The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00062

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wjewisfr Florid fan
Volume 3 Number 8
and SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood, Florida Friday, March 2, 1973
Price 20 cents
Israelis Strike Into
Munich Terrorist
By Special Report
TEL AVIV Israeli com-
mandos struck deep into the
heart of Lebanon Wednesday,
mauling Arab terrorist bases at
which the men who took part
in the Munich and Lod massa-
cres trained last year.
Apartment Divisions
Hit $400,000
Melvin H. Baer, chairman.of
the apartment division of the
UJA-Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion 1973 campaign, has an-
nounced that pledges of almost
*400,000 have been received so
far in this year's campaign.
This total was arrived at with
only a few weeks of active cam-
paigning and with more than
two months of the campaign
till to go.
Mr. Baer went on to say, "I
am most gratified with the re-
sults of our campaign so far and
want to thank all the area
chairmen, the building chairmen
and the building captains for
their hard work. It is only be-
cause of them that the opening
weeks of our campaign ha\
proN. -" ill. I feel that
with their continued efforts our
goals ill 1)0 met."
The 1973 apartment division
cami! :n this year has been
highlighted by the deep interest
that .part i! nt dwellers have
shown in the plight of Soviet
Jewry. Recent Soviet emigres
to Israel have appeared at a
number of building meetings and
have testified to the many prob-
lems that Soviet Jews encounter
in attempting to leave Russia.
Informed that the cost of
bringing one Jew out of Russia
is $1,250, many residents of the
buildings have made pledges in
units of that amount thus mak-
ing their pledge responsible for
bringing one, two or more of
their fellow Jews out of the So-
viet Union.
Mr. Baer concluded his state-
ment on the campaign by say-
in/. "Although we are all ex-
tremely optimistic about this
year's campaign, we also have
a lot of hard work ahead. Door
! solicitation is just start-
ing in our buildings and we hope
t!-nt we can count on the co
eration an! the generosity of all
the tenant-, it i- only with ev-
eryone's help that we will bo
able to attain our goal."
Lebanon;
Mauled
Military headquarters here
Raid eight Israelis- were wounded,
but that all of the commandos
were successfully evacuated try
helicopter after a landing from
the sea northeast of Tripoli
caught the Arab* by surprise.
Lebanese and terrorist sources
reported 12 to 18 persons killed
in the strike, but Israeli officials
said the death count among the
guerrillas was "in the dozens."
The strike by sea at facilities
used for training by the so-
called "Black September" move-
ment was executed flawlessly
only hours after Israel launched
her first super raissUe boat.
A champagne bottle that re-
sisted the efforts of Prime Min-
ister Golda Meir was shattered
by an Israeli navy man on his
second try. Considerable pub-
licity given to the Haifa debut
of th new class of warships
was believed associated with an
intensive effort to sell Israel-
mado weaponry' abroad.
Dr. Samuel Jaffe To Be
Awarded Honorary Degree
Dr. Alfred Gottsch?lk. president,
Hebrew Union College-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion, has announced
that at the ordination exercises
June 3. in New York City. Dr.
; 1 Z. Jaffe, spiritual leader,
Temple Beth El. will lie awarded
the honorary degree of doctor ol
divinity.
AJCommittee Warns Of 'Key' Overreaction
The American Jewish Com-
mittee has advised members of
its Miami chapter that letters
from one of the "Key 73" or-
ganizations sent to Jewish busi-
nessmen here are identical to
communications sent Christian
businessmen, the Jewish Ilor-
Idiiui learned this week.
Dr. Charles R. Beber. presi-
dent of the AJC here, reported
that a number of the chapter's
members have received letters
from, a group known as "Evan-
gelism Task' Force Calling
our Continent to Christ." The
letter is signed by the Rev. Troy
L. Miller, Surfside Challenge.
Inc., a rehabilitation center lo-
cated at 4900 NE 2nd Ave.
Rev. MlUer reportedly told the
A4C office, the Floridinn learn-
ed, that no effort had been made
to remove Jewish naidts from
lists of civic leaders, govern-
ment officials and contributors
to the United Fund, which were
utilized by the "Evangelism Task
Force."
He said, in an interview that
no thought was given to deleting
Jews from the mailing which
was, he said, "a call to Christ
for those Christian businessmen
receiving the letter."
Dr. Beber advised AJC mem-
bers against "baseless suspicion
of an Christian motivation In
approaching Jews for dlaloRue
or interrengious programs and
against withdrawal frrm the
arena of interreugious activity.
The chapter president said re-
cent gains in Jewish-Christian
relationships "must not be lost
through an irrational over-reac-
tion to movements which rely
or. persuasion and not coercion."
. Recent surveys by the Syna-.
gogue Council of America and.
B'nai B'rith nationally have min-.
imized the effect of Christian
.missionary work among Jewish-
students on college campuses----
Others who signed the evan-
gelical letter, in addition to Rev.
Miller, are Rev. J. \V. Peoples.
Greater MSami Church of God.
Rev. Robert Barber. Good Shep-
herd Lutheran Church. Rev. John
.. St. Paul's United Metho-
dist Church, Rev. Philip Weeks.
Holy Comforter Episcopal
Church, and Rev. Wallace Riv-
ers, First Baptist Church of
North Miami.
Israel-Spain Relations Seen
Ending Diplomatic Impasse
WASHINGTON (JTA) A
definite break in the diplomatic
impasse between Spain and Is-
rael was seen here in the state-
ment by a leading Spanish jour-
nalist that the two countries es-
tablish "formal relations." For
political and economic reasons,
the Spanish government has re-
fused to have diplomatic rela-
tions with Israel. Spain has held
steadfastly to Arab positions in
the United Nations and in the
international forums regarding
Middle East issues.
Jose Maria Armero, chairman
of the Spanish news agency.
Europa Press, said In a state-
ment published this week in
Madrid that Spain should stop
ignoring" Israel. Armero, who
recently visited Israel, said that
the two countries have common
economic problems, particularly
regarding relations with the
European Economic Community.
According to a news dispatch
here reporting Armero's state-
ment, the Spanish journalist al-
so said that in his view no other
nation in the world was "as pre-
pared as Israel to receive Spain's
cultural message."
Spain imports approximately
$12 raiUion worth of goods from
Israel, mainly crude copper, and
exports to Israel about $4 mil-
lion worth of commodities, prin-
cipally processed products. About
9.*00 Jews divided almost evenly
between Sephardim and Ashken-
azirn live in Spain.
ii ... .<-"( !>. ,.i.iii ,. it-ii mi ti.i .in hi .i i.i-i" (i i iiii4rj.ni.,1 > iiiirii.i!i 'i ir r. ,
Chairman's Report On
1973 UJA-JWF Drive
Over 700 of your neighbors will be calling on you for your
gift to the 1973 UJA-Jewish Welfare Federation campaign.
This is not just another year. We have the opportunity to
absorb 40,000 or more Soviet Jews into the State of Israel. We
no longer have the excuse, as we did during the holocaust, that
we do not know what is happening. There is cultural genocide
taking place and we, as Jews, have the opportunity to do some-
thing about it.
We can make sure that when the Jews from the Soviet
Union arrive in Israel there is housing, education and jobs avail-
able to them. If we fail to raise the money, or if Israel's economy
is not able to tolerate this burden, then the guilt and the shame
will be on our shoulders.
When you are contacted to make your contribution, see it as
a Jewish tax. How much would it be worth to you if you were a
Jew behind the Iron Curtain and needed the funds to get out to
the land of freedom and needed the help to adjust to a new
environment? On the average it costs $35,000 per family for
absorption into Israeli economy. How much of this will you
supply?
We are not asking you to contribute to another charity. We
are demanding that you fulfill your obligation as a Jew by giving
more than you have ever given before.
We in the South Broward area know that our population has
expanded tremendously during the last few years. We must keep
pace with our local agencies so that we can supply the services
necessary for you.
Our campaign is going well. We aie raising more money
than we have ever raised before, but so much more is needed.
Whom we save and how well wo accomplish our goa^ls is up to
you. We know you will not fail us.
Herbert [Cats
Chairman
1973 ca
West Germany Won't Aid Airlift
BONN (JTA) A foreign office spokesman ruled out Feb. 13
any possibility of West Germany helping to finance the Vienna-
Tel Aviv airlift for Soviet Jewish immigrants. In December, 1971.
the Israeli government appealed to t'he Intergovernmental Commit-
tee for European Migration (ICEM) in Geneva for extra funds to
help finance the airlift. Many countries responded, especially the
United States, by providing extra funds over and above normal an-
nual contributions to ICEM.
The West German section of ICEM has been trying unsuccess-
fully to persuade the Bonn government to give more than its
annual two million DM general payment to ICEM. Because of the
increasing number of Jews !ea\ I La ICEM funds sel aside for
the Vienna-Tel Aviv airlift have become inadequate. ICEM officials
in Bonn believe that the West German government has been shy
about providing specific contributions for fear of jeopardizing rela-
tions with the Arab states.
U.S. Alivah Fall-Off Analyzed
/
JERUSALEM (JTA) Louis Pincus, chairman of the World
Zionist Organization Executive, said this week that the causes for
the decline in aliyah from the Western nations, particularly the
United States, stemmed from objective conditions in those coun-
tries and in Israel.
Mr. Pincus spoke at the meeting of the Zionist General Council
(actions committee* where the reduced immigration from the
affluent West and the state of Jewish education in the diaspora
were major agenda items.
He attributed the decline in immigration from the U.S. to a
waning of emotional fervor among Jews as the Six-Day War re-
ceded into history and to the fact that America was "regaining its
social equilibrium."
On the other hand, he said, Israeli society was viewed as more
materialistic and less idealistic. He urged olim to speak out against
faults they found in Israeli society and said if they did so "con-
structively, not carpingly" they would be listened to.


Page 2
-Jewisti nurHian nd Shofr f Hollywood
Fiidoy, March-2.' 1973
Temple Sinai Choir At
Sisterhood Meeting
Trmnlr Sinai Choir, under the
ttmuttoV braun, will perform at the next
meeting of the Tsmple Sinai Sis-
ti rhood Tuesday at x p.m. in
Haber Karp Hall at ttie temple.
The program is in honor of Is-
rael's 2Sth anniversary ami will
in' narrated bj Mrs. Melvln \\ai-
writh material written by
Cantor Heilljiaun and Mrs. Wal-
dorf.
Members of the choir are Frank
Kushner, Joseph Tavroges, Ran-
dall Ruhr, Sam Scott. Sam Hloom.
l.eonaid Saver, Jeanne Waldorf.
Selmn Neubauer, Dorothy KJei-
man, Caroline Jacobson, Sarah So-
holoff. Pearl Appelbaum, Julie
Heilbraun, lJelk' Millman, Doro-
thy Kushner, Lillian Levine. Sarah
Albert and Gertrude Hausfeld.
On February -'X the Sisterhood
held its annual donor luncheon at
thi Fontainehleau Hotel with Mra.
Jacob Mogilowlta as chairman.
Mrs. Philip Mautner was reserva-
tion and ticket chairman; Mrs.
Burton Strauss, earned donor
chairman, and Mrs. Murray Sand-
berg was in charge of table dec-
orations. Mrs. Joel Rottman is
Sisterhood president.
At the donor luncheon a musi-
cal entitled, "Yes, Yes, Yvettc" was
presented, produced and directed
by Mrs. Mclvin Waldorf.
Sisterhood members participat-
ing were Mrs. Martin Geilman,
Mrs. Edwin Gordon. Mrs. Diane
Go-don. Mrs. Phillip Hausfeld.
Mrs. Yehuda H"ilhraun, Mrs. Her-
man Kleiman, Mrs. Martin Meyer,
Mr-. Mort Kushner. Mrs. Bernard
Reese. Mrs. Albert Schwartzer and
Mrs. Sarah Sobolotf. Mrs. Deena
Solove as accompanist.
WAITER GRAY
Sight and Sound
Program Given
Bv Photographer
A pragma entitled "Sight and
Hound" was p.vsented by Walter
Gray, international and loea' nho-
t'iZTapln-r. and by Dr. Morton
Sfalavskv, spir'tua! lod"r a!" Tem-
ple Beth Shalom on March 1 at
the tvmple.
The presentation included slid--
taken by Mr. Gvyv during a recent
trip to Israel with rommentniles
by Dr. Malax skv. Dr. Malav-sky'
iiK-oMtlv returned from Israel and
brought t_he audience information
on the situation there.
Proceeds from the evening went
to the Jewish National Fund to be
Used in purchasing trees in the
Bro\vi"-d Forest in Israel.
Rabbi Stanley Rabinowit<: spir-
itual leader of Adas Israel Con-
gregation in Washington, D.C.,
has been designated chairman
of the 73rd annual convention
of the Rabbinical Assambly, in-
ternational association of con-
servative rabbis. The announce-
ment was made by Rabbi Ju-
dah Nadich, Rabbinical Assem-
bly president. The annual con-
vention of the rabbinical group
will be held May 6 through 1C
at Grossingei's. Rabbi Rabino-
wiiz is a graduate the The Jew
ish Theological Seminary of
America from which he holds
an honorary doctorate in He-
brew letters. Recently he was
appointed to the executive com
mittee of the Seminary's board
of directors.
Salter, F^evine
Finish First In
Golf Twosome
Ben Salter and Sid Levinr
managed to hold off three other
teams by a stroke to win the
Kmerald Hills Best Ball Twosome
though Bud Brimm came charpinr
it them bv scoring a hole-in-one
on the 1:2th hole of the Hollywoof
course.
Emerald Hills associate pro .San-
Kinder said the other two teams
I which failed to overtake Salte:
end Levine were Marvin Sr.mmers
' Jerry Neiderman and Judee Irvin-
Hoffman-Harold Silverman.
Winners Salter and Levine had
a 65 in the individual full handicap
event. The three trailing teams
scored 66 each. In fifth and sixth
l>ositions, with 67's. were Fd
Zwick-Stan Blumin and Leo Ber-
l isch-Gene Posner.
Brimm caught his hole-in-one
with a five-iron on the 133-yard
twelfth. Salter and Levine took an
early lead and stayed tbere. De-
spite coolish weather I for Florida i
40 teams turned out for the tour-
nament.
FACTORY DIRECT SAVE!
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"FOR YOUR HOME, APT., OR OFFICE"
DESIGNED AND INSTALLED TO YOUR ORDER
SOME FLOOR MODELSAVAILABLE
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Parsons Tables Bars
Counter Tops Tabletops
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1541 So 21st Court, Hwd.
FREE EST'MATES
Dade: 947-8713
Broward: 923-6651
ORDERS TAKEN NOW FOR
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Friday. March 2. 1973
VJewisti flcridUan and Shofir of Hollywood
Page 3
:
Urgent Action Needed!
There are many Soviet Jews who are desirous of emigrating
to Israel ami who have had their visa applications rejected. Once
a Soviet .low applies for a visa it is not uncommon for him to
lose his job, become si/cially unacceptable and labeled "a traitor."
These activists hope that we will do everything in our power
to sway public opinion tn their behalf. One way to do this is by
writing to the Soviet Government in Washington, B.C., and tTT"
the Soviet I'nion on behall of a particular Soviet Jew.
Another and most important action wc can take now is to
write to particular Jews in the Soviet Union who have requested
Us to do so to let them know of our interest in them, our wish
o help and informing them of what we are trying to do. This
bolsters their spirits so that they know they are not alone.
One such person who requests action on his behalf is
llikhai: Kerlxl. H is 37 years old and the father of one son who
,is 10 y< ars old. His Write, Ade'.e, is suffering from multip'e sclero-
sis and is Ix rlriddi-n. Mikhail Kerbel has applied for emigration to
Isiael three times and each time has had his visa request refused.
, In December i>i 1172 h<' lost his job as a specialist engineer
and lias In en refused emplqym 'nr e'sewherc. His son is a \i n
virtuoso. Lctteis should be addressed as follow-:
U.S.S.R.
Kharkov 24
Uiitsa Pctrovska 36
Kvnrtira 5
Kerbel, ^likhail
Send all letters air mail, registered, and request an Interna-
rionnl return receipt. It is also requested that you write in
Mikhail Kei bels heha'f to:
The Supreme Soviet of the U.S.S.R.
Nikolai Podgorny
and to
The Chairman of the Council of Ministers
cl' the Soviet Union
A. S. Kosygin
One hour of your time may be helpful in saving one Soviet
Jewish family.
For further information contact the Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion of Greater Hollywood.
Robert N. Kerbel Breakfast Guest At Beth El
Robert Af. Kerbel, executive di-
'cctor, Jewish Welfare Federation,
Hollywood, will speak on Sunday
at Temple Beth Kl, during a break-
fast at 0:30 a.m., in the Tobin
Auditorium of the temple. His top-
'c wi'l be. "The F.nd of the Jcw-
sh Community in America."'
i ,,.. ii' i i
The program is in conjunction
vith the temple's adult education
series. Hosts for the breakfast will
be the temple Brotherhood. Pro-
ceeds from the breakfast will go
to the Youth Scholarship Fund.
After obtaining his social work
degn e, Mr. Kerbel worked as a
caseworker with the Family Serv-
ice ol Philadelphia, and later, for
the Association for Jewish Children
tht'iw. In"l*)R2 ho lieeamo director
of the Jewish Family and Chil-
dren's Service of New Orleans
where he remained until he as-
SUOkesVUs position in Rochester in
1067 as assistant director ol Hi
Jewish Community Council' an'i
United Jewish Welfare Fund.
Mr.VKerbel is a member of th
National Association of Socid
Worker*, the National Associatioi
of Jewish Community Opganizcl
Personnel ami the National Col -
ference of Jewish Communal Serv -
ice.
Barnett Bank of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue *^%
Phone 923-8222 I .
masMa.
The Jewish Calendar
5733 19 73

Rosh Hodfsh (Allot 11) /"/on. Thurs. Sun. Tucs. Mar. 5
Post ol Ci'hcr Mar. 15
Purim Mor. IS
Roih. hoDesh N.son Apr. 3
First Day Passover Rosh Hodcsh lyor Tues. Thurs. Apr. 17 May 3
Lag B'Oincr Sun. May 20
Rosh HoOe-,h Slvon Firs* Oay Shoouoth Frf. Wed. June 1 June 6
Roth Hodesh Tommul Sun. Tim. Mon. Tues. Wed. July t
Fost til Tommul July 17
Rosh Hodesh Ay July 30
Post Ol Av Aug. 7
.Bosh Hodesh Elul Aug. 29
5734 1973
Rosh Hoshonoh Thurs. Sot. Sept. 27
Fast of tedalia Sept 29
Vom Kippwr Sot. Oct. 6
First Doy o* Succelh Thurs. Oct. 11
Feost ot Conclusion Thurs. Oct. 18
Simcholh Toroh Frl. Oct. 1
Rosh Moo*sri Meshvan Sot. rvVon. Oct.. V
Rosli'Hodrh Kislev Nov. 26
First Doy Hanukoh Thurs. Dec 20
Rosh Itodcsh leves Wed. Dec. 2*
All Sacred Ocean on the preceding ion* cnmminre ; niiig at Sunset
Ifs really important!
Be sure to mention
*Jewish HcridHann
when putronizing
jur advertisers
Hyman Safran, Detroit business
executive and communal lead-
9r, has been named chairman
of the board of trustees of the
'nstitute for Jewish Life, a divi-
sion of the Council of Jewish
Federations and Weliare Funds.
The Institute, headquartered in
3oston encourages and devel-
ops innovative and replicable
projects and demonstrations to
give greater meaning to Jew-
ish life.
IRA L. HUNTER
Vice President and
Resident Manager
-,m*ti.
Shields & Company
members principal skct'ki iiks exchank3
7300 Collins Avenue, Miami Reach, Fla. 33141
Telephone: 865-0522 Broward 925-7517 & 925-6897
PLANNING
ON MOVING TO
ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me, Esther, 635-6554 and
let me quote you rates. Also
local moving & long distance
novitig anywhere in the U.S.
ir overseas.
A. B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)
Marine Painst & Supplies
HARDWARE PAINT. INC
HOUSEWARE3 ft GIFTS
HONE DECOR ACCESSORIES
Bitfc / Closet Accessories
leaiei *llows Room Dividers
Wiatfow Shades Artifrciil flowers
Drafory Rods Foliate
VaMDUtr Pliita
Key & Lock Work Patio Furniture
Store Hours 7:30 A.M. 6:00 P.M. Closed Sundays
1M EAST BEACH BOULEVARD
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PHONE 927-OSSC
Rent-A-Car
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$5 A DAY
FREE MILEAGE
100 Mile Radius
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
510 S. DIXJE HWY.
920-4141
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HEW
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CEILING SPRAY
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Give New Life to Old or Cracked Ceilings
.'OFFICES .HOMES Vf NEW CONSTRUCTION
"21 Years of Quality Work
ARTS FURNITURE CLINIC
Specializing in all wood furniture repairs
REFINISHING STRIPPING ANTIQUING
Nothing too small but large quality of workmanship
Call for any information
920-7122
Reasonable Professional
420 S. Dixie Highway, Hollywood
1
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CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE 989-3983
Dry wall Plastering Homo Improvements]
BOWERS & SONS
Licensed A Insured
Hollywood, Florida
The most beautiful
Jewish Chapel in Florida
is just a few minutes
driving time
from Hollywood.
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL. INC. FUNERAL DIRECTORS
North Miami Beach: 16480 N.E. 19th Avenue
Tel: 920-1010
To arrange a funeral anywhere in the United States,
call the nearest Riverside Chapel
Murray N. Rubin, F.D.


Page 4
+Je*istltk*rkHOM and Sliofar <>f Hollywood
Friday, March 2, 1973
^Jewish flcridHan
M4 Mini OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E. 6th Street Telephone 373-4605
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 373-4605
P.O. Box 2973. Miami. Florida 33101
FRED K. SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SKI.MA M. THOMPSON
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Assistant to Publisher
MARION NEVINS. News Coordinator
The Jewish Florldisn Does Not Guarantee The Kaahruth ^
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published Bl-Weekly by the Jewish Florldian
Second-Class Postage Paid at Miami. Fla.
, Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood Shofar Editorial
ADVISORY COMMITTEE Dr. Sheldon Wlllrns. Chairman; Ross Becker-
man, Ben Sailer. Marion Nevins. Dr. Norman Atkin. Robert N. Kerbel
MATTER OF FACT *<*
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndi-
cate. Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association, American As-
sociation of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
MHSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year $2.00. Out of Town Upon
Renuest.
Volume 3
Friday, March 2, 1973
Number 8
28 ADAH 5733
Golda Highlights Miami Events
South Florida continues to be the favored meeting
place for national and international Jewish organizations
and institutions, and this winter has been no exception.
But all these meetings, important and inspiring as they
have been, continue to highlight the event March 3 when
Prime Minister Golda Meir of Israel will help launch the
1973 worldwide campaign for Israel Bonds.
Coming here immediately following her latest meeting
with President Nixon in Washington two days before adds
an even more dramatic note to the visit of Mrs. Meir, but
that is hardly needed. This will not be her first appearance
in these parts no one will forget the meeting immedi-
ately following the Six-Day War in 1967 but it will be
the first since she became Prime Minister of the Jewish
state.
, The Miami conference to plan for the record sale of
S360 million in Israel Bonds this year will bring together
more than 2,500 Jewish leaders from North America. Again,
local men will play a prominent role in the deliberations
as they have done in every aspect of the building of Israel
from its very inception.
It hardly needs to be said that the March 3 event is
one all in this area, Jew and non-Jew, is looking forward
to with great anticipation.
All Doubts Now Removed
If there were any lingering doubts about the criticism
surrounding the CBS "Bridget Loves Bemie" program, the
poorly contrived Chanukah-Christmas show removed them.
The series continues to be an insult to the intelligence, as
well as to Christianity and Judaism, both of which it treats
with disrespect and ignorance.
Although the bigotry of Archie Bunker in that other
CBS contribution to American culture may cause distress
among many, there are at least the elements of humor and
honesty as saving graces. "Bridget Loves Bernie" has
neither and remains an affront that leaves little doubt about
how great a wasteland most of the television world repre-
sents.
Changes in the scripts, to meet both Jewish and Chris-
tian objections, have been made since the criticism of last
December. They only point up, however, the cheapness of
the entire production from its very beginning as an exam-
ple of "wasteland" mentality.
rV^CEMfNT j
UNLESS THE !
RESTRICTIONS
ARE
ELIMINAIED
n*Mil!*-Vtr)*
Aeiar
WASHINGTON, D.C. The
initial reports from Dr. Henry
A. Kissinger's mission to Hanoi
are cautiously hopeful. The
North Vietnamese have been
talking as though they meant
to observe the I.this of the
cease-fire accord. Yet this hope-
ful appearance can easily prove
to be deceptive before all is
over.
Hence it is also important to
note that a move is already on
foot, in the always helpful U.S.
Senate, to undermine President
Nixon's effort to get a lasting
peace in troubled Vietnam. The
aim is to strike from the Presi-
dent's hand one of the major
levers he possesses to ensure
Hanoi keeping the vital prom-
ises that it has made.
Of these levers, there are only
three. One lever is all but im-
possibly difficult to use. It is
more of the kind of bombing
that caused Hanoi to resume
serious negotiations at the end
of December. Another lever is
plainly not fully reliable. It is
pressure on Hanoi from the Chi-
nese and the Soviets.
A TMIKI) lever was therefore
included in the cease-fire terms
by the American initiative. It is
politely called "reconstruction
aid." Thi.s aid to both Vietnams
was first proposed by President
Lyndon Johnson, to loud and
general applause.
The Nixon administration plan
is to provide a total of $7.5 bil-
lion of reconstruction aid. It
will be spread out over a period
of several years. About one-
third will go to North Viet-
nam, and the rest to South
Vietnam to support continuing
Vietnamization.
The aid program is a crucial
lever, as regards Hanoi, for sev-
eral obvious reasons. On the
one hand. Hanoi needs the money
very badly. The measure of the
need is the recent boasting of
the American money soon to
come by Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap
and other Hanoi leaders. They
have been presenting the prom-
ise of U.S. funds to their peo-
ple as a prime proof that the
cease-fire accord is a good bar-
gain.
On the other hand, the much-
needed aid can always be cut
off. if the aid is under U.S. con-
trol, whenever Hanoi starts
breaking the promises included
in the cease-fire accord.
NO ONE but a fool can fail
to see that a lever to enfore ful-
fillment of these promises is a
positive necessity. Consider, for
example, how Hanoi began
breaking the promises made to
Gov. W. Averell Harriman in
the Laos accord of 1962 before
the ink was really dry on that
document.
The attack on the essential
aid lever in the Senate is only
just beginning, and it is not yet
a frontal attack. For example,
the chairman of the Foreign Re-
lations Committee, Sen. J. Wil-
liam Fulbright, has suggested
that control of the aid program
be confided to some sort of in-
ternational body. One can easily
imagine, for instance, how one
of the squashy United Nations
dependencies would1 use the
lever that the aid program
would normally provide for this
country.
There are other Senate move-
ments, too. A Republican but
pro-Fulbright member of the
Foreign Relations Committee,
Sen. James Pearson of Kansas,
has been taking the position
that the Senate itself must de-
termine the true scope of the
needed aid This was an ingredi-
ent in the amazing proposal that
a gaggle of senators go along to
Hanoi with Dr. Kissinger. Again,
one can imagine how helpful
this would have been to Kissing-
er's desperately delicate diplo-
macy.
OVERALL, the senators who
have been the angriest oppon-
ent* of the war in Indochina are
the ones who seem most eager
to reduce the chance for peace
in Indochina. One way or an- intensive presidential effort,
other, bad trouble seems to lie maybe going to the country over
ahead in the Senate, and prob- Congress' head, will probably
ably in the House as well. An_______Continued on Page IS
SM.S
Max Lerner
V
Sees It
NEW YORK, N.Y. L. the alphabet game of governmental
agencies, there is one I cast a strong vote for an OSI, or Of-
fice of Social Intelligence. It doesn't exist, but it ought to. I
find it shocking (as I wrote in an earlier piece) that in our
bright lexicon of government we pre-empt the term "intelli-
gence" for espionage and research focused on the capabilities
of foreign governments the Central Intelligence Agency and
its whole spawned family but we have no agency to gather
intelligence and suggest strategy for our most pressing domestic
problems.
I don't know what this shows about Americans as a peo-
ple, and if I knew, I wouldn't like it. But I am quite confident
about the need to shift our misplaced and distorted priorities.
The espionage can go on, for whatever it may be worth. But we
need to dust off the spook house tinsel from the term "intelli-
gence" and put it in a setting of human needs worthy of it.
ft' it *
LET ME PI T FOUR PROPOSITIONS summarily about the
why and the how..
1. Americans have a mythology about problem-solving: that
if you get the "facts" and appropriate the money, you can solve
the problem. We have facts galore about poverty, schools, crime,
prisons, narcotic addiction, rtuw relations, tax inequities, mental
health, alienations, violence. We also have the money. But we
are learning the bitter lesson that you can't throw either facts
or money at a problem and hope it will go away.
For each problem cluster, we have to have an approach or
lead; some strategy for getting at it.
The history of the past decade is strewn with the wrecks of
solutions which never solved the problems, or that did some good
but evoked new hostilities or dangers in the process. The pov-
erty pro-ram. community-control of schools, busing scatter-site
housing, the Model Cities program, drug abuse and penalties, por-
nography policing-cite any of these and you get an intense re-
action which suggests that the problem hasn't yielded to a hastily
applied solution.
rt-rfT. lhe,"fac's" about y Problem are not given from the
start, ft is only when you have a provisional strategy that vou
kno,v what facts to di for jn oixJpr tQ .^ *> h-t you
:r',H1,,,,y ? WhP" yUr r"Search *"*' confirm ,h"
approach, then and only then do you have the right to ask for
money, and then the money will be forthcoming
stiff SLa^f1! ueth sif, suited and archaic. There are all kinds of White Houe
and .r^0, 3. Va,ietV f Prhl0mS' bUt thcy are to PubliC
I 1 IH V '" .T^ abUt who should b" ^presented.
llt'E i Assembly iey become a stage for displaying po-
litical machismo. The congressional committee public hearings
do yield some intelligence, especially under a wise and hard-
workmg leadership. But they are also too public, and they be-
come either a form of ladder-climbing for the committee chair-
man or a tug-of-war between interested groups.
As for the presidential commissions on civil rights race
riots, pornography, population control, energy resources Zl
graP^s "Z TS >da,a and get Ut "ain of mono-
g.aphs. and then write a report which is a one-day editorial
3 wed::dic' aLT*-'and congross -552
8. We need a federal agency which will gather and make
:;;;*; "71 :ntellirce needed for an *^
exLt to^av on' In? "?**"" ""* ^^ and **". t
aml^rl un,verslty campuses, in business and unions.
l~2V R1'OUPS 8nd in a larSe vari(,ty of voluntary
organizations are simply not tapped for national purposes
article ^Hthe P'a,Cid afsumption ,hat the welter of books.
^u W,l' make the'r Way int0 th* channels of
Srm in ^ ** CW ^ ^ P3**5 fpr conventional wis-
litT'"8 'Lf,rn St3le' hac*"eyed stuff that would
zzzsxxaz!'a -^CTiticai int -
4. That is what I have in mir.d for the OSI. Not White House
mittees but th- ~T\V heann8s of congressional com-
It wouldn't be either hard or costly to get these men and
goTeaKhTr a" T^ f "" ^- ""hen"
Soli ZTrZ I nK "nCCCSSary in Private *** with no
horfs barred, keep transcripts, study and evaluate them keen


Friday, March 2, 1973
+Jewistncrkllan nd Shofr of Hollywood
Page 5
Hallandale UJA-JWF Apartment Division Meetings
'"'KSSI
(Left to right) Sam Reckler, Mrs. Renee Har-
nick, Mr. and Mrs. Max Lieberman, and Mrs.
Bemice Radner, Parker Plaza.

(Left to right) Otto Steiber and Charles Blitman, La Mer.
(Left to right) Sam Pure, Abe Charleston, Mrs.
Sam Pure, Mrs. Abe Charleston, Mr. and
Mrs. Jack Burman, Parker Plaza
(Left to right) Wiiliam Littman and David Schwartzman,
Hemispheres.
Seated (left to right) crre Mr. and Mrs. Ben
Schwab and Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Aronoff.
Standing (left to right) Mrs. Martin May, Mr.
and Mrs. I. L. Rabkin, all of the La
Apartments.
Mer
UJA Division Sets Agenda For Meeting
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD, HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
Temple 3ethl
Wemozial
Cyazdens

i-rfc"
X;v .,- ._^r
The only all-jewish ccmclcry in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call:
923 8256 or write:
~TEMPLE BET
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above. .
NAME:
call: m&Sl
le: wS&OTil
Barry Holeve, chairman of th^
Metropolitan Division of the 1973
TJJA-Jevish Welfare Federation
campaign, and Dr. Meron Levitats.
cochairman, have invited presidents
and representatives of the Jewish
Men's organizations of South
Broward to a meeting Sunday at
10:30 a.m. The meeting will be
held in the board room of the
Jewish Welfare Federation, 1909
Harrison St., Hollywood.
Agenda of the meeting will be
discussion of the current situation
of Jews throughout the world and
to ask cooperation and help in al-
Purim Party At State Hosptial
A Purim Party will be held at
the South Florida State Hospital
on Monday. March 12 at 7 p.m. in
the chapei of the hospital.
These parties are sponsored by
the Broward-North Dade Council
of B'nai B'rith Women to com-
memorate the Jewish holidays
throughout the year. Participating
chapters for this party will be
Hollywood, Sunshine and Winston
Services will be conducted by
Rabbi Avrom Drazin of Temple
Israel of Miami. Traditional foods
in keeping with the holiday will be
served by the B'nai B"rith Women.
leviating poverty, persecution and
insecurity.
Organization representatives at-
tending will be asked also to
pledge their organizations to par-
ticipate in the 1973 UJA-JWF
campaign.
Palmer9s
Miami Monument Company
3279 S.W. 8th Street, Miami
444-0921 4444922
Closed On The Sabbath
Personalized Memorials Custom
Crafted In Our Own Workshop.
eviU
Memorial dnapel
"JEWISH fUNERAL DIRECTORS"
#
LOCAL AND OUT OF STAT*
ARRANGEMENTS
947-2790
I 13385 W. DIXIE MWV.. N.M.


Page 6
* Aist fkrkiiar "* Shof" of Hollywood
Friday, March 2, 1973

By BOB KfRSfl, Executive Director,
lewish Welfare federation of GteettTttoliywooi
Hallandale Hadassah Group Activities
Therf are over 70 Jewish organizations in the South Broward
The jrallandal..- Chapter of Ha- j "Why Jerusalem." Program vice noon, in the Parker Towers Pro-
da.ssah will hold Us donor luncheon. I preside!.! la Mrs. Ann Cohen. Mrs. -ram vice president i Harry
TlHir-dav, March 22, at noon, at: .Jjajujeacc Dank. pivMdent. will
-t*wr m- Al*hr F>\frmml+*ui*\. BaWii o*f pri>*le.
Bidnick principal Of the Hillel; lm|..-riul Towers announces that
Community Da> School will be I a luncheon and card party will
guest speaker: A program will be
We have Hadassah Chapters. Deborah Chapters, Bnai B^th, KSftS^OitJniiM
-RT, Jewish War V. terans, Pioneel Won.,-., National Council of Jew- ^wrence Dm*.
Gold donors will be
guests at the gold patron lunch-
Mi Women, Ti-mplr Sisterhoods, Men's Clubs. Zionist organizations,
>!: !.-!- Gardens (Jewish Home for the Aged) and many more. Bach
ne il these or,'ani/aion.s .' worthwhile. Each one has for its cause a
i tuation ol some aspect of Jewish life, whether it be to provide
training for North African families who are now citizens of Israel,! Irving Weissman, president of tin
. to 'mom,!., health facilities or to use the Jewish presence and moral Florida Region of Hadassah. will
^ mi pi in bettei Ing the entire community each one is so important, be guest speaker. Lee Bairy. "Gen-
tleman of Song," will entertain.
There is no question that we must build our synagogues to be Chairman is Mrs. Zachary Boosin.
rtroi ger bastions of Judaism and that the fund-raising by Sisterhoods j The next discussion group meet-
.r.d Men's Clubs i- to Important, and yet. each one of these organiza-! ing will be held Thursday. March
tions deals with oik- Isolated segment of the community. Bach one is a1 15. at 10:30 a.m. in the Parker
i mbenhip orpai ization and provides its services to those individuals Tower- Blue Room. Mrs. Harrj
. ,... ., ,,,- | Zeiger, vice urcsment ol educa-
ho paj dues and fulfil] other financial obligations to it. I tio,^win lead a .lisimsion on Amcr-,
Zeiger. Mrs. Zachary Boosin. pres-
ident will preside..
Plan Tower* next regular meet-
in" will iie held Tuesday. March
20 at 12:30 p.m. in the Plaza Tow-
ers Social Hall. A skit entitled, "A
Certain kind of Woman" will be
1 i icy Epstein Mrs. Sol Cooper is presented by the chairmen of the
honored president. group. Program vice president is
neld at the Marco Polo Hotel.
Hollywood Ha- Tuesday. March 13, at noon. Pro-
I'arker will hold its next regu-
eon on Wednesday, April 4 at! noon at the Eden Roc Hotel. Mrs,
Mrs. Sid Sisholce. Mrs. Helen
Fromm, president, will preside.
HD WM Ml MM 1
Barnett Bank of Hollywood
Tyler Street al 19m A>cnue
PlK.nt923S222
Q
has besrun to develop some unified coordinated efforts so that
we, as Jcw.s. regardless of our affiliation with particular organizations
can act as an entire community. Snch attempts are being made by the
Jew sh Communit) Relations Council of the Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion, and the Israel 23 Committee. The result of the work of these com-
munity committees is very gratifying, yet less than 25 per cent of
the Jewish organizations really participate. The others are too busy
Homo Federal Building. The pro
gram will feature two movies:
"What's New in Hadassah." and
"History of the Jewish People."
A dramatic reading will be given
by Mrs. Manny Rose, program
vice president. The anthems will
be sung by Mrs. Joseph Millman
With then own projects and do not understand, it seems to me, that! Mrs. Caspar Alman. president, will
without a strong viable Jewish community serving all people there is
no future.
We are in the midst of our campaign for 1973. There is no one
Jewish organization in this area that does not benefit from the results
c! the United Jewish Appeal-Jewish Welfare Federations fund-raising
efforts. The Hadassah Hospital cannot stand in Jerusalem unless there
k an Israel. The funds of the United Jewish Appeal give more money
to ORT than all the ORT women of America raise. Allocations from
our campaign provide funds for every Jewish religious denomination
and for services of the community for those who are unaffiliated as
well. No Jew who is involved in any organization can fulfill his obliga- j Theodor
);.on to Judaism Just by being a member of that organization. They
. ust see themselves as part of the total Jewish people and partici-
i ate in the Jewish community's endeavors whatever they may be.
preside.
Fairways will meet Wednesday.
March 7. at 1 p.m. in the Home
Federal Bldg. Honoring Jewish
Music Month. Mrs. Murray Feur-;
stein, education vice president, will j
give a talk on Jewish music and i
musicians, followed by a program | Jj
of Yiddish. Hebrew, and Knglish |
melodies by Belle Millman. local
vocalist and member of the Sinai
Temple Choir. Program vice presi-
dent is Mrs. Louis Brachman. Mrs.
Marcus, president, will
CARBURETOR &
IGNITION SERVICE
DYNO
TESTING SERVICE
MOBILE
SERVICE
L
i L
L
929-1243
1021 H 20 AVE HOIItWOOD
I
Luncheons and donor credits are very important. It is time, how-
( it. to stand up and lie counted as a member of the total Jewish
ommunity, and to participate by your funds, your time and your ef-
lort. Only in that way can we have some insurance that all that we
> land for and work for will be secure.
The Hemisphere'* next regular!
meeting will take place Tuesday. I
March 20 at 1 p.m. in the Ocean ;
Terrace Room. The program will
feature Mrs. Reuben Goldman,
past president of the auxiliary.
Jewish Day School of Rochester,
N.Y., and a director of the Upper
N.Y. State Region of Hadassah.
Mrs. Goldman's subject will be.
Cul*e>n Vjde
arc
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Friday. March 2. 1973
Jtmristl fhorktiair) ihot" Hollywood
Paae 7
<
For all the parades
The petitions
The angry marches
for all the times you
looked at a
headline and said,
"There must be something
more we can do."
There are 70,000
"immigrants in Israel
waiting to hear
from you.
.
keep the promise
GIVE TO THE ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND OF THE UNITED JEWISH APPEAL.
SUPPORT THE UNITfP JEWISH APPEAL
THE ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
By Giving To
GREATER HOLLYWOOD'S
JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION
lfW HARMON STM"
927-0536
HOLLYWOOD. 33820


Page 8-
fjewlst Fk>ri Friday, March 2, 1973
Mayor Keating Issues Israel 25 Proclamation
Mayor David Keating of Holly-
wood issued a Salute to Israel
proclamation at the kick-off meet-
ing of the Israel 25 celebration.
The celebration is planned to com-
memorate Vie 25th anniversary of
Attending the kick-off meeting where Mayor David Keat-
ing issued a Salute to Israel proclamation were (left to right)
Abe Duibin, chairman Israel 25 committee; Mayor David
Keating; David Peleg, Israeli diplomat; Dr. Norman Atkin,
president Jewish Welfare Federation.
Community leaders who attended the kick-off meeting of
the Israel 25 celebration included (left to right) Herbert Katz,
campaign chairman, Jewish Welfare Federation; Rabbi
Samuel Z. Jaffe, Temple Beth El; Rev. Robert Switz, presi-
dent, Ministerial Assn. Broward County; Mrs. Joseph
Hopen, chairman, Israel 25 cultural committee.
the State of Israel which takes
place this year. Top community
leadership gathered at Orange-
brook Country Club to lend sup-
port to the celebration and to plan
for its observance.
This is Mayor Keating's procla-
mation:
WHEREAS, Israel has been a
bastion of democracy and free-
dom since its creation 25 years
ago and
WHEREAS. Israel has afford-
ed the United States and the
free world a significant bal-
ance of power in the Middle
East and
WHEREAS, as a result of the
Six-Day War. Israel's policy
of equality and freedom for all
faiths has enabled Christians.
Moslems and Jews to freely
pilgrimage to their holy
shrines in safety, security and
dignity, and
WHEREAS, Israel has guaran-
teed preservation of their holy
shrines
THEREFORE BE IT RE-
SOLVED that I, David R.
Keating, mayor of the city of
Hollywood. Fla.. do herebv
designate Feb. 15 to May 20
a period of ce'ebration in hon-
or of Israel's 25th anniversary.
Attending the Jewish Youth Council Bike-A-Thon meeting
on Feb. 15 were (left to right) Mark Fried, Jewish Youth Coun-
cil advisor; Tommy Katz, chairman, Bike-A-Thon; Ricky
Abseloff, Bike-A-Thon cochairman; Steve Brodie, past presi-
dent JYC, and campaign chairman; Scott Snyder, JYC presi-
dent.
Bike-A-Thon Committee
Sets 10, 20 Mile Routes
A meeting of the Bike-A-Thon
committee of the Jewish Youth
Council of the Jewish Welfare
Federation of Greater Hollywood
was held at the home of Mrs. Rob-
ert Pittell on Feb. 15.
Two routes were established,
one 10 miles, another 20 miles. The
date of the Bike-A-Thon is Sun-
day, April 8, with an alternate rain
date April 15.
The 10 mile route begins at
Temple Sinai, Temple Beth Sha-
lom and Temole Beth El, with the
20 mile route beginning at Beth
Shalom.
The Bike-A-Thon will culminate
with entertainment and refresh-
ments at T-Y Park.
Steve Brodie. past president of
the Jewish Youth Council, was ap-
pointed campaign chairman of the
Jewish Youth Council and has be-
gun forming his campaign com-
mittee. The campaign committee
will solicit community leaders to
sponsor Jewish youth participating
in the Bike-A-Thon.
The campaign process will have
two approaches. One will be for-
malized along the lines of that
used by the Federations and United
Jewish App-al, for which the cam-
paign chairman and his committee
will be responsible. It is expected
that the campaign committee will
be able to solicit the larger spon-
sorships.
The other approach will be for
each participant in the Bike-A-
Thon to acquire as many sponsors
as possible prior to April 8.
Awards will be given to the in-
dividual who receives the most
money, and another award will be
given to the participant who re-
ceives the greatest number of
sponsors.
Although a firm goal has not
yet been set, it is expected by the
Blke-A-Thon committee that they
will double the money raised last
year.
Theme for this year's Bike-A-
Thon will be "Save a Soviet Jew."
the same as last year's except that
as a result of stiffer restrictions
and newly imposed ransoms on
Jewish academicians and profes-
sionals in the Soviet Union, the
needs will be much greater.
Mark Fried, advisor to the Jew-
ish Youth Council from the Young
Leaders Council, is securing the
cooperation of young adults in the
community to assist the Bike-A-
Thon committee and will be re
sponsible for setting up check
points along the route, entertain-
ment and refreshments, following
the Bike-A-Thon.
Mrs. Robert Pittell is coordina-
tor of the effort. Ricky Abseloff is
in charge of printing and distribut-
ing materials including permission
slips and sponsor sheets.
Scott Snyder, president of Jew-
ish Youth Council, fe responsible
for forming telephone committees
and securing additional workers
and participants.
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Why is it traditional to have
the base color of the Tails white
and the fringes of the Tails
white?
Rabbi Moses Isserles (the Laws
of Tsisith. Darkei Moshe 2:9i
makes a statement to the effect
that he never saw anything but
white fringes and therefore, there
should be no deviation from this
custom The Talmud (Menachoth
41 :B) states the Tsisith and the
Talis should be of the same color.
Therefore, the Talith should al-
so be white. The Tosafoth com-
mentary of the Talmud indicates
that matching the color of the
Talith with the Tsisith is a means
of beautifying the garment and
whatever a Jew wears or uses for
the fulfillment of a holy com-
mandment of the Almighty should
be as aesthetically appealing as
possible. Some commentaries (e.g.
Rabbi Joel Sirkes) try to explain
the reason fofr the white Tsisith
and Talis on the following grounds:
the Talmud (Rosli Hashonah 17 :a)
indicates that the purpose of the
Talis was demonstrated by the Al-
mighty Himself to Moses. He told
Moses that whenever the people
of Israel have sinned, they should
wrap themselves ir. a Talith. as
the Almighty showed Moses, and
offer prayers of penance so that
they misht be foreiven.
Since the Talith, therefore, was
a garment used to seek forgive-
ness, it should be whfte because
white is the color of purity and
symbolizes forgiveness. Black or
blue stripes on the Talith are only
for decorative purposes.
Why are there bine or black
"tripes on the Talith?
Some claim that these are to
demonstrate that even though
the basic color of the Trisith !s
white, there was originally one
strand of blue running through the
other strands. Some claim that this
strand of blue represented a sym-
bol of royalty against the white
background of purity. In a way
it demonstrated that the Jew is
a son of the "King of Kings," the
Almighty, who is the supreme
royalty.
^^*^*^***^**^^*^*^^*A*^******^*^^*^**^*^XAWWV|f *"
scene aWid
by Maijon Nevins
Square, oblong, big, small, white, orange or sky blue pink
such are the shapes and colors of envelopes we all receive in our
daily mail inviting us to luncheons, dinners, teas or cocktail par-
ties or perhaps just asking us to send a check to one fund or the
other. The winter seasons brings us a plea for a disease of the
week a charity of the month a cause of a lifetime. Some we
answer- some make their way to the wastebasket. Some gather-
ings we attend some we turn down. What's the magic formula
that makes a plea effective? How did that interesting or un-
interesting bit of printed literature arrive at your desk? Who
wrote the copy? Who picked the type? Who decided it was to be
a dinner? Who decided that people were sick of dinners let's
just ask for money and get it over.
The scene opens. It's a living room. Cast of characters in-
cludes about eight people in the home of the "Campaign Chair-
man" the "Fund-raising Vice President" or the gal who got
talked into planning the year's fund-raising event Now just to
achieve this position there is a bit of by-play which usua'ly
starts with someone asking you whether you would just lend your
name to said worthy drive. Usual dialogue: "We have plenty of
I>eop!e to do the work. We only want to use your name." That's
when you get hooked. The bait is tasty and you bite. Never did
you know that Jane Doe was such a great name never did
you realize its importance in the community shyly you say
you'll think about it but >ou know you're hooked. Jane Doe
chairman of the dinner-luncheon-tea-drivethat's you.
Time passes. Phone call comes from your worthy president
What are you planning for the activity, cookie?" you hear
"What activity? answers the maeher* Jane Doe. chairman!
You know you did accept the chairmanship!" Afraid to an-
swer that you really believed them when thev said thev just
wanted to use your name you say. "Gee. I have a few Ideas.
How about all meeting at my house on the second Tuesday'"
Thus came the first living room scene.
Agenda for the little meeting is how to get the most from
the most. Do we have a dinner to include the men? Do we have
a luncheon at an "elegant" dining room? De we have a seminar
featuring a "great" speaker? De we brunch, lunch or munch-""
\ote -carried set invitations are the next order of busi-
ness. Print, color. size, content discussions continue. Shall it
bn fancy, startling, pretty or plain and how come plain costs
as much as engraved? So we're sending out a black and white
striped envelope with a shocking pink insert.
m, ,SC1 ST! *rUgh "ine COVers tnc scvcn **nC meetings
that are held between the mailing of the invitations and the big
event. It doesn t count the 4,000 telephone calls that are made
to pcop.e who.weren't particularly turned on by the shocking
Pink pleas in the black and white envelopes. Despite the fact that
the pink insert was made of double faced scotch
tape which you couldn't drop once you had picked it up. They
hi! L VhT SaUCd ff' ,hey Wore il a bad* of ^ance
te. i.n n anSWCr- WlUd they Cme? 0n* the ay would
S,r f", nam,?U!d tUr" Ut to Jane M""- O^y Sod
couW top these lasMew^Tr WUM Seem that nothin*
turned out tU another^ f? ** ** S
make them H it t j nopper- For those who tried to
badges ,orm,^int e^Tspenf ** *"" *
of the H^SiS^S ^ **"" ^
the ^eousTeltalr^rolTe fa^-StS *% *** *
show was viewed in nT DtP,ornat while the fashion
accommodate^ SSmXFE S "**** ** ** <
question of being awTS^ t^ZTrT 2 2? "* "
:^--^:-
Md. S,K ^, "" 8UP; *" ~ """
Mlrta, B o' s Z '' T<"" P""i- K H<
ssSSSSSf-SSSs


Friday, March 2, 1973
+JWist norkilan *"<* Shofm of Hollywood
Page 9-
.
Mrs. Shapiro Feted At
Sweetheart Luncheon
More than 500 people paid trib-
ute to "Sweet Rachel" Shapiro at
the luncheon ten'dered in her hon-
or by the Sisterhood of Tempi"
Hcth Shalom. The luncheon was
held in the ballroom of th" complete new temple building with
tables set and food served within
the bare walls.
Entertainment was provided by
youngsters from the re'Lgious
school which Mrs. Shapiro and
her husband have helped build. In
addition, the Habimah Players add-
ed greetings to Mrs. Shapiro with
a performance of one of their new
sketches.
Chairman of the sweetheart
luncheon 73 committee was Mrs.
Peter Bouer. Other members were
Mrs. Anne Harris, Mrs. Edward
Kaplan Mrs. Morton Katz. Miss
Reichklhd, Mrs. Wolf Reich-
kind. Mrs. Jerome Siegei, Mrs.
Herman Toll and Mrs. Beatrice
I Zuckc-rman.
i
Next meeting of the Sisterhood
will he a membership meeting on
I Monday at 8 p.m. A film on Torah
Fund will be shown.
On Monday evening. March 26
i there wi."] be a meeting of the
' board of the Sisterhood.
Passover Theme For Leadership Training Institute
>vill open with readings from a
Passover anthology of poetry and
prose,
"Passover Seminar" will be the
theme of the next meeting of the
'oadership training institute of
Greater Hollywood's Jewish Wei-
Care Federation. The meeting will
lake place Thursday. March 15 at
i p.m. at the home of Mrs. Dong-
as Kaplan, 425 Highland Dr.,
Hollywood.
The evenings program will en-
compass ways of preparing the
homo for Passover, physically and
'spiritually. It will include the
planning and execution of a Seder
with suggestions for the menu ap-
propriate to the occasion.
The meeting is being planned
by members of the institute in-
cluding Mrs. Robert Kernel. Mrs.
Douglas Kaplan. Mrs. Alvin Cohen,
Mrs. Robert Schultz and Mrs.
James Jacobsen. The gathering
Members of the Jewish Welfare Federation's Women's Di-
vision who attended a recent parlor meeting were (left to
right) Mrs. Louis Joblove, Mis. Fred Blumenthal, Mrs. Nor-
"man Bluth, and Mrs. Paul Koenig.
s.s. Canberra announces
a free Caribbean cruise for
one of your kids.
$350* $350* $00
$50
Now you can take a child 6f yours who's under 12 on a
Caribbean cruise, free. Which is a pretty good price. All
the rest of your children under 12 can come along for $50
apiece. Which is also a pretty good price. It's available on
the s.s. Canberra's March 26th cruise from Port Ever-
glades. .,, '
It's a great way to see the Caribbean and see your
family, all at the same time. And it just might be cheaper
than leaving them home.
Your kids will be well taken care of on s.s. Canberra.
There is a playroom, a paddle pool, and a nursery with
nanny and nurse... and some of the most fascinatme
islands to see in the Caribbean.
For you there are two great restaurants, three pools,
more open deck space than any passenger ship afloat,
more public rooms than the Fiance, more staterooms than
the Oceanic...and the best cruise values from Florida.
s s Canberra, the World Cruise Ship, will stop in
Port Everglades just this once, so be sure to book now.
Prices range from this $350 minimum to $1,550 on our
10-day cruise on March 26th. Caribbean ports you 11 visit
are- Nassau, Port-au-Prince, Curasao, Barbados, Marti-
nique and St. Thomas. Prices are per person based on
double occupancy. There are over 50 rooms at the mini-
mum fare on each cruise.
For reservations or information call your Travel
Aeent or (212) 867-0150. For more information on other
s s Canberra cruises, please send in the coupon.
s.s.Canberra
ie World Cruise Ship

s.s. Canberra, c/o Cunard
PO. Box 373, Farmingdale, New York 11735
Sirs: Please send your free brochure describ-
ing s.s. Canberra's Caribbean Cruises.
Namc-
Address-
City------
-Stale.
.Zip.
My Travel Agent is-
P&O. sailing the seven seas undei Ihe British Flag since
Represented in the U.S. by Cunard Steam-Ship Company Ltd.


Page 18
+JmMffor*#9r7 ** ofr Holrywood
Priday. Mart* 2. 197S
Temple Solel Slates
Annual Art Auction
The Temple Solel SLsterhool and
Mi'ii's Club nre sponsoring their
2nd annual ait auction on Tucs-
i Ht JtWtltK
day at Emerald H!l!s Country
Club, 4100 N. Hills Dr. at 8 p.m.
A special preview Bhowin; wil'
begin at 7 p.m. and the auctioneer
^vi" start the bidding at 8 p.m
I Cata'ogs of all items to be auc-
tioned will be distributed at tl
1 preview.
A painting by Yanni Posnakoff
entitled. "Back to School." and
other objects of art will be dis-
tributed as gifts.
On display will be works of art
from Paris. London, Spain. Italy.
I-i ad and other world art centers.
ArtMs to be represented include
Lebadang. Liberman, Picasso,
Chagall. Butterfield, D'Anty, Min-
ney, Dora, Miro, Degas. Matisse,
Stelfman, plus Israeli artists, Kos-
onagi, Goldberg, Vardi, Gat and
Katz.
Prices range from $20 to $2,000
and will include etchings, litho-
graphs, oils, watercolors, moilcrn
and old masters, sculpture, and
limited editions signed and num-
bered.
Chairmen of the event are Mrs
Arthur Kail and Myier Sher. Art
committee members are Mr. an-!
Mrs. Stanley Seligman, Dr. and
Mrs. Peter Keller, Mrs. Gerald
Ray. Mrs. Jack Packar, Mrs. Moron
LevitatS, Mrs. Jesse Small. Mrs. f
Jerry Fishman, Mrs. Martin Katz,
Mrs. Stan Katlin. Mrs. Milt Rubin
Mrs. James Kronengold, Jerrj
Bloom and Phil Weisberg.
There is no admission charge
ind the DUblic is invited.
Rules Issued For Poetry In Festival Contest
The 13th annual Seven Lively I high schools, college students and I i>oem. and the Ed Seney award,
HAROLD A. COHEN, M.D., P.A.
takes pleasure in announcing
the relocation of his office
for the practice of
PLASTIC SURGERY
,0
EMERALD HILLS MEDICAL SQUARE
4420 Sheridan St Telephone
Hollywood, Fla. 962-1696
Arts Festival poetry contest will
have major changes in its format
this year, according to Mrs
Charles Adams, program vice
president.
In the genera] 'any subject,
category of the contest,.all private.
parochial and pub'ic schools w:l
conduct their own preliminary
competitions for grades 1 through
12. Boys and girls should contact
their English teacher or principal
for details on the contest
Schools that have not received
etters and rules should call Mrs
lane Rose, |>erfonning arts super-
visor, at Hollywood Recreation of-
fice. 2030 Polk St.
Adult and collegiate writers
ma] submit entries directly t<.
Hollywood Recreation Division bj
> p.m. March li). All poems must
'h> original. Participants are li n-
td to two poems in the general
category.
There will lx' competitions in
four memorial categories. TheSM
contests are open to all ages in-
cluaing elementary, middle an 1
Hadassah Group
To Hear Talk
On Eye Care
The Henrietta Szold Group of
Hadassah will hold its next meet-,
, ing on Thursday. March 15 at
12:30 p.m. at the Miramar Rec-
reation Center. Mrs. Adele Poland
vill conduct the meeting and will'
".....'"CO Dr. Stanley Harris, guest
speaker.
Dr. Harris, president of the
Broward Optoraetrlc Assoc., will
peak on the importance of ey are. Th"ro will also be a film
ihown on the "Miracle of Vision."
\ question and answer period will
fol low.
The meeting will be open to the
oublic and refreshments will be
served.
adults. Participants may submit
>ne entry in each of these con-
tests. The special contests pay
tribute to four honorees "in me-
morium."
The Mabel Price trophy will go
for the best, or'gina: modern poem.
Further information and copies
>f the rules may be obtained at
the recreation office. 3030 Polk
St.
The "Lively Art of Poetry" corn-
to the writer o{ the best, original, petitions are .sponsored by Seven
sonnet writ fen in" 'Shakespearean, Lively Arts'Festival, in cooi>era-
form, the? Frank Bowers award for
an original poem on a patriotic
subject: the Clarence Cone award
for the best, original humorou-
tion with Hollywood Recreation
Division. William D. Honitz is
president, and Mrs. Thomas A.
Thomas, vice president.
V
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from us or vour dealer.
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- T
Friday, March 2. 1973
*j0ftffli fhiridiatr and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 11
Hallandale Hadassah Units
Hold Youth Aliyah Affair
The Hallandale Chapter of Ha-
dassah and its *ix groups held its
annual Youth Aliyah luneheon at
the Americana Hotel on February
14. Mrs. Albert Aaron, president
of the chapter, introduced the
guest speaker, Mrs. Leonard Sehre-
iber, Youth Aliyah chairman of the
Miami Chapter. Mrs. Milton Kauff-
num was chairman of the day.
Mrs. Joseph Korot was cochair-
man.
The program o|iene sinsin'4 of the anthems by Mrs.
Jo ph Mlllman, accompanied on
the piano by Mrs. Alex Fisch.
Mrs. Theodore Marcus delivered
the invocation. A benediction
given by chapter vice president of
program, Mrs. Manny Rose, fol-
lowed the luncheon. Operati
stars, Ruth Raffo and Curth
Alfred Golden To Speak Oil Jewish Youth
Rayuin entertained, accompanied
by Morse Haithwalte at the piano
Group presidents are Mrs. Cas-
per Alman, Chai; Mrs. Theodore
Marcus, Fairways; Mis. Laurence
Dank. Hemisphere; Mrs. Sol Coop-
er, Imperial; Mis. Zaeharj Boosin,
Parker, and Mrs. Helen Fromm,
Plaza Towers.
Group Aliyah chairmen are Mrs.
Edward Dincin, Chai; Mrs Charles
Fentor, Fairways; Mrs. Morris
Lipson, Hemisphere; Mis. Sydney
| I-:,.-stein. Imperial: Mrs, Michae'
Bolgar, Parker; Mrs. Beryl Jaffe.
sochairman o!' Parker and Mrs
Nathan Greenberg, Plaza Towers
Mrs. Fannie Nims is Youth AJi.
vah treasurer. Mrs. Sherman Fast.
fi nd-raUing vice president of the
Florida region, is chapter advisor
Aifrr-d Golden. National Hillei
:(;mmissi(iner, will be guest of the
Sisterhood of Temple Beth Fl at
i meeting on Tuesday at 11:30 a.m.
Mr. Gol '.: n will =peak on the sub-
;<, rtf- -The Alienation of our
Jewish Youth."
The meeting is one of a series
af monthly bullet luncheon meet-
ings planned by the Sisterhood.
I'he ar'I which Mr. Golden will
r i< on'- of concern to women
and one that is of concern in the
Jewish community.
Mr. Golden is n member of the
rnee itive board <>i T- mole Beth
1 an l Is chairman nf the Hilioi
.- chairman
advisory board of the University
Of M ami.
Ret n nvins chairmen are Mrs.
Charles Wolfe, Mrs. Irving Green
and Mrs. ii irv v Horowitz.
Promotional Programs
For 1973 Arts Festival
The tempo for Seven Lively
Arts Festival of 1973 will be set
the end of March with a series of
promotional programs at Holly-
wood Mall and Hollywood Fashion
Center to usher in the formal
events between April 7 and 15.
William D. Horvitz. president of
the board of directors for the fes-
tival, met with committees and
hoard members at the home of
Mrs. Thomas A. Thomas, vice pres-
ident, to establish the schedule of
went*. Mr*. Charles Adams, pro-
gram chairman, presented Mr.
Horvitz with a modern sculpture
created by Richard E. Freely, "in
nppn-ciation for his efforts on be-
half of the annual festivals."
Mrs. Stuart Sutton will coordi-
nate the programs set for Marih
30-31 and April
6-7 at the shop-
MOTOROLA
Quasar
COLOR
Portable TV
ConsoleTV
SALES
AND
SERVICE
APPLIANCE CITY]
OT HOLLYWOOD MALL INC.
9S1-1300
ping centers. In addition, she will
head the committees working on
youth arts day, 11 to 4 p.m. at
Monti 11a Park. There will be a
"paint-in" for boys and cirls, arts
and crafts exhibits by kindergar-
ten through high school, and pres-
entations by young talent.
An "Opening Gala" will take
place 8 p.m. April 7 at Young Cir-
cle Bandshell with Mrs. Sam Sorin
coordinating the activities. Mayor
and Mrs. David Keating, honorary
chairmen of the festival, will be
introduced, along with all artistic-
directors of the upcoming events.
A special tribute will be paid Wil-
liam Drainer, superintendent of
Board of Public Instruction, for
his support of performing and fine
arts in the school system.
Young artists in the community
will ]>erform in a musical program
to complete the evening.
ftfusicale Group
Plans Meeting
On March 13
Tuesday Morning Musica'e o'
HoPywood wi'l meet March !", j1
i0#30 a.m. in the St. James Rpisco-
nal Church Social Hall, 3329 Wll
son St. Hollvwood. The group L a
nember of the Florida State and
National Federation of Musi.
Chihs.
Mrs. Harry F. Rodman is pro-
Tram chair.nan and will pr sent a
"Crtisa ie for Strings" by the L'd-
diard String Trio. Virginia Brook*
Liddlard is- the violinist, Robert .'.
Liddiard is cellist-director, an-1
Hilda B. Whitehead is pianist. The
croup, undei tne direction of Lois
NIpc, will offer a program of songs,
One of the highlights of the cal-
endar of Tuesday Morning Musi-
caU' is the annual musical tour to
be held Tusday, March 20. 1 to 4
p.m. Mrs. Morton Grossman is ir
charge of the tour.
Mark III Group
To Entertain For
HCJW Section
The Bollywood Section of the
National Council of Jewish Wom-
->> w\V feature the "Mark Thre
G-O'JO" as entertainers at its Mon
''>v meeting at Tpmple Sinai in
Hollywood at 12:30 p.m.
The group of three young broth
ers, student- at Hebrew Academy
provide music for all occasions,
Their repertoire includes polkas,
"ox trots swing and modern rock
and music from "Fiddler on the
Roof."
Mrs. Alan Jacobs is program
chairman for the event.
FULL TIME SEAMSTRESS, SHIRTS, ALTERATIONS
REPAIR WORK ALL DONE ON PREMISES
ACROSS FROM SROWARD HIGH SCHOOL.
1910 N. FEDERAL. HWY. 923-1133 HOLLYWOOD, FLA.
JACKBERMAN
INSURANCE AGENCY
All Types of Insurance
L~ Automobile Insurance For Senior Drivers
JACK BERMAN
PHONE 023-2471
MIAMI 947 50O2
CJITE lOI
2940 HOLLYWOOD BLVD
HOLLYWOOD FL* >3020
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LUNCHEON DINNERS
11:30 A.M. 11:00 P.M.
SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS
1:00 P.M. 11.00 P.M.
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PHONE 920-7077
DR. J.B. BRUMBERG
Takes pleasure in announcing the
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at South Broward Medical Arts Bldg.
599 South Federal Highway, Dania, Fla.
927-2020
GRAND OPENING
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Daily 10 to 4'Ml. Free Open.ng G.f.s
Sunday 10 to 7 P.M. Ample Park.ng
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Weekdays 927-1761-3000 Hallandale Reach Blvd.
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Member: Greoter Hollywood Chamber cf Commerce


Page 12
+Jcwist> fhridnan "<* ShofW of Hollywood
Friday, March 2, 1973
PERSONALITY PROFILE
.
Joseph Kleiman
In Che 11' years tharjoseph
Kleiman has lived In Hollywood
anj number of Jewish organiza-
JOSfPH KUIMAN
lions have beneflittcd from his
tremendous drive an,i his hard
work. However, both of these as-
sets would lias been nothin1,' were
they nut accompanied by his ex-!
pertlse and training. Born in Po- i
land, Joe Kleiman came to this '
country as a very young boy and
a lived all bis schooling here. His
i r education included college
work at the City College of New
York and after that a master's la
i from Columbia University,
During the time he r.s secur-
ing his own education he also was
teai hing others for be was em-
ployed as a Hebrew teacher in
a Ycshiva during that period. He
had learned Hebrew at home for
the Kleiman family spoke only
Hebrew on the Sabbath.
I l'-'rith Home "and Hospital
tor the Aged in Memphis where
i he remained for seven years. His
next post ,va< as administrator at
the Morristown Rehabilitation
C(nler. And then 11 years ago he
came to Hollywood upon an offer
from a group of investors to build
and ojierate nursing homes for
them.
Sine" his arrival here almost ev-
ery Jewish organization has felt
the impact of Joe Kleiman's tal-
ents. Currently he is the chairman
of the Jewish Community Rela-
tions Council which is the coordi-
nating group for local Jewish or-
ganizations. Mr. Kleiman was the
original organizer of the local
council which is an arm of the
National Jewish Community Re-
lations Council.
Mr. Kleiman was also among
the organizers of the Broward
Chapter of the American Jewish
Committee and is currently vice
president. He is a board member
of Jewish Family Service, a mem-
ber of the board of the Council for
Senior Citizens and a member of
the board of Temple Sinai. Mr.
Kleiman is a'so a fellow in the
American Gerontologieal Associa-
tion; a fellow in the American
College of Nursing Home Admin-
istrators and a member of the
Academy of Certified Social
Workers.
Admiral
Warns Of
i
Pollution
TEL AVIV (JTA) An Is-
raeli expert warned this week
that the Mediterranean Sea and
especially its eastern shores was
more pollution-prone than any
other major body of water in
the world and urged Israel to
take drastic action to save its
fishing grounds and beaches.
Rear Admiral Yochai Bin
Nun, former commander of
the Israeli Navy and general
manager at the Israeli Ocean-
ography and Linological Re-
search Co., charged that there
were too many groups in Israel
dealing with pollution problems
without any coordination be-
tween them.
Awcoraing to Bin Nun, the
Mediterranean is becoming pol-
luted by industrial waste from
France and Italy. He said pol-
lutants from the North Atlantic
are entering the inland sea
through the Straits of Gibraltar.
Westerly winds push the pol-
lutants toward the eastern
shores where they accumulate
because there is no outlet, he
said.
CLEANING PRESSING LAUNDRY
WYNONA CLEANERS
PHONE: 922-5561
500 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY, HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
WE PICK UP AND DELIVER
BROWARD PSYCHIATRIC GROUP, P.A.
Jerome F. Bergheim, M.D.
Milton H. Graditor, M.D.
Gordon Lever, MD.
IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE ASSOCIATION Of
Igmedio S. Pantaleon, M.D.
in the practice of psychiatry
AND
Roberto Branciforte M.D.
in the practice of child and adolescent psychiatry.
EMERALD HILLS MEDICAL SQUARE
4400 SHERIDAN STREET
Hollywood, Florida
Hours by Appointment 961-4730
!!..
ffily
of in
His family life, in fan. prob-l
provided the original seeds
interest in Jewish involvement
for Joseph Kleiman for his lather I
was one of the original Zionists
and his time in the United States
waa to him only a detour on I
i/ to Palestine. Joseph Kleimar
remembers that when be and his
parents were on their way here
from Poland they had n stop-ovei
in Belgium where they were tc:
board the translantic ship.
"On that doek 1 can reme
my father passing Irs hat around |
among the refugees for contribu-
tions to the Jewish National Fund,
I also remem'her." said Mr. Klei-
man, "thai when he didn't think
the amount aecumu'ated was
enough he threw every cent he!
had in his own pockets Into th"
hat. We reany arrived in the
United States penniless."
Because of his generosity Mr.
Kl'-iman Sr. found it necessary to
borrow a dollar from one of the
other men traveling to the states
on the same ship. Ironically
noogf) young Joe Kleiman eventu-
ally married the daughter of that
man.
One of Joseph Kleiman's most
'heartwarming memories of his
own life Is the period in UNRRA
to bring a group of 1,000 DP chil-
dren to Palestine in 1946. It vvas|
the only legal ship to enter the
port of Haifa at that time an,l in-!
terestly enough the ship arrived
on the last day of Passover. The
first Passover night's Seder had
been held out in the open in Mar-
seilles as the ship prepared to
leave.
Shortly after this trip to Pal-
estine where he had seen his par-
ents and his sister for the first
time in 12 years. Mr. Kleiman
returned to the United States. Re-
suming his career which had veered
to the field of social work, he be-
came the administrator of the
Activities Highlight SS Canberra Cruises
In 1S72, 'The Illustrated Lon-
don News" described activities
on board the F& C Mail Steam-
er r-ailin;; down the Red Sea:
"Among the various games on
deck, quoits is one of the fa-
vorites. Aunt Sally' is another
favorite. Cards, chess, back-
gammon, draughts, and lotter-
ies,, or wagers upon the day's
run of the ship, or the hour of
arrival at each port, are re-
ed to by many of the pas-
sengers. Scandal may also be-
come one of the means of pass-
ing time: and flirtation is al-
o ci i ian to give materials
an lal for work upon."
Things haven't changed much
in 101 years and while pitching
quoits may not be among the
most favorite pastimes, the
pitching of woo certainly will
be when 1' & O'a Canberra sails
out of Port Everg'adcs on it-
maiden voyage from this port
on March 26.
Romance always abounds on
cruise ships with honeymoons,
second honeymoons, and new ro-
mances being initiated. Many
new activities have been added
to P & O's amusement list in
the last 101 years. Besides the
popular sunbathing, shuffle-
board and swimming in the Lido
pool, there are more exotic
pastimes which include keep-
fit classes, port lectures and lec-
tures on such unusual subjects
as shelling, water sports, island
formation and vegetation.
You might want to partici-
pate in a table tennis tourna-
ment or obtain sewing instruc-
tions. Or perhaps camera semi-
nars with the ship's photogra-
pher. Then there is always the
fascinating feature films in a
plush 340 seat cinema that is
equipped for wide screen film
features.
Want more? There are cric-
ket matches, dancing lessons,
bridge lessons, lessons and lec-
tures on the secret of beauty
care just to name a few.
If you want still more day-
time activities there are visits
to the bridge, shopping in the
fabulous shops with bargain
goods from all over P&O's
But save some of your en-
ergy for nighttime activities. A
full entertainment on board!
features ringers, dancers and
specialty acts who have played
clubs and theaters in many ma-
jor cities Miami among
them. You'll be entertained
royally every night with fabu-
lous shows and cabaret per-
formances In Canberra's two
exciting Hi-lit clubs. And you'll
be watching the kind of talenl
that you're used to seeing in
only the best places.
But that's lust a start. There
are piano concerts as well as
cocktail piano and trios that
play for you while you drink
relax in your choice of
eight cafes, cocktail lounges
pubs, clubs and bars. There are
frog and horse races (neither
alive if you are a hit squeamish!
late-night discotheque with one
of the prettiest "discos" on
land or sea. entertainers from
the islands when the ship is in
port and informal get-togethers
and parties with the crew staff.
Canberra's several bands will
make dancing a treat at almost
any hour. Don't forget the ex-
citing casino where games of
chance are played while Can-
berra is between ports. There
will be special entertainment
nights too, with fancy dress and
unusual entertainment that will
even feature you if you're in
the mood. These nights might
include London Pub Night
'you'll eat fish 'n chips olde
English style and be entertained
by strolling singers). The Roar-
ing '20s Night features the Can-
berra's flapper girls doing the
Charleston. Continental Bistro
Night features a cabaret with a
full can-can line and favorite
world, games of whist (like
bridge), origami instruction,
scrabble and charades. There
are many quizzes with prizes
as well as some informal aqua-
tic games at one of the three
pools.
foreign tunes sung by the ship's
featured performers. If all this
activity makes you tired just
reading about it think of Can-
berra's three pools and fantas-
tic amount of deck space and
room to relax that surround
"Pitching quoits was a favorite pastime aboard P & O ships
101 years ago. It is still being done aboard the Canberra
today. When the Canberra sails on her maiden voyage
from Port Everglades on March 26th, quoits will be just
one of the 50 activities one can enjoy on a Caribbean cruise
that will find lucky passengers visiting such exotic ports as
Curacao, Barbados, Nassau, Martinique, and St. Thomas."
them. Canberra has almost ev-
ery activity possible to put on a
ship. She has lots and lots of
room for r/ou to relax and
watch the sea go by when you
are through being active.
Canberra's sailing out of Port
Everglades on March 26 is her
only one from Florida this year.
But her schedule from New
York and Norfolk will take her
through more than a score of
cruises during 1973.
For complete information and brochures on the Caribbean
cruises write Cunard Lines Ltd., Port Everglades Station.
Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 33316 or phone Miami 947-7524;
Fort Lauderdale 525-3381
'-


iday. March 2, 1973
fJeH'isti ncrk/iar "<* Shofar of Hollywoed
Page 13
Hollywood
UJA-JWF
Apartment
Division
Meetings
CANDLELIGHTIN6 TIME
28 ADAR 6:02
9?
.
Teen
Scene
The Jewish Council Football
League concluded last week with
Temple Solel squeaking by Tem-
ple Israel 19-18 and Bnai B'rith
No. 1 crunching an outinanneJ
Bnai Israel No. 2 33-0.
That win by B'nai Israel No. 1
clinches the league title and caps
an undefeated season which fea-
tured an explosive offense coupled
with a stingy defense. B'nai Israel
rolled over its opposition with such
decisiveness that one player was
heard to comment that their
"toughest opponents were the of-
ficials."
The champs finished with a 4-0
record but reliable sources report
that a challenge might be issued
from the slow but experienced
Young Leaders Council team.
JMctttr of 7*rf h*
JOSEPH ALSOP
Con't. from Page 4-
bo needed to overcome the
trouble.
One way or another, however,
the trouble must be overcome.
To begin with, it cannot be em-
phasized too often that the real
heart of the cease-fire agree-
ment is in the clauses covering
Cambodia and Laos. These re-
quire Hanoi to recall its troops
from both countries. If Hanoi
keeps this key promise, then
Hanoi cannot physically sustain
another major aggression against
South Vietnam.
This is because of the im-
portance of the Cambodian and
Laotian bases and supply lines.
Here, in turn, is why the cease-
fire agreement gives the South
Vietnamese a reasonable chance
of isettlir;-; their own future
among themselves. Yet no inter-
national commissions and peace-
keeping groups can do much to
ensure Hanoi keeping its prom-
ises about I-aos and Cambodia.
That is why the President
nPp4s the endangered lever.
Wildfire
in the south.
There's no
future in it.
Help stop the woods
arsonist-report him.
advertising
conuibulcd lor
lh public good
Help Prevent Forest Fires in the South
(Left to right) Jacob Geller, Arthur Rubin and Sydney Holtz-
man, Galahad South.
(Left to right) Arthur Margolis and Jerome Herbert, Diplomat
Towers.
(Left to right) Alvin Hess, Dr. Valeri Lapidus, speaker, Mel-
vin H. Baer, apartment division chairman and Nathan
Pritcher, Hillcrest.
(Left to right) Mrs. Marian Landau and Mrs. Alan Bedol,
Diplomat Towers.


Page 14
fJenisiinoriafMam nd Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, March 2, 1973
c
itu v_calendar
crnrnuni
NtXDAY. MAKCH 4
Women's American ORT Recruitment Phonathon J. M.
Pontiuc 2800 N. KOth Ave^HoHgwood j 4
MOXDAV. .MAKCH 5 \
National Council of Jewi;h Women, Hollywood Section
Meeting 12:30 pan. Temple Sinai
Sisterhood Temple Beth Shalom Film Showing 8 p.m.
Assembly Hall of temple
TI i:SI>AV. .11 \R( II (i
Sisteihood Temple Sinai Meeting 8 p.m. Temple
Sinai
Temple Sole] Ait Auction 7 p.m. Bmerali Hills Coun-
try Cmb
SUNDAY. MARCH 11 ......................................
Heniietta S/olcl Hadassah Group Kvening of Entertain-
ment 8 p.m. Miramar Recreation Center
Tl ksivw, MARCH 13
Temple Solel Sisterhood Meeting 8 p.m. Emerald
Hills Bath and Tunis Club
Temple Beth El Sisterhood Luncheon Masting 11:30
a.m. Temple Beth El
H'KDXKSDAY, MARCH 14
National Women's Committee Branded University, Holly-
wood Chapter Meeting 10 a.m. Galahad South
Till RsDAY, MARCH 15
Women's Division Jewish Welfare Federation Board Meet-
ing 10 a.m.
Women's Division Jewish Welfare Federation -- Leadership
Training Institute Meeting 8 p.m. Home of Mrs.
Douglas Kaplan
Jewish Fami'y Service Board Meeting 8 pan.
Goren Asks Matzohs For Soviets
JERUSALEM UTAi Acting in response to a plea from
Jewish political prisoners in the Soviet Union, Chief Rabbi Shlomo
Goren has cabled Soviet authorities urging them to supply Jewish
prisoners with mat/oh-, for the Passover holiday and to permit them
to pi-aeticc their religion freely in accordance with their conscience.
The Ashkenazic chief rabbi said that if he receives a favorable
response from the authorities he is prepared to send the Jewish
prisoners in Russia packages of matzohs and other Passover foods
sufficient for all their needs.
Rabbi Goren said he cabled the International Red Cross in
Geneva asking its Intervention, He has also asked the chief rabbis
of Britain, France and Switzerland and the presidents of rabbinical
organizations in the United States to use their good offices to see
to it that Jewish prisoners in the U.S.S.R. are adequately supplied
for Passover.
WILLARD ALUMINUM PRODUCTS
FLORIDA ROOMS SCREEN ROOMS UTILITY ROOMS
AWNINGS PATIO FURNITURE HURRICANE SHUTTERS
MOBILE HOME SKIRTING W NDOW AND WINDOW REPAIR
BAHAMA SHUTTERS SCREENING AND
SCREENING REPAIR CARPORTS
5959 LEF STREET
lust off 4412 Streets South From Sheridan
HOLLYWOOD, FLA.
962-2600
STUARTS RESTAURANT
and COFFEE SHOP
1841 N. YOUNG CIRCLE, HOLLYWOOD
SPECIALIZING IN PARTIES FOR ALL OCCASSIONS
"You Provide Guests We Do All The Rest"
OPEN 5 A.M. TO 8 P.M.
BREAKFAST LUNCH DNNER
TAKE OUT AND DELIVERY SERVICE
CALL 925-9090

THE SHIRT BARN
NOW IN OUR NEW AND LARGER QUARTERS
SH!RTS SLACKS SPORTSWEAR
"QUALITY AT A PRICE"
136 N.E. 1st AVENUE, HALLANDALE
OPEN MONDAY SATURDAY 10-5
PHONE 922-3638
Bar Mitzvah
PHILir FKEEI>
Philip, "on of Mr. and Mrs. Ger-
ald Freed, will celebrate his Bar
\Utaval| Saturday morning,
.NTart'h* nfTrmple Israel of MirV
mar.
is is is
IRA JAXOS
Ira, son of Mrs. Esetlle Janos
wi'l celebrate his Bar AlTtZVah Sa1
urda) mornlna, March 10 at Tcm
le Israel of Miramar.
Cr is is
HEX FINDER
Jill, daughter of Dr. and Mrs.
Richard Finder, will celebrate her
Bat Mitzvah Friday evening.
March 9 at Temple Sinai.
Cr is is
MICHAEL JAFFE
Michael Ross, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Lee Jaffe, will celebrate his
Bar Mitzvah Saturday morning.
March 10 at Temple Sinai.
is -Cr -Cr
JOSH OYETT
Josh, son of Mr. and Mrs. So'
Ovett, will celebrate his Bar Mitz-
ah Saturday morning. Marrh 3
it Temple Beth Shalom.
it is is
JOSH! A HERMAN
Joshua, son of Mr. and Mrs. Rob-
ert Berman. will celebrate his Bar
Mitzvah Saturday morning. March
10 at Temple Beth Shalom.
*r CINDY SAKS
Cindy, daughter of Mr. and Mm.
Fides Saks, will celebrate her Bat
Mitzvah Saturday morning. March
3.
Temple So'el =er-i~ps wttl be
N*M at Kit.raid Hills Country
Club at 10:30 a.m.
Religious
Ser
vices
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
(Conservative. 416 N.E. 8(h Avenue
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz, Cantor
Jacob nanzipjr.
II.M.I.ANHAI.i': JEWISH I'KXTKI!
i'Yiiliiy s:i:. |,.in Bervk*e dedicated t"
"Peace." Batunlaj 8 ;i m. Sermon:
"Scriptural Leaner "f the Week."
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Conservative*
6920 S.W. 35th St.. Rabbi Avrom
Drazin, Cantor Abraham Koster.
HOLLYWOOD
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1351 S.
14th Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffe
Sabbath service* will he h.-M al T< m-
nle Beth Kl Friday. S:1R i>.m. pr
Samuel '/ .!aff<-. Miiritunl leader, will
aneah on "Ell, EM" The S..ul Musi.'
{ our People.
BETH SHALOM (Temole) Conserva-
tiv""I Mi *---- '-- >
1 4601 Arthur Street. Rabbi Mor-
ton Malavsky, Cantor Irving Gold.
TEMPLE BETH AHM. Conservative.
310 SW R'nd Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi
Salomon Benerroch.
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal) 5001
Thomas Street, Hollywood. Rabbi
Robert Frazin.
TEMPLE SINAI (Conservative) 1201
Johnson Street. Rabbi David Shapiro
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingslty. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. 37
ROBERT
TAYLOR
INCOME TAX SERVICE
$5 up
6801 Pembroke Read
Pembroke Pines,
Florida 33023
Phone 966-Ten Forty
I.....,.< "-. ". .-.. ..
:-'!. -
meichels
.v
iWiuiu .. ; .i ,y:; '':., ",' mriii' (Pi.|H.ri:-n ;t;:i
by MM BARACH


Ileiv are two interesting e&tfdattt rerijx's wnich come' to me
from a cookbook recently published by the Batya Chapter of
-Miziaehl wornxn of Detroit. Organization cookbooks often con-
taun some o< the best recipes found anywhere, since they are
filled with pereowsl favorites. If you would like to see ractpea
use fiom your group's cookbook. I'd Ik> glad to peruse you,
book and select some reciivs for this column. Just send the bonk
to me in rare of The Cleveland Jewish News, 13910 Cedar ltd.,
Cleveland. Ohio 4411s
EtitJPI.ANT PARMHHANA
1 eggplant 2 med. tomatoes
2 eggs (approx.) (beaten) H green pepjier
bread crumbs 1 can tomato sauce
vegetable oil y/i tsp. salt
2 onions dash of pepper
3 stalks celery 2-3 slices American cheese
Vi lb. butter
Peel and slice c-'^plant three-quarters inch thick. Dip
slices in > ggs and bread crumb? and then eggs again. Pry in oil.
Dice onion and celery and fry in butter at low heat. Dice tomato
and green pepper and add to onion and celery. When vegetables
are soft, add tomato sauci, salt and popper. Stir until smooth
Pla ;i'anl in bottom of casserole. Pour sauce over and grate
I heese .;n top. Bake in p:-heated oven at 400' for 35-40 minul -.
EXTRA EASY EC.C.PI.AX'T CASSEROLE
1 fairly large eggplant stick butter
1 can cream of mushroom soup 1 can French fried onions
Peel and slice eggplant into one-inch slices. Arrange a layer
of the eggplant slices in a 1 'a quart casserole. Top with some of
the butter and some soup. Re|>cat this process until ingredie-ts
are used. Top with can 01 onions. Bak. at 350 for 45 minutes.
PAINT & BODY WORK
COMPLETE TRIM SHOP
Domestic & Foreign Cars ft Trucks
Auto ft Truck Towing
Insurance Estimates Wrecks Rebuilt Frame Repairs
fiberglass Iff styling Vinyl Tops Scat Covers
PALM MOTORS
"VIC WEIGER"
5650 PLUNKETT STREET, HOLLYWOOD
Phone: 983-2046
^O^/NT&BODYSHOP
BBB
EXPERT
PAINT JOBS
COLLISION
REPAIRS
INSURANCE CLAIMS
2245 PEMBROKE RD.
2 BLOCKS WIST OF DIXIE
EXPERT
BODY WORK
FREE-
ESTIMATES*
923-6942
Broward Psychiatric Group, P.A.
JEROME F. BERGHEIM, M.D.
MILTON H. GRADIT0R, M.D.
IGMEDI0 S. PANTALE0N, M.D.
ROBERTO BRANCIF0RTE, M.D.
P. GORDON LEVER, M.D.
announces the relocation of its offices for the practice
of child, adolescent and adult psychiatry
To
EMERALD HILLS MEDICAL SQUARE
4400 Sheridan Street
Hollywood, Florida
Hours by Appointment Phone 961 -4730


Frhjtry, Hjcmrh 2. 1973
*iewdhllctkfitr and Snofar of Hollywood
Page 15
As We Were Saying By ROBERT SEGAl
Far Beyond Fund Raising
RELIEF is OX the way for
Jewish lund-raisrs of Amer-
projcct to develop fund
professionally with spe-
Iraining for the prospective
f-raisi-rs is evolving at Mary-
School for Social Work
Community Planning. Bran-
Florence Heller Graduate
School for Advanced Studies in
Social Welfare, Yeshiva's Wurz-
weiler School of Social Work,
and at Case Western Reserve.
It has to be acknowledged,
of course, that a few stalwarts
are genuinely concerned about
Jewish poverty in America's
large cities; and thousands do
take fire from the struggle of
present-day Soviet Jews. Surely,
pride in Israel's creation and
staying power continues high.
When we place a higher value
on iioverty rights than on hu-
man rights, when we are more
preoccupied with charting stock
market rises than we are with
charting low income housing de-
(lcioncies, we are defaulting on
much that enriched the lives of
our forebears and brought us
safely and in dignity to this time
of challenge and locus of free-
dom. To regain buoyancy, to
achieve greater stature, to ful-
fill prophetic promise, to gener-
ate new vita'ity, Jews of Amer-
ica Will have to do much more
than worry about country club
bias and preferential quotas and
the blandishments of assimila-
tion.
Seymour B. I.iehman Book Review
Israel Politics And History
IK. STATE OK ISRAEL was officially born
May 14, 1948, For the past several months and
May of this year, Jewish communities tjirough-
the world, (except In Russia), will mark Israel's
25th anniversary. The event is be-
Ing celebrated by a continuous se-
ri< i of affairs.
Among the many books that ap-
pear this sear, there are two de-
serving of special mention. One of
these books has been discussed In
these pages by Boris Smolar. Jan.
19. 1973. He wrote anent Ami the
Mills shouted for Joy by Bernard
p 'hist should be considered as "the book of books"
on*4e birth of Israel. To heap further encomiums
woul i)(. carrying coals to Newcastle. We must
noMthal this book disp'aces a recent best-seller.
Jerus.V.em. We wish that the Postal-Levy book
bad appeared a year earlier so that the other would
not have received the attention that it did.
Wlwn Abba Kban speaks, the world listens.
His latest bok My-Country (Random House. $151
Ls his moving account of Israel from its birth to
this past year. The master weaver of words played
a leading role in hi- count'y's struggle for security.
His intimate knowledge of the many problems that
be-ci the new nation ranged from those of mass
immigration, with all its attendant as,x,cts, to the
economy that always appeared to be on the verge
of tottering, and the international stage where
friends were few and diplomatic double-t.-Jk often
concealed the forked-tongue of those who protested
friendship and consistently abandoned Israel for
expediency and sel'ish interests.
Khan sheds light on events that escaped notice
years ago. It is true that Dulles and EsenhoWer
were responsible for Israel being compelled to with-
draw from the Suez Canal in 1957 but few realize
that Dulles changed his views by 1958. Dulles told
Israel then that lie opposed Nasser's "radical pre-
tensions to establLsn his hegemony over other na-
tions" in the Middle East. Dulles supported Israel's
right to use her share of the Jordan Yarmuk waters.
The foregoing one of many other enlightening
paragraph:, that are of great historical importance.
The master rhetorician is equally fluent with his pen.
DATELINE ISRAEL
By CARL ALPER7
Theodore Herzl Slept Here
yilOl > VXDS OK TOIRUSTS, in their buses and
taxis, drive blitlx ly along Mamilla R.1. in Jeru-
salem. eoir->'etely oblivious of a small metal plaque
attached to a two-story stone
house at No. 18. The plaque,
elected in 1950 by the Jerusalem
Municipality, reads: "Theodore
Heizl Lodged in This House in
IS98."
The story is vividly told in
Herzl's diaries. The founder of the
Zionisl movement bad gone to
Palestine seeking an audience with
Kaiser Wilhelm II. The Marx and Stein families,
at IS Mamilla Rd., provided him with hospitality,
and ii; this room Herzl wrote page after page of his
diary: ,1"' account of his meeting with the Kaiser;
his plans for reconstruction Of Jerusalem's slums.
and his reminiscences of his problems.
The house has remained in the Stern fatni'y
evei since. They have transformed it into a family
storehouse in which memories of Herzl and family
relics and antiquities intermingle. Michael Stern
was Herzl's host, and he considered the preserva-
tion of the house with its historical associations, a
national responsibility imposed on him. Upon his
death in 1044 at the* fe of 9(1 he passed the re-
sponsibility on to his family, and today Meir Stern,
as the third gem ration, is faithful to the trust.
Here is the chair in which Herzl sat; the table
at which he wrote his diaries; the huge cupboard in
which lie Ituauc Ut clothes; the Umphonium. or old
music box, which Herzl listened to, and all the little
things which set the period of Herzl's visit.
One enters 18 Mamilla Rd. through Michael
Stern's original store, which dea's with sundries:
toiletries, notions, etc. Behind the counter are the
family rooms, filled with souvenirs and mementoes
of the past.
A few years ago plans were announced for the
leveling of the whole area, on which would be < (in-
struct, il a now. gleaming tourist and hotel center.
Meir stern led a civic protest which elicited gov-
ernmental pro,nisi' that no matter what was done,
the o'd Herzl House would be preserved In it or-
iginal form as an historical shrine, -it would thus
be an exotic < nclavc, nestling among the hotels and
cafes, boutiques and swimming pools of a modern
tout i-t center.
In thi ,ii antime, Meir Stern welcomes all who
wish to co.ne and see and hoar his gtoik ul and'ess
stori -. Tourists who have already been id all the
standard sights, won''", well enjoy a visit here. Do
not expect a museum with glass cases, or careful
attention to aesthetic display. It is a home of peo-
ple who in all their genteel shabbiness have sur-
rounded themselves with memories of their past.
Il is not a museum. It Ls the real thing.
There is no admission charge, and there is
nothing you have to buy. though you may. find some
unusual arts ami crafts items, or antiques with
whi-h Stern might be willing to part. At the very
least, if you are an ii I'deemab'e romantic perhaps
you would attach sentimental value to a tube of
toothpaste puicluised from the dark a.id dingy
store out front, back of which Theodor Herzl once
slept.
Between You aad Me By BORIS SMOLAR
The 'Golden' Go I da
/OLDEN DAYS ARE NOW being planned in this
country for Golda Meir, Israel's Premier, during
her forthcoming v;sit to meet with President Nixon.
March 1. She will be honored as
never before by President Nixon
and the American Jewish commu-
nity.
Nixon is interested to show his
friendship to Israel in a demon-
strative manner. He has shown
it during his first term as U.S.
President by supplying Israel for
the past lour years with $1.2 bil-
lion worth of arms, mostly on a credit basis to help
Israel shoulder the burden of defense. He is also
interested in showing his affection for Golda who
made an indelible impression on him in her last \ isit
to Washington 13 months ngo.
Contrary to France. Where Co! la was harassed
by the French government to a point where a hotel
refused to accept room reservations for her during
her visit there last month, Nixon is anxious to show
that in the United States Golda is most welcome,
lie will emphasize this by a state dinner.
American Jewry, too will dlsp'ay special affec-
tion for Golda during her visit here. She has al-
ways been admired by Jews in this country and
was alwavs given hearty receptions. This time, how-
ever, the reception in New York will be something
different. It will be in grand style and will demon-
strate the deep love which Jews feel for her in every
American city.
Active leaders in Jewish Federations the coun-
try over and .local chairmen of the United Jewish
Appeal will represent their respective communities
at an impressive gala dinner wli.h the United
Jewish Appeal is arranging in 'ier honor March 5.
The dinner will be a holiday affair celebrating the
25th anniversary of the State of Israel and Golda's
75th birthday which falls on May 3.
Other festivities are being planned by other
Jewish organizations and institutions. Celebrations
in Go'da's honor will be held in many synagogues
and In Jewish schools. Thee will be the kind of
festivities that will put American Jewry in a "Gol-
den Mood" and which will find their reflection
among Jews all over North America.
United Jewish Appeal leaders are certain
that Golda's visit will stimulate greater giving for
Israel among all elements of American Jewry. They
know that the IMA will raise more money In 1973
than in any previous year in its history. But how
much more" This will be known by the time she
leaves for Israel.
The Nixon-Mcir talks in Washington are ex-
pected to reinforce .the existing firm relationship
between the United States and Israel. At these talks
steps will also, no doubt, be considered to reduce
Arab-Israel tensions and prevent new hostilities.
Preceding Mrs. Men's vi-.it to Washington was
King Hussein of Jordon A visit from the Soviet
"boss" Leonid Brezhnev also to Nixon will follow-
later this year. The belief in Washington is. how-
er thai the kej to an andcrsl in I'.na between the
Arab countries and Israel lies not in Jordan, where
the king has indicated a more willing attitude
toward an arrangement with Israel, but in Egypt.
The long-standing view of the U.S. government
i.s that peace conditions cannot be imposed by
foreign countries on Israel r the Arab countries,
and that the two parties should negotiate their own
terms of peace. The Soviet Union is opposed to this
\iew. in this respect, Brcafanev's visit will require
lew is h w at liing.
Extremely active for the UJA campaign this
year are the Jewish Federations throughout the
country. Stimu'atrd by new approaches in commu-
nity fund-raising advocated by Irving Blum of Bal-
timoif, president Of the Council of Jewish Federa-
Uons and Welfare Funds, the Federations which
are the finan.'ial backbone of the U3A and of
local and domestic Jewish institutions are broad-
ening their bases this year in the triangle of Jew-
i.h leadership, Jewish giving and Jewish rcsponsi-
biiity.


Page 16
+Jew1sti FIcrldRar Shofar of Hollywood
Friday. March 2, 1973


BAER'S STORE OPEN SSTi'&VT
SAVE
KROEHLER
RECUNER
SALE!
Perfect 3anJy Qft!
You (an give your fomily the most outstanding alue we hove ever I
fered. It's an exceptional discovery to find a big cemfartot
Kroehler Recliner at $68. We purchased 140 rectifiers from KroeMer
which qualified Boer's lor the lowest price that Kroehler has ever
sold this reclinet for and we're passing the savings on to you. Coma
in to Boer's and see this chair, look at its attractive stylo, try Hi.
man-siied comfort, select the color thafs perfect for your home, but
hurry, at this low price these recliners will not last long.
IMMEDIATE FREE DELIVERY,
ALL OTHER
KROEHLER
FUTORIAN
BERKLINE
RECLINERS
ALSO ON
SALE!
Fines*
Naugahyde
Upholstering
>f
It'* ***y 'o Itaafi eio tKof/j
c'oanf Thiy art vphoUU'+J !>
lo*8 "faring Naujishyo'o rfcaf h)
tlath fwppjrUd fo< Poagof _
I', t, vr-Mhab.'*.
Regular 108
SPECIAL SALE PRICE ... SAVE *40
n
m
Large 3 position
Recliner Is Comfort able)
For Every Member Of
Your Family -
MlAX
CHOICE Of COLORS
Com* in ami t m mid savo mow.
South Browar Open Sunday 1 to 6 P.M.
Decorator Serf Jeo
Jrtmendou* Se lec/foal
Trem Delivery
DANIA
1025 S. Federal Highway
'AmpU Peking
lMmd Chmim
Term* AxxUUbl*
ft 1LOCKS H. Of SHERIDAN
FT. LAUDERDALE
4711 N. State Road 7
.:


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