMENTS
Furnished and Unfurnished
3500 Polk Street
Hollywood Hifls
Dade 625-4545 Broward 989-3030
30 Different Buildings
Serving
Hollywood
for
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Of Hollywood__________________
I
>\ 2024 Hollywood Hvd. 022-0177 J+



Friday. May 25. 1973
Vjewfsf) fffr A4b0> nd Shofar of Hollywood
Paqe 15-
As We Were Saying:
By ROBERT SEGAl
Wounded Knee Forces Us To Face Facts

IT HAS TAKEN WOUNDED KNEE to force some
present-day inhabitants of this troubled land to
face the facts of Indian life-and death on these
plains, these praries, those reser-
vations, thee shanty towns they
have occupied. For 250 years of
ooaehine by the whites on Indian
soil we now ca'l the United States,
those with rd skins were pushed
off their 1'ttlc farms, deprived of
heir hunting pattern, attacked
with rifle and assailed by torch,
rhe storied savagery of the Indian
cannot be expunged from the history books. But
which people, facing murder and pllage and loss of
a beloved and colorful way of life, might not fight
with any weaponry and tactics available?
Once a million souls, the American Indians
reached a bw point of 237,000 at the turn of the
century. Then, despite a sordid and misguided
American policy designed to force them into urban
assimilation a pitifully alien way of life for them
they grew in numbers to nearly 800,000 by 1970.
And what really has been their lot? This peo-
ple has s?en 400 treaties drafted and signed by
United States officials, only to be largely dishon-
ored by a government priding itself on its probity.
In our times, suicide is the second highest cause of
death among Indians; their death rate from tubercu-
losis has been seven times that of the remainder of
the American population; their unemployment rate
sometimes runs 40 per cent, or 10 times that of
others inhabiting the land they once owned. They
are easy prey to the ravages of influenza, pneu-
monia, dysentery, trachoma. Long before the scourge
of air pollution had settled over America, the In-
dians had grown highly vulnearablc to ills prevalent
on the reservations.
Slowly at first in this era of candid television
and gutsy documentary films, the scarlet American
shame of Little Big Horn, and Wounded Knee has
been fastened upon our minds and souls. Ouster's
last stand has been resurrected into infamy revis-
ited; and the shabby ways of the Bureau of Indian
Affairs politics on the part of many (certainly not
all) have been sharply X-rayed for those with cour-
age to look.
Ouster's last stand in 1876 marked the centen-
nial of U.S. history. Soon we shall observe our bicen-
tennial. Part of that observance should be a time of
atonement for America's sorry descent into geno-
cide, our maltreatment of the American Indian.
Israel Newsletter
By CARL AlPERT

Maimon And His Mission
'AACIV MAIMON, who admits to being over 70. is sup-
posed to be in semi-retirement. As author of the
jM union Method, the mo.-t widely used system of Hebrew
*Ji"'ihand. and a-; one time official stenographer for Zion-
,it Congresses and many convent:ons,
ic :-till keeps his fingers lithe by short-
land recording of the weekly meetings
)f the Israel government Cabinet, where
peed, accuracy and discretion are re-
quired in cqua.1 measure.
But the rest of the week finds Maimon
involved in a dramatic, nationwide proj-
?ct to help immigrants adjust to their
new life in Israel. Operating on a shie-
Istring, he is able to activate tens of thousands of volun-
[teer man-hoih's, and bring private lessons in Hebrew or
almost any other subject into the homes of the immigrants.
Panorama
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
*A
Sabra Ambassador
TT'JE APPOINTMENT OF Simcha Dinitz as the
new Israel ambassador to the United States is
a matter of some moment. As everyone knows there
are four great powers: the United States, the Soviet
~'n:in. China and Inel. One can
easily see this by picking up a cony
of the New York Times or for
hat matter of any leading paper
ind crmrarine the amount of space
iven the various nation-?. These
"our mentioned will eas'ly D2 in
'he lead.
Another test is to consider how
well-known are the amb.i Isadora of
i he various nations. There is hardly a question, for
instance that Abba Eban. who served as Israel's
ambassador until succeeded by Gen. Yitzhak Rabin,
was as well-known as Andrei Gromyko, th" Soviet
ambassador. To be sure, Eban owed something of
his prestige to another fact: Many Americans lik?d
to listed to him speak becans- they thought it would
help them improve their Eng'.ish.
How does one get a big job like an ambassador'
People say, "You've got to know someone." This no
doubt helps, but not always.
The new Israeli ambassador stated from the
bottom or at least from the outside. Years a^o he
was the watchman of the Israel Embassy in Wash
inuton. He was college trained in America and all
ithat, but there seemed no other place for him. So
I he took it.
Later he took a job teaching Hebrew in Cincin-
Jnati. -More recently he has worked with Golda Meir.
Born in Tel Aviv, he is the first Israel-born pore
1 ambassador to America.
It is a simrha to have the first Sabra ambassa
dor.
This is not an agency or an institution. It is a man. It
has no office, no telephone, no bureaucracy, no red tape,
no publicity, and almost no money. He does it by the fa-
natical doggedness with which he mobilizes groups of vol-
unteers He finds them primarily among Israel's high
school youngsters, but he also has help from women's or-
ganizations and from youth groups from overseas.
Unassuming in manner, unimpressive in appearance,
Yaacov Maimon is already a leg.-nd in this field. He began
his projeet in 1950 when immigrants were sitting restlessly
in maabarot, not being assimilated into the life of the
country. Since then he has reached thousands.
His method is simple. He gets word from the authori-
ties where the latest group of immigrants are being set-
,led. In a short time, Maimon is there, going from apart-
ment to apartment almost like a peddler offering his
wares: "Is there anyone here who would like help in his
studies?" The offer applies equally to children at school,
to housewives, to working men. Then Maimon mobilizes
his volunteers. His annual contributed budget of less than
$6,000 is spent mostly on truck transport to bring volun-
teers to the new settlement area. Lessons are given in
individual homes, for the emphasis is on personal rela-
tionship rather than on class work. Children can't go out
to evening classes. Adults are frequently ashamed to
appear in a class where their ignorance is paraded. When
a housewife is taught Hebrew in her own kitchen by a
15-year-old sabra girl all her inhibitions fall away. It is as
if her own daughter were teaching her.
Yaacov Maimon is eve"" where at once: Jerusalem.
Haifa, Bet Shemesh. Ashdod, Givat Olga, Tivnn. Hedera.
where not? It is he who visits the homes, introduces the
volunteers, gets them started with a sample lesson, ob-
tains weekly reports from the volunteer teachers, encour-
ages, guides, organizes, keeps records.
I followed Maimon one evening as he made his rounds
in a nearby neighborhood of Russian immigrants from
Georgia. In an amazingly short time he had knocked on
30 doors, ingratiated himself with the immicrants, and
assigned his high school volunteers to their tasks. Two
hours later he was already hearing their first reports, and
preparing for next week's assignments. Tomorrow he will
be in Hedera. and the following day in Ashdod.
This is old-fashioned, personal volunteer work of the
most devoted kind It brings the lives of the immigrants
not only education, but the warmth of personal contact
with old-time Israelis, and the knowledge that others are
interested in them.
Maimon is happy in his unpaid work. He has no com-
plaints, no demands. He is grateful for good health. Only
sometimes he wishes he had a helicopter so h:- could get
around to more places more quickly.
Book Review
SEYMOUR B. UEBMAN
Holocaust Literature
THE WARSAW DIARY OF C11AIM A. KAPLAN.
translated and edited by Abraham 1. Katsh (Col-
lier Books. S2.95) is a revised and updated edition
of thr bonk originally published as
"Scroll of Agony."
Twenty years after the Warsaw
ghetto, Chaim Kaplan's diary was
louud preserved in a kerosene can.
A Warsaw Hebrew teacher, he is
believed to have died in late 1942
M early 1943. The journal begins
Sept. 1. 1933, the date that Hitler
-tunned the world. It ends in Aug-
ust 1942. The diary is a human document. It will be
quoted for years to come. Kaplan has many dia-
tribes against I he Judenrat and its police.
The rumors that ran through the ghetto, the
bribery of the Judenrat's police to be kept off the
list of those to be deported (and they knew what
deportation meant!, the secret observances of Purim
and Chanukah. the pangs of hunger, the anguish of
parents and children who were separated are all
a part of a history that humanity must not be per-
mitted to forget.
In the introduction to Hunter and Hunted, se-
lections and aditing by Gerd Korman (Viking Press.
S8.95). Prof. Korman has two memorable quotations.
The first is by Emil Fackenheim who said.
"... we are first commanded to survive as Jews,
lest the Jewish people perish We are commanded,
second, to remsmber in our very guts and bones
the martyrs of the holocaust We are forbidden,
thirdly, to deny or de-pair of God lest Judaism
perish. We are forbidden, finally, to despair of the
world as the place which is to become the kingdom
of God, lest we help make it a meaningless place in
which God is dead or Irrelevant and everything is
permitted. To abandon any of 'hese imperatives, in
rci.oonse to Hitler's victory at Auschwitz, would be
to hand him yet other, po thumous victories."
The other quote is from Elie Wiesel who in-
sisted that the holocaust "can still be experienced
. Any Jew must enter into it again in or-
der to take it upon himself. We all stood at Sinai;
... we all heard the Anochi I am the Lord.' He
later said in 1967 that the catastrophe must be
understood first and foremost as a "unique Jewish
catastrophe."
Korman divided the book into seven parts and
he prefaces the selections with a lengthy historical
introduction and prefatory notes for each of the
sections. He indicates l?ssons to be learned from
the fact that the spokesmen for Jews and the lead-
ers of a Jewish organization for over two decades
(1921 1946) were men of wealth and political in-
fluence but they were assimilationists and devoid
of a deep Jewish understanding.
The Cornell professor collected 27 provocative
essays drawn from diaries, letters, documents and
transcripts written by journalists, soldiers and his-
torians. The book is a poignant and potent historical
record. He borrowed from Chaim Kaplan who wrote.
"Individuals will be destroyed, but the Jewish com-
munity will live on."
Lest Wr Forget by Leivy Smolar (BBYO Juda-
ism Pamphlet Series, no, price) is a brief mono-
graph whioh supplies in a too-capsulated form some
bits of anti-Semitic history, German-Jewish rela-
tionships with some "nuisar" and a bibliography.
There arc many photos and illustrations. It is this
type of publication which encourages a few to under
take some further studies but, for a greater num-
ber, serves as an end to deeper involvement.


Page 16
*Jelsf>mridUQifl Shrfw f Hollywcd
Friday, May 25, 1973
NORTON
SINCE 1924
TIRE CO.
tSKd
MAKE SURE YOU CAR IS IN TIP-TOP SHAPE
BEFORE YOU START THIS YEAR'S TRIP WITH OUR
SAFETY
SERVICE
CENTER
BFGoodrich
msmML
SWFTV CHECK-UP
\
NORTON TIRE CO. SAYS
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
OR YOUR MONEY REFUNDED
tc any reason you ae "ot co*nBtetfl salnfied with j
in ne pasynapf C3' hit yoj Ouy t'0*n Hvton hit <
Cn *etoii 't along *iih your ome'im' notce *p'hin J
' Ikt if' of nu'chasf antf oj' nf>y -ill tf ,
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HERE'S WHAT WE u $
Q TIRES D "SSLffi WHEEL
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FOREIGN 4 j BFGoodrich
SPORTS CARS
IMPORTED CAR
SPECIALS
SIZE PRICE F.E. TAX
145X13 ZX Black 29.65 1.24
145X13 2X White 35.57 1.31
155X13 ZX Black 32.68 1.44
155X13 ZX White 39.32 1.48
160X13 ZX Black 24.36 1.48
155X14 ZX White 45.15 1.56 j
150X14 ZX Black 33.39 1.43
155X15 ZX Black 38.75 1.59
165X14 ZX Black 45.37 167
165X15 ZX Black 44.39 1.81
165X15 ZX White 57.58 1.93
135X13 X Black 21.80 .89
145X15 X Black 131.55 139
165X15 X Black I 42.44 1.82
520X12 X Black 27.84 1.18
1560X15 X Black 39.85 169
590X14 X Black ; 42.38 176
725X13 X Black 52.95 220
165X13 XAS Black 44.20 1.67
165X14 XAS Black | 48.25 1.77
175X14 XAS Black 53.26 190
165X15 XAS Black | 51.08 195
DVNLOP
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95
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f. E. Tax &
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SIZE
155R-13 Black
165R-13 Black
175R-13Black
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165R-14 Black
165R-14 White
165R-15 Black"
165R-15White
PRICE
23.95
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150
169
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205
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1.87
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NORTON
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LONGMILER
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GOOD MILEAGE LOW COST
650/700X13
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775X14 15.25 2.09
775X15 15.50 2.11
825X14 17.00 2.24
825X15 17.00 230
855X14 21.25 243
855X15 21.50 2.47
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G78-14/825X14
G78-15/825X15
H78-14/855X14
H78-15/855X15
21.95
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24.95
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J78-15/885X15 33.95
"L78-15/915X15 37.95
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from compact size to luxury size.
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670X15 Tube-type
670X15 Tubeless
700X13 Tubeless
700X14 Tubeless
700X15 Tube-type
710X15 Tube-type
650X16 Tube-type
700X16 Tube-type
750X16 Tube-lype
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within 90 days ol
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After 90 days, we
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charge you only for
the P'iod of ownership based on the regular
selling price at the time of return, pro-rated over
specified number of months.
BATTERIES
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Equivalent prices on all other sizes
SAFETY BRAKE SERVICE
FORD, CHEVROLET
AMERICAN COMPACTS
VB
1 Tarn drums it required
1 Replace linings all 4 wheels.
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CENTRAL MIAMI
5300 N.W. 27th Ave. 634-1556
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\ N. MIAMI BEACH
170ON.E. 163rd St. 945-7454
MIAMI BEACH
i454.Altoa Roafl 472-5353,


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