The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00065

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
m ,1 -amHae,*
-

I
..'
wJewisti Flondlii3in
rolume 3 Number 11
and SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood. Florida Friday, April 13, 1973
Two Sections Price 25 cents
ii'ii.....n'li......n,'
PASSOVER MESSAGE
It Can Be Done! I
i
By NOIWAN ATKIN, M.D.
President, Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood
At a time when we are attempting to assure a Passover of
freedom and joy to many thousands of Jewish refugees, let us
not forget that here in our own community a resurgence of the
Judaica spirit is manifesting itself.
Our young people are becoming increasingly aware of and
Involved in their Jewish identities as exemplified by their enthusi-
astic participation In creative religious services, in fund-raising
activities, in the Jewish-life and Hebrew oriented courses offered
fin the Judaica program, and in social and cultural events that are
pelf -genera ted.
The young leaders, too those men under 40 who tomorrow
ill be the leaders in the Jewish community by providing the
petus for even more programs designed to weld our large
imily ever closer are a source of great pride to us. On a plat-
eau of their lives when their careers are most demanding, when
HbIi families are in greatest need of paternal guidance, our
Bung men have taken precious time to join forces for the better-
Bent of the entire commune.
The Women's Leadership Institute as well has, with original-
Hp and imagination, sponsored events and seminars with cultural
Mbd sociological impact which have added to the continuity of
Bwish life in the South Broward area
And men and women of Hollywood and Hallandale high-
ylses have participated with fervor and zeal in this 1973 UJA/
Hfewish Welfare Federation campaign, helping to raise more
ajhilanthropic funds than ever before in the history of such a
drive
Each of these components unto itself is a demonstration of b
,"^e viable Judaic spirit; together they form an invincible life-
Krce which emerges at this Passover 1973 as a symbol of the
Jfteedom we seek for every Jew who lives in this world.
It oan be done!
HaMtaOMlMiaKtlCHMmiPlllllWlin'lM'iainilliniir'' i-, .'...'.. .....
Neighborhood Campaigns Underway
I M < I iBtlHHWIIIMIMHOTlWHIWIl^iH.!MrllL'1UtgwriMr''' l
PASSOVER MESSAGE
I The Promise Will Be Kept!
By HERBERT KATZ
I 1973 UJA/Jewish Welfare Federation Campaign Chairman
"Let all who are hungry enter and eat with us; let all who
\*fe forlorn come and celebrate Passover with us."
The time-honored words have not diminished in their
luminescence; on the contrary, they are taking on fresh signifi-
cance as. for the first time in history, we see a small nation
itretc"hin out her arms to embrace all the hungry and forlorn
[ Jews who seek her comfort.
The advent of Passover also means the diminution of our
(Community as many South Browardites return to homes in
father climes We are sorry to see them go, but with them go our
^Brm regards and deep appreciation for the generosity with
Iffrhich they gave of their time and their money in our collective
effort to help lews around the world.
I The Reconstituted Jewish Agency of Israel tells us that the
973 goal of $470 million falls far short of the realistic needs of
Kworld Jewry. The figure they mention as being more represen-
Bative is $787 million, some $317 million more. So it becomes
ftven more incumbent upon us, the "Jews of Good Fortune," to
Kold out the hand of friendship to the "Jew of Misfortune."
PWere our roles reversed, would you not wish rt so?
It would not be hyperbole to say that world Jewry is under-
| going a renaissance. It is, indeed, a rebirth, a reemergence of a
spirit which has been, if not mutilated almost beyond recogni-
tion, largely quiescent through horror at the past and fear of the
resent. But survive it did, and 1973 sees brother aiding brother
a new life, a new freedom, a new meaning to all his aspirations.
In this Passover season, let us not forget that "tzedakah"
does not have only singular meaning; it is a plural concept as
Well which encompasses not just neighbor helping neighbor but
nation helping nation. Let us make Passover even more meaning-
ful; let us rejoice in knowing that we gaveand then we gave
more because the thought of even one Jew suffering again
was insupportable. Although we bow our heads in thanks for
those Jews who have survived, we must uncover our hearts until
j every Jew in the world is safe.
I Tha promise wttL be *eptt--------
Doorbells will soon be ringing
all over town as the volunteer
workers of Greater Hollywood's
Jewish Welfare Federation go
from door to door soliciting
theiir neighbors for Contribu-
tions to the JWF 1973 campaign.
This portion of the campaign,
which is being conducted by the
metropolitan division under the
chairmanship of Barry Holeve,
is aimed at securing commit-
ments from all those members
of the Jewish community who
have not made their pledge this
year.
Although the current campaign
total of $950,000 is the largest
amount ever collected at a simi-
lar stage of the drive, there are
still contributors who pledged
over $350,000 in 1972 who have
tnot been contacted for their
commitments this year. It is
these people as well as new con-
tributors that the volunteers will
attempt to reach.
The 1973 JWF campaign has
been aimed at the highest goal
in Greater Hollywood's history.
Starting in the mid-40s before
the creation of the State of Is-
rael, the local Federation has
through the years assumed a
larger and larger share of the
commitment towards the small
mid-East democracy. In 1972 the
campaign topped the million dol-
lar mark for the first time.
This year the campaign lead-
ership has assumed an even
higher goal and for this rea-
son the door-to-door solicitation
is being conducted; a i>hon-a-
thon is being carried on simul-
taneously. It is expected that
with this concentrated drive the
1973 campaign will surpass the
1972 campaign by 40 per cent.
Much of the funds collected
in the campaign will go towards
allaying the costs of resettling
Israel Tours
Reduce Rates
TEL AVIV (JTA) Minister
of Tourism Moshe Kol said this
week that American tourist6
traveling to Israel next winter
on 10-day package tours will pay
some $120 less than last winter's
minimum package fare.
An agreement to that effect
was reached at a meeting be-
tween Mr. Kol and the director
of El Al. Mordechai Ben Ami.
According to Mr. Kol, the Is-
raeli Hotel Association and Is-
rael travel agents were also
partners to the agreement.
Readiness to cut winter rates is
part of a national effort to in-
crease tourism.
Syrians Harass
Damascus Jeivs
TEL AVIV (JTA) A tour-
ist who visited Damascus re-
cently reported here this week
that three Jews were arrested
recently and that the persecu-
tion, harassment and extortion
of Damascus Jews has intensi-
fied. The tourist identified the
arrested Jews, all heads of fam-
ilies, as Avraham Shou, Joseph
- Shevut and Nissim Kafif.
some of the members of Soviet
Jewry in Israel. It is expected
that this year 70,000 of them will
emigrate. Not counting the ran-
som money which is collected
from a number of them, it still
costs $35,000 to settle a typical
family in their new homeland.
The process must include reedu-
cation, housing provisions and
employment.
At the present time a good
portion of the Soviet emigrants
are professional people. Their
Russian training in most cases
has not fitted them for practic-
ing their profession in the free
world.
Generally speaking, the Soviet
system makes for extreme spe-
cialization with, for example, a
registered nurse performing only
one function. It becomes neces-
sary for these people to be re-
trained so that they can take
their place in the world of free
people.
A large part of the money col-
lected locally will go for this
purpose In addition the local
agencies must be provided for.
The growing population and the
current inflation have all added
to the budgets of JWF's bene-
ficiary agencies. For all these
reasons campaign leadership is
pushing to attain this year's high
but necessary goal.
Women's Division
Hits New High
March proved to be a banner
month for the campaign of the
Women's Division of Greater
Hollywood's Jewish Welfare
Federation. A total of $87,000
was reached, representing an
increase of 50 per cent over the
campaign last year at the same
time. This record amount was
achieved with functions ranging
from early morning brunches,
noontime lunches, afternoon teas
and nighttime phon-a-thons.
-First on the list of gatherings
was a parlor meeting at the
home of Mrs. Mary Zinn. Mrs.
Zinn, a prominent community
leader and a long-time Holly-
wood resident, served as hostess
to a dozen of her close friends
at a breakfast in her ocean
front apartment.
Making the appeal for funds
for the ever-increasing needs of
Israel as well as the needs of
local agencies was Mrs. Reva
Wexler, president of the Wom-
en's Division of the Greater Mi-
ami Federation.
Next meeting to take place
was a brunch at the Emerald
Hills Country Club. The morn-
ing fund-raising event was spon-
sored by June Gordon and Mar
ion Nevins, both members of the
board of the Women's Division
More than 50 of the largest
contributors to the Women's Di-
vision campaign gathered to he?r
Mrs. Lillianc Winn, a native
Moroccan Jew who is now a
resident of Miami, tell of her
childhood in her native land and
of her gratitude to JDC for the
help they gave her in securing
an education.
A sunny afternoon was the
scene for a gathering hosted by
Hilda Corn and Gloria Green-
spun, both prominent members
of the Hollywood community.
Mrs. Greenspun is a past cam-
paign chairman of the Women's
Division. A spirit of fellowship
and generosity was evident as
a representative group of the
area women listened to Dr. Dori
Parrola, a Soviet Jew, give his
version of the situation in Russia
today for Soviet Jewry.
Topping the events for March
and truly making it a worthwhile
month for the Women's Division
was a so-called "Immigration
Experience" planned by the
women of the division under the
chairmanship of Susan Miller.
Starting in the assembly hall of
Temple Beth Sholom. the group
of almost 100 women were asked
to portray Soviet emigrants. As
they entered the hall, they were
confronted by two facing tables
with women playing the part of
Soviet officials sitting behind
them and issuing passports to
those who requested them.
The roles of Soviet emigrants
were carried out throughout the
meeting by the women attending.
The Soviet guards and officials
were replaced by women acting
the roles of JDC officials as the
group left the so-called immigra-
tion office and boarded buses for
the final destination.
In fiction the destination was
Schonau the actual stopping
off spot for Soviet emigrants en
route to Israel. In reality, the
final stop was Temple Israel. A
spartan Israeli lunch was served
to the group at their destina-
tion.
Both on the bus while travel-
ing and in the hall of Temple
Israel during lunch, committee
members told their rehearsed
tales of the problems of Soviet
emigration while assuming the
role of a Soviet Jew. Alia Rusi-
nek, an actual Soviet emigrant,
also told her story of her efforts
to leave Russia and her ultimate
happiness in reaching Israel and
her joy at having her husband
join her there recently.
Next on the agenda for the
Women's Division is a phon-a-
thon starting April 9 which will
continue until hopefully
every woman has been contacted
to make her contribution to the
Federation campaign.
Volunteers are still needed
to carry on with this portion nf
the oamoaign. They may make
arrangements to help with this
work by calling the Federation
office.


?age 2-A
*Jeisi-flcrHSar nd Sherfar of Hollywood
Friday. Aprikia, 1973
June 20 XD' Day
For Teen Tour
June 20 will be "D" for depart-
ure day for the 30 high school
-udents who will participate in a
RABBI AVROM I. DRAZIN
four-week study lour of Israel and
Italy.
The Itinerary has been coordi-
. ated bj the Broward board of rab-
! Is: Dr. Samuel Jaffe, president,
.iid Dr. Morton Malavsky. teen
ti ui chairman for the board. Tour
I lans and arrangements have been
made in cooperation and in con-
sultation with the Jewish Welfare
I (.'deration of Hollywood, with Dr.
Robert Pittell acting as Federa-
tion's teen tour chairman.
In order to be eligible to join
the tour, participants must be high
school students interviewed and
recommended by their respective
rabbi-; or youth leaders, and then
he interviewed together with par-
ents by the tour leader. Rabbi Av-
rom Drasta.
Rabbi Dcazin, spiritual leader
oi Temple Israel of Miramar. serv-
ed as interim Ilillcl director at the
University of .Miami and has for
yean* taughl teen-agers. Rabbi Dra-
tin was chosen to lead the teen
tour by representation of the
.mi board of rabbis and the
committee of Federation by unan-
imous decision.
1) parture will be from Fort
Laudcrdale Airport on the evening
ol Wednesday, June 20. The tour
will be met by assigned counselors
bl Lod International Airport, at
which time the group will transfer
to Alonsi Yitzehak where there
will be full recreational and edu-
cational programs daily.
Crash course in conversation-
al Hebrew.
Lectures about Israel.
Seminars regarding the tours.
Preparatory, discussions re-
Igarding archaeological digging.
Work in the fields.
Swimming.
Sports activities.
Kap sessions.
Israeli (oik songs and dances.
Archaeological digging.
MOTOROLA
Quasar.
COLOR
Portable TV
ConsoleTV
SALES
AND
SERVICE
Appliance CityI
OF HOLLYWOOD MALL INC.
" OS 1-1300
Evening programs daily.
Friday night and Shabbat
morning religious services
Meetings with Israeli youth.
During the period at the kibbutz.
there will be two full clay tours.thc
first to Natanya. the Riviera city
of Israel, Tel Aviv. Tel Aviv Uni-
versity, Bar Ilan University, Reho-
\ot and Jaffa: the second to Ash-
clod and Ashkelon and to the Kib-'
butz Yad Mordechai to see the re-
construction of the battle of 1948.
Commencing July 1, there will
be 10 days of intensive touring
throughout Israel including Eilat,
Arad, Jerusalem. Beersheba. Kfar
Yerucham. Sde Boker, Avdat, Miz-
peh Rimon Yotvata and the fam-;
ous Solomon's Pillars.
July 11 will be the departure
date for Home, where all the fam-
ous landmarks will be toured, plus
side trips to Naples. Pompeii and
Sorrento during the remaining six ;
days. July 17 will find the group
homeward bound.
Cost of the tour is $997. plus S3
tax and a $10 registration fee
. which ij non-refundable. Some of
the local temples are subsidizing
Children of their congregants to
the extent of $250. Any applicant
I who might need financial assist-
', ancc will be invited to discuss his
! situation with a committee ap-
pointed for this purpose.
Applications are .available at
the offices of all local temples and
at the Jewish Welfare Federation,
1900 Harrison St. Because of the
necessity of limiting the group to
SO, acceptance will be on a first-
cone, first-served basis.
Teclmion's I^ast Meet Of Season Planned April 26
_. ..,,. ma n__________* ..;- II____1....... f llw. Iv.
The Women's Division of the
South Browaru chapter of the
American Society of Technion will
held its closing meeting of the sea-
son April 26 at the home of Dr.
Marilyn Segal. 700 Washington St..
Hollywood. A petite luncheon will
be served at noon.
The election and Installation of
officers and board members for
the 1973-73 term as submitted by
the nominating committee at the
March meeting will take place. A
program entitled. "The Technion
Student" will be presenteo by tin.
Milton Sirkin.
The officers are Mrs Louis Moss,
honorary founding president; Mrs.
Emil Lublin, honorary' vice presi-
dent; Mrs. Louis Lavin. president;
Mrs. Charles Harrison, vice presi-
dent; Mrs. Emanuel Teich, vie
president; Mrs. Hy Feinerman. re
cording secretary; Mrs. Mae Friend
ucl Rubin, financial secretary, and
corre.-pondine secretary: Mrs. Sam-
Mrs. Sylvia Spector. treasurer.
Members of the board of direc-
tors are Mrs. Hy Sdwinbaum, Mrs.
Harry Smallberg. Mrs. Eleanor
Go Id berg, Mrs. Joseph Margolis.
Mrs. Rose Tulin and Mrs. Sol
Geffner.
ROBERT
TAYLOR
INCOME TAX SERVICE
> lip
6801 Pembroke Road
Pembroke Pines,
Florida 33023
Phone 966-Ten Forty
ORDERS TAKEN NOW FOR
VALENCIAS
ANGIETS GROVES
BONDED FRUIT SHIPPERS
1809 Wiley Street, Hollywood
FRESH SQUEEZED ORAXGE JUICE
TAKE-HOME MESH BAGS
COCONUT PATTIES 79c Lb.
CLAXTON FRUIT CAKES
Telephone 927-5447
FACTORY DIRECT SAVE!
CUSTOM BUILT MICA FURNITURE
"FOR YOUR HOME, APT., OR OFFICE"
DESIGNED AND INSTALLED TO YOUR ORDER
SOME FLOOR MODELS AVAILABLE
Cabinets-Book Cases
Parsons Tables Bars
Counter Tops Tabletops
JACK RUBINSTEIN
1541 So 21st Court, Hwd.
FREE ESTIMATES
Dade: 947-8713
Broward: 923-6651
A Happy Passover To All .
"SELECT YOUR HOME BY COMPUTER'
SERVING THE "HOLLYWOOD" AREA
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE
SALES AND RENTALS
Main Office
4514 Hollywood Blvd
987-4663 Miami (no toll) Dial 624-0111
Branch Office
7649 Hollywood Blvd.
961-3800 Miami (no toll) Dial 624-1641
*
PRESTIGE
STUART'S RESTAURANT
and COFFEE SHOP
1841 N. YOUNG CIRCLE, HOLLYWOOD
SPECIALIZING IN PARTIES FOR ALL OCCASSIONS
"Too Provide Guests We Do All Tfce Rest"
OPEN 5 A.M. TO 8 P.M.
BREAKFAST LUNCH DNNER
TAKE OUT AND DELIVERY SERVICE
CALL 925-9090
\lh theREAHTof HOLLYWOOD HILLS"
A Happy Passover To All .
Bank

GEORGES
.<
INC. 961-1720
AUTHORIZED SALES
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ZENITH-RCA-AOMIRAL -AMPEX
REPAIR ON ALL MAKES
* Q \
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0TH +*
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<
o
w
Well, you re in the car and (a) you need monev
lor shopping or (1)1 you have (o make a deport
and gel to the office in a hurry or (c) you should
stop at the bank hut the mere thought of parking
the car and coping with the children in and out ol
the lank is too much to think about Well!
Well! You're in the rai so (a) drre to the Move.
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and (c) drive-out in just minuty* Mid aj alxnfl
your merrier way. |J*"
Come on Move Ahead-it- what we"helieve
linking is all about.
JS FIRST
a nRTionnL
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF HOLLYWOOD
BROWARO COUNTY S SENIOR BANK Se.vingConnnuouHy Since 1924
cawti MurwtM mi 12M in. naurnot inii uttMt
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF HALLANOALE
im iisi uiiusiii iuc> iivo uiuuratu im in ii21
SECOND NATIONAL BANK OF WEST HOLLYWOOD
MtirvMtriSKiMcimn iiuiudMunramlire aouraoo* imii wmo
to got.lor .nio.tn Ic J20 000 H>mM.| ( 0 I C MMttu flO>'JI (v. Stilt""
t


Friday, April 13, 1973
*JewisHHhrncMH^in *"* Shofar of Hollywood
Page 3-A
I
Hollywood Among 12 Cities
Reporting 40% Increases
At a board meeting of the Coun-
cil ') Jewish (CMefatibfa and Wei
fre Funds in New Ynik City it
innounced that the (;
cod community had joined
'.! group of 11 other cil i re
porting increases in excess of 40
per cent over last year's can
dale, according to Robert
I, executive director of the
Jew in Welfare Federation.
Mr. Kernel attended session of
the centntitteea on Urban Affairs,
..(ifari Coljege Vouth ami
Facility, and on the Afcing.
In at: overseas report to the
board, the second world asscmbU
of the HcLonstitutcd Jewish Agen-
cy of Israel noted that at its Fob
vuary convocation in Jerusalem it
had approved an operating budget
of 470 million for the 1973-74
fiscal year, underscoring that the-
Beth Ei Sisterhood
Holds Donor Event
A "bubbly afternoon" resulted
after a year of working and plan-
ning by the Temple Beth El Sis
terhood when its donor luncheon
was held last month in the Gra-
nada Room of the new Holiday
Inn on S. Ocean Dr., Hollywood.
Mrs. Florence Roth was honored
for her library work.
Mrs. Milton Jacobs, president
presented a check to Lewis E
Conn, president of Temple Beth
El, from the Sisterhood's largest
fund-raising project. The proceeds
go to support service to the blind,
youth, religious school and other
important projects.
The committee that coordinated
the fund-raising donor luncheon in
eluded Mrs. Harold Schakner.
chairman; Mrs. Jacob Frank, Mrs
Raslyn Emanuele, Mrs. Doroth>
Weinfeld, Mrs. Theodore Lifset.
Mrs. Alfred Mazzarino, Mrs. Abra
ham Glazer. Mrs. Morton Golden
berg, Thelma Kopel, Mrs. Sylvia
Moss, Mrs. Stuart Kallman, Mrs
Eleanor Goldberg, Mrs. Charle:
Wolfe. Mrs. Sam Weinstein ant:
Mrs. Eleanor Perkins, executivt
vice president.
Stephen Dubov. a tenor who has
performed with the Opera Guild
of Greater Miami, the Miami Phil
harmonic Orchestra, the St. Louis
Symphony Orchestra, and who was
in several Broadway hits, enter
lained the gathering. A senior at
the University of Miami, he is ;.
cantor at Temple Beth Am in South
Miami.
;j70 million budget would compel
postponement of vital services and
-ing "'profound concern"
boiil the effects of the shortcom-
ings.
"That is why." declared Mr. Ker-
nel, "it is absolutely mandatoiy
that our local goal of SI1- million
be met. even exceeded if possible.
n attempting to s realistic and
ittainabie goals, tin assembly did
o with the full knowledge that
hey would fell far jhorl of the
ictual nerd, which they put at
S787 million "
The assembly also recorded its
"earnest thanksgiving for the
rcater dignity enjoyed by the en-
tire Jewish people in our genera-
!'on as a result of the existence
ind character of the State of Is-
ael, for the new courage and hope
,\ hieh Israel has inspired in com-
nunities living under duress, and
for the solidarity and unity of pur-
i03e that now pervade the whole
jf the Jewish people." The state-
nent was issued in conjunction
with a salute to the 25th anniver
ary of the State of Israel.
Ann B. Potter
Owner Of
Felice Wishes
All Her Customers
And Friends A
Happy Passover...
Felice Hair Stylist
6520 Pembroke Rd.
Miramar
989-1156
Rent-A-Car
^ Pal LOW AS
$5 A DAY
FREE MILEAGE
100 Mile Radioi
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
529 S. DIXJC HWY.
920-4141
Hourwooft
4S-5691 Miami
Douglas Gardens
Auxiliary Plans
'Phantom Ball'
Mrs. Lilyan Beckerman. presi
ddent of the Hollywood Auxiliary (
of the Douglas Gardens Jewish j
Home for the Aged, has announc-1
ed that its-only fmid-iaisiug event,
of the year will be a "Phantom
Ball."
The "Ball" is the result of a"n j
idea the auxiliary leadsrs came up j
with, based on the premise that |
many people would prefer to make:
a contribution and stay home.
"This is the year when all those
people who have always told me
they'd rather stay home and send
money will have a chance to prove
they meant it," said Mrs, Becker-
man.
"Each year we've found it more
difficult to make arrangements for
a good hotel dinner show that will
leave us a margin of profit. We're
hoping that all our friends and
supporters will come through and
send in their contributions as
usual.
"Actually, with no expense in-
volved, we shauld be able to raise
more money fo- the home than in
previous years."
nett
anK,
Barnett Bank
, of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
A Happy Passover To All .
PHONE -527-4029
TOMMY SHROUDED
927-4172
Vmarp FDAura uiDBnoa
STORE FRONTS
INC
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1600 N. DIXIE HIGHWAY, HOLLYWOOD, FLA.
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ftf#tett#
TIRE CENTER
HALLAN Dixie Auto SERVICE INC.
HALLANDALE BLVD It S. DIXIE HWY.
920-2823
A Happy Passover to our
Friends and Customers
and to
The Entire Jeicish Community
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DRAPERIES
BED SPREADS
INTERIOR DECORATING
FASHION FABRICS
60S N. FEDERAL HWY.
HAtlANOAlE. FLORIDA
Phone: 923 0564
SHADES
SUP COVERS
UPHOLSTERY
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Specializing in all wood furniture repairs
REFINISHING STRIPPING ANTIQUING
Nothing too small but large quality of workmanship
Call for any information
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420 S. Dixie Highway, Hollywood
100 East Beach Boulevard
Hallandale, Florida 33009
Phone 927-0566
A Happy Passover To All
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Burials and American
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Arrangements made during lifetime
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Manhattan Brooklyn Westchester Bronx Far Rockaway
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J>'


Page 4-A
+Jewish fkirkMar) "! Shfr of Hollywood
Friday, April 13. 1973
wJew'ssti Ftcriclian
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E. 6th Street Telephone 373-4605
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 373-4605
P.O. Box 2973. Miami. Florida 33101
FRED K. SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SELMA M. THOMPSON
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Assistant to Publisher
MARION NEVINS. News Coordinator
Tht Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published Bl-Weekly by the Jewish Floridian
Second-Class Postage Paid at Miami. Fla.
Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood Shofar Editorial
ADVISORY COMMITTEE Dr. Sheldon Wlllens. Chairman: Ross Becker-
man, Ben Salt.-r. Marion Nevlns. Dr. Norman Atkin. Robert N. Kerbel
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndi-
cate, Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association, American As-
sociation of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year $2 Off. Out of Town Upon
R< auest.
Volume 3
Friday, April 13. 1973
Number 11
11 NISAN 5733
Announcement Welcomed
I The announcement that the University of Miami will
oBer an interdepartmental major in Judaic studies beginning
with next fall's semester is welcome news for the Jewish
community of the Greater Miami area. By its action, U-M
joins more than 300 colleges now offering such courses,
although not all have provided the necessary credit hours
leading to a major in the college of arts and sciences.
While it is too soon to gauge student reaction to;the
program, the success on other campuses would indicate
a favorable response. It is also too soon to predict the ef-
fect on our community's search for trained teachers and
other Jewish professionals. However, if all the program
does is produce more knowledgeable and educated Jews
then it will be an important adjunct to our present educa-
tional system which is notable for its neglect of those be-
yond their teens.
The University of Miami is to be commended for this
valuable contribution to the education of our total commu-
nity, for without a knowledge of the Jewish influence on
western civilization no person is truly educated.
Warsaw Takes Its Place
Passover is, of course, one of the great Jewish festi-
vals according to modern polls, the most popular of all
our holidays. In recent years, it has become the occasion
for reminding us of one of the great events in modem
Jewish history, the uprising of the Warsaw Ghetto.
On the eve of Passover, in 1943,the Nazis infiltrated
the ghetto in an effort to destroy the Jewish Organization
of Fighters, the heroic underground of the Polish city. Only
lightly armed, denied assistance from others, the heroes
held off the Germans until September when the last of
them fell.
Warsaw takes its place in Jewish history and no cele-
bration of Passover can be held in the future without hon-
oring the memory of those modem martyrs to the freedom
which is the essence of the Passover observance.
Rising Costs Affect Passover
The increased food costs which affect all families will
be felt particularly hard by needy Jewish families as they
prepare for the special reguirements of the rapidly ap-
proaching Passover holiday. In Greater New York, it is
estimated that the increase in the prices of Passover food
may be as much as 25 per cent above that of a year ago,
and a special appeal has gone out from the Federation of
Jewish Philanthropies.
Synagogues in the Greater Miami area have tradi-
tionally aided those families which need assistance in ob-
serving this festival which stresses a changed diet in great
part. In recent years, they have been aided in their search
for the needy through public and private welfare agencies
and the number of Jewish families receiving welfare has
come as a surprise to many.
While we have received no special appeal from the
synagogues this year, it would be well to remember the
local people who reguire our assistance and search out
those synagogues now which have Passover funds so that
they may help all those who are in need.
Setting Shameful Record Straight
There is a good deal of significance in the fact that the
Senate Foreign Relations Committee has unanimously ap-
proved the Genocide Convention. With 53 senators indicat-
ing their support, an early vote is expected on the guestion
and the prospects are good that the United States at last
will join the 75 United Nations member states which have
ratified the treaty outlawing genocide.
The Senate has been unable to muster enough votes
even to get the issue out of the Foreign Relations Commit-
tee for the past 20 years, a shameful record that is at last
on its way to being set straight
MATTER OF FACT h *
WASHINGTON. DC. Now-
adays, in the dark hours before
dawn you sometimes wonder
whether a lot of virtuous Amer-
icans do not actualty WANT to
see their country-defeated. Con-
sider, to begin with, the power-
ful drive now taking shape
among the liberal Democrats in
Congress to dismantle the na-
tional defense.
THEN consider a few other
things of some significance, like
the dreadful surprise that fol-
lowed hard on the heels of the
first round of the Strategic Arms
Limitation Talks. The surprise
took the form of a Soviet test,
demurely delayed until the first
SALT round was over, of a sub-
marine-launched ballistic missile
with a range of about 4,500
miles.
The surprise was dreadful for
several reasons. To begin with,
the range of this new submarine-
launched missile exceeds by
around 1.000 miles the maximum
that had been considered pos-
sible by the American scientific
analysts. The first SALT agree-
ment was squarely based on
the U.S. analysts' predictions,
which have now turned out to
be poppycock.
Then, too. the Soviet test
proved that in the first round
of SALT talks the Soviet nego-
tiators had been grossly mislead-
ing, if not directly untruthful.
They had pleaded that their sub-
marine-launched ballistic missiles
had a much shorter range than
the comparable American weap-
ons. They had stressed the com-
plex operational factors that
make an increase of range al-
most exactly equivalent to an
increase of number, in the case
of strategic missiles launched
from submarines.
HENCE the Soviets had claim-
ed they had a right to a lot
more submarine-launched mis-
siles than the United States. This
claim, made in the sacred name
of "parity," was, in fact, recog-
nized. Under SALT I, the So-
viets are allowed to build up to
a total of 950 submarine-launch-
ed nuclear missiles, whereas the
United States is held to a level
of about 600 such missiles.
Now, however, the Soviets
have a submarine-launched mis-
sile of much longer range than
any in the U.S. arsenal, either
in existence or in prospect. Its
present accuracy has been ques-
tion, but accuracy can always
be improved. With missiles of
such range, moreover, Soviet nu-
clear submarines can lurk in the
Bering Sea or the Sea of Okho-
tsk, far beyond the reach of U.S.
sea surveillance. And thence
they can loft their missiles to
almost all the most vital Amer-
ican targets'.
IN SUM, this single Soviet
missile test betokens a coming
change in the strategic balance
that ought to give the creeps to
any liberal Democrat who gives
a pin about his country's future.
Instead, one of the prime aims
of the liberal Democratic attack,
now being organized in the Sen-
ate, is the destruction of the
U.S. Trident program. This is a
program, of course, intended to
give this country greater and
less vulnerable seaborne nuclear
striking power.
One of the main objections to
Trident, naturally, is that the
new missiles will be MIRVed
in other words, will have multi-
ple warheads capable of being
independently targeted. The doc-
trine of the virtuous is that if
the United States goes on
MIRVing its missiles, the So-
viets will then be driven to
MIRV their missiles. This, once
again, is purest goose-talk.
SOVIET nuclear missiles are
not MIRVed today, simply be-
cause Soviet missile develop-
ment took a wrong turning a
good many years ago. To MIRV
a missile successfully, you have
to put a complex miniaturized
computer on board the missile.
For detailed guidance, the So-
viets instead relied for a long
time on computer systems at the
launch point.rather than using
onboard computers.
"Throughout much of.the first
round of SALT talks, however,
it was already perfectly clear
that the Soviets were working,
all out, to correct this past error
and thus to MIRV. Another
recent Soviet missile test has
shown, furthermore, that the So-
viets have already achieved con-
siderable success in this inten-
sive effort.
THE NEW missile tested is
called the SS-17. It has an on-
board computer and a range of
6.000 miles. It can even be re-
garded as a new "counterforce
weapon.' But the main point is
'tha't"tn'e new missile'ls a long
step in the direction of much
more widespread Soviet MIRV-
ing. which the goose-talkers say
we must not "stimulate." In
such matters, the Soviets need
no stimulation.
The goose-talkers still quack
about "parity." In reality, an-
( onliime.l on Page 12-A
-/xS It,'12
Max Lerner
Sees It
V
REDDING, Calif. The passionate ethnic movements of
the 1960s have carried over into the quieter '70s in the militancy -
of embattled Indians at Wounded Knee, S.D. It is a delayed carry-
over. But history's road to the current Wounded Knee is worth
following since it sheds considerable light on the very diverse
cultures of the Indians and their white conquerors.
No cosmetic words can gloss over the fact that the European
whites settling in the East, pushing even farther West to the
Pacific took the land away from the Indians by force and fraud.
There were two courses open to the Indians: to adapt them-
selves or to fitfht. They were not good at adapting, and very good
at fighting, but the superior white weaponry foreclosed the out-
come. Even after Wounded Knee in 1890, usually regarded as
the end of the wars, there were sporadic minor outbursts, includ-
ing one in the early part of the century here around Redding.
The whole experience left a scar on the conscience of the whites
and the consciousness of the Indian:.
What makes it the more tragic is that it need not have hap-
pened that way. There was once the mentality of a Thomas Jef-
ferson as well as an Andrew Jackson. The Jackson approach was
one of a rough, no-nonsense belligerence: Get the Indians out of
their lands, by whatever means. The Jefferson approach was
gentler, more reasonable, respectful of Indian culture and identity.
Jefferson's turned out to be the road not taken. Jackson's
was the road taken, and it led to Wounded Knee in 1890 and
again in 1973.
* &
IT IS A CASE OF two diverse cultures, which turned each
other off. instead of enriching each other. Each is caught now in
its own neurosis: The Indians unable to come to terms wholly
either with city living or reservation living, veering between
self-pity and militancy: the whites feeling their guilt, yet unable
to be truly generous.
The solution isif both groups dare move toward it to
round out Indian autonomy on the reservations, to stop doing
things "for" the Indians and to help them do things for them-
selves, and also to ease the path of integration for those who
want to take it. This cant be done unless the Indians retain a
pride in their history, culture, identity, and unless the whites
develop a genuine respect for all three.
Needless to say, integration doesn't mean the melting pot,
in the sense of liquidating the cultural differences. It means ac-
cepting (he diversity of cultures and showing some hospitality
between them.
The demands of the Wounded Knee leaders declaring the
independence of an Oglala nation and a state of war with the
United States are infantile. Indian history cannot be rolled
back and replayed. More likely, this represents some 80 per cent
rhetoric and 20 per cent bitterness. Russell Means and the other
leaders of his tiny group express only a small segment of the
thinking of Indians. Himself a city Indian, he has in one sense
been integrated with the large culture outside, taking over its
flair for publicity and the activist method of extreme dramatic
demands which catch the headlines and the imagination. Com-
pare this with the traditional Indian values of an eloquet dignity
between stretches of impassive silence.
"fr #
AT BOTTOM, THE WOUNDED KNEE confrontation is a
phase in an internal struggle within Indian leadership groups.
The militant AIM group has few roots in the cultural soil of the
reservations. It will doubtless be strengthened if the struggle re-
sults in some Indian martyrs of the federal blockade. A Senate
investigation, in many ways desirable, would also give the group
a national stage, which it needs. But however restless and bitter
the Indians have reason to be, the overwhelming weight of their
community is conservative, collective, traditional.
Denying that he meant to starve out the contingent at
Wounded Knee, Federal Marshal Wayne Colburn blurted out.
But I'm sure as hell planning to change their lifestyle." It was
a hapless remark. Their lifestyle is the one great resource of the
American Indians, more precious than the oil wells some of them
have. It is what they can contribute to an integration of the two
cultures.
Wounded Knee comes sadly Just at the point when many
young whites are questioning the .aggressive, acquisitive value*
of their own culture and turning*) the gentler Indian vaiM*and
to the historic road not taken. -


Friday, April 13, 1973
+Jeliti Fkridn&n n<* Shofar of Hollywood
Page 5-A.
'
World Watching As Trial Of
Soviet Mechanic Begins
As the world watched with an-
xiety, a new trial began March 29
in Vinnitza, the Ukraine. A 36-year-
old mechanic named Isaak Shkol-
nik is being tried by a closed mili-
tary court on charges of anti So-
viet slander and treason.
Mr. Shkolnik's real crime was
applying for a visa to emigrate to
Israel. He was arrested in July of
1972, immediately following that
application, and has been detained
since that time. He was originally
charged with "slandering the So-
viet State and social order" and
"anti-Soviet agitation and propa-
ganda."
The charge of treason, which
carries a possible death sentence,
was added later. It was based on
the claim that the calling card of
a British businessman was found
in Shkolnik's apartment and he
was thus accused of "industrial
espionage."
The National Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council has
asked that many telephone calls
and cables to the Soviet Union be
made immediately. Calls and tele-
grams to officials should stress
that the world is watching and that
every attempt will be made to
gain maximum exposure of this
new threat to Soviet Jews.
Calls to the family should be
SHOUT!
SCREAM!
RANT!
RAVE!
COMPLAIN!
IN
SPANISH
ITALIAN
RUSSIAN
FRENCH
GERMAN
CHINESE
OR...?
TILOS
THE INTERNATIONAL
LINGUISTIC
OVERSEAS SYSTEM
(under famed Linguist
ALBERT JOSEF SCHAROL)
Don't Waste Money-
Phone 522-2537
215 N. 46th Avenue
Hollywood
supportive of their plight, but not
anti-Soviet, the council explains.
Possible contacts include:
(wife) Faiga Shkolnik tele-
phone 437-61, Vinnitza, Ukraine,
SSR
(mother) Mrs. Shkolnik tele-
phone 260-74, Vinnitza, Ukraine,
SSR
Vinnitza KGB officials Pogrilov
and Uskich telephone 294-86
Roman Rudenko, Procurator
General of the Soviet Union 15-
A Pushkinskava
Moscow, RFSSR .U.S.S.R.
Telephone 296-9002, Moscow
The council would like to be
informed of any completed com-
munications; cassette tapes of con-
versations would be preferred.
The council address is 55 West
42nd St., New York City 10036.
Robert Kerbel Guest
At Club Breakfast
"Soviet Jewry" will be the topic
of a lecture by Robert N. Kerbel of
the Jewish Welfare Federation,
Hollywood, before the Hallandale
Jewish Center Men's Club Sunday
at 9 a.m.
Mr. Kerbel is a member of the
National Association of Social
Workers, the national association
of Jewish Community Organized
Personnel, and the National Con-
ference of Jewish Services.
A Happy Pasaover To All...
JESSIE'S BEAUTY SALON
WEST TAFT ST.
5 Beauticians
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COMPLETE COIFFURES
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LONG HAIR SPECIALISTS
MANICURES
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A Happy Passover To All.
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Where Hollywood
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U.I. 1 SHIMIDAN
1420 S. MOIIl. HWY. DAN
lM( (Oil'WOOD tUlli OAMIA
m.
920-2545
Hollywood Chapter
Of Hadassah Holds
Donor-Patron Event
More than 500 guests filled the
Crystal Room of the Diplomat Ho-
tel as the Hollywood Chapter of
Hadassah held its annual "Donor
Reward and Patron Luncheon" re-
cently. Mrs. Frances M. Briefer,
chapter donor luncheon chairman,
welcomed the large audience.
As president of the chapter, Mrs.
Abraham J. Salter, introduced the
presidents of the six groups which
make up the chapter, Mrs. Harry
Bagdan, Beach group; Mrs. George
SeftelL H'Atid group; Mrs. Adele
Foland, Henrietta Szold group;
Mrs. Herman Goodman, Hillcrest
group; Mrs. Earl Heichen, Mt. Sco-
pus group and Mrs. Samuel Hutter,
Shalom group.
Mrs. Alfred Tuvin, national
board chairman, handled the pres-
entation of awards to the women
who had made their contributions
towards the support of Hadassah
work.
Following the presentation cere-
mony, the Habimah Players of
Hollywood in conjunction with
members of the Hollywood Play-
house presented an original musi-
cal portraying some of the high-
lights of the history of Hadassah.
Teens To Conduct
Religious Service
Temple Sinai will be the scene
of a completely original religious
service conducted by area teen-
agers April 21. To be held outdoors
at 8 p.m., the creative event will
have "Havdalah" (Freedom) as its
theme. A silent vigil on behalf (
Soviet Jewry will follow.
Heading the group as chairman
is Linda Emas. Her committee is
composed of Steve Scharf, Wendy
Berk, Jackie Rich, Kathy Newman,
Karen /Stone and Paul Kerbel.
Rabbi Robert Frazin of Temple
Solel is the young people's advisor.
All young members of the Jew-
ish community are invited. (Rain
date will be April 28.)
Hadassah Group To Elect New Slate Of Officers
Husbands and friends are in-
vited to participate in cards or
mah jongg following the regular
meeting of the Henrietta Szold
group of Hadassah which will take
place Thursday, April 19.
Mrs. Adele Foland will preside
The business segment of the get-
togfther will begin at 12:30 p.m.
in the Miramar Recreation Center,
at which time election of officers
for the coming year will be held.
r
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Pucre 6 A
+Jcnilft ncrSrHa^ir "< Shofar of Honywood
Friday, Apri1 J3 1873
Camp Ka-Dee-Mah Accepting Applications
Application: re now being ac- schedule Our teor.s travel the
ted for the seventh summer
OB of Camp Ka-Dee-Mah. the
n j camp in Greater Hollywood
hi '1 by the Jewish commu-
nity which provides children with
an opportunity for recreational
.ty n;i a broad scale in ;i so
on with other Jewish young
f hHdn n at the camp receive
xpowre to their Jewish and
I rkan heritages through mu-
-i i, cb ma, story I
cations and special events
i than through formal da i -
j religious -
' amp Ka-Dee-Mah i- social
ii k oriented, with small groups of
i Ii i n led by matui e i
i. a have be, n ...;. i one m
mselves with the social and
- inal growth of children. It
an opportunity for group
designed to gii e youn ; i -
learning experi net includ-
T.aking friends, sharini
living new skill.,, adjusting to
Ituations, am! undent
. reciating the world around
h m.
Five "age-graded" programs are
ifferari for boys and girls from the
- of three to IS. Application:
ire being accepted from all real-j
dents of the community regardless
.1 their ability to pay the fui: cost
>f tuition. Scholarship applicants
can arrange a confidential appm:i!
v. nt bj calling Miss Esther Low-
enth.81., MBOW, executive director
of the Jewish Family Service of
Broward County. 1909 Harrison
St.. Hollywood.
The five groups of campers arc: '
PRESCHOOL: All boys and
girls who will be three or four by
July 1, 1973, and who have not
<*t attended kindergarten, are eli-
gtde for Camp Ka-Dee-Mah's pre-
NChool group. These programs will
>c similar to the junior camp but
vill be presented in a shortened
into span (9 a.m. to 3 pjn.) Short-
er trips, cook-outs and activities
vill be suited to the younger ages
n this group. The pre-school camp
vlll be housed at Temple Beth
Shalom and will include house tot
house I us pickup.
JUNIORS: *oys and girls who
will be in kindergarten or first
sTade as of Sept. 1, J973 are eli-
gible for this group. Their pro- j
gram will be similar to the senior
.amp program described here, but
vill be presented at a more lei-
surely pace. Trips and cook-outs
vill be shorter, and activities suit-
ed to the younger ages will be fea-1
tltred. Junior camp is housed in a
separate wing of Temple Beth-El.
md travels in its own bus during
the camp day.
SKNIOKS: These are youngsters
ilio will he in second through fifth
grades in September. They experi-
ence a complete range of day
lamping activities, including ua-
'ure and campcraft, sports and
yames, arts and crafts, music, dra-
matics, trips, celebrations, oneg
-habbat programs, overnights and
special events. A program of swim
nstruction and recreational swim-
ming is held at the Hallandale
City Pool.
The camp program stresses a re-
laxed but friendly approach to or-
ganized fun. rather than the fran-
tic, over-competitive atmosphere
sometimes seen in camping
TEEN TRAVELERS: Offers a :
program designed to meet the
needs of campers who will be en-
tering grades six through nine.
Teen travelers are given the oppor-
tunity to "do their own thing" by
actively participating in the pre
Iminary planning of their own
irogram.
This year we continue the two
separate teen units one for the
sixth and seventh graders, and one
tor the eighth and ninth. After
'heir daily pick-up. the two units
vill go their separate ways, with
activities geared to their respec-
tive interests and needs. On occa-
sion the twa. units will plan joint
jctivities.
Teen travelers is a unique pro-
gram, since it introduces the more
uature campers to a variety of
canpsites aad a flexible daily
hi
("." lunches, and camp ".ill pro-
hways and byways of Dade and, vidi a beverage1 Wiiri theninc)
broward counties. Each new day and also with the daily snack.
brings a new experience, new site, Children will be picked up ir.
new adventure. The daily sit. .,,. vicinity of their homes, ar.d
chosen so that the tarn program Is .-. ,n no; be d to cross MA
i rounded, including athlel .,. without an es
social, cultural, educational and
REGISTRATION 1973 Season
community service activit -
The basic time schedule will be
>30 to 4:30 but they will be free
o rr their hour, to
specific activities, such as night
ball games, camp-fires or beach
-n-tie-. Schedules of coming ac-
ivities will be distributed in ad-
vance, and will .! i r ny iacluue
one 11. ning activity a
. eek. Teen traveli re will carry
heir own lunches but bevera
"-ill be supplied by the camp tin-
luded in the fee).
CTF"s (cou s in training)
'ill be a carefully select small
group of lOlh j radars who are
lere ed In an intensive, well-
under! Iflhi w designed
to develop an understanding of
child behavior, group leadership
techniques and program .-kills.
This group will be attached to
junior and senior camps. Their
lime will be devoted to instruc-
tion, observation, discussion, prac-
tice and supervised practical as-
iigniBtntS. Some time will be left
over for just plain fun.
All applicants will be interview-
ed to determine their readiness
uinl Interest Only si.\-weck regis-
trations can be accepted, at a S90
fee for the season. Those who com- ,
plete the program satisfactorily ;
will be issued a certificate and will
be eligible for hiring next summer |
as second year (rather than begin-
ning) junior counselors.
All children will bring their I
cort. !"i.....chool ranipcrs will be
picked up at their own homes
Transport ition will be provided
anywheri within the area served
by the Jewi ii Welfare Federation
Greater Hollywood unless such
service unduij extends the travel
inae of othnr rider- Transporta-
tion i- included in the camp fees
Camp Ka-Dee-Mah is operated
on a nonpioiit basis, thereby pro
\ iding for reas inable f. es
3 weeks June 25-Julv 13
3 weeks July 16-Aug. 3
$90
6 weeks June 25-Aug. 3
$175
fEEN TRAVELERS:
S103 for
3 eks $200 for G week
ciT's: Si)0 for (i weeks (shorter
period not available i
A completed application mav
be brought or mailed to Camp Ka '
Dei M h i Jewi in Welfare Fed
cration, 1900 Harrison St., Holl;
wood. A deposit of at least 823 \
VII Y ACCOMPANY BACH AP
PLICATION, The deposit cannot'
be refunded unless the camp is j
unable to accept the child. Bal
ance of th fee i due June 11.
Applications will be accepted in
the order of their receipt, and
registration for each age group
will close as soon as the limit for
thai group has been reached. Par-
eats are urged to register earl}
in order to avoid disappointment
for their children.
HARRY B. ORRINGER M.D.
Announces the Relocation of
the offices of
HARRY B. ORRINGER, MD. AND ASSOCIATES PA.
For the Practice of
TO
1030 Washington Street
Hollywood, Florida 33020
Office Hours
By Appointment
Telephone
921-6100

our own
gas war.
Datsun1200.
Own a Datsun Original.
FromNisMnwith Prick* ^^
SCOTT MOTORS
1640 SO. STATE ROAD 7
at Pembroke Road, Hollywood
Name
Sex M F B.rthdate
Acclress
Nearest Con
Previous Yea p Ka-Dee-V
Pre-Schoo 73.
Senioi "-73
Teen
CAMPING PERIOD DESIRED
3 WEEKS 6,2 S90 00
3 WEEKS r 8 3 $90 CO
6 WEEKS $175.00
Age as ot 7' i > 73
Grade 9.-1,73
12)
Junior r 1st Gradi
Teen Travi
C I T ,101'
- 3105 CO C t T.
Teen Tr. $10! $90 00
Teen Tr S200.00 6 .'..
73 YAMAHA'S ARE AT WEG
NOW CHOOSE FROM 18 MODELS
From Mini to 750 cc
AND GET IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
WEG ENTERPRISES INC.
YAMAHA MOTORCYCLES
2307-09 S. STATE ROAD 7
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
i
i^KURASH/T5
Main Office 2429 Hollywood Blvd.
Phone 923-2461
Branch Office 7991 Johnson St.
Phone 966-9300 or 947-3332 Toil Free
Stanley S. Kurssh Our Urge Staff of
and Naomi R. Kurash Qualified Associates
Ready To Serve You.
4
A Happy Passover To AH .

fi

CAMP BARNEY MEDINTZ
/ / of ttte
ATLANTA JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
ilnuiu
-.111-4 .r.ill.
'Knrh i"ik .Lime-
-.iiiii I f^S?"0" Second Seuton
June 24 July 22 July 23 Aug. 20
Only $390. Per Smion
MeaiMMM all activitier!
nr-ilnl in ||. \\\ut Kk^cMi..
K0 miMW MMh m Atl.inu. l..i
In Cr.il.iml. l.j.
i.ii iiifurmaiinni nir nr i-sll-
I TI.M'i .!,,.. k,. \.| ..AiUiii.i. 1... l(l,W*l
- <,


Friday, April 13. 1973
Jtllfcl mhrUdliar Sho,r of Hollywood
Page 7-A
' <,
Moses Vs Pharaoh
By RABBI SAMUEL SILVER
(A Seven Arts Feature)
Whenever Passover reaurs, we have
a vision of the confrontation between
Mo3es and Pharaoh.
Moses represents compassion. Per-
sonally safe from the rigors of bondage,
he could not stand to see the Israelite
slaves suiter. Their anguish was a pain
in his heart.
Pharaoh represents callousness. An
insatiable thirst tor power made it possible
for him to impose slavery on other human
beings and immunized him against pity.
Moses wanted to serve. Pharaoh
wanted to dominate.
Passover is ancient but not dated.
We have seen again and agcin in his-
tory the clash, the confrontation, despots
like Pharaoh (haters, we might call
them) and devotees of righteousness
(phophets, we might call them).
In the Bible, the duel between Pharaoh
and Moses is a personal one. The conflict
is one between two individuals, antitheti-
cal one to the other.
We see the confrontation not only be-
tween individuals, but also, in the long
course of history, between groups.
What we might term Mosaism trans-
cends any personage. Mosaism is the sum
total of those trends in society making for
human well-being. Mosaism is reflected
in endeavors for the broadening of the
area of well-being in the world. Mosaism
is the effort to ameloriate the conditions
under which people live.
When groups strive to lift the status of
the poor, the handicapped and the disad-
vantaged, that is Mosaism.
When groups curtail freedom or shut
out the sight of suffering in the world,
when they seek power or self-aggrandize-
ment, that is Pharaohism at work.
The duel between these two persists
until today.
The confrontation has another aspect.
Not only does Passover recall the
clash between two people.
Not only does Passover recall the con-
Continued on Pag 10-A
'Jhadi(jcna4 ^ft/Mere)
\t<>c<>
Beautiful long-lasting arrangement __ _
of mums and carnations with $1 ^J wU
mums and
3 candles for your Seder dinner
KINDAU
2S1-0990
MIAMI-
MIAMI 1IACH
373-4631
THE FLORIST .,
Your Plwn* ll Your Ch*at Account'
MOUTH OADI
635*191
HOUYWOOD
920-41 SI
ill.


PagefrA
-JewistncrfdHar rf i -" --,,'--
Fridcry, April 13, 1973
Holiday Greeting*
to the Jewish Community

MANOR KOSHER FOOD CENTER
4620 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
(Next to Winn Dixie)
Under strict super-
vision of Orthodox
Vaad Haskashruth of
Florida.
RABBI SHUDON
EVER, DIRECTOR.
Telephone 966-8155
J/o/lyuioad Waadiuark
Mica
CUSTOM MADE FURNITURE
r Call
927-0987
1201 S.W. 4 AV., DANIA
ASK *OR JEAN OfSMARIAS. OUR FRENCH
DESIGNER YOUR CHOKE WILL BE OUR
QUALITY & YOUR PRIDE.
PERRY'S
OF COURSE
LADIES WEAR
1918 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
EXTENDS THEIR BEST WISHES TO ALL
FOR A HAPPY PASSOVER
A Happy Passover To AU .
THE GARDEN CENTER WITH THE GROW-HOW
HALLANDALE GARDENS
806 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY, HALLANDALE
PHONE 923-2070
Open Sundays 9-5 We Deliver
A Happy Passover To All .
ONE ELEVEN MIRACLE PAINT & BODY SHOP
Quality Painting and Professional Body Work
129 N.W. 4th Avenue, Dania
Telephone 925-9011
FRANK RUZECKI

A Happy Passover To All .
ftC~A~QEU
DELICATESSEN t RESTAURANT
COMPLETE TAKE OUT DEFT.
AND BUFFET CATERING
HOLLYWOOD FASHION CENTER
(Next to Richards)
OPEN 7 DAYS 983-7000
A Happy Passover To All ...
RUTH'S LITTLE SHOP
Chinese Dolls Fur Dogs Leather Goods
Taiwan Mexico Imoprt Gift Hems
27-E North Federal Hwy., Dania, Florida 920-9913
Israel As Seen By
David Schoenbrun
By SEY.MOl'R B. LIEBMAN
Israel is celebrating the 25th
anniversary of its independence.
Much has happened in the inter-
vening years and, as history ac-
cumulates, people have a tendency
to forget the past. David Schoen-
brun, long-time Chief Correspon-
dent for CBS News, was in Miami
Beach recently and, in an inter-
view, expressed some of his ideas
of that land of tension and pro-
gress.
Schoenbrun recalled some of
the almost forgotten miracles and
p/obiems that beset Israel in its
early years. He sketched in vivid
fashion the manner in which
650.000 Jewish Palestinians prior
to May 194i undertook the re-p< n-
sibility of bringing ir.to the new
State and caring for two million
[mmifrai ana children.
The Jewish residents of Pales-
scrimped, they shared, and
they sacnf] d so that the
le, young and old. could be
into the country and
helped to become fruitful citizens.
It was the small handful who bore
the greatest part of the burden of
bringing Israel's present Jewish
population to two and a half
million.
David Schoenbrun has spent
considerable time in Israel during
the past few years. He told of a
conversation that he had with
Gideon Samet. a 30 year old Israeli
who is thp editor of Ha'aretz.
Samet had stated that the three
generations that constitute today's
people are like three layers each
lying upon another. The first or
bottom layer is that of the
"founding fathers" which is the
generation of Ben-Gurion, Levi
Eshkol, Golda Meir and their co-
horts. For them, the queslion was:
"Shall we exist?'" They devoted
themselves ; clearing swamps and
making their dreamt come true.
To the n ''- generation, that of
le Dayan. Yigal
Allon, et al the first Palestinian-
born Jews : i |iu tion was: "With
... shall w found
MIKE'S QUICK COPY CENTER
PRINTING
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
Bulletins Brochures Reports Statements Btc.
PHOTO OFFSET SAME DAY SERVICE
927-6262
306 W. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
(Between N.W. 3rd and 4th Avenue)
A Happy Passover To All .
FLAIR OPTICAL
SAM ROTHFARB OPTICIAN
CONTACT LENSES
Prescriptions Filled Broken lenses Duplicated
Sun Glasses Ground Te Prescription Laboratory en Premise
(Reprirs)
DIAL 927-2236
2723 Hollywood Blvd.
A Happy Passover To All .
PETER'S LOCKSMITH
PETER P. ZUBE, SR., Proprietor
Diplomat Mall Swapping Center
HallendelcFla. 33009
Phone 927-0050
A Happy Passover' to All .
IMPERIAL TOWERS
BEAUTY SALON
"Complete Beauty Care"
1801 S. Ocean Drive, Hallandale 92W) 122
A Happy Passover To All .
BREINER BITOS. SERVICE STATION
400 NORTH DIXIE HIGHWAY, HALLANDALE
PHONE 922-2324
A Happy Passover To All ,
THE KATIE SHOP, HK.
V. W. Specialists
101 N.E 1st Street, Dania 922-0573
DAVID SCHOENBRUN
the answer by building farms, fac-
tories, creating jobs, etc.
The latest generation, the native-
born Israelis, ask themselves,
"How shall we exist?" and "in
what kind of society shall we per-
severe?" Schoenbrun believes that
this new generation is pragmatic.
He said. "Heroes make a country
biit cant really run it."
He added thai this new genera-
tion is apoli .'.,i. They vote, but
they do not pa iicipate in the
. attles it go on b"tween
elections. He aiso noted that
aimost I/O pei cent of the Israeli
A Happy Passover To All. .
fr*m
SALLY'S
ALTERATIONS
ALTERATIONS FOR
MEN and WOMEN
Phone 922-6900
1818'2 N. 20!h Ave. Hwd.
SALLY GREENE, Owner
A Happy Passover To All.
HOLLYWOOD
CAR WASH
FAST FULL SERVICE
CAR WASH
In Front of Dog Track
tOl N. Federal Highway
Hallandale
929-3696
A Happy Passover To All..
SMART SET
STYLING SALON
BETTY PRISCAK
6488 Hollywood Uvd.
Hollywood
Telephone: 981-0635
'
:~~~;
A Happy Passovc- To All..
EXECUTIVE .
CLEANERS
Mr. t Mrs. Norman Sil verman
3810 S Ocean Dr.
hfc.ll in......| a. "'
A Happy Passover To AH
LINOLEUM
CITY
GEORGE SUVOtMAN
60S North Stele Reed 7 '
r4ofpyw0od Telephen* 961-1889 ..... 1


Friday. April 13. 1973
i.-. -
* Je*i*t fkrktlan end Shefer of Hollywood

'
Page SA
*
^^e^
electorate exercise their franchise.
He commented on the kibbutz
whose members constitute only 3
per cent of the total population.
Although only 3 out of every-10
Israelis are kibbutzniks, they sup-
ply an elite leadership in the army
and in the political life. They bore
the highest percentage of human
losses in each of Israel's three
wars.
Despite their important role and
that of the Histadrut, Israel is not
V. really the socialist state that most
people believe it to be. This
erroneous picture is the fault of
the mass media which disseminates
news about Israel.
It is true, he said, that the
founding fathers and Israel's polit-
ical leadership wanted and still
desire a socialist state, but that is
lot the desire of the majority and
:he facts are against the existence
cf a socialist state at present.
Although he refused to prog-
rasticate about future events on
the Israeli national and interna-
tional scene, one can draw certain
* Inferences frcm his remarks. He
' ; lievea that Israel can maintain
the Jewish character of the State
with a Jewish majority only by
relinquishing, in a peace treaty,
the Jordan West Bank. If Israel
A Happy Passover To All..
LUMANS
3806 South Ocean Drive
Hollywood
Phone 922-2250
Dresses Sportswear
Swim Suits
incorporated this area into the
State, then the Jews would become
a minority because of the addi-
tional Arab citizens whose birth
-rate is, higher than that of the
Jews.
Schoenbrun is not optimistic
about aliyah from the West.
Americans, and especially Miami
Beach Jewish tourists, he point-
edly added, must realize that
Israeli Jews are not obligated to
be more pious than the Jews in
the Diaspora. It is absurd to be-
lieve that living in the Holy Land
will transform the character and
habits of Jews.
Religious observance depends on
the individual and not on his place
of residence. Most Americans fail
to adjust to life in Israel and their
expectations are frequently un-
realistic. Scientists and people of
culture integrate more readily
into the Israeli way of life.
The American "New Left"' Jew-
ish youth go to Israel to escape
materialism and capitalism, but
they find that Israelis, toe, are
materialistic and capitalistic de-
spite the existence of an autocratic
labor mo\ ement.
Schoenbrun and his daughter
and son-in-law found that a major-
ity of the youth are "squares" and
very conformist While Israel:
1
A Happy Passover To All..
AMERTCIAjN
SERVICE CENTER
202 North Ocean Drive
Hollywood
Phone 922-6802
New Ownership
Jean Cescla
ft
A Happy Passover To All...
(BfALLANDALlI
TRAVEL
SERVICE
The Diplomat MH
East HoUandale Bch. Blvd.
Phone 927-4271
. AIR LINES AND
CRUISE TICKETS
t
A Happy Passover To All.
BODY KNOCK SHOP
NO JOB TOO BIG
AU. WORK GUARANTEED
BONDED
Complete
AUto Center
980 N. Fed. Hwy. Hatlan Sale
920-8100
fr Daily 8-5, Sat. V Day
New and Used Cars

youth are fascinated by the vital-
ity of American life, they are non-
alienated, they love their country,
they fight to be drafted, and they
respect their parents. He did iwt
find any clamor for a women's
liberation movement because Is-
raeli women do not feel sup-
pressed, oppressed, or frustrated.
Schoenbrun's latest book. "The
New Israelis,'' will be reviewed in
the near future, since his inter-
view did not touch on the material
in his book.
I
A Happy Passover To All .
-^ CITY NATIONAL BANK
El OF HALLANDALE
@ AT THE DIPLOMAT MALL
PERSONAL AND BUSINESS BANKING
EVERY MODERN BANKING SERVICE
SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES
MEMBER FDIC FEDERAL RESERVE
*rv
A Hcppy Passover To All .
Grosse Pointe
FURNITUPE SHOPS CUR 59-h YEAR
Ft. Lauderdale Showroom
524 N.E. 6th Ave., on N. Federal Hwy.
PHONE: 763-4508
Open Monday 'til 9 P.M.
Hollywood Showroom
2216 Hollywood Blvd.
PHONE: 922-3492
Open Friday 'til 9 P.M.
A HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL
FROM ..
Hollywood Memorial Gardens
CEMETERY, INC.
1600 N. 60th AVENUE, HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33021
A Happy Passover To All .
HOLLYWOOD, INC. REALTORS
DEVEIOPEKS OF
HOLLYWOOD HILLS AND EMERALD WHS
OfteKS A COMPLETE MAI ESTATE SERVICE
, 1ST. J0
HOLLYWOOD
981-1000
4MI SMCHIOAN
MIAMI
625-2550
A Happy Passover To All .
FEDERAL HWY. PHILLIPS 66 SERVICE STATION
1503 N. Federal Highway, Hollywood
Phone 925-9078
SHALOM from...
BEST WISHES, INC
4S33 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood
Telephone 981-7500
A Happy Passover To All .
ARGO UNIFORM CO.
1000 South Dixie Hiahway, Hellandale
Phone 9224597
A Hcppy Passover To All .
RITZ
FURNITURE REFINISHING
A Happy Passover To All .
"WONDERFUL WALLS, INC.
The WaHpeper Showroom at the...
"NEW DIPLOMAT MALL"
Hal Ian dale 920-0899
REASONABLE
SANDBLASTING & CUSTOM REFINISHING
WOODS METALS PIANOS WOOD &
METAL OFFICE FURNITURE
1316 N. DIXIE HWY. 922-8875
m
PASSOVER GREETINGS TO THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
FROM
Southeast Bank of Miramar
and the
Southeast Bank of Hollywood Hills
(Member FDIC)
A Happy Passover To All .
"SELECT YOUR HOME BY COMPUTER"
SERVING THE "HOLLYWOOD" AREA
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE
SALES AND RENTALS
Main Office
4514 Hollywood Blvd
987-4863 Miami (no toll) Dial 6240111
Branch Office
7649 Hollywood Blvd.
961-3800 Miami (no toll) Dial 624-1641
RRESYI
. htfreftEARTof HOLLYWOOD HILLS"


Page 10 A
+Jeni$t ftcridiiani "' Shof.r of Hollywood
Friday. Apiil 13. 1973
A Happy Passover To All .
FREE DELIVERY PHONE: 927-1 AT
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7 A.M. 10 P.M
HDIRAL HWY. AT JOHNSON ST.
Where You Shop With Confidence
A Happy Passover To All .
MORNINGSTAR'S JEWELERS *
PROTECT YOUR JEWELS !!!
Have Them Appraised by Stale Diamond & Jewelry Appraisers
WHILE YOU WAIT
119 N. 20 Ave 923-2372 Hollywood
A Happy Passover To All .
STUDIO OF HOLLYWOOD HILLS
4512 HOLLYWOOD BLVD., HOLLYWOOD
Phone 983-1200
Specializing in Wedding and Bar Mitzvah Pictures .
Moses Vs Pharaoh
Continued from Pag* 7-A
flict between two types of national re-
gimes.
It also reminds us that within each one
of us there are tendencies of Mosaism and
Pharaohism.
We feel whii us the tug towards
power. There is a bit of Pharaoh in each of
us. We hunger for power, we can experi
ence the inward workings of hatred foi
other human beings.
And, simultaneously, there is within
us something of the Mosaic. Each of us
feels the promptings of mercy and con-
cern in our hearts. Our innards have a
dab of Mosaism which often surfaces.
Yes, we are the repositories of the
brutal and the brotherly, the cruel and the
kindly, the sweet and the bitter.
Which will prevail? It depends on
how fervently we celebrate Passover and
absorb the great message of the holiday:
to serve can be as gratifying as to rale; to
help can be as viscerally enjoyable as to
hurt.
May the best trend win.
v
t
A Happy Pa3sover To All .
BROWARD
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Hollywood Center
3601 Johnson Street
966-2020
Ft. Lauderdale Center
3501 Davie Road
581-8700
A Happy Passover To All .
BILL KELLEY

U.S. NORTH of GULFSTREAM in HAIL AND ALE
Phone:923-6571
SOUTHERN PHOTO SERVICE
MR. and MRS. MARTIN SAND
MR. and MRS. ZACHARY D. BIAL
BEST WISHES FOR A
HAPPY PASSOVER
!TO ALL
JOSEPH and IDA BAUM REALTOR
A Happy Passover To All .
FRANK MOORE
REALTY. INC.
COL. FRANK D. MOORE, President
NORMAN PLATT, General Manager
Realtor Multiple listing Service
2455 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Fla.
929-1902-Main Office
2515 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Fla
927-1616 Branch Office
HOLIDAY GREETINGS .
SPORTS CAR SOUTH INC.
FIAT CARS NOW IN HOLLYWOOD
MG AUSTIN HEALY
AH Makes of Foreign Cars
SALES and SERVICE
FT. LAUDERDALE
763-8105
630 N. Federal Hwy
6 Blocks North of Tunnel j
HOLLYWOOD
966-8660
1881 N. State Rd. 7
(441) at Harding
PAS50VER GREETINGS AND BEST WISHES
CARPET SHOWROOMS, INC.
Wholesale Through Trade Only
1920 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
hfallandate, Florida 33009
Suite 90J
BROWARD 9204004-9
DADE 944-6988
WISHING ALL OF THE JEWISH COAAMUN1TY
A HAPPY PASSOVER
TENDER TOUCH HAIR STYLIST
5715 HOLLYWOOD BLVD
HOLLYWOOD
PHONE 983-3058
A Happy Passover To All. ..
CHEZ PHYDEAUX
PET GROOMING
Jean E. Bull & Virginia Toepfer
122 S. Federal Highway
Hallandale
Call 920-6700
A Happy Passover To All. .
LA NORMANDIE
"French Cuisine et ;ts Best"
Quaint and Delightfully
Different Dining
129 N. Federal Hwy., Dania
For Reservations Call
"Noralee' 927-1889
A Happy Passover To All
ALADIN
EMPLOYMENT
AGENCY
RHEBA ASBURY
FRANK LINDGREN
CHARLOTTE BASSETT
2632 Hoilywod Blvd.
Phone 923 2411
A Happy Passover To All..
TRAVtl flMf
"Hallandale's
Travel Headquarters"
All Typos of Travel
1640 EAST HALLANDALE
BEACH BLVD.
Phono 927-9329
A Happy Passover To All
GETTO
UPHOLSTERY
6242 Pembroke Road
Miramar
Phono 989-8005


+Jt-Wistl ttcrirtfor no" Shofar of Hollywood
Peg- li-A
Editor To
Zionists
of Temple Beth El, Avrom Drii/in
..f T. mple Rleth Israel, It. bi rt
'razin of temple Sold, Morton
kj of Temple Beth Shalom,
and Harry Schwartz of the Haltan-
dale Jewish Center: Mayor Da-, id
Keating of Hollywood, State Sen.
William Zlnkil, and Stat." Rep
John Miller.
Guests will be entertained by
Dr. Alvin Colin, a life member oi
the ZOA, and his aecompaiiist,
Belle Barasch, composer and di
motor for B'nai B'rith women's
i hi iter of Fort Laud) rdale.
C3sigregationa!is?s Make Ccmni?fment
The following letter was re-1 time to say again thai we accept
wived by Rabbi Harrj Schwartz of you for what yen are fa we have
llandale Jewish Oahter: : rarked togctl i in the past
To our friends of the Jewish u, caatiniK to ;i. re toward
opmunity|^Jg iti**! h*-1 j> ,i iIImi rialteou <
'We, the undersigned members for all men, toward the making of
if the Church Council of Union this single, beautiful and vu
Chairman (or
he Mr. Perry.
the evening will
hist District to he held at Tem-
Sini I. 1201 Johnson St.. Holly
id, i !! p m. Thursday. April
according to president Sain I.
irry. The distinguished journal
topic v. '. b \ "The Year ol
icision IDT.!."
:Mr. Shoemaker lws teen editor
the Herald since 1962 and is
io a director of the Miami Hoi-
Publishing Co.
The meeting will commemorate
25th anniversary of the State
Israel and the 75th jubilee of
fthe Zionist Organization of Amcr
*a.
.Rabbi D->vi leader of Temple Sinai, will serve
as narrator for the candleugnting
proceedings in which 25 prominent
Zionists will oarticipate.
f Also participating in the pro-
gram will be'Rabbis Samuel Jane
Dream Prompted
Ugandau Leader
To Oust Israelis
LONDON MTA) President
!di Amin of Uganda said this wefc
that he expelled Israelis from h'
country las) year because tha'
course of action came to him in
dream.
He also alleged thai the In eli
military and technical ;"' ;
whom he had inviti d to aid i:i Hi
level ,pn i! hi-, cot'ntry wer
"milking the Ugandan economy.'
The African presidi nl mad" hi
remarks in an interview v \'h Davit'
Frost on an independent Britisl
television broadcast. He said tha'
e very often took actions tha
ame to him in a dream.
tional Church, a mcmbci
;ation of the t nited Church
ii Christ, -end a message of love
ind reassurance to our man?
rii ii in the Jew I ih com n initj
.Vc do !' at this time i>; ( tuse o
i : ing tensions created by the
Ii m campaign call 8 .
'Some Jews find in II a reason
ii ;. i -surgence of ar.ti-Semi-
Such is quite possible when
Emil Cohen will be honored at' ligiou i pmotions are heig it n I
'.n spite of reassurances to the con-
I- 11 ued by the program's na
ial l ad r hip, d > know tha'
Chri tian i con id*
of the State of Israel Thursday, : ven responsibilit; to
the conversion ol Jews
April 19. in the Miami Beach .T], n ,,,... ,
Auditorium under the sponsor- share this fear
Be i ; I -i ad I
npon it."
The letter was signed by the
Rev. Luthei C Pii n | aator of
l Church
ic in ad-
....
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I
Page 12-A
fJewisli fkSrkgtm and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, April 13. 1973^
T
PERSONALITY PROFILE
Scott Snyder
The soon-to-be 17-year-old for-1 was confirmed at the end of the
mer Bostonian with the qjjiet vP'!}iifciQth grade and by thea I felt the
spoke earnestly: "I guess anfiSenvTbeginnings of commitment."
Matzah Symbol of Hope For Soviet Jews
scorr snydik
itism has always seen around me
-at school, for instance but I've
become aware of it only in the
past two years. No, I don't think
there is any way of combatting it
except through education of the
prejudiced which is pretty unreal-
istic; I think the answer for us lies
in strengthering Jewish family ties
and Jewish community spirit. I
want to find out as much as I can
about Jewish identity so that I
can decide how Jewish I want my
own family to be when the time
comes."
A statement of this kind would
do many an adult proud. Coming
from a young man who will enter
Nova High School next term, it
seemed even more profound.
And there was more: "Being in
Israel last summer was a real turn-
ing point in my life. I came back
with a feeline that it was import-
ant to oct mv friends involved in
the Jewish thing. Just to belong
to a temole and to participate in
social events wasn't enough. We
had to find out who we were and
where we were going.
"The other two big factors in
my decision to explore my Jewish-
ness were Rabbi Morton Malavsky
of Temple Beth Shalom and myJ
And now Scott Snyder is presi-
dent of the Jewish Federation's
Youth Council, and finds his com-
mitment growing stronger each
day. A member of the National
Honor Society, treasurer of Nova's
Key Club and an Eagle Scout. Scott
is still able to find time to read
extensively.
Number one favorite? Jewish
history, of course. But his wide-
ranging taste encompasses the
classics and current novels as well.
The same holds true for music; as
he says, he likes "some classics,
some rock, some folk songs, and
most Israeli music."
Avocationally, apart from books,
Scott enjoys study weekends and
discussion groups more than any-
thing else, but his Youth Council
activities keep him on the go.
"The council is important," he
says, "because it is for all the
kids, temple-affiliated or not. This
is only the second year the coun-
cil has been around and I think
we're doing pretty well. The thing
is not to set the goals too high be-
cause, of course, we win some and
we lose some. But the group in
the next few years will profit from
our mistakes."
In addition to all his academic
and extracurricular activities,
Scott works several nights a week
at a Hollywood restaurant. He has
not yet decided what vocation to
pursue although he is attracted to
his uncle's profession of orthodon-
ture, but he definitely opts for a
northern school. "Boston prefer-
ably." he states and then grimaces
as he murmurs something about
the prohibitive expense.
"But I really don't know what I
want to do yet, and I don't think
many kids my age do unless their
parents have decided for them.
I'm searching now myself and
the world and philosophy and I
just don't know enough to decide
what to do with .he rest of my
life."
Scott is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
David Snyder, who had tactfully
withdrawn during the interview.
As we were saying goodnight, they
returned and added a comment
that tells the Scott Snyder story
better than perhaps anything else:
"Before Scott became so inter-
ested in the Jewish community,"
said Mr. Snyder, "we were in-
volved in only a perfunctory way.
Ifll I I1U...... I I !"' '
So that the Jews of the Soviet Union may know they have not been forgotten, the
following should be read at the Passover Seder of every American Jewish household.
The leader ot the service takes up the matzah, sets it aside, and says:
THIS IS THE MATZAH OF HOPE
This matzah, which we set aside as a symbol of hope for the Jews of the Soviet Union, reminds U3
of the indestructible links that exist between us.
As we observe this festival of freedom, we recall that Soviet Jews are not free to leave without
harassment; to learn of their past; to pass on their religious traditions: to learn the lanauage of
their fathers; to train teachers and rabbis of future generations.
We remember the scores who sought to live as Jews and struggled to leave for Israel the land
of our fathers but now languish in Soviet labor camps. Their struggle against their oppressors
goes on. They will not be forgotten.
We will stand with them in their struggle until the light of freedom and redemption shines forth.
N '11 \?V' N 1MN p^ TO yD^yil 71SI3 T
OV'llNO PO 1T>N '1 "IN9 JJUVDNn )1fi }N3I3'0
"lyowvsam nvi pyn in Otyonyi -ng^on
.in iwm vuoipy ys^yn jjnj'aiNa lyiga
yj ,on-o pn SWOV oyi pvjjfl vo iyn
iyj_n i)tion-\jji>iiNw )tt yi*N "l in to )pnrt
IS ;J113T1 )H UN^Oll HN^-INO IS V"1D OW*l
on v>m)N jU'tuhniino -iyn pyn jyrty)
H lvnift W joy'sp-no yy>'*y-> yiyn
iy-iyt? i-t>mn is ;nuN ynyt pa W*M
.jinn yp>\>ojipis ihta o'J3-i pn
pnm tump yni'TN VPtnmt n ipjyiyj i'ia
-iyn o>n ,\t dv<) piiyp
!>MtV' rono p'P Pl m T* iv^ni \m ,io'yj
lvJ! nh pn nun n pa -rjtrt ont
->y"t .oaoyp ooynN ywoyiiNo \m op'wino
IN U"J lyp'-myujiN yiyn ywp 5>Jrnyi .
?TW1 loyjiNO vwi iiyii >n .iyun
l^vn 1*3 v\ iyi >a iyow pyu vo
\jn-io pa jno ip'od'S p>m iyoipo>nN
,lVmu iin
nipnn OW by It nxn
inn ov 5y .O'lnna tm/ ,i nsg
mn btrfv ij'nn^ v*V nipnn oiti' ^y
iwprj jiN nab ^y njyo it nso .nisyion-rna
.O^iy^ pjll' ^3 1MIN OJ'3^1 1J'J'3
nin'v istj ,i)Jinn pat Ninw noon ina ,nny
.p-iin '13 oj'n jiisyion-jini
>)3 ojn njis jiity^i jins^ I'nn >J3 o)'H
> oj'n oji6i Jii3N mioo Yo^ y-\in
.o'Nsn nnn) o'jsii onVn vtbn* yyn
D"iin on ivpaw iis 'ton o^n jin iso.
N^3 1T33 J1NS1' DWDJ l'/5V^ nWVTpn .1]jim
.J13WOJ onon^o .'o'3it?n
INT*/ -tji oriN in_ tbyj.i ,ms3 onoiy un
.nt-iNini Jinsn t'n Mtin TNn jin
T
i Now he is teaching us, and for the
uncle, Dr. Sam Meline. Oh sure. | first time we are acquiring our
I was in the USY and went to He-1 own sense of identification. We
brew school and became Bar Mitz-
vah at the end of the seventh
grade. But it wasn't until later
and largely through talks with
both of them that I knew I
wanted to go on, to go deeper. I
K.Ai<*tt*r of *"?<*& by
JOSEPH KISOP
Con't. from Page 4
other question already faces us.
How will the Soviets behave if
and when they are allowed to
acquire a heavy predominance
of nuclear striking power? Any
sensible man ought to be able
to figure out the answer to that
question. And the question indi-
cates where the Soviets are
heading
find that we want to participate
as much as he does,."
And thus is "the child .
father to the man."
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After serving the North Dade Community
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vice-president of Levitt Memorial
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)


Sday, April 13, 1973
+Jewish fkfkttari < Shof.r of Hollywood
Page 13-A
Hollywoodites Elated After
Completing Tour Of Israel
*
+
"Anyone who still pictures a
ussian refugee as the old, pathetic
treotype with kerchief under
an should see the well-dressed
en and women arriving in Vi-
na," declared Mrs. Robert Baer,
of a quartet from Hollywood
ho joined 68 other Americans in
_|t city last month,
""Some of the ladies had streaked
r. and many of them were my
Htemporaries. It was obvious that j
Jey were not leaving Russia to es-1
poverty," she added, "which i
aught home to us more strongly .
an ever the fact that the desire j
live freely as Jews is the single ;
Mivating force behind Soviet cmi-
ation."
Mrs Baer and her husband Rob-1
(whose remarks were recorded '
j#.the March 30 issue of the Jew-'
isi Floridian) together with Dr.
aid Mrs. Joel Schneider, were in
Vienna on the first leg of an Is-
vrael study mission sponsored by
the Young Leadership Cabinet of
the United Jewish Appeal.
These ongoing traveling semi-
nars commence in the Danube city
because it is the stop-over point
for the emigrating Jews coming
fceadquarters serves as the way-
tation for the Soviets who are
coming in increasing numbers and
who must be provided with Is-
raeli citizenship, passports, physi-
cals, food, and shelter until they
first available transportation.
, And it is here that American*
have their first encounters with
the people for whom they have
been lobbying so forcefully and
towards whom so much fund-rais-
ing has been directed.
The kitchen at Shoenau, the cas-
tle which once boused the Nazis, is
hi operation 24 hours a day since
there is never any advance notice
as to how many refugees will ar
rive. Every train, every bus. every
plane is met by representatives of
the Joint Distribution Committee;
sometimes there are no Russian
emigres, sometimes one, sometimes
as many as 100.
i -> Within a maximum of 48 boun
each has completed his preliminary
processing and is on the next plane
for Israel, and_the visiting Amer
icans travel the same route.
"I was astonished," commented
Mrs. Baer, "to find that many ol
the Russians in my party spoke
Shalom Group Meets
Shalom Group of the Hollywood
Chapter of Hadassah met this week
at the Home Federal Bldg. in
Hollywood. Following refresh
merits and a brief business meet-
ing, a musical program was pre
sented by the Hollywood Hills
* choral group under the direction
of Mrs. Jean Wepner.
Yiddish. Between my smattering i
and theirs, and with an assist from I
the interpreter, we were able
to communicate much better than
I had any reason to hope."
"The really magic words," added
Dr. Joel Schneider, "were "Miami
Beach.'" When we were asked
where we came 'from, we ex-
plained that Hollywood was close
to that city, and the faces lit up
with instant recognition. "Every-
body has heard of Miami Beach,
one of the Russians told me."
The Schneiders had looked for
ward to attending the Viennese
Opera during their two-day sojourn
in the Austrian capital, but a trip
to Mathausen Concentration Camp
where the ovens,. the "showers"
and the bullet holes (indicating
how the Jews who escaped one
form of extermination were ulti-
mately disposed of) left them with
but one desire to get out of
Austria as soon as possible.
"It was as if we were on a sur
realist movie set," said Mrs.
Schneider. "We were simply in a
state of shock as it was explained
to us that only one barrack was
ever constructed to house Jewish
prisoners because no Jew ever sur-
vived more than three days unless
he could pass himself off in some
way as a non-Jew. How can people
have forgotten?" she added sadly.
It was a very subdued entourage
that returned to Vienna. "Some-
one remarked that we ought to
shop for the children," Mrs. Sch-
neider went on, "but someone else
said she didn't want to leave any
of her money in that country. And
we all felt the same way. We just
wanted out. We walked down the
streets of Vienna that afternoon
looking at middle-aged people and
mentally asking 'what were YOU
doing 30 years ago?"
The Americans were catapulated
swiftly from somber remembrance
to contemporary joy as they landed
in Tel Aviv where, according to
Dr. Schneider, "150,000 kids from
two to 17 were celebrating Purim.
It was wall-to-wall Jewish youth [
Ashkanazi, Sephardic, Hassidic,
black, white all singing, danc
ing, banging each other on the
head with harmless plastic ham-
mers and no police, no demon
strations, no violence. It was pure
happiness as only young people
can be happy."
A tour of other parts of Israel
introduced the Americans to what
Dr. Schneider termed that coun
try's "might." "There is no doubt in
my mind, he said, "that Israel
could not be conquered without
the intervention of a major power
I do not think Israel would ever
give up the Golan Heights or Jeru-
salem part of the West Bank
and part of the Sinai peninsula
might be expendable. We saw the
position of the country prior to
the '67 war, and it was very vul
nerable. Its defensive posture to-
day is superb."
"One final '" ought," interjected
Mrs. Schneider. "Of the 72 Amer-
icans who left New York, some
were committed, some were semi-
committed, and some were just
plain curious. But when we de-
barked in New York after weeks
with the Israelis, 72 VERY com-
mitted people walked down that
ramp. It was the most exciting,
most stimulating thing that ever
happened to any of us. And we
can't wait to go back!"
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\
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J


Poge 14-A
^JmisiitturidUan Shofar of Hollywood
Friday. April 13, 1973
W,H UMMStMCES
r :v -
HALIANOAIE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
(Conservative). 416 NE 8th Ave.
Rahbi Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor
Jacob Danziger.
Sabbl Srh.in/.'s sermons will be s*
follows:
Aurii IS, "Preparlns. for the Seder"
S:1.'. 11 Til.
April 14, Scripture Censor < the VVseK
S:4*. it m.
April ''i. fcsiivnl 5ervi.'e S:45 p m.
April 17. "The TortUl ut b'rwKirtm."
8:4." B.m,
April 18, "The V......swered Question"
8: l."> :i.m.
April 20, Informal service 7 p.m.
(there will be ri" late servic*!
April 21, -Til.- Uttle Tiling.- ;i I he
little Come Too" I" : m
April ft. "Th.. Mataoh Speaks" :4S
a.m.
April 24, memorial uervlce, '\>- shiill
not Ki.ii-i i B:45 a m.
NORTH .MIAMI BEACH (
M1RAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Conservative)
6920 S.W. 35th St.. Rabbi Avrom
Orazin, "antor Abraham Koster.
Rabbi Drasln'a sermons will be aa
follows:
April IS, "The Bat.......i Greatness."
8:JO p.m.
April 14, "Fathers and Sons," 9 a.m.
April 17. "Are v>u Asking me or Tell-
iiik Me "" '.< a.m.
April ix. "Secrets of Jewish Xnmerol-
oay." !> a.m.
April 20, "What Was Hoses' llurr) '"
8:3") P.m.
April 21. "Little Things Mean u Lot."
9 m.
April ^3. "Is Passovers Jewish Holl-
day.'" Si a.m.
April L'4. "Rinu mlivi'iiiK Is Mil
Kiinuuh." a.m.
HOLLYWOOD
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1351 S
14th Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffe.
April is, a Jewish .Musi.- Festival,
8:1". p.m.
Aurii |6, Vesner services t:lf p.m.;
only Si.'der C:15 p.m.
Aprn 17. Passover service l":3o a.m.
April 'i "4 Xe Qm
U .- \ -:. 5 in
April 24, Tlskor |0:SO a.m.
-------a -
BETH SHALOM (Temple) Conserva-
tive. 4601 Arthur St. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irvino Go'd.
In aiiii.iIon if regular wn less,
following Passover services will
held:
April IB, S 15 8 in 8:S(I and 7 p m,
April 17, 0 a.m .".'l 'i:4" p.m.
\uril iv. :, a m
Ann! 20, 7 n.m. (Uiora will In- n
-< r\ il i )
1 April '-.. 7 p m.
:. y n in and 7 p m.
ApriJ -'4. B a.m : Tlskor II a m.
the
ii,
Ih'.p
TEMPLE BETH AHM (Conservative).
3'0 SW 62nd Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi
Salomon Benerroch.
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal) 5001
Thomas St., Hollywood. Rabbi Rob-
ert Frazin.
There \wi> t>r* no Passover services
lu..
in
physical llmltaiions. Rabbi
Frazin will speak in regular services
is follow I :
April IS, "Gueas who's Coming t"
Seder?" *< p.m.
April 20, "lAt All Who aro Hungry
Come and Bat" s p.m.
Services are conducted at II
dan Hills Elementary
and Thomas.
Short-
School, "'-ml
TEMPLE SINAI (Conservative) 1201
Johnson St. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun
In addition to regular services. Pass-
over Services Will ho held ns follows:
April Ifl. Zlnn Chapel fi p.m.
April 17, main sanctuary MO am.;
Zlnn Chanel G p.m.
April 20, I'assi.ver ralata in the main
sanctuary sis p.m.
April L':'. Zlnn Chapel 6:30 p.m
Anrll S3, main sanctuary 8:80 a.in.:
Zlnn Chanel S:S0 p.m
April 24, main sanctuary sin
Vskor main
sanctuary
-e>-
a.m.:
10:15 a in
NORTH MIAMI REfi" H
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralnh P. Kingsley. Cantor Irvina
Shulkes. 37
Post 613, Ladies Install New Slates
Victor Freedman Post 613. Jew-
ish War Veterans, held its annual
elections March 22, and at the
same time honored its 25th anni-
versary in the cities of Hallandale
nd Hollywood.
Elected for the 1973-74 term
mere Herman Zweibach, comman-
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
(), 173 Jewish Telegraph!,- Ae.-n. v>
Why do some people insist on
having Inn* Challoth (breads)
for the Sabbath meal?
The Sabbath requires two Chal-
loth. If the two Challoth are long
they resemble the letter "Vav"
twice. Since each. Hebrew letter
has a numerical equivalent and
the letter "Vav" has a numerical
equivalent of six, two long Chal-
loth would represent the number
12. The two long Challoth are thus
representative of the 12 loaves of
show bread that were put on the
holy table in the temple of old.
This symbolism is a way of mak-
ing the home a temple during the
hours of thi Sabbath meal. There
are some people who actually have
12 loaves on the Sabbath in order
to accomplish this representation.
For those to whom 12 loaves would
be rather extravagant, two long
loaves, having the equivalent of
the sum of 12, are a fitting substi-
tute.
en Mike Bogdanoff, senior vice
ommander; Hy Spigel, first jun-
or vice commander: Sylvia Sokol,
second junior vice commander,
ierman Murransky, judge advo-
cate; Monford Sadow, post chap-
lain: Dr. Nathan Sudanow, post
surgeon: Edward Ross, Arthur
Sherry and Joseph Rosenthal, trus-
tees, and Ray Weiss, benevolent
und committee.
Installation of the new officers
vas held in conjunction with those
>f the ladies auxiliary at Temple
3inai, 1201 Johnson St., Sunday.
At the March 22 meeting, a fare-
well party was held for outgoing
?ost chaplain Dave Rugoff who,
after 15 years in the office, is re^
turning to live in Tom's River. N.J
Mr. Rugoff was honored with a
ife membership in JWV in recog-
nition of his devotion to his post
ind his leadership of a singing
3roup which has entertained resi-
dents of all area nursing homes.
Also honored was Jerry Cici,
'professionally known as Genaro)
who is an employee of the city of
Hollywood and who will be taking
over the choral duties vacated by
Mr, Rugoff.
The post meets each second and
fourth Thursday at 8 p.m. in the
Hallandale Home Federal Bldg.
: All eligible veterans are urged to
attend.
Family Learning
Experience Set
For May 1. 5 6
Openings for Bve more couples
nre j-tin available tor the family
learnine andfetudies semrna/Ap
held at the Hilton Inn of the,Palm
Beaches May 4. 5 and 6. ,
? ,i. nt....."" >i, i.
The K'-ilkih weekend !m< l>""'i
arranged by Hie Jewish Welfare
K lexation with a go.-il of "broad
ening the base of Jewish life by
an enriching family experience."
The schedule will Include orion ,
la! ion ant! introductions with chil
dren, services and consorvat'v
orayer book, and dinner with twi
families together Friday evening
Dinner will feature the blessing o'
children and wives, and singing.
Saturday's session will com
mence with services at 9:30 dur ,
in?, which (ho older children wil'
read fiom the Torah and Baftorah'
following luncheon there will br
special children's activities. Hi;h j
lights of the evening will h" Fam
ily Circle ut 8 and Havdalah at
8:30.
Sunday will be devoted to pray '
era and discussion groups. Depart '
ure is set for 1 p.m.
Dr. Mei-vin Verbit, professor o'
-ociology at Brooklyn College ane"
vice chairman of the Committee o
"ollege Youth and Faculty of the
Council of Jewish Federations an.!
Welfare Funds, will be the scholar
'n-residence and moderator of dir
cusslon groups.
The cost of the weekend, whier
includes two meals a day, is $10f
ler couple, plus S10 per child t
i maximum of $i:<0. Children wil
ileep in their parents' rooms ur
less separate accommodations s
dditional costs are requested.
There will be no counselors or
abysitters for children undc
hree; th"y are, however, welcom
viih complete parental super
vision.
Contact the Jewish Welfare Fed
ration office for reservations.
Bar Mitzvah
LINDA HENKIN
Linda, daughter of Mr. and Miv
Arnold Henkin, will celebrate he.
Bat Mitzvah Saturday, April 21. a
Temple Beth El.
# V ^
DANIEL MELINE
Daniel, son of Dr. and Mrs. Sam
uel Mellne, will become a Ha
Mitzvah Saturday,. April 14, a
Temple Beth Shalom.
fr i3 is
HARVEY SOLOMON
Harvey, son of Mr. and Mrs
Gcrson Solomon, will celebrate hi
Bar Mitzvah Saturday. April 14,
at Temple Israel of Miramar.
hm

Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
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Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
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WISHES ENTIRE JEWISH COMMUNITY A HAPPY PASSOVER
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OPEN MONDAY SATURDAY 10-5
PHONE 922-3638
* -1
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CANDLELIGHTING TIMF
11 NISAN 6:22
Clifford H. Sehnger D.D.S.
Announces the opening of r.is office
for the practice of [dentistry
at the
Home Federal Building,
2100 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Suite 304
Telephone 921-2990- Hallandale, Florida
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Phone; 821-3647
ITALIAN MARKET
2424 Hollywood Boufevard
Hollywood, Florida
Nicholas (Babe) & Doris Garritano


V
-FrW
Ppdcry, April 13. 1973
+Je*lstncrkUan < Shofr of Hollywood
Page ISA
'abbinic Law Gives Precedents
For New Israel Legal System
By Spool*] Re,M>rt To make tl.a,li(ionai JewLsh lc.
CW YORK Precedents ica' Precedents more readily avail-1
from traditional Jewish law "t),le- Biii-Hun has not only under- j
, from traditional Jewish law I f'1 B,"-1,iln ,las not ,ml-v un(le'-
arex Kalf ystem 01 Israel on a case-by- i an(l oUwi' ''twature in taped
tasl basis, a member of Bar-Ilan "memol> b',k." but is also de-
Sci
pity's Yaacov Herzoi? Law i vo|o>'in high-speed computer
1 faculty reports. techniques for the retrieval of le-
! K"l information from the tapes.
"Th* (.in Is are finding that, in j Tn addition, Prof. Neeman no-
areas -.here Israel's laws .nay j ted. in the 3\2 years since the
still lx mclear. centuries-old rab-j LaW School was founded in 1970,
binic -KeiHinsa" may offer a valid ] it has built up a library of some
and us; ul hasis for deciding 20th ,io,000 volumes, including what
century legal problems." Prof. one r.cent American visitor .a
Vaaco. Xeeman declared. librarian from a major univer-
sity called "the finest collec-
tion of American legal materials
outside the United States."
definition of Jeuishness," he no- j "Tnat is another way in which
ted| "For example. "Responsa" Bar-Ilan is making a contribu-
tion to Israel's legal system'."
Prof. Neeman declared. "Because
our laws are still evolving from
the British Mandate legal system.
not only American materials and
"Responsa" literature, but cases
from British and Commonwealth
law, from India and West Ger-
many, and even from many of the
developing African nations."
141
220 VOLT APPLIANCES
FOR ISRAEL!
TRAEGER BROS ft ASSOC., INC.
SEYBOLD BLDG. PHONE 371-5551
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132
VravJtiona: precedents are not I
limK<>: to such matters as mar- j
i iage nd divorce, or the legal'
Z
Iquari on Rabbinic Law) are
nova lying found to offer a good
I deal or "he prosaic, but very time-
ly, litl.vct of illegal business con-
tacts. What makes this search | we cannot foresee which legal
[for vaJ'.i precedents so important i precedents may yet prove rele-
1. that after only 25 years of vnnt. We have therefore collected
existi e. the li\i,al system of Is-
iael is -till in flux, still evolvin
and d> loping.
Holidays Cancel Hallandale
Chapter Discussion Groups
Mrs. Harry Zeiger. vice president
.f education for the Hallandale
Chapter of Hadassah, announces
ihat the "Current Events Discus-
sion" group will not convene in
April because of the holidays.
Chai Group will hold its regular
meeting Tuesday April 24 at noon
! in the Casa Grande. Room of the
[ Home Federal Bldg., Hallandale.
' Mrs. Joseph Millman will open the
meeting with the singing of the
anthems. A 25th year memorial
service for the martyrs of Mt.
! Scopus will bo led by program
! vice president Mrs. Manny Rose.
; Mrs. Casper Alman president, will
preside.
A Happy Passover To All .
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"Ear-Han University is encour-
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its re. ance to current life not
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servim as a bridge between mod-
el* I.'ael and our Jewish heri-
Wroi Neemar., who has studied '
exten- ely in the United States
nd h. ? both LL.M. and J.D. de-1
injtludc-i In students' casebooks:
spoke r.t a reception given in his
honor by the Lawyers' Commit-'
tee of :iar-Ilan University.
JLaw School students at Bar- j
Han ii . in Jew.-h law each year of their J
stndie- Prof. Neeman noted. In
additli :.. Jewish law sources are '
include in students' caseworks
and n ny students are being en- .
ravaged to do research in this
irea within the framework of
i -*
I their elective seminars.
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Page 16-A
Jmtsirnor*m*n ^ HHyw 4
PAtay; ApnJ 13. W

First Federal of Miami
opens new 183rd Street office
with valuable grand opening gifts
1
1
f
Plus a certificate to purchase this complete 4-piece
Oneida Coffee Service for only S19.95*
You are cordially invited to the Grand
Opening of First Federal's new 183rd Street
office. And we'd like to say hello with some
elegant gifts.
Simply open or add to your First Federal
account in the amount of S500 or more.
You'll receive a classic compote in famous
Oneida silverplate with our compliments. It's
3" high and 6V across.
Also, you'll receive a certificate to buy this
magnificent Oneida 4-piece silver coffee
service for only S 19.95* This distinguished
silverplate set includes a 6-cup coffee server
with scroll handle, double handled sugar bowl
with cover, creamer, and 12" serving tray.
You get both .the compote and the certif-
icate for just one deposit of $500 or more.
Gift offer expires April 20, 1973. Limit of one
compote and certificate per account.
At First Federal, your monev will earn the
highest allowable interest on passbook
savings a full 5% per year. And up to 6%
on savings certificates. All accounts earn
daily interest with daily compounding.
We'll be happy to transfer vour funds,
free. So stop in soon. We're open Monday
9AM to 8PM. and Tuesday through Friday.
9AM tO 3PM. fto.FtoAhSu.eS.loT*,
Free playing cards...
Limit: One set per family
A double deck of first-quality playing cards your gift for just
stopping by. One set tree per family, additional 'sets $2 each.
Otter good through April 20. W3.
I
J
,\G*S
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183 rd St.0ff ice: 18301 Biscayne Boulevard
First Federal Saving* and Loan Association of Miami / America's Oldest Federal... Largest in the South / W H Walker J, Phai / u k r
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WiSTLANO Shoppy C^e, / ROOSEVELT ,0,5 N.W. 7th Av.. / "W*mS!K^



wJemsli Floridiiari
Volume 3 Number 11
and SIIOI Alt OF GREATER IIOELYWOOH
Hollywood. Florida Friday. April 13, 1973
Section B
,
a*.
I
WAs
y^Jrthodox Uvnion By BEX GALLOB
(c), 1973 Jewish Telegraphic Agency)
During each of the past 10 years, some 100
families, about a third of them from non-Or-
thodox backgrounds, have gathered annually
for an Orthodox-organized weekend retreat
arranged to make directly meaningful for
them the satisfaction of full participation in a
traditional Jewish Sabbath.
Achieving participation by non-Orthodox
Jews has been a deliberate element of each
of the retreats in Gatlinburg, Tenn. The re-
sults of the experiment, developed by the Ye-
shiva of the south in Memphis and the south-
east region of the Union of Orthodox Congre-
gations of America, have been sufficiently
premising so that it has been formally adopted
as a long-range program as the association of
Orthodox congregations moves into its 75th
year. The event will be celebrated at the
organization's next annual dinner in New York
in May.
Rabbi Reuven Savitz, the new national di-
rector of the Orthodox Union, as the organi-
zation is popularly known, is the sparkplug for
this and a variety of other UOJOA programs
being developed to find realistic solutions of
the problems which plague American Jewry,
religiously defined, as it grapples with the con-
sequences of the upheavals of the past two
decades.
THE WEEKEND EETREATS project was
formally approved as a national program at
the Orthodox Union's 1972 biennial conven-
tion, which elected Harold Jacobs, a Brooklyn
businessman, as its new president. With the
solid backing of Jacobs and the UOJCA board,
the young and vigorous Rabbi Savitz is direct-
ing development of a wide-ranging series of
activities which he feels meets two basic re-
quirements: they are meaningful responses to
the problems of America's religious Jews in
the 20th century, and they are achievable
within the scope of the Orthodox Union's less
than overflowing resources of funds and man-
power.
The projects are being developed to re-
spond to the challenges of the deterioration
of the urban sector and the flight to suburbia,
which strikes Orthodox synagogues with par-
ticularly destructive force; the impact of the
college milieu which has proved to be devas-
tating to the Jewish loyalties of religiously
unprepared students; the accelerating growth
in the rate of mixed marriages; and the decay
of the Jewish family unit
Rabbi Savitz, in an interview with the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency, reviewed the
sweeping changes in American life in the 75
years, since the Orthodox Union was started
in Manhattan by a small group of dedicated
lay leaders and rabbis and their handful of
congregations. Orthodox Jewry, like other
newly arrived Jewries, was a fragmented
European entity struggling to survive in an
alien environment. The fledgling Orthodox
Union set about the task of stimulating the
beginnings of a cohesive Orthodox Jewish
society in America. It began to bring the scat-
tered congregations, rabbis and lay Orthodox
Jews toward a sense of mutual identity and
interests, to ensure that Orthodoxy could
adapt effectively to the American scene, Rabbi
Savitz said.
AS ORTHODOX COMMUNAL life began
to thrive and gain recognition, the Orthodox
Union moved to make the Orthodox commu-
nity a major fotce in American Jewish life.
From the early 1930s to the '50s. he declared,
the Orthodox viewpoint was not represented
on a national scale. But as the Orthodox Union
actively articulated the interests and concerns
of a by-now thriving Orthodoxy to the total
American Jewish community, the Orthodox
Union was invited to join the major national
as the National Jewish Relations Advisory
and international Jewish organizations, such
Council and the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organizations. The
UOJCA began to bring the forces of the Or-
thodox community to bear on the policies and
directions of American Jewish life.
Now Orthodox Jews have major roles as
professional and lay leaders in such power
centers as the Jewish Federations, and the
idea that day schools most of them under
Orthodox sponsorship merit support from
Jewish communal funds is accepted by a grow-
ing number of these Federations, Rabbi Savitz
pointed out. This is an area in which Rabbi
Savitz has some special expertise as a former
executive director of the Bais Yaacov School in
Baltimore, and as chairman of the Association
of Jewish Day Schools in Greater Baltimore.
Rabbi Savitz also cited the legislation
which has been enacted to protect basic Or-
Continued Ob Page 8-B


Page 2-B
+ ki*JTkrHitr aadSWfar of Hollywood
Fridcry. April 13, 197V
B'nai B'rith Youth Projects
Penetrate Broward County
Broward B'nai B'rith Youti Or-
ganization (BBYO) chapters have
been penetrating the Hollywood
community by seeking out, and
servicing people who need more
than anything else the knowledge
that someone is concerned about
them.
B'nai B'rith Girls-Gimmel. whose
president is Judy Nathanson.'
spearheaded a bagels and lox
brunch for the flood victims of
Wiikes-Barre, Pa.: they sent Pass
ov< r greetings to Soviet Jews, and
recently presented a program
highlighting the creation to B'nai
B'rith Herzl Lodge.
BBG Gimmel won the non-sec-
tarian National Parents' Magazine
Award for "Outstanding Service
to the Community under the lead-
er-hip rf chapter advisor Mrs
Pic-hard Nathanson. They placed
first in Florida region in the Na-,
J BBYO Scrapbook Contest,
rk Dubin. secretary of Aleph
'/./ k Aleph Massadah. reports
that their president. Harley Gins-
t> r:. and Tom Katz. of Aleph
Zadik Aleph (AZAl-B'nai Israel
osotured Brat place in the regional
contest; Rob Fader came in ,
second in the AZA-storyte!ling con-
te t. and chapter cheat champ is,
Jack Nadelman. Chapter advisor is
Michael Specktor. vice president
of t Miami BBYO board of di-
rectors. AZA-B'nai Israel chapter
adviser is Dr. Mark Greenberg.
Other BBYO chapters in the
Hollywood area are B'nai B'rith'
Ghis-Shimron. advisor Mrs. Myrna
Bloom; BBG-Elysiums, advisor Mrs.
Gail N'ovick; AZA-Moshe Weinberg.
advisor Jack Goodman- BBG-T'se-
Haltah, cfrar ^er advisor Mrs. Phil
Levin, and BBG-Tikva. temporary
advisor Mrs. Richard Nathanson. '
A new seventh grade BBG chap
ter is in the process of being
formed in the Hollywood area: and
another group-BBGs is being initi-,
atcd in Fort Lauderdak. A brother
AZA chapter to the BBG group is
also being organized.
!
Interested potential members or
advisors may call Mrs. Girt Bos-
sak. BBYO director, at the BBYO
office. 4200 Biscavne Blvd.. Miami.
B'nai B'rith Girh and Aleph
Zadik Aleph are components of,
the B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-1.
lion. There are 700 members in I
the Broward-Dade area: 34 chap
ters. Eight of the groups are in
Hollywood.
Chapters are serviced by volun-
teer advisors and the newly organ
iz?d Browsrd-North Dade Palm
Beach BBYO board of directors,
under the presidency of Dr Phil
Levin, sets policy and serves as a
sounding board for youth leaders
and advisors. A second board is i
the Miami BBYO board of direc-
tors.
Experienced Sewing
Machine Operators
Piece rate, good wages for
qualified operators. Yearround
work, paid vacations, holidays
and bonus. Call 823-5504.
MY AUNT TILLIES
BEAUTY PARLOR
"A YESTERDAY'S PLACE WITH TOMORROW'S IDEAS"
Formerly "Village Coiffures"
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
MR. ALAN AND MISS DIANA
Also Relocated: Miss Marcia
1295 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
(In Back of Dinty Moore's)
Phone 923-1094
F & J TEXACO
GREETINGS FROM FRANK VENZA
LUBRICATIONS TIRES BATTERIES ACCESSORIES
SCIENTFIC MOTOR TUNEUPS BRAKE CLUTCHES
MUFFLERS ROAD SERVICE
AUTO AIR CONDITIONING REPAIRS
ROAD SERVICE WE GIVE STAMPS
PHONE 925-8058
1722 NO. FEDERAL HIGHWAY
WISHING ALL OF THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
A HAPPY PASSOVER
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Arthur Godfrey Road. 425 at Sheridan Plantation. 6907 W Broward Boulevard
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Surfside. 9564 Harding Avenue Miam. Shores, 9501 N E 2nd Avenuo
South Dade. N Kendall Drive at U.S. 1


Friday. April 13. 1973
VJewlst nprkfiairi and Stiofar of Hollywood
Page 3-B
TV Special Filmed In Israel To
Be Aired By NBC Network April 25
Three internationally acclaimed,
lerfovmen, Melvyn Douglas, i.on-
Ion-born Claire Bloom and Israel's,
Topol are the state" 3F TlTe" Goirigl
Up of David Lev, an original TV
drama which was filmed on loca-
tion in Isnel and will be shown in
coincide with that nation's 25th I
anniversary. The special will be |
colorcast on the NBC television
network Wednesday, April 25 from
8:30 to 10 p.m. Eastern Standard
Time.
YnV trtle role is played by 10-
year old Biandon Una, co-star of
the series. "The Courtshi!) of Ed-
die's Father."
Ernest Kinov, who has written
for TV, the stage ana motion pic
tures in this country, is CO-uthor
.
>
)
' i: i in' ..'.ti.i ,i:. < : ;:_,. .__,.;........MbW
&&9 By BOB KtRBFl, Executive Director,
lewjsk Welfare federation ef Gnater Htllywi
On the first Seder night in April 1943 the Jews in the War-
saw ghetto took up arms against their Nazi overlords. It was the
beginning of an epie battle, not for victory, as the resistance
fighters knew fi-om the outset, but for the honor of their people.
On the walls of the ghetto they posted an 11th commandment
'Thou Shalt Not Despair." It was their watchword and their
legacy.
When the battle was near its end, the few Jews who sti'.l
survived issued an appeal to their brethren around the world
"Remember Ua' Do no tforget what we have suffered at the
hands of our enemy! Let our departure from the world in ashes
and smoke not be in vain!"
Their call was not immediately heard, but its entreaty was
never to be forgotten.
As we approach Passover 1973 here in America, it is import-
ant that we not forget what happened. We can remember by
prayers and especially by the matzoh of hope prayer for the
Jews in tthe Soviet Union. We can remember by making our
gifts to the United Jewish Appeal and the Jewish Welfare
Federation.
The first is minimal actionthe second is doing. Both of
these can help us to relieve uphappiness and to relieve depres-
sion. Something greater :s also available to us. and that is look-
ing at our own concept of Judaism, reaffirming what we want to
make of our lives as Jews, and the role that each of us takes in
shaping a better world: a world free of oppression, of hate,
poverty and despair.
As Jews we really have no choice. We are told that "there
shall be no poverty among us" and that there shall be justice for
all. We are also commanded to love our neighbor as ourselves.
But there is something that sometimes escapes us and that is a
knowledge of our history, our own past and the events that have
s-haped us into what we are today.
Who we are today was determined by the forces of life that
surrounded us. What we will be tomorrow is greatly influenced
by what we do today.
If you have not recently studied the history of Judaism, do
so today. If you have neglected to make your pledge to the 1973
campaign, do so today. If you have put off action from which
someone would benefit, take that action today.
As I see it freedom not only has its joys, but its respon-
sibilities. This is what Judaism teaches us.
of the 90-minute play with F.ph-
raira Kishon. writer and film direc-
tor j^n IsrajjJ, #- t^ft.
The producer is Mildred Freed
Alberg, who produced a number of
award-winning dramas for the
Hallmark Hall of Fame" on NBC-
TV. James F. Collier is the director
of this El Sol production.
Jerusalem and Tel Aviv are the j
settings for the drama, with much I
of the plot centered in Jerusalem.
The special focuses on the boy, i
David Lev, who leaves school and ]
journeys to Jerusalem from Tel
Aviv in search of information
which will ease the grief of his
mother. She has closed out the rest .
of the world in her mourning for |
her husband an American killed
while serving with Israeli forces
during the Six-Day War.
Douglas portrays the patient
grandfather, who cares for young
David. Miss Bloom is the boy's j
mother, Hannah, hospitalized by.
her sorrow. Topol, making his
debut in a drama special on U.S.
television, appears as the warm-
hearted, outgoing cab driver,
Chaim, who helps David.
The title, Mrs. Alberg said, has
a Biblical connotation. It is drawn
from a reference in the Old Tes-
tament to David's ascent to the
Mount of Olives. "In the case of
David Lev, he undertakes an odys-
scy to Jerusalem, climbing a hill
which was a scene of battle, seek-
ing information he desperately
needs."
Mrs. Alberg produced the Hall-
mark Hall of Fame for six years
and Our American Heritage for
four years, both on NBC-TV. Her
television credits include the first
two-'hour drama "Hamlet," for the
Hallmark Hall of Fame in 1953.
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Page 4-B
Jen 1st fhrkfiar nd Shofar of Hollywood
Friday. April 13. 1973

*WWMWWVW^*****A******AA****'
scene around
SILENCE you MUST keep silent' You are in the Soviet
Union."' Such was the greeting shouted harshly by the grim-
faced female guard as we entered the offices of the Soviet immi-
gration authorities. Her strident voice pierced the dull gray
morning as she barked the orders through the shrieking mega-
phone clutched in her strong purposeful hands.
Meekly earning out the shouted orders we timidly passed
through a neutral colored unmarked door only to find ourselves
in a big barren room facing a battery of Soviet officials. Their
identity was easily determined by their typically Russian black
fur caps and their frighteningly ominous expressions. It all added
a note of gloom to the proceedings. However, it was here that we
were to get the passports that we would need to make our journey
to our new homeland and so we took the necessary papers gladly
and walked on into the depths of the large hall. We looked an-
xiously for signs of a familiar face and finding a few we joined
them and huddled together in small groups.
Moments seemed like hours as we clutched our valuable pa-
pers in our nervous fingers. The voice of authority continued
shouting SILENCE SILENCE SILENCE. The shouting
loudness of the orders seemed strangely in conflict with the mes-
sage. Interminable minutes later the march to freedom began.
Herded into groups of 40 we wearily settled ourselves for the
ride ahead. Sleep was out of the question as our vehicle weaved
and turned along the long miles to Schonau JDC's stopping off
place on the way to freedom. The windows were blacked out. No
sign of the surrounding terrain was visible. On and on we went.
The wheels stopped. Our destination was reached. We
breathed the welcome air of salvation. Voices were different.
Sweet in tone, they appeased, cajoled and explained to us in
soothing words what our future would be. Questions were an-
swered kindly and with the resultant flood of queries came the
realization. Here we were with our own at last! Free and on
our way to the home of our forefathers.
Such was the experience planned by the Women's Di-
vision of Jewish Welfare Federation for a large group of women
from our Jewish community. In reality, the guards, the Russian
officers, the Joint Distribution Committee people were all mem-
bers of the Women's Division acting out the parts for this fund-
raising effort. In reality, the first stop along the way was the
assembly hall of Temple Beth Shalom and the last stop was
Temple Israel of Miramar. In between we rode buses with win-
dows blacked out and the route was purposely planned in circuit-
ous fashion so as to simulate a long journey.
After finishing our lunch, which was typically Israeli and
featured herring and hard-boiled eggs, we listened to some of
the girls who had planned the function. Susan Miller, chairman of
the day, related a most moving story of one of the Soviet Jews.
And then Alia Rusinek, a young Russian who actually emigrated
to Israel not too long ago, told us her story. It included all the
trials and tribulations that seem to come to all Russian Jews who
wish to emigrate. She pleaded for support for her fellow Jews
and Marty Jacobson added her own plea for help for this vital
part of world Jewry.
For those of us who experienced this day, it was one we will
never forget. And for all of us thanks to those girls who made
it so memorable for all of us. They were Nancy Atkin, Sylvia
Abram, Aviva Baer, Phyllis Casler, Barbara Buchwald. Meral
Ehrenstein, Vicki Deitchman. Brenda Grecnman, Carol Morten-
stern, Bea Langel. Karen Margulies, Stephanie Gurland, Marion
Letitats, Elaine Fleischer, Marty Jacobson, Marie Portnoy, Ruth
Kerbel. Sue Gunzburger, Helen Glassman, Debby Glazer, Rikki
Goodman. Joyce Gould, Bonnie Stein, Sue Gervin, Elaine Ross,
Wendy Rubin, Barbara Keller, Marjorie Fishman. Nancy Sch-
wartzenfeld, Stevie Naids, Joyce Roaman, Ellie Katz and Merle
Schneider.
* -Cr ft
Leave it to Lil Beckerman to come up with the best of the
year. As president of the Hollywood auxiliary of the Douglas
Gardens Jewish Home for the Aged, she and her board members
have decided to eliminate the big affair and just ask for money
instead. Lil is calling it a "Phantom Ball" and for those of us
who are sated with morning, noon and evening affairs, it's great.
So, right now I'm taking my pen in hand and making out a
check for the home. How about you?
& ft
It was a great evening at the Hollywood Playhouse when
the show -Forty Carats" was shown for an audience of supporters
of the Brandeis University women's division. Mrs. Ben Leerer
is president of the organization. Mrs. Julius Harris and Mrs.
Reuben Klein were hostesses.
While Israel celebrates its 25th anniversary, and the Zionist-
Organization of America its 75th jubilee, Hollywood's Sam Perry
tops them both. Nineteen-seventy-three marks the Broward ZOA
presidents 80th birthday year. Sam has served as the group's
top officer for 10 years.
Guest Artists To Join
Broward's Civic Ballet
When the "Evening of Ballet"
offering for the 1*73 Seven Livel>
Alls festival is" presented Friday!
The distinguished author Elie
Wiesel will be the recipient of
the 1973 Distinguished Service
Award of the National Federa-
tion of Jewish Men's Clubs at
its 44th annual convention at
the Diplomat Hotel, Hollywood,
May 6 through May 10.
$300,000 Raised
For Olympian
Memorial Center
Campaign chairman Harold Gold-
farb summed up the feelings of
both Israelis and Greater Miamians
attending the Olympian Memorial
Center dinner at the Eden Roc
Hotel last week when he said, "We
will be back!"
The dinner, hosted by author
Dick Schaap, the national chair-
man for the center of physical edu-
cation which will be built on the
campus of Tel Aviv University,
raised more than $300,000 as the
beginning of the local effort.
Before more than 400 persons.
Prof. Yuval Ne'eman, president of |
Tel Aviv University, presented an
honorary doctorate to David Light
of Miami Beach, one of the school's j
founders.
Prof. Ne'eman, a world-renowned
physicist, also awarded founder's
plaques to Moses Hornstein and
Bay Harbor Islands Mayor Shepard
Broad, and Ne'eman accepted a j
painting commemorating the Olvm-
pians' memory from artist John
Pitre.
Main speaker at the dinner was i
Shmuel Lalkin, manager of the
1972 Israel Olympic team and sec-1
retary of the Israel Sports Federa- ]
tion, who affirmed his nation's
determination to rebuild the coach-
ing staff and team which was deci-
mated by the murders in Munich.
ROSEAMRIE MINIS
at Young Circle, a host of guest
artists will join the Broward
County Civic Ballet.
The program will include the
"Juliet Russe de Monte Carlo ver-
ion of "Swan Lake" (Act in ,*
jUged by Miss Rosemarie Menee;
'Bach Montage." choreographed by
Barbara Gay Rassel; and "Paquita,'
especially staged for the Browai i
Ballet by Dennis Seetoo, ballet mas
tor of the New York City Open
Ballet
Ballerina Alexandra Nada. part-
nered by her husband, Eugene Sli-
vin, will dance lead roles in Swaa
Lake, while Donald Paradise, fre"
quent guest soloist with Browari
Civic Ballet, will take the character
lead of Von Rothbart.
Miss Menes will be making her
fourth appearance in Holly-wool
with the local ballet group. She
will dance the Grand Pas de Deux
in Paquita. partnered by Ali Pour-
farrokh. Like the Slavins, she was
also a member of Ballet Etusse
Her recordings for ballet dancer;
and teachers will be released lat.-r
this spring.
The Bach work has been especia!
ly choreographed for the Seven
Lively Arts festival and will tea-'
ture local soloist Beth Greenweli
partnered by Mr. Paradise. Set :>
an electronic score, the choreog
raphy is a montage of classical
ballet variations interplayed with
jazz and current dance steps.
This marks the Broward Civic
Ballets 12th season with the fest.
val.
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,Friday. April 13. 1973
+Jei*l tkrkfl&r "d Shofar of Hollywood
Page 5-B
State Department Intercedes
With Soviet Embassy Officials
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
State Department has made
formal representations on hu-
manitarian grounds to the Soviet
Embassy here on behalf of Mai k
Yampolsky's family.
The 25-year-old former Rus-
sian jazz drummer and mathe-
matics student is in the eighth
day of a hunger strike opposite
the Soviet Embassy to protest
the refusal of Russian author-
ities to grant exit visas to his
in-laws, Dr. and Mrs. Isaac Polit-
innikov and their daughter Vic-
toria, who live in Novosibirsk.
State Department spokesman
John King also disclosed that
the Department had rejected a
request from the Soviet Em-
bassy that it intervene to end
Yampolsky's hunger strike. King
said the Embassy made the re-
quest on March 27, the day
Yampolsky began his fast.
A District of Columbia ordi-
nance forbids demonstrations
within 500 feet ot toreign lega-
tions; Yampolsky is conducting
his hunger strike in front of the
Philip Murray building, across
the street and about 60 feet
away from the Embassy gates
Pro-Arab Propaganda
a- Spreading In Brazil
%
RIO DE JANEIRO, (JTA)
Pro-Arab propaganda is mak-
ing steady inroads in Brazil in
the form of articles in small town
newspapers and inexpensive
pamphlets sold in bookstalls and
in university bookstores.
Articles in the newspapers are
subtle, without the cliches and
verbal paroxysms that mark sim-
ilar articles in the American and
European press.
The articles deal with issues
such as the role of women in
Arab society, the contributions
of Arabs to the Brazilian econ-
' omy and intellectual life, the
)
M-DCC Dedicates
Shaw Memorial
Dedication ceremonies of the Fred
Shaw Memorial Plaza at Miami-
Dade Community College South
were held this week with Dr. Peter
Masiko Jr., M-DOC president, pre-
siding at the ceremony in the
jilaza, located between the Gibson
Health Center and the Trammell
Learning Resources Center.
The welcoming address was de-
livered by Dr. Ambrose Garner.
South Campus vice president,
dedicatory remarks were made by
Jack Kassewitz, a member of the
M-DCC Board of Trustees and a
long-time friend of Mr. Shaw. The
response was made by Mrs. Fred
Shaw. Jean and Bobby Shaw, the
Shaws' daughter and grandson, un-
veiled the memorial.
Mr. Shaw came to Miami-Dade
in 1965 from the University of
. Miami where he had been since
1946. While at Miami-Dade South,
t, he had been director of the
^LHumanities Division, academic
f dean and was later named the
college's vice president for devel-
opment, which office be held until
bis death in 1972.
^*****i ****r***v>*
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
11 NISAN 6:22
^WW^^^^^^A"
avjVM>VMN
political and economic develop-
ment of Arab workers.
These stories, written in a sim-
ple and straightforward manner,
are geared toward a working
class readershiD.
Pamphlets, equally well-writ-
ten, deal with the aspirations of
the Palestine people, the aims
of Arab liberation, and depict
Israel and Zionists as oppressors
and Gestapo-like individuals.
These pamphlets are sold at
prices ranging from three to six
cruzeiros (fifty cents U one
dollar), almost free of charge
compared to other pamphlets of
comparable numbers of pages,
quality of printing and layout.
They are evidently subsidized
and thus are almost being given
away.
: Young Jews, especially on the
campuses, are exposed to them,
especially as there are no com
parable pro-Israel or pro-Zionist
pamphlets. The Zionist material
available is written in a heavy
style and is usually too expen-
sive for the students.
the same site where local Jews
have been maintaining a daily
vigil for nearly two years.
King said the State Depart-
ment had consulted with police
and was informed that Yampol-
sky was not violating the law
which was intended to prevent
mass demonstrations that
blocked entry' to foreign em-
bassies.
Replying to questions from
reporters, King said the State
Department official who re-
ceived the Soviet Embassy's pro-
test by phone eight days ago,
made the first informal repre-
sentation on behalf of Yampol-
sky's family. He said the official,
who he did not identify, sug-
gested that the Soviet govern-
ment should taxc a humanitarian
approach with regard to the
Politinnikovs. Since then, sev-
eral telephone conversations
have taken place between State
Department and Soviet Embassy
officials during which the De-
partment repeated its represen-
tations on a formal basis.
King said that while neither
Yampolsky nor his relatives are
American citizens, the State De-
partment's representations were
in line "with our consistent view
for free emigration. We did
draw this particular case to the
attention of the Soviet Embassy
on a humanitarian basis," he
said.
Yampolsky's wife, Eleanora.
ended her hunger strike outside
the Soviet Embassy in London,
Monday. She had begun it on be-
half of her parents on March 26,
a day before Yampolsky began
his fast here.
Yampolsky was visited by 80
children from the Hebrew Acad-
emy of Greater Washington
Tuesday. They came by bus to
join his vigil. When they started
to pray, police ordered them to
a point 500 feet away from the
Embassy gates.
Rabbi Chaim Douek (left) chief rabbi of Egypt for some 10
years, was finally able to leave Egypt last April. Sine his
arrival in the United States in October, Rabbi Douek and
his family have been receiving resettlement assistance
from the New York Association for New Americans
(NYANA). Here he shows the passport on which he traveled
to Mrs. Ruth Wortman, NY ANA caseworker, as his only son.
Jacques, looks on. NYANA. which receives its funds from
the nationwide campaigns of the United Jewish Appeal,
provides cash outlays for rent, furniture, medical care and
other essential needs as well as casework, vocational and
educational services to about half of all Jewish newcomers
to the United States.
HAPPY PASSOVER TO THE ENTIRE JEWISH COMMUNITY
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Page 6-B
+ Ion 1st ftcridlar "* Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, Apri' 13, lSV^J
Rozalia Is NOW Rose Community Seders Set
By PHILIP 808KIS
Executive Director, New York
Association for New Americans
(c). l!'":l Jewish I eieftraphic Agency)
A year ago, 2i -year-old Rozalia
Tessler was preparing to celebrate
her first Passover in the United
States. With her father and
mother, her sister Ida and her
brother Arkady. Rozalia had ar-
rived from Russia only three
months earlier.
TODAY, "Rose"' Tessler is again
preparing to celebrate Passover; i
but many things besides her
Ume have changed. In Russia
ha had been a nurse's assistant,,
but here she will graduate from
Touro College in New York City
in June, 1974, not only with a I
Bachelor of Science degree, but i
with a certificate in one of Amer- \
ka's newest professions as a ,
physician's associate.
"For my parents,"' Rose Tessler
says frankly, 'life in America is
Klill difficult, but for me it is like ,
all my dreams come true all 11
ever wanted."
The Tellers came to the United !
States late in 1971 from a village I
which had only three Jewish !
families left: now they live in an !
area of Brooklyn with a thriving
Jewish community.
"I am still surprised whenever
I go out into the street and hear
people taking Yiddish, or when 1
ride on the subway and see some-
one reading a Yiddish paper,
Rose say.s. -In the old country.
even if there had been more Jews, |
f eopic would have been afraid to '
Co these things in public. Not that
there was any official anti-
S. mitism in our village," sh
notes, "but we felt it would be
better if we did not call the atten
tion of the gentiles to the fact that
we were Jews."
A YEAR AGO, Rose knew al-
most no English. One of the first
resettlement services provided lo
her ;ind her sister Ida by NY ANA,
the New York Association for New |
A'Mcricans. therefore, was En?;li-h
le.-sons. During the first few
ni'-nths after they arrived here.
T\:YANA also gave the Tessler
family money for rent, furniture
and interim maintenance and
helped them get dental and med-
ical services. In September, 1972,
Rose was assisted to enroll at
Touro College in one of the
f:rst courses anywhere in the
United States for physician's asso-
ciates.
What are her plans after grad-
uation?
"To work," she says, "and to see
whether I can aiaKe enough money
to go back to school and some day
become a doctor."
A Happy Passover To AH ..
U NORMANDfE
"French Cuisine at i*s Best"
Quaint and Delightfully
Different Dining
129 N. Federal Hwv. Dania
For Reservatons Call
"Noralee" 927-1889
Rost's younger sister, Ida, 20,
is still working in an office as
she did a year ago, but she too is
now part of the American dream.
She is continuing with her English
language course and is also study-
ing shorthand and typing, so that
he can one day become a sec-
retary.
Arkady. 13. is still attending a
Yeshiva in Brooklyn. "I told him
to study hard," Rose says, "so that
one day he can become a doctor.
But he is only a child yet, so he
really cannot make up his aiind.
But he said to me, 'Okay. I will
study hard and become a doctor.'"
AS FOR Boruch and Sofia Tess-
ler, the parents, for the second
time they have had to begin life
all over again. After World War II,
40 Jews returned to their village
from the concentration camps, out
of more than 400 who were taken
by the Nazis. The rett had been ;
exterminated. These included
Boruch Tellser's first familywife
and five children who were
taken to Auschwitz and never re-
turned. Mrs. Tesslers parents and
four brothers were also destroyed.
The Tesslers came under official
scrutiny from the Russian author-
ities when Boruch Tessler applied
for permission to emigrate to join '
his two brothers in America. H& j
was called to the regional police
station some time later and told j
that the application had been re
jected, despite his plea that he had
not seen his two brothers in 40 !
yean.
It was Rose t'r.en still Rozalia
who wrote to higher authorities |
after the application had been '
rejected. She was frightened, she
admits, but they were determined
to go somewhere where they could !
live as Jews, where the people did |
not mutter "zhid" as they passed.
IT WAS ALMOST a miracle, j
she says, that a month 'ater they j
received notification that the
authorities were reviewing their
papers. It was three months after
that that the family received per- '
mission to leave; processing took j
another three months. The Tess-|
lers feel that it was a good omen |
for their future in America that!
they arrived in New York on!
Dec. 14, 1971, in time for Chan-
ukah.
The Tesslers v. ere helped to j
come to the United States by
United Hias Service. NYANA, j
which helped them during their j
first difficult months in America.
and UHS both receive funds from j
the campaigns of the United Jew-1
ish Appeal.
Now both Boruch and Sofia
Tessler are retracing the history
of earlier waves of Jewish immi-
gration. Both Boruch. who is 69
years of age, and Sofia, 46, are
working in knitting factories.
"Hard work," Rose says, "and both
f tbesn come home very tired
every night."
"YOU KNOW," she adds, "as
happy as I am. I can see that
when you are older, it is much
harder to start all over again. But
I can also say honestly that my
parents have no regrets. They are
not sorry that they came, and the:
reason tor that is that they knew
that what they were doing was not
for themselves, but for us my
sister, my brother and me.
"Where we were, I could never
have dreamed of going to college.
And I could not have hoped to live
a Jewish life."
"Everybody has dreams, that is
natural," Rose Tessler says, "but j
I am lucky at least some of my
dreams are already happening."
Following are the times and places of community Seders to
be held in the Hollywood area:
Hallandale Jewish Center April 16 7:15 p.m. Center
Temple Beth El closed all reservations booked
Temple Beth Shalom April 16 7 p.m. Tempi?
Temple Beth Israel April 16 7 p.m. Temple
Temple Sinai April 16 6:30 p.m. Karp Hall, Temple
Temple Solel No Seder
Reservations must be made for any of the above-listed
Seders.
.

Question
Box
Why is the inside of the Sab-
bath Challoth necessarily white
instead of colored flour (e.g.,
dark or yellow?)
In olden days, it was required
that whatever was eaten on the
Sabbath be the most luxurious of
foods. As white flour was more re-
fined and therefore more luxurious
than other types of flour, it was
thought fitting to use it for the
preparation of the Sabbath Chal-
loth.
Some scholars say that the white
of the Challoth represents forgive-
ness. Adam sinned on Friday (the
day before the first Sabbath), and,
in some ways, our Sabbath observ-
ance represents an act of forgive-
ness for the original sin of our an-
cestor. This interpretation seems |
to be in accordance with one of i
the opinions in the Talmud which
claims that the forbidden fruit
Adam consumed in paradise was
wheat. Thus, whiteness of the:
wheat for the Sabbath bread rep-1
resents the refinement of the origi-,
nal character of man.
Why do some people immerse ,
in a Mikveh (ritual bath) every
Friday afternoon before the Sab-
bath?
The Sabbath is not only a day
of physical rest, but of spiritual
refinement as well. The mystics
(Zohar. Exodus 204; Rabbi Isaac
Luria, etc) are regarded as the
originators of this custom. They t
claimed that men acquire an "ad-
ditional" soul on the Sabbath,
which doubles his spiritual capac-
ity and allows him to transcend
himself. Immersion in the Mikveh
is a means to attaining this special
spiritual quality required for the
Sabbath. In other words, a higher
spiritual attainment is available
to man but he must exert some
effort on his own in order to at-
tain H.
A Happy Passover To All .
HAMILTON
DISTRIBUTORS INC.
HAROLD RODACK
1955 Harrison Street, Hollywood
Phone: 925-3396
A Happy Passover To All .
IOOK FOR THIS SIGN .. .
FILL-R-UP Auto Wash
3640 WEST HALLANDALE BEACH BOULEVARD
PEMBROKE PARK
Just West of 1-95
Phone 981-9945
A Happy Passover To Aii .
PETE'S HOTPOINT
YOUR APPLIANCE CENTER
2847 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
PHONE: 922-8800 927-9206
'SEE PETE FOR BEST DEAL"
"I
ff
A Happy Passover To All .
HALLANDALE MOVING
& STORAGE
205 N.E. 1st AVENUE, HALLANDALE
Phone 923-04O2
A Happy Passover To All .
TEND-A-TYKE, INC.
CONSTANCE BANE
Director
6311 Washington Street. Hollywood
Telephone 966-5823

Passover greeting*
* t 0 I
'"Commit
SINCE 1934
"HVl
CONVfNifNr flHKB
io stitvi you"
HOLLYWOOD ^
1909 TYLER STRC6T
925-8111
WEST HOILYWOOO
59S0 WASHINGTON ST.
981-2000
DANIA
140 S. FEDERAL HWY.
923-8241
Davie
3894 SW. 64 AVE.
(DAVIE RD)
584-5000
HALLANDALE iU
2401 I HALLANDALE BCH tV**
920-1616


Friday. April 13, 1973
^Jewisii Meridian tna Shofr of Hollywood
Page 7-B
Rabbi Jaffa
T

Passover Gains
New Relevance
By KABBI SAML'EL Z. JAFFE
President, Broward Board of Rabbis
The ageless message of Passover is a clarion call to freedom
for every generation in our millennial history, this festival has
taken on new meaning and dimension in response to the chal-
lenge of the time.
This year the Passover theme is invested
with new relevance and urgeney. As we gather
in celebration around our festive Seder tables,
replete with the rich symbols of our faith, our
minds and heart! will turn to our oppressed
brethien behind the Iron Curtain.
Soviet Jewry lit! in silence, isolated from
the main current* of Jewish life. Russian Jews
will have no Pesach, nor will they celebrate
the Seder; they are being denied their reli-
gious and cultural heritage. Those seeking free-
dom, the freedom to emigrate to Israel, do so at
i great cost in terms of personal welfare, se-
curity and even physical safety. In applying for
visas, they jo.;:urdize their jobs, positions and
their right to be. Some have been imprisoned, as traitors to the
state, and others institutionalized for so-called rehabilitation.
For those granted permission to leave the country, a heavy
ransom is exacted. The policy and action of the Kremlin toward
Soviet Jews, and the suffering that has been inflicted upon them,
are unconscionable.
This year, when we point to the matzoh. we shall be poig-
nantly and graphically reminded that it symbolizes indeed tthe
'bread of affliction" being eaten by our fellow Jews. We shall
taste the flatness of their lives and identify with their plight. But
the urleavened bread must also symbolize the matzoh of hope
that, although this year Soviet Jewry is oppressed and fettered,
next year, through the grace of God and our own concerted ef-
forts, they may he free. As we partake of this ceremony, it gives
stress to the indestructible link which binds us into one people-
hood and, above all, of our responsibility to our brethren.
Soviet Jews cannot speak, so we must speak for them. They
have no voice. We must raise our voices to bestir the conscience
of the world to the wrongs that are being perpetrated, and mar-
shall all our resources to mobilize public opinion as to the im-
morality of the Soviet policy in denying its Jews basic rights
the freedom to be Jews and/or the freedom to leave.
If they are to survive and not lose hope they must come
to know, through our deeds and actions, that they have not been
forgotten.
At this juncture in the deliberations of our Congress on
the U.S. trade agreement with Russia, it's imperative for us to
exert our influence and moral suasion in support of the Jackson-
Vanik Bill which would deny most-favored nation status to the
Soviet Union until the inequities against its Jews are ameliorated.
Pesach 1973 confronts us with this paramount challenge
to break the bonds which shackle the body and the spirit of our
people wherever they may be. Experience has taught us that
freedom caanot be fragmented. We American Jews can never
enjoy our hard-earned liberty while one segment of our people
is held in bondage. We shall be free in the full sense of the word
only when all our brethren are free.
Our prayer is that next year may the whole House of Israel
celebrate the universal Passover, and that all men enjoy the bless-
ings of liberty and peace.
Congressman J. Herbert Burke, R-12m, Fla., a member of
the House Foreign Affairs Committee, discusses issues con-
fronting the Middle East with Israeli Prime Minister Gokla
Meir in a private meeting held with key members of the
committee recently. The Congressman, who has supported
and sponsored legislation calling for a strong and viable
State of Israel in the Mid-East, had previously discussed
problems in that area with the Prime Minister in Tel Aviv
where he was sent on a mission for the committee. Results
of the private discussion with the Prime Minister were not
made public.
Levitt To Build New
Hollywood Chapel
| After five years of serving the
Jewish community in the North
Dade area. Levitt Memorial Chap-
els, Inc., has purchased property
at 1821 Pembroke ltd., Hollywood,
one block west of U.S. 1, where a
new, modern funeral home -0 1 bo
constructed, according to an an-
nouncement made by Cantor
Emanuel Mandel, president.
Levitt Memorial Chapel's plans
for expansion were predicated on
the fact that the Hallandale and
Hollywood area is one of the fast-
est growing Jewish communities in
the country and until this time,
there has been no exclusive Jew-
ish Funeral Home in Broward to
serve their needs.
The new chapel will be under
the personal supervision of Sonny
Levitt, vice president.
Mr. Levitt is well-known to many.
The son of Roz and Lou Levitt,
residents of Hollywood since 1951,
he attended South Broward High
School, Miami-Dade Junior Col-
lege. University of Florida and
received his degree in mortuary
science from the McAllister Insti-
tute of New York.
Prior to moving to North Miami
Beach, he was a member of Tem-
ple Beth Sholom and Temple Sinai
and his activities continued in
North Dade's Beth Moshe and Beth
Torah Congregations.
A recipient of many community
service awards. Mr. Levitt is a
past presidei.' of Harmony Lodge.
B'nai B'nth: Noble Grand of N.M.B.
Oddfellows, and a member of Dia-
mond Lodge K. of P.; Golden
Glades Lodge F. & A.M.; N.M.B.
Lions Club, the Forward Club; and
the Jewish Funeral Directors As-
sociation of America.
Upon completion of the Holly-
wood cl.apel. Philip Weinstein will
assume the ct'i'ies ot manager of
the North Dade Levitt Memorial
Chapel located at 13385 W. Dixie
Hwy., North Miami, and will also
be available to assist in Follywood.
giving Levitt Memorial the largest
staff of licensed Jewish funeral di-
rectors in Florida.
Mr. Weinstein. formerly of Chi-
cago, has been a Florida resident
since 1952 He is president of
Temple Sinai of North Dade's
Brotherhood: a past chancellor of '
i Maccabee Lodge K. of P.; a board j
! member of the Past Chancellor's |
Association; a member of Mitrvah
; Lodge B'nai B'rith, and Golden
Glades Lodge F. & A.M.
Mr. Levitt and Mr. Weinstein
are sot only licensed funeral di-
I rectors, but are proficient in eoun-
i seling with a family in regard to
Jewish laws, customs and tradi
tions. Harvey Pincus and Stuart
Kramer are presently serving their '
embalmcr's internship under their j
supervision.
When the Leadership Training Institute of the Women's Di-
vision of Greater Hollywood's Jewish Welfare Federation held
a Passover training session for its members recently they
were instructed as to the correct way to set up their homes
for the Seder services.
These ladies were among those attending.
'VI
Standing, Hedi Cantor, Ilena Weisberg; sitting, Gail Cohen
and Lois Frimet _>
ft
ft ft
ft ft ft
Mary Garber, Maxine Dubin, Tammy Cohen
ft ft ft ft ft ft
Elaine Fleischer, Bea Langel, Evelyn Israel and Nancy '
Greenberg
pASSOVeR
QKeeUNQS
The Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater
Hollywood extends Passover greetings to
the community.
Norman Atkin, M.D.
President
L'


~*
Pcce 8-B
Orthodox

Union
Moves
Into
75th
Year
+Je*istnt>rkiian
and Shofar of Hollywood
Continued From Page IB
thodox interests, sucli as me Job rights of
Sabbath observers, citing the key role of the
National Jewish Commission on Law and
Public Affairs (COLPA) which the Orthodox
Union helped to found. COLPA has had a key
role also in kosher slaughtering protection
and in a wide range of public policy questions
significant both to the Orthodox community
and the total American Jewish community.
He pointed out that Orthodox Jews now take
part in almost every phase of business and
government and that the wearing of skullcaps
and even Hassidic garb is no longer a handi-
cap to employment.
RABBI SAVITZ CITED also the Orthodox
Union's world-famous kosher certification pro-
gram, stressing that the American food indus-
try has recognized the purchasing power of
observant Jews and that rabbinically certi-
fied kosher products are available on an un-
precedented scale throughout the nation. He
said the Orthodox Union's emblem is rec-
ognized throughout both the food industry and
the Jewish community as a trustworthy guar-
antee of ka.-hruth for some 5,000 products and
services for consumers and institutions, of-
fered by more than 600 producers.
The national director emphasized that
Continued On Page 15-B
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL
The Hollywood Recreation Drpartment's 18th annual Salute
to the State of Israel featured Mary and Mori Urovsky, et.-.-
nic dancers, and the Greater Hollywood Symphonic Mando-
lin Orchestra.
Member F.D.I.C.
American Bancshares, Inc.
A Happy Passover To All .
THE VILLAGE SQUARE
DOGGIE COIFFURES
RUSSELL ZIMMERMAN
2140 Tyler Street, Hollywood
Telephone927-3411
V
SOMETHINGNEWINHOLLYWOOD!
NOW OPEN
FRANCOS PIZZERIA and RESTAURANT
SPECIALIZING IN ITALIAN FOOD AND PIZZA
AND PRESENTING:
Our own Italian Calzone A Tempting combination of
Moxzaretla, Ricotta and Parmegiano Cheeses Fried
or Baked in Dough Delicious!
All Food Prepared in the Ofd*Fashioned Homemade
! Italian Way of Cooking
SUGGESTIONS FROM OUR MENU:

. .
. -

n>
i
i
I i
. -
ALL TYPES OF SPAGHETTI
Spaghetti with Mutld!]
Spaghetti ith Mushrooms
Spaghetti with Sausage
Spaghetti irh Marinara Sauce
PIZZA
fry
Our Own
Sicilian Pfcxa
and franco's
Special
Combination of
Sausage, Pepper, Mushrooms,
Meat Balls & Anchovies
ENTREES
Veal Cunot Parmegiana
Veal Scallopini Piizaiola
Egg Plant Parmegiana
Manicotti
Ravioli
SANDWICHES
Veal Cutlet Parmegiana Meatball Sausage
Egg Plant All Your Favorites!
WE SELL
INDIVIDUAL SLICES
OR
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WE ARE OPEN 11 A.M. to 1 A.M.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
PROMPT
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v*t i
FRANCOS PIZZERIA and RESTAURANT
i
203 1 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD
HOLLYWOOD Telephone 921-9 804


Friday. April 13. 1973
-Jewistl nnricfFan nd Shofr of Hollywood
Page 9*;
Recreational Department
Honors State Of Israel
*.*
More than 4,000 persons in a
decord turn-out, attended the Hoi- j
lywood Recreation Department's
18th annual salute to the State of
Israel, according to gusst speaker
Abe Durbin.
The program, which featured the
Greater Hollywood Symphonic Man-
dolin Orchestra with soloists Nina
Diamond, soprano, and David Orn-
stein, violinist, was dedicated to
the 25th anniversary of the coun-
try. Also featured were Mary and
Mori Urovsky, ethnic dancere.
In a post-program intei-view Mr.
Durbin, chairman of the local Is-
rael 25 committee, had high praise
for Patrick Heneghen, Phyllis
Dewey and Joan P.osc. of the Rec-
reation Department. 'They did a
simply fantastic job of coordinat-
ing this event." he commented,
"and we look forward to their par-
ticipation in upcoming Israel 25
celebiations.
Among festivities 'choduled be-
tween now and May 21 are a tree-
I'luntint' ceren i block-party
and a parade, in all of which the
Recreation Department will be
involved.
AJCommittee Sponsors
Interreiigious "Trilogue"
NASHVILLE Leaders of the
Roman Catholic. Southern Baptist,
and Jewish faiths, completing a
nioneerin^ three-day interreiigious
"trilogue" here, issued a declara
tion cal'ing for a "recommitment
to social consciousness and social
action by religious groups in Amer-
ica," and urging religious leaders
to "come togetther in all cities as
a coalition of concern on social
issues."
The 60 scholars and theologians i
specifically expressed their "will- j
ingness to work with representa-
tives of women's grouos. the blacks
and the Indians. Chicanos and
sther minorities, the poor people
and th working peopb, to make
'ommon cause with th"m in their
trag?lc for lesal and social jus-
tice ar.d economic opportunity."
Goren Ordered To Hand'
Over Langer Documents
Carl Glick, an investment
banker, has been elected
president of United Hias Serv-
ice, the worldwide Jewish mi-
gration agency. Mr. Glick, a
partner of David I. Greene
and Co., is a member of the
board of governors and cam-
paign cabinet of the United
Jewish Appeal of Greater
New York and of the cam-
paign cabinet of the United
Jewish Appeal, Inc. He suc-
ceeds Harold Friedman, who
was elected chairman of the
executive committee.
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Supreme Court ruled that Ash-
kenazic Chief Rabbi Shlomo
Goren's ruling in the Langer
case has no effect on Abraham
Borokovsky, who is suing in a
Petach Tikva religious court to
have his status as a Jew con-
firmed.
The Supreme Court also or-
dered Rabbi Goren to hand over
all documents pertinent to the
case to the Petach Tikva court
and to pay IL 1000 toward the
costs of Borokovsky's litigation.
The status of Borokovsky, a
convert to Judaism, was placed
in doubt by Rabbi Goren's ruling
last year that Hanoch and
Miriam Langer, the children of
Borokovsky's first wife and her
second husband, were not illegit-
imate and could marry their
fiances.
Goren's ruling, sanctioned by
a nine man religious court whose
members have still not been
identified, was based on evidence
he said he had that Borokovsky's
conversion to Judaism was not
valid. In that case he was never
legally married to the Langer
children's mother and her sut>
sequent marriage to Otto Langer
was not adulterous.
The Supreme Court upheld
Borokovsky's claim that he waa
not called to give evidence by
Goren's court and was not aware'
of its deliberations. It ruled.
therefore, that the Goren court**"
decision could in no way affect
the Petach Tikva court and im-
plied that the latter, by the
same token, could disregard'
Rabbi Goren's decision in tho
Langer case.
Goren has claimed that tho
case was closed with his ruling.
He has refused to turn over
documents to the Petach Tikva
court on grounds that it waa
biased against the Langer chiU
dren inasmuch as it was the
same court that had originally
branded them bastards and for-
bade them to marry.
ft-
*;*
!
BURD I JST

"the time of the singing
of the birds is come
and the voice of the turtle
is heard in the land.''

TO OUR FRIENDS,
A JOYOUS PASSOVER
4
.
ar
". i
'

****


Fcge 10-B
+Jewisti ncridtiain *>' of Hollywood
Friday, April 13, 1973
' Teenage Hotline Schedules
Fund-Raising Drive May 6
MB
Dr. Norman Atkin, (left) president of Greater
Hollywood's Jewish Welfare Federation;
Joseph Kleiman, chairman of the Hollywood
Jewish Community Relations Council; Dr.
Samuel Meline, president of the Young Lead-
ers Council of JWF, and Abe Durbin, chair-
man of the Israel 25 committee, discuss
plans for the coming celebration of Israel's
25th anniversary. The group has already
arranged many events to commemorate the
independence of the mid-East democracy
with many local organizations, both Jewish
and Christian, involved in making the cele-
bration a memorable one.
Teen-agers are needed to par-
ticipate in the annual one-day Teen-
age Hotline fund-raising drive, ac-
eopdiog to ."liana Dolphins otfen^
sive tackle Norm Evans, honorary
chaiiman of the door-to-door ef-
frt. which is scheduled Sunday,
May 6.
The Hollywood Mall Association
has offered its help in starting the
drive; all volunteers will meet at
the north entrance to the mall.
State Rep. Hal Dyer is hosting a
party for the participants at the
end of the day. A dance band fur-
nished by radio station WGM,
will be featured
Teenage Hotline, launched 3'i
years ago. is Broward County's old-
est crisis prevention service, and
helps thousands of teen-agers each
year. Available 365 days a year,
this service is provided through the
generosity of many volunteers,
both teen-age and adult, none of
whom are paid. All have under
gone a seven-week training pro
ram to give them the ability to as
sist the caller in recognizing reali-
ties of the situation he confronts
and exploring strategies open to
him in solving the problem.
Although Teen-age Hotline was
originally established as a crisis
:ine for youth, over 20 per cent of
the calls are now from adults. The
group of volunteers includes op-
erators ranging in age from 16 to
&<) "-=* parents, teachers, doctors,
lawyers, teen-agers trained in
psychology, sex, sociology and
medical problems such as VD and
drugs.
Planned and implemented by a
committee made up of various
representatives of the community
and of Hollywood's Chai Chapter,
15'nui B'rith, Teen-age Hotline has
never asked for one tax dollar to
maintain its program. It is sup-
ported through the contributions of
Broward County residents, the pri-
mary outlay being for telephones
and office rent.
Teen-agers are urged to support
this endeavor by joining Norm Ev-
ans May 6 for the day-long fund-
raising drive.

Passover Greetings
SAM'S ACCORDION &
GUITAR CENTER
635 No. State Road 7
1

?urrnn in nxnb
wishing you a joyous Passover
and health and happiness always'
*
'
Publfx
where
shopping
is Q
pleasure


Friday. April 13, 1973
"Jta&ft ncrkOai) "<* Shofar of Hollywood
Page 11 B
Warsaw Ghetto Revolt
Thirty Years Later
By DR. SAMUEL SCHEPS material available on the Warsaw namely: Is it 'Kiddush Hashcm"
(c). 1973 Jewish Tatamvhic Ageiu-v) | ghetto, and on the revolt. Even as whan a Jew is led to the slaughter?
ghetto life went on with its inde- For, "Kiddush Hashem" has al-
scrible torment and suffering, i ways Wen understood as an act
Jewish historians and chroniclers of will, and here free will could
stored up the evidence for future not be exercised,
generations. We have a tremen Nevertheless, a man of the stat-
dous amount of diaries, notes, let- ure of nnlcl ZciUin. the religious
GENEVA The 30th anniver-
sary of the revolt in the Warsaw
Ghetto will be marked on April 19.
On that day, 30 years ago, a
glorious chapter was written in
the annals of Jewish history. We
about to celebrate the teis and other data by Jews in the |>hi|osophcr and sage visibly. and


are now
25th anniversary of the establish-
ment of tthe Jewish state. We
cannot possibly understand the
emergence of a Jewish state in
J948 without paying detailed and
diligent attention to the events
five years earlier.
THE REVOLT in the Warsaw
Ghetto, resistance in other ghet-
toes, the struggles of Jewish par-
tisans in the forests of Eastern
Europe, the Jewish Brigade. Jew-
ish heroic deeds in the ranks of
other armies all these are ele-
ments in a pattern out of which
the Jewish state has emerged.
Those who revolted in the War-
saw Ghetto, and on a smaller scale
elsewhere, had a very clear grasp
of their position. They knew very
well that they had no chance of
escape, still less of victory. They
realized that they would never sec
freedom. But they also knew that
they were fulfilling a historic mis-
sion. Masada nourished the will to
live of the Jewish people for some
2,000 years; the revolt in the
Warsaw Ghetto had a similar im
pact as soon as it became known.
It belongs to the mystique of
the Jewish people that it has al-
ways drawn strength out of the
depths of misery. Chaim Nachman
Bialik, the centenary of whose
birth we are also marking this
year, has given us a wonderful
poem on this theme.
THE JEWISH people was never
the samp again after the revolt in
the Warsaw Ghetto. The revolt
has given it a new dimension. We
have not yet fully exhausted the
Warsaw Ghetto and in other ghet
toes. It will take generations to
muster the wh'#'e of this material,
and fully understand its signifi-
cance.
On the way, let it be said -hat
in the ghettoes, it was not all
glory and selfless heroism. There
were acts of meanness and even
treachery, though one should not
patently performed the act of
Kiddush Hashem" the saneti-
ficaiion of God's name when
tie went to his death in the Ghet-
to of Warsaw wrapped in his U1U
(praying shawl). Here, too, we
can be guided by Maimonides:
The most Important aspect of
"Kiddash Hashem" is to die as a
Jew." And this was the a "id test
hasten to pass judgment on peo applied to fellow-Jews who died
pie living under such conditions.
To mind comes the figure of
Adam Czerniakov, chairman of the
Jewish Council in the Ghetto of
Warsaw. Did he behave as he
should have behaved? Can this
question be asked? Czemiakov, a
man of integrity, gave the answer
himself: he committed suicide. His
difry, uncovered a few years ago.
is a very moving document.
This tragic problem of the sur
render of Jews to the Nazi hordes
*ilh their heads held high and
their Jewish faith undiminished.
THIS IS also the view of one
ol our great authorities on the
"Shoa" (the holocaust), Dr. Mark
.Iworzeeki.
Again, Rnbhi Ephraim Oshri
tells in his book. Religious Life
in the Ghetto of Slobodka: A group
of Nazis hurst into a house where
.nbbis were holding a meeting.
Rabbi Blchanan Wassermann said:
If we go to our death with our
in order to save others, cropped >^s held high we shall be ful-
up again and aga.n in a number of fil'in "e hl8nest command of
basing our fai,n Kiddush Hashem.'
ghettoes. Some argue,
themselves on Maimonides, that
"when pagans demand from Jews
to let them have one of them, as
a victim, and promise to kave the
rest alive, the Jews should die
rather than surrender one of them
The same can be said of Dr. Jan-
usz Korozak, who went to the gas
chamber as a proud Jew.
Just to recall a few facts: The
revolt lasted from April 19 until
PETECHICHELO
Extends Passover Greetings
VEGETABLE
BIN
Idlliri (ildil nuiiunci-1 tint Kik i-n m .v.____J
selves." Yet. some great rabbinic ;he ^gl"mnJg / ** the *co?d
authorities in the ghettoes held of ihat !%*!
that it was incumbent upon the Pnt,,n* on ^K^f^LwT
leaders to save some Jews, even if wh *! < ,e battle of the War-
that meant the sacrifice of others
saw Ghetto after a battle of great
kill, as well as deathless courage,
THERE WAS another question, have helped to make sure the vie-
now seemingly remote, but at that lory of Jewish arms in the wars
time, 30 years ago. of painful and that established and secured the
acute importance to many Jews. State of Israel.
JI..IIHWJ). "
.....- ii,. -
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GREETINGS
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AUTO PAINTING
721 N. Dixie Highway
HaMandale
Phone 920-6219

fttrcnW
m i
pesath
.

'23
<37
uiiiiuaEti
at MMNM IHNfl MBMN tl
This poster, issued by the Jewish Music Council of the Na-
tional Jewish Weliare Board (JWB). announces a "Musical
Offering to Israel" as the theme of Jewish Music Festival,
to be conducted in Jewish communities throughout the coun-
try from March 18 to April 16 (Purim to Erev Pesach). Jew-
ish Music Festival is one way through which JWB seeks to
strengthen Jewish culture and provides links between Israel
and American Jewry.
SIR SPEEDY

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PRINTING CENTER
2132 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD
Phone 921-2594
1309 S. STATE ROAD No. 7 (Rt. 441)
Phone 962-1309
Wishes All The
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a
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I
Best Wishes To All
The Jewish Community
For The Passover Holiday
From .
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CENTER & NURSING HOME
2400 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Phone 927-9717
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Passover Greetings
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Public Dance for Singles Every Friday 8 to 11 p.m.
Sunday 7 to TO p.m.
COUPLES WELCOME ALSO CLASSES $2.00 PER PERSON
Refreshments Classes Door Prizes
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Phone: 920-3957
Passover Greetings
BILL KING
INSURANCE AGENCY, INC
23 W. Sunrise Blvd.
Over 35 Years Insurance Experience
Insurance Problems? Phone 763-7077
WISHING ALL OF THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
A HAPPY PASSOVER
DON PETER'S MENS WEAR
1600 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Hallandale, Florida


Page 12-B
+Jewlst) thx-kUan nd Shofar of Hollywood
Friday. April 13. 1973

ORT In Israel How It All Began
\T By ADAM PENN
(A Seven Arts Feature)
The road that starts at Jaffa Gate in the
walls of Old Jerusalem, and serves as the
mainline that carries trucks, buses and che-
ruts across the waist of Israel to the Medi-
terranean, stretches like a direction sign to
the point of ORT's origin in Israel 25 years
ago.
For it was in a building located in the
alleyways of Jaffa that the first ORT school
was founded, and where the first classes were
held on Dec. 14, 1948.
As in the birth of many endeavors, the
origins of ORT Israel are numerous, depend-
ing on the vantage point from which one
looks. But there is only one genesis. ORT
Israel was an outgrowth and extension to Is-
rael of ORT as an international Jewish serv-
ice agency.
WHEN JAFFA SCHOOL was opened in
1948, ORT had a history of 68 years during
which it had given aid to over 500,000 Jews
in every- part of Europe, had set up programs
in all the havens of the world where Jews had
escaped from the holocaust, and was at that
moment still deeply involved in the salvage
operations in the DP camps of Germany, Aus-
tria and Italy.
ORT brought this history and experi-
ence, and many of the people who had par-
ticipated in it, to the task of creating ORT
Israel.
When the guns stopped firing and the
War of Independence was over, among the
manifold difficulties facing the new Israel
was what to do with its demobilized soldiers
and war wounded. The Ministry of Defense
asked CRT to begin a program of vocational
rehabilitation for them, and for this purpose
made available a stiucture in the heart of
old Jaffa
IT WAS NOT a particularly generous
gift. Jaffa's Arab population having fled, the
city was to all intents a ghost town. The Salti
House, located at 8 Apak St., had been a
crumbling three-story Arab factory. It was in
the line of fire during the battles for Jaffa,
and when ORT took over it was, according to
an eye-witness report by its first director, Zvi
Rivlin, 'half demolished by shelling."
It was as if the ministry had challenged
ORT to rehabilitate the building and its sol-
diers simultaneously.
"In those days," recalls Rivlin, "We were
always tearing something down and putting
something up often enough pupils had
to watch out for falling debris. Nor was the
study material situation particularly satisfac-
tory. Instructors and students would go off to
scrounge in the ruins of Jaffa for old iron,
strings of wire or wood boards, and adapt
them to study usage. Yet we never heard any
complaints about lack of material or technical
deficiencies."
THE STUDENTS WERE assigned to the
school, which carried the legend Merkaz (ORT
Center) under which was the inscription'"The
ORT Training Center for ex-Servicemen."
These were graduates of the hard school
of war, and they proved an exceptional group.
MosJ weju^pung men with one or another
sort of war wound. The course of study in-
cluded radio communications and repair, type-
writer maintenance, electrical installation and
toolmaking. They took to it all with a will.
Many of them volunteering for construction
work on the school building.
In early spring, 1949, 46 students arrived
with their instructors from the ORT school in
Sofia, Bulgaria. ORT pledged to parents that
their youth would be able to continue their
schooling in Israel. These first were followed
by later waves of youth and adults from all
over Europe, east and west. They will always
have a very special place in the story of ORT,
like the prodigal son who has returned.
"THEY WERE AN absolutely model group,"
recalls Zvi Rivlin. "They served as a kind of
experimental human laboratory. Neither we
nor they had previous experience to go by.
Which is why they helped us fix the initial
shape of educational methods and vocational
guidance in this school of ours."
Jaffa was the first ORT school in Israel.
It was quickly joined by others. By the close
of its first full year of operation, ORT had an
enrollment of 1,534 scattered in 17 institu-
tions. This became the core for the develop
ment of ORT Israel.
In an atmosphere where party and ideolo-
gical labels were dominant, ORT alone served
no idea but vocational and technical educa-
tion.
ONE OTHER ELEMENT had to be added
to these earliest steps official status and
support without which ORT could not have
become, as it has, Israel's basic resource for
skilled manpower to man its economic develop-
ment.
In the spring of 1950, an ORT delegation
met with the recently appointed Minister of
Education, Zalman Shazar, now Israel's Presi-
dent. Their discussions resulted in a declara-
tion of policy that had far reaching implica-
tions for the future:
"I am glad to inform you that on my own
initiative (italics in the original) we now
propose to incorporate the ORT schools in the
network of officially recognized institutions,
and as a sign of our recognition, to grant
them government subsidies, although these
have a more symbolic value than a monetary
one. This straightens out the Medinah's (gov-
ernment's) line with regard to ORT."
ORT IN ISRAEL today has a student body
of about 50,000. The ORT educational system
comprises 84 schools of every kind and size,
plus service programs that function outside of
schools. Its programs are located in 45 cities,
towns, hamlets, farm settlements, a map of
which would cover the entire face of Israel.
This network graduates 12,000 technically
equipped people into Israel's society and econ-
omy annually, and that number will grow,
ity to progress and defend itself.
This is the long road that began 25 years
ago with the first school in Jaffa in December,
ORT is today the nation's crucible for
the creation of a large segment of those who
will insure its living standards and its capac-
1948.
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HOLLYWOOD TILF A TERRAZZQ COMPANY
Some off the -young guests at a recent meeting of the Jewish
Youth Council off Greater Hollywood's Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration, where plans were discussed ffor future activities.
r
Peggy Garron, Mark Fried, vice president of the Young
Leader's Council of JWF and advisor to the youth: Steve
Brodie, campaign chairman and Jodi Stolove
T
Lee Seligman, Phil Kaplan, Barry Snyder
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AHili*. .TWk Mwlkal Aamjl ^uJl' u LA*


Friday, April 13. 1973
+Je*isi) norkUan "< Shofar of Hollywood
Page 13 B
GUESTS AT JWF WOMEN'S DIVISION
FUND-RAISING MEETINGS
Mrs. Stephen Com, Mrs. Stanley Greenspun, Mrs. Herman
Corn and Mrs. Norman Atkin
Mrs. Aaron Schecter, Mrs. Bernard Milloff and Mrs. Mary
Feldman
Mrs. Michael Joelson, Mrs. Carol Goldner, Mrs. David Rose
and Mrs. Morris Lewis
V
\
Mrs. Leon Stemberger, Mrs. Morris Calig, Mrs. Sam Wein-
stein and Mrs. Vivian Goldstein
vmz state
comptroller report
S recently cited tlie Jewish Na-
rael's permanent retention of at
least parts of the former Jor-
Temple Solel
Breaks Ground
In Hollywood
Sunday, April 1, Abe Durbin,
founder-president of Temple Solel,
saw a dream fulfilled when ground
was broken for the congregation's
new home at 52nd Avenue and
Thomas Street in Hollywood.
When Temple Solel. the only
liberal congregation in the Holly-
wood area, was formed in May of
1970, a total of 35 families com-
prised its membership.
Today, with congregants from
Pembroke Pines, Hallandale, Mira-
mar, Fort Lauderdalc, North Mi
ami Beach, Plantation and Davie
in addition to Hollywood, some
400 families call Solel (Pathfinder)
their place of worship, even
though they have had to hold their
services in public schools.
Under the spiritual guidance of
Rabbi Robert Frazin, the congre-
gation has flourished and grown
with the population of this area.
There are now more than 400 chil-
dren attending the religious school
classes which are divided between
Hollywood Hills High School and
Stirling Elementary.
April Is Open
House Month
Aboard The
TSS Fairwind
"Welcome Aboard" is the invi-
tation being issued by Sitmar
Cruises.
April is "open House Month"
aboard the TSS Fairwind and the
puglic is being invited to visit the
ship every Saturday in April be-
tween the hours of 11 a.m. and
1 p.m. at Port Everglades, Pier 5.
Boarding passes, available only
through travel agents, will be re-
quired. In addition, a lucky couple
visiting the ship during the month
will be awarded a 7-day deluxe
Caribbean cruise aboard the Fair-
wind. The travel agent responsible
for the winners' visit to the Fair
wind will also receive a compar-
able trip for two.
All public rooms and facilities
as well as cabins in different rate
categories will be open for inspec-
tion and the famous Fairwind hos
pitality will be extended to visitors.
Giorgio A. Lauro, chairman of
Sitmar Cruises, explains: "The
facilities and conveniences offered
by the Fairwind are so detailed
and numerous, would-be cruise
passengers will enjoy the experi-
ence of visiting the 25,000-ton
'uxury vessel before booking their
cruise. People shop for an auto-
mobile, a house or even a pair of
shoes. Why not shop for a cruise?
We're inviting the public to see
our product."
The Fairwind sails from Port
Everglades on a Saturday weekly
departure schedule and visits San
Juan, St Thomas. Santo Domingo
and Port au-Prince. Its sister ship,
the TSS Fairsea, is positoned on
the West Coast, and cruises to
Mexico and Central America ana
to Canada and Alaska.
Home based in Monte Carlo
Sitmar Cruises' head office in the
United States is located at 3303
Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. Re-
gional sales offices are also located
in New York, Chicago, Miami,
Dallas, Denver, Seattle, San Fran-
cisco, Toronto and Vancouver.
Abe Durbin, founder-president, is pictured before the micro-
phone at the recent groundbreaking ceremony conducted by
leaders of Hollywood's only liberal congregation. Temple
Solel.
Hollywood Federal Offices
Feature Major Art Exhibit
Dr. Ray Albert, president of the
Hollywood Arts and Crafts Guild,
announces that one of the guild's
major art shows, the 22nd annual
"Members Exhibition," will be
open at Hollywood Federal Sav-
ings and Loan Association's down-
town office, 1909 Tyler St. through
Friday.
The exhibit includes oils, water
colors, acrylics and mixed media,
representing a broad spectrum of
art techniques, in modern and
traditional modes. Subjects are
landscapes, seascapes, portraits,
still life, primitives and non-objec-
tive art.
Over $300 in cash awards were
made by the art show's sponsor,
Hollywood Federal Savings and
Loan Association, at the guild's
third annual awards and installa-
tion dinner at the Reef Restaurant
in Fort Lauderdale last week.
Three first place awards of $50
each were presented to Frank Va-
lenchis, Hollywood, for his "Rural
Barn"; Aileene Leistner, Hallan-
dale, for "Three of One," and
Mary Coulter, Fort Lauderdale, for
"Everglades."
Second place awards of $35 each
were given to Anne Jacobs, Holly-
wood, "Slightly Pregnant"; Kitty
Logan, Fort Lauderdale, "Old
Tours," and Thomas Strickland,
Miami, "Self Portrait." The $20
third place wards went to Frank
Valenchis, Hollywood, "Old Door";
Dorothy Disch, Cpa Locka- "Epic-
tetus," and Louis Eisele, Holly-
wood, "End of Another Day."
Honorable mentions of $5 each
were received by John Sowers,
Hollywood, "Gulfshore"; Dorothy
Disch, Opa-Locka, "Pan," and Es-
ther Levine, Hallandale, "Street in
Londonderry."
The thirty selected paintings
will be on exhibit at Hollywood
Federal's West Hollywood office,
5950 Washinjton St., April 16
through April 20, and the Dania
office, at 140 S. Federal Hwy.,
April 23-27.
PASSOVER GREETINGS
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1021 N. 20th AVENUE
GIVE US A CALL!
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DANIA
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"WHERE PEOPLE CARE F^R PEOPLE"
Member of So. Fla. Nursing Home Association
Skilled Nursing Care Facility
REGISTERED NURSES ON DUTY ROUND THE CLOCK
DOCTORS ON CALL 24 HOURS A DAY
V
MARTIN STEYER
Administrator
SIDNEY M. LEE
Asst. Administrator
Phone 927-0508
440 Phippen Road Dania, Fla. 33004
SHELDON D. BERMAN, Co-Manager


Pcge 14-B
+Jewisti Flcrictiain Shofar of Hollywood
Mrs. Sol Cooper, cochairman; Mrs. Lawrence J. Dank,
chairman; Rabbi Dov Bidnick; Mrs. Albert Aaron chapter
president and Mrs. Manny Rose, program vice president,
ere pictured at rthe donor luncheon sponsored by Hallan-
dale Chapter, Hadassah.
Hallandale Hadassah Holds
2nd Annual Donor Luncheon
The Hallandale Chapter of Ha-
tiu-.sah and its six groups held the
second annual donor luncheon in
the Regeancy Room of the Diplo-
mat Hotel Thursday. March 22,
with an attendance of nearly 500
members.
Mrs. Lawrence J. Dank was
chairman of the day. Chapter pres-
ident Mrs. Albert Aaron intro-
duced the guest speaker. Rabbi
Dov Bidnick. principal of Hillel
HAPPY PASSOVER
TO AIL OF THE
JEWISH COMMUNITY
DRAW DRAPES &
CARPETS OF
SOUTH FLORIDA
2020 HARRISON STREET
HOLLYWOOD
927-7008
I Day Community School of North
! Miami Beach, who also gave the '
! benediction. Mrs. Sol Cooper, co- j
1 chairman for the luncheon, deliv-
I ered the invocation.
Members of the Habimali Play
en led the singing of the anthems
;mrl Mrs. Manny Rose, chapter vice j
president of program, presented i
1 the Habimah Players in an original
, musical entitled "Passport to Prom-
1 ise" which was written by Bunny
' Goldstein and directed by Telsa
I Balick, both of whom were n^r-
I rators for the presentation.
Singers in the cast were Evie
Blumenthal, Sylvia Berman and
Elaine Rucla: accompanist was pi-
anist Deeve Solove.
Group presidents are Mrs. Cas-
per Alman, Chai: Mrs. Theodore
Marcus, Fairways; Mrs. Lawrence
j .1. Dank, Hemispheres; Mrs. Sol
I Cooper, Imperial: Mrs. Zachary
Roosin, Parker, and Mrs. Helen
, Fromm, Plaza Towers.
Group donor chairmen were Mrs.
Edward Dincin, Chai; Mrs. Louis
1 Adler, Fairways: Mrs. Ezra Lip-
. ton. Hemispheres; Mrs. Martin
Block, Imperial; Mrs. Fannie Nims,
, Parker, and Mrs. Samuel L. Later.
! Plaza Towers.
'Masterplayers1 To I
Be Under Baton Of |
Dr. Alfred Schardl |
Hollywood's Adult Education Di- |
\ ision is offering a chamber en-
semble called ""The Masternlay-
rrs" under the baton of Dr.-Albert-" I
.Josef Schardl Tuesdays and
Thursdays from 10 a.m. to noon
at McArthur High School, it baa
been announced.
The chamber ensemble consists
of 25 instruments a full com-1
plcment of strings, including vio
Line, violas, cellos, and double or
contra basses, plus woodwinds such
as French horn, bassoon, oboe and '
clarinet and trumpet, flute and
harpr-ioord. It will be patterned i
after the Boston Chamber Orches-1
tra, which Dr. Schardl conducted
for four years.
Dr. Schardl, who also teaches
German in the adult education pro-
gram, plans some 12 Masterplay-
ers concerts each year, including
several lecture-demonstration con-
certs. In a lecture-demonstration
concert the 43-year-old compos-
er's trademark as a conductor he
takes music apart and rewrites it to t
explain t<; the audience how music
is pal together as a language.
Dr. Schardl received his B.Mus.,
degree from Boston University in j
1953 and his D.Mus. from the |
Efachsctutle Fuer Music in Munich j
in 1957. He has also studied at i
Brandeis University. He has con ]
ducted the St. Celta Society in Bos !
ton. Ottawa Chamber Society. Uni-
versity of Toronto Symphony, Ba
varian State and Auslandstelle Op-
era Companies, and the Hollywood
Symphonic Orchestra.
Friday, April 13, 1973
,.i. '.,: i'! "it; i ... "' .
I M M]
A Happy Passover To All. .
36 Years of Wallpaper Selling
'locks Foils Murals Grasses
At Big Discounts
MARSH BERLAND
WALLCAPERS, INC
4397 W. Hallandale
Beach Boulevard
Hollywood, Fla. 33023
PHONE 961-0771
1.1
A Happy Passover To All. .
DR. and MRS.
HANS E. R. COHN
Parkway Professional Bldg.
6151 Miramar Parkway
Suite 215
Phone 966-5700
Miramar, Fla. 33023
Holiday Greetings To The Jewish Community
V5rW* BONAFIDE
WALLPAPER
STUDIO
7195 Pembroke Rd., Pembroke Pines
Opposite Perry Airport-Eastside
Phone (305) 981-6959
Interior Decorating Furniture Carpet
Oil Paintings Murals Flocks
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PASSOVER GREETINGS
VISITING HOMEMAKER SERVICE
OF BROWARD COUNTY, INC. Est. 1959
Qualified Aides 7 Days 24 Hours
Visiting Registered Nurses
Hourly Visits
2121 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 925-8643
1101 E. Broward Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale 524-5582
A Happy Passover To All .
MUNROE UDELL'S
JAXSONS OLD FASHION ICE CREAM PARLOR
128 S. FEDERAL HIGHWAY, DAN IA
A Happy Passover To All .
ANN LEVINE of BOULEVARD FASHIONS
2029 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood
Phone 922-5212
A Happy Passover To All .
MR. and MRS. ALLAN L. DAVIS
OF HOLLYWOOD HEARING AID SERVICE
2124 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood
920-8338 949-8042
C^cmnuinitvi \calendar
V
SUNDAY. APRIL 15
Alternate date for Youth Council bikea-thon (in the event
of rain April 8)
MONDAY. APRIL 16
BraM-leu University, national women's committee study
'" group 10 a.m. Home Federal tfldg ,"Hollywood
THURSDAY, APRIL 19
Henrietta Szold Group of Hadassah regular meeting
12:'0 p.m. Miramar Recreation Center
Jewish Family Service board meeting 8 p.m. board
room. Jewish Welfare Federation, 1909 Harrison St.
American Israeli Lighthouse (Hallandale Chapter) regu-
lar meeting 12:'0 p.m. Home Federal, Hallandale
SATURDAY, APRIL 21
Teen creative religious service 8 p.m. on the grounds
of Temple Sinai. 1201 Johnson St., Hollywood
MONDAY, APRIL 2'
National Council of Jewish Women meeting 12:30 p.m.
Home Federal Bldg., Hallandale
TUESDAY, APRIL 24
Hollywood Chapter of Hadassah book review 1 p.m.
Home Federal Bldg., Hollywood
Sisterhood Temple Sinai board meeting 8 p.m. at
the temple
Chai Group. Hallandale Hadxssah regular meeting noon
Home Federal Bldg, Hallandale
THURSDAY, APRIL 26
Luncheon-parlor meeting for women noon home of
Mrs. Edward Kaplan
South Broward Chapter of women's division of Technion
general meeting 12:30 p.m. home of Mrs. Myron Segal
Broward Zionist District annual meeting 8 p.m.
Temple Sinai
................. : lilH.'I '"'-< '' : -' : '*-
1
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FLOWERS BY JUDY
FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASSIONS
6N.W. 1st Avenue, Dania
Phone 922-8051
AFTER HOURS CALL 981-0906
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A HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
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Phone 983-1344
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Friday. April 13, 1973
*Jeistirk*i(U&* and Slwf.r of Hollywood
Page 1S-B
Orthodox Union Moves Into 75th Year
I
Continued From Page 8-B
these gains had been made in constant coop-
eration with other key Orthodox organizations,
as well as such specialized Orthodox agencies
as COLPA, "all working together to create
the climate in which such goals could become
realities." Reporting that the Orthodox Union
represents some 1,500 congregations, of which
about 850 are active dues-paying affiliates and
others recipients of services, Rabbi Savitz
added that the organization sponsors "the
fastest-growing and most successful youth or-
ganization" in the Orthodox field the Na-
tional Conference of Synagogue Youth. He
said the NCSY, with 20,000 dues-paying mem-
bers, "has affected the lives of thousands of
other young Jews participating in its social
and educational programs."
AS PART OF ITS long-range expansion
program, Rabbi Savitz said, the Orthodox
Union has opened regional offices in several
parts of the country and is currently opening
new regions at the rate of two a year, with
an eventual goal of 20 regions to serve Ortho-
dox Congregations.
All this constitutes the expanding power
base, he declared, from which the Orthodox
Union plans to reach out with concrete pro-
grams to meet urgent present and anticipated
needs. Citing the problems which urban de-
cline has created for Orthodox congregations
in particular, he said the Orthodox Union
plans to explore the possibilities of experi-
mental small satellite synagogues and to de-
velop the concept of "less elaborate and more
practical synagogue buildings" which hope-
fully would be less vulnerable to rapid urban
change.
More than 80 per cent of American Jew-
ish youth currently attend college. Accord-
ingly. Rabbi Savitz said, the "moral aberra-
tions" on modern campuses have had a dis-
proportionately destructive impact on Amer-
ican Jewry. Most Jewish youngsters have a
"vacuum" about their religion and their tradi-
tion and arc therefore "easy prey" for radical
groups, missionaries and immoral activities.
He said the Orthodox Union, in cooperation
with Yavneh, the Orthodox campus organiza-
tion, and other Orthodox groups, is planning a
strong, well-financed program of Jewish edu-
cation and Jewish social values on college
campuses. Noting that a start had been made
en some campuses, particularly in the east, by
Young Israel, NCSY and Yavneh in providing
kosher food and Orthodox-oriented social and
educational programs on a consistent basis, he
said much more such effort was needed and
that the Orthodox Union hoped to make a
continuing contribution.
ONE REASON FOR THE "alarming rate"
of increase in mixed marriages among Amer-
ican Jews has been a loss of feeling of Jewish
identity which has removed a deterrent among
many Jews toward acceptance of non-Jewish
mates, he said. The Orthodox Union hopes to
recreate such Jewish identity feelings by pro-
grams advancing the ideal of Israel, synagogue
membership, communal obligation and Torah
study. He said Orthodox Union planners see,
as the centers for these efforts, the Orthodox
synagogue for which the Orthodox Union will
provide tools and counsel and a willingness to
test fresh approaches toward solutions of prob-
lems that are critical.
He also reported that the Orthodox Union
hopes to persuade non-Orthodox rabbis to
join in that battle to strengthen Jewish iden-
tity and to act to persuade rabbis who per-
form mixed marriages to end the practice. He
added that "informal" discussions have been
held with non-Orthodox rabbis in efforts to
induce them to end officiating at such mar-
riages.
The weekend retreats started in Tennessee
10 years aqo are the key to the Orthodox
Union's pjogram to strengthen the Jewish
family unit. One currently is planned in Cali-
fornia this spring and others in other sections
during the rest of this year. The format pro-
vides not only for a typically complete Sab-
bath observance ntually, but also for discus-
sion groups among participants and lectures
by leading Orthodox scholars. The retreats
involve taking over an entire hotel, making
it kosher and converting it into a Sabbath
haven from the pressures and bustle of the
Hork-a-day week, starting on a Thursday night
and ending at Sunday noon. Non-Orthodox
families come as guesjts of Orthodox friends,
Rabbi Savitz s;.:d. Costs are covered by the
participants.
HOW HAS IT WORKED so far? Rabbi
Savitz replied that 10 annual retreats in one
city could hardly provide scientifically valid
conclusions. But. he added, he could report
that nn-observant participants had subse-
quent^' begun to practice some of the rituals,
that some had enrolled their children in day
schools and that Orthodox synagogues in the
region had gained new members from among
the non-Orthodox participants.
He also pointed out that the Orthodox
Union has had an aliyah department for sev-
eral years, which he said he believed was the
only one under auspices of a congregational
agency, which provides up-to-date information
for Orthodox families planning to settle in
Israel. He reported that the organization had
started testing, in a modest way, the idea of an
on-going program of Torah lecture tours, ar-
ranging for outstanding Orthodox scholars to
visit smaller communities to bring authentic
Jewish learning to audiences otherwise un-
likely to hear such scholars. Also getting in-
tensive planning is a test of use of video-taped
recordings of seminars featuring such scholars
for use in isolated communities, he said.
Government Studying Dayan
Proposal On Arab Land Sales
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
government is studying a propos-
al by Defense Minister Moshe
Dayan to permit land sales trans-
actions between Jews and Arabs
in the Administered Territories.
Mr. Dayan made the sugges-
tion last week in a speech in
which he implied criticism of the
government for not doing enough
to further Jewish settlement in
the territories.
It appeared, however, that Gen.
Dayan was not proposing any-
thing new, but rather was asking
the government to give its of-
ficial blessing to something
that is already taking prace on
a fairly large scale.
Experts here estimate that Is-
raelis have already purchased
more than 150,000 dunams (37,-
500 acres) of land from Arabs in
the Administered Territories.
Despite the fact that they are
officially not permitted to buy
Arab land in the Judaea and
.Samaria regions, some 10,000
dunams have been bought there.
The state comptroller report
recently cited ffie Jewish Na-
tional Fund (JNF) as the pur-
' chaser of 85,000 dunams of land
in the territories.
Government officials explain-
ed that the JNF acted as an in
termediary and that the land
was turned over to the Israel
lands authority.
Land purchases by Israelis in
the territories has sparked a
sharp increase in prices. Should
the government officially en-
dorse the policy, the prices will
go much higher, exrorts say.
Defense Minister Dayan indi-
cated in Tel Aviv what Israel's
borders would be if a general
peace settlement was reached
in the Middle East at this time.
"Jerusalem will be divided no
more nor will Nathanya be en-
dangered from the east," he told
a meeting of the organization of
civilian employees of the armed
services.
There will be no Egyptian en-
clave in the Gaza Strip nor will
the Straits of Eilat be in foreign
hands," he said. His remarks in-
dicated that he envisaged Is-
rael's permanent retention of at
least parts of the former Jor-
ALL CANDIDATES A6REE-.
ZIP CODE SPEEDS
HOLIDAY MAIL
Modern Seder Spotlights
Mott's Apple Sauce, Juice
danian territory closest to Is-
rael's Mediterranean coast town
of Natanya before the Six-Day
War.
iie inip'icd the same for Fast-
en! Sinai and Sharm El Sheikh.
Passover delicacies today can be
prepared witn ease, treeing the
hostess of the Seder to enjoy the
holiday with the help of many
convenience fooGs.
Charoseth, traditionally centered
on the ceremonial platter, usually
contains a blend of apples, walnuts,
raisins, cinnamon and wine and
Mott's Apple Sauce is an ideal way
to modernize the tasty dish.
A decanterful of apple juice will
appeal to the children as their
Passover "wine." And the finale
for this feast might be a Passover
spongecake layered like a torte,
filled with an apple sauce custard.
This spongecake rises for the occa-
sion with eggs, matzo meal and
potato flour without a fleck of
the forbidden "chametz" (leaven).
At a time when certain vege-
tables are restricted, fruit such as
apple sauce plays an important
part in the Seder menu, and handy
jars of prepared Mott's Apple I
Sauce has become part of tthe,
Jewish-American tradition.
Mott's forwards a rabbinical let-
let noting, "the following products
are absolute!:' kosher for Pass-
over," and lists products including
Sunsweet Prune Juice, Sunsweet
Cooked Prunes, Mott's Apple Juice,
Mott's Fruit Treats and Mott's Ap-
ple Sauce.
Passover treats are not restric-
ted to the Seder. There are other
favorites to be enjoyed throughout
this holiday. One snack or break-
fast speciality is Mott's O'Brei.
It's a bit like French toast
made with eggs, matzos, cinnamon
'lavored and sweetened with apple
aucc. Even better when served
vith extra dollops of apple sauce!
CHAROSETH
1 jar (15 oz.) Motts Apple
Sauce (\'- cups)
i' cups coarsely chopped
walnuts
1 cup raisins
'-_ tsp. cinnamon
2 tbls. red wine
Combine all ingredients. Spoon
i portion onto ceremonial platter
to represent mortar. Serve re-
mainder as a condiment. Makes
about three cups.
MOTT'S O'STUFFED CAPON
1 canon. 0 lbs.
4 tbls. chicken fat or vegetable
oil
1 large onion, chopped
IVs cups chopped celery
'_. cup chopped fresh parsley
'j lb. fresh mushrooms, sliced
1 jar (15 oz.) Mott's Apple
Sauce (I '. cups)
saU and pepper
1; tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. fine herbs
6 8 matzos, broken
i Wash capon and pat dry. Rinse
and pat dry liver, heart and giz-
: zard; chop coarsely, thin saute
i with chopped oriion in two table
i- f;ii or oil until dhions are
oft. Add celery, parsley, mush-
; saute until tender. Add
apple sauce and seasonings. In
sieve, pour hit water over matzos.
quickly draini \g and pressing out
excess water. Add matzos to skil-
let, gently toss with other ingredi
entl and saute one minute. Remove
from heat. Stuff capon lightly with
acple sauce-matzo stuffing and
skewer or sew openings. Brush
with remaining fat or oil. Season
with additional salt and pepper
Place breast-side-up on rack in pan.
Roast in preheated 350 over ab:>ut
2',j hours, or until meat thermom-
eter reaches 185".
PASSOVER APPLE
SAUCE SPONGECAKE
Custard filling:
hi cup lemon juice
1*4 cups Mott's Apple Sauct,
(part of 25 oz. jar)
% cup sugar
Vt tsp. cinnamon
% tsp. nutmeg
l'/i tbls. potato flour
>4 tsp. salt
1 egg
2 egg yolks (reserve 2 egg
whites for spongecake)
Combine all ingredients in top
of double boiler. Stir constancy
over hot water until thick. Co.l.
Makes about three cups filling, or
enough for a four layer, 10 Ux
spongecake.
Cake:
8 egg yolks
8 egg whites,
(plus 2 reserved egg white)
% cup Mott's Apple Sauce
2 tbls. lemon juice
grated rindof 'i lemon
Vi tsp. salt
1 '/* cups sugar \
1 cup matzo cake meal
2 tbls. potato flour
For best results, have eggs at
room temperature. Beat egg yolks
until thick; stir in apple sauce,
lemon juice and rind. In large bowl,
beat egg whites until frothy. Add
salt, and beat until soft peaks
form. Gradually add sugar and beat
I until stiff, but not dry. Fold egg
i whites into apple sauce mixture.
Fold in dry ingredients, a little
at a time. Pour batter into un-
greased 10 in. spring-form tube
, pan. Bake in preheated 325 oven
\ one hour. Invert pan on rack :>r
; over neck of buttle until cool.
MOTTS O'BREI
4 matzos, 6 Ins. sq.
hoiling water
4 eggs
1 jar (15 oz.) Mott's Apple
Sauce (l'a cups)
V* tsp. cinnamon
ii tsp. salt
1 tbls. butter
Dash pepper
Break matzos into pieces. Co\?r
| with boiling water, then quickly
j drain off; press excess water out.
, Beat eggs with one-half cup apple
sauce and seasonings. Pour oxer
matzos and combine. Brown mix-
| tun in butter, stirring and flip-
ping with spatula until eggs are
set. Serve with remaining apple
sauce. Makes 4-6 servings.
ROBERT
TAYLOR
INCOME TAX SERVICE
5 up
6801 Pembroke Road
Pembroke Pines,
Florida 33023
Phone 966-Ten Forty
A Happy Passover To All
HERZFELD & STERN
Established 1880
members new york- stock cxomamoc
39d6 8. ocean drive,
hollywood, fla.
RllMgNW HI4HI (a-MM
-71l toAori
NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA PALM BEACH MIAMI BEACH
ENEVA AMSTERDAM
JOHN R. EATON, Manager
SHELDON D. BERMAN, Co-Manager


Page 1G-B
*Jeist FhrHkUl *"* HoHywo.d
Friday, April 13, 1973
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